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Sample records for necrosis factor therapy

  1. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Segal, Barbara; Rhodus, Nelson L; Patel, Ketan

    2008-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation involving large and small joints. Systemic manifestations as well as involvement of paraoral tissues contribute to morbidity. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in RA by amplifying inflammation in multiple pathways that lead to joint destruction. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors were first licensed for clinical use in 1998; 3 have been approved for the treatment of RA: Iinfliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab. The purpose of this paper is to review the pathogenesis of RA, the state of the art of therapy, and the most current information on the safety and efficacy of TNF inhibitors for treatment of RA.

  2. Targeted Cancer Therapy with Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Kerner, Zachary J.; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a member of the TNF superfamily, was the first cytokine to be evaluated for cancer biotherapy. However, the clinical use of TNF-α is severely limited by its toxicity. Currently, TNF-α is administered only through locoregional drug delivery systems such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated hepatic perfusion. To reduce the systemic toxicity of TNF-α, various strategies have been explored over the last several decades. This review summarizes current state-of-the-art targeted cancer therapy using TNF-α. Passive targeting, cell-based therapy, gene therapy with inducible or tissue-specific promoters, targeted polymer-DNA complexes, tumor pre-targeting, antibody-TNF-α conjugate, scFv/TNF-α fusion proteins, and peptide/TNF-α fusion proteins have all been investigated to combat cancer. Many of these agents are already in advanced clinical trials. Molecular imaging, which can significantly speed up the drug development process, and nanomedicine, which can integrate both imaging and therapeutic components, has the potential to revolutionize future cancer patient management. Cooperative efforts from scientists within multiple disciplines, as well as close partnerships among many organizations/entities, are needed to quickly translate novel TNF-α-based therapeutics into clinical investigation. PMID:24115841

  3. PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS OF TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-TARGETED THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Krishna; Wu, Peggy; Rhew, Elisa J.; Yeldandi, Anjana K; Kamp, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-targeted therapies are increasingly being prescribed in the management of a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The use of this class of medications also pose risks of developing an assortment of pulmonary side effects including infections (TB, bacterial, and fungal infections), pulmonary nodules, chronic pneumonitis/fibrosis, SLE-like reactions, vasculitis, and exacerbations of underlying lung disease. In addition to surveillance for tuberculosis prior to initiation of TNF-targeted therapy, a high level of vigilance should be maintained during administration for infectious and non-infectious complications, even years into a patient’s course. The available evidence argues for caution in using these agents in patients with pre-existing lung disease and heightened suspicion of accelerated nodule formation in those with preexisting rheumatoid nodules. Management centers on excluding infection, identifying confounders (especially methotrexate or pre-existing lung disease), and promptly discontinuing TNF-targeted therapy. In some instances, invasive procedures (e.g. bronchoscopy or VATS lung biopsy) will be necessary to establish the proper diagnosis, and the administration of steroids may be beneficial. PMID:19201589

  4. Kinetics of tumor necrosis factor production by photodynamic-therapy-activated macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pass, Harvey I.; Evans, Steven; Perry, Roger; Matthews, Wilbert

    1990-07-01

    The ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to activate macrophages and produce cytokines, specifically tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is unknown. Three day thioglycolate elicited macrophages were incubated with 25 ug/mi Photofrin II (P11) for 2 hour, after which they were subjected to 630 nm light with fluences of 0-1800 J/m. The amount of TNF produced in the system as well as macrophage viability was measured 1, 3, 6, and 18 hours after POT. The level of TNF produced by the macrophages was significantly elevated over control levels 6 hours after POT and the absolute level of tumor necrosis factor production was influenced by the treatment energy and the resulting macrophage cytotoxicity. These data suggest that POT therapy induced cytotoxicity in vivo may be amplified by macrophage stimulation to secrete cytokines and these cytokines may also participate in other direct/indirect photodynamic therapy effects, i.e. immunosuppression, vascular effects.

  5. Type I pityriasis rubra pilaris: upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and response to adalimumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao-Hua; Zhou, Youwen; Ball, Nigel; Su, Ming-Wan; Xu, Jin-Hua; Zheng, Zhi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) has unknown etiology and is often refractory to conventional therapies. to document a PRP patient's response to adalimumab therapy and to highlight the potential role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the development of PRP skin lesions. a patient received adalimumab therapy at standard dosing intervals. In addition, the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of TNF in the lesional and perilesional normal skin was quantified in two patients with PRP. the patient responded to adalimumab therapy and achieved clinical remission by 4 months. There was a significant elevation of TNF mRNA in the lesional skin of PRP. TNF upregulation is detected in PRP lesional skin, consistent with the observed clinical efficacy of TNF blockade for the treatment of PRP.

  6. Indicators of suboptimal tumor necrosis factor antagonist therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, James O; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Gisbert, Javier P; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Smyth, Michael; Patel, Haridarshan

    2017-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is refractory to treatment in one-half of patients. To evaluate the occurrence of suboptimal therapy among patients with IBD treated with tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNFs). A multinational chart review in Europe and Canada was conducted among IBD patients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) who initiated anti-TNF therapy between 2009 and 2013. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of suboptimal therapy during a two-year follow-up period, defined by the presence of the following indicators: dose escalation, discontinuation, switching, non-biologic therapy escalation, or surgery. The study included 1195 anti-TNF initiators (538 UC and 657 CD). The majority of patients (64% of UC and 58% of CD) had at least one indicator of suboptimal therapy. The median time to suboptimal therapy indicator was 12.5 and 17.5 months for UC and CD patients, respectively. Among the 111 UC and 174 CD anti-TNF switchers, 51% and 56% had an indicator of suboptimal therapy, respectively. The median time to suboptimal therapy indicator with the second anti-TNF was 14.3 and 13.0 months for UC and CD patients, respectively. The majority of IBD patients showed suboptimal therapy with current anti-TNFs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Alopecia secondary to anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Rego, Juliana Carlos Gonçalves; Estrada, Bruna Duque; Bastos, Paula Raso; Piñeiro Maceira, Juan Manuel; Sodré, Celso Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs represent a substantial progress in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immunologic diseases. However, its crescent use has revealed seldom reported or unknown adverse reactions, mainly associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Psoriasiform cutaneous reactions and few cases of alopecia can occur in some patients while taking these drugs. Two cases of alopecia were reported after anti-TNF therapy. Both also developed psoriasiform lesions on the body. This is the second report about a new entity described as 'anti-TNF therapy-related alopecia', which combines clinical and histopathological features of both alopecia areata and psoriatic alopecia. The recognition of these effects by specialists is essential for the proper management and guidance of these patients. PMID:25830994

  8. Alopecia secondary to anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Rego, Juliana Carlos Gonçalves; Estrada, Bruna Duque; Bastos, Paula Raso; Piñeiro Maceira, Juan Manuel; Sodré, Celso Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs represent a substantial progress in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immunologic diseases. However, its crescent use has revealed seldom reported or unknown adverse reactions, mainly associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Psoriasiform cutaneous reactions and few cases of alopecia can occur in some patients while taking these drugs. Two cases of alopecia were reported after anti-TNF therapy. Both also developed psoriasiform lesions on the body. This is the second report about a new entity described as 'anti-TNF therapy-related alopecia', which combines clinical and histopathological features of both alopecia areata and psoriatic alopecia. The recognition of these effects by specialists is essential for the proper management and guidance of these patients.

  9. Histoplasmosis complicating tumor necrosis factor-α blocker therapy: a retrospective analysis of 98 cases.

    PubMed

    Vergidis, Paschalis; Avery, Robin K; Wheat, L Joseph; Dotson, Jennifer L; Assi, Maha A; Antoun, Smyrna A; Hamoud, Kassem A; Burdette, Steven D; Freifeld, Alison G; McKinsey, David S; Money, Mary E; Myint, Thein; Andes, David R; Hoey, Cynthia A; Kaul, Daniel A; Dickter, Jana K; Liebers, David E; Miller, Rachel A; Muth, William E; Prakash, Vidhya; Steiner, Frederick T; Walker, Randall C; Hage, Chadi A

    2015-08-01

    Histoplasmosis may complicate tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blocker therapy. Published case series provide limited guidance on disease management. We sought to determine the need for long-term antifungal therapy and the safety of resuming TNF-α blocker therapy after successful treatment of histoplasmosis. We conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 98 patients diagnosed with histoplasmosis between January 2000 and June 2011. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate risk factors for severe disease. The most commonly used biologic agent was infliximab (67.3%). Concomitant corticosteroid use (odds ratio [OR], 3.94 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.06-14.60]) and higher urine Histoplasma antigen levels (OR, 1.14 [95% CI, 1.03-1.25]) were found to be independent predictors of severe disease. Forty-six (47.4%) patients were initially treated with an amphotericin B formulation for a median duration of 2 weeks. Azole treatment was given for a median of 12 months. TNF-α blocker therapy was initially discontinued in 95 of 98 (96.9%) patients and later resumed in 25 of 74 (33.8%) patients at a median of 12 months (range, 1-69 months). The recurrence rate was 3.2% at a median follow-up period of 32 months. Of the 3 patients with recurrence, 2 had restarted TNF-α blocker therapy, 1 of whom died. Mortality rate was 3.2%. In this study, disease outcomes were generally favorable. Discontinuation of antifungal treatment after clinical response and an appropriate duration of therapy, probably at least 12 months, appears safe if pharmacologic immunosuppression has been held. Resumption of TNF-α blocker therapy also appears safe, assuming that the initial antifungal therapy was administered for 12 months. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Drug insight: Anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy for inflammatory arthropathies during reproduction, pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Skomsvoll, Johan F; Wallenius, Marianne; Koksvik, Hege S; Rødevand, Erik; Salvesen, Kjell A; Spigset, Olav; Kvien, Tore K

    2007-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists are widely used to reduce disease activity and joint damage, and to improve health-related quality of life in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or psoriatic arthritis. To date, no increased risk of embryotoxicity or teratogenicity, or adverse pregnancy outcome (such as birth defects, premature birth, and low birth weight) has been reported in patients with inflammatory arthropathies treated with anti-TNF therapy, compared with the general population. However, the available data are limited, and methotrexate, which is commonly used in combination with anti-TNF drugs, is teratogenic. Until more data are available, no firm conclusions can be reached regarding the safety of anti-TNF therapy in pregnancy. Nevertheless, in selected cases where there is high disease activity, anti-TNF therapy might be recommended, depending on the results of individual risk-benefit analyses. Fully informed consent from the mother is needed in such cases. Anti-TNF agents are not usually used during lactation, although the risk of toxicity is probably negligible.

