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Sample records for necrosis factor inhibitors

  1. Malaria: a tumour necrosis factor inhibitor from parasitized erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, N A; Caro, H N; Taverne, J; Playfair, J H; Rademacher, T W

    1996-01-01

    The excessive production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is associated with the pathology of blood-stage malaria and phosphatidylinositol-containing phospholipid antigens from parasitized erythrocytes stimulate its secretion by macrophages, thus acting as toxins. This brief report describes some properties of an inhibitor present in lysates from erythrocytes infected with malarial parasites that blocked the detection of recombinant TNF in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and diminished or abolished the cytotoxicity of TNF. It was not found in control lysates of normal erythrocytes. Its addition to macrophage cultures stimulated by toxic malarial preparations or by bacterial lipopolysaccharide also blocked the detection of TNF. These findings may explain the contradictory results obtained from different assays for TNF, and emphasize the need for caution when interpreting the results of a single assay system. If released when parasitized erythrocytes rupture in vivo, the inhibitor could help protect both parasite and host from the damaging effects of TNF. PMID:8778034

  2. Use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gallitano, Stephanie M; McDermott, Laura; Brar, Kanwaljit; Lowenstein, Eve

    2016-05-01

    Patients with HIV and AIDS are living longer because of advancements in antiretroviral therapy. These patients are often susceptible to debilitating inflammatory disorders that are refractory to standard treatment. We discuss the relationship of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and HIV and then review 27 published cases of patients with HIV being treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. This review is limited because no randomized controlled trials have been performed with this patient population. Regardless, we propose that reliable seropositive patients, who are adherent to medication regimens and frequent monitoring and have failed other treatment modalities, should be considered for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors.

  3. What factors determine patients' preference for tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Fajri, Dessy W; Brand, Caroline A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Martin, Belinda J; Buchanan, Russell R C; Schachna, Lionel

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, either intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ), demonstrates similar efficacy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of this study was to examine factors influencing patient preference of TNFi. Fifty-nine (79.7%) participants were male with mean age 43.9 years and disease duration of 22.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (79.7%) agreed with the statement 'My doctor gave me a choice and I made a decision based on my personal preference'. Patients commenced first on IV TNFi most commonly cited reduced frequency of injections (96.6%), administration by a trained professional (89.7%) and use of infusion time for leisure activities (86.2%). Patients commenced on SQ TNFi cited flexibility with timing of treatment (80%), shortened administration time (73.3%) and the convenience of home therapy (73.3%). Shared clinical decision-making between clinicians and patients may be desirable for AS patients commencing TNFi therapy.

  4. Polymer-conjugated inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α for local control of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Newell R.; Prata, Joseph E.; Friedrich, Emily E.; Ramadan, Mohamed H.; Elder, Allison N.; Sun, Liang Tso

    2013-01-01

    Burns, chronic wounds, osteoarthritis, and uveitis are examples of conditions characterized by local, intense inflammatory responses that can impede healing or even further tissue degradation. The most powerful anti-inflammatory drugs available are often administered systemically, but these carry significant side effects and are not compatible for patients that have underlying complications associated with their condition. Conjugation of monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pro-inflammatory cytokines to high molecular weight hydrophilic polymers has been shown to be an effective strategy for local control of inflammation. Lead formulations are based on antibody inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α conjugated to hyaluronic acid having molecular weight greater than 1 MDa. This review will discuss fundamental aspects of medical conditions that could be treated with these conjugates and design principles for preparing these cytokine-neutralizing polymer conjugates. Results demonstrating that infliximab, an approved inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-α, can be incorporated into the conjugates using a broad range of water-soluble polymers are also presented, along with a prospectus for clinical translation. PMID:23903893

  5. Safety and tolerability of tumor necrosis factorinhibitors in psoriasis: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Semble, Ashley L; Davis, Scott A; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors are an alternative to oral systemic therapies for psoriasis. Data regarding the safety of TNF-α inhibitors from randomized clinical trials may not fully reflect the effects on the clinic patient population receiving the therapy, but other sources of information are available. We performed a literature review to assess the safety and tolerability of the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis with TNF-α inhibitors. A literature search was conducted using PubMed for articles dating from January 2000 to October 2013. Randomized controlled, cohort, open-label, and observational studies were included, as well as case reports and letters to the editor. Articles found on PubMed describing the safety of anti-TNF-α therapy in psoriasis patients were included, while studies highlighting interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 inhibitors were excluded, as were non-English articles. In total, 58 articles were included in the review. TNF-α inhibitors exhibit both efficacy and tolerability in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Adverse effects associated with these medications are not common and can be minimized with routine clinical monitoring and patient education. While the risk of severe adverse events is low, the lack of very large, long-term, randomized safety trials limits the ability to fully define the safety of these agents. TNF-α inhibitors have a good efficacy/safety ratio for use in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Serious adverse effects are not common, and common injection-site reactions are usually manageable. The benefits of TNF-α inhibitors outweigh the risks for moderate-to-severe psoriasis; however, there are potential adverse effects and the patient populations at highest risk include the elderly and those with a history of malignancy.

  6. Structures of adamalysin II with peptidic inhibitors. Implications for the design of tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. X.; Meyer, E. F.; Kress, L. F.; Politi, V.

    1998-01-01

    Crotalus adamanteus snake venom adamalysin II is the structural prototype of the adamalysin or ADAM family comprising proteolytic domains of snake venom metalloproteinases, multimodular mammalian reproductive tract proteins, and tumor necrosis factor alpha convertase, TACE, involved in the release of the inflammatory cytokine, TNFalpha. The structure of adamalysin II in noncovalent complex with two small-molecule right-hand side peptidomimetic inhibitors (Pol 647 and Pol 656) has been solved using X-ray diffraction data up to 2.6 and 2.8 A resolution. The inhibitors bind to the S'-side of the proteinase, inserting between two protein segments, establishing a mixed parallel-antiparallel three-stranded beta-sheet and coordinate the central zinc ion in a bidentate manner via their two C-terminal oxygen atoms. The proteinase-inhibitor complexes are described in detail and are compared with other known structures. An adamalysin-based model of the active site of TACE reveals that these small molecules would probably fit into the active site cleft of this latter metalloproteinase, providing a starting model for the rational design of TACE inhibitors. PMID:9521103

  7. Fullerenes and their derivatives as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α with highly promoted affinities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaoyin; Gao, Xuejiao J; Jang, Joonkyung; Gao, Xingfa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cell signalling protein involved in systemic inflammation in infectious and other malignant diseases. Physiologically, it plays an important role in regulating host defence, but its overexpression can lead to serious illnesses including cancer, autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease. Gadolinium-based metallofullerenols, e.g., Gd@C82(OH) x (x ≈ 22), are well known for their abundant biological activities with low toxicity experimentally and theoretically; however, their activity in direct TNF-α inhibition has not been explored. In this work, we investigated the inhibiting effects of four types of fullerene-based ligands: fullerenes, fullerenols, metallofullerenes, and metallofullerenols. We reported previously that fullerenes, metallofullerenes and their hydroxylated derivatives (fullerenols) can reside in the same pocket of the TNF-α dimer as that of SPD304-a known inhibitor of TNF-α [He et al. (2005) Science 310:1022, 18]. Ligand docking and binding free energy calculations suggest that, with a similar nonpolar interaction dominated binding pattern, the fullerene-based ligands, C60, C60(OH)12, Gd@C60, C82, C82(OH)12, Gd@C82, Gd@C82(OH)13 and Gd@C82(OH)21, have larger affinity than currently known inhibitors, and could be used to design novel inhibitors of TNF-α in the future. Graphical Abstract Fullerene-material/TNF-α.

  8. A stonemason with accelerated silicosis in the setting of tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Baird, Timothy; Putt, Michael; Dettrick, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We present the case of a 26-year-old stonemason with accelerated silicosis in the setting of treatment for psoriasis with the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitor adalimumab. Accelerated silicosis is an important occupational lung disease with a poor prognosis and limited treatment options [1]. Although the exact pathogenesis remains unknown, it is suggested that secretion of cytokines, including TNF-alpha, plays a central role in disease progression [1,2]. Importantly, however, TNF-alpha inhibitors, in addition to resulting in an increased risk of infection, are also now being seen to cause interstitial lung disease [3,4]. To our knowledge, this is the first documented patient to develop silicosis whilst on TNF-alpha inhibitor therapy. This case challenges the theory behind TNF-alpha's exact role in the pathogenesis of silicosis and lung fibrosis, highlights the importance of monitoring individuals with both occupational and drug exposures, and illustrates the increasing difficulties physicians face in investigating patients with pulmonary infiltrates and multiple possible aetiologies. PMID:27516887

  9. Fullerenes and their derivatives as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α with highly promoted affinities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaoyin; Gao, Xuejiao J; Jang, Joonkyung; Gao, Xingfa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cell signalling protein involved in systemic inflammation in infectious and other malignant diseases. Physiologically, it plays an important role in regulating host defence, but its overexpression can lead to serious illnesses including cancer, autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease. Gadolinium-based metallofullerenols, e.g., Gd@C82(OH) x (x ≈ 22), are well known for their abundant biological activities with low toxicity experimentally and theoretically; however, their activity in direct TNF-α inhibition has not been explored. In this work, we investigated the inhibiting effects of four types of fullerene-based ligands: fullerenes, fullerenols, metallofullerenes, and metallofullerenols. We reported previously that fullerenes, metallofullerenes and their hydroxylated derivatives (fullerenols) can reside in the same pocket of the TNF-α dimer as that of SPD304-a known inhibitor of TNF-α [He et al. (2005) Science 310:1022, 18]. Ligand docking and binding free energy calculations suggest that, with a similar nonpolar interaction dominated binding pattern, the fullerene-based ligands, C60, C60(OH)12, Gd@C60, C82, C82(OH)12, Gd@C82, Gd@C82(OH)13 and Gd@C82(OH)21, have larger affinity than currently known inhibitors, and could be used to design novel inhibitors of TNF-α in the future. Graphical Abstract Fullerene-material/TNF-α. PMID:27316702

  10. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  11. The development of novel inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production based on substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrozolones

    SciTech Connect

    Laufersweiler, Matthew; Brugel, Todd; Clark, Michael; Golebiowski, Adam; Bookland, Roger; Laughlin, Steven; Sabat, Mark; Townes, Jennifer; VanRens, John; De, Biswanath; Hsieh, Lily; Heitmeyer, Sandra; Juergens, Karen; Brown, Kimberly; Mekel, Marlene; Walter, Richard; Janusz, Michael

    2010-11-16

    Novel substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrzazolones are presented as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) production. Many of these compounds show low nanomolar activity against lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced TNF-{alpha} production in THP-1 cells. This class of molecules was co-crystallized with mutated p38, and several analogs showed good oral bioavailability in the rat. Oral activity of these compounds in the rat iodoacetate model for osteoarthritis is discussed.

  12. Lichenoid Reactions in Association with Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors: A Review of the Literature and Addition of a Fourth Lichenoid Reaction.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Morgan; Basile, Amy; Bair, Brooke; Fivenson, David

    2015-06-01

    In this manuscript, a clinical case of a patient treated with adalimumab for Behcet's disease develops lichen planopilaris. A variety of mucocutaneous lichenoid eruptions have recently been described in association with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. The authors briefly discuss the clinical and pathological presentation of lichen planopilaris as well as a potential pathogenesis of cutaneous adverse effects seen as the result of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy. They review all case reports of lichen planopilaris occurring on tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and suggest its classification as a fourth recognized pattern on this therapy.

  13. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha processing inhibitor-1 inhibits skin fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Terao, Mika; Murota, Hiroyuki; Kitaba, Shun; Katayama, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Elevated serum concentration of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (sTNFRp55) is known to correlate with the severity of systemic sclerosis (SSc). However, it has not been verified whether this increase contributes to the pathogenesis of SSc. In this study, we found that sTNFRp55 also is increased in the bleomycin (BLM)-induced murine model of SSc. Therefore, we examined the effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha processing inhibitor-1 (TAPI-1), the inhibitor of TNFRp55 sheddase, in this model. TAPI-1 was administered weekly to mice with skin fibrosis induced by daily BLM injections. TAPI-1 significantly suppressed BLM-induced skin thickness and the number of myofibroblasts. It also inhibited the increase of serum sTNFRp55 after 3 weeks of BLM injections. The mRNA expression of collagen type I alpha1, transforming growth factor-beta1 and alpha smooth muscle actin were decreased by TAPI-1 administration. Taken together, these findings indicate that targeting the TNFalpha converting enzyme might be a new type of therapy for patients with SSc. PMID:19758314

  15. A Novel Small-molecule Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Attenuates Inflammation in a Hepatitis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Gong, Haiyan; Zhu, Haiyan; Ji, Qing; Su, Pei; Liu, Peng; Cao, Shannan; Yao, Jianfeng; Jiang, Linlin; Han, Mingzhe; Ma, Xiaotong; Xiong, Dongsheng; Luo, Hongbo R.; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a hallmark of many inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and septic shock and hepatitis, making it a potential therapeutic target for clinical interventions. To explore chemical inhibitors against TNFα activity, we applied computer-aided drug design combined with in vitro and cell-based assays and identified a lead chemical compound, (E)-4-(2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl) (named as C87 thereafter), which directly binds to TNFα, potently inhibits TNFα-induced cytotoxicity (IC50 = 8.73 μm) and effectively blocks TNFα-triggered signaling activities. Furthermore, by using a murine acute hepatitis model, we showed that C87 attenuates TNFα-induced inflammation, thereby markedly reducing injuries to the liver and improving animal survival. Thus, our results lead to a novel and highly specific small-molecule TNFα inhibitor, which can be potentially used to treat TNFα-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24634219

  16. Hepatitis B and C reactivation with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: synopsis and interpretation of screening and prophylaxis recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Inbal; Abu-Shakra, Mahmoud; Sikuler, Emanuel

    2013-06-01

    Information on reactivation of chronic viral hepatitis infection in patients who are candidates for tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFi) is in a constant state of flux. We retrieved the most updated guidelines (in English) of prominent rheumatological and gastroenterological professional socienties for the mangement of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the context of treatment with TNFi. Subsequently, the major areas of uncertainty and absence of consensus in the guidelines were located and a secondary search for additional studies addressing those areas was performed. Based on our search we formulated a personal interpretation applicable to health care settings with virological laboratories capable of performing viral load measurements, and health systems that can support use of potent nucleoside/tide analogues in well-defined patient populations. PMID:23882898

  17. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, −0.99; 95% CI, −1.61 to −0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, −0.58; 95% CI, −1.10 to −0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, −0.31; 95% CI, −0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, −0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with

  18. Effects of tumour necrosis factor-alpha synthesis inhibitors on rat trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Bobin-Dubigeon, C; Collin, X; Grimaud, N; Robert, J M; Le Baut, G; Petit, J Y

    2001-11-01

    The fact that tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is clearly involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal bowel disease, especially Crohn's disease, suggests that TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitors could be beneficial for treatment. The present study assessed the effect of chronic oral gavage of two in vitro TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitors, JM 34 maleate or [N-(4,6-dimethylpyridin-2-yl)-furane-2-carboxamide)] maleate and XC 21 or (N-betapicolyl-tetrafluorophtalimide), on colonic inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rats received JM 34 maleate (100 mg/kg) and XC 21 (50 mg/kg) 1 h before colitis induction and then daily for 8 days by oral gavage. The colon was removed on day 8 and processed for clinical score, myeloperoxidase activity, and soluble TNF-alpha release. Treatment with XC 21, as well as dexamethasone and sulphasalazine, reduced colonic damage and decreased (except with dexamethasone) the incidence of diarrhoea. JM 34 maleate failed to improve the clinical signs of chronic colitis. After trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis, myeloperoxidase activity and TNF-alpha colonic mucosal production were substantially increased compared to the control (saline instillation). Both of these inflammatory indicators were then significantly decreased (P< or =0.05) after the four chronic treatments (JM 34 maleate, XC 21, sulphasalazine, and dexamethasone). XC 21 appeared to be as efficient as sulphasalazine in improving colonic inflammation. PMID:11716848

  19. CD8+ T Cells Specific to Apoptosis-Associated Antigens Predict the Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Alessandra; Scrivo, Rossana; Martini, Helene; Martire, Carmela; De Marzio, Paolo; Vestri, Anna Rita; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells (apoptotic epitopes) represent a principal player in chronic immune activation, which is known to amplify immunopathology in various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship involving these autoreactive T cells, the rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology, and the response to tumor necrosis factorinhibitor therapy. The frequency of autoreactive CD8+ T cells specific to various apoptotic epitopes, as detected by both enzyme-linked immunospot assay and dextramers of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules complexed with relevant apoptotic epitopes, was longitudinally analyzed in the peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients who were submitted to etanercept treatment (or other tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as a control). The percentage of apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells was significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients than in healthy donors, and correlated with the disease activity. More important, it was significantly more elevated in responders to tumor necrosis factorinhibitor therapy than in non-responders before the start of therapy; it significantly dropped only in the former following therapy. These data indicate that apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells may be involved in rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology through the production of inflammatory cytokines and that they may potentially represent a predictive biomarker of response to tumor necrosis factorinhibitor therapy to validate in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26061065

  20. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients receiving tumor-necrosis-factor-inhibitor therapy: implications for chemoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, James A; Baddley, John W

    2014-10-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is an important opportunistic infection that has been increasingly reported in patients with rheumatic disease. Reported incidence among patients taking TNF inhibitors (TNFi) has varied, but has usually been low. Still, disease causes significant mortality among those affected and must be considered in patients with rheumatological disease presenting with dyspnea and cough. Diagnosis can be difficult in the non-HIV population, and our understanding of the epidemiology and natural history after exposure is changing. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is believed to be the most effective agent for treatment and prophylaxis, but is associated with significant adverse effects. Given the low incidence reported in most studies of patients on TNFi, prophylaxis is probably not beneficial for this patient population as a whole. PMID:25182673

  1. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy in ankylosing spondylitis: differential effects on pain and fatigue and brain correlates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Inman, Robert D; Davis, Karen D

    2015-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with back pain and fatigue and impacts mobility but can be treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). The differential effects of TNFi treatment on multiple symptoms and the brain is not well delineated. Thus, we conducted a 2-part study. In study 1, we conducted a retrospective chart review in 129 ankylosing spondylitis patients to assess TNFi effects on pain, fatigue, motor function, mobility, and quality of life (QoL). After at least 10 weeks of TNFi treatment, patients had clinically significant improvements (>30%) in pain (including neuropathic pain), most disease and QoL factors, and normalized sensory detection thresholds. However, residual fatigue (mean = 5.3) was prominent. Although 60% of patients had significant relief of pain, only 22% of patients had significant relief of both pain and fatigue. Therefore, the preferential TNFi treatment effect on pain compared with fatigue could contribute to suboptimal effects on QoL. Part 2 was a prospective study in 14 patients to identify TNFi treatment effects on pain, fatigue, sensory and psychological factors, and brain cortical thickness based on 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Centrally, TNFi was associated with statistically significant cortical thinning of motor, premotor, and posterior parietal regions. Pain intensity reduction was associated with cortical thinning of the secondary somatosensory cortex, and pain unpleasantness reduction was associated with the cortical thinning of motor areas. In contrast, fatigue reduction correlated with cortical thinning of the insula, primary sensory cortex/inferior parietal sulcus, and superior temporal polysensory areas. This indicates that TNFi treatment produces changes in brain areas implicated in sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive functions.

  2. Ketoconazole attenuates radiation-induction of tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D.E.; Virudachalam, S.; Kufe, D.W.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1994-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that inhibitors of phospholipase A2 attenuate ionizing radiation-induced arachidonic acid production, protein kinase C activation, and prevent subsequent induction of the tumor necrosis factor gene. Because arachidonic acid contributes to radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor expression, the authors analyzed the effects of agents which alter arachidonate metabolism on the regulation of this gene. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinicrine, bromphenyl bromide, and pentoxyfylline or the inhibitor of lipoxygenase (ketoconazole) or the inhibitor of cycloxygenase (indomethacine) were added to cell culture 1 h prior to irradiation. Radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by each of the phospholipase A2 inhibitors (quinicrine, bromphenylbromide, and pentoxyfylline). Furthermore, ketoconazole attenuated X ray induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression. Conversely, indomethacin enhanced tumor necrosis factor expression following irradiation. The finding that radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by ketoconazole suggests that the lipoxygenase pathway participates in signal transduction preceding tumor necrosis factor induction. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor expression by indomethacin following irradiation suggests that prostaglandins produced by cyclooxygenase act as negative regulators of tumor necrosis factor expression. Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor induction ameliorate acute and subacute sequelae of radiotherapy. The authors propose therefore, that ketoconazole may reduce acute radiation sequelae such as mucositis and esophagitis through a reduction in tumor necrosis factor induction or inhibition of phospholipase A2 in addition to its antifungal activity. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Active tuberculosis in a psoriasis patient treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors despite an initial negative tuberculin skin test and no known risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen E Gilbert E; Manalo, Iviesan F; Wu, Jashin J

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are becoming more common in the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis. These medications have a low incidence of serious adverse events and are generally considered safe; however, they do make patients more susceptible to tuberculosis (TB) infection both through latent reactivation and primary infection. We describe a case of a patient who had an initial negative tuberculin skin test (TST), began TNF inhibitor therapy, and then 11 years later was diagnosed with active TB. After the initial screening, the patient did not have any subsequent screenings for TB and no apparent change to his TB risk status. TB is still common in many areas of the United States and travel is not necessary to be exposed. Patients on TNF inhibitors that develop active TB have increased morbidity and mortality than those who are not. It is necessary that dermatologists limit the risk of TB to patients by screening them before initiation and annually when they are on the TNF inhibitor. PMID:27617949

  4. Dose Optimization for Single Intradiscal Administration of the Tumor Necrosis FactorInhibitor, Etanercept, in Rat Disc Injury Models

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Experimental animal study. Purpose We aimed to determine the optimal dose of a single direct injection of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor, etanercept, by using the rat model of degenerative intervertebral disc from injury. Overview of Literature The pain-related peptide expression was suppressed in the etanercept (100 µg and 1,000 µg)-administered groups in a dose-dependent manner. Methods The neurotracer FluoroGold (FG) was applied to the surfaces of L4/5 discs to label their innervating dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (n=50). Ten rats were included in the nonpunctured disc sham surgery control group, whereas the other 40 were included in the experimental group in which intervertebral discs were punctured with a 23-gauge needle. Saline or etanercept (10 µg, 100 µg, or 1,000 µg) was injected into the punctured discs (n=10 for each treatment). After 14 days of surgery, DRGs from L1 to L6 were harvested, sectioned, and immunostained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The proportion of FG-labeled CGRP-immunoreactive DRG neurons was evaluated in all the groups. Results There were no significant differences between the puncture+saline group and the puncture+10-µg etanercept group (p >0.05). However, a significant decrease in the percentage of FG and CGRP double-positive cells in FG-positive cells was observed in the etanercept (100 µg and 1,000 µg)-administered groups in a dose-dependent manner (p <0.05). Conclusions When a low dose of the TNF-α inhibitor (10 µg of etanercept) was directly administered to the rat intervertebral disc in the rat model of degenerative intervertebral disc from injury, no suppressive effect on the pain-related peptide expression was observed. However, when a higher dose of etanercept (100 µg and 1,000 µg) was administered, the pain-related peptide expression was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:27559439

  5. Vialinin A and thelephantin G, potent inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α production, inhibit sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Yasukiyo; Namiki, Daisuke; Makiuchi, Mao; Sugaya, Kouichi; Onose, Jun-Ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi; Abe, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Several p-terphenyl compounds have been isolated from the edible Chinese mushroom Thelephora vialis. Vialinin A, a p-terphenyl compound, strongly inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α production and release. Vialinin A inhibits the enzymatic activity of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 5, one of the target molecules in RBL-2H3 cells. Here we examined the inhibitory effect of p-terphenyl compounds, including vialinin A, against sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) enzymatic activity. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values of vialinin A and thelephantin G against full-length SENP1 were 1.64±0.23μM and 2.48±0.02μM, respectively. These findings suggest that p-terphenyl compounds are potent SENP1 inhibitors. PMID:27491710

  6. Assessing the likelihood of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease following tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Asha; Stobaugh, Derrick J; Deepak, Parakkal

    2015-04-01

    The association between inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We sought to evaluate this association by analyzing adverse events (AEs) reported to the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) with a standardized scoring tool for drug-induced AEs. A search of the FAERS for RA or JRA (January 2003-December 2011) reported with adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, or infliximab was performed. This dataset was then queried for cases indicating IBD. Full-length reports were accessed using the Freedom of Information Act and organized by age, sex, concomitant medications, co-morbidities, type of TNF-α inhibitor used, and diagnosis/treatment details. The Naranjo score was used to determine whether the drug-induced AEs were definite, probable, possible, or doubtful. There were 158 cases of IBD after TNF-α inhibitor exposure in RA or JRA patients. Use of the Naranjo score revealed that, in a majority of the cases (71.5 %), TNF-α inhibitor exposure was considered a 'possible' cause. A majority of the 'probable cases' in JRA were reported with etanercept (40 patients, 90.91 %). There were no 'definite' cases of anti-TNF-induced IBD. After applying the Naranjo scale, a weak association between new-onset IBD and TNF-α inhibitor therapy in RA patients and a moderately strong association especially with etanercept exposure in JRA patients was observed. However, causality cannot be determined due to limitations of the FAERS and the Naranjo score.

  7. Structure-based rational design of peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors to target tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme as potential therapeutics for hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Gu, Qiuhong; Zhao, Ning; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) has recently been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of hepatitis and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we reported a successful application of the solved crystal structure of TACE complex with a peptide-like ligand INN for rational design of novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target and inhibit TACE. First, the intermolecular interactions between TACE catalytic domain and INN were characterized through an integrated bioinformatics approach, with which the key substructures of INN that dominate ligand binding were identified. Subsequently, the INN molecular structure was simplified to a chemical sketch of peptide hydroxamic acid compound, which can be regarded as a linear tripeptide capped by a N-terminal carboxybenzyl group (chemically protective group) and a C-terminal hydroxamate moiety (coordinated to the Zn(2+) at TACE active site). Based on the sketch, a virtual combinatorial library containing 180 peptide hydroxamic acids was generated, from which seven samples were identified as promising candidates by using a knowledge-based protein-peptide affinity predictor and were then tested in vitro with a standard TACE activity assay protocol. Consequently, three designed peptide hydroxamic acids, i.e. Cbz-Pro-Ile-Gln-hydroxamic acid, Cbz-Leu-Ile-Val-hydroxamic acid and Cbz-Phe-Val-Met-hydroxamic acid, exhibited moderate or high inhibitory activity against TACE, with inhibition constants Ki of 36 ± 5, 510 ± 46 and 320 ± 26 nM, respectively. We also examined the structural basis and non-bonded profile of TACE interaction with a designed peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitor, and found that the inhibitor ligand is tightly buried in the active pocket of TACE, forming a number of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic forces and van der Waals contacts at the interaction interface, conferring both stability and specificity for TACE-inhibitor complex

  8. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, -0.99; 95% CI, -1.61 to -0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, -0.58; 95% CI, -1.10 to -0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, -0.31; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for

  9. Genistein reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 transcription but not urokinase expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Hinsbergh, V W; Vermeer, M; Koolwijk, P; Grimbergen, J; Kooistra, T

    1994-11-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor PAI-1 is markedly elevated in vivo and in vitro upon exposure to the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Here we report that the isoflavone compound genistein prevents the increase in synthesis of PAI-1 induced by these inflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells in vitro, and partially reduces the basal PAI-1 production by these cells. These effects of genistein were accompanied by a decrease in PAI-1 mRNA and in a suppression of the PAI-1 transcription rate as shown by run-on assay. A specific action of genistein, probably by inhibiting a tyrosine protein kinase, is likely, because the structural genistein analogue daidzein, which has a low tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor activity, did not inhibit PAI-1 synthesis. Vanadate, a tyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor, increased PAI-1 production. The effect of genistein on PAI-1 synthesis was rather selective. Herbimycin A also reduced PAI-1 synthesis, but several other tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors, namely tyrphostin A47, methyl-2,5-dihydroxy-cinnamate, and compound 5, were unable to do so. All these tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors reduced basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells. This indicates that the effect of genistein on PAI-1 transcription proceeds independently of its effect on mitogenesis. In contrast to TNF-alpha-induced PAI-1 production, the transcription and synthesis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was not inhibited by genistein. A TNF-alpha-mutant (Trp32Thr86TNF alpha) that specifically recognizes the 55-kD TNF-receptor, mimicked the effects of TNF alpha on both PAI-1 and u-PA. Because genistein affected PAI-1, but not u-PA induced by this mutant, involvement of different TNF-receptors cannot underlie the difference in the effects of genistein on PAI-1 and u-PA synthesis. Because genistein also

  10. Association between tumour necrosis factorinhibitors and risk of serious infections in people with inflammatory bowel disease: nationwide Danish cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Björn; Friis-Møller, Nina; Andersson, Mikael; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether people with inflammatory bowel disease treated with tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are at increased risk of serious infections. Design Nationwide register based propensity score matched cohort study. Setting Denmark, 2002-12. Participants The background cohort eligible for matching comprised 52 392 people with inflammatory bowel disease, aged 15 to 75 years, of whom 4300 were treated with TNF-α inhibitors. To limit confounding, a two stage matching method was applied; firstly matching on age, sex, disease duration, and inflammatory bowel disease subtype, and secondly matching on propensity scores (1:1 ratio); this yielded 1543 people treated with TNF-α inhibitors and 1543 untreated to be included in the analyses. Main outcome measures The main outcome was any serious infection, defined as a diagnosis of infection associated with hospital admission. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for two risk periods (90 and 365 days after the start of TNF-α inhibitor treatment). Hazard ratios of site specific serious infections were obtained solely for the 365 days risk period. Results Within the 90 days risk period, 51 cases of infection were observed in users of TNF-α inhibitors (incidence rate 14/100 person years), compared with 33 cases in non-users (9/100 person years), yielding a hazard ratio of 1.63 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 2.63). Within the risk period of 365 days, the hazard ratio was 1.27 (0.92 to 1.75). In analyses of site specific infections, the hazard ratio was above 2 for several of the subgroups but only reached statistical significance for skin and soft tissue infections (2.51, 1.23 to 5.12). Conclusions This nationwide propensity score matched cohort study suggests an increased risk of serious infections associated with use of TNF-α inhibitors within the first 90 days of starting treatment and a subsequent decline in risk. This calls for increased clinical awareness of potential

  11. Application of a stochastic modeling to assess the evolution of tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Agliari, Elena; Asti, Lorenzo; Barra, Adriano; Scrivo, Rossana; Valesini, Guido; Wallis, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript we apply stochastic modeling to investigate the risk of reactivation of latent mycobacterial infections in patients undergoing treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. First, we review the perspective proposed by one of the authors in a previous work and which consists in predicting the occurrence of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection or newly acquired tuberculosis during treatment; this is based on variational procedures on a simple set of parameters (e.g. rate of reactivation of a latent infection). Then, we develop a full analytical study of this approach through a Markov chain analysis and we find an exact solution for the temporal evolution of the number of cases of tuberculosis infection (re)activation. The analytical solution is compared with Monte Carlo simulations and with experimental data, showing overall excellent agreement. The generality of this theoretical framework allows to investigate also the case of non-tuberculous mycobacteria infections; in particular, we show that reactivation in that context plays a minor role. This may suggest that, while the screening for tuberculous is necessary prior to initiating biologics, when considering non-tuberculous mycobacteria only a watchful monitoring during the treatment is recommended. The framework outlined in this paper is quite general and could be extremely promising in further researches on drug-related adverse events. PMID:23383039

  12. Blockade of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) in combination with tumor-targeted delivery of tumor necrosis factor-α leads to synergistic antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Z; Syrkin, G; Adem, A; Geha, R; Pastoriza, J; Vrikshajanani, C; Smith, T; Quinn, T J; Alemu, G; Cho, H; Barrett, C J; Arap, W; Pasqualini, R; Libutti, S K

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we examined whether the combination of tumor vasculature-targeted gene therapy with adeno-associated virus bacteriophage-tumor necrosis factor-α (AAVP-TNF-α) and/or the orally administered LCL161, an antagonist of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), enhanced antitumor efficacy without systemic toxicity. M21 human melanoma xenografts were grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Mice were treated according to one of four treatment regimens: AAVP-TNF-α alone (AAVP-TNF-α plus sodium acetate-acetic acid (NaAc) buffer) via tail vein injection; LCL161 alone (phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) plus LCL161) via oral gavage; AAVP-TNF-α plus LCL161; and PBS plus NaAc Buffer as a control group. Tumor volume, survival and toxicity were analyzed. AAVP trafficking and TNF-α production in vivo were detected on days 7 and 21 by real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence. The levels of apoptosis and activation of caspases were assessed on days 7 and 21 by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) and immunofluorescence assays. Our results showed that the combination of AAVP-TNF-α and LCL161 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice with melanoma xenografts. The combination of AAVP-TNF-α and LCL161 was also significantly more effective than either agent alone, showing a synergistic effect without systemic toxicity.

  13. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced ICAM-1 expression in human vascular endothelial and lung epithelial cells: modulation by tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Burke-Gaffney, A.; Hellewell, P. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) increases the expression of the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on cultured endothelial and epithelial cells and modulation of this may be important in controlling inflammation. Activation of tyrosine kinase(s) is known to be involved in the signal transduction pathways of many cytokines. In this study we have investigated the effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ST638, tyrphostin AG 1288 and genistein, on TNF alpha-induced ICAM-1 expression in human alveolar epithelial (A549) and vascular endothelial (EAhy926) cell lines and also normal human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC). 2. ICAM-1 expression on cultured cells was determined by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Endothelial or epithelial monolayers were exposed to increasing doses of TNF-alpha (0.01-10 ng ml-1), in the presence or absence of either ST638 (3-100 microM), AG 1288 (3-100 microM) or genistein (100 microM) and ICAM-1 expression was measured at 4 and 24 h. Control experiments examined the effect of ST638 on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 20 ng ml-1, 4 h)-stimulated ICAM-1 and compared it to that of a specific protein kinase C inhibitor, R031-8220 (10 microM). Also, functional consequences of changes in ICAM-1 expression were assessed by measuring adhesion of 111 In-labelled human neutrophils to EAhy926 endothelial and A549 epithelial monolayers treated with TNF alpha, in the presence or absence of ST638. 3. ST638 caused a concentration-dependent reduction in TNF alpha- (0.1-10 ng ml-1)-induced ICAM-1 on EAhy926 endothelial (at 4 h) and A549 epithelial monolayers (at 4 and 24 h). In contrast, ST638 caused a concentration-dependent increase in TNF alpha- (0.1-10 ng ml-1)-induced ICAM-1 on EAhy926 endothelial cells at 24 h. Similar effects were seen with AG 1288 or genistein. ST638 (100 microM) significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited ICAM-1 expression on HLMVEC endothelial cells induced by

  14. The effects of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors, methotrexate, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids on cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roubille, Camille; Richer, Vincent; Starnino, Tara; McCourt, Collette; McFarlane, Alexandra; Fleming, Patrick; Siu, Stephanie; Kraft, John; Lynde, Charles; Pope, Janet; Gulliver, Wayne; Keeling, Stephanie; Dutz, Jan; Bessette, Louis; Bissonnette, Robert; Haraoui, Boulos

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this systematic literature review was to determine the association between cardiovascular events (CVEs) and antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA)/psoriasis (Pso). Systematic searches were performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases (1960 to December 2012) and proceedings from major relevant congresses (2010–2012) for controlled studies and randomised trials reporting confirmed CVEs in patients with RA or PsA/Pso treated with antirheumatic drugs. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed on extracted data. Out of 2630 references screened, 34 studies were included: 28 in RA and 6 in PsA/Pso. In RA, a reduced risk of all CVEs was reported with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (relative risk (RR), 0.70; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.90; p=0.005) and methotrexate (RR, 0.72; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.91; p=0.007). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.18; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.38; p=0.04), which may have been specifically related to the effects of rofecoxib. Corticosteroids increased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 1.47; 95% CI 1.34 to 1.60; p<0.001). In PsA/Pso, systemic therapy decreased the risk of all CVEs (RR, 0.75; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.91; p=0.003). In RA, tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and methotrexate are associated with a decreased risk of all CVEs while corticosteroids and NSAIDs are associated with an increased risk. Targeting inflammation with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate may have positive cardiovascular effects in RA. In PsA/Pso, limited evidence suggests that systemic therapies are associated with a decrease in all CVE risk. PMID:25561362

  15. Glucose ingestion induces an increase in intranuclear nuclear factor kappaB, a fall in cellular inhibitor kappaB, and an increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha messenger RNA by mononuclear cells in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Aljada, Ahmad; Friedman, Jay; Ghanim, Husam; Mohanty, Priya; Hofmeyer, Deborah; Chaudhuri, Ajay; Dandona, Paresh

    2006-09-01

    Because hyperglycemia is a major detrimental factor in the prognosis of acute cardiovascular conditions such as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke, and because an acute glucose challenge in healthy subjects has been shown to induce oxidative stress in mononuclear cells (MNCs), we have now investigated whether glucose induces inflammatory stress at the cellular and molecular level. Glucose ingestion (75 g in 300 mL water) in healthy human subjects resulted in an increase in intranuclear nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding, the reduction of inhibitor kappaB alpha (IkappaBalpha) protein, and an increase in the activity of inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK) and the expression of IKKalpha and IKKbeta, the enzymes that phosphorylate IkappaBalpha, in MNCs. Glucose intake caused an increase in NF-kappaB binding to NF-kappaB2, NF-kappaB2a, and NF-kappaB3 sequences in the promoter site of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene along with an increase in the expression of TNF-alpha messenger RNA in MNCs. Membranous p47(phox) subunit, an index of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase expression and activation, also increased after glucose intake. We conclude that glucose intake induces an immediate increase in intranuclear NF-kappaB binding, a fall in IkappaBalpha, an increase in IKKalpha, IKKbeta, IKK activity, and messenger RNA expression of TNF-alpha in MNCs in healthy subjects. These data are consistent with profound acute pro-inflammatory changes in MNCs after glucose intake.

  16. Endotoxin Tolerance Inhibits Degradation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 3 by Suppressing Pellino 1 Expression and the K48 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Peizhi; Liu, Hongxiang; Zhang, Yiyin; Liao, Rui; He, Kun; Ruan, Xiongzhong; Gong, Jianping

    2016-09-15

    Pellino 1 positively regulates Toll-like receptor 4 signaling by regulating tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) degradation and is suppressed with the induction of endotoxin tolerance. However, the role of TRAF3 in endotoxin tolerance is largely unknown. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation decreased TARF3 protein expression in mouse Kupffer cells (KCs) and liver tissues, whereas endotoxin tolerization abrogated this effect. Degradative TRAF3 K48-linked ubiquitination and the cytoplasmic translocation of the MYD88-associated multiprotein complex were significantly inhibited in tolerized KCs, which led to markedly impaired activation of MYD88-dependent JNK and p38 and downregulation of inflammatory cytokines. TRAF3 ablation failed to induce a fully endotoxin-tolerant state in RAW264.7 cells. Pellino 1 knockdown in Raw264.7 cells did not impair induction of cIAP2 in response to LPS but inhibited the K63-linked ubiquitination of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) and K48-linked ubiquitination of TRAF3 protein. We also found upregulation of Pellino 1 and downregulation of TRAF3 in liver tissues of patients with cholangitis. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism that endotoxin tolerance reprograms mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling by suppressing Pellino 1-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination of cIAP2, K48-linked ubiquitination, and degradation of TRAF3. PMID:27377744

  17. [Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-alpha therapy. When TB (LTBI orAT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-alpha therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-alpha therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. IfTST is performed in immunosupressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test.

  18. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment.

  19. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283.

  20. Melanoma risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Hyrich, Kimme L; Knight, Lani L; Green, Adèle C

    2016-10-01

    Clinicians are concerned that treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonists (TNFα biologics) may increase patients' risk of melanoma compared with treatment with nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (nbDMARDS). We aimed to assess the risk of melanoma in RA patients treated with TNFα biologics compared with RA patients treated with nbDMARDS. A secondary aim was to quantify the risk of melanoma in RA patients treated with TNFα biologics compared with the general population. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis searching Medline, Embase and the ISI Science Citation Index databases to January 2016. Cohort studies that enabled a quantitative assessment of the risk of melanoma in RA patients treated with TNFα biologics compared with either RA patients treated with nbDMARDS or the general population or both were included. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. From 812 articles, we identified six that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four studies reported on the risk of melanoma in RA patients treated with TNFα biologics compared with those treated with nbDMARDS, with a pooled effect estimate of 1.60 (95% confidence interval 1.16-2.19). Five reported on the risk of melanoma in RA patients treated with TNFα biologics compared with the general population, and the pooled effect estimate was 1.87 (95% confidence interval 1.53-2.30). There was no significant heterogeneity in either analysis. This systematic review and meta-analysis does not allay clinician's fears and, while awaiting further evidence from large collaborative studies, this patient population may benefit from regular skin checks and counselling to avoid excessive sun exposure. PMID:27391143

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Proteolytic Activation of Pro-matrix Metalloproteinase-9 by Human Skin Is Controlled by Down-regulating Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 and Mediated by Tissue-associated Chymotrypsin-like Proteinase*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuan-Ping; Nien, Yih-Dar; Garner, Warren L.

    2008-01-01

    The proteolytic activation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 by conversion of the 92-kDa precursor into an 82-kDa active form has been observed in chronic wounds, tumor metastasis, and many inflammation-associated diseases, yet the mechanistic pathway to control this process has not been identified. In this report, we show that the massive expression and activation of MMP-9 in skin tissue from patients with chronically unhealed wounds could be reconstituted in vitro with cultured normal human skin by stimulation with transforming growth factor-β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We dissected the mechanistic pathway for TNF-α induced activation of pro-MMP-9 in human skin. We found that proteolytic activation of pro-MMP-9 was mediated by a tissue-associated chymotrypsin-like proteinase, designated here as pro-MMP-9 activator (pM9A). This unidentified activator specifically converted pro-MMP-9 but not pro-MMP-2, another member of the gelatinase family. The tissue-bound pM9A was steadily expressed and not regulated by TNF-α, which indicated that the cytokine-mediated activation of pro-MMP-9 might be regulated at the inhibitor level. Indeed, the skin constantly secreted tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 at the basal state. TNF-α, but not transforming growth factor-β, down-regulated this inhibitor. The TNF-α-mediated activation of pro-MMP-9 was tightly associated with down-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in a dose-dependent manner. To establish this linkage, we demonstrate that the recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 could block the activation of pro-MMP-9 by either the intact skin or skin fractions. Thus, these studies suggest a novel regulation for the proteolytic activation of MMP-9 in human tissue, which is mediated by tissue-bound activator and controlled by down-regulation of a specific inhibitor. PMID:12004062

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Luster, M I; Simeonova, P P; Gallucci, R; Matheson, J

    1999-09-01

    The molecular cloning of a group of proteins, collectively referred to as cytokines, and including interleukins, chemokines, growth factors, colony stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors, has allowed for the increased understanding of the mechanisms for many disease processes as well as provided strategies for the development of novel therapies. Conceptually similar to hormones and peptides, this group of phylogenetically related molecules are also involved in various toxicological processes, including apoptosis, cell repair, and in particular inflammation. In this review, we offer a description of what many believe represents the primary regulatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha and its role in toxicological processes. For over a decade it has been suspected that this molecule helps mediate the shock state induced by bacterial endotoxin and the wasting diathesis that typifies chronic diseases. Advances in molecular biology that have provided tools to modulate TNFalpha regulation and synthesis have allowed for the identification of additional roles for TNFalpha in homeostasis, cellular damage, and repair. This review provides a brief summary of our understanding of TNFalpha biology followed by a discussion of its role in toxicological responses. This is followed by specific examples of organ-specific and tissue-specific responses to chemical damage where TNFalpha has been implicated. The review concludes with a review of its implication in human risk assessment, particularly as it relates to genetic polymorphisms of TNFalpha expression and disease susceptibility.

  3. Discovery of novel hydroxamates as highly potent tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] converting enzyme inhibitors. Part II: Optimization of the S3′ pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzola Jr., Robert D.; Zhu, Zhaoning; Sinning, Lisa; McKittrick, Brian; Lavey, Brian; Spitler, James; Kozlowski, Joseph; Neng-Yang, Shih; Zhou, Guowei; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Madison, Vincent; Sun, Jing; Lundell, Daniel; Niu, Xiaoda

    2010-10-01

    A series of cyclopropyl hydroxamic acids were prepared. Many of the compounds displayed picomolar affinity for the TACE enzyme while maintaining good to excellent selectivity profiles versus MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -14, and ADAM-10. X-ray analysis of an inhibitor in the TACE active site indicated that the molecules bound to the enzyme in the S1{prime}-S3{prime} pocket.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonist-induced sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Clementine, Rochelle Robicheaux; Lyman, Justin; Zakem, Jerald; Mallepalli, Jyothi; Lindsey, Stephen; Quinet, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is an important player in granuloma formation, and recent clinical trials have investigated the efficacy of TNF-alpha inhibitors in sarcoidosis. Paradoxically, there are several case reports in the medical literature describing the development of sarcoidosis in patients treated with TNF-alpha inhibitors. We describe 3 cases of TNF-alpha antagonist-induced sarcoidosis: 1 case of pulmonary, ocular and cutaneous sarcoidosis developing in a patient receiving infliximab for erosive rheumatoid arthritis, 1 case of etanercept-induced sarcoidosis in a patient with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, and 1 case of sarcoidosis developing in a patient receiving etanercept for erosive rheumatoid arthritis. We also provide a brief discussion on the role of TNF alpha in granuloma formation and implications in the use of TNF-alpha antagonists in autoimmune disease.

  5. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and their antagonists regulate spontaneous and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Sheridan, Clare; Cullen, Sean P; Tynan, Graham A; Logue, Susan E; Afonina, Inna S; Vucic, Domagoj; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2013-02-15

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) play a major role in determining whether cells undergo apoptosis in response to TNF as well as other stimuli. However, TNF is also highly proinflammatory through its ability to trigger the secretion of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which is arguably the most important role of TNF in vivo. Indeed, deregulated production of TNF-induced cytokines is a major driver of inflammation in several autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we show that IAPs are required for the production of multiple TNF-induced proinflammatory mediators. Ablation or antagonism of IAPs potently suppressed TNF- or RIPK1-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. Surprisingly, IAP antagonism also led to spontaneous production of chemokines, particularly RANTES, in vitro and in vivo. Thus, IAPs play a major role in influencing the production of multiple inflammatory mediators, arguing that these proteins are important regulators of inflammation in addition to apoptosis. Furthermore, small molecule IAP antagonists can modulate spontaneous as well as TNF-induced inflammatory responses, which may have implications for use of these agents in therapeutic settings.

  6. Tumour necrosis factor in synovial exudates.

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovine, F S; Nuki, G; Duff, G W

    1988-01-01

    The actions of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) include resorption of bone and cartilage, suggesting a potential role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. TNF activity was looked for in synovial fluids from 137 patients with different rheumatic diseases. Unfractionated samples were tested in the L929 bioassay. Significant TNF activity that was neutralised by monoclonal antibody to TNF alpha occurred in 13 (30%) of 44 samples. Raised TNF levels were not associated with any particular disease type or routine laboratory markers of inflammation but were related to disease duration in osteoarthritis. The finding of biologically active TNF in symptomatic joints of arthritic patients supports the idea that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of joint damage in chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:3263088

  7. Contrasting effects of an aminobisphosphonate, a potent inhibitor of bone resorption, on lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor α in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Shunji; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Takada, Haruhiko; Kosugi, Hiroshi; Endo, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    Aminobisphosphonates (aminoBPs), potent inhibitors of bone resorption, have been reported to induce inflammatory reactions such as fever and an increase in acute phase proteins in human patients, and to induce the histamine-forming enzyme, histidine decarboxylase, in mice. In the present study, we examined the effect of aminoBP, 4-amino-1-hydroxybutylidene-1,1-bisphosphonic acid (AHBuBP), on the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1 and TNFα, in mice.Intraperitoneal injection of AHBuBP did not itself produce detectable levels of IL-1 (α and β) and TNFα in the serum. However, the elevation of serum IL-1 induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was greatly augmented in mice injected with AHBuBP 3 days before the LPS injection, whereas the LPS-induced elevation of serum TNFα was almost completely abolished.Spleen and bone marrow cells taken from mice injected with AHBuBP produced IL-1β in vitro spontaneously, and the production was augmented following the addition of LPS. Cells that accumulated in the peritoneal cavity in response to AHBuBP produced a particularly large amount of IL-1β. However, AHBuBP treatment of mice did not lead to an impairment of the in vitro production of TNFα by these three types of cells.Liposomes encapsulating dichloromethylene bisphosphonate (a non-amino BP) selectively deplete phagocytic macrophages. When an intraperitoneal injection of these liposomes was given 2 days after an injection of AHBuBP, there was a marked decrease in the LPS-induced elevation of serum IL-1 (α and β) (LPS being injected 3 days after the injection of AHBuBP).These results indicate that AHBuBP has contrasting effects on the in vivo LPS-induced production of IL-1 and TNFα in mice, enhancing the production of IL-1 by phagocytic macrophages and suppressing the production of TNFα, although underling mechanisms remain to be clarified. PMID:9831909

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-22

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner.

  9. Inhibitors of tumor progression loci-2 (Tpl2) kinase and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production: selectivity and in vivo antiinflammatory activity of novel 8-substituted-4-anilino-6-aminoquinoline-3-carbonitriles.

    PubMed

    Green, Neal; Hu, Yonghan; Janz, Kristin; Li, Huan-Qiu; Kaila, Neelu; Guler, Satenig; Thomason, Jennifer; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Tam, Steve Y; Hotchandani, Rajeev; Wu, Junjun; Huang, Adrian; Wang, Qin; Leung, Louis; Pelker, Jefferey; Marusic, Suzana; Hsu, Sang; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Hall, J Perry; Cuozzo, John W; Lin, Lih-Ling

    2007-09-20

    Tumor progression loci-2 (Tpl2) (Cot/MAP3K8) is a serine/threonine kinase in the MAP3K family directly upstream of MEK. Recent studies using Tpl2 knockout mice have indicated an important role for Tpl2 in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and other proinflammatory cytokines involved in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Initial 4-anilino-6-aminoquinoline-3-carbonitrile leads showed poor selectivity for Tpl2 over epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase. Using molecular modeling and crystallographic data of the EGFR kinase domain with and without an EGFR kinase-specific 4-anilinoquinazoline inhibitor (erlotinib, Tarceva), we hypothesized that we could diminish the inhibition of EGFR kinase by substitution at the C-8 position of our 4-anilino-6-aminoquinoline-3-carbonitrile leads. The 8-substituted-4-anilino-6-aminoquinoline-3-carbonitriles were prepared from the appropriate 2-substituted 4-nitroanilines. Modifications to the C-6 and C-8 positions led to the identification of compounds with increased inhibition of TNF-alpha release from LPS-stimulated rat and human blood, and these analogues were also highly selective for Tpl2 kinase over EGFR kinase. Further structure-activity based modifications led to the identification of 8-bromo-4-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenylamino)-6-[(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-4-yl)methylamino]quinoline-3-carbonitrile, which demonstrated in vitro as well as in vivo efficacy in inhibition of LPS-induced TNF-alpha production. PMID:17715908

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-22

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner. PMID:26631731

  11. Activation of coagulation after administration of tumor necrosis factor to normal subjects.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Büller, H R; ten Cate, H; Wortel, C H; Bauer, K A; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; Sauerwein, H P; Rosenberg, R D; ten Cate, J W

    1990-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor has been implicated in the activation of blood coagulation in septicemia, a condition commonly associated with intravascular coagulation and disturbances of hemostasis. To evaluate the early dynamics and the route of the in vivo coagulative response to tumor necrosis factor, we performed a controlled study in six healthy men, monitoring the activation of the common and intrinsic pathways of coagulation with highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, administered as an intravenous bolus injection (50 micrograms per square meter of body-surface area), induced an early and short-lived rise in circulating levels of the activation peptide of factor X, reaching maximal values after 30 to 45 minutes (mean +/- SEM increase after 45 minutes, 34.2 +/- 18.2 percent; tumor necrosis factor vs. saline, P = 0.015). This was followed by a gradual and prolonged increase in the plasma concentration of the prothrombin fragment F1+2, peaking after four to five hours (mean increase after five hours, 348.0 +/- 144.8 percent; tumor necrosis factor vs. saline, P less than 0.0001). These findings signify the formation of factor Xa (activated factor X) and the activation of prothrombin. Activation of the intrinsic pathway could not be detected by a series of measurements of the plasma levels of factor XII, prekallikrein, factor XIIa-C1 inhibitor complexes, kallikrein-C1 inhibitor complexes, and the activation peptide of factor IX. The delay between the maximal activation of factor X and that of prothrombin amounted to several hours, indicating that neutralization of factor Xa activity was slow. We conclude that a single injection of tumor necrosis factor elicits a rapid and sustained activation of the common pathway of coagulation, probably induced through the extrinsic route. Our results suggest that tumor necrosis factor could play an important part in the early activation of the hemostatic mechanism in septicemia.

  12. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  13. Induction maintenance with tumour necrosis factor-inhibitor combination therapy with discontinuation versus methotrexate monotherapy in early rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy in randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Emamikia, Sharzad; Arkema, Elizabeth V; Györi, Noémi; Detert, Jacqueline; Chatzidionysiou, Katerina; Dougados, Maxime; Burmester, Gerd Rüdiger; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an induction-maintenance strategy of combined therapy (methotrexate (MTX)+tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor (TNFi)) followed by withdrawal of TNFi could yield better long-term results than a strategy with MTX monotherapy, since it is unclear if the benefits from an induction phase with combined therapy are sustained if TNFi is withdrawn. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of trials using the initial combination of MTX+TNFi in conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naïve patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic literature search was performed for induction-maintenance randomised controlled trials (RCTs) where initial combination therapy was compared with MTX monotherapy in patients with clinically active early RA. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved low disease activity (LDA; Disease Activity Score (DAS)28<3.2) and/or remission (DAS28<2.6) at 12–76 weeks of follow-up. A random-effects model was used to pool the risk ratio (RR) for LDA and remission and heterogeneity was explored by subgroup analyses. Results We identified 6 published RCTs, 4 of them where MTX+adalimumab was given as initial therapy and where adalimumab was withdrawn in a subset of patients after LDA/remission had been achieved. 2 additional trials used MTX+infliximab as combination therapy. The pooled RRs for achieving LDA and clinical remission at follow-up after withdrawal of TNFi were 1.41 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.89) and 1.34 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.89), respectively. There was significant heterogeneity between trials due to different treatment strategies, which was a limitation to this study. Conclusions Initial therapy with MTX+TNFi is associated with a higher chance of retaining LDA and/or remission even after discontinuation of TNFi. PMID:27651929

  14. Induction maintenance with tumour necrosis factor-inhibitor combination therapy with discontinuation versus methotrexate monotherapy in early rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of efficacy in randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Emamikia, Sharzad; Arkema, Elizabeth V; Györi, Noémi; Detert, Jacqueline; Chatzidionysiou, Katerina; Dougados, Maxime; Burmester, Gerd Rüdiger; van Vollenhoven, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an induction-maintenance strategy of combined therapy (methotrexate (MTX)+tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor (TNFi)) followed by withdrawal of TNFi could yield better long-term results than a strategy with MTX monotherapy, since it is unclear if the benefits from an induction phase with combined therapy are sustained if TNFi is withdrawn. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of trials using the initial combination of MTX+TNFi in conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naïve patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic literature search was performed for induction-maintenance randomised controlled trials (RCTs) where initial combination therapy was compared with MTX monotherapy in patients with clinically active early RA. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients who achieved low disease activity (LDA; Disease Activity Score (DAS)28<3.2) and/or remission (DAS28<2.6) at 12–76 weeks of follow-up. A random-effects model was used to pool the risk ratio (RR) for LDA and remission and heterogeneity was explored by subgroup analyses. Results We identified 6 published RCTs, 4 of them where MTX+adalimumab was given as initial therapy and where adalimumab was withdrawn in a subset of patients after LDA/remission had been achieved. 2 additional trials used MTX+infliximab as combination therapy. The pooled RRs for achieving LDA and clinical remission at follow-up after withdrawal of TNFi were 1.41 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.89) and 1.34 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.89), respectively. There was significant heterogeneity between trials due to different treatment strategies, which was a limitation to this study. Conclusions Initial therapy with MTX+TNFi is associated with a higher chance of retaining LDA and/or remission even after discontinuation of TNFi.

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Signaling, but Not TWEAK (TNF-like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis)-triggered cIAP1 (Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein 1) Degradation, Requires cIAP1 RING Dimerization and E2 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Feltham, Rebecca; Moulin, Maryline; Vince, James E.; Mace, Peter D.; Wong, Wendy Wei-Lynn; Anderton, Holly; Day, Catherine L.; Vaux, David L.; Silke, John

    2010-01-01

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) proteins, cIAP1 and cIAP2, are important regulators of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily (SF) signaling and are amplified in a number of tumor types. They are targeted by IAP antagonist compounds that are undergoing clinical trials. IAP antagonist compounds trigger cIAP autoubiquitylation and degradation. The TNFSF member TWEAK induces lysosomal degradation of TRAF2 and cIAPs, leading to elevated NIK levels and activation of non-canonical NF-κB. To investigate the role of the ubiquitin ligase RING domain of cIAP1 in these pathways, we used cIAP-deleted cells reconstituted with cIAP1 point mutants designed to interfere with the ability of the RING to dimerize or to interact with E2 enzymes. We show that RING dimerization and E2 binding are required for IAP antagonists to induce cIAP1 degradation and protect cells from TNF-induced cell death. The RING functions of cIAP1 are required for full TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, however, delayed activation of NF-κB still occurs in cIAP1 and -2 double knock-out cells. The RING functions of cIAP1 are also required to prevent constitutive activation of non-canonical NF-κB by targeting NIK for proteasomal degradation. However, in cIAP double knock-out cells TWEAK was still able to increase NIK levels demonstrating that NIK can be regulated by cIAP-independent pathways. Finally we show that, unlike IAP antagonists, TWEAK was able to induce degradation of cIAP1 RING mutants. These results emphasize the critical importance of the RING of cIAP1 in many signaling scenarios, but also demonstrate that in some pathways RING functions are not required. PMID:20356846

  16. Golimumab in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis who have previous experience with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors: results of a long-term extension of the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled GO-AFTER study through week 160

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Kay, Jonathan; Landewé, Robert B M; Matteson, Eric L; Gaylis, Norman; Wollenhaupt, Jurgen; Murphy, Frederick T; Zhou, Yiying; Hsia, Elizabeth C; Doyle, Mittie K

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess long-term golimumab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who discontinued previous tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitor(s) for any reason. Methods Results through week 24 of this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of active RA (≥4 tender, ≥4 swollen joints) were previously reported. Patients received placebo (Group 1), 50 mg golimumab (Group 2) or 100 mg golimumab (Group 3) subcutaneous injections every 4 weeks. Patients from Groups 1 and 2 with <20% improvement in tender/swollen joints at week 16 early escaped to golimumab 50 mg and 100 mg, respectively. At week 24, Group 1 patients crossed over to golimumab 50 mg, Group 2 continued golimumab 50/100 mg per escape status and Group 3 maintained dosing. Data through week 160 are reported. Results 459 of the 461 randomised patients were treated; 236/459 (51%) continued treatment through week 160. From week 24 to week 100, ACR20 (≥20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology criteria) response and ≥0.25 unit HAQ (Health Assessment Questionnaire) improvement were sustained in 70–73% and 75–81% of responding patients, respectively. Overall at week 160, 63%, 67% and 57% of patients achieved ACR20 response and 59%, 65% and 64% had HAQ improvement ≥0.25 unit in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Adjusted for follow-up duration, adverse event incidences (95% CI) per 100 patient-years among patients treated with golimumab 50 mg and 100 mg were 4.70 (2.63 to 7.75) and 8.07 (6.02 to 10.58) for serious infection, 0.95 (0.20 to 2.77) and 2.04 (1.09 to 3.49) for malignancy and 0.00 (0.00 to 0.94) and 0.62 (0.17 to 1.59) for death, respectively. Conclusion In patients with active RA who discontinued previous TNF-antagonist treatment, golimumab 50 and 100 mg injections every 4 weeks yielded sustained improvements in signs/symptoms and physical function in ∼57–67% of patients who continued treatment. Golimumab

  17. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  18. Tumour necrosis factors in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    2001-03-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) and TNF beta levels in serum were measured by enzyme immunoassays in 64 Libyan children (age: 1-12 years, sex: 39 males, 25 females) with mild to moderately severe asthma (Group A). Among these patients, 35 had active disease (AA) and 29 had inactive disease (NA). According to age range, 20, 21 and 23 patients were between 1-3 years (A1), > 3-5 years (A2) and > 5-12 years (A3) respectively. A1 had 9 and 11 patients with active (AA1) and inactive (NA1) disease; A2 had 10 and 11 patients with active (AA2) and inactive (NA2) disease; A3 had 16 and 7 patients with active (AA3) and inactive (NA3) disease respectively. Age-matched comparisons was made with 57 healthy children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females) (Group B). Among the controls, 15, 19 and 23 children were between 1-3 years (B1), > 3-5 years (B2) and > 5-12 years (B3) respectively. It was observed that serum mean TNF alpha level was significantly higher in patients, while TNF beta levels was normal (A vs B-TNF alpha P < 0.001, TNF beta: P > 0.1). The TNF alpha level was elevated significantly in active disease, while it was normal in inactive disease (AA, NA, B: P = 0.0001; AA vs NA; P < 0.0001; NA vs B: P > 0.05) and TNF beta levels were normal in both groups (AA, NA, B: P = 0.25). Further, TNF alpha levels were significantly higher in all age ranges but in patients with active disease only (AA1, NA1, B: P = 0.0008; AA2, NA2, B: P = 0.0003; AA3, NA3, B: P = 0.0396). TNF alpha may therefore be involved in the pathophysiology of asthma possibly through various proinflammatory mechanisms.