  11. A prospective study of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in South African rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Pettipher, Clive; Rudolph, Riana; Musenge, Eustasius; Tikly, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    To quantify primary and secondary anti-tumour necrosis factor inadequate response (aTNF-IR) and intolerance in South Africans with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 1 year. Rheumatologists from nine independent private practices monitored RA patients commencing on aTNF therapy (incident cases) or already on aTNF therapy (prevalent cases). Observations at baseline and quarterly intervals recorded discontinuation of therapy for either lack of response or adverse effects. Of the 98 patients screened, 86 were eligible to participate. Mean time from onset of symptoms of RA to start of aTNF treatment was 9.7 years (range: 0.5-32 years). Only 58 (67.4%) continued on aTNF therapy at 12 months, including five judged to have an aTNF-IR. Overall 12 patients had a secondary aTNF-IR with seven discontinuing for this reason. Seven patients discontinued due to adverse events, four due to funding problems and 10 were lost to follow-up. Infections were the most common adverse events, but only two stopped treatment as a result. No cases of active tuberculosis (TB) were recorded, despite nine patients having a positive tuberculin skin test and one, a past history of pulmonary TB. Almost a third of patients discontinued aTNF therapy over the 1-year period, with infections and inadequate response to treatment being the main reasons for discontinuation. The study highlights the need for biologics with alternative modes of action for patients with moderate to severe RA in South Africa. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy and fetal risk: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni, Renée M; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (anti-TNFs) are effective in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) recalcitrant to conventional medical therapy. As the peak incidence of IBD overlaps with the prime reproductive years, it is crucial to establish pharmacologic regimens for women of childbearing age that achieve effective disease control without posing significant fetal harm. A systematic literature review was performed to identify all human studies with birth outcomes data after maternal exposure to infliximab, adalimumab, or certolizumab pegol within 3 mo of conception or during any trimester of pregnancy. Live births, spontaneous abortions or stillbirths, preterm or premature births, low birth weight or small for gestational age infants, and congenital abnormalities were recorded. Fifty selected references identified 472 pregnancy exposures. The subsequent review includes general information regarding anti-TNF therapy in pregnancy followed by a summary of our findings. The benefits of biologic modalities in optimizing disease control during pregnancy must be weighed against the potential toxicity of drug exposure on the developing fetus. Although promising overall, there is insufficient evidence to prove absolute safety for use of anti-TNFs during pregnancy given the limitations of available data and lack of controlled trials. PMID:23674866

  13. Dysregulation of innate immunity in ulcerative colitis patients who fail anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Angela C; Mallon, Dominic; Radford-Smith, Graham; Boyer, Julien; Piche, Thierry; Prescott, Susan L; Lawrance, Ian C; Tulic, Meri K

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the innate immune function in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients who fail to respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. METHODS Effects of anti-TNF therapy, inflammation and medications on innate immune function were assessed by measuring peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine expression from 18 inflammatory bowel disease patients pre- and 3 mo post-anti-TNF therapy. Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and cytokine production post TLR stimulation was assessed in UC “responders” (n = 12) and “non-responders” (n = 12) and compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in blood to assess disease severity/activity and inflammation. Pro-inflammatory (TNF, IL-1β, IL-6), immuno-regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, IFNγ) and Th2 (IL-9, IL-13, IL-17A) cytokine expression was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while TLR cellular composition and intracellular signalling was assessed with FACS. RESULTS Prior to anti-TNF therapy, responders and non-responders had similar level of disease severity and activity. PBMC’s ability to respond to TLR stimulation was not affected by TNF therapy, patient’s severity of the disease and inflammation or their medication use. At baseline, non-responders had elevated innate but not adaptive immune responses compared to responders (P < 0.05). Following TLR stimulation, non-responders had consistently reduced innate cytokine responses to all TLRs compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01) and diminished TNF (P < 0.001) and IL-1β (P < 0.01) production compared to responders. This innate immune dysfunction was associated with reduced number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) (P < 0.01) but increased number of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) (P = 0.03) as well as intracellular accumulation of IRAK4 in non-responders following TLR-2, -4 and -7 activation (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Reduced innate immunity in

  14. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) increases circulating osteoclast (OC) precursors numbers by promoting their proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNF inhibitors (TNFi) on the differentiation and activity of OC in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods. Seventeen RA patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers, in vitro OC differentiation assays, and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes was performed. Results. After TNFi therapy, patients had reduced RANKL surface expression in B-lymphocytes and the frequency of circulating classical CD14brightCD16− monocytes was decreased. Serum levels of sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and CTX-I were reduced in RA patients after TNFi treatment. Moreover, after exposure to TNFi, osteoclast differentiation and activity were decreased, as well as the expression of TRAF6 and cathepsin K. Conclusion. We propose that TNFi arrests bone loss and erosion, through two pathways: direct reduction of osteoclast precursor numbers and inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways acting through TRAF6. PMID:28286757

  15. Safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Androulakis, Ioannis; Zavos, Christos; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mastorakos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease has significantly improved since the introduction of biological agents, such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab. The Food and Drug Administration has classified these factors in category B, which means that they do not demonstrate a fetal risk. However, during pregnancy fetuses are exposed to high anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels that are measurable in their plasma after birth. Since antibodies can transfer through the placenta at the end of the second and during the third trimesters, it is important to know the safety profile of these drugs, particularly for the fetus, and whether maintaining relapse of the disease compensates for the potential risks of fetal exposure. The limited data available for the anti-TNF drugs to date have not demonstrated any significant adverse outcomes in the pregnant women who continued their therapy from conception to the first trimester of gestation. However, data suggest that anti-TNFs should be discontinued during the third trimester, as they may affect the immunological system of the newborn baby. Each decision should be individualized, based on the distinct characteristics of the patient and her disease. Considering all the above, there is a need for more clinical studies regarding the effect of anti-TNF therapeutic agents on pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26715803

  16. What is left when anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases fails?

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic incurable conditions that primarily present in young patients. Being incurable, the IBDs may be part of the patient’s life for many years and these conditions require therapies that will be effective over the long-term. Surgery in Crohn’s disease does not cure the disease with endoscopic recurrent in up to 70% of patients 1 year post resection. This means that, the patient will require many years of medications and the goal of the treating physician is to induce and maintain long-term remission without side effects. The development of the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) agents has been a magnificent clinical advance in IBD, but they are not always effective, with loss of response overtime and, at times, discontinuation is required secondary to side effects. So what options are available if of the anti-TNFα agents can no longer be used? This review aims to provide other options for the physician, to remind them of the older established medications like azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate, the less established medications like mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus as well as newer therapeutic options like the anti-integins, which block the trafficking of leukocytes into the intestinal mucosa. The location of the intestinal inflammation must also be considered, as topical therapeutic agents may also be worthwhile to consider in the long-term management of the more challenging IBD patient. The more options that are available the more likely the patient will be able to have tailored therapy to treat their disease and a better long-term outcome. PMID:24574799

  17. What is left when anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases fails?

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-02-07

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic incurable conditions that primarily present in young patients. Being incurable, the IBDs may be part of the patient's life for many years and these conditions require therapies that will be effective over the long-term. Surgery in Crohn's disease does not cure the disease with endoscopic recurrent in up to 70% of patients 1 year post resection. This means that, the patient will require many years of medications and the goal of the treating physician is to induce and maintain long-term remission without side effects. The development of the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) agents has been a magnificent clinical advance in IBD, but they are not always effective, with loss of response overtime and, at times, discontinuation is required secondary to side effects. So what options are available if of the anti-TNFα agents can no longer be used? This review aims to provide other options for the physician, to remind them of the older established medications like azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate, the less established medications like mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus as well as newer therapeutic options like the anti-integins, which block the trafficking of leukocytes into the intestinal mucosa. The location of the intestinal inflammation must also be considered, as topical therapeutic agents may also be worthwhile to consider in the long-term management of the more challenging IBD patient. The more options that are available the more likely the patient will be able to have tailored therapy to treat their disease and a better long-term outcome.

  18. Leishmaniasis, Autoimmune Rheumatic Disease, and Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Xynos, Ioannis D.; Tektonidou, Maria G.; Pikazis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    We report 2 cases of leishmaniasis in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in Greece. To assess trends in leishmaniasis reporting in this patient population, we searched the literature for similar reports from Europe. Reports increased during 2004–2008, especially for patients treated with anti–tumor necrosis factor agents. PMID:19523302

  19. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  20. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy and periodontal parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Yaniv; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra; Machtei, Eli E

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) therapy on the clinical and immunologic parameters of the periodontium. Ten patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who routinely received infusions of infliximab, 200 mg (RA+), 10 patients with RA without anti-TNF-alpha therapy (RA-), and 10 healthy controls (C) were included. Clinical parameters, including the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (AL), and bleeding on probing (BOP), were assessed, and total gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) TNF-alpha level was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis of variance with Scheffe modification and the Pearson correlation test were used for statistical analysis. The ages of the patients ranged from 22 to 76 years (mean, 50.73 +/- 9.1 years). The mean PI was similar among the groups. However, mean inflammatory parameters in the three groups varied significantly; GI was greater in the RA- group compared to RA+ and C groups (P = 0.0042). The RA+ group exhibited less BOP than RA- and C groups (21.1% +/- 3.0%, 45.9% +/- 6.2%, and 39.1% +/- 7.2%, respectively; P = 0.0146). The mean PD in the RA+ group was shallower than in RA- and C groups (3.22 +/- 0.13 mm, 3.85 +/- 0.22 mm, and 3.77 +/- 0.20 mm, respectively; P = 0.055). Clinical AL in the RA+ group was lower than in RA- and C groups (3.68 +/- 0.11 mm, 4.52 +/- 0.26 mm, and 4.35 +/- 0.24 mm, respectively; P = 0.0273). TNF-alpha levels in the GCF of the RA+ group were the lowest compared to RA- and C groups (0.663, 1.23, and 0.949 ng/site, respectively; P = 0.0401). A significant positive correlation was found between TNF-alpha levels in the GCF and clinical AL (r = 0.448; P = 0.0283). Patients with RA receiving anti-TNF-alpha medication had lower periodontal indices and GCF TNF-alpha levels. Thus, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines might prove beneficial in suppressing periodontal diseases.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  2. Pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis: efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a patient with a simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and axial spondyloarthritis. This condition differs from both the PASH (pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and suppurative hidradenitis) syndrome, in which arthritis is absent, and the PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome, in which suppurative hidradenitis is lacking. Our patient failed to respond to etanercept therapy, whereas all dermatologic and rheumatic manifestations completely regressed following infliximab infusion. We therefore propose that simultaneous presence of pyoderma gangrenosum, acne conglobata, suppurative hidradenitis, and seronegative spondyloarthritis might represent a distinct syndrome that could be termed the PASS syndrome. Tumor necrosis factor α therapies seem to play selective roles.

  3. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  4. Adverse events of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiang; Cai, Qing; de Mooij, Tristan; Xu, Xia; Dai, Shengming; Qu, Wenchun; Zhao, Dongbao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence of short-term and long-term adverse events associated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) blocker treatment in Chinese Han patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study included 402 Chinese Han AS patients treated with TNF-α blockers. Baseline data was collected. All patients were monitored for adverse events 2 hours following administration. Long-term treatment was evaluated at 8, 12, 52 and 104 weeks follow-up for 172 patients treated with TNF-α blockers. Short-term adverse events occurred in 20.15% (81/402), including rash (3.5%; 14/402), pruritus (1.2%; 5/402), nausea (2.2%; 9/402), headache (0.7%; 3/402), skin allergies (4.0%; 16/402), fever (0.5%; 2/402), palpitations (3.0%; 12/402), dyspnea (0.5%; 2/402), chest pain (0.2%; 1/402), [corrected] abdominal pain (1.0%; 4/402), hypertension (2.2%; 9/402), papilledema (0.5%; 2/402), laryngeal edema (0.2%; 1/402) and premature ventricular contraction (0.2%; 1/402). Long-term adverse events occurred in 59 (34.3%; 59/172) patients, including pneumonia (7.6%; 13/172), urinary tract infections (9.9%; 17/172), otitis media (4.7%; 8/172), tuberculosis are (3.5%; 6/172) [corrected], abscess (1.2%; 2/172), oral candidiasis (0.6%; 1/172), elevation of transaminase (1.7%; 3/172), anemia (1.2%; 2/172), hematuresis (0.6%; 1/172), constipation (2.3%; 4/172), weight loss (0.6%; 1/172), exfoliative dermatitis (0.6%; 1/172). CRP, ESR and disease duration were found to be associated with an increased risk of immediate and long-term adverse events (P<0.05). Long-term treatment with Infliximab was associated with more adverse events than rhTNFR-Fc (P<0.01). This study reports on the prevalence of adverse events in short-term and long-term treatment with TNF-α blocker monotherapy in Chinese Han AS patients. Duration of disease, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and c-reactive protein serum levels were found to be associated with increased adverse events with anti

  5. Anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy inhibits lung metastasis in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Naito, Yohei; Kato, Sho; Nakagawa, Taro; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone, and patients often develop pulmonary metastases. In a previous study, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α treatment of human osteosarcoma cells increases their metastatic ability in an animal model. TNF-α can act as a tumor necrosis factor and also as a tumor-promoting factor. In the present study, the effect of a TNF-α inhibitor on osteosarcoma aggressiveness and pulmonary metastases was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The effect of infliximab, a TNF-α inhibitor, on a metastatic osteosarcoma 143B cell growth and motility was investigated in vitro. An orthotopic xenograft model of 143B cell growth and spontaneous metastasis in SCID mice was used to assess the in vivo effect of infliximab. Infliximab greatly reduced cell motility and pulmonary metastases in 143B cells. The mechanism of pulmonary metastasis inhibition involved decreased expression of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), Rho (small GTPase protein), and its effector. These results suggest a novel role for TNF-α inhibition in the reduction or prevention of pulmonary metastases of osteosarcoma in this animal model. TNF-α inhibition may become a preventive therapeutic option for the pulmonary metastases of osteosarcoma. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Sequence dependence of administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2 in murine tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Gauny, S; Chan, A; Landre, P; Winkelhake, J L

    1989-02-01

    Simultaneous administration of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) has been shown to block tumor take in murine models. We investigated the effects of sequence and schedule of administration as a function of tumor burden with two tumor models (B16 and Meth A). rhTNF followed by rhIL-2 had extraordinary antitumor efficacy, but rhIL-2 followed by rhTNF was much less effective. Sequential rhTNF/rhIL-2 therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in only reduced growth rate. Experiments with genetically immunodeficient mice suggested that T cell factors may be required for synergistic antitumor activity.

  7. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  8. Importance of tuberculosis screening before inhibiting tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    García-López, A; Burgueño-Montañés, C

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of tuberculosis infection in recent years, due to the increasing use of drugs inhibiting tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNFα) in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. We report the case of a male patient being treated with infliximab (anti-TNFα) who developed disseminated tuberculosis with ocular involvement. It is very important to conduct a proper screening to detect patients at risk for tuberculosis before starting treatment with these drugs. For this purpose, the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold in Tube (Interferon Gamma Release Assay, IGRA) is presented as an alternative screening test with high sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy and rehabilitation for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Amato, Giorgio; Benucci, Maurizio; Cavazzana, Ilaria; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ciancio, Giovanni; D Alessandro, Giuseppe; Angelis, Rossella De; Lupoli, Salvatore; Lurati, Alfredo Maria; Naclerio, Caterina; Russo, Romualdo; Semeraro, Angelo; Tomietto, Paola; Zuccaro, Carmelo; De Marco, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    To systematically review the evidence for a synergistic effect of combining rehabilitation with biological anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Data were analysed to identify the most effective rehabilitation programmes, the best endpoints for effectiveness, and patient subgroups most likely to benefit from combination therapy. Systematic MEDLINE and Embase searches were performed to identify studies evaluating rehabilitation programmes and biological therapy in patients with AS. Evidence was categorised by study type, and efficacy, adverse effects and other outcomes were summarised. Of the 75 studies identified, 13 investigated the combination of a rehabilitation programme with TNF inhibitor therapy, while the remainder studied rehabilitation with standard therapy (often not specified). Data from these few studies suggest that combined rehabilitation plus anti-TNF therapy is more effective in terms of symptom severity, disease activity, disability and quality-of-life indices versus biologic alone or rehabilitation with standard medical therapy, or, in non-comparative studies, compared with baseline. The most effective rehabilitation appears to be supervised or in-patient programmes with an educational component. Available data do not provide guidance on most appropriate endpoints or identify patients most likely to benefit from combination therapy. Combined, TNF inhibitor and rehabilitation therapy appear to have a synergistic effect, possibly due to increased adherence to exercise. Exercise regimes are more effective if supervised and include an education component. Further randomized, controlled trials comparing endpoints and investigating longer-term benefits of combining TNF inhibitors with rehabilitation in different AS subgroups are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Combination therapy of cyclosporine and anti-tumor necrosis factor α in psoriasis: a case series of 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen Barak, Eran; Kerner, Miryam; Rozenman, Dganit; Ziv, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy has become important in treating psoriasis, using synergism between different mechanisms to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. Little has been published on the combination of cyclosporine and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α agents. In this study, a retrospective chart review was made of the effects of this combination therapy in 10 patients with recalcitrant psoriasis. Treatment included a conditioning phase with cyclosporine, 3.14 ± 0.37 mg/kg for 4.6 ± 2 weeks, and a combination phase during which etanercept/adalimumab were initiated and cyclosporine was tapered over 10.2 ± 3.7 weeks. Treatment success, evaluated after each phase, was classified as complete recovery (CR, more than 75% improvement), partial response (PR, 25-75% improvement), and no response (NR, less than 25% improvement). All patients reached CR at the end of the combination therapy. Two were still on combination therapy after 12 and 20 weeks. Adverse event occurred in three cases, all in the conditioning phase. We conclude that combination therapy with cyclosporine and anti-TNF α appears to offer an effective and safe approach to treatment of psoriasis.

  11. Granulocyte-Monocyte Apheresis as an Adjuvant Therapy to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Drugs for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lago, Iago; Gómez-Irwin, Laura; Fernández, Encarnación; Higuera, Rebeca; Cabriada, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    Biologic anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) drugs have demonstrated their efficacy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, some patients will not respond to this therapy or will develop loss of response. Leukapheresis is the main non-pharmacological therapy for some immune-mediated diseases. The aim of our study was to describe our experience with this therapy in ulcerative colitis patients after loss of response to anti-TNF treatment. Leukapheresis was indicated in four patients with left-sided or extensive colitis because of partial response to biological therapy or secondary loss of response to it. All patients received 8 to 10 sessions in an intensive regimen. Globally, a decrease in the Mayo score was observed. The overall response rate was 50% with one patient who displayed sustained response. No patients have required colectomy during follow-up. Adjuvant treatment with leukapheresis in patients with inadequate response to anti-TNF treatment showed some beneficial effect, although of limited duration, in patients with ulcerative colitis. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  12. Persistence With Conventional Triple Therapy Versus a Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor and Methotrexate in US Veterans With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Brian C; Teng, Chia-Chen; Tang, Derek; Leng, Jianwei; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Mikuls, Ted R; Harrison, David J; Cannon, Grant W

    2017-03-01

    To compare persistence and adherence to triple therapy with the nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) methotrexate (MTX), hydroxychloroquine, and sulfasalazine, versus a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) plus MTX in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Administrative and laboratory data were analyzed for US Veterans with RA initiating triple therapy or TNFi + MTX between January 2006 and December 2012. Treatment persistence 365 days postindex was calculated using 3 definitions. Definition 1 required no gap in therapy of ≥90 days for any drug in the original combination. Definition 2 required no added or switched DMARD, no decrease to nonbiologic DMARD monotherapy, and no termination of all DMARD therapies. Definition 3 was similar to definition 2 but allowed a switch to another drug within the same class. Adherence used a proportion of days covered of ≥80%. Propensity-weighted analysis with matched weights was used to balance covariates. The analysis included 4,364 RA patients (TNFi + MTX, n = 3,204; triple therapy, n = 1,160). In propensity-weighted analysis, patients in the TNFi + MTX group were significantly more likely than patients in the triple therapy group to satisfy all persistence criteria in definition 1 (risk difference [RD] 13.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 9.2-17.0]), definition 2 (RD 6.4% [95% CI 2.3-10.5]), and definition 3 (RD 9.5% [95% CI 5.5-13.6]). Patients in the TNFi + MTX group also exhibited higher adherence during the first year (RD 7.2% [95% CI 3.8-10.5]). US Veterans with RA were significantly more likely to be persistent and adherent to combination therapy with TNFi + MTX than triple therapy with nonbiologic DMARDs. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey.

    PubMed

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loët, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by email to obtain the files of patients with TNF-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-two cases were collected, revealing two aspects of these manifestations. Ten patients (six patients receiving infliximab, four patients receiving etanercept) only had anti-DNA antibodies and skin manifestations one could classify as 'limited skin lupus' or 'toxidermia' in a context of autoimmunity, whereas 12 patients (nine patients receiving infliximab, three patients receiving etanercept) had more complete drug-induced lupus with systemic manifestations and at least four American Congress of Rheumatology criteria. One patient had central nervous system manifestations. No patients had lupus nephritis. The signs of lupus occurred within a mean of 9 months (range 3-16 months) in patients treated with infliximab and within a mean of 4 months (range 2-5 months) in patients treated with etanercept. In all cases after diagnosis was determined, anti-TNF was stopped and specific treatment introduced in eight patients: two patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, four patients received oral steroids (15-35 mg/day), and two patients received topical steroids. Lupus manifestations abated within a few weeks (median 8 weeks, standard deviation 3-16) in all patients except one with longer-lasting evolution (6 months). At that time, cautious estimations (unpublished data from Schering Plough Inc. and Wyeth Inc.) indicated that about 7700 patients had been exposed to infliximab and 3000 to

  14. The evaluation of sleep quality and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Karatas, Gulsah; Bal, Ajda; Yuceege, Melike; Yalcin, Elif; Firat, Hikmet; Dulgeroglu, Deniz; Karataş, Fatih; Sahin, Suleyman; Cakci, Aytul; Ardic, Sadik

    2017-01-01

    Poor sleep quality (SQ) is increasingly recognized as giving rise to decreased quality of life, and raising pain perception. Our aim is to evaluate the SQ in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapy. This was a prospective observational and open-label study of RA patients. A total of 35 patients with RA were enrolled in this study. Of the 35 patients, 22 had high disease activity (DA), and 13 were in remission. High DA group was initiated an anti TNF-α therapy. Clinical and objective parameters of SQ were assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and polysomnography (PSG). The total PSQI score and the frequency of poor SQ were high in 60 % of the RA patients. The median PSQI score was significantly higher in the high DA group than in the remission group (P = 0.026). Following an anti-TNF-α therapy initiation, significant improvements were observed in the high DA group by PSQI test (P = 0.012). However, no statistically significant difference was found by PSG (P > 0.05). Although an improvement in DA with anti-TNF-alpha therapy did not provide an amelioration in laboratory parameters, we found a significant improvement in SQ by subjective PSQI test. These findings may support that sleep disorders in RA are likely to be associated with a complex pathophysiology.

  15. Non-tumor necrosis factor-based biologic therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: present, future, and insights into pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Filipe Seguro; Alves, José Delgado

    2014-01-01

    The way rheumatoid arthritis is treated has changed dramatically with the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) biologics. Nevertheless, many patients still have less than adequate control of their disease activity even with these therapeutic regimens, and current knowledge fails to explain all the data already gathered. There is now a wide range of drugs from different classes of biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs available (and soon this number will increase significantly), that provides the opportunity to address each patient as a particular case and thereby optimize medical intervention. Currently available biologics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis apart from anti-TNF-based therapies are reviewed, along with an analysis of the new insights they provide into the pathogenesis of the disease and a discussion of future prospects in the area. PMID:24353404

  16. Periodontal therapy reduces the severity of active rheumatoid arthritis in patients treated with or without tumor necrosis factor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, P; Bissada, N F; Palomo, L; Han, Y W; Al-Zahrani, M S; Panneerselvam, A; Askari, A

    2009-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis are common chronic inflammatory conditions. Recent studies showed a beneficial effect of periodontal treatment on the severity of active RA. This study was undertaken to further examine the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the signs and symptoms of RA in patients treated with or without anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) medications. The effect of anti-TNF-alpha therapy on periodontitis also was assessed. Forty participants diagnosed with moderate/severe RA (under treatment for RA) and severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to receive initial non-surgical periodontal therapy with scaling/root planing and oral hygiene instructions (n = 20) or no periodontal therapy (n = 20). To control RA, all participants had been using disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and 20 had also been using anti-TNF-alpha before randomization. Probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), RA disease activity score 28 (DAS28), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured at baseline and 6 weeks later. Linear mixed models were used to identify significant differences between subjects who received periodontal treatment and those who did not. Patients receiving periodontal treatment showed a significant decrease in the mean DAS28, ESR (P <0.001), and serum TNF-alpha (P <0.05). There was no statistically significant decrease in these parameters in patients not receiving periodontal treatment. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy resulted in a significant improvement in CAL, PD, BOP, and GI. Non-surgical periodontal therapy had a beneficial effect on the signs and symptoms of RA, regardless of the medications used to treat this condition. Anti-TNF-alpha therapy without periodontal treatment had no significant effect on the periodontal condition.