  19. Modulation of topoisomerase activities by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Z; Cohen, S; Fresa, K; Coffman, F D

    1995-01-01

    A number of chemotherapeutic agents which inhibit the DNA topoisomerases markedly potentiate cell death mediated by tumor necrosis factor, suggesting a role for these enzymes in the TNF cytotoxic mechanism. To investigate this possibility, topoisomerase I and II activities were assayed following TNF addition to murine L929 cells. Topoisomerase I and II activities increased within 15 min of TNF addition and returned to baseline levels within 1 and 2 hr, respectively. The increases in both topoisomerase activities were blocked by H-7 (but not H-8) and similar increases were seen following PMA addition. However, concentrations of H-7 which blocked the increased topoisomerase activities had no effect on TNF cytotoxicity nor on the enhancement of TNF cytotoxicity by topoisomerase inhibitors. Thus, in these cells topoisomerase activities are directly modified by TNF during the initial phases of a cytotoxic response. However, neither TNF cytotoxicity nor the enhancement of TNF cytotoxicity by topoisomerase inhibitors appears to require the TNF-mediated increases in topoisomerase activities. PMID:7842491

  20. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  1. Fibrinolytic response to tumor necrosis factor in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Levi, M; Büller, H R; van Deventer, S J; de Boer, J P; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W

    1991-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be involved in the disturbance of the procoagulant-fibrinolytic balance in septicemia, leading to microvascular thrombosis. To assess the dynamics of the fibrinolytic response to TNF in humans, we performed a crossover saline-controlled study in six healthy men, investigating the effects of a bolus intravenous injection of recombinant human TNF (50 micrograms/m2) on the stimulation and inhibition of plasminogen activation as well as on plasmin activity and inhibition. TNF induced a brief fourfold increase in the overall plasma plasminogen activator (PA) activity peaking after 1 h (p less than 0.0001), which was associated with rises in the antigenic levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (p less than 0.0001) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (p less than 0.0001). Plasminogen activator inhibitor type I antigen remained unchanged in the first hour, but showed a rapid eightfold increase thereafter (p less than 0.0001), which coincided with the decrease in PA activity. Generation of plasmin activity in the first hour was signified by an 11-fold rise in D-dimer levels (p less than 0.0001); inhibition of plasmin was reflected by a 36-fold rise in plasmin-alpha 2 antiplasmin complexes (p less than 0.0001), as well as by a transient 16% decrease in alpha 2-antiplasmin activity (p less than 0.01). In conclusion, TNF induced an early activation of the fibrinolytic system becoming maximal in 1 h, with a rapid inhibition thereafter. Earlier observations in the same subjects showed sustained coagulation activation for 6-12 h. The observed disbalance between the procoagulant and fibrinolytic mechanisms after TNF injection confirms the in vivo relevance of the effects of TNF on vascular endothelium in vitro and may explain the tendency towards microvascular thrombosis in septicemia.

  2. A GSK-3β Inhibitor Protects Against Radiation Necrosis in Mouse Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Thotala, Dinesh; Engelbach, John A.; Yuan, Liya; Cates, Jeremy; Gao, Feng; Drzymala, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To quantify the effectiveness of SB415286, a specific inhibitor of GSK-3β, as a neuroprotectant against radiation-induced central nervous system (brain) necrosis in a mouse model. Methods and Materials: Cohorts of mice were treated with SB415286 or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) prior to irradiation with a single 45-Gy fraction targeted to the left hemisphere (brain) using a gamma knife machine. The onset and progression of radiation necrosis (RN) were monitored longitudinally by noninvasive in vivo small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) beginning 13 weeks postirradiation. MRI-derived necrotic volumes for SB415286- and DMSO-treated mice were compared. MRI results were supported by correlative histology. Results: Mice treated with SB415286 showed significant protection from radiation-induced necrosis, as determined by in vivo MRI with histologic validation. MRI-derived necrotic volumes were significantly smaller at all postirradiation time points in SB415286-treated animals. Although the irradiated hemispheres of the DMSO-treated mice demonstrated many of the classic histologic features of RN, including fibrinoid vascular necrosis, vascular telangiectasia, hemorrhage, and tissue loss, the irradiated hemispheres of the SB415286-treated mice consistently showed only minimal tissue damage. These studies confirmed that treatment with a GSK-3β inhibitor dramatically reduced delayed time-to-onset necrosis in irradiated brain. Conclusions: The unilateral cerebral hemispheric stereotactic radiation surgery mouse model in concert with longitudinal MRI monitoring provided a powerful platform for studying the onset and progression of RN and for developing and testing new neuroprotectants. Effectiveness of SB415286 as a neuroprotectant against necrosis motivates potential clinical trials of it or other GSK-3β inhibitors.

  3. Genetic ablation of soluble tumor necrosis factor with preservation of membrane tumor necrosis factor is associated with neuroprotection after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Pernille M; Clausen, Bettina H; Degn, Matilda; Thyssen, Stine; Kristensen, Lotte K; Svensson, Martina; Ditzel, Nicholas; Finsen, Bente; Deierborg, Tomas; Brambilla, Roberta; Lambertsen, Kate L

    2016-09-01

    Microglia respond to focal cerebral ischemia by increasing their production of the neuromodulatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor, which exists both as membrane-anchored tumor necrosis factor and as cleaved soluble tumor necrosis factor forms. We previously demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor knockout mice display increased lesion volume after focal cerebral ischemia, suggesting that tumor necrosis factor is neuroprotective in experimental stroke. Here, we extend our studies to show that mice with intact membrane-anchored tumor necrosis factor, but no soluble tumor necrosis factor, display reduced infarct volumes at one and five days after stroke. This was associated with improved functional outcome after experimental stroke. No changes were found in the mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor and tumor necrosis factor-related genes (TNFR1, TNFR2, TACE), pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) or chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL10, CCL2); however, protein expression of TNF, IL-1β, IL-6 and CXCL1 was reduced in membrane-anchored tumor necrosis factor(Δ/Δ) compared to membrane-anchored tumor necrosis factor(wt/wt) mice one day after experimental stroke. This was paralleled by reduced MHCII expression and a reduction in macrophage infiltration in the ipsilateral cortex of membrane-anchored tumor necrosis factor(Δ/Δ) mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that membrane-anchored tumor necrosis factor mediates the protective effects of tumor necrosis factor signaling in experimental stroke, and therapeutic strategies specifically targeting soluble tumor necrosis factor could be beneficial in clinical stroke therapy. PMID:26661199

  4. Update on intravitreal anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapies for ocular disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine associated with a variety of ocular diseases. The currently available TNF-? inhibitors are etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab. Experimental and clinical studies on the intravitreal use of these agents have been reported with etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab: etanercept has shown limited efficacy in scarce reports; infliximab has been associated with local safety concerns but appears to benefit certain cases; adalimumab has shown no efficacy in cases of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or diabetic macular edema (DME), but the combination with bevacizumab may be effective in refractory cases of macular diseases. Further preclinical and clinical studies are warranted in order to be able to obtain a more robust conclusion on the use of intravitreal TNF-? inhibitors. PMID:25825604

  5. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  6. Enhancement of glioblastoma radioresponse by a selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib: Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Khong Bee . E-mail: dmskkb@nccs.com.sg; Wang, Ting Ting; Woon, Chow Thai; Cheah, Elizabeth S.; Moore, Xiao Lei; Zhu Congju; Wong, Meng Cheong

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Toward improved glioblastoma multiforme treatment, we determined whether celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, could enhance glioblastoma radiosensitivity by inducing tumor necrosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. Methods and Materials: U-87MG cells treated with celecoxib, irradiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival and angiogenic factor protein analysis (angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). In vivo, survival of mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells and treated with celecoxib and/or irradiation was monitored. Isolated tumors were assessed for tumor necrosis and tumor microvascular density by von Williebrand's factor (vWF) immunohistochemical staining. Results: Celecoxib (4 and 30 {mu}M; 24, 48, and 72 h) enhanced U-87MG cell radiosensitivity by significantly reducing clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. Angiopoietin-1 and VEGF proteins were decreased, whereas angiopoietin-2 expression increased after 72 h of celecoxib alone and when combined with irradiation. In vivo, median survival of control mice intracranially implanted with U-87MG cells was 18 days. Celecoxib (100 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) significantly extended median survival of irradiated mice (24 Gy total) from 34 to 41 days, with extensive tumor necrosis [24.5 {+-} 8.6% of tumor region, compared with irradiation alone (2.7 {+-} 1.8%)]. Tumor microvascular density was significantly reduced in combined celecoxib and irradiated tumors (52.5 {+-} 2.9 microvessels per mm{sup 2} tumor region), compared with irradiated tumors alone (65.4 {+-} 4.0 microvessels per mm{sup 2}). Conclusion: Celecoxib significantly enhanced glioblastoma radiosensitivity, reduced clonogenic survival, and prolonged survival of glioblastoma-implanted mice by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis with extensive tumor necr0010os.

  7. Molecular biology and immunology for clinicians 23: autoimmunity and the superfamilies of tumor necrosis factor and tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Leonard H

    2003-04-01

    The parsimony of nature can be stated as "if its not broke don't fix it, just tweak it and reuse it again and again." Nature recycles: once a motif is demonstrably useful it shows up again, often in unexpected places. Tumor necrosis factor and its receptor(s) are examples of this. At least 20 molecules have now been identified as being 25% homologous or more identical with tumor necrosis factor and being involved in a variety of immune and nonimmune functions. Members of the receptor superfamily have shared structural motifs and trigger shared intracellular signaling pathways. Rather than having been implicated in arcane and rare syndromes, some of these activities are pivotal in immune function and, when perturbed, some predispose to known immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease. Not surprisingly, some of these are becoming targets for immunomodulation. New members of these 2 superfamilies are currently being described and the newcomers and the "original stock" will show up in the clinic before you know it! Part of the confusion has always been that each laboratory describing a new biologic principle names the mediating compound. Thus, multiple labs, multiple names for the same protein (recall Ro/SS-A, La/SS-B). Thus, special attention is paid below to acronyms and their synonyms.

  8. Targeting tumor-necrosis factor receptor pathways for tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schaer, David A; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2014-01-01

    With the success of ipilimumab and promise of programmed death-1 pathway-targeted agents, the field of tumor immunotherapy is expanding rapidly. Newer targets for clinical development include select members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family. Agonist antibodies to these co-stimulatory molecules target both T and B cells, modulating T-cell activation and enhancing immune responses. In vitro and in vivo preclinical data have provided the basis for continued development of 4-1BB, OX40, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related gene, herpes virus entry mediator, and CD27 as potential therapies for patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the immune response to tumors, consider preclinical and early clinical data on select TNFR family members, discuss potential translational challenges and suggest possible combination therapies with the aim of inducing durable antitumor responses. PMID:24855562

  9. Tumor necrosis factor alpha polymorphism in heart failure/cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Lou; Iyengar, Srinivas

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is produced by activated macrophages. It has been shown to stimulate the release of endothelial cytokines and NO, increase vascular permeability, decrease contractility, and induce a prothrombotic state. The most studied TNF-a gene mutation in heart disease is a gamma to alpha substitution, which occurs when 308 nucleotides move upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF promoter and has been associated with elevated levels of TNF-alpha. The TNF1 allele (wild type) contains gamma at this site, while the TNF2 allele has an alpha substitution at the site. The TNF2 allele is a more powerful transcriptional activator, therefore leading to higher TNF-alpha levels. Most of the studies to date have failed to conclusively show any link between the polymorphism and heart disease, both coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy/heart failure. PMID:15591843

  10. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor-ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor-ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity.

  11. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha induces translocation of protein kinase C in tumour necrosis factor-sensitive cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Fuchimoto, S; Orita, K

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was associated with the activation of protein kinase C (PKC), using PANC-1 cells (TNF-alpha sensitive) and LoVo cells (TNF-alpha resistant). In combination with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of PKC, TNF-alpha caused marked inhibition of the growth of LoVo cells. Inhibition of PANC-1 cell growth by TNF-alpha was blocked by pretreatment with TPA for 24 hr, along with down-regulation of PKC activity. Intracellular translocation of PKC from cytosol to membrane was induced by TNF-alpha treatment in PANC-1 cells but not in LoVo cells. PMID:1916896

  12. Leonurus sibiricus induces nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Se-Eun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyung; Choi, In-Young; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Il Kwang; Lee, Ju-Young; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Using mouse peritoneal macrophages, we have examined the mechanism by which Leonurus sibiricus (LS) regulates nitric oxide (NO) production. When LS was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production; however, LS by itself had no effect on NO production. The increased production of NO from rIFN-gamma plus LS-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB. Furthermore, treatment of peritoneal macrophages with rIFN-gamma plus LS caused a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. PDTC also decreased the effect of LS on TNF-alpha production significantly. Because NO and TNF-alpha play an important role in immune function and host defense, LS treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms as a result of stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  13. Full-length membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-α acts through tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 to modify phenotype of sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zetang; Wang, Shiyong; Gruber, Sandy; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J

    2013-09-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from spinal hemisection or selective spinal nerve ligation is characterized by an increase in membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor-alpha (mTNFα) in spinal microglia without detectable release of soluble TNFα (sTNFα). In tissue culture, we showed that a full-length transmembrane cleavage-resistant TNFα (CRTNFα) construct can act through cell-cell contact to activate neighboring microglia. We undertook the current study to test the hypothesis that mTNFα expressed in microglia might also affect the phenotype of primary sensory afferents, by determining the effect of CRTNFα expressed from COS-7 cells on gene expression in primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Co-culture of DRG neurons with CRTNFα-expressing COS-7 cells resulted in a significant increase in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.8, and voltage-gated calcium channel subunit CaV3.2 at both mRNA and protein levels, and enhanced CCL2 expression and release from the DRG neurons. Exposure to sTNFα produced an increase only in CCL2 expression and release. Treatment of the cells with an siRNA against tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) significantly reduced CRTNFα-induced gene expression changes in DRG neurons, whereas administration of CCR2 inhibitor had no significant effect on CRTNFα-induced increase in gene expression and CCL2 release in DRG neurons. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that mTNFα expressed in spinal microglia can facilitate pain signaling by up-regulating the expression of cation channels and CCL2 in DRG neurons in a TNFR2-dependent manner. PMID:23711481

  14. Membrane Tumor Necrosis Factor Confers Partial Protection to Listeria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torres, David; Janot, Laure; Quesniaux, Valerie F.J.; Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Maillet, Isabelle; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Erard, Francois

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a critical role in the host response to the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LM). TNF exists in soluble and membrane-bound forms and exhibits both unique and overlapping activities. We examined the role of membrane TNF in the absence of secreted TNF for host resistance in knockin mice in which the endogenous TNF was replaced by a regulated, noncleavable allele (mem-TNF). Macrophages expressing mem-TNF produced nitric oxide and displayed normal bactericidal activity. Although mice completely deficient in TNF (TNF−/−) succumbed to LM infection within 4 days, mem-TNF mice controlled LM infection at a low dose (104 CFU) but succumbed at a higher dose of infection (105 CFU). In contrast to complete TNF deficiency, mem-TNF mice developed confined microabscesses that expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase. The transfer of lymphocytes from immunized mem-TNF, but not TNF−/−, mice protected TNF−/− mice from fatal infection. Taken together the data suggest that in the absence of soluble TNF, the presence of membrane-expressed TNF on phagocytes and lymphocytes partially restores host defense to LM infection. PMID:16314479

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Innate Immunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor–ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator [HVEM], a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes), lymphotoxin-β receptor (LT-βR), and HVEM are used by embryonic and adult innate lymphocytes to promote the development and homeostasis of lymphoid organs. Lymphotoxin-expressing innate-acting B cells construct microenvironments in lymphoid organs that restrict pathogen spread and initiate interferon defenses. Recent results illustrate how the communication networks formed among these cytokines and the coreceptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 both inhibit and activate innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), innate γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Understanding the role of TNFSF/TNFRSF and interacting proteins in innate cells will likely reveal avenues for future therapeutics for human disease. PMID:25524549

  16. Tumour necrosis factor induction by malaria exoantigens depends upon phospholipid.

    PubMed Central

    Bate, C A; Taverne, J; Román, E; Moreno, C; Playfair, J H

    1992-01-01

    In patients with malaria, the clinical manifestations of the disease are associated with the presence of high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in the serum. Blood-stage parasites of human and rodent malarial parasites release serologically related exoantigens which induce the production of TNF in vitro and in vivo and which can kill mice made hypersensitive to TNF by pretreatment with D-galactosamine. They also elicit the production of T-independent antibody, which blocks these effects. The capacity of the exoantigens to stimulate macrophages to secrete TNF does not require the presence of protein or carbohydrate, but is associated with a lipid whose activity can be abolished by treatment with phospholipase C. Treatments of the exoantigens which destroyed their activity in vitro also abrogated their immunogenicity and their toxicity for mice. No TNF-inducing activity could be detected in preparations of parasitized erythrocytes that was not associated with phospholipid, and the TNF-inducing properties of the malarial phospholipids are quite distinct from those of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that release of potentially toxic phospholipids by parasites may be responsible for some of the pathology of malaria. PMID:1537589

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  18. Targeted Cancer Therapy with Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Kerner, Zachary J.; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a member of the TNF superfamily, was the first cytokine to be evaluated for cancer biotherapy. However, the clinical use of TNF-α is severely limited by its toxicity. Currently, TNF-α is administered only through locoregional drug delivery systems such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated hepatic perfusion. To reduce the systemic toxicity of TNF-α, various strategies have been explored over the last several decades. This review summarizes current state-of-the-art targeted cancer therapy using TNF-α. Passive targeting, cell-based therapy, gene therapy with inducible or tissue-specific promoters, targeted polymer-DNA complexes, tumor pre-targeting, antibody-TNF-α conjugate, scFv/TNF-α fusion proteins, and peptide/TNF-α fusion proteins have all been investigated to combat cancer. Many of these agents are already in advanced clinical trials. Molecular imaging, which can significantly speed up the drug development process, and nanomedicine, which can integrate both imaging and therapeutic components, has the potential to revolutionize future cancer patient management. Cooperative efforts from scientists within multiple disciplines, as well as close partnerships among many organizations/entities, are needed to quickly translate novel TNF-α-based therapeutics into clinical investigation. PMID:24115841

  19. Haplotypes of tumor necrosis factor gene and tracheal aspirate fluid levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kazzi, S Nadya J; Tromp, Gerard; Quasney, Michael W; Buhimschi, Irina A

    2008-08-01

    Individual variability in the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) has been attributed to genetic factors. We examined whether alleles of TNF gene (lymphotoxin-alpha+250, TNF-alpha-308, and TNF-alpha-238) affect tracheal aspirate fluid (TAF) levels of TNF-alpha among preterm infants at risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. TAF samples were collected within 48 h of birth and 7, 14, 21, and 28 d later. Haplotypes [designated using the nucleotide bases in the chromosome order (lymphotoxin-alpha+250, TNF-alpha-308, TNF-alpha-238)] of TNF were correlated with levels of TNF-alpha. Diplotypes of TNF (genotypes of haplotypes) classified as high, intermediate, or low based on their relation to TAF TNF-alpha levels were also correlated with TNF-alpha levels. The most frequent (and reference haplotype) was AGG. The GGG haplotype was associated with the lowest TAF TNF-alpha levels on day 7 among African American infants (p < 0.008). Sequential changes in levels of TNF-alpha correlated with infants' diplotype status [high (HH), intermediate (HL), low (LL)]. Fetal chorioamnionitis but not bronchopulmonary dysplasia was associated with infants' diplotypes (p < 0.005). Haplotypes of the TNF gene influence TAF levels of TNF-alpha. Diplotypes of TNF are associated with fetal chorioamnionitis.

  20. Role of Agents other than Tumor Necrosis Factor Blockers in the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by possible peripheral and axial joint involvement, enthesitis, dactylitis, and skin and nail disease. It affects up to one-third of psoriatic patients, and may be associated with comorbidities such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The usually prescribed initial treatment of moderate-severe PsA is methotrexate, which may be accompanied or replaced by a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor such as etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab. However, some patients may become unresponsive (or have contraindications) to available anti-TNF agents and require alternative treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential role of some new immunomodulatory agents.

  1. BRAF inhibitor and stereotactic radiosurgery is associated with an increased risk of radiation necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kirtesh R.; Chowdhary, Mudit; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Lawson, David H.; Cassidy, Richard J.; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcomes and toxicities of melanoma brain metastases (MBM) patients treated with BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with SRS alone. We identified 87 patients with 157 MBM treated with SRS alone from 2005 to 2013. Of these, 15 (17.2%) patients with 32 MBM (21.4%) received BRAFi therapy: three (20.0%) before SRS, two (13.3%) concurrent, and 10 (66.7%) after SRS. Overall survival (OS) was compared between cohorts using the product limit method. Intracranial outcomes were compared using cumulative incidence with competing risk for death. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between groups, except for the SRS cohort, which had higher rates of chemotherapy and more recent year of diagnosis. Radiation characteristics, including dose per fraction, total dose, gross tumor volume size, and prescription isodose, were also similar between cohorts. One-year outcomes – OS (64.3 vs. 40.4%, P =0.205), local failure (3.3 vs. 9.6%, P =0.423), and distant intracranial failure (63.9 vs. 65.1%, P =0.450) were not statistically different between the SRS + BRAFi and SRS-alone groups, respectively. The SRS + BRAFi group showed higher rates of radiographic radiation necrosis (RN) (22.2 vs. 11.0% at 1 year, P <0.001) and symptomatic radiation necrosis (SRN) (28.2 vs. 11.1% at 1 year, P <0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that BRAFi predicted an increased risk of both radiographic and SRN. SRS and BRAFi predicted for an increased risk of radiographic and SRN compared with SRS alone. Approaches to mitigate RN for patients receiving SRS and BRAFi should be considered until the clinical trial (http//:www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01721603) evaluating this treatment regimen is completed. PMID:27223498

  2. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  3. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  4. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  5. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Exogenous tumour necrosis factor α induces suppression of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Our previous studies showed that arthritic Lewis (LEW) rats produced the highest levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α in the recovery phase of adjuvant arthritis (AA), suggesting a correlation between high TNFα levels and reduced severity of arthritis. To further explore this correlation, we compared the TNFα secretion profile of the AA-resistant Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats with that of LEW rats, determined the effect of exogenous TNFα on the course of AA in LEW rats, and examined various mechanisms involved in TNFα-induced disease modulation. Methods A cohort each of LEW and WKY rats was immunised subcutaneously with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb). At different time points thereafter, subgroups of rats were killed and their draining lymph node cells were tested for cytokine production. Another group of LEW rats was injected with TNFα intraperitoneally daily for a total of 10 injections, 3 before and 6 after Mtb challenge, and then observed for signs of AA. In parallel, TNFα-treated rats were examined for changes in other cytokines, in CD4+CD25+ T cell frequency, and in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) mRNA expression levels. Results LEW rats displayed a TNFα secretion profile that was opposite to that of the WKY rats. Furthermore, TNFα treatment significantly downmodulated the severity of AA in LEW rats, and decreased the interferon (IFN)-γ secretion in response to the pathogenic determinant of the disease-related antigen. No significant alterations were observed in other parameters tested. Conclusion The role of endogenous TNFα in the induction and propagation of arthritis is well established. However, exogenous TNFα can downmodulate the course of AA, displaying an immunoregulatory functional attribute of this cytokine. PMID:18380898

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-inducing activities of Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Migliardo, M; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Corradini, C; Teti, G

    1996-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production may lead to increased human immunodeficiency virus replication in patients with AIDS. In order to identify cryptococcal components that are predominantly responsible for stimulating TNF production, various concentrations of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), galactoxylomannan (GalXM), mannoproteins (MP), and alpha(1-3) [corrected] glucan were added to whole-blood cultures. All of the cryptococcal components tested, as well as whole heat-killed cryptococci, were capable of inducing TNF-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner. MP were significantly more potent than any of the other cryptococcal components tested or heat-killed cryptococci in stimulating TNF-alpha production (P < 0.05). GXM, in contrast, was significantly less potent in this activity than either GalXM or MP (P < 0.05). As little as 0.5 microg of MP per ml was sufficient to produce moderate but significant elevations of TNF-alpha release. Maximal MP-induced TNF-alpha levels were similar to those induced by Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide, our positive control. Further experiments using isolated leukocytes suggested that monocytes were the cell population mainly responsible for TNF-alpha production, although the participation of other cell types could not be excluded. The presence of complement-sufficient plasma was a necessary requirement for TNF-alpha induction by GXM, GalXM, and low doses of MP. High MP concentrations (100 microg/ml) were also capable of stimulating TNF-alpha production in the absence of plasma. These data indicate that soluble products released by C. neoformans are capable of inducing TNF-alpha secretion in human leukocytes. This may be clinically relevant, since high concentrations of such products are frequently found in the body fluids of AIDS patients infected with C. neoformans. PMID:8945566

  8. A threshold hazard model for estimating serious infection risk following anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bo; Lunt, Mark; Galloway, James; Dixon, Will; Hyrich, Kimme; Symmons, Deborah

    2013-03-11

    Over recent years novel biologic agents have been developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The most common type of biologic agent in use in the United Kingdom is the anti-tumor necrosis factor inhibitor class. To fully appreciate the potential risks of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients, knowledge about the baseline hazard (risk pattern) and the characteristics of patients associated with serious infection is important. We propose a nonproportional hazard model for estimating the infection risk, by including the drug exposure history information into the baseline hazard. We found that the infection risk reaches a peak within 1 month after drug exposure starts and then declines steadily for nearly 2 years before stabilizing out.

  9. Myocardial steatosis and necrosis in atria and ventricles of rats given pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw Bowen; Reens, Jaimini; Johnson, Elizabeth; Brocklehurst, Simon; Slater, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical therapies for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) include plasma glucose lowering by enhancing glucose utilization. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is important in controlling the balance between glucose and fatty acid substrate oxidation. Administration of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors (PDHKIs) to rats effectively lowers plasma glucose but results in myocardial steatosis that in some instances is associated primarily with atrial and to a lesser degree with ventricular pathology. Induction of myocardial steatosis is not dose-dependent, varies from minimal to moderate severity, and is either of multifocal or diffuse distribution. Ventricular histopathology was restricted to few myocardial degenerative fibers, while that in the atrium/atria was of either acute or chronic appearance with the former showing myocardial degeneration/necrosis, acute myocarditis, edema, endothelial activation (rounding up), endocarditis, and thrombosis associated with moderate myocardial steatosis and the latter with myocardial loss, replacement fibrosis, and no apparent or minimal association with steatosis. The evidence from these evaluations indicate that excessive intramyocardial accumulation of lipid may be either primarily adverse or represents an indicator of other adversely affected cellular processes.

  10. Characterization of tumor necrosis factor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Marino, M W; Dunn, A; Grail, D; Inglese, M; Noguchi, Y; Richards, E; Jungbluth, A; Wada, H; Moore, M; Williamson, B; Basu, S; Old, L J

    1997-07-22

    Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF) initially came to prominence because of its anti-tumor activity, most attention is now focused on its proinflammatory actions. TNF appears to play a critical role in both early and late events involved in inflammation, from localizing the noxious agent and amplifying the cellular and mediator responses at the local site and systemically, to editing (e.g., apoptosis) injured cells or effete immune cells and repairing inflammatory damage. We have generated mice deficient in TNF (TNF-/- mice) and have begun to examine the multiple functions attributed to TNF. TNF-/- mice develop normally and have no gross structural or morphological abnormalities. As predicted, they are highly susceptible to challenge with an infectious agent (Candida albicans), are resistant to the lethality of minute doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following D-galactosamine treatment, have a deficiency in granuloma development, and do not form germinal centers after immunization. Phagocytic activity of macrophages appears relatively normal, as do T cell functions, as measured by proliferation, cytokine release, and cytotoxicity. B cell response to thymus-independent antigens is normal, but the Ig response to thymus-dependent antigen is reduced. Surprisingly, cytokine production induced by LPS appears essentially intact, with the exception of reduced colony-stimulating factor activity. Other unexpected findings coming from our initial analysis are as follows. (i) TNF has low toxicity in TNF-/- mice. (ii) TNF-/- mice show an anomalous late response to heat-killed Corynebacterium parvum. In contrast to the prompt response (granuloma formation, hepatosplenomegaly) and subsequent resolution phase in C. parvum-injected TNF+/+ mice, similarly treated TNF-/- mice show little or no initial response, but then develop a vigorous, disorganized inflammatory response leading to death. These results suggest that TNF has an essential homeostatic role in limiting the extent and

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and ceramides in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Brindley, D N; Wang, C N; Mei, J; Xu, J; Hanna, A N

    1999-01-01

    The present studies tested the hypothesis that some effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are mediated by activation of sphingomyelinases and the production of ceramides. Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated with short-chain ceramide analogs, (C2- and C6-ceramides: N-acetyl- and N-hexanoyl-sphingosines, respectively), and this treatment increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in the absence of insulin progressively from 2-24 h. This effect was inhibited by blocking the activations of mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), and ribosomal S6 kinase which mediated an increase in GLUT1 concentrations. Long-term increases in PI 3-kinase activity associated with insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) increased the proportion of GLUT1 and GLUT4 in plasma membranes. These events explain the increases in noninsulin-dependent glucose uptake and incorporation of this glucose into the fatty acid and glycerol moieties of triacylglycerol. The mechanisms by which TNF-alpha and ceramides increase PI 3-kinase activity were investigated further by using rat2 fibroblasts. Incubation for 20 min with TNF-alpha, bacterial sphingomyelinase, or C2-ceramides increased PI 3-kinase activity by about fivefold, and this effect depended upon a stimulation of tyrosine kinase activity and an increase in Ras-GTP. This demonstrates the existence of a novel signaling pathway for TNF-alpha that could contribute to the effects of this cytokine in stimulating basal glucose uptake. By contrast, treating the 3T3-L1 adipocytes for 2-24 h with C2-ceramide diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by decreasing the insulin-induced translocation of GLUT1 and GLUT4 to plasma membranes. This inhibition was observed when there was no increase in basal glucose uptake, and it occurred downstream of PI 3-kinase. Our work provides further mechanisms whereby TNF-alpha and ceramides produce insulin resistance and decrease the effectiveness of insulin in

  12. Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome and Ophthalmoplegia Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus with No Skin Eruption in a Patient Treated with Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Helene; Thomsen, Sidsel Thorup; Hansen, Stine Scott; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Lindelof, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus lies dormant in the dorsal root ganglia after symptomatic chicken pox infection, usually in childhood. If the virus reactivates in the trigeminal ganglia, it can cause varicella zoster ophthalmicus, which can have severe ocular complications. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman in severe immunosuppression due to treatment with mycophenolate mofetil, glucocorticosteroids and a tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor. The reactivation caused superior orbital fissure syndrome, which has only rarely been described in relation to varicella zoster virus reactivation. In our case, the syndrome was seen along with severe encephalitis.

  13. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T.; De Caterina, Raffaele; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  14. Upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta in Q fever endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Capo, C; Zugun, F; Stein, A; Tardei, G; Lepidi, H; Raoult, D; Mege, J L

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of Q fever endocarditis likely involves some alterations in the responses of monocytes, the in vivo targets of Coxiella burnetii. To test this hypothesis, the production of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6 was assessed in monocytes from patients with Q fever endocarditis. Spontaneous transcription and secretion of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 were significantly higher in patient monocytes than in healthy controls. The interleukin-6 transcripts were also upregulated in patient cells. Moreover, in patients with recent endocarditis exhibiting high titers of immunoglobulin G directed to C. burnetii in phase I, monocytes released significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 than in patients with stabilized endocarditis. Immunoglobulin G titers and the overproduction of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 were significantly correlated. Hence, the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines might be a marker of disease activity. PMID:8613372

  15. Wnt3a regulates tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated interleukin-6 release in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kato, Kenji; Minamitani, Chiho; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kozawa, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    It is recognized that Wnt pathways regulate bone metabolism. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Wnt3a on TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in these cells. Wnt3a, which alone did not affect the IL-6 levels, significantly suppressed the TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release. Lithium Chloride (LiCl), which is an inhibitor of GSK3β, markedly reduced the TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release, similar to the results with Wnt3a. The suppression by Wnt3a or LiCl was also observed in the intracellular protein levels of IL-6 elicited by TNF-α. Wnt3a failed to affect the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, Akt, IκB or NFκB. Either Wnt3a or LiCl failed to reduce, rather increased the IL-6 mRNA expression stimulated by TNF-α. Lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, and bafilomycin A1, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, significantly restored the suppressive effect of Wnt3a on TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that Wnt3a regulates IL-6 release stimulated by TNF-α at post-transcriptional level in osteoblasts.

  16. Glioma-secreted soluble factors stimulate microglial activation: The role of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Jung, Eun-Hye; Kwon, Mi-Youn; Han, Inn-Oc

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of soluble factors secreted by glioma on microglial activation. Conditioned medium (CM) from glioma cells, CRT-MG and C6, significantly induced nitric oxide (NO) production and stimulated the mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in BV2 cells. Glioma CM stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed CM-induced NO production in BV2 cells. In addition, CM stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity, which was repressed by SB203580. Gliomas displayed higher mRNA expression and release of TNF-α and IL-1β than primary astrocyte cells. Neutralization of TNF-α and IL-1β in C6-CM using a neutralizing antibody inhibited NO/iNOS expression in BV-2 cells. These results indicate potential contribution of diffusible tumor-derived factors to regulate microglial activation and subsequent tumor microenvironment. PMID:27609291

  17. Media effects in modulating the conformational equilibrium of a model compound for tumor necrosis factor converting enzyme inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchelli, Martina; Guardiani, Carlo; Sandberg, Robert B.; Menichetti, Stefano; Procacci, Piero; Caminati, Gabriella

    2015-07-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Tumor Necrosis Factor α Converting Enzyme (TACE) are a promising therapeutic tool for Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. Here we report on an extensive chemical-physical analysis of the media effects in modulating the conformational landscape of MBET306, the common scaffold and a synthetic precursor of a family of recently discovered tartrate-based TACE inhibitors. The structural features of this molecule with potential pharmaceutical applications have been disclosed by interpreting extensive photophysical measurements in various solvents with the aid of enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations and time dependent density functional calculations. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques, the paper provides a general protocol for studying the structure in solution of molecular systems characterized by the existence of conformational metastable states.

  18. Analysis of risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Jiang, Tao; You, Zhen-Jun; Yuan, De-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Femoral head necrosis is a rare but devastating complication following femoral neck fracture. The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fracture. This retrospective study included 166 patients with femoral neck fractures treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation at the authors' institution from January 2004 to December 2008. Eight patients died for reasons unrelated to the surgery, and 12 patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 fractures) were followed until union or until conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The patients included 61 males and 85 females with an average age of 47.5 years (range, 18-68 years). The authors analyzed the following factors: age, sex, Garden classification, reduction quality, surgical methods, injury-to-surgery interval, preoperative traction, weight-bearing time, and implant removal. All patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 6-90 months). The incidence of femoral head necrosis was 14.4% (21/146). Garden classification (P=.012), reduction quality (P=.008), implant removal (P=.020), and preoperative traction (P=.003) were significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. Patient age (P=.990), sex (P=.287), injury-to-surgery interval (P=.360), weight-bearing time (P=.868), and surgical methods (P=.987) were not significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was not a significant risk factor for femoral head necrosis development (P=.498). Garden classification, reduction quality, and preoperative traction had a significant effect on femoral head necrosis development. PMID:25437087

  19. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  20. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell injury by cycloheximide

    SciTech Connect

    Nolop, K.B.; Ryan, U.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent polypeptide mediator released by activated monocytes and macrophages, has a number of proinflammatory effects on endothelial cells. TNF is cytotoxic to tumor cells in vivo and in vitro, but TNF-induced toxicity to endothelial cells is less well established. We now report that cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, renders endothelial cells highly susceptible to TNF-induced lysis. TNF alone did not change the overall rate of protein synthesis by endothelial cells, whereas the addition of CHX completely abolished protein synthesis. Endothelial cells incubated in TNF alone in high concentrations (up to 1,000 U/ml) showed minimal rounding up and release of 51Cr. Likewise, CHX alone (5 micrograms/ml) had no significant effect on endothelial cell morphology and release of 51Cr. However, incubation of endothelial cells in both CHX and TNF caused injury in a dose-dependent manner. Morphological evidence of cell retraction, rounding, and detachment began within 2 h, but specific 51Cr release did not begin to rise until after 4 h. These changes were not observed when endothelial cells were incubated with TNF/CHX at 4 degrees C. The combination of TNF/CHX was lethal to all endothelial cells tested (bovine pulmonary artery, human umbilical vein, and human aorta), with human aortic cells showing the most pronounced changes. We conclude that healthy endothelial cells are resistant to TNF-induced lysis, but inhibition of their ability to make protein renders them highly susceptible.

  1. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    PubMed

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  2. Psoriasis Induced by Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Agents: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Fedra; De Martinis, Massimo; Sirufo, Maria Maddalena; Ginaldi, Lia

    2016-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors revolutionized the management of patients affected by autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and psoriasis. The biologic agents targeted to block TNF-α such as infliximab, adalimumab, certulizumab pegol, etanercept, and golimumab, have a good safety profile; however, with increasing, broader, and prolonged use, patients could be exposed to an increased risk of adverse reactions including a wide spectrum of dermatological conditions of different etiology and morphology. Among these, of particular interest is the development of skin immune-mediated diseases that seem to be the consequence of the paradoxical inflammation induced by anti-TNF-α therapy. The majority of these lesions are identified as psoriasiform with three main morphologies and different frequency: pustular psoriasis, signs of psoriasis, and guttate; although erythrodermic or inverted psoriasis, among others, may be observed with less frequency. The increased incidence of these dermatological immune-mediated lesions highlight the importance of the skin as a main target of the side effect of anti-TNF-α agents, while the immunopathogenetic hypothesis of these paradoxical effects are quite intriguing. The aim of this review is to collect and to analyze existing knowledge to better understand the pathogenetic mechanism of these complications and suggest new fields of investigation, improve therapeutic strategies of autoimmune diseases, and prevent and/or better address such complications. PMID:27663916

  3. Tumour necrosis factor-α inhibition can stabilize disease in progressive vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Webb, K C; Tung, R; Winterfield, L S; Gottlieb, A B; Eby, J M; Henning, S W; Le Poole, I C

    2015-09-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a proinflammatory cytokine central to many autoimmune diseases, has been implicated in the depigmentation process in vitiligo. We review its role in vitiligo by exploring its pro- and anti-inflammatory properties and examine the effects of blocking its actions with TNF-α antagonist therapeutics in reports available in the literature. We found that TNF-α inhibition halts disease progression in patients with progressive vitiligo but that, paradoxically, treatment can be associated with de novo vitiligo development in some patients when used for other autoimmune conditions, particularly when using adalimumab and infliximab. These studies reinforce the importance of stating appropriate outcomes measures, as most pilot trials propose to measure repigmentation, whereas halting depigmentation is commonly overlooked as a measure of success. We conclude that TNF-α inhibition has proven useful for patients with progressive vitiligo, where TNF-α inhibition is able to quash cytotoxic T-cell-mediated melanocyte destruction. However, a lingering concern for initiating de novo disease will likely prevent more widespread application of TNF inhibitors to treat vitiligo.

  4. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  5. Renal Tumor Necrosis Factor α Contributes to Hypertension in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baorui; Cheng, Yuan; Usa, Kristie; Liu, Yong; Baker, Maria Angeles; Mattson, David L.; He, Yongcheng; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a major proinflammatory cytokine and its level is elevated in hypertensive states. Inflammation occurs in the kidneys during the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that TNFα specifically in the kidney contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, a widely used model of human salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury. SS rats were chronically instrumented for renal interstitial infusion and blood pressure measurement in conscious, freely moving state. Gene expression was measured using real-time PCR and renal injury assessed with histological analysis. The abundance of TNFα in the renal medulla of SS rats, but not the salt-insensitive congenic SS.13BN26 rats, was significantly increased when rats had been fed a high-salt diet for 7 days (n = 6 or 9, p < 0.01). The abundance of TNFα receptors in the renal medulla was significantly higher in SS rats than SS.13BN26 rats. Renal interstitial administration of Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNFα, significantly attenuated the development of hypertension in SS rats on a high-salt diet (n = 7–8, p < 0.05). Glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis were also significantly ameliorated. These findings indicate intrarenal TNFα contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in SS rats. PMID:26916681

  6. Renal Tumor Necrosis Factor α Contributes to Hypertension in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baorui; Cheng, Yuan; Usa, Kristie; Liu, Yong; Baker, Maria Angeles; Mattson, David L; He, Yongcheng; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a major proinflammatory cytokine and its level is elevated in hypertensive states. Inflammation occurs in the kidneys during the development of hypertension. We hypothesized that TNFα specifically in the kidney contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, a widely used model of human salt-sensitive hypertension and renal injury. SS rats were chronically instrumented for renal interstitial infusion and blood pressure measurement in conscious, freely moving state. Gene expression was measured using real-time PCR and renal injury assessed with histological analysis. The abundance of TNFα in the renal medulla of SS rats, but not the salt-insensitive congenic SS.13(BN26) rats, was significantly increased when rats had been fed a high-salt diet for 7 days (n = 6 or 9, p < 0.01). The abundance of TNFα receptors in the renal medulla was significantly higher in SS rats than SS.13(BN26) rats. Renal interstitial administration of Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNFα, significantly attenuated the development of hypertension in SS rats on a high-salt diet (n = 7-8, p < 0.05). Glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis were also significantly ameliorated. These findings indicate intrarenal TNFα contributes to the development of hypertension and renal injury in SS rats. PMID:26916681

  7. A comparison of the intoxication pathways of tumor necrosis factor and diphtheria toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) initiates tumor cell destruction is unknown. We have approached this problem by comparing the biological properties of TNF with diphtheria toxin (DTx), a well-characterized cytotoxin. Initial studies with human U937 cells revealed that a transient exposure to low pH enhances the cytotoxic activity of TNF. Detailed studies on the interaction of TNF with pure lipid vesicles revealed that the acid-enhanced cytolytic activity of this cytokine is correlated with the acquisition of membrane binding and insertion properties. Significantly, an increase in target membrane stabilization was observed in the presence of TNF; hence, TNF is not directly lytic for membranes. In susceptible target cells, DTx induces the release of {sup 51}Cr- and {sup 75}Se-labeled proteins within 7 h. Although DTx-triggered cell death has generally been accepted as a straightforward effect of translation inhibition, little or no cell lysis was observed over a 20-30 h period when target cells were exposed to cycloheximide, amino acid deficient medium or metabolic poisons even though protein synthesis was inhibited to levels observed with DTx. The protein synthesis inhibition and cytolytic activities of DTx showed similar dose-dependencies, target cell specificities, and sensitivities to NH{sub 4}Cl inhibition. DTx-induced DNA fragmentation preceded cells lysis and did not occur in cells that were treated with the other protein synthesis inhibitors.

  8. Drug-induced lupus: Including anti-tumour necrosis factor and interferon induced.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Fernández, S; Ahijón-Lana, M; Isenberg, D A

    2014-05-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a syndrome with clinical and serological features similar to systemic lupus erythematosus that is temporally related to continuous drug exposure and which resolves after discontinuation of this drug. More than 90 drugs, including biological modulators such as tumour necrosis factorinhibitors and interferons, have been identified as likely 'culprits'. While there are no standard diagnostic criteria for drug-induced lupus erythematosus, guidelines that can help to distinguish drug-induced lupus erythematosus from systemic lupus erythematosus have been proposed and several different patterns of drug-induced lupus erythematosus are emerging. Distinguishing drug-induced lupus erythematosus from systemic lupus erythematosus is important because the prognosis of drug-induced lupus erythematosus is usually good when the drug is withdrawn. This review discusses the differences between drug-induced lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus, the mechanisms of action of drug-induced lupus erythematosus and drugs that are usually associated with drug-induced lupus erythematosus, with particular focus on the biological treatments.

  9. AMPK dependent protective effects of metformin on tumor necrosis factor-induced apoptotic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Hu, Kai; Lin, Ling; Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Liu, Yiqing; Dai, Jie; Ye, Bin; Zhang, Li

    2015-09-25

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced cellular apoptosis represents a common pathological mechanism underlying the progression of various liver disorders. Recently studies revealed that the anti-diabetic metformin provided protective benefits in several animal models of liver injury. In the present study, the potential modulatory effects of metformin on TNF-α-dependent apoptotic liver damage was investigated in mice with TNF-α/d-galactosamine (D-Gal)-induced liver injury. The results indicated that treatment with metformin significantly suppressed the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), the activation of caspase cascade and the induction of cleaved caspase-3. Morphological analysis showed that metformin alleviated histopathological abnormalities and reduced TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells. Co-administration of the AMPK inhibitor compound C completely abolished the inhibitory effects of metformin on caspase cascade activation, significantly reversed the beneficial effects of metformin on histopathological abnormalities and hepatocytes apoptosis, and partially abolished the suppressive effects of metformin on plasma ALT elevation. These data indicated that metformin effectively alleviated TNF-α/D-Gal-induced apoptotic liver injury and these beneficial effects were at least partially mediated by AMPK.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor regulates NMDA receptor-mediated airway smooth muscle contractile function and airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Anaparti, Vidyanand; Pascoe, Christopher D; Jha, Aruni; Mahood, Thomas H; Ilarraza, Ramses; Unruh, Helmut; Moqbel, Redwan; Halayko, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    We have shown that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) are receptor-operated calcium entry channels in human airway smooth muscle (HASM) during contraction. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) augments smooth muscle contractility by influencing pathways that regulate intracellular calcium flux and can alter NMDA-R expression and activity in cortical neurons and glial cells. We hypothesized that NMDA-R-mediated Ca(2+) and contractile responses of ASM can be altered by inflammatory mediators, including TNF. In cultured HASM cells, we assessed TNF (10 ng/ml, 48 h) effect on NMDA-R subunit abundance by quantitative PCR, confocal imaging, and immunoblotting. We observed dose- and time-dependent changes in NMDA-R composition: increased obligatory NR1 subunit expression and altered regulatory NR2 and inhibitory NR3 subunits. Measuring intracellular Ca(2+) flux in Fura-2-loaded HASM cultures, we observed that TNF exposure enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization and changed the temporal pattern of Ca(2+) flux in individual myocytes induced by NMDA, an NMDA-R selective analog of glutamate. We measured airway responses to NMDA in murine thin-cut lung slices (TCLS) from allergen-naive animals and observed significant airway contraction. However, NMDA acted as a bronchodilator in TCLS from house dust mice-challenged mice and in allergen-naive TCLS subjected to TNF exposure. All contractile or bronchodilator responses were blocked by a selective NMDA-R antagonist, (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate, and bronchodilator responses were prevented by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) or indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). Collectively, we show that TNF augments NMDA-R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization in HASM cells, whereas in multicellular TCLSs allergic inflammation and TNF exposure leads to NMDA-R-mediated bronchodilation. These findings reveal the unique contribution of ionotrophic NMDA-R to airway hyperreactivity.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha induces the expression of transforming growth factor alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegel, W; Roeder, C; Schmielau, J; Rodeck, U; Kalthoff, H

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha increased the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA and protein in all of six human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines tested. In addition, TNF-alpha increased the expression of an EGFR ligand, transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, at the mRNA and protein level in all cell lines. Increased expression of EGFR protein was associated with elevated steady-state EGFR mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that increase in EGFR mRNA was due to an increased rate of transcription. Induction of EGFR mRNA expression by TNF-alpha was abrogated by cycloheximide but occurred independently of TNF-alpha-induced production of TGF-alpha protein. Protein kinase A or Gi-type guanine nucleotide-binding proteins were not involved in this process as assessed by using appropriate stimulators and inhibitors of these signal transduction pathways. By contrast, staurosporine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, partially inhibited, and 4-bromophenacyl bromide, a phospholipase inhibitor, completely inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent EGFR mRNA expression. The phospholipase C-specific inhibitor tricyclodecan-9-yl xanthogenate did not alter TNF-alpha-dependent EGFR mRNA expression, suggesting that phospholipase A2 is involved in the modulation of EGFR expression by TNF-alpha. The simultaneous induction of a ligand/receptor system by TNF-alpha suggests that this cytokine modulates autocrine growth-regulatory pathways in pancreatic cancer cells. Images PMID:8430098

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibition and Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence and Death in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Zeringue, Angelique L.; McDonald, Jay R.; Eisen, Seth A.; Ranganathan, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy on the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) recurrence or HNC-attributable death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA patients with HNC were assembled from the US national Veterans’ Affairs (VA) administrative databases, and diagnoses confirmed and data collected by electronic medical record review. The cohort was divided into those treated with non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) versus TNF inhibitors (TNFi) after a diagnosis of HNC. Likelihood of a composite endpoint of recurrence or HNC-attributable death was determined by Cox proportional hazards regression. Of 180 patients with RA and HNC, 31 were treated with TNFi and 149 with nbDMARDs after the diagnosis of HNC. Recurrence or HNC-attributable death occurred in 5/31 (16.1%) patients in the TNFi group and 44/149 (29.5%) patients in the nbDMARD group (p = 0.17); it occurred in 2/16 (13%) patients who received TNFi in the year prior to HNC diagnosis but not after. Overall stage at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and stage 4 HNC (HR 2.49 [CI 1.06–5.89]; p = 0.04) were risk factors for recurrence or HNC-attributable death; treatment with radiation or surgery was associated with a lower risk (HR 0.35 [CI 0.17–0.74]; p = 0.01 and HR 0.39 [CI 0.20–0.76]; p = 0.01 respectively). Treatment with TNFi was not a risk factor for recurrence or HNC-attributable death (HR 0.75; CI 0.31–1.85; p = 0.54). We conclude that treatment with TNFi may be safe in patients with RA and HNC, especially as the time interval between HNC treatment and non-recurrence increases. In this study, TNF inhibition was not associated with an increase in recurrence or HNC-attributable death. PMID:26599370

  14. Dissecting Cellulitis of the Scalp Responding to Intravenous Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Gemmeke, Astrid; Koch, André

    2012-04-01

    The authors present the case of a 30-year-old male patient with a severe and long-standing dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. The disease did not respond to conventional treatment, including oral antibiotics, isotretinoin, and prednisolone. Quality of life was significantly impaired. After introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment (infliximab), the malodorous discharge stopped, inflammation was reduced significantly, nodules became flat, and pain decreased. The treatment was well tolerated although he developed a temporary psoriasiform rash after the second intravenous infusion. In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment is a new therapeutic option in this severe and recalcitrant disorder. PMID:22708007

  15. Dissecting Cellulitis of the Scalp Responding to Intravenous Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Gemmeke, Astrid; Koch, André

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 30-year-old male patient with a severe and long-standing dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. The disease did not respond to conventional treatment, including oral antibiotics, isotretinoin, and prednisolone. Quality of life was significantly impaired. After introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment (infliximab), the malodorous discharge stopped, inflammation was reduced significantly, nodules became flat, and pain decreased. The treatment was well tolerated although he developed a temporary psoriasiform rash after the second intravenous infusion. In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment is a new therapeutic option in this severe and recalcitrant disorder. PMID:22708007

  16. Effect of particle size on hydroxyapatite crystal-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nadra, Imad; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Philippidis, Pandelis; Whelan, Linda C; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Haskard, Dorian O; Landis, R Clive

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages may promote a vicious cycle of inflammation and calcification in the vessel wall by ingesting neointimal calcific deposits (predominantly hydroxyapatite) and secreting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, itself a vascular calcifying agent. Here we have investigated whether particle size affects the proinflammatory potential of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro and whether the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway plays a role in the macrophage TNFalpha response. The particle size and nano-topography of nine different crystal preparations was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and gas sorbtion analysis. Macrophage TNFalpha secretion was inversely related to hydroxyapatite particle size (P=0.011, Spearman rank correlation test) and surface pore size (P=0.014). A necessary role for the NF-kappaB pathway was demonstrated by time-dependent I kappaB alpha degradation and sensitivity to inhibitors of I kappaB alpha degradation. To test whether smaller particles were intrinsically more bioactive, their mitogenic activity on fibroblast proliferation was examined. This showed close correlation between TNFalpha secretion and crystal-induced fibroblast proliferation (P=0.007). In conclusion, the ability of hydroxyapatite crystals to stimulate macrophage TNFalpha secretion depends on NF-kappaB activation and is inversely related to particle and pore size, with crystals of 1-2 microm diameter and pore size of 10-50 A the most bioactive. Microscopic calcific deposits in early stages of atherosclerosis may therefore pose a greater inflammatory risk to the plaque than macroscopically or radiologically visible deposits in more advanced lesions.

  17. Transmembrane tumor necrosis factor-alpha sensitizes adipocytes to insulin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjing; Yang, Peng; Liu, Li; Zheng, Shan; Zeng, Qingling; Liang, Huifang; Zhu, Yazhen; Zhang, Zunyue; Wang, Jing; Yin, Bingjiao; Gong, Feili; Wu, Yiping; Li, Zhuoya

    2015-05-01

    Transmembrane TNF-α (tmTNF-α) acts both as a ligand, delivering 'forward signaling' via TNFR, and as a receptor, transducing 'reverse signaling'. The contradiction of available data regarding the effect of tmTNF-α on insulin resistance may be due to imbalance in both signals. Here, we demonstrated that high glucose-induced impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 3T3-L1 adipocytes was concomitant with decreased tmTNF-α expression and increased soluble TNF-α (sTNF-α) secretion. However, when TACE was inhibited, preventing the conversion of tmTNF-α to sTNF-α, this insulin resistance was partially reversed, indicating a salutary role of tmTNF-α. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with exogenous tmTNF-α promoted insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt, facilitated GLUT4 expression and membrane translocation, and increased glucose uptake while addition of sTNF-α resulted in the opposite effect. Furthermore, tmTNF-α downregulated the production of IL-6 and MCP-1 via NF-κB inactivation, as silencing of A20, an inhibitor for NF-κB, by siRNA, abolished this effect of tmTNF-α. However, tmTNF-α upregulated adiponectin expression through the PPAR-γ pathway, as inhibition of PPAR-γ by GW9662 abrogated both tmTNF-α-induced adiponectin transcription and glucose uptake. Our data suggest that tmTNF-α functions as an insulin sensitizer via forward signaling.

  18. Predisposing Factors of Liver Necrosis after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization in Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Joskin, Julien Baere, Thierry de; Auperin, Anne; Tselikas, Lambros Guiu, Boris Farouil, Geoffroy; Boige, Valérie Malka, David; Leboulleux, Sophie; Ducreux, Michel; Baudin, Eric; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo investigate predictive factors for liver necrosis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of neuroendocrine liver metastases.MethodsA total of 164 patients receiving 374 TACE were reviewed retrospectively to analyze predictive factors of liver necrosis. We analyzed patient age and sex; metastasis number and location; percentage of liver involvement; baseline liver function test; and pretreatment imaging abnormalities such as bile duct dilatation (BDD), portal vein narrowing (PVN), and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We analyzed TACE technique such as Lipiodol or drug-eluting beads (DEB) as the drug’s vector; dose of chemotherapy; diameter of DEB; and number, frequency, and selectivity of TACE.ResultsLiver necrosis developed after 23 (6.1 %) of 374 TACE. In multivariate analysis, DEB > 300 μm in size induced more liver necrosis compared to Lipiodol (odds ratio [OR] 35.20; p < 0.0001) or with DEB < 300 μm in size (OR 19.95; p < 0.010). Pretreatment BDD (OR 119.64; p < 0.0001) and PVT (OR 9.83; p = 0.030) were predictive of liver necrosis. BDD or PVT responsible for liver necrosis were present before TACE in 59 % (13 of 22) and were induced by a previous TACE in 41 % (9 of 22) of cases.ConclusionDEB > 300 μm in size, BDD, and PVT are responsible for increased rate of liver necrosis after TACE. Careful analysis of BDD or PVT on pretreatment images as well as images taken between two courses can help avoid TACE complications.

  19. Prolactin increases tumor necrosis factor alpha expression in peripheral CD14 monocytes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chun; Li, Yun; Lin, Xiaojun; Ye, Jinghua; Li, Weinian; He, Zhixiang; Li, Fangfei; Cai, Xiaoyan

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is one of the major proinflammatory mediators of rheumatic arthritis (RA); the regulatory factors for TNF-α release is not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the role of prolactin receptor (PRLR) activation in regulating the expression and release of TNF-α from CD14(+) monocytes. The results showed that the expression of PRLR was detectable in CD14(+) monocytes of healthy subjects, which was markedly increased in RA patients. Exposure to PRL in the culture increased the expression and release of TNF-α from CD14(+) monocytes, which was abolished by the PRLR gene silencing or blocking the mitogen activated protein (MAPK) pathway. We conclude that exposure to PRL increases TNF-α release from CD14(+) monocytes of RA patients, which can be abolished by PRLR gene silencing or treating with MAPK inhibitor.

  20. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  1. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-10-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells.

  2. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  3. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  4. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  5. Structural Biology of Tumor Necrosis Factor Demonstrated for Undergraduates Instruction by Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The…

  6. Genetics Home Reference: tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): definition, semiology, prognosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and place relative to other periodic joint diseases. Joint Bone Spine. 2004 Jul;71(4):284-90. Review. Citation on PubMed Pettersson T, Kantonen J, Matikainen S, ...

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene -376 polymorphism and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis: an Egyptian study.

    PubMed

    Nada, Mona Abd el Fattah; Labib, Dalia Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in the clinical activity of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and the development of progression. Dysregulation in the expression of tumor necrosis factor gene had been suggested in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between tumor necrosis factor α-376 polymorphism with disease susceptibility and course of multiple sclerosis in Egyptian patients. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism were carried out on 36 primary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, 36 age- and sex-matched remitting relapsing multiple sclerosis patients (diagnosed according to McDonald's Diagnostic criteria) and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The GG genotype and the guanine allele (G) were detected significantly more often in the primary progressive (p = 0.02; p = 0.004, respectively) and remitting relapsing (p = 0.015; p = 0.024, respectively) multiple sclerosis groups as compared with the healthy control group. The G allele in the examined position in tumor necrosis factor alpha might have a role as regards susceptibility in both remitting relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

  8. Transfection of influenza A virus nuclear export protein induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lara-Sampablo, Alejandra; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; De Jesús-Ortega, Nereyda; Santos-López, Gerardo; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-06-24

    Influenza A virus genomic segments eight codes for non-structural 1 (NS1) protein that is involved in evasion of innate antiviral response, and nuclear export protein (NEP) that participates in the export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, transcription and replication. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is highly expressed during influenza virus infections and is considered an anti-infective cytokine. NS1 and NEP proteins were overexpressed and their role on TNF-α expression was evaluated. Both TNF-α mRNA and protein increased in cells transfected with NEP but not with NS1. We further investigate if NS1 or NEP regulates the activity of TNF-α promoter. In the presence of NEP the activity of TNF-α promoter increased significantly compared with the control (83.5±2.9 vs. 30.9±2.8, respectively; p=0.001). This effect decreased 15-fold when the TNF-α promoter distal region was deleted, suggesting the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-kB response elements. This was corroborated by testing the effect produced on TNF-α promoter by the treatment with Raf/MEK/ERK (U0126), NF-kB (Bay-11-7082) and PI3K (Ly294-002) cell signaling inhibitors. Treatment with U0126 and Bay-117082 reduced the activity of TNF-α promoter mediated by NEP (41.5±3.2, 70% inhibition; and 80.6±7.4, 35% inhibition, respectively) compared to mock-treated control. The results suggest a new role for NEP protein that participates in the transcriptional regulation of human TNF-α expression.