  17. Periodontal Therapy Reduces the Severity of Active Rheumatoid Arthritis in Patients Treated With or Without Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, P; Bissada, NF; Palomo, L; Han, YW; Al-Zahrani, MS; Panneerselvam, A; Askari, A

    2010-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis (PD) are common chronic inflammatory conditions. Recent studies have shown a beneficial effect of periodontal treatment on reducing the severity of active RA. This study was undertaken to further examine the effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on signs and symptoms of RA in patients treated with or without anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α medications. The effect of anti-TNF-α therapy on periodontitis also was assessed. Methods Forty participants diagnosed with moderate/severe RA (under treatment for RA) and severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to receive initial non-surgical periodontal therapy with scaling/root planing and oral hygiene instructions (n=20) or no periodontal therapy (n=20). To control RA, all participants had been using disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and 20 had been using anti-TNF-α in addition to DMARDs before randomization. Periodontal probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), gingival (GI) and plaque (PI) indices, RA disease activity score (DAS-28) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured at baseline and six weeks afterwards. Linear mixed models were used to identify significant differences between subjects receiving periodontal treatment and those who did not. Results Patients receiving periodontal treatment showed a significant decrease in the mean DAS28, ESR (p < 0.001) and serum TNF-α (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant decrease in these parameters in those patients not receiving periodontal treatment. Anti- TNF-α therapy resulted in a significant improvement in CAL, PD, BOP and GI. Conclusions Non-surgical periodontal therapy had a beneficial effect on signs and symptoms of RA regardless of the medications used to treat this condition. Anti-TNF-α therapy without periodontal treatment has no significant effect on the periodontal condition. PMID:19335072

  18. Risk of tuberculosis is higher with anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody therapy than with soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor therapy: The three-year prospective French Research Axed on Tolerance of Biotherapies registry

    PubMed Central

    Tubach, Florence; Salmon, Dominique; Ravaud, Philippe; Allanore, Yannick; Goupille, Philippe; Bréban, Maxime; Pallot-Prades, Béatrice; Pouplin, Sophie; Sacchi, Antoinette; Chichemanian, Rose Marie; Bretagne, Stéphane; Emilie, Dominique; Lemann, Marc; Lorthololary, Olivier; Mariette, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is associated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy but whether it is drug-specific remains a concern. Our objective was to describe cases of tuberculosis associated with anti-TNF therapy, identify risk factors and estimate the incidence. Methods An incidence study with the French population as reference and a case-control analysis. We collected, for 3 years, cases of TB among French patients receiving anti-TNF therapy, whatever the indication, with two controls treated with anti-TNF agents per case. Results We collected 69 cases of TB in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis (n=40), spondylarthropathies (n=18), inflammatory colitis (n=9), psoriasis (n=1) and Behçet’s disease (n=1) treated with infliximab (n=36), adalimumab (n=28) and etanercept (n=5). None of the cases had received correct chemoprophylaxis treatment. The sex and age-adjusted incidence rate of TB was 116.7 per 100,000 patient-years. The SIR was 12.2 (95% confidence interval 9.7–15.5) and was higher for therapy with infliximab and adalimumab than for that with etanercept: 18.6 (13.4–25.8) and 29.3 (20.2–42.4) versus 1.8 (0.7–4.3), respectively. In the case-control analysis, the exposure to infliximab or adalimumab versus etanercept was an independent risk factor for TB: odds ratio=13.3 (2.6–69.0) and 17.1 (3.6–80.6), respectively. Other risk factors were age, the first year of anti-TNF treatment, and being born in an endemic area. Conclusions The risk of TB is higher for patients receiving monoclonal-antibody than soluble-receptor anti-TNF therapy. The increased risk with early anti-TNF treatment and the absence of correct chemoprophylaxis treatment favours the reactivation of latent TB. PMID:19565495

  19. Infliximab therapy balances regulatory T cells, tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) expression and soluble TNFR2 in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, A; Hijdra, D; Vorselaars, A D M; Crommelin, H A; van Moorsel, C H M; Grutters, J C; Claessen, A M E

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology that most commonly affects the lungs. Although elevated levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) have been reported, the extent to which they play a role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis remains unclear. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is thought to be one of the driving forces behind granuloma formation, illustrated by the efficacy of infliximab in severe sarcoidosis. Tregs express TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) highly. Here, we examined the influence of infliximab therapy on Tregs and (soluble) TNFR2 levels in sarcoidosis, and correlated these with response to therapy. We observed that relative frequencies of Tregs were significantly higher in patients (n = 54) compared to healthy controls (n = 26; median 6·73 versus 4·36%; P < 0·001) and decreased following therapy (4·95; P < 0·001). Baseline TNFR2 expression on Tregs was increased significantly in patients versus controls (99·4 versus 96·2%; P = 0·031), and also in responders to therapy versus non-responders (99·6 versus 97·3%; P = 0·012). Furthermore, baseline soluble TNFR2 (sTNFR2) was higher in responders than in non-responders (mean 174 versus 107 pg/ml; P = 0·015). After treatment, responders showed a significant reduction in sTNFR2 levels in peripheral blood (-44·7 pg/ml; P < 0·001), in contrast to non-responders (+3·59 pg/ml). Our results demonstrated that Treg frequencies and TNFR2 expression on Tregs are increased in sarcoidosis, followed by a decline during infliximab therapy, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this T cell subset. Interestingly, sTNFR2 levels at baseline differed significantly between responders and non-responders, making it a potential marker in predicting which patients might benefit from infliximab.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist therapy for concomitant rheumatoid arthritis and hepatitis C virus infection: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ko-Ming; Cheng, Tien-Tsai; Lin, Jing-Chi; Chen, Chung-Jen

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate treatment response and hepatic safety of anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy among patients with concomitant rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We reviewed the charts of 101 consecutive RA patients who were eligible for anti-TNF-α therapy in the Chiayi Branch of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Group A patients were sero-positive for anti-HCV antibodies and had HCV RNA but were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Group B (the control group) patients were sero-negative for both anti-HCV antibodies and HBsAg. Response to anti-TNF-α treatment was assessed by calculating disease activity score at 28 joints (DAS28) at baseline and 5, 8, and 11 months after the start of TNF-α antagonist therapy. Percentage change in DAS28 from baseline to month 5 was 21.36 ± 8.01 % in group A and 26.98 ± 10.43 % in group B (p = 0.011). However, there was no obvious difference in treatment response between groups at other time points. Anti-TNF-α therapy was discontinued within 1 year of starting treatment in two subjects in group A and 4 in group B. Response to anti-TNF-α was better in group B than in group A at 5 months, but there was no substantial difference in response at the 1-year evaluation. Although the study sample was small, our results suggest that the safety of anti-TNF-α therapy is similar in RA patients with and without concomitant HCV infection.

  1. Pretreatment 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and durability of anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Zator, Zachary A; Cantu, Stephanie M; Konijeti, Gauree Gupta; Nguyen, Deanna D; Sauk, Jenny; Yajnik, Vijay; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports an immunologic role for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we examined if pretreatment vitamin D status influences durability of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α therapy in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). All IBD patients who had plasma 25(OH)D level checked <3 months prior to initiating anti-TNF-α therapy were included in this retrospective single-center cohort study. Our main predictor variable was insufficient plasma 25(OH)D (<30 ng/mL). Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for potential confounders was used to identify the independent effect of pretreatment vitamin D on biologic treatment cessation. Our study included 101 IBD patients (74 CD; median disease duration 9 years). The median index 25(OH)D level was 27 ng/mL (interquartile range, 20-33 ng/mL). One-third of the patients had prior exposure to anti-TNF-α therapy. On multivariate analysis, patients with insufficient vitamin D demonstrated earlier cessation of anti-TNF-α therapy (hazard ratio [HR], 2.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-4.39; P = .04). This effect was significant in patients who stopped treatment for loss of response (HR, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.34-9.09) and stronger for CD (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 0.95-5.99) than UC (P = NS). Our findings suggest that vitamin D levels may influence durability of anti-TNF-α induction and maintenance therapy. Larger cohort studies and clinical trials of supplemental vitamin D use with disease activity as an end point may be warranted.

  2. CD8+ T Cells Specific to Apoptosis-Associated Antigens Predict the Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Alessandra; Scrivo, Rossana; Martini, Helene; Martire, Carmela; De Marzio, Paolo; Vestri, Anna Rita; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells (apoptotic epitopes) represent a principal player in chronic immune activation, which is known to amplify immunopathology in various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship involving these autoreactive T cells, the rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology, and the response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy. The frequency of autoreactive CD8+ T cells specific to various apoptotic epitopes, as detected by both enzyme-linked immunospot assay and dextramers of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules complexed with relevant apoptotic epitopes, was longitudinally analyzed in the peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients who were submitted to etanercept treatment (or other tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as a control). The percentage of apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells was significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients than in healthy donors, and correlated with the disease activity. More important, it was significantly more elevated in responders to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy than in non-responders before the start of therapy; it significantly dropped only in the former following therapy. These data indicate that apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells may be involved in rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology through the production of inflammatory cytokines and that they may potentially represent a predictive biomarker of response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy to validate in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26061065

  3. Working life and physical activity in ankylosing spondylitis pre and post anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Prince, David S; McGuigan, Louis E; McGirr, Ellen E

    2014-02-01

    To assess effects of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) on working life and physical activity in Australia; to quantify changes in working life and physical activity that occur after anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) treatment; and to assess efficacy of anti-TNF-α therapy for AS in an Australian context. This is a multi-centre observational study of people with AS on anti-TNF-α therapy. All participants satisfied the New York Modified Criteria and had active and refractory disease at anti-TNF-α therapy commencement. Participation involved a standardized interview, a metrology assessment, assessment of disease remission and medical record review. Interviews and patients' records were used to compare working life (employment, sick leave and productivity) and physical activity (participation rate, hours/week, and physical intensity) between the pre-AS, post-AS and post-anti-TNF-α therapy periods. Fifty-two patients took part. Participants were on average 44.8 years old, predominately male (86.5%) and had been on anti-TNF-α therapy for 29 months; 39% were in partial remission and 75% had 50% reduction in the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Responders to anti-TNF-α therapy were 10.5 years younger than non-responders (P = 0.004). Post-anti-TNF-α therapy participants gained 6.6 h/week of work (P = 0.02), and productivity improved 31% (P < 0.001) compared to immediately prior to commencing treatment. Physical activity participation increased from 71% to 85% (P = 0.039) and activity intensity increased by 33% (P = 0.002) post-treatment. Participants gained 1.8 h/week of sport (P = 0.001) and 2.2 h/week of recreational physical activity (P < 0.001). Australians with AS have their working life and physical activity severely affected by this disease. Treatment with anti-TNF-α therapy results in significant improvement in these parameters. © 2012 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2012 Asia

  4. Immediate Anti-tumor Necrosis Factor-α (Etanercept) Therapy Enhances Axonal Regeneration After Sciatic Nerve Crush

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kinshi; Liu, Huaqing; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi; Myers, Robert R.; Shubayev, Veronica I.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration begins immediately after injury. Understanding the mechanisms by which early modulators of axonal degeneration regulate neurite outgrowth may affect the development of new strategies to promote nerve repair. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a crucial role in the initiation of degenerative cascades after peripheral nerve injury. Here we demonstrate using real-time Taqman quantitative RT-PCR that, during the time course (days 1–60) of sciatic nerve crush, TNF-α mRNA expression is induced at 1 day and returned to baseline at 5 days after injury in nerve and the corresponding dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immediate therapy with the TNF-α antagonist etanercept (fusion protein of TNFRII and human IgG), administered systemically (i.p.) and locally (epineurially) after nerve crush injury, enhanced the rate of axonal regeneration, as determined by nerve pinch test and increased number of characteristic clusters of regenerating nerve fibers distal to nerve crush segments. These fibers were immunoreactive for growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and etanercept, detected by anti-human IgG immunofluorescence. Increased GAP-43 expression was found in the injured nerve and in the corresponding DRG and ventral spinal cord after systemic etanercept compared with vehicle treatments. This study established that immediate therapy with TNF-α antagonist supports axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:19746434

  5. Efficacy of incentive spirometer exercise on pulmonary functions of patients with ankylosing spondylitis stabilized by tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    So, Min Wook; Heo, Hyun Mi; Koo, Bon San; Kim, Yong-Gil; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of combining incentive spirometer exercise (ISE) with a conventional exercise (CE) on patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) stabilized by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy by comparing a combination group with a CE-alone group. Forty-six patients (44 men, 2 women) were randomized to the combination group (ISE plus CE; n=23) or the CE group (n=23). The CE regimen of both groups consisted of 20 exercises performed for 30 min once a day. The ISE was performed once a day for 30 min. The trial duration was 16 weeks. Patients were assessed before and at the end of treatment by measuring the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), chest expansion, finger to floor distance, pulmonary function measures, and 6-min walk distance. Both groups improved significantly in terms of chest expansion (p<0.01), finger to floor distance (p<0.01), and BASFI (p<0.05) after completing the exercise program. However, only the combination group showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity (p<0.05), total lung capacity (p<0.01), and vital capacity (p<0.05). Although this did not achieve statistical significance, the combination group was mildly superior to the CE-alone group in functional disability and pulmonary function measures. Combining ISE with a CE can provide positive results in patients whose AS has been clinically stabilized by TNF inhibitor therapy.

  6. Immediate anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (etanercept) therapy enhances axonal regeneration after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kinshi; Liu, Huaqing; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi; Myers, Robert R; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2010-02-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration begins immediately after injury. Understanding the mechanisms by which early modulators of axonal degeneration regulate neurite outgrowth may affect the development of new strategies to promote nerve repair. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a crucial role in the initiation of degenerative cascades after peripheral nerve injury. Here we demonstrate using real-time Taqman quantitative RT-PCR that, during the time course (days 1-60) of sciatic nerve crush, TNF-alpha mRNA expression is induced at 1 day and returned to baseline at 5 days after injury in nerve and the corresponding dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immediate therapy with the TNF-alpha antagonist etanercept (fusion protein of TNFRII and human IgG), administered systemically (i.p.) and locally (epineurially) after nerve crush injury, enhanced the rate of axonal regeneration, as determined by nerve pinch test and increased number of characteristic clusters of regenerating nerve fibers distal to nerve crush segments. These fibers were immunoreactive for growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and etanercept, detected by anti-human IgG immunofluorescence. Increased GAP-43 expression was found in the injured nerve and in the corresponding DRG and ventral spinal cord after systemic etanercept compared with vehicle treatments. This study established that immediate therapy with TNF-alpha antagonist supports axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

  7. Neutrophil biomarkers predict response to therapy with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Helen L; Cox, Trevor; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophils are implicated in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the mechanisms regulating their activation are largely unknown. RA is a heterogeneous disease, and whereas many patients show clinical improvement during TNF inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, a significant proportion fails to respond. In vitro activation of neutrophils with agents, including TNF, results in rapid and selective changes in gene expression, but how neutrophils contribute to TNF signaling in RA and whether TNFi sensitivity involves differential neutrophil responses are unknown. With the use of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we analyzed blood neutrophils from 20 RA patients, pre-TNFi therapy, to identify biomarkers of response, measured by a decrease in disease activity score based on 28 joint count (DAS28), 12 wk post-therapy. Biomarkers were validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR) of blood neutrophils from 2 further independent cohorts of RA patients: 16 pre-TNFi and 16 predisease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Twenty-three neutrophil transcripts predicted a 12-wk response to TNFi: 10 (IFN-regulated) genes predicting a European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) good response and 13 different genes [neutrophil granule protein (NGP) genes] predicting a nonresponse. Statistical analysis indicated a predictive sensitivity and specificity of each gene in the panel of >80%, with some 100% specific. A combination of 3 genes [cytidine monophosphate kinase 2 (CMPK2), IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 1B (IFIT1B), and RNASE3] had the greatest predictive power [area under the curve (AUC) 0.94]. No correlation was found for a response to DMARDs. We conclude that this panel of genes is selective for predicting a response to TNFi and is not a surrogate marker for disease improvement. We also show that in RA, there is great plasticity in neutrophil phenotype, with circulating cells expressing genes normally only expressed in more immature cells.

  8. Increases in Sex Hormones during Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy in Adolescents with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Mark D; Thayu, Meena; Griffin, Lindsay M; Baldassano, Robert N; Denson, Lee A; Zemel, Babette S; Denburg, Michelle R; Agard, Hannah E; Herskovitz, Rita; Long, Jin; Leonard, Mary B

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate children with Crohn's disease for inverse relationships between systemic inflammatory cytokines and sex hormone regulation in the context of anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) therapy. An observational study design was used to assess sex hormone and gonadotropin levels at the time of initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy and 10 weeks and 12 months later in 72 adolescents (Tanner stage 2-5) with Crohn's disease. Mixed-model linear regression was used to evaluate relationships between hormone levels, systemic inflammation, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry whole-body fat mass Z scores over the study interval. Sex hormone Z scores increased significantly during the 10-week induction interval: testosterone Z scores in male patients increased from a median of -0.36 to 0.40 (P < .05) and estradiol Z scores in females increased from -0.35 to -0.02 (P < .01). In mixed model regression, the pediatric Crohn's disease activity index score, cytokine levels, and measures of inflammation were significantly and negatively associated with sex hormone Z scores and with luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels, adjusted for sex and Tanner stage. Sex hormone and gonadotropin levels were not associated with body mass index or fat mass Z-scores. Crohn's disease is associated with delayed maturation, and initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy was associated with significant and rapid increases in sex hormone and gonadotropin levels, in association with improvements in disease activity and measures of inflammation. These data are consistent with preclinical studies of the effects of inflammation on sex hormone regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [A Case of Crohn's Disease Showing Favorable Response to Induction and Maintenance Therapy with Methotrexate after Failure of Anti-tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy].

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Yun, Gak Won; Park, Yoo Mi; Kim, Jie Hyun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyo Jin; Park, Jae Jun

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the introduction of immumomodulators and biologics, therapeutic approaches in Crohn's disease have changed significantly during the past decade. Although new biologic therapy has dramatically improved the treatment of Crohn's disease, a substantial number of patients are refractory to these therapies or lose their initial response. Methotrexate (MTX) is a structural analogue of folic acid that can competitively inhibit the binding of dihydrofolic acid to the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase and has been widely used as immunomodulator in rheumatology area for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. Although MTX has also been shown to be an effective agent for remission induction and maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease, the use of MTX in Crohn's disease has not yet been reported in Korea. Herein, we report a case of Crohn's disease patient who was successfully treated with MTX after treatment failure with thiopurine and anti-tumor necrosis factor.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Allele PTPRC Is Also Associated With Response to Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor α Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anti–tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. Methods A total of 1,283 RA patients receiving etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab therapy were studied from among an international collaborative consortium of 9 different RA cohorts. The primary end point compared RA patients with a good treatment response according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria (n = 505) with RA patients considered to be nonresponders (n = 316). The secondary end point was the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (ΔDAS28). Clinical factors such as age, sex, and concomitant medications were tested as possible correlates of treatment response. Thirty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of RA were genotyped and tested for any association with treatment response, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results Of the 31 RA-associated risk alleles, a SNP at the PTPRC (also known as CD45) gene locus (rs10919563) was associated with the primary end point, a EULAR good response versus no response (odds ratio [OR] 0.55, P = 0.0001 in the multivariate model). Similar results were obtained using the secondary end point, the ΔDAS28 (P = 0.0002). There was suggestive evidence of a stronger association in autoantibody-positive patients with RA (OR 0.55, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.39–0.76) as compared with autoantibody-negative patients (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.41–1.99). Conclusion Statistically significant associations were observed between the response to anti-TNF therapy and an RA risk allele at the PTPRC gene locus. Additional studies will be required to replicate this finding in additional patient collections

  11. Combined effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and ionizing radiation in breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Prasad, Uttara; Shankar, Sunita; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Shanaiah, Murthy; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent endogenous activator of the cell death pathway and functions by activating the cell surface death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). TRAIL is nontoxic in vivo and preferentially kills neoplastically transformed cells over normal cells by an undefined mechanism. Radiotherapy is a common treatment for breast cancer as well as many other cancers. Here we demonstrate that ionizing radiation can sensitize breast carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. This synergistic effect is p53-dependent and may be the result of radiation-induced up-regulation of the TRAIL-receptor DR5. Importantly, TRAIL and ionizing radiation have a synergistic effect in the regression of established breast cancer xenografts. Changes in tumor cellularity and extracellular space were monitored in vivo by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (diffusion MRI), a noninvasive technique to produce quantitative images of the apparent mobility of water within a tissue. Increased water mobility was observed in combined TRAIL- and radiation-treated tumors but not in tumors treated with TRAIL or radiation alone. Histological analysis confirmed the loss of cellularity and increased numbers of apoptotic cells in TRAIL- and radiation-treated tumors. Taken together, our results provide support for combining radiation with TRAIL to improve tumor eradication and suggest that efficacy of apoptosis-inducing cancer therapies may be monitored noninvasively, using diffusion MRI. PMID:10677530

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α predicts response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rordorf, Roberto; Savastano, Simone; Sanzo, Antonio; Spazzolini, Carla; De Amici, Mara; Camporotondo, Rita; Ghio, Stefano; Vicentini, Alessandro; Petracci, Barbara; De Regibus, Valentina; Taravelli, Erika; Landolina, Maurizio; Schwartz, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF) and are up-regulated in affected patients. We investigated whether pro-inflammatory cytokines might predict the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). METHODS AND RESULTS: Plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 were assessed in 91 patients before CRT. Response to CRT was defined as a decrease ≥15% in left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) at 6 months. Baseline TNF-α did correlate with LVESV reduction (P=0.001) after CRT. The subject group was divided according to tertiles of TNF-α. From the lower to the upper tertile LVESV (-31±28%, -17±17%, -9±22%) and LV end-diastolic volume (-23±25%, -14±16%, -4±18%) were progressively less reduced after CRT (P<0.001). The proportion of responders to CRT was 70%, 42% and 33%, according to the lower, intermediate and upper tertile of TNF-α distribution (P=0.01). Serious cardiac events (cardiac death, HF hospitalization or urgent heart transplantation) occurred in 63% of patients in the upper tertile vs. 32% and 17% in the intermediate and lower tertiles, respectively, during a median follow-up of 47 months (P<0.001). Circulating TNF-α predicts the degree of LV reverse remodeling after CRT and may contribute to the early identification of those patients at higher risk of events after device implantation.

  13. Reliability of Tuberculosis Screening Test in Patients Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonist Therapy in a United States Rheumatology Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-06

    necrosis factor (TNF) in United States military rheumatology clinic. Method: QTB-G blood testing became available 18 months after the study initiation and...Candida and/or Tetanus Patient with (+) TST and/or (+) QTB-G and those with CXR finding concerning for LTBI were referred to Infectious Disease for evaluation

  14. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, −0.99; 95% CI, −1.61 to −0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, −0.58; 95% CI, −1.10 to −0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, −0.31; 95% CI, −0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, −0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with

  15. Fundamental principals of tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene therapy approach and implications for patients with lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D; Aydin, Cigdem; Bozcuk, Hakan; Terzioglu, Ender; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2004-05-01

    Apoptosis, known as programmed cell death, is defined as a cell's preferred form of death under hectic conditions through genetically conserved and complex pathways. There is a decisive balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signaling pathways to maintain homeostasis in cells. In order to shift the balance towards apoptosis, the modulation of both apoptotic and anti-apoptotic pathways represents an attractive target for cancer therapeutics. Currently, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the most commonly used treatment modalities against lung cancer. Tumor suppressor gene, p53, is required in order for both of these treatment methods to work as anti-tumor agents. As a result, tumors lacking p53 display resistance to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, death ligands induce apoptosis regardless of p53 status of cells. Thus, these methods constitute a complementary therapeutic approach to currently employed conventional treatment modalities. At present, death ligands are being evaluated as potential cancer therapeutic agents. Since resistance to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-mediated apoptosis represented an obstacle for the treatment of patients with lung carcinoma in the earlier attempts, an extensive research was recently initiated to understand molecular mechanism of TNF-alpha signaling. NF-kappaB transcription factors have been demonstrated to modulate the apoptotic program, mostly as blockers of apoptosis in different cell types. In this review, we concentrate on the current progress in the understanding of TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis for lung carcinoma. Representative models of NF-kappaB-inhibiting gene therapy strategies from various labs including ours are also provided as examples of up-to-date approaches to defeat TNF resistance. In order to give the reader better understanding and appreciation of such approaches, previously unpublished in vivo assays are also incorporated into this review. Current progress in clinical trials using

  16. Rehabilitation treatment in patients with ankylosing spondylitis stabilized with tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Stefano; Bonaldo, Lara; Pigatto, Maurizia; Lo Nigro, Alessandro; Ramonda, Roberta; Punzi, Leonardo

    2011-07-01

    To assess the 2- (T1) and 6-month (T2) followup effects on pain, spine mobility, physical function, and disability outcome of a rehabilitation intervention in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) stabilized with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy. Sixty-two outpatients (49 men, 13 women, mean age 47.5 ± 10.6 yrs) were randomized to rehabilitation plus an educational-behavioral (n = 20) program, to an educational-behavioral program only (n = 20), or to a control group (n = 22). The educational-behavioral program included 2 educational meetings and 12 rehabilitation exercise sessions (stretching, strengthening, chest and spine/hip joint flexibility exercises), which patients then performed at home. Outcome assessment at the end of rehabilitation training (T1) and at T2 was based on spinal pain intensity in the previous 4 weeks by self-report visual analog scale (VAS; 100 mm: 0 = no pain, 100 = maximum pain), BASMI, BASFI, BASDAI, and on chest expansion and the active range of motion of the cervical and lumbar spine measured by a pocket goniometer. The 3 groups were comparable at baseline. On intragroup comparison at T1, the rehabilitation group showed significant improvement in the BASMI and BASDAI, in chest expansion, and in most spinal active range of motion measurements. BASFI and cervical and lumbar VAS scores improved in both the rehabilitation and educational-behavioral groups. The positive results achieved in the rehabilitation group were maintained at the 6-month followup. Combining intensive group exercise with an educational-behavioral program can provide promising results in the management of patients with clinically stabilized AS on TNF inhibitor treatment.