  9. Phosphorylation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (p55) protects macrophages from silica-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Federica; Di, Peter; Niu, Xiaomei; Friedman, Mitchell; Hammond, Timothy; Riches, David W H; Ortiz, Luis A

    2004-01-16

    Macrophages play a fundamental role in silicosis in part by removing silica particles and producing inflammatory mediators in response to silica. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a prominent mediator in silicosis. Silica induction of apoptosis in macrophages might be mediated by TNFalpha. However, TNFalpha also activates signal transduction pathways (NF-kappaB and AP-1) that rescue cells from apoptosis. Therefore, we studied the TNFalpha-mediated mechanisms that confer macrophage protection against the pro-apoptotic effects of silica. We will show that exposure to silica induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, but not by IC-21. Silica-induced activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ERK activation in response to silica exposure was only observed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, whereas activation of p38 phosphorylation was predominantly observed in IC-21 macrophages. No changes in JNK activity were observed in either cell line in response to silica exposure. Silica induced apoptosis in both macrophage cell lines, but the induction of apoptosis was significantly larger in IC-21 cells. Protection against apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells in response to silica was mediated by enhanced NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNFalpha receptor. Inhibition of these two protective mechanisms by specific pharmacological inhibitors or transfection of dominant negative mutants that inhibit IkappaBalpha or ERK phosphorylation significantly increased silica-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These data suggest that NF-kappaB activation and ERK-mediated phosphorylation of the p55 TNF receptor are important cell survival mechanisms in the macrophage response to silica exposure. PMID:14570868

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  11. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-α with Adalimumab: Effects on Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Raghav; Schuett, Jutta; Schuett, Harald; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Luchtefeld, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is well known that atherosclerotic inflammatory vascular disease is critically driven by oxidized lipids and cytokines. In this regard, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is known as a crucial mediator of early pro-atherosclerotic events. Epidemiologic data suggest that blockade of TNF-α has beneficial effects on vascular outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however, detailed mechanistic studies are still lacking. This study aims to elucidate effects of TNF-α blockade by adalimumab–which is approved for several inflammatory disorders–on endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion under pro-atherosclerotic conditions. Methods and Results Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 macrophages were stimulated with oxidized low density lipoprotein and subsequent analysis of this conditioned media (oxLDL CM) revealed a strong release of TNF-α. The TNF-α rich supernatant led to activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as shown by enhanced expression of major adhesion molecules, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin which was suppressed by the TNF-α inhibitor adalimumab. Accordingly, adalimumab effectively prevented THP-1 monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under static as well as under flow conditions. Furthermore, adalimumab suppressed endothelial leakage as shown by Evan's blue diffusion across a confluent endothelial monolayer. Of note, after intraperitoneal injection we detected abundant deposition of fluorophore-labelled adalimumab in atherosclerotic plaques of hypercholesterolemic mice. Conclusion Our results show that adalimumab prevents major inflammatory effects of TNF-α on endothelial activation, endothelial monocyte adhesion, endothelial leakage and therefore extends the therapeutic options of adalimumab to limit vascular inflammation. PMID:27467817

  12. Anti-tumour necrosis factor agent and liver injury: Literature review, recommendations for management

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberta Elisa; Parisi, Ioanna; Despott, Edward John; Burroughs, Andrew Kenneth; O'Beirne, James; Conte, Dario; Hamilton, Mark Ian; Murray, Charles Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in liver function tests, including transient and self-limiting hypertransaminasemia, cholestatic disease and hepatitis, can develop during treatment with anti-tumour-necrosis-factor (TNF) therapy. The optimal management of liver injury related to anti-TNF therapy is still a matter of debate. Although some authors recommend discontinuing treatment in case of both a rise of alanine aminotransferase more than 5 times the upper limit of normal, or the occurrence of jaundice, there are no standard guidelines for the management of anti-TNF-related liver injury. Bibliographical searches were performed in PubMed, using the following key words: inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); TNF inhibitors; hypertransaminasemia; drug-related liver injury; infliximab. According to published data, elevation of transaminases in patients with IBD treated with anti-TNF is a common finding, but resolution appears to be the usual outcome. Anti-TNF agents seem to be safe with a low risk of causing severe drug-related liver injury. According to our centre experience, we found that hypertransaminasemia was a common, mainly self-limiting finding in our IBD cohort and was not correlated to infliximab treatment on both univariate and multivariate analyses. An algorithm for the management of liver impairment occurring during anti-TNF treatment is also proposed and this highlights the need of a multidisciplinary approach and suggests liver biopsy as a key-point in the management decision in case of severe rise of transaminases. However, hepatic injury is generally self-limiting and drug withdrawal seems to be an exception. PMID:25516646

  13. Vpr Enhances Tumor Necrosis Factor Production by HIV-1-Infected T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Richard, Léa; Rua, Réjane; Porrot, Françoise; Casartelli, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr displays different activities potentially impacting viral replication, including the arrest of the cell cycle in the G2 phase and the stimulation of apoptosis and DNA damage response pathways. Vpr also modulates cytokine production by infected cells, but this property remains partly characterized. Here, we investigated the effect of Vpr on the production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We report that Vpr significantly increases TNF secretion by infected lymphocytes. De novo production of Vpr is required for this effect. Vpr mutants known to be defective for G2 cell cycle arrest induce lower levels of TNF secretion, suggesting a link between these two functions. Silencing experiments and the use of chemical inhibitors further implicated the cellular proteins DDB1 and TAK1 in this activity of Vpr. TNF secreted by HIV-1-infected cells triggers NF-κB activity in bystander cells and allows viral reactivation in a model of latently infected cells. Thus, the stimulation of the proinflammatory pathway by Vpr may impact HIV-1 replication in vivo. IMPORTANCE The role of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr remains only partially characterized. This protein is important for viral pathogenesis in infected individuals but is dispensable for viral replication in most cell culture systems. Some of the functions described for Vpr remain controversial. In particular, it remains unclear whether Vpr promotes or instead prevents proinflammatory and antiviral immune responses. In this report, we show that Vpr promotes the release of TNF, a proinflammatory cytokine associated with rapid disease progression. Using Vpr mutants or inhibiting selected cellular genes, we show that the cellular proteins DDB1 and TAK1 are involved in the release of TNF by HIV-infected cells. This report provides novel insights into how Vpr manipulates TNF production and helps clarify the role of Vpr in innate immune responses and inflammation

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  15. Recombinant tumour necrosis factor inhibits malaria parasites in vivo but not in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Tavernier, J; Fiers, W; Playfair, J H

    1987-01-01

    As tumour necrosis serum kills malarial parasites in vitro and inhibits the multiplication of some species of Plasmodium in mice, we examined the effect of recombinant mouse tumour necrosis factor (rTNF) on P. yoelii both in vitro and in vivo. Parasites incubated overnight with rTNF showed no loss of viability, but repeated injection of rTNF into infected mice reduced parasitaemia and significantly prolonged survival of mice infected with a lethal variant of the parasite. We conclude that TNF acts on blood-stage malaria in vivo via a host cell and that another molecule in tumour necrosis serum is involved in killing the parasite in vitro. PMID:3621669

  16. Tumor necrosis factor alpha protects heart cultures against hypoxic damage via activation of PKA and phospholamban to prevent calcium overload.

    PubMed

    El-Ani, Dalia; Philipchik, Irena; Stav, Hagit; Levi, Moran; Zerbib, Jordana; Shainberg, Asher

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanisms by which tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) provides protection from hypoxic damage to neonatal rat cardiomyocyte cultures. We show that when intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) levels are elevated by extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]o) or by hypoxia, then TNFα decreased [Ca(2+)]i in individual cardiomyocytes. However, TNFα did not reduce [Ca(2+)]i after its increase by thapsigargin, (a SERCA2a inhibitor), indicating that TNFα attenuates Ca(2+) overload through Ca(2+) uptake by SERCA2a. TNFα did not reduce [Ca(2+)]i, following its elevation when [Ca(2+)]o levels were elevated in TNFα receptor knock-out mice. H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, attenuated the protective effect of TNFα when the cardiomyoctyes were subjected to hypoxia, as determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released and from the cardiomyocytes. Moreover, when the levels of [Ca(2+)]i were increased by hypoxia, H-89, but not KN93, (a calmodulin kinase II inhibitor), prevented the reduction in [Ca(2+)]i by TNFα. TNFα increased the phosphorylation of PKA in normoxic and hypoxic cardiomyoctes, indicating that the cardioprotective effect of TNFα against hypoxic damage was via PKA activation. Hypoxia decreased phosphorylated phospholamban levels; however, TNFα attenuated this decrease following hypoxia. It is suggested that TNFα activates phospholamban phosphorylation in hypoxic heart cultures via PKA to stimulate SERCA2a activity to limit Ca(2+) overload.

  17. A Nonpolar Blueberry Fraction Blunts NADPH Oxidase Activation in Neuronal Cells Exposed to Tumor Necrosis Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sally J.; Dunlap, Kriya L.; McGill, Colin M.; Kuhn, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are key to the progressive neuronal degeneration common to chronic pathologies, traumatic injuries, and aging processes in the CNS. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) orchestrates cellular stress by stimulating the production and release of neurotoxic mediators including reactive oxygen species (ROS). NADPH oxidases (NOX), ubiquitously expressed in all cells, have recently emerged as pivotal ROS sources in aging and disease. We demonstrated the presence of potent NOX inhibitors in wild Alaska bog blueberries partitioning discretely into a nonpolar fraction with minimal antioxidant capacity and largely devoid of polyphenols. Incubation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with nonpolar blueberry fractions obstructed the coalescing of lipid rafts into large domains disrupting NOX assembly therein and abolishing ROS production characteristic for TNF-α exposure. These findings illuminate nutrition-derived lipid raft modulation as a novel therapeutic approach to blunt inflammatory and oxidative stress in the aging or diseased CNS. PMID:22530077

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  19. Macrophage response in patients diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head presenting different risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Diana; Trăistaru, Rodica; Kamal, Constantin Kamal; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Grecu, Dan Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a condition caused by partial or total interruption of blood supply to the femoral head. The diminished blood supply causes necrosis of the cellular elements and of the bone marrow, followed by the collapse of the bone structure, events that ultimately lead to the destruction of the bone tissue, the appearance of local pain and loss of function in the affected coxofemoral joint. The importance of this condition is that it mainly affects young adults aged 30-50 years, active from a socio-professional standpoint, and increased life expectancy. The material studied to achieve CD68 immunostaining was represented by bone fragments from the area of necrosis and from the adjacent areas of the femoral heads, harvested from 39 patients when performing hip arthroplasty surgery. The patients were diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head and hospitalized in the Clinic of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, from June 2014 to January 2015. The 39 patients included in the study were divided into four categories according to presented risk factors (alcohol, alcohol and smoking, trauma, corticosteroids). All the 39 cases had positive immunostaining for CD68, macrophage being highlighted both in the area of necrosis and in the adjacent areas. We noted significant differences in the number and arrangement of macrophages in patients presenting different risk factors. The highest number of macrophages was present in patients presenting a risk factor corticosteroids, and the lowest number of macrophages was found in patients who had trauma as the main risk factor.

  20. Chloroplastic oxidative burst induced by tenuazonic acid, a natural photosynthesis inhibitor, triggers cell necrosis in Eupatorium adenophorum Spreng.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Yin, Chunyan; Qiang, Sheng; Zhou, Fenyan; Dai, Xinbin

    2010-03-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA), a nonhost-specific phytotoxin produced by Alternaria alternata, was determined to be a novel natural photosynthesis inhibitor owning several action sites in chloroplasts. To further elucidate the mode of its action, studies were conducted to assess the production and involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the toxic activity of TeA. A series of experiments indicated that TeA treatment can induce chloroplast-derived ROS generation including not only (1)O(2) but also superoxide radical, H(2)O(2) and hydroxyl radicals in Eupatorium adenophorum mesophyll cells, resulting from electron leakage and charge recombination in PSII as well as thylakoid overenergization due to inhibition of the PSII electron transport beyond Q(A) and the reduction of end acceptors on the PSI acceptor side and chloroplast ATPase activity. The initial production of TeA-induced ROS was restricted to chloroplasts and accompanied with a certain degree of chloroplast damage. Subsequently, abundant ROS were quickly dispersed throughout whole cell and cellular compartments, causing a series of irreversible cellular harm such as chlorophyll breakdown, lipid peroxidation, plasma membrane rupture, chromatin condensation, DNA cleavage, and organelle disintegration, and finally resulting in rapid cell destruction and leaf necrosis. These results show that TeA causing cell necrosis of host-plants is a result of direct oxidative damage from chloroplast-mediated ROS eruption.

  1. A novel tumor necrosis factor-responsive transcription factor which recognizes a regulatory element in hemopoietic growth factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.F.; Pell, L.M.; Kuczek, E.S.; Occhiodoro, F.S.; Dunn, S.M.; Vadas, M.A. ); Lenardo, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    A conserved DNA sequence element, termed cytokine 1 (CK-1), is found in the promoter regions of many hemopoietic growth factor (HGF) genes. Mutational analyses and modification interference experiments show that this sequence specifically binds a nuclear transcription factor, NF-GMa, which is a protein with a molecular mass of 43 kilodaltons. It interacts with different affinities with the CK-1-like sequence from a number of HGF genes, including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF, interleukin 3 (IL-3), and IL-5. The authors show that the level of NF-GMa binding is induced in embryonic fibroblasts by tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) treatment and that the CK-1 sequence from the G-CSF gene is a TNF-{alpha}-responsive enhancer in these cells.

  2. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-11-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  4. Tumor necrosis factor α is a risk factor for infection in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Kim, Seihran; Lee, Hwa Jung; Park, Inhwee; Kim, Heungsoo; Shin, Gyu-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: It has been shown that circulating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is elevated in end stage renal disease patients; however, the relationship between TNF-α and the development of infection in these patients is unknown. In this study, we investigated the association of plasma TNF-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6) with infection in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We also evaluated the association of their plasma levels with the production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and with various clinical parameters. Methods: We enrolled 32 patients on maintenance PD and 10 healthy controls. Plasma and PBMC were isolated from blood. PBMC were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 775 days. Six patients developed organ infections (five pneumonia and one liver abscess), and six patients developed PD peritonitis and eight developed exit site infection. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly elevated in organ infections but not in peritonitis or in exit site infection. Plasma TNF-α was the only significant risk factor for organ infections and pneumonia in multivariate regression analysis. Patients with high plasma TNF-α levels showed a significantly greater cumulative hazard rate for organ infections compared to those with low TNF-α levels. Plasma TNF-α levels correlated with TNF-α production by PBMC and showed an inverse association with Kt/V. Conclusions: This is the first study showing that plasma TNF-α is a significant risk factor for infection in PD patients. PMID:27000486

  5. A diverse family of proteins containing tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor domains.

    PubMed

    Zapata, J M; Pawlowski, K; Haas, E; Ware, C F; Godzik, A; Reed, J C

    2001-06-29

    We have identified three new tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain-containing proteins in humans using bioinformatics approaches, including: MUL, the product of the causative gene in Mulibrey Nanism syndrome; USP7 (HAUSP), an ubiquitin protease; and SPOP, a POZ domain-containing protein. Unlike classical TRAF family proteins involved in TNF family receptor (TNFR) signaling, the TRAF domains (TDs) of MUL, USP7, and SPOP are located near the NH(2) termini or central region of these proteins, rather than carboxyl end. MUL and USP7 are capable of binding in vitro via their TDs to all of the previously identified TRAF family proteins (TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, TRAF4, TRAF5, and TRAF6), whereas the TD of SPOP interacts weakly with TRAF1 and TRAF6 only. The TD of MUL also interacted with itself, whereas the TDs of USP7 and SPOP did not self-associate. Analysis of various MUL and USP7 mutants by transient transfection assays indicated that the TDs of these proteins are necessary and sufficient for suppressing NF-kappaB induction by TRAF2 and TRAF6 as well as certain TRAF-binding TNF family receptors. In contrast, the TD of SPOP did not inhibit NF-kappaB induction. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy indicated that MUL localizes to cytosolic bodies, with targeting to these structures mediated by a RBCC tripartite domain within the MUL protein. USP7 localized predominantly to the nucleus, in a TD-dependent manner. Data base searches revealed multiple proteins containing TDs homologous to those found in MUL, USP7, and SPOP throughout eukaryotes, including yeast, protists, plants, invertebrates, and mammals, suggesting that this branch of the TD family arose from an ancient gene. We propose the moniker TEFs (TD-encompassing factors) for this large family of proteins.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha genetic predisposing factors can influence clinical severity in nephropathia epidemica.

    PubMed

    Maes, Piet; Clement, Jan; Groeneveld, Paul H P; Colson, Paul; Huizinga, Tom W J; Van Ranst, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Severe human infection with Hantavirus is characterized by high fever, cold chills, thrombocytopenia, arterial hypotension, acute renal failure, and/or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like pulmonary involvement, but the clinical course varies greatly between individuals. We investigated whether genetically determined differences in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production can influence the severity of Hantavirus disease. We studied a TNF-alpha single-nucleotide promoter polymorphism (SNP) at position -238 (a guanine [G]-to-adenine [A] transition) and ex vivo TNF-alpha production in a recall study of 36 Belgian patients who had a serologically proven form of Puumala virus-induced Hantavirus infection with the kidney as main target organ. In our study, the highest creatinine levels were found in patients with the lowest ex vivo TNF-alpha production. Creatinine levels correlated inversely with TNF-alpha production (R = -0.35, p < 0.05). The number of thrombocytes was significantly lower in patients with the GA-238 genotype (low TNF-alpha producers) compared with patients with the GG-238 genotype. In our study, genetically determined low production of TNF-alpha was associated with some parameters indicating a more severe clinical course of Puumala Hantavirus infection in humans, possibly by impaired activation of TNF-alpha-dependent antiviral mechanisms, which could in turn result in decreased clearance of Hantavirus. PMID:16987073

  7. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  8. Lipopolysaccharide triggers invasive streptococcal disease in mice through a tumour necrosis factor-alpha-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hongyan; Kohanawa, Masashi; Yimin; Nakajima, Hirofumi; Sato, Yuichiro; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nakane, Akio

    2002-03-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes sometimes induces invasive streptococcal infection, including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Muscular necrosis is one of the peculiar symptoms of invasive streptococcal infection and STSS. We inoculated S. pyogenes into the muscles of mice. To do so, 5 x 10(8) bacteria in 0.2 ml phosphate-buffered saline were injected into the right hind thigh. None of the mice injected with the bacteria showed muscular necrosis and none died. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and infiltration of leucocytes were detected in the muscles of infected sites, although the condition of the infected mice did not deteriorate after anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody treatment. The infected mice treated intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) showed augmentation of bacterial growth, muscular necrosis and death. TNF-alpha was detected in the sera of the infected mice treated with LPS, but not in the muscles of the infected sites. Infiltration of leucocytes into the infected muscle was not observed in the infected mice treated with LPS. Anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody treatment decreased mortality in the infected mice treated with LPS. Moreover, the infected mice treated with recombinant TNF-alpha showed augmentation of muscular necrosis and death. These results suggest that systemic production of TNF-alpha induced by stimulation with LPS inhibits infiltration of leucocytes into the infected site and exacerbates muscular infection, and that TNF-alpha produced in streptococcal infection is not a defence factor for the host. Invasive streptococcal infection and STSS appear to be induced by both S. pyogenes and the host's immune system.

  9. Dichotomy between RIP1- and RIP3-Mediated Necroptosis in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Induced Shock

    PubMed Central

    Linkermann, Andreas; Bräsen, Jan H; De Zen, Federica; Weinlich, Ricardo; Schwendener, Reto A; Green, Douglas R; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) signaling may result in survival, apoptosis or programmed necrosis. The latter is called necroptosis if the receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) or genetic knockout of RIP3 prevents it. In the lethal mouse model of TNFα-mediated shock, addition of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk (zVAD) accelerates time to death. Here, we demonstrate that RIP3-deficient mice are protected markedly from TNFα-mediated shock in the presence and absence of caspase inhibition. We further show that the fusion protein TAT-crmA, previously demonstrated to inhibit apoptosis, also prevents necroptosis in L929, HT29 and FADD-deficient Jurkat cells. In contrast to RIP3-deficient mice, blocking necroptosis by Nec-1 or TAT-crmA did not protect from TNFα/zVAD-mediated shock, but further accelerated time to death. Even in the absence of caspase inhibition, Nec-1 application led to similar kinetics. Depletion of macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, granulocytes or genetic deficiency for T lymphocytes did not influence this model. Because RIP3-deficient mice are known to be protected from cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP), we applied Nec-1 and TAT-crmA in this model and demonstrated the deterioration of pancreatic damage upon addition of these substances. These data highlight the importance of separating genetic RIP3 deficiency from RIP1 inhibition by Nec-1 application in vivo and challenge the current definition of necroptosis. PMID:22371307

  10. Dichotomy between RIP1- and RIP3-mediated necroptosis in tumor necrosis factor-α-induced shock.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Bräsen, Jan H; De Zen, Federica; Weinlich, Ricardo; Schwendener, Reto A; Green, Douglas R; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) signaling may result in survival, apoptosis or programmed necrosis. The latter is called necroptosis if the receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) or genetic knockout of RIP3 prevents it. In the lethal mouse model of TNFα-mediated shock, addition of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk (zVAD) accelerates time to death. Here, we demonstrate that RIP3-deficient mice are protected markedly from TNFα-mediated shock in the presence and absence of caspase inhibition. We further show that the fusion protein TAT-crmA, previously demonstrated to inhibit apoptosis, also prevents necroptosis in L929, HT29 and FADD-deficient Jurkat cells. In contrast to RIP3-deficient mice, blocking necroptosis by Nec-1 or TAT-crmA did not protect from TNFα/zVAD-mediated shock, but further accelerated time to death. Even in the absence of caspase inhibition, Nec-1 application led to similar kinetics. Depletion of macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, granulocytes or genetic deficiency for T lymphocytes did not influence this model. Because RIP3-deficient mice are known to be protected from cerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP), we applied Nec-1 and TAT-crmA in this model and demonstrated the deterioration of pancreatic damage upon addition of these substances. These data highlight the importance of separating genetic RIP3 deficiency from RIP1 inhibition by Nec-1 application in vivo and challenge the current definition of necroptosis. PMID:22371307

  11. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro. PMID:8629860

  12. Interferon-γ differentially modulates the impact of tumor necrosis factor-α on human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Spratte, Julia; Oemus, Anne; Zygmunt, Marek; Fluhr, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory T helper (Th)-1 cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), are immunological factors relevant at the feto-maternal interface and involved in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders. The synergistic action of the two cytokines has been described with regard to apoptotic cell death and inflammatory responses in different cell types, but little is known regarding the human endometrium. Therefore, we examined the interaction of TNF-α and IFN-γ in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs). ESCs were isolated from specimens obtained during hysterectomy and decidualized in vitro. Cells were incubated with TNF-α, IFN-γ or signaling-inhibitor. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, prolactin (PRL), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein (RANTES) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 were measured using ELISA and real-time RT-PCR. Nuclear factor of transcription (NF)-κB and its inhibitor (IκBα) were analyzed by in-cell western assay and transcription factor assay. TNF-α inhibited and IFN-γ did not affect the decidualization of ESCs. In contrast, IFN-gamma differentially modulated the stimulating effect of TNF-alpha on cytokines by enhancing IL-6, RANTES and MCP-1 and attenuating LIF mRNA expression. These effects were time- and dose-dependent. IFN-γ had no impact on the initial activation of NF-κB signaling. Histone-deacetylase activity was involved in the modulating effect of IFN-γ on RANTES secretion. These observations showed a distinct pattern of interaction of the Th-1 cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the human endometrium, which could play an important role in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders.

  13. K1 and K3 capsular antigens of Klebsiella induce tumor necrosis factor activities.

    PubMed

    Choy, Y M; Tsang, S F; Kong, S K; Leung, K N; Parolis, H; Lee, C Y; Fung, K P

    1996-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharide antigens isolated from Klebsiella pneumoniae sero-type 1 (K1) and sero-type 3 (K3) could induce tumor necrosis factor-alpha in ICR mice. K1 and K3 capsular antigens were found to be non-toxic by brine shrimp bioassay. When injected into Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice, both K1 and K3 capsular antigens exhibited significant suppression in the growth of tumor cells. The significance of these observations is discussed.

  14. Gemella morbillorum Bacteremia after Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha as Acne Inversa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Matthias G.; Gattringer, Klaus B.; Khalifeh, Neda; Koreny, Maria; Spertini, Verena; Mallouhi, Ammar; Willeit, Markus; Volc-Platzer, Beatrix; Asboth, Friederike; Graninger, Wolfgang; Thalhammer, Florian

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of fever, brain abscesses, and Gemella morbillorum bacteremia after anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) therapy in a 21-year-old acne inversa patient currently taking long-term dapsone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing such a case. During antimicrobial therapy, the patient developed systemic varicella infection with severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:22189120

  15. Induction of inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis in normal mouse skin by the combined treatment of tumor necrosis factor and lithium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Beyaert, R.; De Potter, C.; Vanhaesebroeck, B.; Van Roy, F.; Fiers, W.

    1991-01-01

    Previously we reported that lithium chloride (LiCl) potentiates tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Here, using a murine normal skin model, it is shown that a subcutaneous injection of TNF plus LiCl induces acute dermal and subcutaneous inflammation and necrosis. Histology showed a marked initial dermal and subcutaneous neutrophil infiltrate by approximately 2 hours, followed by a predominantly mononuclear infiltrate by 24 hours, which remained present for several days. Tumor necrosis factor or LiCl alone induced negligible inflammation, disappearing after 6 hours; furthermore there was never necrosis or ulceration of the overlying skin in case of single-agent application. In vitro studies showed that the combination of TNF and LiCl, but not either agent alone, was directly cytotoxic to fibroblastic cells of murine skin. No inflammatory infiltration was visible in tumors treated intratumorally or perilesionally with TNF plus LiCl, although the latter treatment resulted in a perilesional leukocyte infiltration. Furthermore the combination of TNF and LiCl had no effect on macrophage cytotoxicity to L929 tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:1848044

  16. Successful treatment of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) with tocilizumab: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Akasbi, Nessrine; Soyfoo, Muhammad S.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease linked to chromosome 12p13 and, more specifically, with mutations within the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A gene (TNFRSF1A gene). It is characterized by the presence of fever, abdominal pain, myalgia, arthralgia or arthritis, and skin rash. In this report, we describe the case of a patient with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) treated successfully with the anti-interleukin-6 (anti-IL-6) receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab, while treatment with anti-TNF α etanercept and infliximab had both failed.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta suppresses tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaday, G G; Schor, H; Rahat, M A; Lahat, N; Lider, O

    2001-04-01

    The inflammatory response is marked by the release of several cytokines with multiple roles in regulating leukocyte activities, including the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Although the effects of individual cytokines on monocyte MMP expression have been studied extensively, few studies have examined the influence of combinations of cytokines, which are likely present at inflammatory sites. Herein, we report our investigation of the combinatorial effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta on MMP-9 synthesis. We found that TGF-beta suppressed TNF-alpha-induced MMP-9 secretion by MonoMac-6 monocytic cells in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal effect of TGF-beta observed at 1 ng/ml. Such suppression was likely regulated at the pretranslational level, because steady-state mRNA levels of TNF-alpha-induced MMP-9 were reduced by TGF-beta, and pulse-chase radiolabeling also showed a decrease in new MMP-9 protein synthesis. The suppressive effects of TGF-beta were time dependent, because short exposures to TNF-alpha before TGF-beta or simultaneous exposure to both cytokines efficiently reduced MMP-9 secretion. Expression of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TNF-alpha receptors was unaffected by either cytokine individually or in combination. Affinity binding with radiolabeled TGF-beta demonstrated that levels of TGF-beta receptors were not increased after preincubation with TGF-beta. Suppression of TNFalpha-induced MMP-9 secretion by TGF-beta correlated with a reduction in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion. Furthermore, the effect of TGF-beta or indomethacin on blockage of TNF-alpha-stimulated MMP-9 production was reversed by the addition of either exogenous PGE2 or the cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogue Bt2cAMP. Thus, we concluded that TGF-beta acts as a potent suppressor of TNF-alpha-induced monocyte MMP-9 synthesis via a PGE2- and cAMP-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that various

  18. The new factor Xa inhibitor: Apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Bhanwra, Sangeeta; Ahluwalia, Kaza

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the most important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and anti-thrombotic treatment is widely used as a result. The currently used drugs include heparin and its derivatives, vitamin K antagonists, though efficacious, have their own set of limitations like unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile, parenteral route (with heparin and its derivatives only), narrow therapeutic window, and constant laboratory monitoring for their efficacy and safety. This lead to the development of novel factor Xa inhibitors which could be given orally, have predictable dose response relationship and are associated with lesser hemorrhagic complications. They include rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban among others. Apixaban has currently been approved for use in patients undergoing total knee or hip replacement surgery and to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Many trials are ongoing for apixaban to firmly establish its place in future, among the anti-thrombotic drugs. PMID:24554904

  19. Defective production of interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by stimulated monocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mũzes, G; Vien, C V; González-Cabello, R; Fehér, J; Gergely, P

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha activity by E. coli lipopolysaccharide-triggered monocytes was studied in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in various stages of activity. Monocytes from both groups of SLE patients produced significantly less tumour necrosis factor-alpha activity than those of age and sex matched healthy controls. However, interleukin-1 activity was only significantly reduced in patients with active stage of the disease. These findings indicate further immunoregulatory disturbances in monocyte function concerning SLE. PMID:2636360

  20. Direct evidence for rapid and selective induction of tumor neovascular permeability by tumor necrosis factor and a novel derivative, colloidal gold bound tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Farma, Jeffrey M; Puhlmann, Markus; Soriano, Perry A; Cox, Derrick; Paciotti, Giulio F; Tamarkin, Lawrence; Alexander, H Richard

    2007-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) causes regression of advanced cancers when used in isolation perfusion with melphalan; evidence suggests these effects are mediated via selective yet uncharacterized actions on tumor neovasculature. A novel derivative, colloidal gold bound TNF (cAu-TNF) has been shown to have similar antitumor effects as native TNF with less systemic toxicity in mice. These studies were done to determine their effects on tumor neovasculature, using in vivo video microscopy. Female C57BL/6 mice bearing 20 mm(2) MC38 or LLC tumors that are TNF sensitive and resistant tumors, respectively, had dorsal skinfold chambers implanted. The rate of interstitial accumulation of Texas red fluorescently labeled albumin in tumor and normal vasculature was measured after intravenous TNF, cAu-TNF or PBS. Changes in interstitial fluorescent intensity over time were quantified as a reflection of alterations in vascular permeability. MC38 bearing mice treated with TNF or cAu-TNF demonstrated a rapid, selective and significant increase in tracer accumulation in areas of neovasculature compared to those of normal vasculature. Experiments in LLC tumor bearing mice showed similar results. Monoclonal antibody against tissue factor partially abrogated the effects of TNF on MC38 neovasculature. These data provide direct evidence that TNF and cAu-TNF selectively and rapidly alter permeability in tumor neovasculature; a phenomenon that may be exploited to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutics to tumor.

  1. Multiple roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jonathan M; Daffner, Scott D; Watkins, Colleen M

    2015-09-01

    This review presents a summary of basic science evidence examining the influence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on secondary fracture healing. Multiple studies suggest that TNF-α, in combination with the host reservoir of peri-fracture mesenchymal stem cells, is a main determinant in the success of bone healing. Disease states associated with poor bone healing commonly have inappropriate TNF-α responses, which likely contributes to the higher incidence of delayed and nonunions in these patient populations. Appreciation of TNF-α in fracture healing may lead to new therapies to augment recovery and reduce the incidence of complications.

  2. Q Fever Risk in Patients Treated with Chronic Antitumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Astrahan, Anna; Odeh, Majed; Elias, Nizar; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays a pivotal role in the defense against infection with this Gram-negative coccobacillus. Theoretically, patients who are treated with anti-TNF-α medications are at risk for developing chronic Q fever. We present two patients who developed Q fever while being treated with anti-TNF-α agents and discuss the significance of timely diagnosis of C. burnetii infection in these patients. PMID:27656302

  3. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  4. An aptasensor for electrochemical detection of tumor necrosis factor in human blood.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Electrochemical aptasensors can detect disease markers such as cytokines to provide point-of-care diagnosis that is low-cost, rapid, specific and sensitive. Herein, we describe the development of an aptamer-based electrochemical sensor for detection and analysis of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) - a key inflammatory cytokine - in whole human blood. When testing spiked blood, a TNF-α detection limit of 58 pM (10 ng mL(-1)) and a linear range of 6 nM (100 ng mL(-1)) could be achieved. Furthermore, detection of TNF-α in mitogen stimulated whole blood was demonstrated.

  5. Q Fever Risk in Patients Treated with Chronic Antitumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Astrahan, Anna; Odeh, Majed; Elias, Nizar; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays a pivotal role in the defense against infection with this Gram-negative coccobacillus. Theoretically, patients who are treated with anti-TNF-α medications are at risk for developing chronic Q fever. We present two patients who developed Q fever while being treated with anti-TNF-α agents and discuss the significance of timely diagnosis of C. burnetii infection in these patients.

  6. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  7. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha on Sin Nombre Virus Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Netski, Dale M.; Krumpe, Peter; St. Jeor, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    Previous data indicate that immune mechanisms may be involved in developing capillary leakage during Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infection. Therefore, we investigated production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by human alveolar macrophages and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) after infection with SNV. In addition, we examined the effect of TNF-α on HUVEC monolayer leakage. Our results reveal that although TNF-α decreases accumulation of viral nucleoproteins, TNF-α levels do not change in SNV-infected cells. In addition, supernatants from SNV-infected human alveolar macrophages did not cause a significant increase in endothelial monolayer permeability. PMID:11090198

  8. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) in leishmaniasis. I. TNF alpha mediates host protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Parkinson, C; Millott, S; Severn, A; Carrier, M

    1990-01-01

    Genetically resistant CBA mice developed significantly larger lesions to Leishmania major infection when they were injected with rabbit anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific antibodies compared to control mice injected with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. BALB/c mice recovered from a previous infection following prophylactic sublethal irradiation also developed exacerbated lesions when treated with the anti-TNF antibody. Injection of TNF into the lesion of infected CBA mice significantly reduced the lesion development. Furthermore, TNF activates macrophages to kill Leishmania in vitro. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in mediating host-protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:2335376

  9. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  10. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hallahan, D E; Spriggs, D R; Beckett, M A; Kufe, D W; Weichselbaum, R R

    1989-01-01

    We report that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA is increased after treatment with x-rays in certain human sarcoma cells. An increase in TNF-alpha mRNA is accompanied by the increased production of TNF-alpha protein. TNF-alpha enhances radiation lethality in both TNF-alpha-producing and -nonproducing tumor cells. These data suggest that, in addition to the direct cytotoxic effects of x-rays, production of TNF-alpha may add to radiation lethality through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Combinations of TNF-alpha and therapeutic radiation may be useful in clinical cancer therapy. Images PMID:2602359

  11. Transglutaminase 2 expression is enhanced synergistically by interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α in human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, M; Punzi, F; Bondar, C; Chopita, N; Chirdo, F

    2012-04-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is expressed ubiquitously, has multiple physiological functions and has also been associated with inflammatory diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, autoimmunity and cancer. In particular, TG2 is expressed in small intestine mucosa where it is up-regulated in active coeliac disease (CD). The aim of this work was to investigate the induction of TG2 expression by proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-15] and the signalling pathways involved, in human epithelial and monocytic cells and in intestinal tissue from controls and untreated CD patients. Here we report that IFN-γ was the most potent inducer of TG2 expression in the small intestinal mucosa and in four [Caco-2, HT-29, Calu-6 and human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1)] of five cell lines tested. The combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ produced a strong synergistic effect. The use of selective inhibitors of signalling pathways revealed that induction of TG2 by IFN-γ was mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), while c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were required for TNF-α activation. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry and Western blot analysis showed that TG2 expression was blocked completely when stimulation by either TNF-α or IFN-γ was performed in the presence of nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors (sulphasalazine and BAY-117082). TG2 was up-regulated substantially by TNF-α and IFN-γ in intestinal mucosa in untreated CD compared with controls. This study shows that IFN-γ, a dominant cytokine in intestinal mucosa in active CD, is the most potent inducer of TG2, and synergism with TNF-α may contribute to exacerbate the pathogenic mechanism of CD. Selective inhibition of signalling pathways may be of therapeutic benefit.

  12. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α on Podocyte Expression of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 and in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Choon Hee; Fan, Jingyi; Lee, Eun Young; Kang, Jeong Suk; Lee, Seung Joo; Pyagay, Petr E.; Khoury, Charbel C.; Yeo, Tet-Kin; Khayat, Mark F.; Wang, Amy; Chen, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is believed to play a role in diabetic kidney disease. This study explores the specific effects of TNF-α with regard to nephropathy-relevant parameters in the podocyte. Methods Cultured mouse podocytes were treated with recombinant TNF-α and assayed for production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). TNF-α signaling of MCP-1 was elucidated by antibodies against TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 or TNFR2 or inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or Akt. In vivo studies were done on male db/m and type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Levels of TNF-α and MCP-1 were measured by RT-qPCR and ELISA in the urine, kidney and plasma of the two cohorts and correlated with albuminuria. Results Podocytes treated with TNF-α showed a robust increase (∼900%) in the secretion of MCP-1, induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Signaling of MCP-1 expression occurred through TNFR2, which was inducible by TNF-α ligand, but did not depend on TNFR1. TNF-α then proceeded via the NF-κB and the PI3K/Akt systems, based on the effectiveness of the inhibitors of those pathways. For in vivo relevance to diabetic kidney disease, TNF-α and MCP-1 levels were found to be elevated in the urine of db/db mice but not in the plasma. Conclusion TNF-α potently stimulates podocytes to produce MCP-1, utilizing the TNFR2 receptor and the NF-κB and PI3K/Akt pathways. Both TNF-α and MCP-1 levels were increased in the urine of diabetic db/db mice, correlating with the severity of diabetic albuminuria. PMID:25852733

  13. Transglutaminase 2 expression is enhanced synergistically by interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α in human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bayardo, M; Punzi, F; Bondar, C; Chopita, N; Chirdo, F

    2012-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is expressed ubiquitously, has multiple physiological functions and has also been associated with inflammatory diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, autoimmunity and cancer. In particular, TG2 is expressed in small intestine mucosa where it is up-regulated in active coeliac disease (CD). The aim of this work was to investigate the induction of TG2 expression by proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-15] and the signalling pathways involved, in human epithelial and monocytic cells and in intestinal tissue from controls and untreated CD patients. Here we report that IFN-γ was the most potent inducer of TG2 expression in the small intestinal mucosa and in four [Caco-2, HT-29, Calu-6 and human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1)] of five cell lines tested. The combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ produced a strong synergistic effect. The use of selective inhibitors of signalling pathways revealed that induction of TG2 by IFN-γ was mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), while c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were required for TNF-α activation. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry and Western blot analysis showed that TG2 expression was blocked completely when stimulation by either TNF-α or IFN-γ was performed in the presence of nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors (sulphasalazine and BAY-117082). TG2 was up-regulated substantially by TNF-α and IFN-γ in intestinal mucosa in untreated CD compared with controls. This study shows that IFN-γ, a dominant cytokine in intestinal mucosa in active CD, is the most potent inducer of TG2, and synergism with TNF-α may contribute to exacerbate the pathogenic mechanism of CD. Selective inhibition of signalling pathways may be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22385244

  14. Shedding of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 Induced by Protein A Decreases Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Availability and Inflammation during Systemic Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Giai, Constanza; Gonzalez, Cintia; Ledo, Camila; Garofalo, Ailin; Di Genaro, María Silvia; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are an important public health concern due to their increasing incidence and high rates of mortality. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen is highly related to its enormous capacity to evade the host immune response. The critical role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the initial host defense against systemic staphylococcal infection has been demonstrated in experimental models and may partially explain the lack of significant benefits observed in clinical trials attempting to neutralize this cytokine in septic patients. S. aureus protein A plays a key role in regulating inflammation through its ability to bind and signal through the TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1). In this study, we demonstrate that S. aureus, via protein A-mediated signaling, induces early shedding of TNFR1, which precedes the secretion of TNF-α in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained using a protein A-deficient mutant and tnfr1−/− mice strongly suggest that the increased levels of soluble TNFR1 present during experimental S. aureus infection may neutralize circulating TNF-α and impair the host inflammatory response. Early shedding of TNFR1 induced by protein A may constitute a novel mechanism by which S. aureus subverts the host immune response. PMID:24002060

  15. Tumor necrosis factor soluble receptors circulate during experimental and clinical inflammation and can protect against excessive tumor necrosis factor alpha in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Van Zee, K J; Kohno, T; Fischer, E; Rock, C S; Moldawer, L L; Lowry, S F

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), a primary mediator of systemic responses to sepsis and infection, can be injurious to the organism when present in excessive quantities. Here we report that two types of naturally occurring soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR-I and sTNFR-II) circulate in human experimental endotoxemia and in critically ill patients and demonstrate that they neutralize TNF alpha-induced cytotoxicity and immunoreactivity in vitro. Utilizing immunoassays that discriminate between total sTNFR-I and sTNFR-I not bound to TNF alpha, we show that sTNFR-I-TNF alpha complexes may circulate even in the absence of detectable free TNF alpha. To investigate the therapeutic possibilities of sTNFR-I, recombinant protein was administered to nonhuman primates with lethal bacteremia and found to attenuate hemodynamic collapse and cytokine induction. We conclude that soluble receptors for TNF alpha are inducible in inflammation and circulate at levels sufficient to block the in vitro cytotoxicity associated with TNF alpha levels observed in nonlethal infection. Administration of sTNFR-I can prevent the adverse pathologic sequelae caused by the exaggerated TNF alpha production observed in lethal sepsis. Images PMID:1317575

  16. Prognostic Factors in Cholinesterase Inhibitor Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sun, In O; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Lee, Kwang Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphates and carbamates are insecticides that are associated with high human mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors affecting survival in patients with cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) poisoning. Material/Methods This study included 92 patients with CI poisoning in the period from January 2005 to August 2013. We divided these patients into 2 groups (survivors vs. non-survivors), compared their clinical characteristics, and analyzed the predictors of survival. Results The mean age of the included patients was 56 years (range, 16–88). The patients included 57 (62%) men and 35 (38%) women. When we compared clinical characteristics between the survivor group (n=81, 88%) and non-survivor group (n=11, 12%), there were no differences in renal function, pancreatic enzymes, or serum cholinesterase level, except for serum bicarbonate level and APACHE II score. The serum bicarbonate level was lower in non-survivors than in survivors (12.45±2.84 vs. 18.36±4.73, P<0.01). The serum APACHE II score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (24.36±5.22 vs. 12.07±6.67, P<0.01). The development of pneumonia during hospitalization was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (n=9, 82% vs. n=31, 38%, P<0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum bicarbonate concentration, APACHE II score, and pneumonia during hospitalization were the important prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Conclusions Serum bicarbonate and APACHE II score are useful prognostic factors in patients with CI poisoning. Furthermore, pneumonia during hospitalization was also important in predicting prognosis in patients with CI poisoning. Therefore, prevention and active treatment of pneumonia is important in the management of patients with CI poisoning. PMID:26411989

  17. The effect of chronic periodontitis on serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Amini, Shahram; Khalilian, Amir; Barekatain, Majid; Mafi, Morvarid; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Rafei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the outbreak in dental science, oral and dental complications in Alzheimer are of the unsolved problems. It is assumed that tumor necrosis factor-α, which is a key factor in Alzheimer, has a relation with periodontal complications in patients with Alzheimer disease. The present study evaluated the effect of chronic periodontitis on serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in Alzheimer disease. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed on 80 patients with Alzheimer disease seeking medical care at Nour Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. Eighty patients with Alzheimer disease between 40 and 70 years old attended this study. Forty had chronic periodontitis (case group), and 40 patients had healthy periodontium (control group). Blood sample was taken, and serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α were measured by means of an ELISA Reader device. Independent T-Test was used to analyze data, and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean of tumor necrosis factor-α was 749.1 ng/μL in case group and 286.8 ng/μL in control group. Independent t-test showed that the mean of tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with Alzheimer and periodontitis was approximately three folds higher than the patients only with Alzheimer, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it seems that there is a difference between serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in patient with Alzheimer and chronic periodontitis and patients with Alzheimer disease and healthy periodontium. Tumor necrosis factor-α level in serum may act as a diagnostic marker of periodontal disease in patients with Alzheimer disease PMID:25426144

  18. Interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels in chronic Chagas disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, R H T; Azevedo, E de A N; Diniz, G T N; Cavalcanti, M da G A de M; de Oliveira, W; de Morais, C N L; Gomes, Y de M

    2015-07-01

    In Chagas disease, chronically infected individuals may be asymptomatic or may present cardiac or digestive complications, and it is well known that the human immune response is related to different clinical manifestations. Different patterns of cytokine levels have been previously described in different clinical forms of this disease, but contradictory results are reported. Our aim was to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in patients with asymptomatic and cardiac Chagas disease. The serum interleukin-10 levels in patients with cardiomyopathy were higher than those in asymptomatic patients, mainly in those without heart enlargement. Although no significant difference was observed in serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels among the patients, we found that cardiac patients also present high levels of this cytokine, largely those with heart dilatation. Therefore, these cytokines play an important role in chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. Follow-up investigations of these and other cytokines in patients with chronic Chagas disease need to be conducted to improve the understanding of the immunopathology of this disease.

  19. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  20. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    El-Kebir, M.; van der Kuip, M.; van Furth, A.M.; Kirschner, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveal a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23542051

  1. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urbaschek, R.; Urbaschek, B.

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are known to induce tumor necrosis; enhanced nonspecific resistance to bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and to radiation sickness; and tolerance to lethal doses of endotoxin. These beneficial effects are achieved by pretreatment with minute amounts of endotoxin. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) are among the mediators capable of invoking radioprotection or resistance to the consequences of cecal ligation and puncture. Both cytokines are potent inducers of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in C3H/HeJ mice (low responders to endotoxin). The number of splenic granulocyte-macrophage precursors was found to increase 5 days after injection of TNF in these mice. Although with IL-1 no increase in the number of granulocyte-macrophage colonies occurred in culture in the presence of serum CSF, a marked stimulation was observed when TNF was added. This stimulation of myelopoiesis observed in vivo and in vitro may be related to the radioprotective effect of TNF. The data presented suggest that TNF and IL-1 released after injection of endotoxin participate in the mediation of endotoxin-induced enhancement of nonspecific resistance and stimulation of hematopoiesis. 76 references.

  2. Production of interferon and tumour necrosis factor by cloned human natural cytotoxic lymphocytes and T cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A; Moore, M

    1987-08-01

    Cell lines and clones, derived from natural killer (NK) cell-enriched (B73.1+) peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from several human donors, that expressed distinct surface phenotypes and were cytolytically active against K562 target cells were tested for their capacity to produce interferon (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IFN and TNF were measured firstly in biological assays and secondly in specific immunoassays for alpha-IFN, gamma-IFN and tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). It was found that the majority of NK-derived lines and clones were highly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced relatively low or undetectable levels of gamma-IFN and TNF alpha following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin. No alpha-IFN was detected in supernatants from these cells. In comparison, cell lines and clones, derived from T lymphocyte (B73.1-) enriched PBL from the same donors were poorly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced higher levels of gamma-IFN and TNF than NK-derived cells. Thus, neither gamma-IFN nor TNF production were shown to correlate well with the capacity of NK-derived or T cell clones to effect cytotoxic action towards K562 in vitro. These results suggest that the co-production of gamma-IFN and TNF is not indicative of cytotoxic potential.

  3. Bioinformatic characterization and gene expression pattern of apoptosis inhibitor from Macrobrachium rosenbergii challenged with infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Vanaraja, Puganeshwaran; Easwvaran, Sarasvathi; Singh, Arun; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2011-12-01

    Apoptosis is genetically programmed cellular killing processes that execute unnecessary or infected cells. It plays an important role in embryogenesis, homeostasis, insect metamorphosis and immunity. Apoptosis inhibitor (MrIAP) was sequenced from the freshwater giant prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii using Illumina Solexa Genome Analyzer Technique. MrIAP consisted of 1753 base pair nucleotides encoded 535 polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 60 kDa. MrIAP amino acid sequence contains IAP superfamily domain between 5 and 490. The deduced amino acid sequences of the MrIAP were aligned with the other IAP family members. The highest sequence similarity was observed in IAP-5 from ant Camponotus floridanus (67%) followed by IAP from body louse Pediculus humanus corporis (66%) and the lowest (62%) in IAP-5 isoform-5 from common chimpanzee Pan troglodytes and IAP-5 from Aedes aegypti. The IAP phylogenetic tree showed that MrIAP closely related to other arthropod blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis, formed a sister group with IAP from a hemichordate acorn worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii and finally clustered together with IAPs from fish groups. The quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that significantly (P < 0.05) highest expression was noticed in hepatopancreas and significantly (P < 0.05) lowest expression in pleopods. Based on the results of gene expression analysis, MrIAP mRNA transcription in M. rosenbergii challenged to infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) was highly induced in hepatopancreas. The collective results of this study indicate that the MrIAP is an essential immune gene and influences the immune response against IHHNV infection in M. rosenbergii. PMID:21945707

  4. Trophoblastic cell lines generated from tumour necrosis factor receptor-deficient mice reveal specific functions for the two tumour necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, C A; Pace, J L; Banerjee, S; Phillips, T A; Hunt, J S

    1999-01-01

    In mice and humans, expression of the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNF-R1) gene in placental trophoblast cells is constitutive whereas expression of the TNF-R2 gene is developmentally programmed. In order to study the individual functions of TNF-R1 and -R2 in this lineage, cell lines were generated from placental explants of homozygous matings of gestation day 10 outbred mice (Swiss-Webster), TNF-R1-deficient (TNF-R1-/-) and TNF-R2-/- transgenic mice as well as the background strain for the TNF-R2-/- mice (WT, C57BL/6x129). All of the cells exhibited trophoblast markers; they contained cytokeratin intermediate filaments, expressed alkaline phosphatase activity and displayed transferrin receptors, but were negative for vimentin filaments and the macrophage marker, F4/80. Analysis of DNA by polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the expected TNF-R genotype in each line. In experiments testing the effects of recombinant mouse TNF-alpha (rmTNF-alpha) on viability and proliferation of the cell lines, rmTNF-alpha modestly but dose-dependently inhibited the growth of WT and TNF-R2-/- cells while having no effect on TNF-R1-/- cells. Actinomycin D-treated WT and, to a lesser extent, TNF-R2-/- cells, were more sensitive to growth inhibition than untreated cells whereas TNF-R1-/- cell responses remained unchanged. These data indicated that rmTNF-alpha inhibits growth of trophoblastic cells through TNF-R1 and that newly synthesized protein(s) provide partial protection against toxicity. In contrast to the receptor species-specific effects on cell growth exerted by rmTNF-alpha, both TNF-R mediated inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity. Collectively, the observations support the postulate that receptor expression is the key factor which determines the nature and extent of TNF-alpha effects on trophoblast cell growth and function.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-α induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition of renal cell carcinoma cells via a nuclear factor kappa B-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Tang; Sun, Guang-Huan; Hsu, Chih-Ying; Huang, Chang-Shuo; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Hsiao-Hsien; Sun, Kuang-Hui

    2011-09-01

    Chronic low dose of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation promotes tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor proliferation and metastasis. The plasma levels of TNF-α are increased in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Furthermore, high-grade clear cell RCC cell lines secrete more TNF-α than low-grade ones, and allow low-grade cell lines' gain of invasive ability. However, the molecular mechanism of TNF-α in mediating progression of RCC cells remains unclear. In the present study, TNF-α induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of RCC cells by repressing E-cadherin, promoting invasiveness and activating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 activity. RCC cells underwent promoted growth in vivo following stimulation with TNF-α. In addition, TNF-α induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Akt in a time-dependent manner, and increased nuclear translocation and promoter activity of NF-κB. To investigate the role of NF-κB activation in TNF-α-induced EMT of RCC, we employed chemical inhibitors (NF-κB activation inhibitor and Bay 11-7082) and transfected dominant-negative (pCMV-IκBαM) and overexpressive (pFLAG-p65) vectors of NF-κB. While overexpression of NF-κB p65 alone could induce E-cadherin loss in RCC, EMT phenotypes and MMP9 expressions induced by TNF-α were not reversed by the inhibitors of NF-κB activation. These results suggest that the TNF-α signaling pathway is involved in the tumorigenesis of RCC. However, NF-κB activation is not crucial for invasion and EMT enhanced by TNF-α in RCC cells.

  6. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α -and Interleukin-1-Induced Cellular Responses: Coupling Proteomic and Genomic Information

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Lee W.; Resing, Katheryn A.; Sizemore, Alecia W.; Heyen, Joshua W.; Cocklin, Ross R.; Pedrick, Nathan M.; Woods, H. Cary; Chen, Jake Y.; Goebl, Mark G.; Witzmann, Frank A.; Harrington, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediate the innate immune response. Dysregulation of the innate immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer, arthritis, and congestive heart failure. TNFα- and IL-1-induced changes in gene expression are mediated by similar transcription factors; however, TNFα and IL-1 receptor knock-out mice differ in their sensitivities to a known initiator (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) of the innate immune response. The contrasting responses to LPS indicate that TNFα and IL-1 regulate different processes. A large-scale proteomic analysis of TNFα- and IL-1-induced responses was undertaken to identify processes uniquely regulated by TNFα and IL-1. When combined with genomic studies, our results indicate that TNFα, but not IL-1, mediates cell cycle arrest. PMID:17503796

  7. CD45 negatively regulates tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Jenny; Petrova, Svetla; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-06-01

    CD45 is known to regulate signalling through many different surface receptors in diverse haemopoietic cell types. Here we report for the first time that CD45-/- bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) are more activated than CD45+/+ cells and that tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by BMDC and splenic dendritic cells (sDC), is increased following stimulation via Toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR9. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation, an important downstream consequence of TLR3 and TLR9 signalling, is also increased in CD45-/- BMDC. BMDC of CD45-/- mice also produce more TNF and IL-6 following stimulation with the cytokines TNF and interferon-alpha. These results show that TLR signalling is increased in CD45-/- dendritic cells and imply that CD45 is a negative regulator of TLR and cytokine receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:16771860

  8. Potentiated antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, L V; Mukhin, N A; Rameev, V V; Sarkisova, I A; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    We studied the efficiency and safety of a new homeopathic preparation Artrofoon containing affinely purified antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Artrofoon produced a positive antiinflammatory effect on the course of rheumatoid arthritis. This preparation reduced the severity of arthralgia (indexes of Li and Ritchie) and morning stiffness and decreased the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and contents of rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. One-month therapy improved the state of patients. Artrofoon was well tolerable. The preparation did not cause the ulcerogenic and nephrotoxic effects. Artrofoon holds much promise for combination therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (including severe articular-and-visceral forms) and complications after treatment with nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations.

  9. Skin Necrosis in a Patient with Factor V Leiden Mutation following Nipple Sparing Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Can

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and immediate breast reconstruction have replaced radical surgical interventions for the treatment of selected patients with breast cancer undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. NSM is technically a difficult procedure. After dissection, the remaining breast skin and nipple-areola complex (NAC) must be thin enough to be free of tumor tissue and thick enough to preserve tissue perfusion. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common cause of hereditary thrombophilia; thrombosis almost always develops in the venous system. The literature includes only a few case series of arterial thrombosis. The present study aimed to describe for the first time a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation that developed nipple-areola complex and skin necrosis, and multiple embolisms in the upper extremity arteries following NSM. PMID:26579335

  10. Canarypox Virus-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells Is Mediated by Apoptotic Cell Death and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ignatius, Ralf; Marovich, Mary; Mehlhop, Erin; Villamide, Loreley; Mahnke, Karsten; Cox, William I.; Isdell, Frank; Frankel, Sarah S.; Mascola, John R.; Steinman, Ralph M.; Pope, Melissa

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant avipox viruses are being widely evaluated as vaccines. To address how these viruses, which replicate poorly in mammalian cells, might be immunogenic, we studied how canarypox virus (ALVAC) interacts with primate antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). When human and rhesus macaque monocyte-derived DCs were exposed to recombinant ALVAC, immature DCs were most susceptible to infection. However, many of the infected cells underwent apoptotic cell death, and dying infected cells were engulfed by uninfected DCs. Furthermore, a subset of DCs matured in the ALVAC-exposed DC cultures. DC maturation coincided with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secretion and was significantly blocked in the presence of anti-TNF-α antibodies. Interestingly, inhibition of apoptosis with a caspase 3 inhibitor also reduced some of the maturation induced by exposure to ALVAC. This indicates that both TNF-α and the presence of primarily apoptotic cells contributed to DC maturation. Therefore, infection of immature primate DCs with ALVAC results in apoptotic death of infected cells, which can be internalized by noninfected DCs driving DC maturation in the presence of the TNF-α secreted concomitantly by exposed cells. This suggests an important mechanism that may influence the immunogenicity of avipox virus vectors. PMID:11070033

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of arctigenin, a lignan compound, on tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide production, and lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cho, J Y; Kim, A R; Yoo, E S; Baik, K U; Park, M H

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of arctigenin, a dibenzyl butyrolactone lignan compound, on tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production, and lymphocyte proliferation. Arctigenin inhibited strongly TNF-alpha production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 and differentiated human macrophage U937 with IC50 values of 5.0 and 3.9 microM, respectively, without displaying cytotoxicity. The TNF-alpha inhibitory effect of arctigenin in lipopolysaccharide-triggered RAW264.7 cells was increased by co-treatment with several known TNF-alpha inhibitors. It also potently attenuated T and B cell proliferation stimulated by concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 2.9 and 14.6 microM, respectively. In contrast, the compound showed a different pattern in lipopolysaccharide- and interferon (IFN)-gamma-induced NO production from RAW264.7 cells. Arctigenin inhibited NO release by IFN-gamma signal, whereas it significantly enhanced lipopolysaccharide-triggered NO production in RAW264.7 cells. The results suggested that arctigenin may regulate immune responses in activated macrophages and lymphocytes including TNF-alpha and NO production and lymphocyte proliferation.

  12. Function of the p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor "death domain" mediated by phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic mediator of inflammation that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of devastating clinical syndromes including septic shock. We have investigated the role of a TNF-responsive phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) for the cytotoxic and proinflammatory activity of TNF. We show here that the cytotoxicity signaled for by the so-called "death domain" of the p55 TNF receptor is associated with the activation of PC-PLC. The xanthogenate tricyclodecan-9-yl (D609), a specific and selective inhibitor of PC-PLC, blocked the cytotoxic action of TNF on L929 and Wehi164 cells. In vivo, D609 prevented both adhesion molecule expression in the pulmonary vasculature and the accompanying leukocyte infiltration in TNF-treated mice. More strikingly, D609 protects BALB/c mice from lethal shock induced either by TNF, lipopolysaccharide, or staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Together these findings imply PC-PLC as an important mediator of the pathogenic action of TNF, suggesting that PC-PLC may serve as a novel target for anti-inflammatory TNF antagonists. PMID:8760826

  13. The p38/RK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway regulates interleukin-6 synthesis response to tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Beyaert, R; Cuenda, A; Vanden Berghe, W; Plaisance, S; Lee, J C; Haegeman, G; Cohen, P; Fiers, W

    1996-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, the activities of which include effects on gene expression, cell growth and cell death. The biological signalling mechanisms which are responsible for these TNF effects remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the stress-responsive p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is involved in TNF-induced cytokine expression. TNF Treatment of cell activated the p38 MAP kinase pathway, as revealed by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase itself, activation of the substrate protein MAPKAP kinase-2, and culminating in the phosphorylation of the heat shock protein 27 (hsp27). Pretreatment of cells with the highly specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 completely blocked this TNF-induced activation of MAPKAP kinase-2 and hsp27 phosphorylation. Under the same conditions, SB203580 also completely inhibited TNF-induced synthesis of interleukin (IL)-6 and expression of a reporter gene that was driven by a minimal promoter containing two NF-Kappa B elements. However, neither TNF-induced DNA binding of TNF-Kappa B nor TNF-induced phosphorylation of its subunits was modulated by SB203580, suggesting that NF-Kappa B is not a direct target for the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Interestingly, TNF-induced cytotoxicity was not affected by SB203580, indicating that p38 MAP kinase might be an interesting target to interfere selectively with TNF-induced gene activation. Images PMID:8617238

  14. Malignancy risk of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockers: an overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuehong; Sun, Jianhong; Yang, Yuan; Huang, Yupeng; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to systematically review the malignancy risk of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) agents. Databases of PubMed Medline, OVID EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched to identify published systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized control trials, observational studies, and case series that evaluated malignancy risk of anti-TNFα blockers. Search time duration was restricted from January 1st, 2000 to July 16th, 2015. Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaires were used to assess the quality of included reviews. Two methodology trained reviewers separately and repeatedly screened searched studies according to study selection criteria, collected data, and assessed quality. Totally, 42 reviews proved eligible with only one Cochrane review. Anti-TNFα antagonists were extensively used to treat various diseases; nevertheless, malignancy risks were most commonly described in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In RA patients, no increased risks of breast cancer, lymphoma, and non-melanoma skin cancer were found, but if the use of anti-TNFα agents was associated with elevated risk of overall malignancy was still uncertainty. In IBD patients, the use of anti-TNFα inhibitors was not connected with enhanced risk of overall cancer. No increased cancer risk was found in other disease conditions. Twenty-nine reviews were rated as good quality, 12 as moderate, and one as poor. There are no sufficient evidences to draw the conclusion that anti-TNFα blockers have relationship with increased malignancy risk.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  16. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  17. The Possible Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yagihashi, Soroku; Toyota, Takayoshi

    2003-01-01

    In this review, the authors provide evidences that imply the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, especially diabetic polyneuropathy. Under chronic hyperglycemia, endogenous TNF-α production is accelerated in microvascular and neural tissues, which may undergo an increased microvascular permeability, hypercoagulability, and nerve damage, thus initiating and promoting the development of characteristic lesions of diabetic microangiopathy and polyneuropathy. Enhanced TNF-α production may also promote atherosclerosis due to increased insulin resistance and the expression of adhesion molecules. Clinical application of specific agents that suppress production and/or activity of TNF-α may inhibit the development and exacerbation of chronic diabetic complications. PMID:14630568

  18. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, Jason P.; Cuff, Simone M.; Yong, Audrey A.; Wang, Eddie C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members’ roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined. PMID:21861782

  19. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 alpha, and interleukin-6 during murine coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Magee, D M

    1995-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were induced in mice infected with Coccidioides immitis. Analyses of the cytokine profiles of two inbred mouse strains which differ in their susceptibility to pulmonary challenge with C. immitis revealed higher levels of IL-6 in lungs from DBA/2 mice (resistant strain) than in those from BALB/c mice (susceptible strain) beginning at day 6 and continuing through day 15 postinfection. Spleen cells from both mouse strains secreted TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, and IL-6 in vitro in response to stimulation with killed spherules but differed in that spleen cells from the resistant strain produced increased levels of these cytokines earlier after pulmonary challenge and at increased levels throughout the course of the disease. PMID:7558338

  20. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha in murine astrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, A; Rubio, N

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in demyelination induced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in SJL/J mice. Using a cytolytic bioassay and ELISA, we have detected and quantified a cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in supernatants from astrocyte cultures infected in vitro with TMEV. TNF was detected only after TMEV-specific infection of astrocyte cultures (approximately 200-400 U/ml). In vitro TNF synthesis appeared in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was produced by both SJL/J (a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination) and BALB/c (a resistant strain) astrocytes. The precise nature of TNF activity was further assessed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and antibody neutralization. These results indicate an active role for astrocytes as accessory immune cells in our experimental model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:8478023

  1. Tumor necrosis factor antagonists in the treatment of multicentric reticulohistiocytosis: Current clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, HONGJUN; WU, CHUNMEI; WU, MENGYUN; ZHOU, YAOU; ZHU, HONGLIN; LI, YISHA; YOU, YUNHUI; LUO, HUI; WANG, LIJING; ZUO, XIAOXIA

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare and debilitating systemic disorder characterized by cutaneous nodules and destructive polyarthritis. Due to its unknown etiology, the treatment of MRH varies with different rates of success, which causes treatment options to be rather independent and empirical. In the present study, a case of a 48-year-old woman with a 12-month history of polyarthralgia and skin nodules was reported. Biopsy samples, which were obtained from her skin eruption exhibited dermal infiltration with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells. Immunohistochemical staining indicated positivity for CD68. The patient was diagnosed with MRH and treated with a combination therapy of infliximab, prednisolone and methotrexate. Her symptoms improved markedly within 2 weeks. Following the results of this case study, a systematic review of 17 cases of MRH treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists was performed, and the efficacy of anti-TNF treatment in MRH was analyzed. PMID:27175854

  2. Endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-8 release in humans.

    PubMed

    van Deventer, S J; Hart, M; van der Poll, T; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A

    1993-02-01

    Neutrophil recruitment and activation are thought to play an important role in tissue damage observed in septicemia. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a small cytokine with important neutrophil-activating and chemoattractant properties. IL-8 release was studied after injection of human volunteers with low doses of either endotoxin (2 ng/kg of body weight) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) (50 micrograms/m2). After TNF-alpha injection, IL-8 appeared at 30 min, whereas increased levels were first observed after 90 min in endotoxin-challenged volunteers. Peak levels were measured at 120 min after both endotoxin (192 +/- 193 ng/L) and TNF alpha (500 +/- 236 ng/L) injection. These data indicate that IL-8 is released in humans after injection of endotoxin and TNF alpha and suggest that endotoxin-induced IL-8 release is mediated by TNF alpha.