  17. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor–methotrexate combination therapy versus triple therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Roy; Tongbram, Vanita; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Tang, Derek H; Chung, James; Collier, David; Urs, Shilpa; Ndirangu, Kerigo; Wells, George; Pope, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Objective Clinical trials have not consistently demonstrated differences between tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) plus methotrexate and triple therapy (methotrexate plus hydroxychloroquine plus sulfasalazine) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study objective was to estimate the efficacy, radiographic benefits, safety and patient-reported outcomes of TNFi–methotrexate versus triple therapy in patients with RA. Methods A systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomised controlled trials of TNFi–methotrexate or triple therapy as one of the treatment arms in patients with an inadequate response to or who were naive to methotrexate was conducted. American College of Rheumatology 70% response criteria (ACR70) at 6 months was the prespecified primary endpoint to evaluate depth of response. Data from direct and indirect comparisons between TNFi–methotrexate and triple therapy were pooled and quantitatively analysed using fixed-effects and random-effects Bayesian models. Results We analysed 33 studies in patients with inadequate response to methotrexate and 19 in patients naive to methotrexate. In inadequate responders, triple therapy was associated with lower odds of achieving ACR70 at 6 months compared with TNFi–methotrexate (OR 0.35, 95% credible interval (CrI) 0.19 to 0.64). Most secondary endpoints tended to favour TNFi–methotrexate in terms of OR direction; however, no clear increased likelihood of achieving these endpoints was observed for either therapy. The odds of infection were lower with triple therapy than with TNFi−methotrexate (OR 0.08, 95% CrI 0.00 to 0.57). There were no differences observed between the two regimens in patients naive to methotrexate. Conclusions In this NMA, triple therapy was associated with 65% lower odds of achieving ACR70 at 6 months compared with TNFi–methotrexate in patients with inadequate response to methotrexate. Although secondary endpoints numerically favoured TNFi–methotrexate, no

  18. Anti-inflammatory drugs and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from monocytes: role of transcription factor NF-kappa B and implication for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Lavagno, Luisa; Gunella, Gabriele; Bardelli, Claudio; Spina, Simona; Fresu, Luigia Grazia; Viano, Ilario; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2004-10-06

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) represents a relevant target in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Besides inhibiting cyclooxygenase, anti-inflammatory drugs can affect the activation of transcription factors. We investigated the ability of dexamethasone, indomethacin, and rofecoxib to modulate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and TNF-alpha release from human monocytes challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both stimuli induced NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and TNF-alpha secretion. Dexamethasone potently inhibited TNF-alpha release, indomethacin inhibited only PMA-evoked release, while rofecoxib had no effect. In the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, dexamethasone and rofecoxib dose-dependently inhibited the DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB in stimulated monocytes, whereas indomethacin failed to inhibit the LPS-evoked one. These results were further confirmed by evaluating the drugs' ability to reduce nuclear NF-kappaB subunits, as well as the amount of phosphorylated IkappaBalpha in cytosolic fractions. In conclusion, these results indicate that anti-inflammatory drugs differ largely in their ability to inhibit NF-kappaB activity and/or TNF-alpha release from human monocytes. These effects can be relevant to rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  19. Effectiveness of anti-tumour necrosis factortherapy in Danish patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Burisch, Johan; Pedersen, Natalia; Roug, Stine; Galsgaard, Julie; Turino, Stine Ydegaard; Brodersen, Jacob Broder; Rashid, Shaista; Avlund, Sara; Olesen, Thomas Bastholm; Green, Anders; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Thomsen, Vibeke Østergaard; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen; Vogel, Ulla; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) treatment in a large cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in clinical practice and to establish a cohort for future studies of genetic markers associated with treatment response. A national, clinically based cohort of previously naïve anti-TNF treated patients from 18 medical departments was established. The patients were screened for tuberculosis prior to treatment initiation. By combining the unique personal identification number of Danish citizens (the CPR number) from blood samples with data from the National Patient Registry, patients with International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10) codes K50-K63 were identified. Treatment efficacy reflected the maximum response within 22 weeks. Among 492 patients with CD and 267 patients with UC, 74%/13%/14% and 65%/12%/24% were responders, partial responders and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy, respectively. More patients with UC than with CD were non-responders (odds ratio (OR) = 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34-2.87, p = 0.001). Young age was associated with a beneficial response (p = 0.03), whereas smoking ≥ 10 cigarettes/day was associated with non-response among patients with CD (OR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.13-4.81, p = 0.03). In this clinically based cohort of Danish patients with IBD treated with anti-TNF, high response rates were found. Heavy smoking was associated with non-response, whereas young age at treatment initiation was associated with a beneficial response among patients with CD. Thus, the results obtained in this cohort recruited from clinical practice were similar to those previously obtained in clinical trials. The work was funded by Health Research Fund of Central Denmark Region, Colitis-Crohn Foreningen and the University of Aarhus (PhD grant). Clinicaltrials NCT02322008.

  20. Anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with a history of deep prosthetic joint infection: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yuji; Kojima, Toshihisa; Kanayama, Yasuhide; Shioura, Tomone; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Tsuboi, Seiji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-10-01

    Four rheumatoid arthritis patients (three women and one man) who had a history of prosthetic joint infection were treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents after treatment of the infection. The anti-TNF therapy was subsequently discontinued in three patients. The reason for discontinuation was not the reactivation of infection, but disseminated tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, and interstitial pneumonia, respectively. These cases suggest that a history of prosthetic joint infection may be a contraindication for treatment with anti-TNF agents.

  1. Changes of energy metabolism, nutritional status and serum cytokine levels in patients with Crohn’s disease after anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Nao; Sasaki, Masaya; Kurihara, Mika; Ichimaru, Satomi; Wakita, Maki; Bamba, Shigeki; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Amagai, Teruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of treatment with antibodies against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on energy metabolism, nutritional status, serum cytokine levels in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). Twelve patients were enrolled. Resting energy expenditure (REE) levels were measured by indirect calorimetry. Crohn’s disease activity index (CDAI) significantly decreased after treatment with anti-TNF-α therapy. Anti-TNF-α therapy did not affect REE, but respiratory quotient (RQ) significantly increased after treatment. Serum interleukin-6 levels were significantly decreased and RQ were significantly increased in high REE (≥25 kcal/kg/day) group as compared to low REE (<25 kcal/kg/day) group. In conclusion, high REE value on admission is a predictive factor for good response to treatment with anti-TNF-α antibodies in active CD patients. PMID:24062610

  2. Combination of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and canstatin gene suppression therapy on breast tumor xenograft growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Yu-Lin; Heng, De-Feng; Miao, Chuan-Hui; Cao, Ying-Lin

    2008-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene therapy and canstatin gene therapy have been investigated extensively in human xenograft tumor models established in immunocompromised nude mice. However, combination antitumor activity of these two agents and the safety of such gene constructs driven by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter in nude mice have not been well documented. We hypothesized that TRAIL and canstatin gene therapy driven by the hTERT promoter might overcome the problem of liver toxicity and still effectively induce apoptosis on tumor cells. In this study, we evaluated the antitumor effects of TRAIL in human breast cancer cell lines and the antiangiogenic effects of canstatin on ECV204 cells. We also analyzed the effects of combined gene therapy using both TRAIL and canstatin in a human breast cancer nude mouse model. Tumor growth, tumor inhibition rate of each group, and toxicity were evaluated after gene therapy. Our results demonstrate that treatment using the canstatin- or TRAIL-expressing vector alone significantly suppresses tumor growth, compared to PBS or a vector control. We also found that combining these two therapies had greater antitumor activity than either treatment alone in the mouse model. Moreover, induction of apoptosis was not detected in normal mouse tissues after intratumoral injection of vectors and liver toxicity did not occur with either treatment. Thus, the combination of TRAIL and canstatin appears to be a promising approach for the gene therapy of breast tumors.

  3. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Clinical Practice Guidelines: The use of tumour necrosis factor-alpha antagonist therapy in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Daniel C; Bernstein, Charles N; Bitton, Alain; Croitoru, Ken; Fedorak, Richard N; Griffiths, Anne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines regarding the use of infliximab in Crohn’s disease were previously published by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology in 2004. However, recent clinical findings and drug developments warrant a review and update of these guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To review and update Canadian guidelines regarding the use of tumour necrosis factor-alpha antibody therapy in both luminal and fistulizing Crohn’s disease. METHODS: A consensus group of 25 voting participants developed a series of recommendation statements that addressed pertinent clinical questions and gaps in existing knowledge. An iterative voting and feedback process was used in advance of the consensus meeting in conjunction with a systematic literature review to refine the voting statements. These statements were brought to a formal consensus meeting held in Montreal, Quebec (March 2008), wherein each statement underwent discussion, reformulation, voting and subsequent revision until group consensus was obtained (at least 80% agreement). OUTCOME: The 47 voting statements addressed three themes: induction therapy, maintenance therapy and safety issues. As a result of the iterative process, 23 statements achieved consensus and were submitted for publication. CONCLUSION: In the past five years, tumour necrosis factor-alpha antagonist therapy has become a cornerstone in the management of moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease refractory to conventional treatment algorithms. The evidentiary base supporting the use of these drugs in Crohn’s disease is substantial and strengthened by results from long-term clinical and molecular studies. However, significant gaps in knowledge exist, particularly with regard to treatment failure. Confidence in the safety of these drugs is increasing, provided that therapy is administered in a clinical setting in which potential complications can be readily recognized and treated. PMID:19319383

  4. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy in ankylosing spondylitis: differential effects on pain and fatigue and brain correlates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Inman, Robert D; Davis, Karen D

    2015-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with back pain and fatigue and impacts mobility but can be treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). The differential effects of TNFi treatment on multiple symptoms and the brain is not well delineated. Thus, we conducted a 2-part study. In study 1, we conducted a retrospective chart review in 129 ankylosing spondylitis patients to assess TNFi effects on pain, fatigue, motor function, mobility, and quality of life (QoL). After at least 10 weeks of TNFi treatment, patients had clinically significant improvements (>30%) in pain (including neuropathic pain), most disease and QoL factors, and normalized sensory detection thresholds. However, residual fatigue (mean = 5.3) was prominent. Although 60% of patients had significant relief of pain, only 22% of patients had significant relief of both pain and fatigue. Therefore, the preferential TNFi treatment effect on pain compared with fatigue could contribute to suboptimal effects on QoL. Part 2 was a prospective study in 14 patients to identify TNFi treatment effects on pain, fatigue, sensory and psychological factors, and brain cortical thickness based on 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Centrally, TNFi was associated with statistically significant cortical thinning of motor, premotor, and posterior parietal regions. Pain intensity reduction was associated with cortical thinning of the secondary somatosensory cortex, and pain unpleasantness reduction was associated with the cortical thinning of motor areas. In contrast, fatigue reduction correlated with cortical thinning of the insula, primary sensory cortex/inferior parietal sulcus, and superior temporal polysensory areas. This indicates that TNFi treatment produces changes in brain areas implicated in sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive functions.

  5. Risk of tuberculosis with anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy: substantially higher number of patients at risk in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Navarra, Sandra V; Tang, Boxiong; Lu, Liangjing; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Mok, Chi Chiu; Asavatanabodee, Paijit; Suwannalai, Parawee; Hussein, Heselynn; Rahman, Mahboob U

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the potential risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) agents in Asia. Methods Absolute risk increase (ARI) of TB was estimated for three widely used anti-TNF-α therapies using published standardized incidence ratios (SIR) from the French Research Axed on Tolerance of bIOtherapies registry and incidence (absolute risk [AR]) of TB in Asia. Assuming an association of increased TB risk with anti-TNF-α therapy and country TB AR (incidence), the ARI of TB by country was calculated by multiplying the SIR of the anti-TNF-α therapy by the country's TB AR. The numbers needed to harm (NNH) for each anti-TNF-α agent and numbers needed to treat (NNT) to reduce one TB event using etanercept therapy instead of adalimumab or infliximab were also calculated for each country. Results The ARI of TB with anti-TNF-α therapies in Asian countries is substantially higher than Western Europe and North America and the difference between etanercept versus the monoclonal antibodies becomes more evident. The NNH for Asian countries ranged from 8 to 163 for adalimumab, 126 to 2646 for etanercept and 12 to 256 for infliximab. The NNT to reduce one TB event using etanercept instead of adalimumab therapy ranged from 8 to 173, and using etanercept instead of infliximab therapy the NNT ranged from 13 to 283. Conclusion Higher numbers of patients are at risk of developing TB with anti-TNF-α therapy in Asia compared with Western Europe and North America. The relative lower risk of TB with etanercept may be particularly relevant for Asia, an endemic area for TB. PMID:24131578

  6. Suppression of human monocyte tumour necrosis factor-α release by glucocorticoid therapy: relationship to systemic monocytopaenia and cortisol suppression

    PubMed Central

    Steer, James H; Vuong, Quylinh; Joyce, David A

    1997-01-01

    Aims Glucocorticoids suppress the release of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by macrophages in vitro and cause monocytopaenia in vivo. These actions may contribute to anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant effects. We therefore examined relationships between prednisolone concentration, suppression of monocyte TNF-α release, monocytopaenia and suppression of total cortisol concentration in healthy volunteers treated with a single dose (1.5 mg kg−1 ) of the glucocorticoid, prednisolone. Methods Monocyte numbers, total cortisol concentration and prednisolone concentration were measured in blood samples collected over 48 h after the dose. Plasma from these samples was also tested for its capacity to suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α release from monocytes in autologous whole blood cultures. Results At 4 h after the dose, monocyte numbers in peripheral blood had fallen to a mean of 18% of the pre-dose level whilst plasma total cortisol had fallen to 9% of the pre-dose concentration. Monocyte numbers recovered in concordance with elimination of prednisolone and there was a significant relative monocytosis at 24 h. The recovery of plasma cortisol was delayed in comparison, with cortisol remaining significantly suppressed at 24 h. Plasma samples taken at 2 h after the dose (corresponding to peak plasma prednisolone concentration) suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of TNF-α by autologous blood monocytes to 27% of pre-dose control. Plasma collected at intervals over the 48 h from dosing also suppressed monocyte TNF-α release in relation to the prednisolone concentration therein. Suppression was largely reversed by the glucocorticoid antagonist, mifepristone. A similar relationship between prednisolone concentration and TNF-α suppression was observed when prednisolone was added to blood samples collected from the volunteers when they were drug-free. Conclusions Blood concentrations of prednisolone achieved after a dose of 1.5 mg kg

  7. The Rates of Serious Infections in HIV-infected Patients Who Received Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α Inhibitor Therapy for Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wangsiricharoen, Sintawat; Ligon, Colin; Gedmintas, Lydia; Dehrab, Admad; Tungsiripat, Marisa; Bingham, Clifton; Lozada, Carlos; Calabrese, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the incidence of serious infections in patients with HIV infection and autoimmune disease who were treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α inhibitor therapy, and to compare these rates among stratified viral load levels. Methods Using a unified search strategy, four centers identified HIV-infected patients exposed to TNF-α inhibitors. Patient characteristics and infection data were assessed via chart review in all patients who were ≥18 years old and received TNF-α inhibitor therapy after HIV diagnosis between January 1999 and March 2015. Results Twenty-three patients with 26 uses of TNF-α inhibitor therapy provided 86.7 person-years of follow-up. Two (8.7%) experienced at least 1 serious infection episode, an overall incidence rate of 2.55 per 100 patient-years (95% CI 0.28–9.23). The incidence rate per 100 patient-years was 3.28 (95% CI 0.04–18.26) among patients with viral load > 500 copies/mL at therapy initiation and 2.09 (0.03–11.65) among patients with viral load ≤ 500 copies/mL. Conclusion This study suggests that TNF-α inhibitors may have a comparable rate of serious infections to the range of those observed in registry databases when used in patients with HIV infection under active care. PMID:27332039

  8. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment.

  9. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283.

  10. Intestinal microsporidiosis: a hidden risk in rheumatic disease patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy combined with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Nadia Emi; de Oliveira Twardowsky, Aline; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Silva, Clovis A; Silva, Ivan Leonardo Avelino França e; de Medeiros Ribeiro, Ana Cristina; Saad, Carla Gonçalves Schain; Moraes, Julio César Bertacini; de Toledo, Roberto Acayaba; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of microsporidiosis, and this parasitosis has an increased rate of dissemination in this population. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of microsporidiosis and other intestinal parasites in rheumatic disease patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment. METHODS: Ninety-eight patients (47 with rheumatoid arthritis, 31 with ankylosing spondylitis and 11 with psoriatic arthritis) and 92 healthy control patients were enrolled in the study. Three stool samples and cultures were collected from each subject. RESULTS: The frequency of microsporidia was significantly higher in rheumatic disease patients than in control subjects (36 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), as well as in those with rheumatic diseases (32 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), ankylosing spondylitis (45 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001) and psoriatic arthritis (40 vs. 4%, respectively; p<0.0001), despite a similar social-economic class distribution in both the patient and control groups (p = 0.1153). Of note, concomitant fecal leukocytes were observed in the majority of the microsporidia-positive patients (79.5%). Approximately 80% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea (26%), abdominal pain (31%) and weight loss (5%), although the frequencies of these symptoms were comparable in patients with and without this infection (p>0.05). Rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis disease activity parameters were comparable in both groups (p>0.05). The duration of anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and glucocorticoid use were also similar in both groups. CONCLUSION: We have documented that microsporidiosis with intestinal mucosa disruption is frequent in patients undergoing concomitant anti-tumor necrosis factor/disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy. Impaired host defenses due to the combination of the underlying disease

  11. Blockade of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha: A Role for Adalimumab in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Refractory to Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Vega, Beatriz; Fernández-Vega, Álvaro; Rangel, Carlos Mario; Nicieza, Javier; Villota-Deleu, Eva; Vega, José A.; Sanchez-Avila, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To report a case of wet age-related macular degeneration (wet-AMD) refractory to intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy in a patient who showed visual and anatomical improvement and stabilization after starting a subcutaneous treatment course with adalimumab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) drug, for concomitant Crohn's disease. Methods Observational case report of a female patient. Ophthalmological evaluation was performed by slit lamp and ophthalmoscopy (posterior pole and anterior segment). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was determined, and imaging was performed by fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Intravitreal therapies used and treatment with anti-TNF-α were recorded. Results A 64-year-old woman with wet-AMD was treated with fourteen intravitreal injections of ranibizumab (0.5 mg) for a period of 40 months with intervals of 1–6 months. She initially showed a good visual and anatomical response to periodic anti-VEGF treatment but during check visits, anatomical and functional responses deteriorated. At the 40-month follow-up, the patient had developed Crohn's disease, and her rheumatologist started treatment with adalimumab (40 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks). During the 25 months of treatment with adalimumab, the patient did not require any additional intravitreal anti-VEGF treatments because her BCVA, clinical, and OCT findings improved and remained stable. Conclusions We described a case of a patient with wet-AMD refractory to anti-VEGF therapy, which clinically benefited from subcutaneous adalimumab therapy. Treatment with subcutaneous anti-TNF-α in combination with anti-VEGF therapy avoids the high cost and risks related to multiple intravitreal anti-VEGF injections with good functional and anatomic outcomes. PMID:27065854

  12. Early tumor necrosis factor α antagonist therapy in everyday practice for inflammatory back pain suggesting axial spondyloarthritis: results from a prospective multicenter french cohort.

    PubMed

    Canouï-Poitrine, Florence; Poulain, Cécile; Molto, Anna; Le Thuaut, Aurélie; Lafon, Cécile; Farrenq, Valérie; Ferkal, Salah; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Ghaleh, Bijan; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie; Fautrel, B; Dougados, Maxime; Claudepierre, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    To determine the frequency of and factors associated with early tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) antagonist therapy in everyday clinical practice in patients with suspected axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA). We used data from the prospective observational study in the French Devenir des Spondylarthropathies Indifférenciées Récentes (DESIR; Outcome of Recent Undifferentiated Spondylarthropathies) cohort of 708 patients with recent-onset (<3 years) inflammatory back pain (IBP) suggesting axial SpA. TNFα antagonist use was recorded at months 6 and 12 and factors independently associated with TNFα antagonist therapy were identified by multivariate logistic regression. Among the 708 patients (mean age 33.8 years, 46.2% men), 166 (23.4%) patients received TNFα antagonist therapy by month 12, including 120 (73.6%) patients who fulfilled Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) axial criteria and 157 (94.6%) who fulfilled at least 1 SpA criteria set; 109 (65.6%) had no sacroiliitis. Factors independently associated with early TNFα antagonist therapy were high Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score using the C-reactive protein level (odds ratio [OR]1-point increase 1.60, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.25-2.03, P < 0.001), high physician's global disease activity score (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.21-1.54, P < 0.001), ASAS nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug score >50 (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.24-2.87, P = 0.003), current or past disease-modifying antirheumatic drug use (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.22-3.59, P = 0.008), systemic corticosteroid use (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.43-4.34, P = 0.002), and mild to severe radiographic hip abnormalities (OR 9.43, 95% CI 2.11-42.09, P = 0.003). After adjustment on these factors, Achilles enthesis hypervascularization by power Doppler and number of work days missed were associated with TNFα antagonist therapy. In the DESIR cohort, approximately one-fourth of patients with recent IBP suggestive of axial SpA were under anti-TNFα therapy

  13. Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection before initiation of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy using both tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Cheol; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Jung, Young Ju; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Chang-Keun; Kim, Yong-Gil; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Shim, Tae Sun

    2014-11-01

    Reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is an important complication in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) blocking agents. However, the best method for LTBI detection before initiation of anti-TNF therapy remains to be determined. From January 2010 to August 2013, anti-TNF therapy was initiated in 426 patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). Tuberculin skin test (TST) and Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube (QFT-GIT) assay were performed before starting anti-TNF treatment. LTBI was defined as a positive TST (induration ≥ 10 mm) or as a positive QFT-GIT result. Patients were followed up until December 2013. The positive TST and QFT-GIT rates were 22.3% (95/426) and 16.0% (68/426), respectively, yielding a total of 27.0% (115/426) of positive LTBI results. LTBI treatment was initiated in 25.1% (107/426) and was completed in 100% (107/107) of patients. During a median 294 days of follow-up, active TB occurred in 1.4% (6/426) of the patients with negative TST and QFT-GIT results at baseline. The either test positive strategy, using both TST and QFT-GIT assay, is acceptable for LTBI screening before commencing anti-TNF therapy in patients with IMIDs.