  3. Trapped without a diagnosis: Tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    Kirresh, Ali; Everitt, Alex; Kon, Onn Min; DasGupta, Ranan; Pickering, Matthew C; Lachmann, Helen J

    2016-08-01

    Tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene. It is characterised by recurrent episodes of myalgia, followed by prolonged fever, migratory rashes, headache, serositis, arthralgia, abdominal pain and periorbital oedema. We describe a 49-year-old man with a self-limiting episode of paraparesis who reported recurrent bouts of abdominal symptoms and headaches since childhood. He had a persistent inflammatory response with night sweats and weight loss. We diagnosed TRAPS 2 years after having identified a TNFRSF1A gene mutation. His symptoms and inflammatory response resolved dramatically with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra. PMID:26965498

  4. Inherited variability of tumor necrosis factor production and susceptibility to infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, J C; Kwiatkowski, D

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical mediator of host defense against infection but may cause severe pathology when produced in excess. Individuals vary in the amount of TNF produced when their peripheral blood mononuclear cells are stimulated in vitro, and family studies indicate that much of this variability is genetically determined. Since the TNF response to infection is partly regulated at the transcriptional level, TNF promoter polymorphisms have been the subject of intense interest as potential determinants of disease susceptibility. A single nucleotide polymorphism at nucleotide -308 relative to the transcriptional start site has been associated with susceptibility to severe malaria, leishmaniasis, scarring trachoma, and lepromatous leprosy. Some experimental data indicate that this polymorphism acts to upregulate TNF transcription, but this remains controversial. Detailed analysis of multiple genetic markers at this locus and more sophisticated investigations of TNF transcriptional regulation, in different cell types and with a wide range of stimuli, are required to understand the molecular basis of these disease associations.

  5. A simple assay for tumor necrosis factor using HEp-2 target cells.

    PubMed

    Müzes, G; Vien, C V; Gonzalez-Cabello, R; Gergely, P; Feher, J

    1989-09-01

    We developed a sensitive bioassay system for the determination of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) using HEp-2 adherent human epipharynx carcinoma cells as targets. TNF from separated human monocytes was triggered by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In a 24 hr 3H-thymidine incorporation assay, TNF-like activity was seen to reproducibly destroy radiolabeled target cells, i.e., inhibits thymidine incorporation and causes detachment of adherent HEp-2 cells. HEp-2 cells were insensitive to human interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). In contrast, human interferon-alpha and gamma were also cytotoxic for target cells. Monocyte supernatants stimulated by LPS, however, failed to contain detectable amounts of interferons. PMID:2484315

  6. Tungsten treatment prevents tumor necrosis factor-induced injury of brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Terada, L S; Willingham, I R; Guidot, D M; Shibao, G N; Kindt, G W; Repine, J E

    1992-02-01

    Exposure to recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or calcium ionophore (A23187) for 4 h increased (P less than 0.05) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from cultured bovine brain endothelial cells (EC). In contrast, treatment with endotoxin or interleukin-1 did not increase (P greater than 0.05). LDH release from brain EC. Pretreatment with tungsten decreased (P less than 0.05) xanthine oxidase activity in brain EC and decreased (P less than 0.05) LDH release from brain EC following exposure to TNF. Our results suggest that TNF-alpha injures brain microvascular EC and that this effect may be mediated by xanthine oxidase.

  7. Hard metal pneumoconiosis and the association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, M W; Paine, R; Davenport, R B; Strieter, R M

    1992-12-01

    Hard metal pneumoconiosis is a recently recognized occupational lung disease associated with the exposure to cobalt fumes in the workplace. Chronic exposure in susceptible individuals results in interstitial lung disease histopathologically manifested as interstitial fibrosis with an associated mononuclear cell infiltrate and the presence of "cannibalistic" multinucleated giant cells in the alveolar airspaces. The majority of patients present with symptoms of chronic cough and dyspnea. Interestingly, in addition, patients uniformly report significant weight loss out of proportion to their degree of respiratory impairment. In this case report we demonstrate the association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and hard metal (cobalt) pneumoconiosis and suggest that TNF may have a potential role in the etiology of the constitutional symptoms and the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease.

  8. Linkage map of the human major histocompatibility complex including the tumor necrosis factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.C.; Katzman, P.; Alicot, E.M.; Koller, B.H.; Geraghty, D.E.; Orr, H.T.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T.

    1987-12-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. gene pair has been linked in the human major histocompatibility complex to HLA-B, HLA-C, and, tentatively, HLA-E and HLA-A on one side and to the class III complement/steroid 21-hydroxylase gene cluster on the other by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The TNF genes are located 200 kilobases (kb) centromeric of HLA-B and about 350 kb telomeric of the class III cluster. Together with previous data on the linkage and structures of the class II and class III regions, a restriction map of the entire human major histocompatibility complex of about 3500 kb has been prepared.

  9. Production of tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1 by monocytes of patients with previous Yersinia arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Repo, H; Jäättelä, M; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Hurme, M

    1988-01-01

    We studied production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) by using purified peripheral blood monocytes of patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA) and of healthy HLA-B27 positive and negative controls. Lipopolysaccharide-exposed cells of HLA-B27 positive and negative patients, and those of HLA-B27 positive controls, generated significantly more TNF than did HLA-B27 negative control cells. There was a positive correlation between the levels of TNF and IL-1. Our results give credence to the view that augmented production of phlogistic mediators may contribute to inflammatory symptoms in patients with HLA-B27 associated disease. PMID:3262459

  10. Successful treatment of childhood onset refractory polyarteritis nodosa with tumor necrosis factor alpha blockade.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Jeffrey; Arroyo, Ramon

    2005-08-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare systemic necrotizing vasculitis of small- and medium-sized arteries that affects patients of all ages. Its incidence ranges from 2 to 9 per million people. The 5-year survival rate is 13% in untreated patients and 77.6% with modern therapy. Standard treatment includes corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Despite aggressive medical management, 22.4% of patients die within 5 years, and of the survivors, medication-induced morbidity is frequent. There is great need for better treatment modalities in terms of safety and efficacy. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy with polyarteritis nodosa refractory to all known standard treatments. After 9 years of persistently active disease, at the age of 14, he was successfully managed with the tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist, etanercept.

  11. Modulation of Endogenous Hormone Action by Recombinant Human Tumor Necrosis Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Robert S.; Donner, David B.; Fletcher Starnes, H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1987-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in the toxic manifestations of overwhelming bacterial infection and in the tissue wasting that often accompanies prolonged infections and malignancy. We have examined a possible role of TNF in the early metabolic alterations following acute tissue injury or sepsis. Recombinant human TNF stimulated rat liver amino acid uptake up to 5-fold in vivo and there was a concomitant increase in plasma glucagon. In vitro TNF had no direct effect on hepatocyte amino acid uptake, but it markedly enhanced the stimulation of amino acid transport by glucagon, without an alteration in binding of glucagon to hepatocytes. This permissive effect of TNF on glucagon action represents an interrelationship between the immune and endocrine systems, and it may help to explain the mechanism of hormonal regulation of both the anabolic and catabolic responses to acute injury.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α: regulation of renal function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic cytokine that becomes elevated in chronic inflammatory states such as hypertension and diabetes and has been found to mediate both increases and decreases in blood pressure. High levels of TNF-α decrease blood pressure, whereas moderate increases in TNF-α have been associated with increased NaCl retention and hypertension. The explanation for these disparate effects is not clear but could simply be due to different concentrations of TNF-α within the kidney, the physiological status of the subject, or the type of stimulus initiating the inflammatory response. TNF-α alters renal hemodynamics and nephron transport, affecting both activity and expression of transporters. It also mediates organ damage by stimulating immune cell infiltration and cell death. Here we will summarize the available findings and attempt to provide plausible explanations for such discrepancies. PMID:23515717

  13. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. New Approaches in Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonism for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis: Certolizumab Pegol.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Alberto; Piga, Matteo; Lubrano, Ennio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Floris, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is still under discussion but great advances have been made in the last 2 decades that confirm the central role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in its inflammatory milieu. New therapeutic approaches have been proposed, and new molecules with anti-TNF-α activity have been chemically altered to improve their pharmacological properties. Certolizumab pegol (CZP) is a PEGylated Fc-free anti-TNF that has been shown clinically to be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), skin psoriasis, and PsA. This article summarizes available data on its clinical efficacy and safety profile in the treatment of patients with PsA.

  15. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  16. Fatigue mechanisms in patients with cancer: effects of tumor necrosis factor and exercise on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St Pierre, B. A.; Kasper, C. E.; Lindsey, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer and its therapy. However, the specific mechanisms underlying cancer fatigue are unclear. One physiologic mechanism may involve changes in skeletal muscle protein stores or metabolite concentration. A reduction in skeletal muscle protein stores may result from endogenous tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or from TNF administered as antineoplastic therapy. This muscle wasting would require patients to exert an unusually high amount of effort to generate adequate contractile force during exercise performance or during extended periods of sitting or standing. This additional effort could result in the onset of fatigue. Additionally, cancer fatigue may develop or become exacerbated during exercise as a consequence of changes in the concentration of skeletal muscle metabolites. These biochemical alterations may interfere with force that is produced by the muscle contractile proteins. These physiologic changes may play a role in the decision to include exercise in the rehabilitation plans of patients with cancer. They also may affect ideas about fatigue.

  17. Extensive genetic polymorphism in the human tumor necrosis factor region and relation to extended HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Jongeneel, C V; Briant, L; Udalova, I A; Sevin, A; Nedospasov, S A; Cambon-Thomsen, A

    1991-01-01

    We have identified three polymorphic microsatellites (which we call TNFa, TNFb, and TNFc) within a 12-kilobase region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that includes the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) locus. TNFc is located within the first intron of the TNF-beta gene and has only 2 alleles. TNFa and TNFb are 3.5 kilobases upstream (telomeric) of the TNF-beta gene and have at least 13 and 7 alleles, respectively. TNFa, -b, and -c alleles are in linkage disequilibrium with alleles at other loci within the MHC, including class I, class II, and class III. TNFa, -b, and -c alleles are also associated with extended HLA haplotypes. These TNF polymorphisms will allow a thorough genetic analysis of the involvement of TNF in MHC-linked pathologies. Images PMID:1946393

  18. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome: are they tumour necrosis factor-mediated disorders?

    PubMed

    Yadav, M; Kamath, K R; Iyngkaran, N; Sinniah, M

    1991-12-01

    A consecutive series of 24 patients with clinical features of primary dengue infection and 22 controls (14 patients with viral fever of unknown origin and 8 healthy subjects) were assayed for serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). The acute sera of the 24 patients with clinical dengue infection were positive for dengue virus-specific IgM antibody. Clinically, 8 had dengue fever (DF), 14 dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and 2 dengue shock syndrome (DSS). All 16 patients with DHF/DSS had significantly elevated serum TNF levels but the 8 DF patients had TNF levels equivalent to that in the 22 controls. A case is made for augmented TNF production having a role for the pathophysiological changes observed in DHF/DSS and mediator modulation as a possible therapeutic approach to treatment.

  19. Elevated tumour necrosis factor in dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Vitarana, T; de Silva, H; Withana, N; Gunasekera, C

    1991-06-01

    Acute and convalescent phase blood samples from five dengue fever (DF) patients and four dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients were tested for the presence of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). While all blood samples showed elevated levels, the acute phase blood sample levels were much higher. The mean TNF level in the acute samples of the five DF cases was 862 while in the DHF cases the level was 1722 pg/ml. Though the sample size is small, the difference appears to be statistically significant. Unlike in DF the distinctive features in DHF are the occurrence of shock, thrombocytopaenic purpura and sometimes disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Increased TNF levels have not been reported in the literature in association with DHF, although it has been shown to contribute to these features which appear in some other diseases.

  20. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  1. Use of the tumor necrosis factor-blockers for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Gupta, Milli; Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy for inflammatory bowel disease represents the most important advance in the care of these patients since the publication of the National Co-operative Crohn’s disease study thirty years ago. The recommendations of numerous consensus groups worldwide are now supported by a wealth of clinical trials and several meta-analyses. In general, it is suggested that tumor necrosis factor-α blockers (TNFBs) are indicated (1) for persons with moderately-severe Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have failed two or more causes of glucocorticosteroids and an acceptably long cause (8 wk to 12 wk) of an immune modulator such as azathioprine or methotrexate; (2) non-responsive perianal disease; and (3) severe UC not responding to a 3-d to 5-d course of steroids. Once TNFBs have been introduced and the patient is responsive, therapy given by the IV and SC rate must be continued. It remains open to definitive evidence if concomitant immune modulators are required with TNFB maintenance therapy, and when or if TNFB may be weaned and discontinued. The supportive evidence from a single study on the role of early versus later introduction of TNFB in the course of a patient’s illness needs to be confirmed. The risk/benefit profile of TNFB appears to be acceptable as long as the patient is immunized and tested for tuberculosis and viral hepatitis before the initiation of TNFB, and as long as the long-term adverse effects on the development of lymphoma and other tumors do not prone to be problematic. Because the rates of benefits to TNFB are modest from a population perspective and the cost of therapy is very high, the ultimate application of use of TNFBs will likely be established by cost/benefit studies. PMID:23002356

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

  3. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator of macrophage helminthotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J; Goldenberg, S; Meltzer, M S; Pearce, E

    1990-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated macrophages are cytotoxic for larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. That soluble secreted factors may mediate this cytotoxicity was suggested by the observation that culture supernatant fluids from stimulated macrophages also exhibited larvacidal activity. These fluids contain the monokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Several observations indicated that TNF is directly toxic to schistosome larvae. Cytotoxic sera taken from BCG- or S. mansoni-immunized mice after endotoxin challenge killed schistosomula in vitro, and upon gel filtration the larvacidal factor(s) in the sera co-eluted with the tumoricidal activity defined as TNF. Recombinant-derived TNF exhibited direct toxicity to schistosomula at high concentrations, or at lower concentrations in the presence of IFN gamma. The larvacidal activity of macrophage supernatant fluids was abrogated by addition of either anti-TNF antisera or Zn+2, which has been shown to inhibit TNF-induced damage of tumour cells. Anti-TNF and Zn+2 likewise suppressed schistosomulum killing by lymphokine-activated peritoneal macrophages or the IC-21 macrophage line, indicating that TNF also plays a role in the effector mechanism of larval killing by whole cells. PMID:2314921

  4. Interleukin 10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Pregnancy: Aspects of Interest in Clinical Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Brogin Moreli, Jusciele; Cirino Ruocco, Ana Maria; Vernini, Joice Monaliza; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding the action of the cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in pregnancy and to emphasize the factors that are of interest to clinical obstetrics. The literature highlights several actions of IL-10 and TNF-α during pregnancy. The actions of these cytokines seem to be antagonistic and dependent on the balance between them, which is orchestrated by the specific immunosuppressive action of IL-10. TNF-α has a characteristic inflammatory action, and it is an additional diabetogenic factor in pregnancy. The loss of the control of the production of these cytokines, with increase of TNF-α, is related to the risk for developing obstetric complications, particularly recurrent fetal loss, gestational diabetes mellitus, hypertensive syndromes, and fetal growth restriction. However, study results are controversial and are not clearly defined. These issues are attributed to the heterogeneity of the studies, particularly regarding their sample sizes and sources, the evaluation methods, and the multiplicity of factors and conditions that influence cytokine production. These questions are fundamental and should be addressed in future investigations to obtain more consistent results that can be applied to obstetric practice. PMID:22462002

  5. Genetic association studies of tumour necrosis factor alpha and beta and tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 polymorphisms across the clinical spectrum of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, G V; Kirk, C W; Middleton, D; Droogan, A G; Hawkins, S A; Patterson, C C; Graham, C A

    1999-11-01

    Allelic association studies with microsatellite markers around the tumour-necrosis factor (TNF) genes have demonstrated significantly different allele distributions of TNF markers (a and b) between relapsing-remitting/secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) (RR/SPMS) patients and normal controls. Considering the suspected genetic and immunological heterogeneity in MS, we tested this association in primary progressive MS (PPMS) patients. Elevated levels of serum soluble TNF receptors (sTNF-R) are reported in patients with gadolinium enhancing lesions, and animal models suggest a possible therapeutic role of sTNF-RI in MS. Thus we performed similar association studies using markers for the TNF-R genes. Gene association studies were carried out on 199-216 normal controls, 174 RR/SPMS patients and 102 PPMS patients using polymorphic dinucleotide repeat TNF markers (a, b and d), and separate markers for TNF-RI and TNF-RII. Forward primers were fluorescently labelled, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were analysed on a fluorescent fragment analyser, and Genescan 672 software was used for allele sizing. Samples were typed for HLA-DR antigens using PCR technology and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. TNFa marker allele distributions differed significantly between PPMS patients and controls (P = 0.028), largely attributable to an increase in the 118-bp TNFa allele in PPMS patients (P = 0.00024). Allele distributions were similar in PPMS and RR/SPMS patients (P = 0.91). Logistic regression analysis, however, indicated that these associations were not independent of that with HLA-DRB1*15. For the TNFb marker, the 127-bp allele showed association with both patient categories (PPMS vs. controls, P = 0.010; RR/SPMS vs. controls, P = 0.027), whilst the 128-bp allele occurred more frequently in controls (PPMS vs. controls, P = 0.036: RR/SPMS vs. controls, P = 0.0009). As with the TNFa 118 bp allele, the association with TNFb was not independent of the HLA

  6. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  7. Persistently elevated soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Rogy, M A; Coyle, S M; Oldenburg, H S; Rock, C S; Barie, P S; Van Zee, K J; Smith, C G; Moldawer, L L; Lowry, S F

    1994-02-01

    The appearance of endogenously produced inhibitors against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (soluble TNF-receptor type I, sTNFR-I) and interleukin-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-1ra) was evaluated acutely in five normal patients after experimental endotoxemia lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and prospectively during a one to 11 week period in 12 septic, critically ill patients. Increased levels of both factors remained detectable in the circulation for up to 24 hours after LPS (2 nanograms per kilogram body weight) administration in normal patients. Despite free TNF-a activity being detected only sporadically (3 percent of the samples) and that IL-1 beta was never detectable in the patients in the intensive care unit, IL-6 bioactivity was present in 90 percent of initial samples. Circulating sTNFR-I levels up to 62,000 picograms per milliliter and IL-1ra levels of 14,800 picograms per milliliter were noted in the critically ill patients and remained consistently detectable throughout the extended period of evaluation. While there was no difference in IL-1ra levels between patients who survived or ultimately died, sTNFR-I levels were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in survivors compared with nonsurvivors. A correlation between circulating sTNFR-I and concurrent cortisol levels (r = 0.64; p < 0.002) was also noted. Furthermore, a correlation between sTNFR-I and the severity of initial insult, as assessed by APACHE II scores (r = 0.54; p < 0.01) was demonstrable. These naturally occurring cytokine antagonists likely represent additional indicators of the presence of an infectious or other inflammatory process and seem to persist in the circulation even during conditions in which their respective proinflammatory cytokines are not demonstrable. PMID:8173722

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 antagonists alleviate inflammatory skin changes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Surguladze, David; Deevi, Dhanvanthri; Claros, Nidia; Corcoran, Erik; Wang, Su; Plym, Mary Jane; Wu, Yan; Doody, Jacqueline; Mauro, David J; Witte, Larry; Busam, Klaus J; Pytowski, Bronek; Rodeck, Ulrich; Tonra, James R

    2009-07-15

    Cancer patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy often experience an acneiform rash of uncertain etiology in skin regions rich in pilosebaceous units. Currently, this condition is treated symptomatically with very limited, often anecdotal success. Here, we show that a monoclonal antibody targeting murine EGFR, ME1, caused a neutrophil-rich hair follicle inflammation in mice, similar to that reported in patients. This effect was preceded by the appearance of lipid-filled hair follicle distensions adjacent to enlarged sebaceous glands. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), localized immunohistochemically to this affected region of the pilosebaceous unit, was specifically up-regulated by ME1 in skin but not in other tissues examined. Moreover, skin inflammation was reduced by cotreatment with the TNFalpha signaling inhibitor, etanercept, indicating the involvement of TNFalpha in this inflammatory process. Interleukin-1, a cytokine that frequently acts in concert with TNFalpha, is also involved in this process given the efficacy of the interleukin-1 antagonist Kineret. Our results provide a mechanistic framework to develop evidence-based trials for EGFR antibody-induced skin rash in patients with cancer. PMID:19584274

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 antagonists alleviate inflammatory skin changes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Surguladze, David; Deevi, Dhanvanthri; Claros, Nidia; Corcoran, Erik; Wang, Su; Plym, Mary Jane; Wu, Yan; Doody, Jacqueline; Mauro, David J; Witte, Larry; Busam, Klaus J; Pytowski, Bronek; Rodeck, Ulrich; Tonra, James R

    2009-07-15

    Cancer patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy often experience an acneiform rash of uncertain etiology in skin regions rich in pilosebaceous units. Currently, this condition is treated symptomatically with very limited, often anecdotal success. Here, we show that a monoclonal antibody targeting murine EGFR, ME1, caused a neutrophil-rich hair follicle inflammation in mice, similar to that reported in patients. This effect was preceded by the appearance of lipid-filled hair follicle distensions adjacent to enlarged sebaceous glands. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), localized immunohistochemically to this affected region of the pilosebaceous unit, was specifically up-regulated by ME1 in skin but not in other tissues examined. Moreover, skin inflammation was reduced by cotreatment with the TNFalpha signaling inhibitor, etanercept, indicating the involvement of TNFalpha in this inflammatory process. Interleukin-1, a cytokine that frequently acts in concert with TNFalpha, is also involved in this process given the efficacy of the interleukin-1 antagonist Kineret. Our results provide a mechanistic framework to develop evidence-based trials for EGFR antibody-induced skin rash in patients with cancer.

  10. Local delivery of antitumor necrosis factor-α through conjugation to hyaluronic acid: dosing strategies and early healing effects in a rat burn model.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Azofiefa, Andrea; Fisch, Evan; Washburn, Newell R

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure dose-response effects of topical delivery of inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) through conjugation to hyaluronic acid in a rat burn model to determine effects on inflammatory responses, burn progression, and early stages of healing. Monoclonal antibodies against TNF-α were conjugated to hyaluronic acid and applied topically in a rat partial-thickness burn model. Metrics of inflammatory responses and tissue necrosis were measured as well as the quantitative analysis of collagen composition and organization. The minimum effective conjugated antibody dose was found to be 100 μg with three applications 48 hours apart. Nonviable tissue thicknesses decreased with increasing dose and dose frequency. Free antibody retarded macrophage infiltration in the periphery but not at the surface, while the conjugated antibody was able to hinder macrophage infiltration at both the periphery and the surface. Quantification of collagen I and III staining ratios at days 4, 7, and 14 and quantitative image analysis of collagen organization at day 14 demonstrated differences between saline and conjugate treatment. This correlated with increases in re-epithelialization observed in conjugate-treated sites. Reductions in inflammatory markers and secondary tissue necrosis under treatment with the conjugates were understood in terms of differences in antibody transport compared to nonconjugated antibody. Differences in collagen composition and organization at Day 14 suggested that the reductions in inflammatory responses altered early healing responses. These results indicate anti-TNF-α conjugated to hyaluronic acid can be an effective treatment for reducing secondary necrosis and improving healing outcomes in burns.

  11. Differences and Similarities in TRAIL- and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Necroptotic Signaling in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sosna, Justyna; Philipp, Stephan; Fuchslocher Chico, Johaiber; Saggau, Carina; Fritsch, Jürgen; Föll, Alexandra; Plenge, Johannes; Arenz, Christoph; Pinkert, Thomas; Kalthoff, Holger; Trauzold, Anna; Schmitz, Ingo; Schütze, Stefan; Adam, Dieter

    2016-10-15

    Recently, a type of regulated necrosis (RN) called necroptosis was identified to be involved in many pathophysiological processes and emerged as an alternative method to eliminate cancer cells. However, only a few studies have elucidated components of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis useful for anticancer therapy. Therefore, we have compared this type of cell death to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated necroptosis and found similar signaling through acid and neutral sphingomyelinases, the mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi, Atg5, and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Notably, executive mechanisms of both TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis are independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), and depletion of p38α increases the levels of both types of cell death. Moreover, we found differences in signaling between TNF- and TRAIL-mediated necroptosis, e.g., a lack of involvement of ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and Atg16L1 in executive mechanisms of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis. Furthermore, we discovered indications of an altered involvement of mitochondrial components, since overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 protected Jurkat cells from TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis, and overexpression of Bcl-XL diminished only TRAIL-induced necroptosis in Colo357 cells. Furthermore, TRAIL does not require receptor internalization and endosome-lysosome acidification to mediate necroptosis. Taken together, pathways described for TRAIL-mediated necroptosis and differences from those for TNF-mediated necroptosis might be unique targets to increase or modify necroptotic signaling and eliminate tumor cells more specifically in future anticancer approaches. PMID:27528614

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nerve growth factor synergistically induce iNOS in pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, N J; Taglialatela, G

    2000-11-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has been reported in tangle-bearing neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can be induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). High CNS levels of TNFalpha are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, where neurons dependent on neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) are particularly affected. In this study we determined the effect of TNFalpha on iNOS in NGF-responsive pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We found that while TNFalpha and NGF alone were unable to induce iNOS, their simultaneous addition resulted in iNOS induction and the release of nitric oxide. Our results suggest that synergistic iNOS induction by TNFalpha and NGF may occur in selective population of NGF-responsive neurons in the presence of elevated CNS levels of TNFalpha.

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sidman, James D.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor pathway has been implicated in various tumors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions such as recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Due to the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors in RRP, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have been utilized as adjuvant therapy. This case series examines the response to EGFR inhibitors in RRP. Four patients with life-threatening RRP were treated with EGFR inhibitors. Operative frequency and anatomical Derkay scores were calculated prior to, and following EGFR inhibitor treatment via retrospective chart review. The anatomical Derkay score decreased for all four patients after initiation of EGFR inhibitor therapy. In one patient, the operative frequency increased after switching to an intravenous inhibitor after loss of control with an oral inhibitor. In the other patients there was a greater than 20% decrease in operative frequency in one and a more than doubling in the time between procedures in two.  This study suggests that EGFR inhibitors are a potential adjuvant therapy in RRP and deserve further study in a larger number of patients. PMID:24795806

  14. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiuping; Andresen1, Bradley T.; Hill, Michael; Zhang, Jing; Booth, Frank; Zhang, Cuihua

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cell injury and dysfunction are the major triggers of pathophysiological processes leading to cardiovascular disease. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) has been implicated in atherosclerosis, hypertension, coronary artery disease, vascular complications of diabetes, chronic renal failure, insulin resistance and hypercholesterolemia. Although now recognized as a class of physiological second messengers, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators in cellular injury, specifically, as a factor in endothelial cell damage. Uncontrolled ROS production and/or decreased antioxidant activity results in a deleterious state referred to as ‘oxidative stress’. A candidate factor in causing ROS production in endothelial cells is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine. TNF-α has been shown to both be secreted by endothelial cells and to induce intracellular ROS formation. These observations provide a potential mechanism by which TNF-α may activate and injure endothelial cells resulting in ED. In this review, we focus on the relationship between intracellular ROS formation and ED in endothelial cells or blood vessels exposed to TNF-α to provide insight into the role of this important cytokine in cardiovascular disease. PMID:20559453

  15. Environmental and Pathogenic Factors Inducing Brown Apical Necrosis on Fruit of English (Persian) Walnut.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Michele; Bortolin, Enrico; Fiorin, Antonio; Belisario, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Brown apical necrosis (BAN) is a most recently described disease affecting English (Persian) walnut fruit. BAN was only recorded in intensively managed walnut orchards and was found to be a disease complex mainly caused by Fusarium species. All fungi associated with this disease are polyphagous and ubiquitous, not specific to walnut. Consequently, BAN occurrence is more strictly dependent, than generally, on the interaction between pathological features and environmental conditions. Environmental variables identified with regression analysis showed that maximum temperature, angle of main wind direction versus tree row orientation, and orchard distance to the closest river/canal, all representative of climatic conditions occurring in the orchard, were related to fruit drop. The factor displaying the highest influence on severity of BAN fruit drop was maximum temperature and only subordinately factors are associated with relative humidity. BAN symptoms were reproduced with in planta artificial inoculation, and fruit drop of symptomatic fruit was significantly higher than that of the noninoculated trees for each type of inoculum (Fusarium semitectum, F. graminearum, and Alternaria spp.). F. semitectum and F. graminearum were more aggressive than Alternaria species, and the earliest artificial inoculations in mid-May resulted in the highest fruit drop. The extension of walnut fruit susceptibility and the conducive environmental factors to BAN are discussed.

  16. Downregulation of tumor necrosis factor and other proinflammatory biomarkers by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Deshmukh-Taskar, Priya; Hinojosa, Myriam; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2014-10-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor (TNF), first isolated by our group as an anticancer agent, has been now shown to be a primary mediator of inflammation. Till today 19 different members of the TNF superfamily which interact with 29 different receptors, have been identified. Most members of this family exhibit pro-inflammatory activities, in part through the activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Thus TNF and the related pro-inflammatory cytokines have been shown to play a key role in most chronic diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, psoriasis, neurologic diseases, Crohn's disease, and metabolic diseases. Therefore, agents that can modulate the TNF-mediated inflammatory pathways may have potential against these pro-inflammatory diseases. Although blockers of TNF-α, such as infliximab (antibody against TNF-α), adalimumab (humanized antibody against TNF-α), and etanercept (soluble form of TNFR2) have been approved for human use, these blockers exhibit numerous side effects. In this review, we describe various plant-derived polyphenols that can suppress TNF-α activated inflammatory pathways both in vitro and in vivo. These polyphenols include curcumin, resveratrol, genistein, epigallocatechin gallate, flavopiridol, silymarin, emodin, morin isoliquiritigenin, naringenin, ellagic acid, apigenin, kaempferol, catechins, myricetin, xanthohumol, fisetin, vitexin, escin, mangostin and others. Thus these polyphenols are likely to have potential against various pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:24946050

  17. Environmental and Pathogenic Factors Inducing Brown Apical Necrosis on Fruit of English (Persian) Walnut.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Michele; Bortolin, Enrico; Fiorin, Antonio; Belisario, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Brown apical necrosis (BAN) is a most recently described disease affecting English (Persian) walnut fruit. BAN was only recorded in intensively managed walnut orchards and was found to be a disease complex mainly caused by Fusarium species. All fungi associated with this disease are polyphagous and ubiquitous, not specific to walnut. Consequently, BAN occurrence is more strictly dependent, than generally, on the interaction between pathological features and environmental conditions. Environmental variables identified with regression analysis showed that maximum temperature, angle of main wind direction versus tree row orientation, and orchard distance to the closest river/canal, all representative of climatic conditions occurring in the orchard, were related to fruit drop. The factor displaying the highest influence on severity of BAN fruit drop was maximum temperature and only subordinately factors are associated with relative humidity. BAN symptoms were reproduced with in planta artificial inoculation, and fruit drop of symptomatic fruit was significantly higher than that of the noninoculated trees for each type of inoculum (Fusarium semitectum, F. graminearum, and Alternaria spp.). F. semitectum and F. graminearum were more aggressive than Alternaria species, and the earliest artificial inoculations in mid-May resulted in the highest fruit drop. The extension of walnut fruit susceptibility and the conducive environmental factors to BAN are discussed. PMID:26214123

  18. The therapeutic potential of tumor necrosis factor for autoimmune disease: a mechanistically based hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, S; Davis, M; Faustman, D L

    2005-08-01

    Excess levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been associated with certain autoimmune diseases. Under the rationale that elevated TNF-alpha levels are deleterious, several anti-TNF-alpha therapies are now available to block the action of TNF-alpha in patients with autoimmune diseases with a chronic inflammatory component to the destructive process. TNF-alpha antagonists have provided clinical benefit to many patients, but their use also is accompanied by new or aggravated forms of autoimmunity. Here we propose a mechanistically based hypothesis for the adverse events observed with TNF-alpha antagonists, and argue for the opposite therapeutic strategy: to boost or restore TNF-alpha activity as a treatment for some forms of autoimmunity. Activation defects in the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB leave autoreactive T cells sensitive to TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. Treatment with TNF-alpha, by destroying autoreactive T cells, appears to be a highly targeted strategy to interrupt the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, lupus and certain forms of autoimmunity.

  19. Factors responsible for the development of avascular necrosis secondary to the treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Flores, J; Ocete-Guzman, G; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Hevia-Sierra, E; Amaya-Alarcon, S

    1993-11-01

    We present 104 cases of unilateral congenital dislocation of the hip treated with the same regime between 1977 and 1988. The patients had an average age of 12 months (range 4-24). The average age at follow-up was 6 years (range 3-13). The incidence of avascular necrosis was 37%. Avascular necrosis presented most frequently in babies of 7 months at the start of treatment, in Tonnis type IV when an adductor tenotomy was not performed, and after open reductions. The most influential factor was the absence of the femoral head descent at the end of the period of traction. The "effective" prereduction traction and the performance of an adductor tenotomy when necessary were the principle factors in avoiding avascular necrosis.

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, and risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer: cohort study based on nationwide prospectively recorded data from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Julia F; Asker Hagelberg, Charlotte; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologic drugs, in patients starting tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment, and in the general population. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Nationwide data from Sweden. Participants Cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologics (n=46 409), cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting TNF inhibitor treatment as first biologic in 1998-2012 (n=12 558), and matched general population comparator cohort, identified through national quality of care and health registers. Main outcome measure Hazard ratio of first in situ or invasive squamous cell skin cancer (1998-2012) and first basal cell cancer (2004-12). Results For basal cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.41) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.14 (0.98 to 1.33; 236 v 1587 events) comparing TNF inhibitor treated patients with biologics-naive patients. For squamous cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.88 (1.74 to 2.03) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.30 (1.10 to 1.55; 191 v 847 events) comparing TNF inhibitors with biologics-naive patients; the latter translated to an annual number needed to harm in the order of 1600. Among people with a history of squamous cell or basal cell cancer, TNF inhibitors did not further increase risks. Conclusion A small to moderately increased risk of basal cell cancer was seen in biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients, with no further effect of TNF inhibitors. For squamous cell cancer, the risk was nearly doubled in biologics-naive patients, with a further 30% increase in risk among patients treated with TNF inhibitors; this translates to one additional case for every 1600 years of treatment experience, assuming that this association reflected causality

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha transcription in macrophages is attenuated by an autocrine factor that preferentially induces NF-kappaB p50.

    PubMed

    Baer, M; Dillner, A; Schwartz, R C; Sedon, C; Nedospasov, S; Johnson, P F

    1998-10-01

    Macrophages are a major source of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which are expressed during conditions of inflammation, infection, or injury. We identified an activity secreted by a macrophage tumor cell line that negatively regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of TNF-alpha. This activity, termed TNF-alpha-inhibiting factor (TIF), suppressed the induction of TNF-alpha expression in macrophages, whereas induction of three other proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta [IL-1beta], IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) was accelerated or enhanced. A similar or identical inhibitory activity was secreted by IC-21 macrophages following LPS stimulation. Inhibition of TNF-alpha expression by macrophage conditioned medium was associated with selective induction of the NF-kappaB p50 subunit. Hyperinduction of p50 occurred with delayed kinetics in LPS-stimulated macrophages but not in fibroblasts. Overexpression of p50 blocked LPS-induced transcription from a TNF-alpha promoter reporter construct, showing that this transcription factor is an inhibitor of the TNF-alpha gene. Repression of the TNF-alpha promoter by TIF required a distal region that includes three NF-kappaB binding sites with preferential affinity for p50 homodimers. Thus, the selective repression of the TNF-alpha promoter by TIF may be explained by the specific binding of inhibitory p50 homodimers. We propose that TIF serves as a negative autocrine signal to attenuate TNF-alpha expression in activated macrophages. TIF is distinct from the known TNF-alpha-inhibiting factors IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta and may represent a novel cytokine. PMID:9742085

  2. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Transcription in Macrophages Is Attenuated by an Autocrine Factor That Preferentially Induces NF-κB p50

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Mark; Dillner, Allan; Schwartz, Richard C.; Sedon, Constance; Nedospasov, Sergei; Johnson, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages are a major source of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which are expressed during conditions of inflammation, infection, or injury. We identified an activity secreted by a macrophage tumor cell line that negatively regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of TNF-α. This activity, termed TNF-α-inhibiting factor (TIF), suppressed the induction of TNF-α expression in macrophages, whereas induction of three other proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) was accelerated or enhanced. A similar or identical inhibitory activity was secreted by IC-21 macrophages following LPS stimulation. Inhibition of TNF-α expression by macrophage conditioned medium was associated with selective induction of the NF-κB p50 subunit. Hyperinduction of p50 occurred with delayed kinetics in LPS-stimulated macrophages but not in fibroblasts. Overexpression of p50 blocked LPS-induced transcription from a TNF-α promoter reporter construct, showing that this transcription factor is an inhibitor of the TNF-α gene. Repression of the TNF-α promoter by TIF required a distal region that includes three NF-κB binding sites with preferential affinity for p50 homodimers. Thus, the selective repression of the TNF-α promoter by TIF may be explained by the specific binding of inhibitory p50 homodimers. We propose that TIF serves as a negative autocrine signal to attenuate TNF-α expression in activated macrophages. TIF is distinct from the known TNF-α-inhibiting factors IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β and may represent a novel cytokine. PMID:9742085

  3. Molecular characterization of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in pearl oyster Pinctada martensii.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Y; Tian, Q L; Du, X D; Wang, Q H; Huang, R L; Deng, Y W; Shi, S L

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is a key signaling adaptor molecule for tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and Toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 receptor family members. It signals the upstream receptors and is involved in a wide range of biological functions, such as immunity and bone metabolism. In this report, the TRAF6 gene from the pearl oyster Pinctada martensii (designated as PmTRAF6) was identified and characterized. The obtained full-length PmTRAF6 cDNA was 2273 bp, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 297 bp, a 3'-UTR of 128 bp with a 42-bp poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame of 1848 bp that encoded 616-amino acid residues. The deduced protein sequence of PmTRAF6 contained a conserved TRAF family motif including a RING-type zinc finger, two TRAF-type zinc fingers, and a coiled-coil region followed by one meprin and TRAF homology domain. Multiple-sequence alignment indicated that TRAF6 was highly conserved among species, and PmTRAF6 showed 53% sequence identity to Azumapecten farreri and Mizuhopecten yessoensis. Furthermore, an amino acid sequence containing a low-complexity region was inserted in the TRAF6s from mollusk. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that PmTRAF6 was constitutively expressed in all tissues studied, with the most abundant mRNA expression in hepatopancreas and gill in P. martensii. After lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the expression of PmTRAF6 mRNA was dramatically upregulated. These results suggested that the obtained PmTRAF6 was a member of the TRAF6 family and perhaps involved in the innate immune response of pearl oyster. PMID:25511039

  4. Toll-like receptor and tumour necrosis factor dependent endotoxin-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Togbe, Dieudonnée; Schnyder-Candrian, Silvia; Schnyder, Bruno; Doz, Emilie; Noulin, Nicolas; Janot, Laure; Secher, Thomas; Gasse, Pamela; Lima, Carla; Coelho, Fernando Rodrigues; Vasseur, Virginie; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Couillin, Isabelle; Moser, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies on endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammatory response in the lung are reviewed. The acute airway inflammatory response to inhaled endotoxin is mediated through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 signalling as mice deficient for TLR4 or CD14 are unresponsive to endotoxin. Acute bronchoconstriction, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-12 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) production, protein leak and neutrophil recruitment in the lung are abrogated in mice deficient for the adaptor molecules myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP), but independent of TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-beta (TRIF). In particular, LPS-induced TNF is required for bronchoconstriction, but dispensable for inflammatory cell recruitment. Lipopolysaccharide induces activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of pulmonary MAPK activity abrogates LPS-induced TNF production, bronchoconstriction, neutrophil recruitment into the lungs and broncho-alveolar space. In conclusion, TLR4-mediated, bronchoconstriction and acute inflammatory lung pathology to inhaled endotoxin are dependent on TLR4/CD14/MD2 expression using the adapter proteins TIRAP and MyD88, while TRIF, IL-1R1 or IL-18R signalling pathways are dispensable. Further downstream in this axis of signalling, TNF blockade reduces only acute bronchoconstriction, while MAPK inhibition abrogates completely endotoxin-induced inflammation. PMID:18039275

  5. Tumor necrosis factor amplifies measles virus-mediated Ia induction on astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Massa, P T; Schimpl, A; Wecker, E; ter Meulen, V

    1987-01-01

    We describe the induction of Ia on cultured astrocytes by measles virus and the amplification of this induction by tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Measles virus induces Ia on rat astrocytes by direct interaction with these cells. TNF does not induce significant levels of Ia at any dose from 1 to 10,000 units/ml. As little as 10 units of TNF per ml, however, amplifies Ia-inducing signals generated by measles virus in astrocytes. In contrast, TNF and measles virus induce class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, when applied individually, and TNF amplification of measles virus class I MHC induction is not apparent. The induction of either Ia or class I MHC antigens on rat astrocytes by measles virus does not depend on glial-derived soluble factors generated during infection. Since brain cells are normally lacking MHC antigens upon which T cells depend for interaction with antigen presenting cells, these data indicate that the ability of measles virus to directly stimulate MHC antigen expression and the ability of TNF to amplify Ia expression locally in the brain may be important in initiating cell-mediated immune response to viral infection. PMID:3118363

  6. Expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme in endocrine cancers.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Tove; Naresh, Anjali; Sabine, Vicky S; Tovey, Sian M; Edwards, Joanne; Dunne, Barbara; Cooke, Timothy G; Jones, Frank E; Bartlett, John M S

    2008-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme (TACE) mediates shedding of human epidermal growth factor receptor-4 (HER4). Recent data suggest that released HER4 intracellular domain (4ICD) induces apoptosis in breast cancer. TACE expression, as measured by immunohistochemical analysis, was observed in 183 of 383 breast carcinomas, 39 of 217 ovarian carcinomas, and 16 of 24 and 17 of 24 hormonesensitive and hormone-insensitive prostate carcinomas, respectively. HER4 expression was detected in breast carcinomas by using 2 antibodies recognizing an extracellular or intracellular epitope. TACE expression was predominantly seen in tumors with high levels of 4ICD and membranous HER4. Apoptotic activity was measured by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and cleaved caspase-3 staining in breast carcinomas. There was no significant association between cleaved caspase-3 or TUNEL positivity and 4ICD, whereas TUNEL positivity was seen predominantly in tumors with high levels of internalized HER4. The data presented herein show TACE expression in endocrine cancers and further support a role for TACE in breast cancer apoptosis.

  7. Fc alpha receptors mediate release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 by human monocytes following receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Patry, C; Herbelin, A; Lehuen, A; Bach, J F; Monteiro, R C

    1995-01-01

    The functional capacity of the human monocyte receptor for the Fc portion of IgA (Fc alpha R) in mediating signal transduction was evaluated by cytokine release. F(ab')2 fragments of anti-Fc alpha R monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used as specific probes to induce release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Multivalent cross-linking by a secondary anti-mouse antibody [F(ab')2 fragments] induced a significant release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 by human blood mononuclear cells, indicating requirements for Fc alpha R aggregation on the cell surface to transmit signals. Both cytokines were released exclusively by adherent cells, identifying monocytes as the responding cells within the mononuclear cell population. This cytokine release could not be due to contaminating endotoxins, because it was not abolished by polymyxin B, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor. Moreover, purified recombinant soluble Fc alpha R inhibited the anti-Fc alpha R mAb-mediated cytokine release from blood monocytes, demonstrating that TNF-alpha and IL-6 were released in a receptor-specific manner. Our data suggest that Fc alpha R, through its capacity to mediate secretion of IL-6, may play an important role in B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production. On the other hand, release of TNF-alpha following stimulation of Fc alpha R molecules directly implicates these receptors in amplification and regulation of the inflammatory process occurring during IgA-mediated host defence. PMID:7590867

  8. Tumour necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma and substance P are novel modulators of extrapituitary prolactin expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Langan, Ewan A; Vidali, Silvia; Pigat, Natascha; Funk, Wolfgang; Lisztes, Erika; Bíró, Tamás; Goffin, Vincent; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Human scalp skin and hair follicles (HFs) are extra-pituitary sources of prolactin (PRL). However, the intracutaneous regulation of PRL remains poorly understood. Therefore we investigated whether well-recognized regulators of pituitary PRL expression, which also impact on human skin physiology and pathology, regulate expression of PRL and its receptor (PRLR) in situ. This was studied in serum-free organ cultures of microdissected human scalp HFs and skin, i.e. excluding pituitary, neural and vascular inputs. Prolactin expression was confirmed at the gene and protein level in human truncal skin, where its expression significantly increased (p = 0.049) during organ culture. There was, however, no evidence of PRL secretion into the culture medium as measured by ELISA. PRL immunoreactivity (IR) in female human epidermis was decreased by substance P (p = 0.009), while neither the classical pituitary PRL inhibitor, dopamine, nor corticotropin-releasing hormone significantly modulated PRL IR in HFs or skin respectively. Interferon (IFN) γ increased PRL IR in the epithelium of human HFs (p = 0.044) while tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α decreased both PRL and PRLR IR. This study identifies substance P, TNFα and IFNγ as novel modulators of PRL and PRLR expression in human skin, and suggests that intracutaneous PRL expression is not under dopaminergic control. Given the importance of PRL in human hair growth regulation and its possible role in the pathogenesis of several common skin diseases, targeting intracutaneous PRL production via these newly identified regulatory pathways may point towards novel therapeutic options for inflammatory dermatoses. PMID:23626671

  9. Effect of a recombinant dimeric tumor necrosis factor receptor on inflammatory responses to intravenous endotoxin in normal humans.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Coyle, S M; Levi, M; Jansen, P M; Dentener, M; Barbosa, K; Buurman, W A; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W; Agosti, J M; Lowry, S F

    1997-05-15

    To determine the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, 12 healthy subjects received an intravenous injection with LPS (2 ng/kg) preceded by infusion of either a recombinant human dimeric TNF receptor type II-IgG fusion protein (TNFR:Fc; 6 mg/m2; n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6) from -30 minutes to directly before LPS injection. LPS elicited a transient increase in plasma TNF activity, peaking after 1.5 hours (219 +/- 42 pg/mL; P < .05). Infusion of TNFR:Fc completely neutralized endogenous TNF activity. LPS administration was associated with an early activation of fibrinolysis (plasma concentrations of tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator activity, and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes), followed by inhibition (plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor type I), changes that were completely prevented by TNFR:Fc. By contrast, TNFR:Fc did not influence LPS-induced activation of coagulation (plasma levels of prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 and thrombin-antithrombin III complexes). TNFR:Fc strongly inhibited endothelial cell activation (plasma levels of soluble E-selectin), modestly reduced neutrophil responses (neutrophilia and plasma concentrations of elastase-alpha1-antitrypsin complexes and lactoferrin), but did not affect the release of secretory phospholipase A2 or lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (P > .05). Infusion of TNFR:Fc only (without LPS) in another 6 normal subjects did not induce any inflammatory response. These data indicate that TNF is involved in only some inflammatory responses to intravenous LPS in humans.

  10. Human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor reduces necrosis and enhances hepatocyte regeneration in a mouse model of acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Donahower, Brian C; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Simpson, Pippa M; Stowe, Cindy D; Saad, Ali G; Kurten, Richard C; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2010-07-01

    We reported previously that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was increased in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in mice and treatment with a VEGF receptor inhibitor reduced hepatocyte regeneration. The effect of human recombinant VEGF (hrVEGF) on APAP toxicity in the mouse was examined. In early toxicity studies, B6C3F1 mice received hrVEGF (50 microg s.c.) or vehicle 30 min before receiving APAP (200 mg/kg i.p.) and were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 h. Toxicity was comparable at 2 and 4 h, but reduced in the APAP/hrVEGF mice at 8 h (p < 0.05) compared with the APAP/vehicle mice. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) and APAP protein adduct levels were comparable between the two groups of mice, with the exception that GSH was higher at 8 h in the hrVEGF-treated mice. Subsequently, mice received two doses (before and 10 h) or three doses (before and 10 and 24 h) of hrVEGF; alanine aminotransferase values and necrosis were reduced at 24 and 36 h, respectively, in the APAP/hrVEGF mice (p < 0.05) compared with the APAP/vehicle mice. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression was enhanced, and interleukin-6 expression was reduced in the mice that received hrVEGF (p < 0.05) compared with the APAP/vehicle mice. In addition, treatment with hrVEGF lowered plasma hyaluronic acid levels and neutrophil counts at 36 h. Cumulatively, the data show that treatment with hrVEGF reduced toxicity and increased hepatocyte regeneration in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Attenuation of sinusoidal cell endothelial dysfunction and changes in neutrophil dynamics may be operant mechanisms in the hepatoprotection mediated by hrVEGF in APAP toxicity.

  11. Tumour necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma and substance P are novel modulators of extrapituitary prolactin expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Langan, Ewan A; Vidali, Silvia; Pigat, Natascha; Funk, Wolfgang; Lisztes, Erika; Bíró, Tamás; Goffin, Vincent; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Human scalp skin and hair follicles (HFs) are extra-pituitary sources of prolactin (PRL). However, the intracutaneous regulation of PRL remains poorly understood. Therefore we investigated whether well-recognized regulators of pituitary PRL expression, which also impact on human skin physiology and pathology, regulate expression of PRL and its receptor (PRLR) in situ. This was studied in serum-free organ cultures of microdissected human scalp HFs and skin, i.e. excluding pituitary, neural and vascular inputs. Prolactin expression was confirmed at the gene and protein level in human truncal skin, where its expression significantly increased (p = 0.049) during organ culture. There was, however, no evidence of PRL secretion into the culture medium as measured by ELISA. PRL immunoreactivity (IR) in female human epidermis was decreased by substance P (p = 0.009), while neither the classical pituitary PRL inhibitor, dopamine, nor corticotropin-releasing hormone significantly modulated PRL IR in HFs or skin respectively. Interferon (IFN) γ increased PRL IR in the epithelium of human HFs (p = 0.044) while tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α decreased both PRL and PRLR IR. This study identifies substance P, TNFα and IFNγ as novel modulators of PRL and PRLR expression in human skin, and suggests that intracutaneous PRL expression is not under dopaminergic control. Given the importance of PRL in human hair growth regulation and its possible role in the pathogenesis of several common skin diseases, targeting intracutaneous PRL production via these newly identified regulatory pathways may point towards novel therapeutic options for inflammatory dermatoses.

  12. The role of nitric oxide in cardiac depression induced by interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, R; Panas, D L; Catena, R; Moncada, S; Olley, P M; Lopaschuk, G D

    1995-01-01

    1. Myocardial dysfunction during septic shock is associated with enhanced production of cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). These cytokines depress cardiac mechanical function by a mechanism which is not well defined. 2. Bacterial endotoxin or cytokines cause the expression of Ca(2+)-independent nitric oxide (NO) synthase in cardiac myocytes, vascular endothelial cells and endocardial endothelial cells, causing enhanced production of NO. As NO has negative inotropic actions on cardiac muscle, we tested the sum effects of IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha in the intact heart to determine whether enhanced expression of NO synthase activity in the cells that comprise the heart is involved in cardiac depression associated with cytokine stimulation. 3. Rat isolated working hearts perfused with IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha showed a markedly greater depression in contractile function, measured as cardiac work, after 2 h of perfusion compared with time-matched control hearts. The depressant action of IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha was first apparent after 1 h of perfusion; no early (15 min) cardiac depressant actions were seen. 4. The competitive inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent NO synthases, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 microM) when given concurrently with IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha prevented the loss in contractile function such that these hearts after 2 h of perfusion had similar function to time-matched controls. L-NAME did not acutely reverse the loss of contractile function in hearts exposed for 2 h to IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7536096

  13. The tumour necrosis factor superfamily ligand APRIL (TNFSF13) is released upon platelet activation and expressed in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Wiggo J; Otterdal, Kari; Gullestad, Lars; Halvorsen, Bente; Ragnarsson, Asgrimur; Frøland, Stig S; Damås, Jan K; Oie, Erik; Aukrust, Pål; Hansson, Göran K; Yndestad, Arne

    2009-10-01

    Activated platelets release a wide range of inflammatory mediators, including members of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily (e.g. CD40 ligand [CD40L] and LIGHT). Such platelet-mediated inflammation could be involved in atherogenesis and plaque destabilisation. In the present study we investigated whether APRIL, another member of the TNF superfamily that has been detected in megakaryocytes, could be released from platelets upon activation. The release of APRIL was studied in thrombin receptor (SFLLRN) activated platelets, and the expression of APRIL was examined in plasma and within the atherosclerotic lesion in patients with carotid and coronary atherosclerosis. Upon SFLLRN activation, there was a gradual release of APRIL, reaching maximum after 90 minutes. While this pattern is similar to that of CD40L and LIGHT, the release of APRIL was quite differently regulated. Thus, prostaglandin E1, but not inhibitors of metal-dependent proteases and actin polymerisation or the lack of GP IIb/IIIa, blocks APRIL release in activated platelets. With relevance to atherogenesis, we found that patients with coronary artery disease (n=80) had raised plasma levels of APRIL as compared with controls (n=20), and APRIL immunoreactivity was detected in aggregated platelets within the ruptured plaque in patients with myocardial infarction and within macrophages in symptomatic carotid plaques. In conclusion, activated platelets release significant amounts of APRIL in a long-lasting manner, differently regulated than the gradual release of other platelet-derived TNF superfamily ligands. The enhanced expression of APRIL in atherosclerotic disorders, both systemically and within the lesion, may suggest a potential involvement of APRIL in atherogenesis. PMID:19806256

  14. Brunner's gland lesions in rats induced by a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Akira; Nakano-Ito, Kyoko; Fujikawa, Yasuhiro; Sonoda, Jiro; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Etsuko; Taketa, Yoshikazu; Van Gessel, Yvonne; Akare, Sandeep; Hutto, David; Hosokawa, Satoru; Tsukidate, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors are reported to cause reversible mucosal hyperplasia (adenosis) in the duodenum of rats; however, the pathogenesis is not fully elucidated. Using lenvatinib, a VEGF RTK inhibitor, we characterized the histologic time course of this duodenal change in rats. At 4 weeks, there was degeneration and necrosis of Brunner's gland epithelium accompanied by neutrophil infiltration around the affected glands. At 13 weeks, the inflammation was more extensive, and Brunner's gland epithelium was attenuated and flattened and was accompanied by reactive hyperplasia of duodenal epithelium. At 26 weeks, the changes became more severe and chronic and characterized by marked cystic dilation, which extended to the external muscular layer. These dilated glands exhibited morphological characteristics of duodenal crypt epithelium, suggestive of replacement of disappeared Brunner's glands by regenerative duodenal crypt epithelial cells. Similar changes were not present in similar time course studies in dog and monkey studies, suggesting that this is a rodent- or species-specific change. Based on the temporal progression of Brunner's gland lesion, we identify degeneration and necrosis of the Brunner's glands as the primary change leading to inflammation, cystic dilatation, and regeneration with cells that are morphologically suggestive of duodenal crypt epithelium.

  15. Effect of Melilotus extract on lung injury via the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein-8-like 2 in septic mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING-WEI; SU, MEI-XIAN; WANG, YUN-HUI; QIAN, CHUAN-YUN

    2015-01-01

    As a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Melilotus extracts have been reported to function as an anti-inflammatory agent, antioxidant and inhibitor of capillary permeability. The present study aimed to identify the mechanisms by which Melilotus interferes with inflammation-associated and oxidative stress pathways during sepsis. An animal model of cecal ligation-perforation (CLP)-induced sepsis was established. Two hours prior to surgery, animals in the treatment group were administered 25 mg/kg Melilotus extract tablets and subsequently every 8 h. At 24 h post-administration, pathological modifications in lung tissue and expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein-8-like 2 (TIPE2) expression, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), inhibitor of κB kinase (IκB), pro-inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were examined. The results showed that Melilotus extract had a marked effect on the pathological manifestation of lung tissue and lung inflammatory response, the upregulation of TIPE2, HO-1 and IκB expression, and the inhibition of TLR4 and NF-κB activities. In addition, following treatment with Melilotus extract, the model animals demonstrated decreased levels of MPO and MDA as well as increased levels of SOD. In conclusion, these results indicated that Melilotus extract may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of CLP-induced lung injury, the mechanism of which proceeded via inflammation- and oxidation-associated pathways by increasing TIPE2 expression. PMID:25405912

  16. Isolation and characterization of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) from grouper, Epinephelus tauvina.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingguang; Guo, Minglan; Gao, Pin; Ji, Huasong; Li, Pengfei; Yan, Yang; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is one of the key adapter molecules in Toll-like receptor signal transduction that triggers downstream cascades involved in innate immunity. In the present study, a TRAF6 (named as Et-TRAF6) was identified from the marine fish grouper, Epinephelus tauvina by RACE PCR. The full-length cDNA of Et-TRAF6 comprised 1949 bp with a 1713 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a putative protein of 570 amino acids. Similar to most TRAF6s, Et-TRAF6 includes one N-terminal RING domain (78aa-116aa), two zinc fingers of TRAF-type (159aa-210aa and 212aa-269aa), one coiled-coil region (370aa-394aa), and one conserved C-terminal meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain (401aa-526aa). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that Et-TRAF6 mRNA is expressed in all tested tissues, with the predominant expression in the stomach and intestine. The expression of Et-TRAF6 was up-regulated in the liver after challenge with Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), Peptidoglycan (PGN), Zymosan, polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)] and Polydeoxyadenylic acid · Polythymidylic acid sodium salt [Poly(dA:dT)]. The expression of Et-TRAF6 was also up-regulated in the liver after infection with Vibrio alginolyticus, Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) and grouper nervous necrosis virus (GNNV). Recombinant Et-TRAF6 (rEt-TRAF6) was expressed in Escherichia BL21 (DE3) and purified for mouse anti-Et-TRAF6 serum preparation. Intracellular localization revealed that Et-TRAF6 is distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and predominantly in the cytoplasm. These results together indicated that Et-TRAF6 might be involved in immune responses toward bacterial and virus challenges.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide signals activation of tumor necrosis factor biosynthesis through the ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Geppert, T. D.; Whitehurst, C. E.; Thompson, P.; Beutler, B.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to activate macrophages, causing the release of toxic cytokines that may provoke inflammation and shock. One of the most important and best studied of these cytokines is tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Details of the signaling pathway leading to TNF biosynthesis remain unclear. The pathway is branched in the sense that TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are both strongly stimulated by LPS. Recent evidence has indicated that MAP kinase homologs become phosphorylated in LPS-stimulated cells, suggesting their possible involvement in signal transduction. We sought to test this hypothesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements of LPS-induced MEK and ERK2 activity were undertaken in LPS-sensitive and LPS-insensitive cells. Transfection studies, in which dominant inhibitors of ras and raf-1 were used to block signaling to the level of MAP kinase, were carried out in order to judge whether the TNF gene transcription and TNF mRNA translation are modulated through this pathway. RESULTS: In RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, both ERK2 and MEK1 activity are induced by LPS treatment. In the same cell line, dominant negative inhibitors of ras and raf-1 block LPS-induced activation of the TNF promoter, as well as derepression of the translational blockade normally imposed by the TNF 3'-untranslated region. A constitutively active form of raf-1 (raf-BXB) was found to augment, but not replace, the LPS signal. In LPS-insensitive cells (RAW 264.7 x NIH 3T3 fusion hybrid cells and primary macrophages derived from C3H/HeJ mice), ERK2 activity was found to be refractory to induction by LPS. CONCLUSIONS: The ras/raf-1/MEK/MAPK pathway is chiefly responsible for transduction of the LPS signal to the level of the TNF gene and mRNA. raf and raf-1 lie upstream from (or actually represent) the physical branchpoints of the transcriptional and translation activation signals generated by LPS. The lesions that prevent LPS signaling in macrophages

  18. Loss of Tumor Necrosis Factor α Potentiates Transforming Growth Factor β-mediated Pathogenic Tissue Response during Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Shizuya; Ikeda, Kazuo; Yamanaka, Osamu; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Okada, Yuka; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kitano, Ai; Ooshima, Akira; Nakajima, Yuji; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Kao, Winston W.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    Animal cornea is an avascular transparent tissue that is suitable for research on wound healing-related scarring and neovascularization. Here we show that loss of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) potentiates the undesirable, pathogenic response of wound healing in an alkali-burned cornea in mice. Excessive invasion of macrophages and subsequent formation of a vascularized scar tissue were much more marked in TNFα-null knockout (KO) mice than in wild-type mice. Such an unfavorable outcome in KO mice was abolished by Smad7 gene introduction, indicating the involvement of transforming growth factor β or activin/Smad signaling. Bone marrow transplantation from wild-type mice normalized healing of the KO mice, suggesting the involvement of bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells in this phenomenon. Co-culture experiments showed that loss of TNFα in macrophages, but not in fibroblasts, augmented the fibroblast activation as determined by detection of α-smooth muscle actin, the hallmark of myofibroblast generation, mRNA expression of collagen Iα2 and connective tissue growth factor, and detection of collagen protein. TNFα in macrophages may be required to suppress undesirable excessive inflammation and scarring, both of which are promoted by transforming growth factor β, and for restoration of tissue architecture in a healing alkali-burned cornea in mice. PMID:16723700

  19. Historical perspectives on tumor necrosis factor and its superfamily: 25 years later, a golden journey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kim, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    Although activity that induced tumor regression was observed and termed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as early as the 1960s, the true identity of TNF was not clear until 1984, when Aggarwal and coworkers reported, for the first time, the isolation of 2 cytotoxic factors: one, derived from macrophages (molecular mass 17 kDa), was named TNF, and the second, derived from lymphocytes (20 kDa), was named lymphotoxin. Because the 2 cytotoxic factors exhibited 50% amino acid sequence homology and bound to the same receptor, they came to be called TNF-α and TNF-β. Identification of the protein sequences led to cloning of their cDNA. Based on sequence homology to TNF-α, now a total of 19 members of the TNF superfamily have been identified, along with 29 interacting receptors, and several molecules that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of these receptors. The roles of the TNF superfamily in inflammation, apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and morphogenesis have been documented. Their roles in immunologic, cardiovascular, neurologic, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases are becoming apparent. TNF superfamily members are active targets for drug development, as indicated by the recent approval and expanding market of TNF blockers used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease, and osteoporosis, with a total market of more than US $20 billion. As we learn more about this family, more therapeutics will probably emerge. In this review, we summarize the initial discovery of TNF-α, and the insights gained regarding the roles of this molecule and its related family members in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22053109

  20. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  1. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  2. Crocin suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cell death of neuronally differentiated PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Soeda, S; Ochiai, T; Paopong, L; Tanaka, H; Shoyama, Y; Shimeno, H

    2001-11-01

    Crocus sativus L. is used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat some disorders of the central nervous system. Crocin is an ethanol-extractable component of Crocus sativus L.; it is reported to prevent ethanol-induced impairment of learning and memory in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that crocin suppresses the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on neuronally differentiated PC-12 cells. PC-12 cells dead from exposure to TNF-alpha show apoptotic morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. These hallmark features of cell death did not appear in cells treated in the co-presence of 10 microM crocin. Moreover, crocin suppressed the TNF-alpha-induced expression of Bcl-Xs and LICE mRNAs and simultaneously restored the cytokine-induced reduction of Bcl-X(L) mRNA expression. The modulating effects of crocin on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins led to a marked reduction of a TNF-alpha-induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Crocin also blocked the cytochrome c-induced activation of caspase-3. To learn how crocin exhibits these anti-apoptotic actions in PC-12 cells, we tested the effect of crocin on PC-12 cell death induced by daunorubicin. We found that crocin inhibited the effect of daunorubicin as well. Our findings suggest that crocin inhibits neuronal cell death induced by both internal and external apoptotic stimuli.

  3. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema.

  4. Critical Roles for Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor α in Antibody-induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong; Pettit, Allison; Ohmura, Koichiro; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Duchatelle, Veronique; Degott, Claude; Gravallese, Ellen; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    In spontaneous inflammatory arthritis of K/BxN T cell receptor transgenic mice, the effector phase of the disease is provoked by binding of immunoglobulins (Igs) to joint surfaces. Inflammatory cytokines are known to be involved in human inflammatory arthritis, in particular rheumatoid arthritis, although, overall, the pathogenetic mechanisms of the human affliction remain unclear. To explore the analogy between the K/BxN model and human patients, we assessed the role and relative importance of inflammatory cytokines in K/BxN joint inflammation by transferring arthritogenic serum into a panel of genetically deficient recipients. Interleukin (IL)-1 proved absolutely necessary. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–α was also required, although seemingly less critically than IL-1, because a proportion of TNF-α–deficient mice developed robust disease. There was no evidence for an important role for IL-6. Bone destruction and reconstruction were also examined. We found that all mice with strong inflammation exhibited the bone erosion and reconstruction phenomena typical of K/BxN arthritis, with no evidence of any particular requirement for TNFα for bone destruction. The variability in the requirement for TNF-α, reminiscent of that observed in treated rheumatoid arthritis patients, did not appear genetically programmed but related instead to subtle environmental changes. PMID:12093872

  5. Interleukin 1 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha: which is the real target in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Dayer, Jean-Michel

    2002-09-01

    Much debate has focused on the relative importance of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The production of these cytokines by synovial macrophages is tightly regulated by cell-cell contact with T cells. During this contact, several surface molecules are implicated in contact mediated cytokine production, including CD40 ligand, CD11b/c, and CD69. Apolipoprotein A-I, an acute phase reactant (APR) that declines during systemic inflammation (reverse APR), inhibits cytokine production by interfering in the T cell-monocyte interaction. Although the effects of IL-1 and TNF-alpha overlap, they have somewhat differing roles in RA on the basis of evidence from several animal models. TNF-alpha appears to play a more important role in triggering events leading to inflammation both locally and systemically, whereas IL-1 is more involved at the local level in processes leading to cartilage and bone destruction and in impeding cartilage repair. However, IL-1 and TNF-alpha strongly synergize in numerous biological functions, both in vitro and in vivo. Blockade of IL-1 and TNF-alpha simultaneously provides favorable effects in collagen and adjuvant induced arthritis, illustrating the importance of both cytokines.

  6. Critical roles for interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in antibody-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Pettit, Allison; Ohmura, Koichiro; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Duchatelle, Veronique; Degott, Claude; Gravallese, Ellen; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2002-07-01

    In spontaneous inflammatory arthritis of K/BxN T cell receptor transgenic mice, the effector phase of the disease is provoked by binding of immunoglobulins (Igs) to joint surfaces. Inflammatory cytokines are known to be involved in human inflammatory arthritis, in particular rheumatoid arthritis, although, overall, the pathogenetic mechanisms of the human affliction remain unclear. To explore the analogy between the K/BxN model and human patients, we assessed the role and relative importance of inflammatory cytokines in K/BxN joint inflammation by transferring arthritogenic serum into a panel of genetically deficient recipients. Interleukin (IL)-1 proved absolutely necessary. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was also required, although seemingly less critically than IL-1, because a proportion of TNF-alpha-deficient mice developed robust disease. There was no evidence for an important role for IL-6. Bone destruction and reconstruction were also examined. We found that all mice with strong inflammation exhibited the bone erosion and reconstruction phenomena typical of K/BxN arthritis, with no evidence of any particular requirement for TNFalpha for bone destruction. The variability in the requirement for TNF-alpha, reminiscent of that observed in treated rheumatoid arthritis patients, did not appear genetically programmed but related instead to subtle environmental changes.

  7. Effects on leukocytes after injection of tumor necrosis factor into healthy humans.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; Wolbink, G J; Aarden, L A; Büller, H R; ten Cate, J W

    1992-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated as a proximal mediator of the septic syndrome. To evaluate the possible role of TNF in leukocyte activation in septicemia, we performed a cross-over saline-controlled study in six healthy men who were intravenously injected with recombinant human TNF (50 micrograms/m2), and analyzed changes in circulating white blood cells and parameters for neutrophil and monocyte activation. TNF elicited a very rapid neutropenia, reaching a nadir after 15 minutes, followed by a neutrophilia. Lymphocytes showed a sustained decrease, whereas monocytes declined transiently. TNF injection was also associated with neutrophil activation, as reflected by a mean fivefold increase in the plasma concentrations of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes and a mean sevenfold increase in plasma lactoferrin levels. Serum neopterin, a marker of monocyte activation, was significantly increased 24 hours after the administration of TNF. These changes occurred in the absence of detectable complement activation, as indicated by unchanged C3a-desarg plasma values. Serum interleukin-6 showed a nearly 40-fold increase after TNF injection, whereas interleukin-1 remained undetectable throughout. We conclude that the systemic release of TNF, triggered early after invasive infection, may be involved in the alterations in circulating leukocyte numbers and in the activation of leukocytes, during the development of the septic syndrome.

  8. Tumor necrosis factor unresponsiveness after surgery in bile duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Houdijk, A P; Boermeester, M A; Wesdorp, R I; Hack, C E; Van Leeuwen, P A

    1996-12-01

    In obstructive jaundice, postoperative complications are related to gut-derived endotoxemia and possibly mediated by cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). This study investigated the course of IL-6 and TNF after surgery in bile duct-ligated rats (BDL) treated with and without an enteral endotoxin binder (cholestyramine). Endotoxin in rat plasma was determined by blocking cytokine production in whole blood cell cultures stimulated by rat plasma using antibodies directed against the endotoxin (CD14) receptor. Surgery elicited a significant IL-6 response in saline-treated BDL rats (BDL-SAL). TNF, however, remained at its low preoperative levels. Cholestyramine treatment resulted in undetectable preoperative TNF and IL-6 levels, but levels of both cytokines were significantly raised after surgery. Endotoxin, as determined by the CD14 blockade test, was identified in the BDL-SAL group, before (time 0) and after surgery (2 and 4 h), whereas in the cholestyramine group endotoxin was only present at 2 h after surgery. The lack of a postoperative plasma TNF response in the BDL-SAL group in the continuous presence of endotoxin suggests endotoxin tolerance for TNF production in obstructive jaundice.

  9. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  10. The promoting effect of tumour necrosis factor alpha in radiation-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, R. F.; Gong, Y. F.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a potent endogenous inflammatory agent, to promote malignant transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells (SHE) initiated by a 0.5-Gy dose of alpha-particles was investigated. Opsonized zymosan particles, which were phagocytosed by a human macrophage-like cell line, triggered TNF-alpha production from U937 cells. This cell supernatant could significantly increase the transformation frequency (TF) of primary SHE cells previously irradiated by a 0.5-Gy dose of alpha-particles. The TF decreased significantly if monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha was added to the supernatant. Similarly, recombinant human TNF-alpha (rhTNF-alpha) increased the TF of alpha-irradiated primary SHE cells to an even greater extent. Addition of TNF-alpha to subcultures of irradiated SHE cells permitted the continuous propagation of these primary cells. In contrast, both TNF-alpha-treated control and alpha-irradiated cells without subsequent TNF-alpha treatment senesced after 7-15 passages. Irradiated SHE cells treated continuously with TNF-alpha could be subcultured over 40 passages and produced fibrosarcomas upon inoculation into nude mice. Our results provide the first evidence that TNF-alpha released by activated macrophages may contribute to the process of malignant transformation initiated by low-dose alpha-particles. PMID:9579824

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Augments Resistance Artery Myogenic Tone in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Meghan; Hui, Sonya K; Dinh, Danny D; Foltz, Warren D; Momen, Abdul; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Offermanns, Stefan; Husain, Mansoor; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes strongly associates with microvascular complications that ultimately promote multiorgan failure. Altered myogenic responsiveness compromises tissue perfusion, aggravates hypertension, and sets the stage for later permanent structural changes to the microcirculation. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle resistance arteries isolated from patients with diabetes have augmented myogenic tone, despite reasonable blood glucose control. To understand the mechanisms, we titrated a standard diabetes mouse model (high-fat diet plus streptozotocin [HFD/STZ]) to induce a mild increase in blood glucose levels. HFD/STZ treatment induced a progressive myogenic tone augmentation in mesenteric and olfactory cerebral arteries; neither HFD nor STZ alone had an effect on blood glucose or resistance artery myogenic tone. Using gene deletion models that eliminate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or sphingosine kinase 1, we demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF drives the elevation of myogenic tone via enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Therapeutically antagonizing TNF (etanercept) or S1P (JTE013) signaling corrects this defect. Our investigation concludes that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF augments resistance artery myogenic vasoconstriction in a diabetes model that induces a small elevation of blood glucose. Our data demonstrate that microvascular reactivity is an early disease marker and advocate establishing therapies that strategically target the microcirculation. PMID:27207546

  12. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema. PMID:27555760

  13. Personalized medicine: theranostics (therapeutics diagnostics) essential for rational use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    With the discovery of the central pathogenic role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in many immunoinflammatory diseases, specific inhibition of this pleiotropic cytokine has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several non-infectious inflammatory disorders. As a result, genetically engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety can be severely impaired by immunogenicity, i.e., the ability of a drug to induce anti-drug antibodies (ADA). Assessment of ADA is therefore an important component of the evaluation of drug safety in both pre-clinical and clinical studies and in the process of developing less immunogenic and safer biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutics diagnostics, also called theranostics, i.e., monitoring functional drug levels and neutralizing ADA in the circulation, is central to more effective use of biopharmaceuticals. Hence, testing-based strategies rather than empirical dose-escalation may provide more cost-effective use of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists and to highlight some of the methodological obstacles that have obscured cost-effective ways of using these therapies.

  14. Microglial derived tumor necrosis factor-α drives Alzheimer's disease-related neuronal cell cycle events.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Kiran; Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Varvel, Nicholas H; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Weick, Jason P; Staugaitis, Susan M; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Lamb, Bruce T

    2014-02-01

    Massive neuronal loss is a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms are still unclear. Here we demonstrate that neuroinflammation, cell autonomous to microglia, is capable of inducing neuronal cell cycle events (CCEs), which are toxic for terminally differentiated neurons. First, oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide (AβO)-mediated microglial activation induced neuronal CCEs via the tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and the c-Jun Kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. Second, adoptive transfer of CD11b+ microglia from AD transgenic mice (R1.40) induced neuronal cyclin D1 expression via TNFα signaling pathway. Third, genetic deficiency of TNFα in R1.40 mice (R1.40-Tnfα(-/-)) failed to induce neuronal CCEs. Finally, the mitotically active neurons spatially co-exist with F4/80+ activated microglia in the human AD brain and that a portion of these neurons are apoptotic. Together our data suggest a cell-autonomous role of microglia, and identify TNFα as the responsible cytokine, in promoting neuronal CCEs in the pathogenesis of AD.

  15. Anti-tumour necrosis factor α therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: international experience

    PubMed Central

    Braun, J; Sieper, J; Breban, M; Collantes-Estevez, E; Davis, J; Inman, R; Marzo-Ortega, H; Mielants, H

    2002-01-01

    The conventional approach to treatment of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), particularly ankylosing spondylitis (AS), has serious limitations, adding a sense of urgency to the evaluation of new treatments for these rheumatic disorders. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a cytokine that has been shown to mediate inflammatory and regulatory activities in SpA and other immune mediated diseases, including other arthritides and inflammatory bowel disease. Positive results have been reported in several international open label and randomised controlled trials of infliximab and etanercept, the two main biological agents targeting TNFα, which have included approximately 300 patients with SpA. Specifically, TNFα-directed therapy resulted in significant improvements in disease activity, function, and quality of life in these patients, most of whom had AS and received infliximab. Preliminary evidence from open label, long term extension trials suggests clinical benefit with continued use. Serious side effects were rare and consistent with experience from patient groups receiving infliximab or etanercept treatment for inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Together, these findings herald an age of more effective treatment of patients with AS with anti-TNFα and other emerging biological agents. PMID:12381511

  16. Paradoxical role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in fumonisin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raghubir P; He, Quanren; Meredith, Filmore I; Riley, Ronald T; Voss, Kenneth A

    2002-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is involved in fumonisin-induced hepatotoxic effects in mice. The hepatic response to fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) was reduced in transgenic animals lacking either of the two TNFalpha receptors. In the present study, we hypothesized that the effect of a similar fumonisin treatment in animals lacking either TNFalpha or both TNFalpha receptors would be considerably less than their wild type (WT) counterparts. The FB(1)-induced increase in circulating liver enzymes was enhanced by deletion of TNFalpha or unchanged in mice lacking both TNFalpha receptors. These findings corresponded with the degree of toxicity as established by microscopic examination of liver. FB(1) induced the expression of TNFalpha in the liver of all strains, except the animals with a deleted TNFalpha gene. The FB(1)-mediated increases in liver sphingosine or sphinganine paralleled the hepatotoxic responses. It is apparent that the presence of TNFalpha is not necessary for FB(1)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice and a lack of the function of this cytokine may aggravate the hepatotoxic responses to fumonisins, perhaps by preventing repair mechanisms or by expression of other signaling molecules. These observations were in accordance with our previous finding where over-expression of TNFalpha also protected against FB(1)-mediated hepatotoxicity, and with the reported beneficial functions of low-level TNFalpha in tissue regeneration.

  17. Genetically engineered bacteriophage delivers a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist coating on neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Jin, Young-Hyun; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a novel approach for the formation of anti-inflammatory surface coating on a neural electrode. The surface coating is realized using a recombinant f88 filamentous bacteriophage, which displays a short platinum binding motif and a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist (TNF-α antagonist) on p3 and p8 proteins, respectively. The recombinant bacteriophages are immobilized on the platinum surface by a simple dip coating process. The selective and stable immobilization of bacteriophages on a platinum electrode is confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, atomic force microscope and fluorescence microscope. From the in vitro cell viability test, the inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) induced cell death was prevented by presenting recombinant bacteriophage coating, albeit with no significant cytotoxic effect. It is also observed that the bacteriophage coating does not have critical effects on the electrochemical properties such as impedance and charge storage capacities. Thus, this approach demonstrates a promising anti-apoptotic as well as anti-inflammatory surface coating for neural implant applications. PMID:24448635

  18. A Case of Sarcoidosis Associated With Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hanazay, Cigdem; Kokturk, Nurdan; Turktas, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic chronic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. It predominantly involves the lungs but can affect many organs or tissues in the body, such as the lymphatic system, skin, eyes, and liver. Typical histopathological lesions are noncaseating granulomas in the affected organ or tissue. Indications, type of treatment, and duration of sarcoidosis treatment is currently debated. Despite studies showing that anti–tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) treatment can successfully be used in refractory sarcoidosis, there are some case reports regarding the development of sarcoidosis with these agents. There have been reports of 47 anti-TNF-associated cases of sarcoidosis until 2012. The patient is a 54-year-old Caucasian male. During routine examinations of the patient who had been followed for psoriasis vulgaris for 20 years and who had been on several anti-TNF regimens thereafter, new pulmonary pathologies due to sarcoidosis were detected. We present here a case of sarcoidosis that developed after infliximab treatment and showed obvious radiologic regression with discontinuation of treatment. During anti-TNF treatment, it should be kept in mind that autoimmune and granulomatous diseases may develop and particular care should be given to patient follow-ups. PMID:26425632

  19. LARP4 Is Regulated by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in a Tristetraprolin-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Mattijssen, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    LARP4 is a protein with unknown function that independently binds to poly(A) RNA, RACK1, and the poly(A)-binding protein (PABPC1). Here, we report on its regulation. We found a conserved AU-rich element (ARE) in the human LARP4 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (UTR). This ARE, but not its antisense version or a point-mutated version, significantly decreased the stability of β-globin reporter mRNA. We found that overexpression of tristetraprolin (TTP), but not its RNA binding mutant or the other ARE-binding proteins tested, decreased cellular LARP4 levels. RNA coimmunoprecipitation showed that TTP specifically associated with LARP4 mRNA in vivo. Consistent with this, mouse LARP4 accumulated to higher levels in TTP gene knockout (KO) cells than in control cells. Stimulation of WT cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which rapidly induces TTP, robustly decreased LARP4 with a coincident time course but had no such effect on LARP4B or La protein or on LARP4 in the TTP KO cells. The TNF-α-induced TTP pulse was followed by a transient decrease in LARP4 mRNA that was quickly followed by a subsequent transient decrease in LARP4 protein. Involvement of LARP4 as a target of TNF-α–TTP regulation provides a clue as to how its functional activity may be used in a physiologic pathway. PMID:26644407

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Induction of Mitophagy in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-activated (TNFα) Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christina; English, Luc; Boulais, Jonathan; Chemali, Magali; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Desjardins, Michel; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity as professional phagocytes capable of internalizing and degrading pathogens to derive antigens for presentation to T cells. They also produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) that mediate local and systemic responses and direct the development of adaptive immunity. The present work describes the use of label-free quantitative proteomics to profile the dynamic changes of proteins from resting and TNF-α-activated mouse macrophages. These analyses revealed that TNF-α activation of macrophages led to the down-regulation of mitochondrial proteins and the differential regulation of several proteins involved in vesicle trafficking and immune response. Importantly, we found that the down-regulation of mitochondria proteins occurred through mitophagy and was specific to TNF-α, as other cytokines such as IL-1β and IFN-γ had no effect on mitochondria degradation. Furthermore, using a novel antigen presentation system, we observed that the induction of mitophagy by TNF-α enabled the processing and presentation of mitochondrial antigens at the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. These findings highlight an unsuspected role of TNF-α in mitophagy and expanded our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for MHC presentation of self-antigens. PMID:23674617

  1. Tumor vascular targeting with tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corti, Angelo; Ponzoni, Mirco

    2004-12-01

    The poor selectivity of chemotherapeutic drugs for neoplastic cells may lead to dose-limiting side effects that compromise clinical outcomes. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, and increased interstitial pressure, could represent critical barriers that limit the penetration of drugs into neoplastic cells distant from tumor vessels and, consequently, the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have recently developed two strategies for increasing the local concentration of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumors and their therapeutic index, based on tumor vascular targeting. First, we have found that vascular targeting with minute amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammatory cytokine able to increase vascular permeability, alters tumor barriers and increases the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in subcutaneous tumors in mouse models. Targeted delivery of TNF-alpha to tumor vessels was achieved by coupling this cytokine with cyclic CNGRC peptide, an aminopeptidase N (CD13) ligand that targets the tumor neovasculature. Second, we have observed that encapsulation of doxorubicin into liposomes able to home to tumor vessels markedly improves drug uptake by neuroblastoma tumors, in an orthotopic xenograft model, and its therapeutic index. Targeted delivery of liposomes was achieved by coupling linear GNGRG peptide to the surface of liposomal doxorubicin. Vascular targeting, either indirectly with NGR-TNF-alpha or directly with NGR-targeted liposomes, could be a novel strategy for increasing the therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. Effects of tumor necrosis factor on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in healthy men.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Romijn, J A; Endert, E; Sauerwein, H P

    1993-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated as a mediator of many diseases associated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) function. To assess the effects of TNF on the HPT axis, we performed a saline-controlled cross-over study in six healthy men, sequentially measuring serum concentrations of gonadotropins, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) after a bolus intravenous injection of recombinant human TNF (50 micrograms/m2). TNF induced an early and transient increase in serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels from 6.0 +/- 1.0 to a maximum of 8.0 +/- 1.0 U/L after 30 minutes (P < .005), whereas the concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) remained unchanged. The increase in LH concentrations was followed by a transient decrease in serum testosterone levels from 18.2 +/- 0.3 to 9.1 +/- 1.2 nmol/L after 4 hours (P < .0001). Remarkably, LH levels had returned to control values when the testosterone level reached its nadir. SHBG levels were not affected by TNF. Our results suggest that TNF affects the HPT axis at multiple levels and may be involved either directly or indirectly in the decrease in circulating testosterone concentrations in systemic illnesses.

  3. Genetically engineered bacteriophage delivers a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist coating on neural electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Jin, Young-Hyun; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports a novel approach for the formation of anti-inflammatory surface coating on a neural electrode. The surface coating is realized using a recombinant f88 filamentous bacteriophage, which displays a short platinum binding motif and a tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist (TNF-α antagonist) on p3 and p8 proteins, respectively. The recombinant bacteriophages are immobilized on the platinum surface by a simple dip coating process. The selective and stable immobilization of bacteriophages on a platinum electrode is confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, atomic force microscope and fluorescence microscope. From the in vitro cell viability test, the inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) induced cell death was prevented by presenting recombinant bacteriophage coating, albeit with no significant cytotoxic effect. It is also observed that the bacteriophage coating does not have critical effects on the electrochemical properties such as impedance and charge storage capacities. Thus, this approach demonstrates a promising anti-apoptotic as well as anti-inflammatory surface coating for neural implant applications.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulates in vivo intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, M. S.; Vaporciyan, A. A.; Miyasaka, M.; Tamatani, T.; Ward, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Lung injury following deposition of IgG immune complexes is neutrophil-dependent and requires both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and CD18. In the current studies, we have evaluated the relationship between TNF alpha and expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in vitro and in vivo. In both rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TNF alpha induced an early (within 60 minutes) increase in ICAM-1 expression, followed by a peak at 6 to 8 hours, with relatively stable expression at 24 hours. Expression of E-selectin did not show the early phase (within 60 minutes) of up-regulation, peaked at 4 hours, and then declined thereafter. Using a radioimmunochemical assay in vivo, it was demonstrated that intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes caused a progressive increase in ICAM-1 expression in lung over an 8-hour period. In animals pretreated with antibody to TNF alpha, the intrapulmonary expression of ICAM-1 was significantly reduced. These results were confirmed by immunoperoxidase analysis of lung tissue. It was also shown that airway instillation of TNF alpha caused up-regulation of ICAM-1 in lung. These data support the concept that deposition of IgG immune complexes in lung induces intrapulmonary up-regulation of ICAM-1 in a manner that is TNF alpha-dependent. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:7685152

  5. Essential protective role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yun; Fischer, Roman; Naudé, Petrus J. W.; Maier, Olaf; Nyakas, Csaba; Duffey, Maëlle; Van der Zee, Eddy A.; Dekens, Doortje; Douwenga, Wanda; Herrmann, Andreas; Guenzi, Eric; Kontermann, Roland E.; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recognized role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in inflammation and neuronal degeneration, anti-TNF therapeutics failed to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Animal disease models had revealed the antithetic effects of the two TNF receptors (TNFR) in the central nervous system, whereby TNFR1 has been associated with inflammatory degeneration and TNFR2 with neuroprotection. We here show the therapeutic potential of selective inhibition of TNFR1 and activation of TNFR2 by ATROSAB, a TNFR1-selective antagonistic antibody, and EHD2-scTNFR2, an agonistic TNFR2-selective TNF, respectively, in a mouse model of NMDA-induced acute neurodegeneration. Coadministration of either ATROSAB or EHD2-scTNFR2 into the magnocellular nucleus basalis significantly protected cholinergic neurons and their cortical projections against cell death, and reverted the neurodegeneration-associated memory impairment in a passive avoidance paradigm. Simultaneous blocking of TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling, however, abrogated the therapeutic effect. Our results uncover an essential role of TNFR2 in neuroprotection. Accordingly, the therapeutic activity of ATROSAB is mediated by shifting the balance of the antithetic activity of endogenous TNF toward TNFR2, which appears essential for neuroprotection. Our data also explain earlier results showing that complete blocking of TNF activity by anti-TNF drugs was detrimental rather than protective and argue for the use of next-generation TNFR-selective TNF therapeutics as an effective approach in treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27791020

  6. Curcumin half analog modulates interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kondamudi, Phani Krishna; Kovelamudi, Hemalatha; Nayak, Pawan G.; Rao, Mallikarjuna Chamallamudi; Shenoy, Rekha Raghuveer

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed at examining the effect of dehydrozingerone (DHZ), half analogue of curcumin which is the active constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa) in the di-nitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) induced model for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats (200–220 g) were divided into four groups (n = 6). Chemical induction of IBD was done by sensitizing with 300 µL of 20 g/L of DNCB (in acetone) onto the nape of rats for 14 days followed by intra-colonic instillation of 250 µL of DNCB (0.1% DNCB in 50% alcohol) solution on day 15. Rats in Group 1 (normal control) and Group 2 (DNCB control) were treated with vehicle. Rats in Group 3 were treated with DHZ (100 mg/kg, p.o.; 8 days) and Group 4 animals were treated with sulfasalazine (SS) (100 mg/kg, p.o.; 8 days). On 24th day, the rats were killed, colon removed and the macroscopic, biochemical, and histopathological evaluations were performed. Results: The levels of myeloperoxidase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substrate, and nitrite increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the DNCB group whereas reduced significantly in the DHZ and SS treated groups. Serum nitrite levels were found to be insignificant between the different groups. Interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha level was significantly high in the DNCB group. Conclusion: These findings show that DHZ can be a promising molecule for the treatment of IBD. PMID:26664018

  7. Identification and characterization of a tumor necrosis factor receptor like protein encoded by Singapore grouper iridovirus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Cai, Jia; Wei, Shina; Gao, Ren; Qin, Qiwei

    2013-12-26

    Virus encoded tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFRs) have been demonstrated to facilitate virus to escape from apoptosis or other host immune response for viral replication. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a large DNA virus which belongs to genus Ranavirus, is a major pathogen resulting in heavy economic losses to grouper aquaculture. Here, SGIV ORF096 (VP96) encoding a putative homolog of TNFR was identified and characterized. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that SGIV-VP96 contained two extracellular cysteine-rich domains (CRDs) with conserved four or six cysteine residues, but lacked the transmembrane domain at the C-terminus. SGIV-VP96 was identified as an early (E) gene and localized in the cytoplasm in transfected or infected cells. Overexpression of SGIV-VP96 in vitro enhanced cell proliferation, and improved cell survival against SGIV infection. Furthermore, virus infection induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were inhibited in SGIV-VP96 expressing FHM cells compared to the control cells. Taken together, our results suggested that SGIV might utilize virus encoded TNFR like genes to modulate the host apoptotic response for effective virus replication.

  8. Functional identification of the alveolar edema reabsorption activity of murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Elia, Nadia; Tapponnier, Maxime; Matthay, Michael A; Hamacher, Jurg; Pache, Jean-Claude; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Totsch, Martin; De Baetselier, Patrick; Fransen, Lucie; Fukuda, Norimasa; Morel, Denis R; Lucas, Rudolf

    2003-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activates sodium channels in Type II alveolar epithelial cells, an important mechanism for the reported fluid resorption capacity of the cytokine. Both TNF-alpha receptor-dependent and -independent effects were proposed for this activity in vitro, the latter mechanism mediated by the lectin-like domain of the molecule. In this study, the relative contribution of the receptor-dependent versus receptor-independent activities was investigated in an in situ mouse lung model and an ex vivo rat lung model. Fluid resorption due to murine TNF-alpha (mTNF-alpha) was functional in mice that were genetically deficient in both types of mTNF-alpha receptor, establishing the importance of mTNF-alpha receptor-independent effects in this species. In addition, we assessed the capacity of an mTNF-alpha-derived peptide (mLtip), which activates sodium transport by a receptor-independent mechanism, to reduce lung water content in an isolated, ventilated, autologous blood-perfused rat lung model. The results show that in this model, mLtip, in contrast to mTNF-alpha, produced a progressive recovery of dynamic lung compliance and airway resistance after alveolar flooding. There was also a significant reduction in lung water. These results indicate that the receptor-independent lectin-like domain of mTNF-alpha has a potential physiological role in the resolution of alveolar edema in rats and mice.

  9. Two soluble antigens of Plasmodium falciparum induce tumor necrosis factor release from macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Bate, C A; Kwiatkowski, D; Jakobsen, P H; Playfair, J H

    1990-01-01

    The production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may contribute to the pathology of malaria. We showed previously that crude preparations of heat-stable exoantigens from parasite cultures induce the release of TNF in vitro and in vivo. When separated from the culture medium by affinity chromatography, in which immune immunoglobulin G was used as ligand, the mixture of exoantigens of Plasmodium falciparum retained the capacity to induce the secretion of TNF, both by human monocytes from Gambian children and by mouse macrophages. Two individual antigens, Ag1 and Ag7, further purified by affinity chromatography and identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis, also stimulated TNF production by both types of cell but differed in other functional properties. Thus, the activity of Ag7, but not that of Ag1, was inhibited by polymyxin B, and antisera made against boiled exoantigens of the rodent parasite Plasmodium yoelii which blocked the ability of these antigens to induce the production of TNF also inhibited the activity of Ag7 without affecting Ag1. Since the prevalence of antibody against Ag7 in sera from children in endemic areas appears to correlate with the development of immunity against the manifestations of the disease, this antigen may be one cause of pathology, perhaps through its ability to induce the production of TNF. Its serological relationship with rodent exoantigens suggests that it might be a candidate for an anti-disease vaccine which has the advantage that its active moiety is not subject to significant antigen polymorphism. PMID:2201638

  10. Effects of tumor necrosis factor α on leptin-sensitive intestinal vagal mechanoreceptors in the cat.

    PubMed

    Quinson, Nathalie; Vitton, Véronique; Bouvier, Michel; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Abysique, Anne

    2013-11-01

    The involvement of tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been established, and anti-TNF-α has been suggested as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of these pathologies. We studied the effects of TNF-α on leptin-sensitive intestinal vagal units to determine whether TNF-α exerts its effects through the intestinal vagal mechanoreceptors and to investigate its interactions with substances regulating food intake. The activity of intestinal vagal mechanoreceptors was recorded via microelectrodes implanted into the nodose ganglion in anesthetized cats. TNF-α (1 μg, i.a.) increased the discharge frequency of leptin-activated units (type 1 units; P < 0.05) and had no effect on the discharge frequency of leptin-inhibited units (type 2 units). When TNF-α was administered 20 min after sulfated cholecystokinin-8 (CCK), its excitatory effects on type 1 units were significantly enhanced (P < 0.0001) and type 2 units were significantly (P < 0.05) activated. Pre-treatment with Il-1ra (250 μg, i.a.) blocked the excitatory effects of TNF-α on type 1 units whereas the excitatory effects of TNF-α administration after CCK treatment on type 2 units were not modified. The activation of leptin-sensitive units by TNF-α may explain, at least in part, the weight loss observed in IBD.

  11. Demyelinizing Neurological Disease after Treatment with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Bruè, Claudia; Mariotti, Cesare; Rossiello, Ilaria; Saitta, Andrea; Giovannini, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Demyelinizing neurological disease is a rare complication after treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α antagonists. We report on a case of multiple sclerosis after TNFα antagonist treatment and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods This is an observational case study. Results A 48-year-old male was referred to Ophthalmology in January 2015 for an absolute scotoma in the superior quadrant of the visual field in his right eye. Visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left. Fundus examination was unremarkable bilaterally. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed a normal macular retina structure. Visual field examination revealed a superior hemianopsia in the right eye. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed findings compatible with optic neuritis. The visual evoked potentials confirmed the presence of optic neuritis. The patient had been under therapy with adalimumab since January 2014, for Crohn's disease. Suspension of adalimumab was recommended, and it was substituted with tapered deltacortene, from 1 mg/kg/day. After 1 month, the scotoma was resolved completely. Conclusions TNFα antagonists can provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, they can also be associated with severe adverse effects. Therefore, adequate attention should be paid to neurological abnormalities in patients treated with TNFα antagonists. PMID:27504093

  12. Tumor necrosis factor and its receptors in human ovarian cancer. Potential role in disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, M S; Stamp, G W; Foulkes, W D; Eccles, D; Balkwill, F R

    1993-01-01

    The gene for tumor necrosis factor, TNF, was expressed in 45 out of 63 biopsies of human epithelial ovarian cancer. In serous tumors, there was a positive correlation between level of TNF expression and tumor grade. TNF mRNA was found in epithelial tumor cells and infiltrating macrophages, whereas TNF protein localized primarily to a subpopulation of macrophages within and in close proximity to tumor areas. mRNA and protein for the p55 TNF receptor gene localized to the tumor epithelium and tumor, but not to stromal macrophages. The p75 TNF receptor was confined to infiltrating cells. Cells expressing TNF mRNA were also found in ovarian cancer ascites and TNF protein was detected in some ascitic fluids. In 2 out of 12 biopsies of normal ovary, TNF mRNA was detected in a minority of cells in the thecal layer of the corpus luteum. Serum levels of TNF and its soluble receptor did not correlate with extent of TNF expression in matched biopsies. Northern and Southern analysis revealed no gross abnormality of the TNF gene. The coexpression of TNF and its receptor in ovarian cancer biopsies suggests the capacity for autocrine/paracrine action. TNF antagonists may have therapeutic potential in this malignancy. Images PMID:8387543

  13. Noise and fidelity of information transmission through the Tumor Necrosis Factor signaling circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, Andre

    2013-03-01

    Molecular noise restricts the ability of an individual cell to resolve input signals of different strengths and gather information about the external environment. We developed an integrative theoretical and experimental framework, based on the formalism of information theory, to quantitatively predict and measure the amount of information transduced by molecular and cellular networks. Analyzing tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling revealed that individual TNF signaling pathways transduce information sufficient for accurate binary decisions, and an upstream bottleneck limits the information gained via multiple integrated pathways. Negative feedback to this bottleneck could both alleviate and enhance its limiting effect, despite decreasing noise. Bottlenecks likewise constrain information attained by networks signaling through multiple genes or cells. We further use this new analysis formalism to ``map'' the noise amplitude across different parts of the network. Finally, we show that the redundancy in signaling due to the existence of parallel pathways is not absolute, and that parallel pathways can transmit different types of information about the input, i.e., the duration vs. amplitude.

  14. Wound healing potential of pterospermum acerifolium wild. With induction of tumor necrosis factor - α

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Aswini Kumar; Giri, Ranjan Kumar; Panda, Dibya Sundar; Satyanarayan, Sremantula

    2011-01-01

    Pterospermum acerifolium, a well-known plant in Indian medicine possesses various therapeutic properties including healing properties and cytokine induction. Wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of P. acerifolium flower along with its effect on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed using excision model of wound repair in Wistar albino rats. After application of the P. acerifolium extract, rate of epithelization with an increase in wound contraction was observed. Animals tropically treated with 10% P. acerifolium extract in petroleum jelly, the wound healing process was observed faster as compared to control group which were treated with petroleum jelly alone. A significant accelerated healing was noticed in animals which were additionally prefed with 250mg/kg body weight of ethanolic P. acerifolium extract daily for 20 consecutive days along with the topical application 10% P. acerifolium extract. During wound healing phase TNF-α level was found to be up regulated by P. acerifolium treatment. Early wound healing may be pronounced due to P. acerifolium extract elevating TNF−α production PMID:24826024

  15. Retrospective cohort study of anti-tumor necrosis factor agent use in a veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Nermeen; Kazerooni, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective for several immunologic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn’s disease (CD), and psoriasis). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents via chart review. Methods. Single-site, retrospective cohort study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents in veterans initiated between 2010 and 2011. Primary aim evaluated response at 12 months post-index date. Secondary aims evaluated initial response prior to 12 months post-index date and infection events. Results. A majority of patients were prescribed anti-TNF agents for CD (27%) and RA (24%). Patients were initiated on etanercept (41%), adalimumab (40%), and infliximab (18%) between 2010 and 2011. No differences in patient demographics were reported. Response rates were high overall. Sixty-five percent of etanercept patients, 82% of adalimumab patients, and 59% of infliximab patients were either partial or full responders, respectively. Approximately 16%, 11%, and 12% of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were non-responders, respectively. Infections between the groups were non-significant. Etanercept and adalimumab patients had higher but non-significant odds of being a responder relative to infliximab. Conclusions. Most patients initiated with anti-TNF agent were responders at 12 months follow-up for all indications in a veteran population. PMID:24883246

  16. Dehydroepiandrosterone protects mice from endotoxin toxicity and reduces tumor necrosis factor production.

    PubMed Central

    Danenberg, H D; Alpert, G; Lustig, S; Ben-Nathan, D

    1992-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated an immunomodulating activity of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) different from that described for glucocorticoids. The present study was designed to test DHEA's activity in endotoxic shock and to investigate its effect on endotoxin-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Mortality of CD-1 mice exposed to a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 800 micrograms per mouse) was reduced from 95 to 24% by treatment with a single dose of DHEA, given 5 min before LPS. LPS administration resulted in high levels of TNF, a response that was significantly blocked by DHEA, both in vivo and in vitro. DHEA treatment also reduced LPS-induced increments in serum corticosterone levels, a parameter considered not to be mediated by TNF. In another experimental model, mice sensitized with D-galactosamine, followed by administration of recombinant human TNF, were subjected to 89% mortality rate, which was reduced to 55% in DHEA-treated mice. These data show that DHEA protects mice from endotoxin lethality. The protective effect is probably mediated by reduction of TNF production as well as by effecting both TNF-induced and non-TNF-induced phenomena. PMID:1444309

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of a Thermally Responsive Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Shamji, Mohammed F.; Chen, Jun; Friedman, Allan H.; Richardson, William J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Setton, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous antagonists of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) have been developed to attenuate inflammation and accompanying pain in many disease processes. Soluble TNF receptor type II (sTNFRII) is one such antagonist that sequesters TNFα away from target receptors and attenuates its activity. Systemic delivery of soluble TNF receptors or other antagonists may have deleterious side effects associated with immune suppression, so that strategies for locally targeted drug delivery are of interest. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are biopolymers capable of in situ drug depot formation through thermally-driven supramolecular complexes at physiological temperatures. A recombinant fusion protein between ELP and sTNFRII was designed and evaluated for retention of bivalent functionality. Thermal sensitivity was observed by formation of supramolecular submicron-sized particles at 32°C, with gradual resolubilization from the depot observed at physiological temperatures. In vitro refolding of the sTNFRII domain was required and the purified product exhibited an equilibrium dissociation constant for interacting with TNFα that was seven-fold higher than free sTNFRII. Furthermore, anti-TNF activity was observed in inhibiting TNFα-mediated cytotoxicity in the murine L929 fibrosarcoma assay. Potential advantages of this ELP-sTNFRII fusion protein as an anti-TNFa drug depot include facility of injection, in situ depot formation, low endotoxin content, and functionality against TNFα. PMID:18547669

  18. Down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor expression by pentoxifylline in cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dezube, B J; Sherman, M L; Fridovich-Keil, J L; Allen-Ryan, J; Pardee, A B

    1993-01-01

    The wasting syndrome (cachexia) characterized by anorexia, malaise, and weight loss is observed in many patients with cancer or chronic infection. The excessive levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)/cachectin reported in 50% of cancer patients exhibiting clinically active disease may therefore mediate, at least in part, the cachexia associated with malignancy. Pentoxifylline, a substituted methylxanthine approved for treatment of intermittent claudication, has been shown in preclinical studies to down-regulate TNF RNA expression as well as TNF activity. We report that pentoxifylline suppressed TNF RNA levels on all three occasions in patients with initially elevated levels of TNF RNA. Pentoxifylline did not suppress TNF RNA to subnormal levels in all five patients with initially normal TNF RNA levels. Four patients reported an increased sense of well-being, improved appetite and ability to perform the activities of daily living. Two of these five patients with normal TNF levels each had a weight gain of more than 5% after 3 weeks of pentoxifylline therapy suggesting that, although TNF may be important in the pathogenesis of cancer cachexia, other anorexia-producing cytokines that are potentially affected by pentoxifylline may also be involved. No severe adverse effects were observed. Taken together these findings suggest that pentoxifylline can down-regulate TNF expression and improve the sense of well-being in cancer patients. A larger study with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design and more sophisticated estimates of quality of life will be needed to confirm these observations.

  19. Polysaccharide peptide induces a tumor necrosis factor-α-dependent drop of body temperature in rats.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejewski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Jakub; Wrotek, Sylwia; Kozak, Wieslaw

    2014-08-01

    Polysaccharide peptide (PSP) extracted from the Coriolus versicolor mushroom is frequently suggested as an adjunct to the chemo- or radiotherapy in cancer patients. It improves quality of the patients' life by decreasing pain, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. However, the effect of PSP on body temperature has not thus far been studied, although it is well known that treatment with other polysaccharide adjuvants, such as lipopolysaccharides, may induce fever. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to investigate the influence of PSP on temperature regulation in rats. We report that intraperitoneal injection of PSP provoked a dose-dependent decrease of temperature in male Wistar rats equipped with biotelemetry devices to monitor deep body temperature (Tb). The response was rapid (i.e., with latency of 15-20min), transient (lasting up to 5h post-injection), and accompanied by a significant elevation of the blood tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level. Pretreatment of the rats with anti-TNF-α antibody prevented the PSP-induced drop in Tb. Based on these data, we conclude that rats may develop an anapyrexia-like response to the injection of peptidopolysaccharide rather than fever, and the response was TNF-α-dependent.

  20. Interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor cause hypotension in the conscious rabbit.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J R; Wright, D J; Guz, A

    1988-09-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of intravenous injections of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) have been investigated in the conscious rabbit. They have been compared with the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) because both IL-1 and TNF are released from macrophages by LPS. 2. IL-1, TNF and Escherichia coli J5-LPS all caused hypotension when given intravenously in a dose with low mortality. The time course of the hypotension caused by IL-1 and LPS was similar, although the maximal fall in mean blood pressure occurred earlier after IL-1. TNF produced a more sustained fall in blood pressure. Hypotension was not accompanied by a compensatory tachycardia after any of the test substances. Hypotension was associated with a fever after TNF, hypothermia after LPS and no significant change in temperature after IL-1. 3. The packed cell volume did not change during hypotension in any of the study groups, implying that the hypotension was not due to fluid loss resulting from increased capillary permeability. 4. IL-1 and TNF are candidates for the role of effectors of LPS-induced hypotension.

  1. Augmentation of the neutrophil response to Naegleria fowleri by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, A

    1989-01-01

    Conditioned medium from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes, previously shown to activate neutrophils for amoeba killing, was found to contain high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effects of human recombinant TNF-alpha on the response of human neutrophils to the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri was studied in vitro. The data showed that recombinant human TNF-alpha augmented the neutrophil respiratory burst (assessed by the cytochrome c reduction assay and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assay) in response to amoebae opsonized with human serum. The priming effects of TNF-alpha were transient; marked enhancement was found with short 5- to 30-min preincubations of neutrophils with the cytokine. The enhancement of oxygen radical production was evident with 20 U of TNF-alpha per 10(6) neutrophils and continued to increase with up to 100 U. TNF-alpha also augmented the neutrophil lysosomal enzyme release in response to N. fowleri. The results support previous reports suggesting an important role of neutrophil cytokine activation for effective immunity against free-living amoebae. PMID:2777375

  2. Cytokine expression in mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles by inhalation. Role of tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Bornholdt, Jette; Kjær, Sanna L; Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2006-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution has been associated with lung and cardiovascular disease, for which lung inflammation may be a driving mechanism. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been suggested to have a key-role in particle-induced inflammation. We studied the time course of gene expression of inflammatory markers in the lungs of wild type mice and Tnf-/- mice after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Mice were exposed to either a single or multiple doses of DEP by inhalation. We measured the mRNA level of the cytokines Tnf and interleukin-6 (Il-6) and the chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein (Mcp-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (Mip-2) and keratinocyte derived chemokine (Kc) in the lung tissue at different time points after exposure. Results Tnf mRNA expression levels increased late after DEP-inhalation, whereas the expression levels of Il-6, Mcp-1 and Kc increased early. The expression of Mip-2 was independent of TNF if the dose was above a certain level. The expression levels of the cytokines Kc, Mcp-1 and Il-6, were increased in the absence of TNF. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that Tnf is not important in early DEP induced inflammation and rather exerts negative influence on Mcp-1 and Kc mRNA levels. This suggests that other signalling pathways are important, a candidate being one involving Mcp-1. PMID:16504008

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and glutathione interplay in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Adamy, C; Le Corvoisier, P; Candiani, G; Kirsch, M; Pavoine, C; Defer, N; Bourin, M C; Su, J B; Vermes, E; Hittinger, L; Pecker, E

    2005-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), in concert with neurohormones, contributes to chronic heart failure (CHF) progression. This implies that TNF a antagonism may constitute an important target for CHF therapy. However, clinical trials in CHF patients using compounds that trap TNF alpha, comprising infliximab, an antibody directed to TNF alpha, and etanercept, a soluble recombinant receptor of TNF alpha, gave disappointing results bringing back to light the dual, short-term beneficial and long-term harmful effect of TNF alpha. This review focuses on the dual, concentration- and time-related effects of TNF alpha, the yin and yang action of TNF alpha in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion and contraction. Importantly, the harmful effects of TNF a are related to glutathione deficiency, a common hallmark to several other chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, in rat models of CHF, oral administration of the glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), was shown to hinder pathways of TNF alpha harmful signalling and to rescue cardiac structure and function. These results suggest that glutathione deficiency in association with TNF alpha activation may play a role in the pathophysiology of CHF and that NAC may represent a potential therapy in CHF.

  4. Are circulating cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha involved in chlorpyrifos-induced fever?

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Rowsey, P J

    1999-05-01

    Oral exposure to chlorpyrifos (CHP) in the rat results in an initial hypothermic response followed by a delayed fever. Fever from infection is mediated by the release of cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha). This study determined if the CHP-induced fever involves cytokine-mediated mechanisms similar to that of infectious fevers. Long-Evans rats were gavaged with the corn oil vehicle or CHP (10-50 mg/kg). The rats were euthanized and blood collected at various times that corresponded with the hypothermic and febrile effects of CHP. Plasma IL-6, TNF alpha, cholinesterase activity (ChE), total iron, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC), and zinc were measured. ChE activity was reduced by approximately 50% 4 h after CHP. There was no effect of CHP on IL-6 when measured during the period of CHP-induced hypothermia or fever. TNF alpha levels nearly doubled in female rats 48 h after 25 mg/kg CHP. The changes in plasma cytokine levels following CHP were relatively small when compared to > 1000-fold increase in IL-6 and > 10-fold rise in TNF alpha following lipopolysaccharide (E. coli; 50 microg/kg; i.p.)-induced fever. This does not preclude a role of cytokines in CHP-induced fever. Nonetheless, the data suggest that the delayed fever from CHP is unique, involving mechanisms other than TNF alpha and IL-6 release into the circulation characteristic of infectious fevers. PMID:10413184

  5. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha RNA through PKA type I.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Jennifer B; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2008-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a cytokine that may contribute to the pathogenesis of septic shock, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, and diabetes. Prostaglandins endogenously produced by macrophages act in an autocrine fashion to limit TNF-alpha production. We investigated the timing and signaling pathway of prostaglandin-mediated inhibition of TNF-alpha production in Raw 264.7 and J774 macrophages. TNF-alpha mRNA levels were rapidly modulated by PGE(2) or carbaprostacylin. PGE(2) or carbaprostacyclin prevented and rapidly terminated on-going TNF-alpha gene transcription within 15 min of prostaglandin treatment. Selective activation of PKA type I, but not PKA type II or Epac, with chemical analogs of cAMP was sufficient to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The mechanisms by which prostaglandins limit TNF-alpha mRNA levels may underlie endogenous regulatory mechanisms that limit inflammation, and may have important implications for understanding chronic inflammatory disease pathogenesis. PMID:18060853

  6. In vitro and in vivo induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha by Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Defosse, D L; Johnson, R C

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is an immunoregulatory cytokine with many biological activities including the mediation of inflammation. We examined sera and synovial fluids from patients seropositive for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi using a radioimmunoassay specific for TNF-alpha. Significant elevation of TNF-alpha was found in the sera and synovial fluids of patients examined, while controls showed no elevation. Sera of mice infected with B. burgdorferi contained elevated levels of TNF-alpha which varied during the course of a 24-day infection. To determine whether B. burgdorferi is capable of inducing TNF-alpha production, spirochetes were added to adherent human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or mouse peritoneal exudate cells and 24 h later supernatants were assayed. TNF-alpha induction occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum stimulation occurred when a ratio of 1 to 10 spirochetes per mononuclear cell was used. At optimal concentrations, induction was not diminished by inactivation of spirochetes or pretreatment with polymyxin B. These results suggest that an increase in TNF-alpha production may occur as a result of infection with B. burgdorferi. PMID:1541526

  7. Capacity of tumor necrosis factor to augment lymphocyte-mediated tumor cell lysis of malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.V.; Manning, L.S.; Davis, M.R.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rHuTNF) was evaluated both for direct anti-tumor action against human malignant mesothelioma and for its capacity to augment the generation and lytic phases of lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against this tumor. rHuTNF was directly toxic by MTT assay to one of two mesothelioma cell lines evaluated, but had no effect on susceptibility to subsequent lymphocyte-mediated lysis of either line. TNF alone was incapable of generating anti-mesothelioma lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) activity. Furthermore, it did not augment the degree or LAK activity produced by submaximal interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations nor did it augment lysis of mesothelioma cells by natural killer (NK) or LAK effector cells during the 4-hr 51chromium release cytolytic reaction. The studies also suggest that mesothelioma targets are less responsive to TNF plus submaximal IL-2 concentrations than the standard LAK sensitive target Daudi, raising the possibility that intermediate LAK sensitive tumors such as mesothelioma may require separate and specific evaluation in immunomodulation studies. This in vitro study indicates that use of low-dose rHuTNF and IL-2 is unlikely to be an effective substitute for high-dose IL-2 in generation and maintenance of LAK activity in adoptive immunotherapy for mesothelioma.

  8. Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha values in elk neonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, S. M.; Johnson, C.R.; Murtaugh, M.P.; Mech, L.D.; White, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Serological indicators of general condition would be helpful for monitoring or assessing ungulate wildlife. Toward that end, we report the 1st reference values for 2 cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-??), in neonatal elk (Cervus elaphus). We obtained blood samples from 140 calves ??? 6 days old in Yellowstone National Park during summer 2003-2005. TL-6 values ranged from 0 to 1.21 pg/ml with a median of 0.03 pg/ml. TNF-?? values ranged from 0 to 225.43 pg/ml with a median of 1.85 pg/ml. IL-6 and TNF-?? concentrations were not significant predictors of elk calf survival through 21 days. Development of ungulate-based IL-6 and TNF-?? assays that provide greater sensitivity than cross-reacting human-based assays could be helpful in monitoring ungulate condition and health status comparisons among herds. Such information could provide indirect assessments of range quality or environmental influences among herds. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  9. Perirenal fat promotes renal arterial endothelial dysfunction in obese swine through tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuangtao; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R.; Jordan, Kyra L.; Tang, Hui; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Perirenal fat is associated with poor blood pressure control and chronic kidney disease, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that perirenal fat impairs renal arterial endothelial function in pigs with obesity-metabolic derangements (ObM). Material and Methods Fourteen domestic pigs were studied after 16 weeks of a high-fat/high-fructose diet (ObM) or standard chow (Lean). Renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and visceral fat volumes were studied in-vivo with CT. Renal arterial endothelial function was also studied ex-vivo in the organ bath. Results ObM pigs demonstrated increased body weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and intra-abdominal fat compared to lean pigs, and perirenal fat volume was significantly larger. RBF and GFR were markedly elevated, while urinary protein level was preserved. Ex-vivo acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of renal artery rings was substantially impaired in ObM compared to Lean. Endothelial function was further blunted in both ObM and Lean arterial rings by incubation with perirenal fat harvested from ObM, but not from Lean pigs, and was restored by inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. ObM perirenal fat also showed increased pro-inflammatory macrophage infiltration and TNF-α expression. Conclusions ObM perirenal fat directly causes renal artery endothelial dysfunction, partly mediated by TNF-α. PMID:26417644

  10. Inositol lipid metabolism in vasopressin stimulated hepatocytes from rats infused with tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzer, J.A.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B. )

    1989-05-30

    We studied the effect of i.v. infusion of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (rHuTNF alpha, Cetus, 15 micrograms/100 g bw over 3 h) on vasopressin (VP)-stimulated {sup 32}P-inositol lipid turnover and the release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates in isolated rat hepatocytes. The early VP-induced decrease (within 30 s) in {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling was significantly reduced (-40%) and at the same time the uptake of {sup 32}P into phosphatidic acid was 50% lower than in saline-infused (matched control) rats. Within 5 min of VP-stimulation, lower {sup 32}P phosphatidylinositol (-40%) and higher {sup 32}P-phosphatidic acid (+30%) labeling were observed in rHuTNF alpha-infused rats. Infusion of rHuTNF alpha also affected the VP-induced release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates. The accumulation of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled water soluble products was decreased by 25% and 17% at 30 s and 10 min, respectively. These data show that rHuTNF alpha mimics early perturbations induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion in VP-stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes.

  11. Effects of biological drug adalimumab on tumour necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme activation.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Sabrina; Sisto, Margherita

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-converting enzyme (TACE) is a membrane-bound metalloprotease and disintegrin. It is produced by a number of host cells and is known to shed and release cell-bound cytokines, particularly members of the TNF family. No investigations into the regulation of this enzyme by autoantibodies have been reported. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies, purified from IgG fractions of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, are capable to regulate TACE expression and activation in human salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC). We also evaluated the potential physiological and therapeutic consequences of TNF-alpha blocking by the biological agent adalimumab, the first fully human (100% human peptide sequences) therapeutic anti-TNF-alpha antibody, on post-translational regulation of TACE. Taken together, our results show a dose-dependent increase in TACE expression in anti-Ro/SSA Abs-treated SGEC, followed by internalization, pro-domain shedding and activation of TACE protein. Adalimumab treatment brought TACE expression to levels than those observed in untreated SGEC. These findings, showing the presence of autoantibodies-dependent mechanisms by which TACE levels are regulated in human SGECs, may have implications in the context of current investigations on the pathological role of autoantibodies.

  12. Endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor induce interleukin-1 gene expression in adult human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; Ordovas, J M; Auger, K R; Robbins, A H; Birinyi, L K; Dinarello, C A

    1986-08-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) can induce potentially pathogenic functions of vascular endothelial cells. This mediator was formerly thought to be produced primarily by activated macrophages. We report here that bacterial endotoxin and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor cause accumulation of IL-1 beta mRNA in adult human vascular endothelial cells. IL-1 alpha mRNA was also detected when endothelial cells were exposed to endotoxin under "superinduction" conditions in the presence of cycloheximide. Metabolic labeling of these cells during endotoxin stimulation demonstrated increased synthesis and secretion of immunoprecipitable IL-1 protein that comigrated electrophoretically with the predominant monocyte species. In parallel with increased IL-1 mRNA and protein, endothelial cells exposed to endotoxin also release biologically active IL-1 that was neutralized by anti-IL-1-antibody. Because bloodborne agents must traverse the endothelium before entering tissues, endothelial IL-1 production induced by microbial products or other injurious stimuli could initiate local responses to invasion. Endothelial cells are both a source of and target for IL-1; accordingly, this novel autocrine mechanism might play an early role in the pathogenesis of vasculitis, allograft rejection, and arteriosclerosis.

  13. Processing of newly synthesized cachectin/tumor necrosis factor in endotoxin-stimulate macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, Dae-Myung; Sherry, B.; Luedke, C.; Manogue, K.R.; Cerami, A. )

    1990-09-11

    The biosynthesis and processing of cachetin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were examined in the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7. Lipipolysaccharide-stimulated cells secreted both glycosylated and nonglycosylated 17-kilodalton (kDa) mature cachectin/TNF into the culture medium. Secreted cachectin/TNF was derived from membrane-associated precursors that were precipitated by polyclonal antisera raised against either the mature protein or synthetic peptide fragments of the 79 amino acid cachectin/TNF prohormone sequence. About half of the precursors were N-glycosylated, apparently cotranslationally. The cachectin/TNF precursors were then proteolytically cleaved to release soluble mature cytokine into the medium, while the membrane-bound 14-kDa prosequence remained cell associated. During the period of LPS stimulation, the amount of macrophage cell surface cachectin/TNF remained at a low level, suggesting that both nonglycosylated and glycosylated precursors of cachectin/TNF are efficiently cleaved by these cells. These findings suggest the presence of a unique mechanism for the secretion of cachectin/TNF.

  14. Hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M J; Lau, J Y; Williams, R; Vergani, D

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To determine the hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS--Frozen liver biopsy sections from 19 patients with chronic HBV infection were studied, 12 of whom were HBeAg positive and 10 serum HBV DNA positive. Hepatic expression of TNF alpha was determined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS--Only infiltrating mononuclear cells showed immunoreactive staining for TNF alpha (median 2, range 0-3; n = 19) which appeared as diffuse positive staining material in the cytoplasm. Patients with active liver disease, assessed histologically and biochemically, had a higher level of expression, both in the number of TNF alpha positive cells and the proportion of TNF alpha positive infiltrating mononuclear cells. There was no correlation between the expression of TNF alpha and serological parameters of viral infection (HBeAg and HBV DNA status and HBV DNA concentrations). CONCLUSION--Hepatic expression of TNF alpha is increased in chronic HBV infection and is related to the activity of liver disease and not to the level of HBV replication. Images PMID:7876386

  15. Withdrawal of anti-tumour necrosis factor α therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Vermeire, Severine

    2015-04-28

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor α (anti-TNFα) therapy is an established treatment in inflammatory bowel disease. However, this treatment is associated with high costs and the possibility of severe adverse events representing a true challenge for patients, clinicians and health care systems. Consequently, a crucial question is raised namely if therapy can be stopped once remission is achieved and if so, how and in whom. Additionally, in a real-life clinical setting, discontinuation may also be considered for other reasons such as the patient's preference, pregnancy, social reasons as moving to countries or continents with less access, or different local policy or reimbursement. In contrast to initiation of anti-TNFα therapy guidelines regarding stopping of this treatment are missing. As a result, the decision of discontinuation is still a challenging aspect in the use of anti-TNFα therapy. Currently this is typically based on an estimated, case-by-case, benefit-risk ratio. This editorial is intended to provide an overview of recent data on this topic and shed light on the proposed drug withdrawal strategies. PMID:25944990

  16. Withdrawal of anti-tumour necrosis factor α therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Vermeire, Severine

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor α (anti-TNFα) therapy is an established treatment in inflammatory bowel disease. However, this treatment is associated with high costs and the possibility of severe adverse events representing a true challenge for patients, clinicians and health care systems. Consequently, a crucial question is raised namely if therapy can be stopped once remission is achieved and if so, how and in whom. Additionally, in a real-life clinical setting, discontinuation may also be considered for other reasons such as the patient’s preference, pregnancy, social reasons as moving to countries or continents with less access, or different local policy or reimbursement. In contrast to initiation of anti-TNFα therapy guidelines regarding stopping of this treatment are missing. As a result, the decision of discontinuation is still a challenging aspect in the use of anti-TNFα therapy. Currently this is typically based on an estimated, case-by-case, benefit-risk ratio. This editorial is intended to provide an overview of recent data on this topic and shed light on the proposed drug withdrawal strategies. PMID:25944990

  17. Critical role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Ouchi, Hiroshi; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Although tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a critical role in the development of COPD, the role of different TNF receptors (TNFRs) in pulmonary emphysema has not been resolved. We aimed to clarify the role of TNFRs in the development of pulmonary emphysema. TNF-α transgenic mice, a murine model of COPD in which the mice spontaneously develop emphysema with a large increase in lung volume and pulmonary hypertension, were crossed with either TNFR1-deficient mice or TNFR2-deficient mice. After 6 months, the gross appearance of the lung, lung histology, and pulmonary and cardiac physiology were determined. In addition, the relationship between apoptosis and emphysema was investigated. Pulmonary emphysema-like changes disappeared with deletion of TNFR1. However, slight improvements were attained with deletion of TNFR2. Apoptotic cells in the interstitium of the lung were observed in TNF-α transgenic mice. The apoptotic signals through TNFR1 appear critical for the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In contrast, the inflammatory process has a less important role for the development of emphysema. PMID:27555760

  18. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-01

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy.

  19. Leptin is an endogenous protective protein against the toxicity exerted by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Waelput, W; Guisez, Y

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a central mediator of a number of important pathologies such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Administration of high TNF doses induces acute anorexia, metabolic derangement, inflammation, and eventually shock and death. The in vivo effects of TNF are largely mediated by a complex network of TNF-induced cytokines and hormones acting together or antagonistically. Since TNF also induces leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes that modulates food intake and metabolism, we questioned the role of leptin in TNF-induced pathology. To address this question, we tested mouse strains that were defective either in leptin gene (ob/ob) or in functional leptin receptor gene (db/db), and made use of a receptor antagonist of leptin. Ob/ob and db/db mice, as well as normal mice treated with antagonist, exhibited increased sensitivity to the lethal effect of TNF. Exogenous leptin afforded protection to TNF in ob/ob mice, but failed to enhance the protective effect of endogenous leptin in normal mice. We conclude that leptin is involved in the protective mechanisms that allow an organism to cope with the potentially autoaggressive effects of its immune system.

  20. Imbalance of tumor necrosis factor receptors during progression in bovine leukemia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Konnai, Satoru . E-mail: konnai@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ikeda, Manabu; Kohara, Junko; Hirata, Toh-ichi; Okada, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-09-01

    Previously, we found an up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-{alpha} and an imbalance of TNF receptors in sheep experimentally infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). In order to investigate the different TNF-{alpha}-induced responses, in this study we examined the TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferative response and the expression levels of two distinct TNF receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from BLV-uninfected cattle and BLV-infected cattle that were aleukemic (AL) or had persistent lymphocytosis (PL). The proliferative response of PBMC isolated from those cattle with PL in the presence of recombinant bovine TNF-{alpha} (rTNF-{alpha}) was significantly higher than those from AL cattle and uninfected cattle and the cells from PL cattle expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of TNF receptor type II (TNF-RII) than those from AL and BLV-uninfected cattle. No difference was found in TNF-RI mRNA levels. Most cells expressing TNF-RII in PL cattle were CD5{sup +} or sIgM{sup +} cells and these cells showed resistance to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between the changes in provirus load and TNF-RII mRNA levels, and TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferation and TNF-RII mRNA levels. These data suggest that imbalance in the expression of TNF receptors could at least in part contribute to the progression of lymphocytosis in BLV infection.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter polymorphisms in Mexican patients with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    García-Trejo, Alma Rosa; Falcón-Lezama, Jorge A; Juárez-Palma, Lilia; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga-Ramos, Joaquín; Rangel, Hilda; Barquera, Rodrigo; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Ramos, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Increased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in patients with dengue have been reported. Various polymorphisms have been identified in the promoter region of the TNF-α gene that may affect its transcription. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between polymorphisms of TNF-α gene and the genetic susceptibility to dengue fever in a group of patients from Morelos State, Mexico. The TNF-α polymorphisms (positions -238 and -308) were determined by PCR-RFLP technique in 130 patients with dengue (85 with dengue fever and 45 with dengue hemorrhagic fever) and 169 healthy controls. The patients were selected from cases reported in Morelos State from 1997 to 2003. The whole group of dengue patients showed a decreased frequency of TNF-α -238 A allele when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.01, OR = 0.19, 95%CI = 0.02-0.78). When the analysis was made separately in dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever patients, the decreased frequency of TNF-α -238 A allele only remained significant in patients with DHF when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.034). This work suggests a possible association of TNF-α -238 A allele with protection to develop symptomatic disease.

  2. Leukotriene B4 and tumor necrosis factor release from leukocytes: effect of peritoneal dialysate.

    PubMed

    Jörres, A; Jörres, D; Gahl, G M; Kessel, M; Müller, C; Köttgen, E; Serke, S; Schulz, E; Mahiout, A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of peritoneal dialysate on the capacity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear (PMNL) and mononuclear leukocytes (MNC) to release leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) was investigated in vitro. Following density gradient separation, aliquots of 5 x 10(6) PMNL or MNC were incubated in peritoneal dialysis fluid containing 1.5% glucose or Hanks' buffer (= control) for 1-2 h at 37 degrees C. TNF alpha and LTB4 production was stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and calcium ionophore A23187, respectively. MNC incubated in buffer and LPS produced (mean +/- SD) 1,006 +/- 522 pg TNF alpha/5 x 10(6) cells; no significant amounts of TNF alpha were detectable in the presence of dialysate. An inhibition of TNF alpha release was also observed in MNC exposed to bicarbonate-buffered dialysates (pH 7.40) and 4.25% and 1.5% glucose solution with physiologic osmolality. Incubation of PMNL in Hanks' buffer followed by A23187 stimulation led to production of 29.1 +/- 19.2 ng LTB4/5 x 10(6) cells, whereas glucose-incubated cells were refractory to ionophore stimulation (less than 0.1 ng LTB4/5 x 10(6) cells). The failure of dialysate-exposed leukocytes to release inflammatory mediators in response to adequate stimuli may contribute to the impairment of cellular host defense in the setting of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

  3. Location of tumour necrosis factor alpha by immunohistochemistry in chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Murch, S H; Braegger, C P; Walker-Smith, J A; MacDonald, T T

    1993-01-01

    This study determined the location and tissue density of cells immunoreactive for tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) in intestinal specimens from 24 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (15 with Crohn's disease, nine with ulcerative colitis) and 11 controls. There was significantly increased density of TNF alpha immunoreactive cells in the lamina propria of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease specimens, although the distribution of these cells differed in the two conditions. In ulcerative colitis most of the TNF alpha immunoreactivity was seen in the subepithelial macrophages, with comparatively less in the deep lamina propria, while in Crohn's disease immunoreactive cells were distributed evenly throughout the lamina propria. Increased submucosal immunoreactivity was found only in Crohn's disease, in which TNF alpha positive macrophages tended to cluster around arterioles and venules, often infiltrating and disrupting vascular endothelium. It is suggested that this degree of TNF alpha production probably contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, by impairing the integrity of epithelial and endothelial membranes, increasing inflammatory cell recruitment, and by prothrombotic effects on the vascular endothelium. Images Figure 2 PMID:8031350

  4. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2-signaling in CD133-expressing cells in renal clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Wang, Jun; Yang, Jun; Burrows, Natalie; Maxwell, Patrick H; Eisen, Timothy; Warren, Anne Y; Vanharanta, Sakari; Pacey, Simon; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pober, Jordan S; Bradley, John R

    2016-01-01

    Compared to normal kidney, renal clear cell carcinomas (ccRCC) contain increased numbers of interstitial, non-hematopoietic CD133+cells that express stem cell markers and exhibit low rates of proliferation. These cells fail to form tumors upon transplantation but support tumor formation by differentiated malignant cells. We hypothesized that killing of ccRCC CD133+ (RCCCD133+) cells by cytotoxic agents might be enhanced by inducing them to divide. Since tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), signalling through TNFR2, induces proliferation of malignant renal tubular epithelial cells, we investigated whether TNFR2 might similarly affect RCCCD133+cells. We compared treating organ cultures of ccRCC vs adjacent nontumour kidney (NK) and RCCCD133+ vs NK CD133+ (NKCD133+) cell cultures with wild-type TNF (wtTNF) or TNF muteins selective for TNFR1 (R1TNF) or TNFR2 (R2TNF). In organ cultures, R2TNF increased expression of TNFR2 and promoted cell cycle entry of both RCCCD133+ and NKCD133+ but effects were greater in RCCCD133+. In contrast, R1TNF increased TNFR1 expression and promoted cell death. Importantly, cyclophosphamide triggered much more cell death in RCCCD133+ and NKCD133+cells pre-treated with R2TNF as compared to untreated controls. We conclude that selective engagement of TNFR2 by TNF can drives RCCCD133+ proliferation and thereby increase sensitivity to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxicity. PMID:26992212

  5. Tumor necrosis factor haplotype diversity in Mestizo and native populations of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castro-Martínez, X H; Leal-Cortés, C; Flores-Martínez, S E; García-Zapién, A G; Sánchez-Corona, J; Portilla-de Buen, E; Gómez-Espinel, I; Zamora-Ginez, I; Pérez-Fuentes, R; Islas-Andrade, S; Revilla-Monsalve, C; Guerrero-Romero, F; Rodríguez-Morán, M; Mendoza-Carrera, F

    2014-04-01

    The so-called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) block includes the TNFA, lymphotoxin alpha and beta (LTA and LTB) genes with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and microsatellites with an allele frequency that exhibits interpopulation variability. To date, no reports have included both SNPs and microsatellites at the TNF block to study Mestizo or Amerindian populations from Mexico. In this study, samples of five Mexican Mestizo populations (Durango, Guadalajara, Monterrey, Puebla, and Tierra Blanca) and four native-Mexican populations (North Lacandonians, South Lacandonians, Tepehuanos, and Yaquis) were genotyped for two SNPs (LTA+252A>G and TNFA-308G>A) and four microsatellites (TNFa, d, e, and f), to analyze the genetic substructure of the Mexican population. Allele and haplotype frequencies, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and interpopulation genetic relationships were calculated. There was significant LD along almost all of the TNF block but the lowest D' values were observed for the TNFf-TNFd pair. Mestizos showed higher allele and haplotype diversity than did natives. The genetic differentiation level was reduced among Mestizos; however, a slightly, but significant genetic substructure was observed between northern and southern Mexican Mestizos. Among the Amerindian populations, the genetic differentiation level was significantly elevated, particularly in both North and South Lacandonians. Furthermore, among Southern Lacandonians, inhabitants of Lacanja town were the most differentiated from all the Mexicans analyzed. The data presented here will serve as a reference for further population and epidemiological studies including these TNF polymorphisms in the Mexican population.

  6. Endotoxin, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor cause neutrophil-dependent microvascular leakage in postcapillary venules.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, E. S.; Ulich, T. R.

    1992-01-01

    Acute inflammation is characterized mainly by the egress of neutrophils from postcapillary venules and by increased vascular permeability leading to the formation of edema. The microvascular site of increased vascular permeability in local acute inflammatory lesions was investigated after the injection of endotoxin (LPS), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) into the dermis overlying the cremasteric and rectus abdominis muscles of rats. LPS caused leakage of colloidal carbon peaking at 3 to 4 hours at the level of the postcapillary venules and capillary leak was variably observed at later time points. IL-1 and TNF also caused postcapillary venular leakage. IL-1 was as potent as LPS and more so than TNF. The microvascular leak caused by LPS, IL-1, and TNF was accompanied by the tissue accumulation of neutrophils, and was neutrophil-dependent because LPS, IL-1, and TNF did not cause vascular labelling in neutropenic rats. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1546745

  7. Induction of the E-selectin promoter by interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor alpha, and inhibition by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, K P; Farrow, S; Daly, M; Talabot, F; Searle, N

    1997-01-01

    Cytokine-induced expression of the endothelial cell surface adhesion molecule E-selectin is inhibited by glucocorticoids (GCs). To investigate possible mechanisms for steroid inhibition, a reporter gene (ESAP) was constructed, comprising the cytokine responsive region of the E-selectin gene (nt -383 to +81) coupled to alkaline phosphatase (AP). In A549 cells stably transfected with the ESAP gene, AP production was highly responsive to the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) and tumour necrosis factor alpha, with ED50 values of 3 pM and 1000 pM respectively. Furthermore the cytokine-induced AP responses were inhibited by GCs, indicating that both transcriptional activation and GC suppression of the E-selectin gene were mediated via regulatory elements within the same region of the promoter. The relative potencies of GC drugs as inhibitors of IL-1beta (10 pM)-stimulated ESAP-gene activation were fluticasone> beclomethasone>dexamethasone, with IC50 values of 0.13, 1.1 and 2.7 nM respectively. Inhibition by fluticasone was blocked by the GC receptor (GR) antagonist drug mifepristone (Ru486), which is consistent with the suppressive effects of GCs being mediated via the GR. However, because the E-selectin promoter lacks a consensus glucocorticoid responsive element, mechanisms for inhibition independent of GR-DNA binding were investigated. Evidence that GCs also inhibited cytokine activation of a synthetic nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB)-driven reporter gene transiently transfected into A549 cells suggested that interference with the activation and/or function of this transcription factor was important for GC inhibition of ESAP. However, in A549-ESAP cells, fluticasone (100 nM) did not affect IL-1beta (10 pM)-induced IkBalpha degradation, NFkappaB-p65 nuclear translocation or the DNA-binding capacity of nuclear NFkappaB complexes, over a period during which cytokine-induced ESAP-gene activation was inhibited. Finally, there was no evidence to suggest that GC

  8. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibit repair of the porcine meniscus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hennerbichler, Alfred; Moutos, Franklin T.; Hennerbichler, Diana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Injury or removal of the knee meniscus leads to progressive joint degeneration, and current surgical therapies for meniscal tears seek to maximally preserve meniscal structure and function. However, the factors that influence intrinsic repair of the meniscus are not well understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the capacity of meniscus tissue to repair a simulated defect in vitro and to examine the effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines on this process. METHODS Cylindrical explants were harvested from the outer one-third of medial porcine menisci. To simulate a full-thickness defect, a central core was removed and reinserted immediately into the defect. Explants were cultured for 2, 4, or 6 weeks in serum-containing media in the presence or absence of interleukin-1 (IL-1) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and meniscal repair was investigated using mechanical testing and fluorescence confocal microscopy. RESULTS Meniscal lesions in untreated samples showed a significant capacity for intrinsic repair in vitro, with increasing cell accumulation and repair strength over time in culture. In the presence of IL-1 or TNF-alpha, no repair was observed despite the presence of abundant viable cells. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that the meniscus exhibits an intrinsic repair response in vitro. However, the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines completely inhibited repair. These findings suggest that increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines post-injury or under arthritic conditions may inhibit meniscal repair. Therefore, inhibition of these cytokines may provide a means of accelerating repair of damaged or injured menisci in vivo. PMID:17448702

  9. Association of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Gene Polymorphisms with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Iran

    PubMed Central

    NADERI, Nosratollah; FARNOOD, Alma; DADAEI, Tahereh; HABIBI, Manijeh; BALAII, Hedie; FIROUZI, Farzad; MAHBAN, Aydin; SOLTANI, Masoumeh; ZALI, Mohammadreza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology, in which genetic factors, seem to play an important role in the disease predisposition and course. Assessment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) gene polymorphisms in many populations showed a possible association with IBD. Considering the genetic variety in different ethnic groups, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association of five important single nucleo-tide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of (TNF-α) gene with IBD in Iran. Methods In this case-control study, 156 Ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, 50 Crohn’s disease (CD) patients and 200 sex and age matched healthy controls of Iranian origin were enrolled. The study was performed during a two year period (2008–2010) at Taleghani Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. DNA samples were evaluated for (TNF-α) gene polymorphisms (including -1031, -863, -857, -308 and -238) by PCR and RFLP methods. Results The frequency of the mutant allele of -1031 polymorphism was significantly higher in Iranian patients with Crohn’s disease compared to healthy controls (P=0.01, OR=1.92; 95% CI: 1.14-3.23). None of the other evaluated polymorphisms demonstrated a significant higher frequency of mutant alleles in Iranian IBD patients compared to controls. Conclusion Among the five assessed (SNPs), only -1031 polymorphism of (TNF-α) gene may play a role in disease susceptibility for Crohn’s disease in Iran. This pattern of distribution of (TNF-α) gene polymorphisms could be specific in this population. PMID:26060764

  10. Disturbance of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Mediated Beta Interferon Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Hanke, Brigitte; Zawatzky, Rainer; Soto, Ubaldo; van Riggelen, Jan; zur Hausen, Harald; Rösl, Frank

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we show that malignant human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cells lost their ability to synthesize endogenous beta interferon (IFN-β) upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) treatment. IFN-β transcription, however, was reinducible in nonmalignant HPV-positive cells, which was confirmed in functional protection assays against encephalomyocarditis virus or vesicular stomatitis virus infections. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against IFN-β blocked the antiviral effect, excluding the possibility that other IFN types were involved. Conversely, both malignant and immortalized cells could be protected against viral cytolysis when either IFN-β, IFN-α, or IFN-γ was added exogenously. This indicates that only the cross talk between TNF-α and the IFN-β pathways, and not IFN-α/β and IFN-γ signaling in general, is perturbed in cervical carcinoma cells. Notably, full virus protection was restricted exclusively to nonmalignant cells, indicating that the antiviral effect correlates with the growth-inhibitory and virus-suppressive properties of TNF-α. The IFN-regulatory factors IRF-1 and p48 (ISGF3γ) emerged as key regulatory molecules in the differential IFN-β response, since their transcription was either absent or only inefficiently enhanced in tumorigenic cells upon treatment with TNF-α. Inducibility of both genes, however, became reestablished in cervical carcinoma cells, which were complemented to nontumorigenicity after somatic cell hybridization. Complementation was paralleled by the entire reconstitution of cytokine-mediated IFN-β expression and the ability of TNF-α to exert an antiviral state. In contrast, under conditions where tumor suppression was not accomplished upon somatic cell hybridization, neither expression of IRF-1, p48, and IFN-β nor antiviral activity could be restored. PMID:11739693

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor: A Mechanistic Link between Angiotensin-II-Induced Cardiac Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Trial, JoAnn; Wang, Yanlin; Entman, Mark L.; Haudek, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion induced the uptake of monocytic fibroblast precursors that initiated the development of cardiac fibrosis; these cells and concurrent fibrosis were absent in mice lacking tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 1 (TNFR1). We now investigated their cellular origin and temporal uptake, and the involvement of TNFR1 in monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation. Methods and Results Within a day, Ang-II induced a pro-inflammatory environment characterized by production of inflammatory chemokines, cytokines, and TH1-interleukins and uptake of bone marrow-derived M1-cells. After a week, the cardiac environment changed to profibrotic with growth-factor and TH2-interleukin synthesis, uptake of bone marrow-derived M2-cells, and presence of M2-related fibroblasts. TNFR1 signaling was not necessary for early M1 uptake, but its absence diminished the amount of M2-cells. TNFR1-KO hearts also showed reduced levels of cytokine expression, but not of TH-related lymphokines. Reconstitution of wild-type bone marrow into TNFR1-KO mice was sufficient to restore M2 uptake, upregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic genes, and development of fibrosis in response to Ang-II. We also developed an in vitro mouse monocyte-to-fibroblast-maturation assay that confirmed the essential role of TNFR1 in the sequential progression of monocyte activation and fibroblast formation. Conclusions Development of cardiac fibrosis in response to Ang-II was mediated by myeloid precursors and consisted of two stages. A primary M1 inflammatory response was followed by a subsequent M2 fibrotic response. While the first phase appeared to be independent of TNFR1 signaling, the later phase (and development of fibrosis) was abrogated by deletion of TNFR1. PMID:25550440

  12. Anaemia and resistance to malaria in transgenic mice expressing human tumour necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Sheikh, N; de Souza, J B; Playfair, J H; Probert, L; Kollias, G

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying a modified human tumour necrosis factor (huTNF)/beta-globin gene construct linked to the T-cell-specific locus control region of the human CD2 gene express huTNF in their T cells which is released into the circulation and causes the development of a wasting syndrome. We now report that the mice develop anaemia, probably through enhanced erythrophagocytosis rather than inhibition of reticulocyte production. Thus autologous erythrocytes, as well as sheep erythrocytes, were cleared more rapidly from the circulation of transgenic mice than from littermate controls. By contrast, peritoneal macrophages from transgenic mice were less phagocytic in vitro than cells from controls. They also secreted less murine (mu)TNF when stimulated by either bacterial lipopolysaccharide or toxic malarial antigens. The yields of muTNF approached normal levels, however, when these refractory cells from the transgenic mice were stimulated in the presence of a high concentration of indomethacin, suggesting that the production of muTNF was inhibited by enhanced synthesis of prostaglandins. The parasitaemia of transgenic mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii was about 10-fold less at its peak than in controls, although it followed the same time-course, and the multiplication of P. chabaudi was inhibited to an even greater degree. This control of parasitaemia may also be explained by enhancement of macrophage activity, mediated by huTNF acting on the murine p55 receptor, presumably by increasing the removal of parasites by phagocytosis or their killing by toxic products released by the activated macrophages. These observations suggest that a factor in the anaemia of human malaria may be macrophage activation caused by the secretion of TNF that occurs in this disease. PMID:7959874

  13. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in patients who have asbestosis and develop cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, R; Koskinen, H; Hemminki, K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were assayed by radioimmunoassay in serum samples collected between 1981 and 1987 from 111 patients with asbestosis who were at a high risk of cancer. Follow up of these patients until 1993 showed that 38 had developed cancer (27 lung, three mesotheliomas, and eight diverse malignancies). RESULTS--The mean serum concentrations of TNF-alpha given in fmol/100 microliters serum in all the cases with cancer (14.1) and the cases with lung cancer (13.6) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the mean concentrations in the exposed controls (10.5). A positive increase was considered to be any value that was > 2 SDs above the mean of the exposed controls. 22% (six of 27) of the cases with lung cancer were positive compared with 4% (three of 73) of the exposed controls, a significant difference (P < 0.001). The serum concentrations of TNF-alpha correlated moderately with cancer (r = 0.3), lung cancer (r = 0.3), and Neu oncoproteins and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (r = 0.3, 0.5 respectively). Also, there was a significant correlation between development of cancer and severity or progression of asbestosis. There was no correlation between the concentrations of TNF-alpha and severity or progression of asbestosis. CONCLUSIONS--These results showed high concentrations of TNF-alpha in the patients who had cancer. TNF-alpha may offer an auxiliary method in early diagnosis of cancers related to asbestosis. PMID:7795753

  14. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha interacts with laminin and functions as a pro-adhesive cytokine.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Goldkorn, I; Lider, O

    1995-05-01

    Certain cytokines, chemokines and growth factors interact with components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and, in particular, sulphated polysaccharides and proteoglycans. Recently, we demonstrated that tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammatory cytokine, can bind fibronectin (FN), a cell-adhesive glycoprotein of the ECM, and that TNF-alpha bound to FN enhances the binding of T cells to the glycoprotein. In the present study, we studied the interactions of TNF-alpha and laminin (LN), another glycoprotein present in basement membranes and extracellular matrices. 125I-labelled TNF-alpha was found to bind to immobilized LN, and more avidly to the E1 and P1 fragments of LN, which contain its integrin- and non-integrin-dependent cell-adhesive sites, suggesting that cryptic TNF-alpha-binding sites are exposed upon proteolytic fragmentation of LN by enzymes such as elastase or pepsin. The bound cytokine did not dissociate from the LN and its fragments during a 24-hr period, indicating that in vivo LN can serve to restrict TNF-alpha adjacent to inflammatory sites. The LN-associated TNF-alpha retained at least some of its biological activities, since both diffusible and, to a greater extent, LN-bound TNF-alpha elevated the beta 1-integrin-dependent adhesion to LN of phorbol ester-activated human CD4+ T cells. Thus, LN and TNF-alpha may act in concert to transmit synergistic activating signals to infiltrating leucocytes, and thereby regulate immune cell reactions in extravascular inflammatory tissue. PMID:7635514

  15. Risk factors for outbreaks of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) and associated mortality in Norwegian salmonid farming.

    PubMed

    Bang Jensen, Britt; Kristoffersen, Anja B

    2015-06-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) has for many years been considered one of the most important restraints to the production of salmonids in European aquaculture. In Norway, the disease is responsible for high losses in post-smolts in the first few weeks after sea transfer. Despite the importance of IPN, there are few epidemiological studies on risk factors and mitigation strategies. In this paper, we present analyses of data from all cohorts put to sea in 2009 to 2012 on Norwegian marine salmonid farms. The data used were obtained from national registers on salmonid production and disease outbreaks. The results showed that the risk of IPN outbreak was higher for spring versus autumn cohorts, Atlantic salmon versus rainbow trout and for cohorts on farms with previous history of IPN. The risk increased with increasing cohort size and infection pressure, whereas increasing temperature and weight at sea transfer decreased the risk. Estimations from a model of cumulative mortality within the first 6 mo after sea transfer showed that mortality in cohorts with IPN increased to approximately 7.2% as compared to a 'baseline' cohort with a mortality of 3.4%. If the cohort had both IPN and pancreas disease (PD), the estimated mortality increased to 12.9%, and cohorts with both IPN, PD and heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) had an estimated mortality of 16.6%, when all other significant factors were kept constant (these were cohort type, year, temperature at sea transfer and weight at sea transfer). Our results provide valuable inputs for mitigation strategies and for economic modelling of consequences of disease.

  16. Predictors of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zampeli, Evanthia; Gizis, Michalis; Siakavellas, Spyros I; Bamias, Giorgos

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an immune-mediated, chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine. Its course is characterized by flares of acute inflammation and periods of low-grade chronic inflammatory activity or remission. Monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) are part of the therapeutic armamentarium and are used in cases of moderate to severe UC that is refractory to conventional treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. Therapeutic response to these agents is not uniform and a large percentage of patients either fail to improve (primary non-response) or lose response after a period of improvement (secondary non-response/loss of response). In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents has been related to uncommon but potentially serious adverse effects that preclude their administration or lead to their discontinuation. Finally, use of these medications is associated with a considerable cost for the health system. The identification of parameters that may predict response to anti-TNF drugs in UC would help to better select for patients with a high probability to respond and minimize risk and costs for those who will not respond. Analysis of the major clinical trials and the accumulated experience with the use of anti-TNF drugs in UC has resulted to the report of such prognostic factors. Included are clinical and epidemiological characteristics, laboratory markers, endoscopic indicators and molecular (immunological/genetic) signatures. Such predictive parameters of long-term outcomes may either be present at the commencement of treatment or determined during the early period of therapy. Validation of these prognostic markers in large cohorts of patients with variable characteristics will facilitate their introduction into clinical practice and the best selection of UC patients who will benefit from anti-TNF therapy. PMID:25133030

  17. Glia-pinealocyte network: the paracrine modulation of melatonin synthesis by tumor necrosis factor (TNF).

    PubMed

    da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Pinato, Luciana; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Carvalho-Sousa, Cláudia Emanuele; Markus, Regina P

    2012-01-01

    The pineal gland, a circumventricular organ, plays an integrative role in defense responses. The injury-induced suppression of the pineal gland hormone, melatonin, which is triggered by darkness, allows the mounting of innate immune responses. We have previously shown that cultured pineal glands, which express toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), produce TNF when challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here our aim was to evaluate which cells present in the pineal gland, astrocytes, microglia or pinealocytes produced TNF, in order to understand the interaction between pineal activity, melatonin production and immune function. Cultured pineal glands or pinealocytes were stimulated with LPS. TNF content was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TLR4 and TNFR1 expression were analyzed by confocal microscopy. Microglial morphology was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. In the present study, we show that although the main cell types of the pineal gland (pinealocytes, astrocytes and microglia) express TLR4, the production of TNF induced by LPS is mediated by microglia. This effect is due to activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. In addition, we observed that LPS activates microglia and modulates the expression of TNFR1 in pinealocytes. As TNF has been shown to amplify and prolong inflammatory responses, its production by pineal microglia suggests a glia-pinealocyte network that regulates melatonin output. The current study demonstrates the molecular and cellular basis for understanding how melatonin synthesis is regulated during an innate immune response, thus our results reinforce the role of the pineal gland as sensor of immune status.

  18. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  19. [Acquired haemophilia (acquired factor VIII inhibitor)].

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, José M; Duboscq, Cristina; Fondevila, Carlos; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia is a rare disorder. The clinical picture ranges from mild ecchymosis and anaemia to life threatening bleeding in up to 20% of patients. The disease is produced by an antibody against Factor VIII and it usually occurs in the elderly, with no previous history of a bleeding disorder. It can be associated to an underlying condition such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, drugs or pregnancy. It has a typical laboratory pattern with isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) that fails to correct upon mixing tests with normal plasma and low levels of factor VIII. Treatment recommendations are based on controlling the acute bleeding episodes with either bypassing agent, recombinant activated factor VII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and eradication of the antibody with immunosuppressive therapy.

  20. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 in the Pacific oyster.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Linlin; Du, Yishuai; Li, Li; Tang, Xueying; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factors (TRAFs) are a family of crucial adaptors, playing vital roles in mediating signal transduction in immune signaling pathways, including RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. In the present study, a new TRAF family member (CgTRAF2) was identified in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Comparison and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CgTRAF2 could be a new member of the invertebrate TRAF2 family. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CgTRAF2 mRNA was highly expressed in the digestive gland, gills, and hemocytes, and it was significantly up-regulated after Vibrio alginolyticus and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) challenge. The CgTRAF2 mRNA expression profile in different developmental stages of oyster larvae suggested that CgTRAF2 could function in early larval development. CgTRAF2 mRNA expression pattern, after the silence of CgMAVS (Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling) -like, indicated that CgTRAF2 might function downstream of CgMAVS-like. Moreover, the subcellular localization analysis revealed that CgTRAF2 was localized in cytoplasm, and it may play predominately important roles in signal transduction. Collectively, these results demonstrated that CgTRAF2 might play important roles in the innate immunity and larval development of the Pacific oyster.

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes macrophage apoptosis through stimulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT).

    PubMed

    Petreaca, Melissa L; Yao, Min; Ware, Carl; Martins-Green, Manuela M

    2008-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is critical for normal wound healing. Inflammation is prolonged and fails to resolve properly in chronic wounds. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces macrophage apoptosis and to delineate mechanisms involved in this process. VEGF inhibition during wound healing leads to an increased number of macrophages remaining in wounds, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in removal of these cells from the wound. If this effect has physiological relevance, it likely occurs via apoptosis. We show that VEGF increases apoptosis of macrophages in vitro using Annexin V-FITC staining and caspase activation. Microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting showed that VEGF increases the expression of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT) in macrophages. We also show that in macrophages LIGHT promotes apoptosis through the lymphotoxin beta receptor. Moreover, inhibition of LIGHT prevents VEGF-induced death, suggesting that LIGHT mediates VEGF-induced macrophage apoptosis. Taken together, our results identify a novel role for VEGF and for LIGHT in macrophage apoptosis during wound healing, an event critical in the resolution of inflammation. This finding may lead to the development of new strategies to improve resolution of inflammation in problematic wounds. PMID:19128255

  2. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  3. Cilostazol prevents retinal ischemic damage partly via inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor-kappa B/activator protein-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Fumiya; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Egashira, Yusuke; Ogishima, Hiromi; Nakamura, Shinsuke; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Cilostazol is a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase III and is widely used to treat ischemic symptoms of peripheral vascular disease. We evaluated the protective effects of cilostazol in a murine model of ocular ischemic syndrome in which retinal ischemia was induced by 5-h unilateral ligation of both the pterygopalatine artery (PPA) and the external carotid artery (ECA) in anesthetized mice. The effects of cilostazol (30 mg/kg, p.o.) on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced retinal damage were examined by histological, retinal vascular permeability, and electrophysiological analyses. Using immunoblotting, the protective mechanism for cilostazol was evaluated by examining antiinflammatory effects of cilostazol on the expression of tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and claudin-5), and the phosphorylations of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and c-Jun. The histological analysis revealed that I/R decreased the cell number in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and the thicknesses of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), and that cilostazol attenuated these decreases. Additionally, cilostazol prevented the hyperpermeability of blood vessels. Electroretinogram (ERG) measurements revealed that cilostazol prevented the I/R-induced reductions in a-, b-, and oscillatory potential (OP) wave amplitudes seen at 5 days after I/R. Cilostazol inhibited the increased expression of TNF-α and the phosphorylation levels of NF-κB and c-Jun in the retina after I/R. In addition, cilostazol prevented TNF-α-induced reduction of ZO-1 and claudin-5 expression in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs). These findings indicate that cilostazol may prevent I/R-induced retinal damage partly through inhibition of TNF-α-induced NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathway. PMID:25505560

  4. Streptococcal Histone Induces Murine Macrophages To Produce Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Ignatowski, Tracey A.; Spengler, Robert N.; Noble, Bernice; Stinson, Murray W.

    1999-01-01

    The histone-like protein (HlpA) is highly conserved among streptococci. After lysis of streptococci in infected tissues, HlpA can enter the bloodstream and bind to proteoglycans in the glomerular capillaries of kidneys, where it can react with antibodies or stimulate host cell receptors. Deposits of streptococcal antigens in tissues have been associated with localized acute inflammation. In this study, we measured the ability of purified HlpA (5 to 100 μg/ml), from Streptococcus mitis, to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cultured, murine peritoneal macrophages. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) was time and concentration dependent and was not diminished by the presence of polymyxin B. Exposure of macrophages to a mixture of HlpA and lipoteichoic acid resulted in a synergistic response in the production of both TNF-α and IL-1. Stimulation with a mixture of HlpA and heparin resulted in reduced cytokine production (50% less IL-1 and 76% less TNF-α) compared to that by cells incubated with HlpA alone. The inclusion of antibodies specific to HlpA in macrophage cultures during stimulation with HlpA did not affect the quantity of TNF-α or IL-1 produced. These observations suggest that streptococcal histone may contribute to tissue injury at infection sites by promoting monocytes/macrophages to synthesize and release cytokines that initiate and exacerbate inflammation. Streptococcus pyogenes, which can infect tissues in enormous numbers, may release sufficient amounts of HlpA to reach the kidneys and cause acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. PMID:10569765

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor α and Interleukin 1β Enhance the Cortisone/Cortisol Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Escher, Geneviève; Galli, Ivo; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S.; Frey, Brigitte M.; Frey, Felix J.

    1997-01-01

    Endogenously released or exogenously administered glucocorticosteroids are relevant hormones for controlling inflammation. Only 11β-hydroxy glucocorticosteroids, but not 11-keto glucocorticosteroids, activate glucocorticoid receptors. Since we found that glomerular mesangial cells (GMC) express 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-OHSD1), which interconverts 11-keto glucocorticosteroids into 11β-hydroxy glucocorticosteroids (cortisone/cortisol shuttle), we explored whether 11β-OHSD1 determines the antiinflammatory effect of glucocorticosteroids. GMC exposed to interleukin (IL)-1β or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) release group II phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a key enzyme producing inflammatory mediators. 11β-hydroxy glucocorticosteroids inhibited cytokine-induced transcription and release of PLA2 through a glucocorticoid receptor–dependent mechanism. This inhibition was enhanced by inhibiting 11β-OHSD1. Interestingly, 11-keto glucocorticosteroids decreased cytokine-induced PLA2 release as well, a finding abrogated by inhibiting 11β-OHSD1. Stimulating GMC with IL-1β or TNF-α increased expression and reductase activity of 11β-OHSD1. Similarly, this IL-1β– and TNF-α–induced formation of active 11β-hydroxy glucocorticosteroids from inert 11-keto glucocorticosteroids by the 11β-OHSD1 was shown in the Kiki cell line that expresses the stably transfected bacterial β-galactosidase gene under the control of a glucocorticosteroids response element. Thus, we conclude that 11β-OHSD1 controls access of 11β-hydroxy glucocorticosteroids and 11-keto glucocorticosteroids to glucocorticoid receptors and thus determines the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticosteroids. IL-1β and TNF-α upregulate specifically the reductase activity of 11β-OHSD1 and counterbalance by that mechanism their own proinflammatory effect. PMID:9221748

  6. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in zebrafish retinal neurogenesis and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xu-Dan; Sun, Yan; Cai, Shi-Jiao; Fang, Yang-Wu; Cui, Jian-Lin; Li, Yu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in zebrafish retinal development and myelination. METHODS Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO), which are complementary to the translation start site of the wild-type embryonic zebrafish TNF-α mRNA sequence, were synthesized and injected into one- to four-cell embryos. The translation blocking specificity was verified by Western blotting using an anti-TNF-α antibody, whole-mount in situ hybridization using a hepatocyte-specific mRNA probe ceruloplasmin (cp), and co-injection of TNF-α MO and TNF-α mRNA. An atonal homolog 7 (atoh7) mRNA probe was used to detect neurogenesis onset. The retinal neurodifferentiation was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies Zn12, Zpr1, and Zpr3 to label ganglion cells, cones, and rods, respectively. Myelin basic protein (mbp) was used as a marker to track and observe the myelination using whole-mount in situ hybridization. RESULTS Targeted knockdown of TNF-α resulted in specific suppression of TNF-α expression and a severely underdeveloped liver. The co-injection of TNF-α MO and mRNA rescued the liver development. Retinal neurogenesis in TNF-α morphants was initiated on time. The retina was fully laminated, while ganglion cells, cones, and rods were well differentiated at 72 hours post-fertilization (hpf). mbp was expressed in Schwann cells in the lateral line nerves and cranial nerves from 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) as well as in oligodendrocytes linearly along the hindbrain bundles and the spinal cord from 4 dpf, which closely resembled its endogenous profile. CONCLUSION TNF-α is not an essential regulator for retinal neurogenesis and optic myelination. PMID:27366683

  7. Comparison of drug survival rates for tumor necrosis factor antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Santana, Virginia; González-Sarmiento, E; Calleja-Hernández, MA; Sánchez-Sánchez, T

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistence of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an overall marker of treatment success. Objective To assess the survival of anti-TNF treatment and to define the potential predictors of drug discontinuation in RA, in order to verify the adequacy of current practices. Design An observational, descriptive, longitudinal, retrospective study. Setting The Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. Patients RA patients treated with anti-TNF therapy between January 2011 and January 2012. Measurements Demographic information and therapy assessments were gathered from medical and pharmaceutical records. Data is expressed as means (standard deviations) for quantitative variables and frequency distribution for qualitative variables. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was used to assess persistence, and Cox multivariate regression models were used to assess potential predictors of treatment discontinuation. Results In total, 126 treatment series with infliximab (n = 53), etanercept (n = 51) or adalimumab (n = 22) were administered to 91 patients. Infliximab has mostly been used as a first-line treatment, but it was the drug with the shortest time until a change of treatment. Significant predictors of drug survival were: age; the anti-TNF agent; and the previous response to an anti-TNF drug. Limitation The small sample size. Conclusion The overall efficacy of anti-TNF drugs diminishes with time, with infliximab having the shortest time until a change of treatment. The management of biologic therapy in patients with RA should be reconsidered in order to achieve disease control with a reduction in costs. PMID:24023512

  8. Somatostatin and macrophage function: modulation of hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor release.

    PubMed

    Chao, T C; Cheng, H P; Walter, R J

    1995-07-21

    Recent studies have shown that somatostatin modulates lymphocyte function, but the effects of somatostatin on macrophage function are not clearly defined. In the present study, peritoneal macrophages (Mluminal diameter) obtained from male rats were treated in vitro with somatostatin or octreotide and their effects on the release of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitrite, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) determined. Macrophages treated with somatostatin (10(-9) M to 10(-7) M) or octreotide (10(-8) M and 10(-7) M) released significantly greater amounts of PMA-stimulated H2O2 than did the untreated controls. In addition, 10(-9) M of somatostatin significantly enhanced PMA-stimulated H2O2 release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. Octreotide had no effect on H2O2 release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. At concentrations of 10(-14) M, 10(-13) M, or greater than 10(-8) M, somatostatin or octreotide suppressed nitrite release by Mluminal diameter. Somatostatin or octreotide did not affect nitrite release by LPS-treated Mluminal diameter. On the other hand, Mluminal diameter treated with 10(-11) M of somatostatin or octreotide released greater amounts of TNF than did the untreated controls. In contrast, TNF release by Mluminal diameter treated with 10(-9) M to 10(-5) M of somatostatin or 10(-7) M to 10(-5) M of octreotide was less than that of the controls. Anti-TNF antibody (1:1000) caused a reduction in the release of H2O2 and nitrite. These findings demonstrate that somatostatin and octreotide modulate the release of H2O2, nitric oxide, and TNF by Mluminal diameter depending on the concentration of hormones used.

  9. Role of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on energy metabolism in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Tredget, E.E.; Yu, Y.M.; Zhong, S.; Burini, R.; Okusawa, S.; Gelfand, J.A.; Dinarello, C.A.; Young, V.R.; Burke, J.F.

    1988-12-01

    A study of the combined effects of intravenous infusion of the recombinant cytokines beta-interleukin 1 (IL-1) and alpha-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on energy substrate metabolism in awake, conditioned, adult rabbits was performed. After a 2-h basal or control period, 48-h fasted rabbits were administered TNF and IL-1 as a bolus (5 micrograms/kg) followed by a continuous intravenous infusion (25 ng.kg-1.min-1) for 3 h. Significant increases in plasma lactate (P less than 0.01), glucose (P less than 0.01), and triglycerides (P less than 0.05) occurred during the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF, whereas neither cytokine alone had no effect. There was a 33% increase in the rate of glucose appearance (P less than 0.05), but glucose clearance was not altered compared with the control period. Glucose oxidation increased during the combined cytokine infusion period and glucose recycling increased by 600% (P less than 0.002). Lactic acidosis and decreased oxygen consumption, as a result of the cytokine infusions, indicated development of anaerobic glycolytic metabolism. A reduction in the activity state of hepatic mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (65 vs. 82% in control animals, P less than 0.05) was consistent with the observed increase in anaerobic glycolysis. Thus the combined infusion of IL-1 and TNF in rabbits produces metabolic manifestations seen in severe injury and sepsis in human patients and, as such, may account for the profound alterations of energy metabolism seen in these conditions.

  10. Genetic variability in the tumor necrosis factor-lymphotoxin region influences susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, B.; Waldron-Lynch, F.; Adams, C.; O`Gara, F.

    1996-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class H1 tumor necrosis factor-tymphotoxin (TNF-LT) region (6p21.3) was investigated as a possible susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inheritance of five TNF microsatellite markers was determined in 50 multiplex families. Overall, 47 different haplotypes were observed. One of these, the TNF a6, b5, c1, d3, e3 (H1) haplotype, was present in 35.3% of affected, but in only 20.5% of unaffected, individuals (P < .005). This haplotype accounted for 21.5% of the parental haplotypes transmitted to affected offspring and only 7.3 % not transmitted to affected offspring (P = .0003). The TNF a6 and TNF c1 alleles were individually associated with RA (P = .0005 and .0008, respectively), as were the HLA-DRB1 {open_quotes}shared epitope{close_quotes} (SE) (P = .0001) and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = .0018). Both univariate and bivariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant effects of TNF c1 and SE in increasing risk to RA (P < .001). Stratification by the presence of SE indicated an independent effect of the TNFc1 allele (P = .0003) and the HLA A1, BS, DR3 extended haplotype (always TNFa2, b3, c1, d1, e3) (P = .0027) in SE heterozygotes, while the H1 haplotype was associated with RA in SE homozygotes (P = .0018). The TNF-LT region appears to influence susceptibility to RA, distinct from HLA-DR. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. The cardiodepressant and vasodepressant effects of tumour necrosis factor in rat isolated atrial and aortic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Foulkes, R.; Shaw, S.

    1992-01-01

    1. The ability of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha (rec huTNF) to elicit cardiodepressor and vasodepressor effects in rat isolated tissues was investigated. 2. rec huTNF (3 x 10(-11)-3 x 10(-8) M) administered directly to the organ bath, caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the isoprenaline-induced inotropic response in electrically stimulated rat left atria. This occurred within 20 min of administration. In contrast, rec huTNF was without effect on the chronotropic response to isoprenaline in isolated spontaneously beating atria. 3. rec huTNF (1 microgram kg-1) was also given systemically to rats and the atria studied in vitro. Only 60 min of rec huTNF pretreatment was sufficient to cause a marked attenuation of the isoprenaline-induced inotropic response. This effect was not further augmented when rats were pretreated with rec huTNF for 24 h. 4. In isolated aortic rings taken from rats 60 min after rec huTNF (1 microgram kg-1, i.v.) administration, there was no effect seen on the constriction induced by phenylephrine in either endothelium-intact or denuded tissues. In addition, any responses to L-arginine or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) administration were unaffected by rec huTNF pretreatment. 5. In aortic rings taken from rats 24 h after rec huTNF administration, the phenylephrine-induced constriction was significantly attenuated in tissues with an intact endothelium. Furthermore, the relaxation to subsequent L-arginine administration was greater in these tissues than in those saline-treated rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1382789

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α produced in the kidney contributes to angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiandong; Patel, Mehul B; Griffiths, Robert; Mao, Alice; Song, Young-soo; Karlovich, Norah S; Sparks, Matthew A; Jin, Huixia; Wu, Min; Lin, Eugene E; Crowley, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Immune system activation contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the resulting progression of chronic kidney disease. In this regard, we recently identified a role for proinflammatory Th1 T-lymphocyte responses in hypertensive kidney injury. Because Th1 cells generate interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), we hypothesized that interferon-γ and TNF-α propagate renal damage during hypertension induced by activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Therefore, after confirming that mice genetically deficient of Th1 immunity were protected from kidney glomerular injury despite a preserved hypertensive response, we subjected mice lacking interferon-γ or TNF-α to our model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Interferon deficiency had no impact on blood pressure elevation or urinary albumin excretion during chronic angiotensin II infusion. By contrast, TNF-deficient (knockout) mice had blunted hypertensive responses and reduced end-organ damage in our model. As angiotensin II-infused TNF knockout mice had exaggerated endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the kidney and enhanced nitric oxide bioavailability, we examined the actions of TNF-α generated from renal parenchymal cells in hypertension by transplanting wild-type or TNF knockout kidneys into wild-type recipients before the induction of hypertension. Transplant recipients lacking TNF solely in the kidney had blunted hypertensive responses to angiotensin II and augmented renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, confirming a role for kidney-derived TNF-α to promote angiotensin II-induced blood pressure elevation by limiting renal nitric oxide generation.

  13. Attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell cytotoxicity and neutrophil chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Crowley, J.J.; Chan, J.C.; Hoffmann, H.; Hatherill, J.R.; Ishizaka, A.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cytokine produced by activated mononuclear cells, to guinea pigs produces a syndrome similar to gram-negative sepsis or ARDS. Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine, protects against TNF-induced and sepsis-induced acute lung injury in vivo. We now report on in vitro cellular studies of PMN-mediated cellular injury and its attenuation. We studied TNF-induced bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) cytotoxicity both with and without PMN. A 51Cr release assay was used to measure EC damage. Further, we investigated PMN function in response to TNF by measuring chemiluminescence. Agents that attenuate EC damage and PMN activation were evaluated in the above assays. Results revealed that TNF causes EC injury (p less than 0.05) and PMN increase TNF-induced EC injury. Furthermore, PTX, aminophylline (AMPH), caffeine, and forskolin attenuate TNF-induced EC cytotoxicity only in the presence of PMN (p less than 0.05). Of interest, dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) protects EC from TNF-induced injury both with and without PMN. Agents that may increase cAMP levels in PMN (PTX, DBcAMP, forskolin, isobutyl methylxanthine, and terbutaline) significantly attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence (p less than 0.05). We conclude that TNF causes EC damage and PMN increase this damage. Furthermore, PTX, AMPH, caffeine, and forskolin can attenuate TNF-induced EC injury in the presence of PMN, whereas DBcAMP attenuates TNF-induced EC injury with and without PMN. In addition, agents that may increase intracellular cAMP levels in PMN can attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence. Thus, these agents likely attenuate TNF-induced PMN-mediated EC injury through their inhibitory effects on PMN.

  14. Targeted lipid-coated nanoparticles: delivery of tumor necrosis factor-functionalized particles to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Sylvia K E; Musyanovych, Anna; Altvater, Martin; Scheurich, Peter; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Landfester, Katharina; Kontermann, Roland E

    2009-07-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles displaying tumor necrosis factor on their surface (TNF nanocytes) are useful carrier systems capable of mimicking the bioactivity of membrane-bound TNF. Thus, TNF nanocytes are potent activators of TNF receptor 1 and 2 leading to a striking enhancement of apoptosis. However, in vivo applications are hampered by potential systemic toxicity. Here, using TNF nanocytes as a model system, we developed a procedure to generate targeted lipid-coated particles (TLP) in which TNF activity is shielded. The TLPs generated here are composed of an inner single-chain TNF (scTNF)-functionalized, polymeric nanoparticle core surrounded by a lipid coat endowed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for sterical stabilization and a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment for targeting. Using a scFv directed against the tumor stroma marker fibroblast activation protein (FAP) we show that TLP and scTNF-TLP specifically bind to FAP-expressing, but not to FAP-negative cells. Lipid coating strongly reduced nonspecific binding of particles and scTNF-mediated cytotoxicity towards FAP-negative cells. In contrast, an increased cytotoxicity of TLP was observed for FAP-positive cells. Thus, through liposome encapsulation, nanoparticles carrying bioactive molecules, which are subject to nonselective uptake and activity towards various cells and tissues, can be converted into target cell-specific composite particles exhibiting a selective activity towards antigen-positive target cells. Besides safe and targeted delivery of death ligands such as TNF, TLP should be suitable for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications, which benefit from a targeted delivery of reagents embedded into the particle core or displayed on the core particle surface.

  15. Soluble malarial antigens are toxic and induce the production of tumour necrosis factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bate, C A; Taverne, J; Playfair, J H

    1989-01-01

    Heat-stable soluble products of rodent malarial parasites induce activated peritoneal macrophages to secrete tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in vitro. Since heat-stable parasite antigens are known to be present in the circulation of patients with malaria and it has been suggested that much of the pathology of malaria is due to TNF, we investigated the ability of such antigens to induce the production of TNF in vivo and to be toxic to mice. Injection of antigens obtained from Plasmodium yoelii or from P. berghei into mice which had previously received the macrophage-activating agent Propionibacterium acnes induced the release of TNF into the serum in amounts equivalent to the maximum release induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Specific antiserum blocked the ability to the boiled soluble antigens, but not of LPS, to induce release of TNF. Similarly, vaccination specifically inhibited the release of TNF into the serum in response to subsequent stimulation with the antigens, but not with LPS. Mice made hypersensitive to the lethal action of TNF by pretreatment with D-galactosamine were killed in a dose-related fashion by administration of antigen preparations; addition of specific antiserum or prior vaccination with the antigens protected such mice, but not those given LPS, from death. We conclude that, in malaria, soluble antigens derived from the parasites may act like a toxin by stimulating the production of TNF, an important mediator of endotoxic shock, and that immunization with such antigens may diminish TNF secretion and consequently many of the clinical manifestations of the disease. PMID:2654012

  16. Characterization of golimumab, a human monoclonal antibody specific for human tumor necrosis factor α.

    PubMed

    Shealy, David J; Cai, Ann; Staquet, Kim; Baker, Audrey; Lacy, Eilyn R; Johns, Laura; Vafa, Omid; Gunn, George; Tam, Susan; Sague, Sarah; Wang, Dana; Brigham-Burke, Mike; Dalmonte, Paul; Emmell, Eva; Pikounis, Bill; Bugelski, Peter J; Zhou, Honghui; Scallon, Bernard J; Giles-Komar, Jill

    2010-01-01

    We prepared and characterized golimumab (CNTO148), a human IgG1 tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonist monoclonal antibody chosen for clinical development based on its molecular properties. Golimumab was compared with infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept for affinity and in vitro TNFα neutralization. The affinity of golimumab for soluble human TNFα, as determined by surface plasmon resonance, was similar to that of etanercept (18 pM versus 11 pM), greater than that of infliximab (44 pM) and significantly greater than that of adalimumab (127 pM, p=0.018).  The concentration of golimumab necessary to neutralize TNFα-induced E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells by 50% was significantly less than those for infliximab (3.2 fold; p=0.017) and adalimumab (3.3-fold; p=0.008) and comparable to that for etanercept. The conformational stability of golimumab was greater than that of infliximab (primary melting temperature [Tm] 74.8 °C vs. 69.5 °C) as assessed by differential scanning calorimetry.  In addition, golimumab showed minimal aggregation over the intended shelf life when formulated as a high concentration liquid product (100 mg/mL) for subcutaneous administration.  In vivo, golimumab at doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg significantly delayed disease progression in a mouse model of human TNFα-induced arthritis when compared with untreated mice, while infliximab was effective only at 10 mg/kg. Golimumab also significantly reduced histological scores for arthritis severity and cartilage damage, as well as serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with arthritis. Thus, we have demonstrated that golimumab is a highly stable human monoclonal antibody with high affinity and capacity to neutralize human TNFα in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha signaling in the development of experimental murine pre-hepatic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, Nicholas G; Wang, Yining N; Wu, Jianmin; Maluccio, Mary A; Skill, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has previously been identified in the development of portal hypertension (PHT) by facilitating portal venous and systemic hyperemia. TNFa is reported to contribute to hyperemia via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) induction and nitric oxide (NO) production. This study examines this hypothesis by utilizing TNFa receptor knockout mice and a murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Plasma TNFa and NOx and tissue TNFa mRNA levels were determined in wild-type mice 0-7d post induction of pre-hepatic PHT by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). TNFa receptor knockout mice also received PVL or sham surgery and splenic pulp pressure, abdominal aortic flow and portal-systemic shunting were recorded 7d following. Portal pressure and systemic hyperemia developed rapidly following PVL. Plasma NOx was increased temporarily 2-3 days following PVL and returned to baseline by day 7. Circulating TNFa was below detectable limits of the ELISA used, as such no increase was observed. Hepatic and vascular TNFa mRNA levels were transiently changed after PVL otherwise there was no significant change. TNFa receptor targeted gene deletion did not ameliorate plasma NOx following PVL and had no effect on the development of PHT. TNFa receptor signaling plays no detectable role in the development of systemic hyperemia in the murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Consequently, increased TNFa observed in intra-hepatic inflammatory models (CCl4) and in patients is probably related to inflammation associated with intra-hepatic pathology. Alternatively, TNFa may be signaling via a TNFa receptor independent mechanism. PMID:21383890

  18. Structural changes of tumor necrosis factor alpha associated with membrane insertion and channel formation.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R L; Stolowitz, M L; Hood, L; Wisnieski, B J

    1996-01-01

    Low pH enhances tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-induced cytolysis of cancer cells and TNF-membrane interactions that include binding, insertion, and ion-channel formation. We have also found that TNF increases Na+ influx in cells. Here, we examined the structural features of the TNF-membrane interaction pathway that lead to channel formation. Fluorometric studies link TNF's acid-enhanced membrane interactions to rapid but reversible acquisition of hydrophobic surface properties. Intramembranous photolabeling shows that (i) protonation of TNF promotes membrane insertion, (ii) the physical state of the target bilayer affects the kinetics and efficiency of TNF insertion, and (iii) binding and insertion of TNF are two distinct events. Acidification relaxes the trimeric structure of soluble TNF so that the cryptic carboxyl termini, centrally located at the base of the trimer cone, become susceptible to carboxypeptidase Y. After membrane insertion, TNF exhibits a trimeric configuration in which the carboxyl termini are no longer exposed; however, the proximal salt-bridged Lys-11 residues as well as regional surface amino acids (Glu-23, Arg-32, and Arg-44) are notably more accessible to proteases. The sequenced cleavage products bear the membrane-restricted photoreactive probe, proof that surface-cleaved TNF has an intramembranous disposition. In summary, the trimer's structural plasticity is a major determinant of its channel-forming ability. Channel formation occurs when cracked or partially splayed trimers bind and penetrate the bilayer. Reannealing leads to a slightly relaxed trimeric structure. The directionality of bilayer penetration conforms with x-ray data showing that receptor binding to the monomer interfaces of TNF poises the tip of the trimeric cone directly above the target cell membrane. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8577707

  19. Selection of novel analogs of thalidomide with enhanced tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitory activity.

    PubMed Central

    Corral, L. G.; Muller, G. W.; Moreira, A. L.; Chen, Y.; Wu, M.; Stirling, D.; Kaplan, G.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) is thought to mediate both protective and detrimental manifestations of the inflammatory response. Recently, thalidomide (alpha-N-phthalimidoglutarimide) was shown to partially inhibit monocyte TNF alpha production (by 50-70%) both in vivo and in vitro. More efficient inhibition of TNF alpha may, however, be necessary to rescue the host from more acute and extensive toxicities of TNF alpha-mediated inflammation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three structural analogues of thalidomide were selected for study based on increased activity against TNF alpha production. The parent drug and the analogs were tested in vitro in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures for their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced cytokine protein and mRNA production using ELISAs and Northern blot hybridization. The in vitro effects of the drugs were then confirmed in vivo in a mouse model of LPS induced lethality. RESULTS: The new compounds (two esters and one amide) showed increased inhibition of TNF alpha production by LPS-stimulated human monocytes, relative to the parent drug thalidomide. The analogs and the parent drug enhanced the production of interleukin 10 (IL-10), but had little effect on IL-6 and IL-1 beta protein and mRNA production. When tested in vivo, the amide analog protected 80% of LPS-treated mice against death from endotoxin induced shock. CONCLUSIONS: Analogs of thalidomide designed to better inhibit TNF alpha production in vitro have correspondingly greater efficacy in vivo. These finding may have therapeutic implication for the treatment of human diseases characterized by acute and extensive TNF alpha production such as tuberculous meningitis or toxic shock. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8827720

  20. Isolated guinea pig gastric chief cells express tumour necrosis factor receptors coupled with the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, S; Santucci, L; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Amorosi, A; Mancini, A; Roberti, R; Morelli, A

    1996-02-01

    The tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis. Both conditions are characterised by high plasma pepsinogen concentrations, which are thought to reflect an increased rate of enzyme release by the pepsinogen secreting (chief) cells. The mechanisms responsible for this cell dysfunction are unknown. This study investigates whether chief cells express TNF receptors and, if so, whether their activation results in cell death. Immunohistochemical studies conducted with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two TNF receptor associated proteins of 55 kDa (TNF-R1) and 75 kDa (TNF-R2) showed that TNF binding sites were expressed in approximately 100% gastric chief cells. Western blot analysis of whole chief cell lysates probed with the TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mAbs gave two distinct bands of 55 and 75 kDa in the immunoprecipitate. Incubating chief cells with TNF caused concentration and time dependent cell death, which was prevented by pretreating the cells with anti-TNF receptor mAbs. Exposing the cells to TNF reduced sphingomyelin content by 25%. Sphingomyelinase (10(-6) to 10(-2) IU/ml) mimicked the effect of TNF in that it provoked a concentration and time dependent reduction in chief cell viability and increased pepsinogen release. In conclusion, gastric chief cells express two TNF receptors partially linked to the sphingomyelin pathway. TNF induced chief cell dysfunction might be responsible for the high plasma pepsinogen concentrations seen in patients with NSAID gastropathy or H pylori induced gastritis.

  1. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor-α genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  2. Tumor necrosis factor: receptor binding and expression of receptors in cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Adamson, G M; Billings, R E

    1994-04-01

    Recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) was labeled with 125I and used to determine the binding characteristics, internalization and intracellular degradation in cultured mouse hepatocytes. [125I]TNF-alpha bound specifically to hepatocytes and Scatchard analysis of the data indicated binding to both a low-affinity (Kd = 20 nM) high capacity (51225 sites/cell) component and high-affinity component (Kd = 4 pM), with low capacity (290 sites/cell). The extent of TNF-alpha binding to hepatocytes correlated closely with its biological activity in hepatocytes, as indexed by depletion of intracellular ATP. At concentrations lower than 0.06 nM there was minimal binding and no effect on cellular ATP, whereas maximal binding at concentrations greater than 45 nM caused 80% depletion (in comparison to controls) of hepatocyte ATP. Incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in rapid uptake, internalization and degradation of [125I]TNF-alpha. This was followed by release of degraded material from hepatocytes. Examination, by reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technology, of hepatocyte RNA extracted after the 4-hr adherence period revealed that mouse hepatocytes expressed mRNA for both TNF-alpha receptor 1 and TNF-alpha receptor 2, and that the relative abundance of TNF-alpha receptor 1 was approximately 7-fold greater than that for TNF-alpha receptor 2. Because it has been shown that these receptors have different affinities for TNF-alpha, this may explain the high- and low-affinity binding sites present on cultured mouse hepatocytes.

  3. Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Estrogen Metabolic Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Marwa; Shouman, Samia; El-Merzebany, Mahmoud; Kilic, Gokhan; Veenstra, Timothy; Saeed, Muhammad; Wagih, Mohamed; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Salama, Salama

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been linked to breast cancer development. Estrogen metabolic pathway is also involved in breast carcinogenesis and DNA adducts formation. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF-α on the estrogen metabolic pathway in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line. Capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for analysis of estrogen metabolites and estrogen-DNA adducts levels respectively. Reporter gene assay, Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes. TNF-α significantly increased the total EM and decreased the estrone (E1) / 17-β estradiol (E2) ratio. Moreover, it altered the expression of genes and enzymes involved in E2 activation and deactivation pathways e.g. Cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In addition, there were increased levels of some catechol estrogens e.g. 4-hydroxy-estrone (4-OHE1) and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) with decreased levels of methylated catechols e.g. 2-methoxy estradiol (2-MeOE2). DNA adducts especially 4-OHE1-[2]-1-N3 Adenine was significantly increased. TNF-α directs the estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic products in MCF-7. This may implicate a new possible explanation for inflammation associated breast cancer. PMID:22866165

  4. Immunolocalization of tumor necrosis factor alpha in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, L.) tissues.

    PubMed

    Ronza, Paolo; Losada, Ana Paula; Villamarín, Antonio; Bermúdez, Roberto; Quiroga, María Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a cytokine involved in a broad spectrum of cellular and organismal responses. Its main function, as a potent pro-inflammatory mediator, has been demonstrated in numerous teleost species and there are many reports on the modulation of TNFα gene expression under pathological conditions. Nevertheless, there is still scarce knowledge about the tissue distribution and type of cells that express this cytokine in fish species, which would help to further investigate its biological activities. These studies are hampered by the lack of molecular markers for teleost that hinder the development of morphological techniques, like immunohistochemistry. The aim of this work was to develop an immunohistochemical technique for the detection of TNFα in paraffin-embedded organs from healthy turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), an economically-important marine fish species. A commercial anti-human TNFα antibody, whose specificity was confirmed by western blot analysis, was used. Immunoreactive cells were observed in higher numbers in the lymphohematopoietic organs, kidney, spleen and thymus, although TNFα-positive cells were also present in the digestive tract, liver, heart, gills and skin. Similarly to non-fish species, monocytes/macrophages appeared to be the main producers of this cytokine; nevertheless, the presence of immunoreactive rodlet cells in different tissues was also reported. The nature and distribution of the labeled cells appeared to be related with a strategic localization for defense response to antigenic challenge. The relative abundance of TNFα-positive cells in the lymphohematopoietic organs also suggests that this cytokine may have a broader role in the normal physiology of those organs. The immunohistochemical technique allowed the in-situ characterization of TNFα expression, representing a valid tool to investigate the immune response of turbot.

  5. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  6. Effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies on histopathology of primary Salmonella infections.

    PubMed

    Mastroeni, P; Skepper, J N; Hormaeche, C E

    1995-09-01

    We reported that administration of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) antibodies exacerbates the course of a Salmonella infection in both susceptible and resistant mice by preventing the suppression of bacterial growth in the reticuloendothelial system. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of in vivo neutralization of TNF-alpha on the histopathology of primary Salmonella infections. We show that in primary infections, the suppression of bacterial growth in the reticuloendothelial system coincides with granuloma formation in the spleen and liver. Administration of anti-TNF-alpha globulins on day -1 of salmonellosis affected neither the histological picture nor the course of the infection in the early stages of the disease (days 1 to 3), with splenic and hepatic lesions consisting mainly of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs); conversely, later in infection (days 3 to 7), the treatment inhibited the formation of granulomas. When the anti-TNF-alpha treatment was started well after the suppression of bacterial growth in the reticuloendothelial system and the formation of granulomatous lesions in the spleen and liver, a prompt relapse of the infection and regression of already established granulomas were seen. In anti-TNF-alpha-treated mice, salmonellae were found inside macrophages and PMNs and extracellularly in the necrotic tissue of the spleen, while in the liver the organisms were seen mainly in inflammatory mononuclear cells, resident Kupffer cells, and hepatocytes and occasionally in the extracellular compartment within necrotic lesions. The bacteria appeared most often in clusters, being morphologically intact when in the extracellular space or within hepatocytes, while undergoing various degrees of degeneration when inside phagocytes. The results suggest that TNF-alpha is required for granuloma formation in salmonellosis and that its neutralization does not completely abrogate the bactericidal activity of macrophages and PMNs

  7. Prognostic and Therapeutic Values of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianmin; Hu, Xuemei; Liu, Shanshan; He, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) causes many deaths worldwide every year, especially in Asia. It is characterized by high malignancy, recurrence, and short survival time. Inflammation is closely related to the initiation and development of HCC. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), an essential inflammatory mediator, has been studied as a potential therapy target in many cancers. However, its potential role in HCC diagnosis and therapy is still unclear. Material/Methods In our study, we detected the TNF-α expression in both human HCC tumor tissue and HCC cell lines HepG2 and HuH7. Then, we detected the effect of anti-TNF-α treatment and it synergistic function with 5-FU in an HCC xenograft mouse model and in HCC cell lines. Results Survival analysis and Cox regression analysis based on 97 HCC patients indicated that a high level of TNF-α is an independent predictor of poor survival in HCC patients. Anti-TNF-α treatment by infliximab synergizes with Fluorouracil (5-FU) by promoting apoptosis of HCC tumor cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effects. Conclusions Based on these data, we conclude that anti-TNF-α treatment could be a good way to increase the effect of classic chemotherapy of HCC patients, especially for the patients who have modest response to classic chemotherapy, such as 5-FU. TNF-α could also be used as a biomarker to help in early diagnosis of HCC. PMID:27739418

  8. Increased serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in beta thalassaemia: effect of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meliconi, R; Uguccioni, M; Lalli, E; Nesci, S; Delfini, C; Paradisi, O; Lucarelli, G; Gasbarrini, G; Facchini, A

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) were determined in beta thalassemic patients before and after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to evaluate whether changes in TNF concentrations after BMT were related to immune mediated complications. METHODS: Serum TNF concentrations were determined by enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) in paired samples from 71 patients with beta thalassemia before and after BMT. Serial samples from 13 patients were also studied for up to six months after BMT. Forty one normal healthy children matched for sex and age were studied as controls. RESULTS: beta thalassemic patients had high serum TNF concentrations before transplantation compared with controls. These were not related to sex, age, duration of disease, number of blood transfusions, transferrin concentrations or splenectomy. DQw1 positive patients showed significantly lower TNF concentrations than non-DQw1 cases. Patients with severe liver fibrosis had significantly higher TNF concentrations. No correlation was found between TNF values and BMT outcome before transplantation but TNF alpha values fell significantly after BMT. The decrease persisted only in patients with successful engraftment. In serial samples studied for up to six months after BMT, TNF values decreased but in four out of five patients with graft rejection and in all five with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) sharp increases occurred at the time of clinical symptoms. No correlation was found between the degree of GVHD and serum TNF-alpha concentrations nor between TNF-alpha concentrations after BMT and the presence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. CONCLUSIONS: About 50% of beta thalassemic patients have increased serum TNF, and the changes after BMT are related to the occurrence of immune mediate complications. The persistence of low TNF concentrations after successful engraftment may be due to the preparative regimen and the lack of adverse immune reactions. PMID:1740519

  9. Haematopoietic malignancies in rheumatoid arthritis: lymphoma risk and characteristics after exposure to tumour necrosis factor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Askling, J; Fored, C; Baecklund, E; Brandt, L; Backlin, C; Ekbom, A; Sundstrom, C; Bertilsson, L; Coster, L; Geborek, P; Jacobsson, L; Lindblad, S; Lysholm, J; Rantapaa-Dahlqvis..., S; Saxne, T; Klareskog, L; Feltelius, N

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of malignant lymphomas, and maybe also of leukaemia and multiple myeloma. The effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists on lymphoma risk and characteristics is unclear. Objective: To assess expected rates and relative risks of haematopoietic malignancies, especially those associated with TNF antagonists, in large population based cohorts of patients with RA. Methods: A population based cohort study was performed of patients with RA (one prevalent cohort (n = 53 067), one incident cohort (n = 3703), and one TNF antagonist treated cohort 1999 through 2003 (n = 4160)), who were linked with the Swedish Cancer Register. Additionally, the lymphoma specimens for the 12 lymphomas occurring in patients with RA exposed to TNF antagonists in Sweden 1999 through 2004 were reviewed. Results: Study of almost 500 observed haematopoietic malignancies showed that prevalent and incident patients with RA were at increased risk of lymphoma (SIR = 1.9 and 2.0, respectively) and leukaemia (SIR = 2.1 and 2.2, respectively) but not of myeloma. Patients with RA treated with TNF antagonists had a tripled lymphoma risk (SIR = 2.9) compared with the general population. After adjustment for sex, age, and disease duration, the lymphoma risk after exposure to TNF antagonists was no higher than in the other RA cohorts. Lymphomas associated with TNF antagonists had characteristics similar to those of other RA lymphomas. Conclusion: Overall, patients with RA are at equally increased risks for lymphomas and leukaemias. Patients with RA treated with TNF antagonists did not have higher lymphoma risks than other patients with RA. Prolonged observation is needed to determine the long term effects of TNF antagonists on lymphoma risk. PMID:15843454

  10. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Downregulating Genes for the Development of Antituberculous Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Aaron; Chen, Yong; Ji, Qingzhou; Zhu, Guofeng; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Vilchèze, Catherine; Weisbrod, Torin; Li, Weimin; Xu, Jiayong; Larsen, Michelle; Zhang, Jinghang; Porcelli, Steven A.; Jacobs, William R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) plays a critical role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in part by augmenting T cell responses through promoting macrophage phagolysosomal fusion (thereby optimizing CD4+ T cell immunity by enhancing antigen presentation) and apoptosis (a process that can lead to cross-priming of CD8+ T cells). M. tuberculosis can evade antituberculosis (anti-TB) immunity by inhibiting host cell TNF production via expression of specific mycobacterial components. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis mutants with an increased capacity to induce host cell TNF production (TNF-enhancing mutants) and thus with enhanced immunogenicity can be useful for vaccine development. To identify mycobacterial genes that regulate host cell TNF production, we used a TNF reporter macrophage clone to screen an H37Rv M. tuberculosis cosmid library constructed in M. smegmatis. The screen has identified a set of TNF-downregulating mycobacterial genes that, when deleted in H37Rv, generate TNF-enhancing mutants. Analysis of mutants disrupted for a subset of TNF-downregulating genes, annotated to code for triacylglycerol synthases and fatty acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase, enzymes that concern lipid biosynthesis and metabolism, has revealed that these strains can promote macrophage phagolysosomal fusion and apoptosis better than wild-type (WT) bacilli. Immunization of mice with the TNF-enhancing M. tuberculosis mutants elicits CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that are superior to those engendered by WT H37Rv. The results suggest that TNF-upregulating M. tuberculosis genes can be targeted to enhance the immunogenicity of mycobacterial strains that can serve as the substrates for the development of novel anti-TB vaccines. PMID:27247233

  11. The role of tumor necrosis factor in increased airspace epithelial permeability in acute lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Donaldson, K; Brown, D; MacNee, W

    1995-08-01

    Increased airspace epithelial permeability is an early event in lung inflammation and injury. In this study, we have developed a rat model to study the mechanisms of the epithelial permeability to 125iodine-labeled bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA), instilled intratracheally during acute lung inflammation. Epithelial permeability was measured as the percentage of instilled 125I-BSA appearing in the blood. The increase in epithelial permeability induced by intratracheal instillation of heat-killed Corynebacterium parvum produced a peak influx of neutrophils into the bronchoalveolar space at 16 h, which occurred after the peak increase in epithelial permeability (8 h). The increased epithelial permeability induced by C. parvum did not appear to be protease- or oxidant-mediated. Depletion of peripheral blood neutrophils was achieved by an intravenous injection of anti-neutrophil polyclonal antibody. The consequent profound reduction in neutrophil and macrophage influx into the airspaces 8 h after instillation of C. parvum reduced the epithelial permeability to control values. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leukocytes from rats 8 h, but not 16 h, after treatment with C. parvum caused a modest increase in epithelial permeability when re-instilled intratracheally into control rat lungs. Separation of the leukocytes before re-instillation indicated that macrophages rather than neutrophils were predominantly responsible for the increased epithelial permeability. The presence of dramatically increased levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in BAL 8 h in contrast to a slight increase in BAL 16 h after C. parvum, the release of TNF from 8 h macrophages, the increased epithelial permeability induced by TNF in epithelial monolayers in vitro, and the inhibition of C. parvum-induced epithelial permeability by TNF antibody support the premise that TNF is a major player in the increased epithelial permeability that occurs during C. parvum-induced acute alveolitis. PMID:7626286

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor p55-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaños-Velez, Esmeralda; Maerlan, Stephanie; Osorio, Lyda M.; Åberg, Frederik; Biberfeld, Peter; Örn, Anders; Rottenberg, Martín E.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNFRp55) mediates host resistance to several pathogens by allowing microbicidal activities of phagocytes. In the studies reported here, TNFRp55−/− mice infected with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi showed clearly higher parasitemia and cumulative mortality than wild-type (WT) controls did. However, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-activated macrophages from TNFRp55−/− mice produced control levels of nitric oxide and killed the parasite efficiently in vitro. Trypanocidal mechanisms of nonphagocytic cells (myocardial fibroblasts) from both TNFRp55−/− and WT mice were also activated by IFN-γ in a dose-dependent way. However, IFN-γ-activated TNFRp55−/− nonphagocytes showed less effective killing of T. cruzi than WT control nonphagocytes, even when interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was added as a costimulator. In vivo, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice and WT mice released similar levels of NO and showed similar levels of IFN-γ mRNA and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in their tissues. Instead, increased susceptibility to T. cruzi of TNFRp55−/− mice was associated with reduced levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (but not IgM) antibodies during infection, which is probably linked to abnormal B-cell differentiation in secondary lymphoid tissues of the mutant mice. Surprisingly, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice showed increased inflammatory and necrotic lesions in several tissues, especially in skeletal muscles, indicating that TNFRp55 plays an important role in controlling the inflammatory process. Accordingly, levels of Mn2+ superoxide dismutase mRNA, a TNF-induced enzyme which protects the cell from the toxic effects of superoxide, were lower in mutant than in WT infected mice. PMID:9596773

  13. Hypoxia inducible factor pathway inhibitors as anticancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Sarah K; Kaluz, Stefan; Wang, Danzhu; Wang, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a significant feature of solid tumor cancers. Hypoxia leads to a more malignant phenotype that is resistant to chemotherapy and radiation, is more invasive and has greater metastatic potential. Hypoxia activates the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which mediates the biological effects of hypoxia in tissues. The HIF complex acts as a transcription factor for many genes that increase tumor survival and proliferation. To date, many HIF pathway inhibitors indirectly affect HIF but there have been no clinically approved direct HIF inhibitors. This can be attributed to the complexity of the HIF pathway, as well as to the challenges of inhibiting protein–protein interactions. PMID:23573973

  14. Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor attenuates contusion necrosis without influencing contusion edema after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tado, Masahiro; Mori, Tatsuro; Fukushima, Masamichi; Oshima, Hideki; Maeda, Takeshi; Yoshino, Atsuo; Aizawa, Shin; Katayama, Yoichi

    2014-04-01

    To clarify the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the formation of contusion edema and necrosis after traumatic brain injury, we examined the time course of changes in the VEGF expression (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), cerebrovascular permeability (extravasation of Evans blue), and water content (dry-wet weight method) of the contused brain tissue in a cortical impact injury model using rats. In addition, we tested the effects of administration of bevacizumab (VEGF monoclonal antibody) on changes in the cerebrovascular permeability and water content of the contused brain tissue, as well as the neurological deficits (rota rod test) and volume of contusion necrosis. Increased VEGF expression was maximal at 72 h after injury (p<0.003). Increases in cerebrovascular permeability and water content, however, became maximal within 24 h (p<0.001) after injury (p<0.01), respectively. Administration of bevacizumab did not influence these changes in cerebrovascular permeability and water content, but led to a significant rise in the neurological deficits at 72 h-14 days (p<0.05 or 0.01) and the volume of contusion necrosis at 21 days (p<0.001) after injury. These findings suggest that increased expression of VEGF after injury does not contribute to the formation of contusion edema, but attenuates the formation of contusion necrosis. This is probably because of an increased angiogenesis and improved microcirculation in the areas surrounding the core of contusion. PMID:24294928

  15. Regulation of human lung fibroblast glycosaminoglycan production by recombinant interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, J A; Krol, R C; Freundlich, B; Sampson, P M

    1988-01-01

    Mononuclear cells may be important regulators of fibroblast glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis. However, the soluble factors mediating these effects, the importance of intercytokine interactions in this regulation and the mechanisms of these alterations remain poorly understood. We analyzed the effect of recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lymphotoxin (LT), and gamma, alpha, and beta 1 interferons (INF-gamma, -alpha and -beta 1), alone and in combination, on GAG production by normal human lung fibroblasts. rTNF, rLT, and rINF-gamma each stimulated fibroblast GAG production. In addition, rIFN-gamma synergized with rTNF and rLT to further augment GAG biosynthesis. In contrast, IFN-alpha A, -alpha D, and -beta 1 neither stimulated fibroblast GAG production nor interacted with rTNF or rLT to regulate GAG biosynthesis. The effects of the stimulatory cytokines and cytokine combinations were dose dependent and were abrogated by the respective monoclonal antibodies. In addition, these cytokines did not cause an alteration in the distribution of GAG between the fibroblast cell layer and supernatant. However, the stimulation was at least partially specific for particular GAG moieties with hyaluronic acid biosynthesis being markedly augmented without a comparable increase in the production of sulfated GAGs. Fibroblast prostaglandin production did not mediate these alterations since indomethacin did not decrease the stimulatory effects of the cytokines. In contrast, protein and mRNA synthesis appeared to play a role since the stimulatory effects of the cytokines were abrogated by cyclohexamide and actinomycin D, respectively. In addition, the cytokines and cytokine combinations increased cellular hyaluronate synthetase activity in proportion to their effects on hyaluronic acid suggesting that induction of this enzyme(s) is important in this stimulatory process. These studies demonstrate that IFN-gamma, TNF, and LT are important stimulators of fibroblast GAG

  16. Association of tumor necrosis factor-α and -β gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Meghaiseeb, Ebtissam Saleh; Al-Robayan, Abdulrahman A; Al-Otaibi, Mulfi Mubarak; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract in which immune dysregulation caused by genetic and/or environmental factors plays an important role. The aim of this case–control study was to evaluate the association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (308) and -β (+252) polymorphisms with susceptibility of IBD. A total of 379 Saudi subjects including 179 IBD patients (ulcerative colitis (UC) =84 and Crohn’s disease (CD) =95) and 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. TNF-α and TNF-β genes were amplified using an amplification refractory mutation systems polymerase chain reaction methodology to detect TNF-α (−308) and -β (+252) polymorphisms. The frequency of the GA genotype of TNF-α (−308G/A) was higher, and the frequencies of the GG and AA genotypes were significantly lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating that genotype GA-positive individuals are susceptible to IBD and that the GG and AA genotypes exert a protective effect. The frequency of allele A of TNF-α (−308G/A) was significantly higher and that of allele G was lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating an association of allele A with IBD risk in Saudi patients. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, an almost similar pattern was noticed in both the groups. The results of TNF-β (+252A/G) polymorphisms showed a significant increase in the frequency of the GG genotype in IBD patients, suggesting a positive association of GG genotype with IBD risk. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, the genotype GG of TNF-β was associated with susceptibility risk to UC but not CD. The frequencies of alleles and genotypes of both TNF-α and-β polymorphisms are not affected by sex or type of IBD (familial or sporadic). TNF-α (−308G/A) and TNF-β (+252A/G) polymorphisms are associated with risk of developing IBD in Saudi population

  17. Inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α suppresses neuroprotective endogenous erythropoietin from astrocytes mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-2α.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Tamura, Tetsuya; Kakita, Hiroki; Kato, Shin; Hida, Hideki; Saitoh, Shinji; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2014-12-01

    Interest in erythropoietin (EPO) as a neuroprotective mediator has grown since it was found that systemically administered EPO is protective in several animal models of disease. However, given that the blood-brain barrier limits EPO entry into the brain, alternative approaches that induce endogenous EPO production in the brain may be more effective clinically and associated with fewer untoward side-effects. Astrocytes are the main source of EPO in the central nervous system. In the present study we investigated the effect of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) on hypoxia-induced upregulation of EPO in rat brain. Hypoxia significantly increased EPO mRNA expression in the brain and kidney, and this increase was suppressed by TNFα in vivo. In cultured astrocytes exposed to hypoxic conditions for 6 and 12 h, TNFα suppressed the hypoxia-induced increase in EPO mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. TNFα inhibition of hypoxia-induced EPO expression was mediated primarily by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α rather than HIF-1α. The effects of TNFα in reducing hypoxia-induced upregulation of EPO mRNA expression probably involve destabilization of HIF-2α, which is regulated by the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. TNFα treatment attenuated the protective effects of astrocytes on neurons under hypoxic conditions via EPO signaling. The effective blockade of TNFα signaling may contribute to the maintenance of the neuroprotective effects of EPO even under hypoxic conditions with an inflammatory response. PMID:25283246

  18. Clearance of human factor XIa-inhibitor complexes in rats.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; Bleeker, W K; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; ten Cate, H; Hack, C E

    1996-06-01

    The serpins C1 esterase inhibitor (C1Inh), antithrombin (AT), alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) and alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) are known inhibitors of coagulation factor XIa (FXIa). Although initial studies suggested alpha 1AT to be the main inhibitor of FXIa, we recently demonstrated C1Inh to be a predominant inhibitor of FXIa in vitro in human plasma. The present study was performed to investigate the plasma elimination kinetics of preformed human FXIa-FXIa inhibitor complexes injected in rats. The amounts of complexes remaining in circulation were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The plasma half-life time of clearance (t1/2) was 98 min for FXIa-alpha 1AT complexes, whereas it was considerably shorter, i.e. 19, 18 and 15 min for FXIa-C1Inh, FXIa-alpha 2AP and FXIa-AT complexes, respectively. Thus, due to this different plasma t1/2, preferentially FXIa-alpha 1AT complexes may be detected in clinical samples. Furthermore, measuring FXIa-FXIa inhibitor complexes in patient samples may not help to clarify the relative contribution of the individual serpins to inactivation of FXIa in vivo.

  19. Discrepancy between tissue factor activity and tissue factor expression in endotoxin-induced monocytes is associated with apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Carola E; Klingenberg, Olav; Ovstebø, Reidun; Joø, Gun-Britt; Westvik, Ase-Brit; Kierulf, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF), the main initiator of blood coagulation, contributes to the manifestation of disseminated intravascular coagulation following septic shock in meningococcal infection. Since a direct relationship between disease severity and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) concentration in the circulation has been shown, we hypothesized that the procoagulant and cytotoxic effects of endotoxin also in vitro were related to its concentration. In vitro studies, however, have frequently used much higher LPS concentrations than those observed in clinical samples. Using elutriation-purified human monocytes, we observed that LPS up to 1000 ng/ml exerted a concentration-dependent increase in TF activity (tenase activity, fibrin formation in plasma). Although there was a dose-dependent increase in TF activity, there was not a concomitant increase in TF expression at LPS concentrations above 1 ng/ml (flow cytometry, Western blotting, TF mRNA). Flow cytometry revealed that this discrepancy between TF activity and TF expression at endotoxin concentrations above 1 ng/ml, coincided with an LPS dose-dependent increase in cell surface phosphatidylserine (PS), considered to promote coagulation. The increased PS expression was associated with an increased number of 7-AAD-positive cells indicating cell death. We conclude that enhancement of monocyte procoagulant activity in vitro by high concentrations of LPS may result from increased PS exposure due to apoptosis and necrosis. Therefore, the LPS concentrations used to examine monocyte procoagulant activity in vitro, should be carefully chosen.

  20. Crystal structure of human factor VIIa/tissue factor in complex with peptide mimetic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Akihisa; Kikuchi, Yasufumi; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yabuta, Naohiro; Koga, Takaki; Hattori, Kunihiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Haramura, Masayuki; Kodama, Hirofumi; Esaki, Toru; Sato, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Susumu; Ohta, Masateru; Kozono, Toshiro

    2004-11-26

    The 3D structure of human factor VIIa/soluble tissue factor in complex with a peptide mimetic inhibitor, propylsulfonamide-D-Thr-Met-p-aminobenzamidine, is determined by X-ray crystallography. As compared with the interactions between thrombin and thrombin inhibitors, the interactions at S2 and S3 sites characteristic of factor VIIa and factor VIIa inhibitors are revealed. The S2 site has a small pocket, which is filled by the hydrophobic methionine side chain in P2. The small S3 site fits the small size residue, D-threonine in P3. The structural data and SAR data of the peptide mimetic inhibitor show that these interactions in the S2 and S3 sites play an important role for the improvement of selectivity versus thrombin. The results will provide valuable information for the structure-based drug design of specific inhibitors for FVIIa/TF. PMID:15504346

  1. AIP1 recruits phosphatase PP2A to ASK1 in tumor necrosis factor-induced ASK1-JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Min, Wang; Lin, Yan; Tang, Shibo; Yu, Luyang; Zhang, Haifeng; Wan, Ting; Luhn, Tricia; Fu, Haian; Chen, Hong

    2008-04-11

    Previously we have shown that AIP1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase [ASK]1-interacting protein 1), a novel member of the Ras-GAP protein family, facilitates dephosphorylation of ASK1 at pSer967 and subsequently 14-3-3 release from ASK1, leading to enhanced ASK1-JNK signaling. However, the phosphatase(s) responsible for ASK1 dephosphorylation at pSer967 has not been identified. In the present study, we identified protein phosphatase (PP)2A as a potential phosphatase in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 in ECs was blocked by PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid. Overexpression of PP2A catalytic subunit induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In contrast, a catalytic inactive form of PP2A or PP2A small interfering RNA blunted TNF-induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 and activation of JNK without effects on NF-kappaB activation. Whereas AIP1, via its C2 domain, binds to ASK1, PP2A binds to the GAP domain of AIP1. Endogenous AIP1-PP2A complex can be detected in the resting state, and TNF induces a complex formation of AIP1-PP2A with ASK1. Furthermore, TNF-induced association of PP2A with ASK1 was diminished in AIP1-knockdown ECs, suggesting a critical role of AIP1 in recruiting PP2A to ASK1. TNF-signaling molecules TRAF2 and RIP1, known to be in complex with AIP1 and activate AIP1 by phosphorylating AIP1 at Ser604, are critical for TNF-induced ASK1 dephosphorylation. Finally, PP2A and AIP1 cooperatively induce activation of ASK1-JNK signaling and EC apoptosis, as demonstrated by both overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown approaches. Taken together, our data support a critical role of PP2A-AIP1 complex in TNF-induced activation of ASK1-JNK apoptotic signaling. PMID:18292600

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, inhibits leiomyoma cell proliferation through the nuclear factor κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Bin; Jee, Byung Chul; Kim, Seok Hyun; Cho, Yeon Jean; Han, Myoungseok

    2014-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor, decreases the in vitro proliferation of leiomyoma cells if the inflammatory pathway is blocked. Menstruation is an inflammation of uterus that produces cytokines and prostanoids, but the inflammatory mechanism underlying the growth of leiomyoma remains unexplained. Using in vitro cultures of leiomyoma cells obtained from 5 patients who underwent hysterectomy, cell proliferation, inflammatory signaling, transcription factors, growth factors, and extracellular matrix were examined by (4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yi)-2,5-diphenyltetraxolium bromide assay, immunoblotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Prostaglandin E2 was used to induce menstruation-like condition in the cells. We found that celecoxib inhibited COX-2 through the expression of nuclear factor κB in the cells. Celcoxib also decreased the gene expression of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, collagen A, fibronectin, platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor β. In conclusion, the present study indicated that celecoxib could inhibit leiomyoma cell proliferation through blocking the inflammatory pathway that is probably one of the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis.

  3. Joint erosion in rheumatoid arthritis: interactions between tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1, and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) regulate osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    O', G; Ireland, D; Bord, S; Compston, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Osteoclasts, specialised bone resorbing cells regulated by RANKL and M-CSF, are implicated in rheumatoid joint erosion. Lymphocyte-monocyte interactions activate bone resorption, this being attributed to tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin 1 ß (IL1ß) enhanced osteoblast expression of RANKL. In animal studies, TNF potently increases osteoclast formation in the presence of RANKL. RANKL-independent osteoclastogenesis also occurs, though IL1 is required for resorptive function in most studies. These inflammatory cytokines have a pivotal role in rheumatoid arthritis, Objective: To study the interactions of TNFα and IL1ß with RANKL, particularly the time course of the interactions and the role of lymphocytes. Method: Cultures of lymphocytes and monocytes (osteoclast precursors) or of purified CD14+ cells alone (osteoclast precursors) were exposed to various combinations of TNFα, RANKL, and IL1ß or the inhibitors osteoprotegerin, IL1 receptor antagonist, or neutralising antibodies to RANKL or to IL1. Osteoclastogenesis and resorptive activity were assessed on microscopy of dentine slices. Results: TNFα potently increased osteoclast proliferation/differentiation in the presence of RANKL. This effect was greatest when RANKL was present before but not after exposure of osteoclast precursor cells to TNFα. The resorptive activity of osteoclasts generated by TNFα in the absence of RANKL was critically dependent upon IL1, which was expressed by lymphocyte-monocyte interaction. Conclusion: TNFα potently enhances RANKL mediated osteoclast activity. Interactions between TNFα and IL1 also result in osteoclastic activity independently of RANKL. These findings will inform therapeutic approaches to the prevention of joint erosion in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15020327

  4. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  5. Identification and characterization of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 3 from humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia; Xia, Hongli; Huang, Yucong; Tang, Jufen; Jian, Jichang; Wu, Zaohe; Lu, Yishan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 3(TRAF3) is a key regulator in TNFR and Toll-like receptor (TLRs)/RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) signal pathway. Here, a TRAF3 gene (Ls-TRAF3, GenBank Accession No: KJ789921) is cloned from humphead snapper (Lutjanus sanguineus). The Ls-TRAF3 cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1788 bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 595 amino acids. The deduced amino acid of Ls-TRAF3 possesses a RING finger, two TRAF-type zinc fingers, a coiled-coil and a MATH domain. Ls-TRAF3 protein shares high identities with other known TRAF3 proteins. In healthy fish, Ls-TRAF3 transcripts were broadly expressed in all examined tissues with highest expression levels in spleen, liver and head kidney. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that Ls-TRAF3 could be induced by bacteria or viral PAMP poly I:C stimulation in vivo. Here, we also showed Ls-TRAF3 that, positively regulated IRF3 and Mx upon poly I:C stimuli, whereas prevented production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 after LPS injection. Moreover, over-expression of wide type (WT) Ls-TRAF3 and truncated forms, including ΔZinc finger 1, ΔZinc finger 2 and Δcoiled-coil suppressed NF-κB activity significantly, whereas the inhibitory effect of NF-κB was partially impaired when the RING finger or MATH domain deletion, suggesting the latter was more important for downstream signal transduction. Taken together, these results implicated that Ls-TRAF3 might play regulatory roles in immune response to pathogen invasion.

  6. Inhibitory effect of tetrahydroswertianolin on tumor necrosis factor-alpha-dependent hepatic apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hase, K; Xiong, Q; Basnet, P; Namba, T; Kadota, S

    1999-06-15

    We investigated the effect of tetrahydroswertianolin (THS), a hepatoprotective agent from Swertia japonica, on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent hepatic apoptosis induced by D-galactosamine (D-GalN) (700 mg/kg, i.p.) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 microg/kg, i.p.) in mice. Apoptotic symptoms were observed at the initial stage of liver damage. By 5 hr after intoxication, hepatic DNA fragmentation had risen to 2123%, with the value in untreated mice set at 100%, without a significant elevation of serum alanine transaminase (ALT) activity. There was a parallel increase in hepatocytes undergoing chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation. By 8 hr after intoxication, serum ALT activity had risen to 3707 U/L. Pretreatment with THS (50 mg/kg, p.o.) at 18 and 2 hr before intoxication significantly reduced DNA fragmentation to 821% of that in untreated mice and prevented the emergence of chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation. A significant and dose-dependent reduction in serum ALT activity at 8 hr also was observed with THS pretreatment. These effects of THS were different from those observed from pretreatment with glycyrrhizin (GCR), which is a clinically used hepatoprotective agent with membrane-stabilizing activity. GCR pretreatment (100 mg/kg, p.o.) did not inhibit hepatic DNA fragmentation (1588% of untreated mice), although this compound significantly protected against serum ALT elevation (1463 U/L). These data suggest that an inhibitory effect on the progression of hepatic apoptosis prior to liver injury may be involved in the hepatoprotective mechanisms of THS, whereas it appears that GCR affects the processes after apoptosis. In a separate experiment, we found that the concentration of serum TNF-alpha rose to 2016 pg/mL at 1 hr after intoxication of mice with D-GalN and LPS, but this increase was suppressed by THS pretreatment (10, 50, or 200 mg/kg, p.o.) to 716, 454, or 406 pg/mL, respectively. Further study with a reverse

  7. Nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor alpha in the process of pseudoexfoliation glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sarenac Vulovic, Tatjana S.; Pavlovic, Sladjana M.; Jakovljevic, Vladimir LJ.; Janicijevic, Katarina B.; Zdravkovic, Nemanja S.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish the role of nitric oxide (NO), ascorbic acid and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the pathogenesis of pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (XFG). METHODS Our study included 120 patients who were referred for cataract surgery. All patients were divided into four groups according to clinical findings: XFG, early and late pseudoexfoliation syndrome (XFS), and cataract (without pseudoexfoliation). Serum and aqueous humour levels of the ascorbic acid, NO and TNF-α were measured. The concentrations of the ascorbic acid and NO were measured by an appropriate spectrophotometric method. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine TNF-α level. RESULTS Aqueous humour concentration of ascorbic acid was significantly lower in patients with late XFS (0.61±0.11 mmol/L) and XFG (0.48±0.15 mmol/L) compared to patients with early XFS (0.9±0.15 mmol/L) and cataract (1.16±0.22 mmol/L), while there was no difference in serum concentration in all examined groups. Aqueous humour concentration of NO was significantly higher in patients with XFG (77.7±11.4 µmol/L) compared to patients with early XFS (50.27±9.34 µmol/L) and cataract (49.77±7.1 µmol/L), while serum concentration was increased in the early stage of XFS (73.26±8.29 µmol/L). Aqueous humour level of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α was increased in patients with XFS (early 460.04±18.32 pg/mL; late 502.42±53.23 pg/mL) and XFG (510.34±43.07 pg/mL), while there was no difference in serum level in all examined groups of patients. CONCLUSION Reduced ascorbic acid and elevated NO and inflammation related cytokine TNF-α level in aqueous humour of the patients with developed XFG suggest that oxidative stress induces local inflammation. PMID:27588268

  8. Tumor necrosis factor alpha has a protective role in a murine model of systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, A; Baltch, A L; Smith, R P; Franke, M A; Ritz, W J; Singh, J K; Gordon, M A

    1994-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in host defense against systemic Candida albicans infection was evaluated in a murine model of systemic candidiasis in which uniform death occurred between 5 and 6 days after infection. TNF-alpha was first detected at 16 h postinfection and progressively increased thereafter. Peak levels (700 to 900 pg/ml) were measured in mice near death. Administration of 0.5 to 1.0 mg of polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) TNF-alpha antibody (TNF-alpha Ab) to mice 2 h preinfection neutralized serum TNF-alpha for up to 30 h. However, this regimen shortened survival from a mean of 5.5 days for IgG controls to 3.4 days (P = 1.9 x 10(-12)). Semiquantitative cultures of spleen, lung, liver, and kidney conducted at 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection found colony counts of spleen and kidney to be significantly higher for TNF-alpha Ab recipients but only for the first 48 h. Administration of 1.5 and 1.0 mg of TNF-alpha Ab at 2 h before and 48 h after fungal injection, respectively, shortened the mean survival from 4.9 to 2.3 days (P = 5.2 x 10(-8)). This regimen neutralized serum TNF-alpha throughout infection. With this regimen, colony counts of all organs were significantly higher in TNF-alpha Ab recipients at 1, 2, and 3 days postinfection. Histopathologic studies showed an increase in the number and size of C. albicans foci in tissues. Peripheral leukocyte counts and inflammatory response in tissue were similar for TNF-alpha Ab and IgG sham recipients. In vitro, incubation of C. albicans with four to eight times the peak serum levels of TNF-alpha for up to 24 h did not inhibit the rate of germ tube or pseudohypha formation. Thus, TNF-alpha that was produced during infection with C. albicans augmented host resistance against this organism and prolonged survival. The protective effect of TNF-alpha was not mediated by increased leukocytes in blood or tissues nor by a direct anticandidal effect of TNF-alpha. This study suggests that the

  9. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey

    PubMed Central

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loët, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by email to obtain the files of patients with TNF-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-two cases were collected, revealing two aspects of these manifestations. Ten patients (six patients receiving infliximab, four patients receiving etanercept) only had anti-DNA antibodies and skin manifestations one could classify as 'limited skin lupus' or 'toxidermia' in a context of autoimmunity, whereas 12 patients (nine patients receiving infliximab, three patients receiving etanercept) had more complete drug-induced lupus with systemic manifestations and at least four American Congress of Rheumatology criteria. One patient had central nervous system manifestations. No patients had lupus nephritis. The signs of lupus occurred within a mean of 9 months (range 3–16 months) in patients treated with infliximab and within a mean of 4 months (range 2–5 months) in patients treated with etanercept. In all cases after diagnosis was determined, anti-TNF was stopped and specific treatment introduced in eight patients: two patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, four patients received oral steroids (15–35 mg/day), and two patients received topical steroids. Lupus manifestations abated within a few weeks (median 8 weeks, standard deviation 3–16) in all patients except one with longer-lasting evolution (6 months). At that time, cautious estimations (unpublished data from Schering Plough Inc. and Wyeth Inc.) indicated that about 7700 patients had been exposed to infliximab and

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced changes in insulin-producing beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jai; Chaudhry, Muhammad A; Rhoten, William B

    2005-10-01

    The migration of macrophages and lymphocytes that produce cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) causes beta-cell death, leading to type 1 diabetes. Similarly, in type 2 diabetes, the adipocyte-derived cytokines including TNF-alpha are elevated in the circulation, causing inflammation and insulin resistance. Thus, the studies described in this article using TNF-alpha are relevant to furthering our understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. We used RINr1046-38 (RIN) insulin-producing beta-cells, which constitutively express calbindin-D(28k), to characterize the effect of TNF-alpha on apoptosis, replication, insulin release, and gene and protein expression. Western blots of TNF-alpha-treated RIN cells revealed a decrease in calbindin-D(28k). By ELISA, TNF-alpha-treated beta-cells had 47% less calbindin-D(28k) than controls. In association with the decline in calbindin-D(28k), TNF-alpha treatment of RIN cells led to a 73% greater increase in changes in intracellular calcium concentration (Delta[Ca(2+)](i)) in TNF-alpha-treated cells as compared to that in control RIN cells upon treatment with 50 mM KCl; caused a greater increase in the [Ca(2+)](i) following the addition of 5.5 microM ionomycin; increased by more than threefold the apoptotic rate, expressed as the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei to total nuclei; decreased the rate of cell replication by 36%; and increased and decreased selectively the expression of specific genes as determined by microarray analysis. The subcellular localizations of Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein, and Bax, a proapoptotic protein, within RIN cells were altered with TNF-alpha treatment such that the two were colocalized with mitochondria in the perinuclear region. We conclude that the proapoptotic action of TNF-alpha on beta-cells is manifested via decreased expression of calbindin-D(28k) and is mediated at least in part by [Ca(2+)](i). PMID:16114068

  11. Inhibition of anti-tuberculosis T-lymphocyte function with tumour necrosis factor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Haïfa; Mariette, Xavier; Godot, Véronique; Weldingh, Karin; Hamid, Abdul Monem; Prejean, Maria-Victoria; Baron, Gabriel; Lemann, Marc; Puechal, Xavier; Breban, Maxime; Berenbaum, Francis; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Flipo, René-Marc; Dautzenberg, Bertrand; Salmon, Dominique; Humbert, Marc; Emilie, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is a major complication of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α treatment, but its mechanism is not fully understood. We evaluated the effect of the TNF antagonists infliximab (Ifx), adalimumab (Ada) and etanercept (Eta) on anti-mycobacterial immune responses in two conditions: with ex vivo studies from patients treated with TNF antagonists and with the in vitro addition of TNF antagonists to cells stimulated with mycobacterial antigens. In both cases, we analysed the response of CD4+ T lymphocytes to purified protein derivative (PPD) and to culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, an antigen restricted to Mtb. The tests performed were lymphoproliferation and immediate production of interferon (IFN)-γ. In the 68 patients with inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, spondylarthropathy or Crohn's disease), including 31 patients with a previous or latent tuberculosis (TB), 14 weeks of anti-TNF-α treatment had no effect on the proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes. In contrast, the number of IFN-γ-releasing CD4+ T lymphocytes decreased for PPD (p < 0.005) and CFP-10 (p < 0.01) in patients with previous TB and for PPD (p < 0.05) in other patients (all vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin). Treatments with Ifx and with Eta affected IFN-γ release to a similar extent. In vitro addition of TNF antagonists to CD4+ T lymphocytes stimulated with mycobacterial antigens inhibited their proliferation and their expression of membrane-bound TNF (mTNF). These effects occurred late in cultures, suggesting a direct effect of TNF antagonists on activated mTNF+ CD4+ T lymphocytes, and Ifx and Ada were more efficient than Eta. Therefore, TNF antagonists have a dual action on anti-mycobacterial CD4+ T lymphocytes. Administered in vivo, they decrease the frequency of the subpopulation of memory CD4+ T lymphocytes rapidly releasing IFN-γ upon challenge with mycobacterial antigens. Added in vitro, they inhibit the

  12. Scopadulciol, Isolated from Scoparia dulcis, Induces β-Catenin Degradation and Overcomes Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Ligand Resistance in AGS Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Rolly G; Toume, Kazufumi; Arai, Midori A; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-04-24

    Scopadulciol (1), a scopadulan-type diterpenoid, was isolated from Scoparia dulcis along with three other compounds (2-4) by an activity-guided approach using the TCF reporter (TOP) luciferase-based assay system. A fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) revealed that compound 1 was cytotoxic to AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The treatment of AGS cells with 1 decreased β-catenin levels and also inhibited its nuclear localization. The pretreatment of AGS cells with a proteasome inhibitor, either MG132 or epoxomicin, protected against the degradation of β-catenin induced by 1. The 1-induced degradation of β-catenin was also abrogated in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity. Compound 1 inhibited TOP activity in AGS cells and downregulated the protein levels of cyclin D1, c-myc, and survivin. Compound 1 also sensitized AGS cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of the death receptors, DR4 and DR5, and decreasing the level of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 1 induced the p53- and proteasome-dependent degradation of β-catenin, which resulted in the inhibition of TCF/β-catenin transcription in AGS cells. Furthermore, 1 enhanced apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant AGS when combined with TRAIL. PMID:25793965

  13. Human tumor necrosis factor receptor (p55) and interleukin 10 gene transfer in the mouse reduces mortality to lethal endotoxemia and also attenuates local inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Anticytokine therapies have been promulgated in gram-negative sepsis as a means of preventing or neutralizing excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, systemic administration of cytokine inhibitors is an inefficient means of targeting excessive production in individual tissue compartments. In the present study, human gene transfer was used to deliver to organs of the reticuloendothelial system antagonists that either inhibit tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- alpha) synthesis or block its interactions with cellular receptors. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with cationic liposomes containing 200 micrograms of either a pCMV (cytomegalovirus)/p55 expression plasmid that contains the extracellular domain and transmembrane region of the human p55 TNF receptor, or a pcD-SR-alpha/hIL-10 expression plasmid containing the DNA for human interleukin 10. 48 h later, mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Pretreatment of mice with p55 or IL-10 cDNA-liposome complexes improved survival (p < 0.01) to LPS-D-galactosamine. In additional studies, intratracheal administration of IL-10 DNA-liposome complexes 48 h before an intratracheal LPS challenge reduced pulmonary TNF-alpha levels by 62% and decreased neutrophil infiltration in the lung by 55% as measured by myeloperoxidase activity (both p < 0.05). Gene transfer with cytokine inhibitors is a promising option for the treatment of both the systemic and local sequelae of septic shock. PMID:7760015

  14. Acquired factor XI inhibitor in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrick, M. J.; Prentice, A. G.; Copplestone, J. A.; Pamphilon, D. H.; Boon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    A 71 year old man with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) experienced excessive bleeding following transurethral resection of the prostate. Investigations showed a prolonged kaolin cephalin clotting time (KCCT) with low concentrations of factor XI. The prolonged KCCT was largely corrected by mixing with normal plasma but this correction was lost on incubation, confirming the presence of an inhibitor. He was treated with pulsed methylprednisolone and chlorambucil which resulted in the resolution of the bleeding problem and the loss of detectable circulating inhibitor. PMID:1577975

  15. Unexpected postpartum hemorrhage due to an acquired factor VIII inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Paidas, Michael J; Hossain, Nazli

    2014-09-01

    Unexplained postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) refractory to standard hemostatic measures should trigger a heightened clinical suspicion of an acquired bleeding disorder. When hemostatic medical interventions and surgical procedures fail to control the bleeding, then significant postoperative blood loss, debilitating morbidity, loss of fertility, and death may occur. In the setting of an autoantibody inhibitor to factor VIII (FVIII), control of life-threatening PPH and avoidance of subsequent bleeding episodes depends on a timely and accurate diagnosis, prompt hemostatic treatment and eradication of FVIII inhibitors, and appropriate long-term patient care and management. Acquired postpartum hemophilia due to a FVIII inhibitor is a rare cause of PPH; however, delayed treatment can lead to increased maternal morbidity and mortality. Acquired FVIII inhibitors also pose an emerging bleeding threat to the neonate as a result of possible transplacental transfer of FVIII autoantibodies to the fetus during the last trimester of pregnancy. The purpose of this review is to increase awareness among hematologists and obstetricians/gynecologists regarding the occurrence of FVIII neutralizing autoantibodies as a cause of PPH, and emphasize the importance of collaboration between obstetrician/gynecologists and hematology specialists to optimize the diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and long-term management of women who experience PPH due to an acquired FVIII inhibitor. PMID:24338123

  16. Paradoxical Induction of Psoriasis and Lichen Planus by Tumor Necrosis FactorInhibitors.

    PubMed

    Au, Sonoa; Hernandez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Case 1. A 33-year-old white woman presented to our clinic with a new-onset psoriasiform pustular eruption involving her palms and soles 4 months after the initiation of adalimumab for Crohn's disease. Her medical history was significant for childhood atopic dermatitis and hidradenitis suppurativa, but she had no personal or family history of psoriasis. Topical corticosteroids including hydrocortisone 2.5%, triamcinolone 0.1%, fluocinonide 0.05%, and clobetasol 0.05% were used without improvement. The pustular eruption spread to her scalp, trunk, and proximal extremities, and her toenails developed onycholysis and dystrophy. Her adalimumab was withdrawn for 1 month due to suspicion of a paradoxical pustular psoriasis reaction. After 2 weeks off adalimumab, the pustular dermatosis had significantly diminished and her gastroenterologist changed her medication to methotrexate. Her eruption continued to clear over the course of the next 6 months. PMID:26790515

  17. C1q/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Protein-3 Attenuates Brain Injury after Intracerebral Hemorrhage via AMPK-Dependent Pathway in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Zhou, Yang; Yang, Bo; Li, Lingyu; Yu, Shanshan; Chen, Yanlin; Zhu, Jin; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    C1q/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related protein-3 (CTRP3) is a recently discovered adiponectin paralog with established metabolic regulatory properties. However, the role of CTRP3 in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is still mostly unresolved. The aim of the present report was to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of CTRP3 in an ICH rat model and to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms. ICH was induced in rats by intracerebral infusion of autologous arterial blood. The effects of exogenous CTRP3 (recombinant or lentivirus CTRP3) on brain injury were explored on day 7. Treatment with CTRP3 reduced brain edema, protected against disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), improved neurological functions and promoted angiogenesis. Furthermore, CTRP3 greatly intensified phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in addition to expression of hypoxia inducing factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Finally, the protective effects of CTRP3 could be blocked by either AMPK or VEGF inhibitors. Our findings give the first evidence that CTRP3 is a new proangiogenic and neuroprotective adipokine, which may exert its protective effects at least partly through an AMPK/HIF-1α/ VEGF-dependent pathway, and suggest that CTRP3 may provide a new therapeutic strategy for ICH. PMID:27807406

  18. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B sensitises anterior pituitary cells to tumour necrosis factor-α- and lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Eijo, G; Zárate, S; Jaita, G; Ferraris, J; Magri, M L; Zaldivar, V; Radl, D; Boti, V; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an important pro-inflammatory factor, is a crucial regulator of cell survival. Both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α activate NF-κB signalling. Oestrogens were shown to suppress NF-κB activation. Oestrogens exert a sensitising action to pro-apoptotic stimuli such as LPS and TNF-α in anterior pituitary cells. In the present study, we show by western blotting that 17β-oestradiol (E(2)) decreases TNF-α-induced NF-κB/p65 and p50 nuclear translocation in primary cultures of anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomised (OVX) rats. Also, the in vivo administration of E(2) decreases LPS-induced NF-κB/p65 and p50 nuclear translocation. To investigate whether the inhibition of NF-κB pathway sensitises anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli, we used an inhibitor of NF-κB activity, BAY 11-7082 (BAY). BAY, at a concentration that fails to induce apoptosis, has permissive action on TNF-α-induced apoptosis of lactotrophs and somatotrophs from OVX rats, as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB signalling enhances E(2)-sensitising effect to TNF-α-induced apoptosis in lactotrophs but not in somatotrophs. In vivo administration of BAY allowed LPS-induced apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells from OVX rats (determined by fluorescence activated cell sorting). Furthermore, LPS-induced expression of Bcl-xL in pituitaries of OVX rats is decreased by E(2) administration. Our results show that inhibition of the NF-κB signalling pathway sensitises anterior pituitary cells to the pro-apoptotic action of LPS and TNF-α. Because E(2) inhibits LPS- and TNF-α-activated NF-κB nuclear translocation, the present study suggests that E(2) sensitises anterior pituitary cells to TNF-α- and LPS-induced apoptosis by inhibiting NF-κB activity.

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway.

  1. Effects of tumour necrosis factor-α on the coronary circulation of the rat isolated perfused heart: a potential role for thromboxane A2 and sphingosine

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, N J; Woodward, B

    1998-01-01

    The actions of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) on the coronary circulation were investigated in the rat isolated heart, perfused under constant flow, recirculating conditions.An early increase in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was observed upon treatment with TNF-α (increase in CPP 10 min after TNF-α treatment: 45±12 mmHg vs control: 15±4 mmHg, P<0.05). The role of sphingosine, prostanoids and endothelins, in this coronary constrictor action, was investigated with the use of pharmacological inhibitors and antagonists.The TNF-α induced increase in coronary tone was blocked by indomethacin, 10 μM (increase in CPP after 10 min: 13±4 mmHg vs TNF-α alone, P<0.05).The thromboxane receptor antagonist GR32191, 10 μM, attenuated the TNF-α induced coronary constriction (12±2 mmHg vs TNF-α alone, P<0.05), as did the joint thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor and receptor antagonist ZD1542, 10 μM (8±1 mmHg vs TNF-α alone, P<0.05).The ceramidase inhibitor N-oleoylethanolamine (NOE), 1 μM, also blocked the TNF-α induced response (8±4 mmHg vs TNF-α alone, P<0.05).In contrast, the coronary constrictor action of TNF-α was not inhibited by the endothelinA/B receptor antagonist bosentan, 3 μM (38±9 mmHg vs TNF-α, P=NS).These data indicated that the early coronary vasoconstriction induced by TNF-α was mediated by both thromboxane A2 and sphingosine, suggesting an interaction between both the sphingomyelinase and phospholipase A2 metabolic pathways. PMID:9647473

  2. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  3. A Novel Carboline Derivative Inhibits Nitric Oxide Formation in Macrophages Independent of Effects on Tumor Necrosis Factor α and Interleukin-1β Expression

    PubMed Central

    Poola, Bhaskar; Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Nantz, Michael H.; Lein, Pamela J.; Gorin, Fredric

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a maladaptive immune response to peripheral nerve injury that causes a chronic painful condition refractory to most analgesics. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), has been implicated as a key factor in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. β-Carbolines are a large group of natural and synthetic indole alkaloids, some of which block activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), a predominant transcriptional regulator of NOS expression. Here, we characterize the inhibitory effects of a novel 6-chloro-8-(glycinyl)-amino-β-carboline (8-Gly carb) on NO formation and NF-κB activation in macrophages. 8-Gly carb was significantly more potent than the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester in inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation in primary rat macrophages. 8-Gly carb interfered with NF-κB–mediated gene expression in differentiated THP1-XBlue cells, a human NF-κB reporter macrophage cell line, but only at concentrations severalfold higher than needed to significantly inhibit NO production. 8-Gly carb also had no effect on tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)–induced phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in differentiated THP1 cells, and did not inhibit lipopolysaccharide- or TNFα-stimulated expression of TNFα and interleukin-1β. These data demonstrate that relative to other carbolines and pharmacologic inhibitors of NOS, 8-Gly carb exhibits a unique pharmacological profile by inhibiting constitutive and inducible NO formation independent of NF-κB activation and cytokine expression. Thus, this novel carboline derivative holds promise as a parent compound, leading to therapeutic agents that prevent the development of neuropathic pain mediated by macrophage-derived NO without interfering with cytokine expression required for neural recovery following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25538105

  4. Mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan induces nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor alpha production in a macrophage cell line: down regulation by taurine chloramine.

    PubMed Central

    Schuller-Levis, G B; Levis, W R; Ammazzalorso, M; Nosrati, A; Park, E

    1994-01-01

    Avirulent mycobacterium H37Ra lipoarabinomannan (LAM) elicited nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha in a dose-dependent manner in a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 cells. H37Ra LAM and recombinant gamma interferon were highly synergistic for NO production. The production of NO and the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated by H37Ra LAM plus recombinant gamma interferon in RAW 264.7 cells are inhibited by taurine chloramine. PMID:7927739

  5. Acquired factor VIII inhibitor syndrome: A rare cause of hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Muthuvel Seral; Raj Kumar, Thallur Ramakrishnan; Subramanian, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with gross hematuria for 1 month. Clinical examinations, laboratory investigations, ultrasound and contrast computed tomography were normal, except anemia. Cystoscopy revealed bloody efflux from the right side. Retrograde pyelogram showed filling defect in the renal pelvis and biopsy was inconclusive. Renal angiogram was normal. She developed ecchymosis on the right thigh and arm with elevated activated partial thromboplastin time. The partial thromboplastin time correction study and Bethesda study confirmed the presence of acquired factor VIII inhibitor (acquired hemophilia). With flexible ureterorenoscopy, the mass in the renal pelvis was removed and its histopathology revealed clotted blood. The patient was subsequently managed with steroids and Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity. PMID:25624582

  6. Proliferative and antiproliferative effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell lines derived from cervical and ovarian malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mutch, D.G.; Massad, L.S.; Kao, M.S.; Collins, J.L. )

    1990-12-01

    Four human cell lines derived from cervical carcinomas (ME-180, SiHa, HT-3, and MS751) and three human cell lines derived from ovarian carcinomas (SK-OV-3, Caov-3, and NIH:OVCAR-3) were analyzed in vitro to determine the effect of recombinant interferon-gamma and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell growth and survival. The effects of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and both interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on cell growth were measured after 24 and 72 hours of incubation by the incorporation of chromium 51. The results of this analysis showed that all seven cell lines were resistant to the antiproliferative action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, that the growth of most cell lines was inhibited by interferon-gamma by 72 hours of incubation, and that after 72 hours of incubation all cell lines demonstrated a synergistic antiproliferative response to the combination of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, the effects of these cytokines on cell growth were found to differ among cell lines and varied with the concentration and the duration of incubation. The growth of one cell line (Caov-3) was stimulated by both tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma. These results suggest that the clinical effects of these cytokines on the growth of gynecologic cancers may be more complex than previously supposed.

  7. Pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis: efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a patient with a simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis. This condition differs from both the PASH (pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis) syndrome, in which arthritis is absent, and the PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome, in which suppurative hidradenitis is lacking. Our patient failed to respond to etanercept therapy, whereas all dermatologic and rheumatic manifestations completely regressed following infliximab infusion. We therefore propose that simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and seronegative spondyloarthritis might represent a distinct syndrome that could be termed the PASS syndrome. Tumor necrosis factor α therapies seem to play selective roles.

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and the ERK Pathway Drive Chemerin Expression in Response to Hypoxia in Cultured Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Su-Kiat; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Lo, Huey-Ming; Wang, Bao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemerin, a novel adipokine, plays a role in the inflammation status of vascular endothelial cells. Hypoxia causes endothelial-cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. This study was aimed at evaluating the protein and mRNA expression of chemerin after exposure of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) to hypoxia. Methods and Results Cultured HCAECs underwent hypoxia for different time points. Chemerin protein levels increased after 4 h of hypoxia at 2.5% O2, with a peak of expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) at 1 h. Both hypoxia and exogenously added TNF-alpha during normoxia stimulated chemerin expression, whereas an ERK inhibitor (PD98059), ERK small interfering RNA (siRNA), or an anti-TNF-alpha antibody attenuated the chemerin upregulation induced by hypoxia. A gel shift assay indicated that hypoxia induced an increase in DNA-protein binding between the chemerin promoter and transcription factor SP1. A luciferase assay confirmed an increase in transcriptional activity of SP1 on the chemerin promoter during hypoxia. Hypoxia significantly increased the tube formation and migration of HCAECs, whereas PD98059, the anti-TNF-alpha antibody, and chemerin siRNA each attenuated these effects. Conclusion Hypoxia activates chemerin expression in cultured HCAECs. Hypoxia-induced chemerin expression is mediated by TNF-alpha and at least in part by the ERK pathway. Chemerin increases early processes of angiogenesis by HCAECs after hypoxic treatment. PMID:27792771

  9. Simvastatin Inhibits Toll-like Receptor 8 (TLR8) Signaling in Primary Human Monocytes and Spontaneous Tumor Necrosis Factor Production from Rheumatoid Synovial Membrane Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Lisa; Ferdjani, Jason; Sacre, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin has been shown to have antiinflammatory effects that are independent of its serum cholesterol lowering action, but the mechanisms by which these antiinflammatory effects are mediated have not been elucidated. To explore the mechanism involved, the effect of simvastatin on toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in primary human monocytes was investigated. A short pretreatment with simvastatin dose-dependently inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to TLR8 activation (but not TLR2, -4 or -5). Statins are known inhibitors of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, but, intriguingly, TLR8 inhibition could not be reversed by addition of mevalonate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, downstream products of cholesterol biosynthesis. TLR8 signaling was examined in HEK 293 cells stably expressing TLR8, where simvastatin inhibited I kappa B kinase (IKK)α/β phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation without affecting the pathway to activating protein-1 (AP-1). Because simvastatin has been reported to have antiinflammatory effects in RA patients and TLR8 signaling contributes to TNF production in human RA synovial tissue in culture, simvastatin was tested in these cultures. Simvastatin significantly inhibited the spontaneous release of TNF in this model, which was not reversed by mevalonate. Together, these results demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized mechanism of simvastatin inhibition of TLR8 signaling that may in part explain its beneficial antiinflammatory effects. PMID:26322850

  10. A Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A.; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A.; Powell, Thomas J.; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases. PMID:22782901

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (Trail) in endothelial response to biomechanical and biochemical stresses in arteries.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, F; Centurione, L; Centurione, M A; Angelini, A; Di Pietro, R

    2015-11-01

    Shear stress is determined by three physical components described in a famous triad: blood flow, blood viscosity and vessel geometry. Through the direct action on endothelium, shear stress is able to radically interfere with endothelial properties and the physiology of the vascular wall. Endothelial cells (ECs) have also to sustain biochemical stresses represented by chemokines, growth factors, cytokines, complement, hormones, nitric oxide (NO), oxygen and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, hormones, and chemical substances, like NO, act and regulate endothelium functions and homeostasis. Among these cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) has been assigned a regulatory role in ECs physiology and physiopathology. Thus, the aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the endothelial response pathways after different types of biomechanical and biochemical stress in in vitro models and to analyze the crucial role of TRAIL under pathological conditions of the cardiocirculatory system like atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and diabetes.

  12. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates changes in tissue protein turnover in a rat cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed Central

    Costelli, P; Carbó, N; Tessitore, L; Bagby, G J; Lopez-Soriano, F J; Argilés, J M; Baccino, F M

    1993-01-01

    Rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma showed enhanced fractional rates of protein degradation in gastrocnemius muscle, heart, and liver, while fractional synthesis rates were similar to those in non-tumor bearing rats. This hypercatabolic pattern was associated with marked perturbations of the hormonal homeostasis and presence of tumor necrosis factor in the circulation. The daily administration of a goat anti-murine TNF IgG to tumor-bearing rats decreased protein degradation rates in skeletal muscle, heart, and liver as compared with tumor-bearing rats receiving a nonimmune goat IgG. The anti-TNF treatment was also effective in attenuating early perturbations in insulin and corticosterone homeostasis. Although these results suggest that tumor necrosis factor plays a significant role in mediating the changes in protein turnover and hormone levels elicited by tumor growth, the inability of such treatment to prevent a reduction in body weight implies that other mediators or tumor-related events were also involved. PMID:8254032

  14. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the first Porifera tumor necrosis factor superfamily member and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Ghignone, Stefano; Mussino, Francesca; Vezzulli, Luigi; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the first Tumor Necrosis Factor homologous and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis: chTNF and chTNFR, respectively. The deduced chTNF amino acid sequence is a type II transmembrane protein containing the typical TNFSF domain. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that chTNF is more related to Chordata TNFs rather than to other invertebrates. chTNF and chTNFR are constitutively expressed both in the ectosome and in the choanosome of the sponge, with higher levels in the ectosome. chTNF and chTNFR mRNAs were monitored in sponge fragmorphs treated with Gram(+) or Gram(-) bacteria. chTNF was significantly upregulated in Gram(+)-treated fragmorphs as compared to controls, while chTNFR was upregulated by both treatments. Finally, the possible chTNF fibrogenic role in sponge fragmorphs was studied by TNF inhibitor treatment measuring fibrillar and non fibrillar collagen gene expression; results indicate that the cytokine is involved in sponge collagen deposition and homeostasis.

  15. Proviral integration site 2 is required for interleukin-6 expression induced by interleukin-1, tumour necrosis factor-α and lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianfei; Li, Xiang; Hanidu, Adedayo; Htut, Tin M; Sellati, Rosemarie; Wang, Lian; Jiang, Huiping; Li, Jun

    2010-01-01

    PIM (proviral integration site) kinases are a distinct class of serine/threonine-specific kinases consisting of PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3. PIM2 is known to function in apoptosis pathways. Expression of PIM2 is highly induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli but the role of PIM2 in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is unclear. In this study, we showed that over-expression of PIM2 in HeLa cells as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells enhanced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) -induced and tumour necrosis factor-α-induced IL-6 expression, whereas over-expression of a kinase-dead PIM2 mutant had the opposite effect. Studies with small interfering RNA specific to PIM2 further confirmed that IL-6 expression in HeLa cells requires PIM2. To investigate the function of PIM2 further, we generated PIM2-deficient mice. It was found that IL-6 production was significantly decreased from PIM2-deficient spleen cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, we demonstrated an important function of PIM2 in controlling the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. PIM2 inhibitors may be beneficial for IL-6-mediated diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20465571

  16. The effects of dexamethasone and chlorpromazine on tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and interleukin-10 in human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Bleeker, M W; Netea, M G; Kullberg, B J; Van der Ven-Jongekrijg, J; Van der Meer, J W

    1997-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that play an important role in severe infections, whereas IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and IL-10 are anti-inflammatory cytokines that counteract their effects. Chlorpromazine and dexamethasone protect mice against lethal endotoxaemia by decreasing circulating concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta. We investigated whether administration of chlorpromazine or dexamethasone to human volunteers is able to modulate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production capacity in whole blood. Blood samples were taken before and several time-points after medication. Circulating cytokine concentrations were low in all samples. LPS-induced TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta production in whole blood was inhibited by dexamethasone treatment, while chlorpromazine had no effect. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated in vitro with LPS, the addition of chlorpromazine (1-100 ng/ml) had no modulatory action on TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-1ra or IL-10 synthesis. The chlorpromazine concentrations measured in circulation of volunteers were eight to 40 times lower than the concentrations shown to be effective in mice. In conclusion, chlorpromazine inhibits TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta production in mice at concentrations that cannot be reached in humans, thus precluding its usage in clinical anti-cytokine strategies. In contrast, dexamethasone is an effective inhibitor of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:9378493

  17. Human nasal cartilage responds to oncostatin M in combination with interleukin 1 or tumour necrosis factor α by the release of collagen fragments via collagenases

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, T G; Rowan, A D; Dickinson, S C; Jones, D; Hollander, A P; Deehan, D; Cawston, T E

    2006-01-01

    Background The synergistic degradation of cartilage by oncostatin M (OSM) in combination with either interleukin 1 (IL1) or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) has been previously demonstrated using bovine nasal cartilage (BNC). Objectives (a) To investigate if human nasal cartilage (HNC) responds in the same way as BNC to these cytokine combinations, particularly in collagen degradation. (b) To compare the response of human nasal and articular cartilages. Methods Collagen release was assessed by measuring the hydroxyproline content of culture supernatants and proteoglycan release by the dimethylmethylene blue assay. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‐1, MMP‐13, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 release were measured by specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and collagenolytic activity was measured by a bioassay using radiolabelled collagen. Results OSM in combination with either IL1 or TNFα acted synergistically to induce collagenolysis from HNC, with a maximum of 79% collagen release. This degradation strongly correlated with MMP‐1 and MMP‐13 levels and collagenolytic activity. Conclusion Collagen release from human cartilage is marked and implicates both MMP‐1 and MMP‐13 in the synergistic degradation of human cartilage by OSM in combination with either IL1 or TNFα. HNC responds in the same way as BNC, thus validating the bovine cartilage degradation assay as a model relevant to human disease. PMID:15975972

  18. Proviral integration site 2 is required for interleukin-6 expression induced by interleukin-1, tumour necrosis factor-α and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianfei; Li, Xiang; Hanidu, Adedayo; Htut, Tin M; Sellati, Rosemarie; Wang, Lian; Jiang, Huiping; Li, Jun

    2010-10-01

    PIM (proviral integration site) kinases are a distinct class of serine/threonine-specific kinases consisting of PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3. PIM2 is known to function in apoptosis pathways. Expression of PIM2 is highly induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli but the role of PIM2 in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is unclear. In this study, we showed that over-expression of PIM2 in HeLa cells as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells enhanced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) -induced and tumour necrosis factor-α-induced IL-6 expression, whereas over-expression of a kinase-dead PIM2 mutant had the opposite effect. Studies with small interfering RNA specific to PIM2 further confirmed that IL-6 expression in HeLa cells requires PIM2. To investigate the function of PIM2 further, we generated PIM2-deficient mice. It was found that IL-6 production was significantly decreased from PIM2-deficient spleen cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, we demonstrated an important function of PIM2 in controlling the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. PIM2 inhibitors may be beneficial for IL-6-mediated diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induces activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis in baboons through an exclusive effect on the p55 receptor.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Jansen, P M; Van Zee, K J; Welborn, M B; de Jong, I; Hack, C E; Loetscher, H; Lesslauer, W; Lowry, S F; Moldawer, L L

    1996-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) can bind to two distinct transmembrane receptors, the p55 and p75 TNF receptors. We compared the capability of two mutant TNF proteins with exclusive affinity for the p55 or p75 TNF receptor with that of wild type TNF, to activate the hemostatic mechanism in baboons. Both activation of the coagulation system, monitored by the plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes, and activation of the fibrinolytic system (plasma levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type I), were of similar magnitude after intravenous injection of wild type TNF or the TNF mutant with affinity only for the p55 receptor. Likewise, wild type TNF and the TNF p55 specific mutant were equally potent in inducing neutrophil degranulation (plasma levels of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes). Wild type TNF tended to be a more potent inducer of secretory phospholipase A2 release than the p55 specific TNF mutant. Administration of the TNF mutant binding only to the p75 receptor did not induce any of these responses. We conclude that TNF-Induced stimulation of coagulation, fibrinolysis, neutrophil degranulation, and release of secretory phospholipase A2 are predominantly mediated by the p55 TNF receptor.

  20. Pretreatment with a 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin fusion protein attenuates activation of coagulation, but not of fibrinolysis, during lethal bacteremia in baboons.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Jansen, P M; Van Zee, K J; Hack, C E; Oldenburg, H A; Loetscher, H; Lesslauer, W; Lowry, S F; Moldawer, L L

    1997-07-01

    Baboons (Papio anubis) receiving a lethal intravenous infusion with live Escherichia coli were pretreated with either a 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-IgG fusion protein (TNFR55:IgG) (n = 4, 4.6 mg/kg) or placebo (n = 4). Neutralization of TNF activity in TNFR55:IgG-treated animals was associated with a complete prevention of mortality and a strong attenuation of coagulation activation as reflected by the plasma concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes (P < .05). Activation of fibrinolysis was not influenced by TNFR55:IgG (plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes), whereas TNFR55:IgG did inhibit the release of plasminogen activator inhibitor type I (P < .05). Furthermore, TNFR55:IgG inhibited neutrophil degranulation (plasma levels of elastase-alpha1-antitrypsin complexes, P < .05) and modestly reduced release of secretory phospholipase A2. These data suggest that endogenous TNF contributes to activation of coagulation, but not to stimulation of fibrinolysis, during severe bacteremia.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha represses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by interfering with the DNA binding of Smads through the activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masato; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Shin, Masashi; Katagiri, Takenobu; Doi, Takahiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Jimi, Eijiro

    2009-12-18

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce not only bone formation in vivo but also osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal cells in vitro. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibits both osteoblast differentiation and bone formation induced by BMPs. However, the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitions remain unknown. In this study, we found that TNFalpha inhibited the alkaline phosphatase activity and markedly reduced BMP2- and Smad-induced reporter activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. TNFalpha had no effect on the phosphorylation of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 or on the nuclear translocation of the Smad1-Smad4 complex. In p65-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, overexpression of p65, a subunit of NF-kappaB, inhibited BMP2- and Smad-induced reporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this p65-mediated inhibition of BMP2- and Smad-responsive promoter activity was restored after inhibition of NF-kappaB by the overexpression of the dominant negative IkappaBalpha. Although TNFalpha failed to affect receptor-dependent formation of the Smad1-Smad4 complex, p65 associated with the complex. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis mobility shift assays revealed that TNFalpha suppressed the DNA binding of Smad proteins to the target gene. Importantly, the specific NF-kappaB inhibitor, BAY11-7082, abolished these phenomena. These results suggest that TNFalpha inhibits BMP signaling by interfering with the DNA binding of Smads through the activation of NF-kappaB.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor α induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes metastasis via NF-κB signaling pathway-mediated TWIST expression in hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Mu, Yakui; Sa, Na; Wang, Haibo; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism in cancer metastasis. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) can induce cancer invasion and metastasis associated with EMT. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. Therefore, we investigated whether TNFα has an effect on EMT and invasion and metastasis in human hypopharyngeal cancer FaDu cells, and further explored the potential mechanisms. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNFα induced EMT in FaDu cells and promoted FaDu cell migration and invasion. TNFα-induced EMT was characterized by a change from well organized cell-cell adhesion and cell polarity to loss of cell-cell contacts, cell scattering and increased expression of vimentin and N-cadherin accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin. Furthermore, we found that p65 translocated to the nucleus after TNFα stimulation and increased the nuclear expression of TWIST. We demonstrated that TNFα treatment also increased the expression of TWIST by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway. While p65 was inhibited by siRNA-65 or BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of NF-κB), TWIST expression was also decreased. Therefore, we conclude that TNFα induces EMT and promotes metastasis via NF-κB signaling pathway-mediated TWIST expression in hypopharyngeal cancer. PMID:24220622

  3. Tumor necrosis factor α induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes metastasis via NF-κB signaling pathway-mediated TWIST expression in hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Mu, Yakui; Sa, Na; Wang, Haibo; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism in cancer metastasis. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) can induce cancer invasion and metastasis associated with EMT. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. Therefore, we investigated whether TNFα has an effect on EMT and invasion and metastasis in human hypopharyngeal cancer FaDu cells, and further explored the potential mechanisms. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNFα induced EMT in FaDu cells and promoted FaDu cell migration and invasion. TNFα-induced EMT was characterized by a change from well organized cell-cell adhesion and cell polarity to loss of cell-cell contacts, cell scattering and increased expression of vimentin and N-cadherin accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin. Furthermore, we found that p65 translocated to the nucleus after TNFα stimulation and increased the nuclear expression of TWIST. We demonstrated that TNFα treatment also increased the expression of TWIST by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway. While p65 was inhibited by siRNA-65 or BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of NF-κB), TWIST expression was also decreased. Therefore, we conclude that TNFα induces EMT and promotes metastasis via NF-κB signaling pathway-mediated TWIST expression in hypopharyngeal cancer.

  4. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the first Porifera tumor necrosis factor superfamily member and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Ghignone, Stefano; Mussino, Francesca; Vezzulli, Luigi; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of the first Tumor Necrosis Factor homologous and of its putative receptor in the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis: chTNF and chTNFR, respectively. The deduced chTNF amino acid sequence is a type II transmembrane protein containing the typical TNFSF domain. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that chTNF is more related to Chordata TNFs rather than to other invertebrates. chTNF and chTNFR are constitutively expressed both in the ectosome and in the choanosome of the sponge, with higher levels in the ectosome. chTNF and chTNFR mRNAs were monitored in sponge fragmorphs treated with Gram(+) or Gram(-) bacteria. chTNF was significantly upregulated in Gram(+)-treated fragmorphs as compared to controls, while chTNFR was upregulated by both treatments. Finally, the possible chTNF fibrogenic role in sponge fragmorphs was studied by TNF inhibitor treatment measuring fibrillar and non fibrillar collagen gene expression; results indicate that the cytokine is involved in sponge collagen deposition and homeostasis. PMID:26705701

  5. Fumonisin B1, a mycotoxin contaminant of cereal grains, and inducer of apoptosis via the tumour necrosis factor pathway and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Ciacci-Zanella, J R; Jones, C

    1999-07-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium moniliforme, a prevalent fungus which infects corn or other cereal grains. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most common mycotoxin produced by F. moniliforme, suggesting that it has toxicological significance. The structure of FB1 resembles sphingoid bases and it inhibits ceramide synthase. As sphingoid bases regulate cell growth, differentiation, transformation and apoptosis, it is reasonable to hypothesize that FB1 can also regulate these activities. Previous studies concluded that FB1 induced apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest in CV-1 cells (African green monkey kidney fibroblasts). In this study, we have identified genes that inhibit FB1-induced apoptosis in CV-1 cells and in two primary human cell types (lung fibroblasts and neonatal kidney cells). A baculovirus gene. inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), protected CV-1 and the human cells from apoptosis. IAP blocks apoptosis which is induced by the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) pathway. Inhibition of interleukin converting enzymes (ICE proteases or caspases) by the baculovirus gene p35 also inhibited FB1-induced apoptosis. FB1 treatment led to cleavage of Rb (retinoblastoma protein) at its C-terminus in CV-1 or human lung cells. As the C-terminus of Rb is cleaved by ICE proteases during apoptosis, this supports an active role for ICE proteases in FB1-induced apoptosis. The tumour suppressor gene p53 was not required for FB1-induced apoptosis because p53-/- primary mouse embryo fibroblasts underwent apoptosis following FB1 treatment. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was not an effective inhibitor of FB1-induced apoptosis in CV-1 or IMR-90 cells. In summary, these results demonstrate that the TNF pathway and caspases plays an important role in FB1-induced apoptosis.

  6. Xylosyltransferase-1 Expression Is Refractory to Inhibition by the Inflammatory Cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor α and IL-1β in Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wei; Zhou, Jie; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Tian, Ye; Li, Jun; Anderson, D. Greg; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether expression of xylosyltransferase-1 (XT-1), a key enzyme in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, is responsive to disk degeneration and to inhibition by the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α and IL-1β in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Analysis of human NP tissues showed that XT-1 expression is unaffected by degeneration severity; XT-1 and Jun, Fos, and Sp1 mRNA were positively correlated. Cytokines failed to inhibit XT-1 promoter activity and expression. However, cytokines decreased activity of XT-1 promoters containing deletion and mutation of the –730/–723 bp AP-1 motif, prompting us to investigate the role of AP-1 and Sp1/Sp3 in the regulation of XT-1 in healthy NP cells. Overexpression and suppression of AP-1 modulated XT-1 promoter activity. Likewise, treatment with the Sp1 inhibitors WP631 and mithramycin A or cotransfection with the plasmid DN-Sp1 decreased XT-1 promoter activity. Inhibitors of AP-1 and Sp1 and stable knockdown of Sp1 and Sp3 resulted in decreased XT-1 expression in NP cells. Genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed AP-1 binding to motifs located at –730/–723 bp and –684/–677 bp and Sp1 binding to –227/–217 bp and –124/–114 bp in XT-1 promoter. These results suggest that XT-1 expression is refractory to the disease process and to inhibition by inflammatory cytokines and that signaling through AP-1, Sp1, and Sp3 is important in the maintenance of XT-1 levels in NP cells. PMID:25476526

  7. Potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor from green tea

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Aica, Isabella; Donà, Massimo; Tonello, Fiorella; Piris, Alejandro; Mock, Michèle; Montecucco, Cesare; Garbisa, Spiridione

    2004-01-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) has a major role in the development of anthrax. LF is delivered by the protective antigen (PA) inside the cell, where it exerts its metalloprotease activity on the N-terminus of MAPK-kinases. PA+LF are cytotoxic to macrophages in culture and kill the Fischer 344 rat when injected intravenously. We describe here the properties of some polyphenols contained in green tea as powerful inhibitors of LF metalloproteolytic activity, and how the main catechin of green tea, (−)epigallocatechin-3-gallate, prevents the LF-induced death of macrophages and Fischer 344 rats. PMID:15031715

  8. Ubiquitination of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Factor 4 (TRAF4) by Smad Ubiquitination Regulatory Factor 1 (Smurf1) Regulates Motility of Breast Epithelial and Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangchun; Jin, Chaoyang; Tang, Yi; Tang, Liu-Ya; Zhang, Ying E.

    2013-01-01

    Smad ubiquitin regulatory factors (Smurfs) are HECT-domain ubiquitin E3 ligases that regulate diverse cellular processes, including normal and tumor cell migration. However, the underlying mechanism of the Smurfs' role in cell migration is not fully understood. Here we show that Smurf1 induces ubiquitination of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4) at K190. Using the K190R mutant of TRAF4, we demonstrate that Smurf1-induced ubiquitination is required for proper localization of TRAF4 to tight junctions in confluent epithelial cells. We further show that TRAF4 is essential for the migration of both normal mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells. The ability of TRAF4 to promote cell migration is also dependent on Smurf1-mediated ubiquitination, which is associated with Rac1 activation by TRAF4. These results reveal a new regulatory circuit for cell migration, consisting of Smurf1-mediated ubiquitination of TRAF4 and Rac1 activation. PMID:23760265

  9. Interleukin-8 is a major neutrophil chemotactic factor derived from cultured human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with interleukin-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takashiba, S; Takigawa, M; Takahashi, K; Myokai, F; Nishimura, F; Chihara, T; Kurihara, H; Nomura, Y; Murayama, Y

    1992-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators produced by cells in the gingiva have been implicated in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease, a common infectious disease. In this study, we examined the biological activity of neutrophil chemotactic factors and the kinetics of expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA derived from normal gingival fibroblasts in response to inflammatory mediators in an in vitro model. Gingival fibroblasts stimulated by either recombinant human interleukin-1 beta or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha produced neutrophil chemotactic factors after 4 h, whereas expression of cell-derived IL-8 mRNA was detected within 1 h after stimulation. Furthermore, in a neutralization assay, rabbit anti-recombinant human IL-8 antiserum inhibited neutrophil chemotactic activity to basal levels. These results provide evidence that gingival fibroblasts synthesize potent chemotactic factors such as IL-8 in the presence of the inflammatory mediators interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The activity of these factors may contribute to neutrophil-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Images PMID:1452358

  10. Quiescent interplay between inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: influence on transplant graft vasculopathy in renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Matata, Bashir M; Hakim, Nadey S

    2006-06-01

    A healthy endothelium is essential for vascular homeostasis, and preservation of endothelial cell function is critical for maintaining transplant allograft function. Damage to the microvascular endothelial cells is now regarded as a characteristic feature of acute vascular rejection, an important predictor of graft loss. It is also linked with transplant vasculopathy, often associated with chronic allograft nephropathy. Large bursts of nitric oxide in infiltrating monocytes/macrophages modulated by inducible nitric oxide synthase are considered pivotal in driving this mechanism. Indeed, it has been shown recently that increased circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the rejecting kidneys are largely responsible for triggering inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. This in turn suggests that several structural and functional features of graft rejection could be mediated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Despite the large body of evidence that supports immunologic involvement, knowledge concerning the cellular and biochemical mechanisms for nephritic cell dysfunction and death is incomplete. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mediating pathophysiological activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase during transplant vasculopathy remains contentious. Here, we discuss the effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha interaction on progressive damage to glomerular and vascular structures during renal allograft rejection. Selective inhibition of inducible nitrous oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha as a potential therapy for ameliorating endothelial dysfunction and transplant graft vasculopathy is also discussed.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor and immune interferon synergistically increase transcription of HLA class I heavy- and light-chain genes in vascular endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Pober, J.S. )

    1990-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor and immune interferon synergistically increase cell-surface expression of class I major histocompatibility complex molecules in cultured human endothelial cells. The authors report that tumor necrosis factor and interferon {gamma} each independently increase mRNA levels and together cause a greater-than-additive (i.e., synergistic) increase in steady-state mRNA levels and transcriptional rates of the class I heavy- and light-chain genes. HLA heavy-chain mRNA is equally stable in cytokine-treated and -untreated endothelial cells. Interferon {gamma} does not increase tumor necrosis factor receptor number or affinity on human endothelial cells. They conclude that the synergistic increase in class I major histocompatibility complex cell-surface expression results principally from the synergistic increase in transcriptional rates. They propose that this increase is caused by the cooperative binding of independently activated transcription factors to the promoter/enhancer sequences of class I genes.

  12. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Naizhen; Gates, Khalilah L.; Trejo, Humberto; Favoreto, Silvio; Schleimer, Robert P.; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Beitel, Greg J.; Sporn, Peter H. S.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated blood and tissue CO2, or hypercapnia, is common in severe lung disease. Patients with hypercapnia often develop lung infections and have an increased risk of death following pneumonia. To explore whether hypercapnia interferes with host defense, we studied the effects of elevated PCO2 on macrophage innate immune responses. In differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human and mouse alveolar macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other Toll-like receptor ligands, hypercapnia inhibited expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent cytokines critical for antimicrobial host defense. Inhibition of IL-6 expression by hypercapnia was concentration dependent, rapid, reversible, and independent of extracellular and intracellular acidosis. In contrast, hypercapnia did not down-regulate IL-10 or interferon-β, which do not require NF-κB. Notably, hypercapnia did not affect LPS-induced degradation of IκBα, nuclear translocation of RelA/p65, or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, but it did block IL-6 promoter-driven luciferase activity in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. Elevated PCO2 also decreased phagocytosis of opsonized polystyrene beads and heat-killed bacteria in THP-1 and human alveolar macrophages. By interfering with essential innate immune functions in the macrophage, hypercapnia may cause a previously unrecognized defect in resistance to pulmonary infection in patients with advanced lung disease.—Wang, N., Gates, K. L., Trejo, H., Favoreto, Jr., S., Schleimer, R. P., Sznajder, J. I., Beitel, G. J., Sporn, P. H. S. Elevated CO2 selectively inhibits interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor expression and decreases phagocytosis in the macrophage. PMID:20181940

  13. Inhibitor-neutralisation assay and electro-immuno assay of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed

    Bertina, R M; van der Linden, I K

    1977-06-15

    A rabbit antibody specifically precipitating human factor IX has been used in the assay of factor IX antigen. The results obtained with two different methods (inhibitor-neutralisation assay and electro-immunoassay) have been compared in a group of healthy individuals and in a group of hemophilia B patients and carriers. In general, identical results are obtained with both methods, except in some hemophilia B+ carriers and patients, where the electroimmuno assay gives 1.5-2.0 times higher levels. Results obtained by electroimmuno assay are more accurate and reproducible than those obtained by inhibitor-neutralisation assay, which is of importance for its potential use in carrier detection.

  14. Involvement of interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor in tumor necrosis factor alpha-dependent angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, S; Ono, M; Shono, T; Izumi, H; Ishibashi, T; Suzuki, H; Kuwano, M

    1997-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a macrophage/monocyte-derived polypeptide which modulates the expression of various genes in vascular endothelial cells and induces angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism by which TNF-alpha mediates angiogenesis is not completely understood. In this study, we assessed whether TNF-alpha-induced angiogenesis is mediated through TNF-alpha itself or indirectly through other TNF-alpha-induced angiogenesis-promoting factors. Cellular mRNA levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and their receptors were increased after the treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells with TNF-alpha (100 U/ml). TNF-alpha-dependent tubular morphogenesis in vascular endothelial cells was inhibited by the administration of anti-IL-8, anti-VEGF, and anti-bFGF antibodies, and coadministration of all three antibodies almost completely abrogated tubular formation. Moreover, treatment with Sp1, NF-kappaB, and c-Jun antisense oligonucleotides inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent tubular morphogenesis by microvascular endothelial cells. Administration of a NF-kappaB antisense oligonucleotide almost completely inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent IL-8 production and partially abrogated TNF-alpha-dependent VEGF production, and an Sp1 antisense sequence partially inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent production of VEGF. A c-Jun antisense oligonucleotide significantly inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent bFGF production but did not affect the production of IL-8 and VEGF. Administration of an anti-IL-8 or anti-VEGF antibody also blocked TNF-alpha-induced neovascularization in the rabbit cornea in vivo. Thus, angiogenesis by TNF-alpha appears to be modulated through various angiogenic factors, both in vitro and in vivo, and this pathway is controlled through paracrine and/or autocrine mechanisms. PMID:9199336

  15. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  16. Tumor-necrosis factor impairs CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological control in chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marc; Abdullah, Zeinab; Chemnitz, Jens M; Maisel, Daniela; Sander, Jil; Lehmann, Clara; Thabet, Yasser; Shinde, Prashant V; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Köhne, Maren; Trebicka, Jonel; Schierwagen, Robert; Hofmann, Andrea; Popov, Alexey; Lang, Karl S; Oxenius, Annette; Buch, Thorsten; Kurts, Christian; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Lang, Philipp A; Hartmann, Pia; Knolle, Percy A; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-05-01

    Persistent viral infections are characterized by the simultaneous presence of chronic inflammation and T cell dysfunction. In prototypic models of chronicity--infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)--we used transcriptome-based modeling to reveal that CD4(+) T cells were co-exposed not only to multiple inhibitory signals but also to tumor-necrosis factor (TNF). Blockade of TNF during chronic infection with LCMV abrogated the inhibitory gene-expression signature in CD4(+) T cells, including reduced expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and reconstituted virus-specific immunity, which led to control of infection. Preventing signaling via the TNF receptor selectively in T cells sufficed to induce these effects. Targeted immunological interventions to disrupt the TNF-mediated link between chronic inflammation and T cell dysfunction might therefore lead to therapies to overcome persistent viral infection.

  17. Anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment increases circulating T helper type 17 cells similarly in different types of inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hull, D N; Williams, R O; Pathan, E; Alzabin, S; Abraham, S; Taylor, P C

    2015-01-01

    We investigated changes in circulating T helper type 17 (Th17) cells following anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 25 RA, 15 AS and eight PsA patients at baseline 4 and 12 weeks after treatment, and Th17 cell frequencies were analysed using interleukin (IL)-17 enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and flow cytometry. A significant increase in IL-17-producing cells was observed by ELISPOT in RA and AS patients at 12 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed significant increases in CD4+IL-17+ cells at 12 weeks in RA and AS and 4 weeks in PsA patients. Anti-TNF treatment increases circulating Th17 cells in three different diseases. PMID:25766640

  18. Increased liver apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor expression in Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) reared in the northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Corriero, Aldo; Zupa, Rosa; Pousis, Chrysovalentinos; Santamaria, Nicoletta; Bello, Giambattista; Jirillo, Emilio; Carrassi, Michele; De Giorgi, Carla; Passantino, Letizia

    2013-06-15

    The Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus (ABFT) is intensely fished in the Mediterranean Sea to supply a prosperous capture-based mariculture industry. Liver apoptotic structures and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene expression were determined in: wild ABFT caught in the eastern Atlantic; juvenile ABFT reared in the central Adriatic Sea; juvenile ABFT reared in the northern Adriatic Sea; adult ABFT reared in the western Mediterranean. The highest density of liver apoptotic structures was found in the juveniles from the northern Adriatic. Two partial TNF cDNAs (TNF1 and TNF2) were cloned and sequenced. TNF1 gene expression was higher in juveniles than in adults. The highest expression of TNF2 was found in the juveniles from the northern Adriatic. These findings might be related to the juvenile exposure to environmental pollutants.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor α is associated with viral control and early disease progression in patients with HIV type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sagar A; Korner, Christian; Sirignano, Michael N; Amero, Molly; Bazner, Sue; Rychert, Jenna; Allen, Todd M; Rosenberg, Eric S; Bosch, Ronald J; Altfeld, Marcus

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation in early human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression is not well characterized. Ninety patients with untreated primary HIV-1 infection were studied to determine associations of inflammatory proteins with early disease progression. High plasma tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels (≥8.5 pg/mL) were significantly associated with an increased viral load set point and shorter times to reaching a CD4(+) T-cell count of <500 cells/mm(3) and initiating antiretroviral therapy. The increased risk of reaching a CD4(+) T-cell count of <500 cells/mm(3) in the group with high TNF-α levels was driven by viral load but was independent of concurrent CD4(+) T-cell count. Thus, TNF-α appears to be an important mediator of inflammation in patients with poor viral control and early HIV-1 disease progression.

  20. Synergistic effects of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha: central monoamine, corticosterone, and behavioral variations.

    PubMed

    Brebner, K; Hayley, S; Zacharko, R; Merali, Z; Anisman, H

    2000-06-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) influence neuroendocrine activity, promote central neurotransmitter alterations, and induce a constellation of symptoms collectively referred to as sickness behaviors. These cytokines may also elicit anxiety and anhedonia, and have been associated with psychological disturbances in humans. In the present investigation, systemic IL-1beta and TNF-alpha dose-dependently and synergistically disrupted consumption of a highly palatable food source (chocolate milk), possibly reflecting anorexia or anhedonia engendered by the treatments. As well, these cytokines synergistically increased plasma corticosterone levels. Although IL-1beta and TNF-alpha provoked variations of amine turnover in the hypothalamus, locus coeruleus, and central amygdala, synergistic effects were not evident in this respect. Nevertheless, in view of the central amine variations induced by the cytokines, it is suggested that immune activation may come to influence complex behavioral processes, as well as affective state. PMID:10788757

  1. Association study of the interleukin-1 gene complex and tumor necrosis factor alpha gene with suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Pilar A; García-Portilla, Paz; Paredes, Begoña; Arango, Celso; Morales, Blanca; Alvarez, Victoria; Coto, Eliécer; Bascarán, María-Teresa; Bousoño, Manuel; Bobes, Julio

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the association between four functional polymorphisms in interleukin-1 (IL-1) [IL-1 alpha -889 C/T, IL-1 beta +3953 C/T, IL-1RA (86 bp)n] and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) (-308A/G) genes and suicide attempts. Distribution of the aforesaid polymorphisms was analyzed in 193 suicide attempters compared with 420 unrelated healthy controls from Asturias (Northern Spain). Genotypes were determined using standard methods. No significant differences were found in genotype or in allelic distribution of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-1RA, or TNFalpha gene polymorphisms. No relationship was found between genotypes and the impulsivity of the suicide attempt. Estimated IL-1 haplotype frequencies were similar in both groups (likelihood ratio test=13.26, df=14, P=0.506). Our data do not suggest that genetically determined changes in the IL-1 or TNFalpha genes confer increased susceptibility to suicidal behavior.

  2. An extraordinary form of the Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome successfully treated with the tumour necrosis factor-α blocker adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Juergen; Paulke, Alexander; Schacher, Beate; Noehte, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) is a rare granulomatous inflammatory disease characterised by the triad of orofacial oedema, facial nerve palsy and furrowed tongue. We describe the case of a 29-year-old patient suffering from an oligosymptomatic form of the disease with orofacial oedema, cobblestone pattern on the buccal mucosa and swelling of the tongue, accompanied by intermittent fatigue, influenza-like symptoms, intermittent tinnitus and acute hearing loss. An increase of several autoimmune-associated antibodies was also detected. Treatment with prednisolone, azathioprine or methotrexate failed to adequately control all symptoms in the long term. In the absence of a specific and well-established therapy for MRS, treatment with adalimumab was administered. Under adalimumab, total remission of all symptoms was achieved, indicating that tumour necrosis factor-α blockers are a promising therapeutic option for patients with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. PMID:24827666

  3. Identification of inflammatory factor TNFα inhibitor from medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hong; Wang, Yali; Jenson, A Bennett; Yan, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The inflammatory response is one of the first defenses our body has to fight against potential endangerments. It plays a critical role in host defense, clearing and slowing the infection in the case of microbial invasion. During an inflammatory response, a variety of cytokines are produced by cells and trigger or enhance the specific inflammation response. TNFα, one of these factors, plays a crucial role in many immune and inflammatory processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and cell survival. It acts in orchestrating the cytokine cascade and the major regulator of inflammatory cytokine production. Abnormality of TNFα signaling leads to many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn's disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Due to the importance of TNFα, regulating TNFα activity is a key to treat the related diseases. There is a long history of using medicinal herbs to treat diseases related to inflammation. We searched for an ingredient that has the ability to inhibit TNFα, we examined AO herbal extract, containing 10 individual herbs and most of these herbs have anti-inflammatory activity within humans. We have tested the anti-inflammatory ability of AO herbal extract on mice. Furthermore, we used macrophage cell from young mice and found that AO extract has the ability to reduce the inflammation by inhibiting TNFα level.

  4. Identification of inflammatory factor TNFα inhibitor from medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hong; Wang, Yali; Jenson, A Bennett; Yan, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The inflammatory response is one of the first defenses our body has to fight against potential endangerments. It plays a critical role in host defense, clearing and slowing the infection in the case of microbial invasion. During an inflammatory response, a variety of cytokines are produced by cells and trigger or enhance the specific inflammation response. TNFα, one of these factors, plays a crucial role in many immune and inflammatory processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and cell survival. It acts in orchestrating the cytokine cascade and the major regulator of inflammatory cytokine production. Abnormality of TNFα signaling leads to many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn's disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Due to the importance of TNFα, regulating TNFα activity is a key to treat the related diseases. There is a long history of using medicinal herbs to treat diseases related to inflammation. We searched for an ingredient that has the ability to inhibit TNFα, we examined AO herbal extract, containing 10 individual herbs and most of these herbs have anti-inflammatory activity within humans. We have tested the anti-inflammatory ability of AO herbal extract on mice. Furthermore, we used macrophage cell from young mice and found that AO extract has the ability to reduce the inflammation by inhibiting TNFα level. PMID:26778692

  5. Quantification of plasma factor XIIa-Cl(-)-inhibitor and kallikrein-Cl(-)-inhibitor complexes in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nuijens, J H; Huijbregts, C C; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Abbink, J J; Strack van Schijndel, R J; Felt-Bersma, R J; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1988-12-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that activation of the contact system of intrinsic coagulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. To monitor contact activation in patients with sepsis, we developed highly sensitive radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for factor XIIa-Cl(-)-inhibitor (Cl(-)-Inh) and kallikrein-Cl(-)-Inh complexes using a monoclonal antibody (MoAb Kok 12) that binds to a neodeterminant exposed on both complexed and cleaved Cl(-)-Inh. Plasma samples were serially collected from 48 patients admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe sepsis. Forty percent of patients on at least one occasion had increased levels of plasma factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh (greater than 5 x 10(-4) U/mL) and kallikrein-Cl(-)-Inh (greater than 25 x 10(-4) U/mL), that correlated at a molar ratio of approximately 1:3. Levels of factor XII antigen in plasma and both the highest as well as the levels on admission of plasma factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh in 23 patients with septic shock were lower than in 25 normotensive patients (P = .015: factor XII on admission; P = .04: highest factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh; P = .01: factor XIIa-Cl(-)-Inh on admission). No significant differences in plasma kallikrein-Cl(-)-Inh or prekallikrein antigen were found between these patients' groups. Elevated Cl(-)-Inh complex levels were measured less frequently in serial samples from patients with septic shock than in those from patients without shock (P less than .0001). Based on these results, we conclude that plasma Cl(-)-Inh complex levels during sepsis may not properly reflect the extent of contact activation.

  6. Lysosomal serine protease CLN2 regulates tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated apoptosis in a Bid-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Autefage, Hélène; Albinet, Virginie; Garcia, Virginie; Berges, Hortense; Nicolau, Marie-Laure; Therville, Nicole; Altié, Marie-Françoise; Caillaud, Catherine; Levade, Thierry; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie

    2009-04-24

    Apoptosis is a highly organized, energy-dependent program by which multicellular organisms eliminate damaged, superfluous, and potentially harmful cells. Although caspases are the most prominent group of proteases involved in the apoptotic process, the role of lysosomes has only recently been unmasked. This study investigated the role of the lysosomal serine protease CLN2 in apoptosis. We report that cells isolated from patients affected with late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) having a deficient activity of CLN2 are resistant to the toxic effect of death ligands such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), CD95 ligand, or tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but not to receptor-independent stress agents. CLN2-deficient cells exhibited a defect in TNF-induced Bid cleavage, release of cytochrome c, and caspase-9 and -3 activation. Moreover, extracts from CLN2-overexpressing cells or a CLN2 recombinant protein were able to catalyze the in vitro cleavage of Bid. Noteworthy, correction of the lysosomal enzyme defect of LINCL fibroblasts using a medium enriched in CLN2 protein enabled restoration of TNF-induced Bid and caspase-3 processing and toxicity. Conversely, transfection of CLN2-corrected cells with small interfering RNA targeting Bid abrogated TNF-induced cell death. Altogether, our study demonstrates that genetic deletion of the lysosomal serine protease CLN2 and the subsequent loss of its catalytic function confer resistance to TNF in non-neuronal somatic cells, indicating that CLN2 plays a yet unsuspected role in TNF-induced cell death. PMID:19246452

  7. Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein-3 protects zinc transporter 8 against proinflammatory cytokine-induced downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liqing; Zhang, Dongmei; Chen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is exclusively expressed in the pancreatic islet and is essential for insulin crystallization, hexamerization and secretion. Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein-3 (TNFAIP3) is a zinc finger protein that serves a major role in the negative feedback regulation of NF-κB signaling in response to multiple stimuli, and is a central regulator of immunopathology. Although the role of TNFAIP3 in diabetes has been extensively studied, its effect on ZnT8 has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to verify whether proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), are able to affect ZnT8 expression in islet cells. In addition, the study aimed to determine the effect of TNFAIP3 overexpression on cytokine-altered ZnT8 activity, considering its effect on NF-κB signaling. Cell-based studies using NIT-1 cells overexpressing TNFAIP3 were used to assess the effect of cytokines on ZnT8 and NF-κB activation, as well as the effect of TNFAIP3 on ZnT8 expression. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were employed to determine the protein expression and NF-κB activation, respectively. The results indicated that cytokine stimulation led to TNFAIP3 upregulation, ZnT8 downregulation and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TNFAIP3 overexpression protected ZnT8 from cytokine-induced downregulation. In conclusion, the current results suggest that inflammation or TNFAIP3 dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes via ZnT8 expression, besides from islet cell apoptosis. In addition, restricting inflammation and enhancing TNFAIP3 expression may exert a positive effect in diabetes prevention, treatment and pancreatic cell transplantation. PMID:27588072

  8. A nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 suppresses endothelin-1 production in cultured vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ohkita, Mamoru; Takaoka, Masanori; Shiota, Yasuko; Nojiri, Rumi; Sugii, Masato; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2002-05-01

    BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which prevents a step of the phosphorylation of inhibitory protein IkappaB bound to NF-kappaB, suppressed basal and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced prepro endothelin (ET)-1 mRNA expression and NF-kappaB activation in cultured vascular endothelial cells. BAY 11-7082 significantly decreased basal and TNF-alpha-induced ET-1 release from endothelial cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation contributes to the suppressive effect of BAY 11-7082 on ET-1 gene expression and ET-1 release, thereby suggesting that NF-kappaB plays an important role in the regulation of ET-1 production.

  9. Drug modulation of antigen-induced paw oedema in guinea-pigs: effects of lipopolysaccharide, tumour necrosis factor and leucocyte depletion.

    PubMed

    da Motta, J I; Cunha, F Q; Vargaftig, B B; Ferreira, S H

    1994-05-01

    1. In guinea-pigs previously sensitized with ovalbumin, the intra-plantar administration of the antigen induced dose-dependent and sustained oedema. An intense infiltrate of neutrophils and eosinophils was observed at the peak of the oedema (4 h). 2. Oedema induced by ovalbumin at the doses of 50 or 200 micrograms/paw was not inhibited by antihistamines (meclizine and cetirizine), a PAF antagonist (BN 50730), a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin), a lipoxygenase inhibitor (MK-886), a dual type lipo- and cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (NDGA), a bradykinin antagonist (Hoe 140) or the combination of cetirizine, MK-886, indomethacin and BN 50730. These drugs did inhibit paw oedema induced by their specific agonists or by carrageenin. These results suggest that histamine, PAF, prostaglandins, leukotrienes or bradykinin are not important in the development of immune paw oedema in guinea-pigs. 3. Dexamethasone (10 mg kg-1) inhibited oedema induced by ovalbumin (50 or 200 micrograms/paw, P < 0.05). This effect apparently does not result from inhibition of arachidonate metabolism, since indomethacin, MK-886 and NDGA were without effect. 4. Oedema induced by ovalbumin (50 or 200 micrograms/paw) was also inhibited by azelastine. This effect was not due to the anti-histaminic property of azelastine since two other potent-antihistamines, meclizine and cetirizine, were ineffective. 5. Intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependently inhibited the oedema induced by ovalbumin (200 micrograms/paw). This effect could not be attributed to hypotension or leucopenia since the maximal dose applied (81 micrograms kg-1) did not induce significant changes in the blood pressure or in the white blood cell levels of the animals. It is suggested that the effect of LPS is mediated by the endogenous release of cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). Murine TNF alpha dose dependently(9-81 microg kg-1) inhibited the paw oedema induced by ovalbumin.7. The anti

  10. Interleukin 1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulate autocrine amphiregulin expression and proliferation of human papillomavirus-immortalized and carcinoma-derived cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, C D; McMullin, E; Iglesias, M; Plowman, G D

    1995-01-01

    Infection with multiple sexually transmitted agents has been associated with inflammation of the cervix and an increased risk of cervical cancer in women infected with human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), inhibited proliferation of normal epithelial cells cultured from human cervix. In contrast, both cytokines significantly stimulated proliferation of cervical cell lines (5 of 7) immortalized by transfection with HPV-16 or -18 DNAs or lines derived from cervical carcinomas (7 of 11). Stimulation was dose dependent from 0.01 to 1.0 nM and was blocked by specific inhibitors, such as the IL-1 receptor antagonist or the TNF type 1 or 2 soluble receptors. Growth stimulation by IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha was accompanied by a 6- to 10-fold increase in RNA encoding amphiregulin, an epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligand. Recombinant human amphiregulin (0.1 nM) was as effective as IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha in promoting proliferation. Monoclonal antibodies that blocked signal transduction by the EGF receptor or that neutralized amphiregulin activity prevented mitogenic stimulation by IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha. These studies indicate that IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha stimulate proliferation of immortal and malignant cervical epithelial cells by an EGF receptor-dependent pathway requiring autocrine stimulation by amphiregulin. Furthermore, they suggest that chronic inflammation and release of proinflammatory cytokines might provide a selective growth advantage for abnormal cervical cells in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7708734

  11. Trichostatin A modulates thiazolidinedione-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor α-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Juu-Chin; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Wang, Chih-Tien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Chun-Ken; Wu, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In obesity, high levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) stimulate lipolysis in adipocytes, leading to hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), the insulin-sensitizing drugs, antagonize TNFα-induced lipolysis in adipocytes, thereby increasing insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients. The cellular target of TZDs is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor that controls many adipocyte functions. As a transcription factor, PPARγ is closely modulated by coregulators, which include coactivators and corepressors. Previous studies have revealed that in macrophages, the insulin-sensitizing effect of PPARγ may involve suppression of proinflammatory gene expression by recruiting the corepressor complex that contains corepressors and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Therefore, we investigated whether the corepressor complex is involved in TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Trichostatin A (TSA), a pan HDAC inhibitor (HDACI) that inhibits class I and II HDACs, was used to examine the involvement of HDACs in the actions of TZDs. TSA alone increased basal lipolysis and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis. Increased basal lipolysis may in part result from class I HDAC inhibition because selective class I HDACI treatment had similar results. However, attenuation of TZD-mediated TNFα antagonism may be specific to TSA and related hydroxamate-based HDACI rather than to HDAC inhibition. Consistently, corepressor depletion did not affect TZD-mediated suppression. Interestingly, TSA treatment greatly reduced PPARγ levels in differentiated adipocytes. Finally, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) mediated TNFα-induced lipolysis, and TZDs suppressed TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation. We determined that TSA increased basal ERK phosphorylation, and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation, consistent with TSA's effects

  12. Increased susceptibility to acute kidney injury due to endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice lacking tumor necrosis factor-α and its receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lianghu; Zhang, Ruihua; Wu, Jin; Chen, Jian; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Satlin, Lisa H; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeffrey M; Striker, Gary E; Tan, Jianming; Zheng, Feng

    2011-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is actively involved in acute organ injury. Since tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) plays a role in acute kidney injury, and induces ER stress and cell death in vitro, we examined the contribution of TNFα to acute kidney ER stress induced by tunicamycin. Contrary to expectation, tunicamycin caused much more severe kidney injury in TNFα-/- than in wild-type mice. The major site of kidney injury in TNFα-/- mice was proximal tubules, which showed extensive cell vacuolation, lipid accumulation, and apoptosis. Reconstitution of TNFα-/- mice with TNFα 24 h before tunicamycin injection reversed the susceptibility. When TNFα-receptor-deficient mice were treated with tunicamycin, severe renal injury developed in TNFR1-/- but not TNFR2-/- mice, suggesting this aspect of TNFα action was through TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1). In response to tunicamycin-induced acute ER stress, kidneys from neither TNFα-/- nor TNFR1-/- mice showed a significant increase in phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), a key step in ER stress regulation. Moreover, proximal tubular cells from TNFR1-/- mice did not show increased eIF2α phosphorylation in response to tunicamycin and were susceptible to ER stress-induced cell death. Finally, treatment of proximal tubule cells isolated from TNFR1-/- mice with an inhibitor of eIF2α phosphatase increased the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α and substantially reduced tunicamycin-induced cell death. Thus, disruption of TNFR1 signaling leads to dysregulation of eIF2α and increased susceptibility to acute ER stress injury in the kidney.

  13. Regulation of arterial-venous differences in tumor necrosis factor responsiveness of endothelial cells by anatomic context.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Kluger, Martin S; D'Alessio, Alessio; García-Cardeña, Guillermo; Pober, Jordan S

    2008-04-01

    We analyzed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) responses of human umbilical artery and vein endothelial cells (HUAECs and HUVECs) in organ and cell culture. In organ culture, TNF induced expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 on HUVECs but only ICAM-1 on HUAECs. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB, c-jun, and ATF2 by TNF was comparable in HUAECs and HUVECs, whereas binding of transcription factors and p300 co-activator to the E-selectin enhancer was lower in HUAECs compared to HUVECs. In cell culture, HUAECs rapidly acquired inducible E-selectin and VCAM-1 whereas ICAM-1 inducibility decreased. Culture of HUVECs rapidly decreased TNF responses of all three genes. By 72 hours in cell culture, TNF-treated HUVECs and HUAECs showed comparable adhesion molecule induction and transcription factor binding to the E-selectin enhancer. Freshly isolated HUAECs expressed higher levels of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) than HUVECs, consistent with greater KLF2 induction by arterial levels of shear stress in vitro. KLF2 expression decreased rapidly in both cell types during culture. Transduction of HUVECs with KLF2 reduced TNF-mediated induction of E-selectin and VCAM-1 while increasing ICAM-1 induction and reduced transcription factor/co-activator binding to the E-selectin enhancer. In conclusion, the differential responses of HUAECs and HUVECs to TNF in organ culture correlate with transcription factor/co-activator binding to DNA and converge during cell culture. Flow-induced expression of KLF2 contributes to the in situ responses of HUAECs but not of HUVECs. PMID:18292233

  14. Thrombospondin-4, tumour necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor Fn14: novel extracellular matrix modulating factors in cardiac remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Erja; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Rysä, Jaana

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac remodelling is defined as changes in the size, shape, and function of the heart, which are most commonly caused by hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial infarction. Both neurohumoral and inflammatory factors have critical roles in the regulation of cardiac remodelling. A characteristic feature of cardiac remodelling is modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM), often manifested by fibrosis, a process that has vital consequences for the structure and function of the myocardium. In addition to established modulators of the ECM, the matricellular protein thrombospondin-4 (TSP-4) as well as the tumour necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor Fn14 has been recently shown to modulate cardiac ECM. TSP-4 null mice develop pronounced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis with defects in collagen maturation in response to pressure overload. TWEAK and Fn14 belong to the tumour necrosis factor superfamily of proinflammatory cytokines. Recently it was shown that elevated levels of circulating TWEAK via Fn14 critically affect the cardiac ECM, characterized by increasing fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in mice. Here we review the literature concerning the role of matricellular proteins and inflammation in cardiac ECM remodelling, with a special focus on TSP-4, TWEAK, and its receptor Fn14.

  15. Participation of tumor necrosis factor in the mediation of gram negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced injury in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Mathison, J C; Wolfson, E; Ulevitch, R J

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages are induced by LPS to release a number of products that determine the host response during gram negative sepsis. To examine the role of one such substance, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), in mediating LPS-induced injury, we employed a rabbit model of endotoxic shock to (a) determine the kinetics and extent of release of TNF into plasma after injection of LPS, and (b) to evaluate the protective effect of in vivo neutralization of LPS-induced TNF by prior infusion of anti-TNF antibody. TNF was maximally induced 45-100 min after injection of 10 micrograms i.v. parent Salmonella minnesota Re595 LPS or 250 micrograms Re595 LPS-HDL complexes. Maximal induction of TNF by LPS was associated with development of hypotension, focal hepatic necrosis, intravascular fibrin deposition and lethality. Based on (a) the peak levels of TNF observed in serum, 2.5 X 10(3) U/ml, (b) the specific activity of purified rabbit macrophage-derived TNF, 1 X 10(8) U/mg, and (c) the biphasic disappearance of intravenously injected purified TNF (t1/2 = 0.5 min, 11 min) we constructed a kinetic model showing that at least 130 micrograms of TNF (1.3 X 10(7) U) was released into plasma 30-200 min postinjection of LPS. Prior infusion of anti-TNF antibody (30-45 min before LPS injection) resulted in neutralization of the LPS-induced serum TNF activity and provided significant protection from the development of hypotension, fibrin deposition, and lethality. Thus, these results provide further evidence that TNF plays a central role mediating the pathophysiologic changes that occur during gram negative endotoxic shock. Images PMID:3384955

  16. Characterization of specific high affinity receptors for human tumor necrosis factor on mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, P.E.; Hotchkiss, A.; Mohler, M.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1985-10-05

    Mouse L-929 fibroblasts, an established line of cells, are very sensitive to lysis by human lymphotoxin (hTNF-beta). Specific binding of a highly purified preparation of hTNF-beta to these cells was examined. Recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was radiolabeled with (TH)propionyl succinimidate at the lysine residues of the molecule to a specific activity of 200 microCi/nmol of protein. (TH)hTNF-beta was purified by high performance gel permeation chromatography and the major fraction was found to be monomeric by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The labeled hTNF-beta was fully active in causing lysis of L-929 fibroblasts and bound specifically to high affinity binding sites on these cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 6.7 X 10(-11) M and a capacity of 3200 binding sites/cell. Unlabeled recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was found to be approximately 5-fold more effective competitive inhibitor of binding than the natural hTNF-beta. The binding of hTNF-beta to these mouse fibroblasts was also correlated with the ultimate cell lysis. Neutralizing polyclonal antibodies to hTNF-beta efficiently inhibited the binding of (TH)hTNF-beta to the cells. The authors conclude that the specific high affinity binding site is the receptor for hTNF-beta and may be involved in lysis of cells.

  17. Identification of a novel cyclosporin-sensitive element in the human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine with pleiotropic biological effects, is produced by a variety of cell types in response to induction by diverse stimuli. In this paper, TNF-alpha mRNA is shown to be highly induced in a murine T cell clone by stimulation with T cell receptor (TCR) ligands or by calcium ionophores alone. Induction is rapid, does not require de novo protein synthesis, and is completely blocked by the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA). We have identified a human TNF-alpha promoter element, kappa 3, which plays a key role in the calcium-mediated inducibility and CsA sensitivity of the gene. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, an oligonucleotide containing kappa 3 forms two DNA protein complexes with proteins that are present in extracts from unstimulated T cells. These complexes appear in nuclear extracts only after T cell stimulation. Induction of the inducible nuclear complexes is rapid, independent of protein synthesis, and blocked by CsA, and thus, exactly parallels the induction of TNF-alpha mRNA by TCR ligands or by calcium ionophore. Our studies indicate that the kappa 3 binding factor resembles the preexisting component of nuclear factor of activated T cells. Thus, the TNF-alpha gene is an immediate early gene in activated T cells and provides a new model system in which to study CsA-sensitive gene induction in activated T cells. PMID:8376940

  18. RAC1 regulate tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated impaired osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guijuan; Shen, Qijie; Lian, Min; Gu, Zhifeng; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Li, Liren; Huang, Shen; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Jinlong; Shi, Jiahai; Zhang, Dongmei; Feng, Xingmei

    2015-09-01

    Human dental pulp contains a rapidly proliferative subpopulation of precursor cells termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) that show self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, including neurogenic, chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic. We previously reported that tomuor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (10 ng/mL) triggered osteogenic differentiation of human DPSCs via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. While previous studies showed that cells treated with TNF-α at higher concentrations showed decreased osteogenic differentiation capability. In this study we analyze the function of TNF-α (100 ng/mL) on osteogenic differentiation of human DPSCs for the first time and identify the underlying molecule mechanisms. Our data revealed that TNF-α with higher concentration significantly reduced mineralization and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Further, we revealed that TNF-α could suppress the osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs via increasing the expression of RAC1, which could activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and liberate β-catenin to translocate into the nucleus. Genetic silencing of RAC1 expression using siRNA restored osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Our findings may provide a potential approach to bone regeneration in inflammatory microenvironments.

  19. Propanil inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by reducing nuclear levels of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappab in the macrophage cell line ic-21.

    PubMed

    Frost, L L; Neeley, Y X; Schafer, R; Gibson, L F; Barnett, J B

    2001-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an essential proinflammatory cytokine whose production is normally stimulated by bacterial cell wall components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during an infection. Macrophages stimulated with LPS in vitro produce several cytokines, including TNF-alpha. LPS-stimulated primary mouse macrophages produced less TNF-alpha protein and message after treatment with the herbicide propanil (Xie et al., Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 145, 184-191, 1997). Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) tightly regulates TNF-alpha transcription. Therefore, as a step toward understanding the mechanism of the effect of propanil on TNF-alpha transcription, IC-21 cells were transfected with a TNF-alpha promoter-luciferase construct, and the effect of propanil on luciferase activity was measured. Cells transfected with promoter constructs containing a kappaB site showed decreased luciferase activity relative to controls after propanil treatment. These observations implicated NF-kappaB binding as an intracellular target of propanil. Further studies demonstrated a marked reduction in the nuclear levels of the stimulatory p65 subunit of NF-kappaB after propanil treatment, as measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. The p50 subunit of NF-kappaB was not found to be reduced after propanil exposure by Western blot. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays showed decreased DNA binding of both p65/p50 heterodimers and p50/p50 homodimers to the kappaB3 site of the TNF-alpha promoter of propanil-treated cells. The marked reduction in nuclear p65/p50 NF-kappaB levels and diminished binding to the TNF-alpha promoter in propanil-treated cells are consistent with reduced TNF-alpha levels induced by LPS. PMID:11312646

  20. Attenuation of Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Fibrosis by Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antibody.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Verissimo, Vivianne L; Cervelli, Jessica A; Vayas, Kinal N; Hall, LeRoy; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes acute injury to the lung that progresses to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a prominent infiltration of macrophages into the lung and upregulation of proinflammatory/profibrotic cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of anti-TNFα antibody to mitigate NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody (15 mg/kg, iv, every 9 days) beginning 30 min after intratracheal administration of NM (0.125 mg/kg) reduced progressive histopathologic alterations in the lung including perivascular and peribronchial edema, macrophage/monocyte infiltration, interstitial thickening, bronchiolization of alveolar walls, fibrin deposition, emphysema, and fibrosis. NM-induced damage to the alveolar-epithelial barrier, measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and cell content, was also reduced by anti-TNFα antibody, along with expression of the oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1. Whereas the accumulation of proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages in the lung in response to NM was suppressed by anti-TNFα antibody, anti-inflammatory/profibrotic M2 macrophages were increased or unchanged. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody also reduced NM-induced increases in expression of the profibrotic mediator, transforming growth factor-β. This was associated with a reduction in NM-induced collagen deposition in the lung. These data suggest that inhibiting TNFα may represent an efficacious approach to mitigating lung injury induced by mustards.

  1. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  2. Analysis of the mechanisms involved in the stimulation of neutrophil apoptosis by tumour necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Gabriela; Trevani, Analía; Martínez, Diego; Vermeulen, Mónica; Gamberale, Romina; Fernández-Calotti, Paula; Raiden, Silvina; Giordano, Mirta; Geffner, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that human neutrophils pretreated with tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then exposed to a variety of agents such as immune complexes, zymosan, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), C5a, fMLP, or granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), undergo a dramatic stimulation of apoptosis, suggesting that TNF-α is able to prime an apoptotic death programme which can be rapidly triggered by different stimuli. We report here that this response involves the participation of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), is dependent on caspases 3, 8 and 9, and is associated with both a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and a down-regulation in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Interestingly, we also found that the anti-apoptotic cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) improves the ability of TNF-α to promote apoptosis, supporting the notion than TNF-α, acting together with IL-1, may favour the depletion of neutrophils from the inflammatory areas during the course of acute inflammation. PMID:15500622

  3. Tumor necrosis factor-α -308G/A gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    El Sissy, Maha H; El Sissy, A H; Elanwary, Sherif

    2014-07-01

    Immune thrombocytope