  14. Impact of thiopurines and anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy on hospitalisation and long-term surgical outcomes in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alexakis, Christopher; Pollok, Richard CG

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the large bowel and is associated with a significant risk of both requirement for surgery and the need for hospitalisation. Thiopurines, and more recently, anti-tumour necrosis factor (aTNF) therapy have been used successfully to induce clinical remission. However, there is less data available on whether these agents prevent long-term colectomy rates or the need for hospitalisation. The focus of this article is to review the recent and pertinent literature on the long-term impact of thiopurines and aTNF on long-term surgical and hospitalisation rates in UC. Data from population based longitudinal research indicates that thiopurine therapy probably has a protective role against colectomy, if used in appropriate patients for a sufficient duration. aTNF agents appear to have a short term protective effect against colectomy, but data is limited for longer periods. Whereas there is insufficient evidence that thiopurines affect hospitalisation, evidence favours that aTNF therapy probably reduces the risk of hospitalisation within the first year of use, but it is less clear on whether this effect continues beyond this period. More structured research needs to be conducted to answer these clinically important questions. PMID:26730281

  15. Sustained improvement in health-related quality of life measures in patients with inflammatory bowel disease receiving prolonged anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael; Tsynman, Donald N; Kim, Albert; Arora, Jyoti; Pietras, Timothy; Messing, Susan; St Hilaire, Lydia; Yoon, Sonia; Decross, Arthur; Shah, Ashok; Saubermann, Lawrence

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the effects of prolonged therapy (≥1 year) with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents were sustained on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A cross-sectional survey of patients with IBD who were treated with anti-TNF agents was performed. Results of the validated HRQoL measures (inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire [IBDQ], EuroQoL-5 dimensions [EQ-5D], health status visual analogue scale [VAS] and the Zung self-rating depression scale) were recorded and compared between patients treated with anti-TNF agents for <1 year and ≥1 year. A total of 41 patients were finally enrolled in the study. Among them, 11 (26.8%) had received anti-TNF therapy for less than one year with a median duration of 7 months (range 3-11 months), while the other 30 (73.2%) had been treated for ≥1 year with a median duration of 42 months (range 12-104 months). Crohn's disease was the most common type in both groups. None of the mean IBDQ, EQ-5D and EQ-5D plus VAS, or Zung self-rating depression scale scores differed significantly between the two groups of patients. Improvements in HRQoL for IBD patients on anti-TNF therapy were sustained for longer than one year. HRQoL measures for IBD patients treated with anti-TNF therapy for <1 year do not differ significantly from those treated for ≥1 year, but a trend towards improved HRQoL measures with prolonged therapy can be obtained. © 2013 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Risk of lymphoma in patients exposed to antitumour necrosis factor therapy: results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Louise K; Galloway, James B; Lunt, Mark; Davies, Rebecca; Low, Audrey L S; Dixon, William G; Watson, Kath D; Symmons, Deborah P M; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2017-03-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of lymphoma compared with the general population. There are concerns that tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may exacerbate this risk. However, since the excess risk of lymphoma in RA is related to the cumulative burden of inflammation, TNFi may conversely reduce the risk of lymphoma by decreasing the burden of inflammation. The aim of this study was to compare the risk of lymphoma in subjects with RA treated with TNFi with those treated with non-biological therapy. Subjects diagnosed by a rheumatologist with RA enrolled in the British Society for Rheumatology Rheumatoid Arthritis Register (BSRBR-RA), a prospective cohort study, were followed until first lymphoma, death or until 30 November 2013. Rates of lymphoma in the TNFi and non-biological-treated cohorts were compared using Cox regression. 11 931 TNFi-treated patients were compared with 3367 biological-naive patients. 84 lymphomas (88 (95% CI 70 to 109) per 100 000 person-years) were reported in the TNFi cohort and 30 lymphomas (154 (95% CI 104 to 220)) in the biological-naive cohort. After adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics, there was no difference in the risk of lymphoma for the TNFi versus the biological-naive group: HR 1.00 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.80). No risk differences were observed for individual TNFi. In medium-term follow-up, there is no evidence that tumour necrosis factor inhibition influences the risk of lymphoma over the background risk in subjects with RA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Endoscopic Complete Remission of Crohn Disease After Anti-Tumor Necrosis FactorTherapy: CT Enterographic Findings and Their Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cherry; Park, Seong Ho; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Park, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the CT enterographic (CTE) findings after endoscopic complete remission (CR) of Crohn disease in patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) and the clinical implications of these findings. The records of 27 patients with Crohn disease (14 men, 13 women; mean age, 28.4 ± 8.6 [SD] years) who achieved endoscopic (ileocolonoscopic) CR after anti-TNF-α therapy and underwent CTE both before therapy and at endoscopic CR were identified. Two readers independently assessed the frequencies and severities of mural and perienteric CTE abnormalities, generally regarded as active inflammatory findings, in the terminal ileum and colorectum in the endoscopic CR state and compared them with the corresponding findings before anti-TNF-α therapy. The association between the presence of CTE abnormalities in the face of endoscopic CR and patient outcome during subsequent follow-up was investigated. CTE abnormalities were present in the face of endoscopic CR in 11-18 (26-42%) of 43 bowel sections (18 terminal ileum, 25 colorectum), the most frequent being mural hyperenhancement (21-40%) followed by mural thickening (12-16%). Both findings were mild and unaccompanied by other findings. The frequency and severity of mural and perienteric CTE abnormalities were statistically significantly reduced at endoscopic CR compared with the pre-treatment state. Patients with (n = 10) and without (n = 17) CTE abnormalities at endoscopic CR did not significantly differ with respect to Crohn disease aggravation during subsequent follow-up periods averaging 27.4 and 28.5 months (0/10 versus 2/17, p = 0.516). More than one-fourth of bowel sections in endoscopic CR after anti-TNF-α therapy had residual CTE abnormalities, predominantly mild mural thickening or hyperenhancement. These findings may not have any clinical significance.

  18. Physiological intermolecular modification spectroscopy for the prediction of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Pierre; Glaubitz, Lisa; Breidert, Matthias; Neurath, Markus Friedrich; Atreya, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies have clinical efficiency only in a subgroup of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Prediction of clinical response is a critical clinical problem. Physiological intermolecular modification spectroscopy (PIMS) is a label-free technology performed in physiological conditions. PIMS enables real-time monitoring of dynamic molecular resonance of entire proteins and macromolecules of an individual. The aim of this study was to explore the capacity of PIMS to discriminate IBD patients regarding response to anti-TNF treatment. Protein extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 30 outpatients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) and treated with infliximab were subjected to PIMS analysis in a blinded transversal study. Total protein from each patient's PBMCs was challenged with infliximab. Dynamic changes in macromolecular interaction were registered while the temperature rose from -37 to 37°C. Individual macromolecular volume and molecular elasticity were determined for each patient. Clinical data revealed that 67% of UC and 79% of CD patients responded to infliximab therapy during the 3-month study period based on their respective clinical activity score. These results confirm that PIMS data predicted response to anti-TNF therapy with an accuracy of 96%. PIMS stratified IBD patients into two groups, responders and nonresponders, which correlated with the clinical efficacy of anti-TNF therapy. PIMS seems to be a powerful technology to adapt IBD treatment to the individual patient. Further studies with PIMS might enable to predict clinical response to biological treatment in IBD patients before the therapy is initiated. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Objective evaluation of physical functioning after tumor necrosis factor inhibitory therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a selection of 3 feasible performance-based tests.

    PubMed

    van Weely, Salima F E; Dekker, Joost; Steultjens, Martijn P M; van Denderen, J Christiaan; Nurmohamed, Michael T; Dijkmans, Ben A C; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E

    2015-04-01

    (1) To select a limited number of performance-based tests that are reliable, show improvement in physical functioning after tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and generate information equivalent to the full set of tests, and (2) are feasible for use in daily clinical practice. Eight performance-based tests were evaluated. To eliminate redundant testing, the tests that showed adequate reliability, the highest standardized response mean (SRM), and the largest proportion of patients with an improved performance-based physical functioning were selected. The selected tests were combined into a new criterion for improvement in physical functioning (AS Performance-based Improvement; ASPI). The number and percentage of improved patients identified with the ASPI and identified with the full set of performance tests were compared. Reliability for all tests was adequate to excellent (ICC 0.73-0.96). The tests for bending, putting on socks, and getting up from the floor had the highest SRM (0.52-0.74) and showed the largest proportion of improved patients after TNFi therapy. The combination of these 3 tests was feasible in daily clinical practice and showed improved physical functioning after TNFi therapy in 67% of the patients. The 3 selected tests are recommended for use in daily practice because they generate information comparable to the full set. They are reliable and feasible, and the combination of these tests showed improved physical functioning after TNFi therapy in 67% of the patients. Evaluation of physical functioning might be improved by adding these tests to other AS outcome measures.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Bioactivity at the Site of an Acute Cell-Mediated Immune Response Is Preserved in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Responding to Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Byng-Maddick, Rachel; Turner, Carolin T.; Pollara, Gabriele; Ellis, Matthew; Guppy, Naomi J.; Bell, Lucy C. K.; Ehrenstein, Michael R.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2017-01-01

    The impact of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapies on inducible TNF-dependent activity in humans has never been evaluated in vivo. We aimed to test the hypothesis that patients responding to anti-TNF treatments exhibit attenuated TNF-dependent immune responses at the site of an immune challenge. We developed and validated four context-specific TNF-inducible transcriptional signatures to quantify TNF bioactivity in transcriptomic data. In anti-TNF treated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we measured the expression of these biosignatures in blood, and in skin biopsies from the site of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) as a human experimental model of multivariate cell-mediated immune responses. In blood, anti-TNF therapies attenuated TNF bioactivity following ex vivo stimulation. However, at the site of the TST, TNF-inducible gene expression and genome-wide transcriptional changes associated with cell-mediated immune responses were comparable to that of RA patients receiving methotrexate only. These data demonstrate that anti-TNF agents in RA patients do not inhibit inducible TNF activity at the site of an acute inflammatory challenge in vivo, as modeled by the TST. We hypothesize instead that their therapeutic effects are limited to regulating TNF activity in chronic inflammation or by alternative non-canonical pathways. PMID:28824652

  1. Immunomodulatory therapy with tumour necrosis factor α inhibitors in children with antinuclear antibody-associated chronic anterior uveitis: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Doycheva, Deshka; Zierhut, Manfred; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Stuebiger, Nicole; Januschowski, Kai; Voykov, Bogomil; Deuter, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the long-term efficacy and tolerability of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitors in the therapy of children with refractory antinuclear antibody (ANA)-associated chronic anterior uveitis. Retrospective analysis of 31 children with ANA-associated uveitis, treated with TNFα inhibitors with a follow-up period of at least 2 years. The outcome measures included: control of inflammation, corticosteroid-sparing potential and side effects. Twenty-three children (74%) were treated with adalimumab, five children (16%) with infliximab and three children (10%) with etanercept. Control of uveitis, defined as 0 anterior chamber cells while on ≤2 drops/day topical corticosteroids, was achieved in 22 of 31 patients (71%) after 1 year (95% CI 52% to 86%), and in 21 of 29 patients (72%) after 2 years of treatment (95% CI 53% to 87%). Control of uveitis was observed in 18 of 23 children (78%) treated with adalimumab, and in two of five children (40%) treated with infliximab. In all children treated with etanercept, no sufficient inflammatory control was found. Systemic corticosteroids could be discontinued in 71% (12/17 children) and topical corticosteroids in 55% (17/31) of the patients. Treatment-related side effects were found in nine children (29%, rate: 0.10/patient-year). Our data show that adalimumab and infliximab have beneficial effects in the therapy of severe ANA-associated anterior uveitis in children.

  2. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responsiveness in Active Psoriatic Arthritis at Multiple Timepoints during the First 12 Weeks of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feletar, Marie; Hall, Stephen; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of high- and low-field extremity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables at multiple timepoints in the first 12 weeks post-antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy initiation in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and active dactylitis. Twelve patients with active PsA and clinical evidence of dactylitis involving at least 1 digit were recruited. Patients underwent sequential high-field conventional (1.5 Tesla) and extremity low-field MRI (0.2 Tesla) of the affected hand or foot, pre- and postgadolinium at baseline (pre-TNF), 2 weeks (post-TNF), 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. A blinded observer scored all images on 2 occasions using the PsA MRI scoring system. Eleven patients completed the study, but only 6 patients completed all high-field and low-field MRI assessments. MRI scores demonstrated rapid response to TNF inhibition with score reduction in tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis at 2 weeks. Intraobserver reliability was good to excellent for all variables. High-field MRI demonstrated greater sensitivity to tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis and greater responsiveness to change posttreatment. Treatment responses were maintained to 12 weeks. This study demonstrates the use of MRI in detecting early response to biologic therapy. MRI variables of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis demonstrated responsiveness posttherapy with high-field scores more responsive to change than low-field scores.

  3. Effects of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy on Osteoprotegerin, Neopterin, and sRANKL Concentrations in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Katharina; Herold, Manfred; Russe, Elisabeth; Klotz, Werner; Weiss, Guenter; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by joint erosions, progressive focal bone loss, and chronic inflammation. Methods. 20 female patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis were treated with anti-TNF-antibody adalimumab in addition to concomitant antirheumatic therapies. Patients were assessed for overall disease activity using the DAS28 score, and neopterin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG) and soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (sRANKL) concentrations were determined before therapy and at week 12. Neopterin as well as OPG and sRANKL were determined by commercial ELISAs. Results. Before anti-TNF therapy patients presented with high disease activity and elevated concentrations of circulating inflammatory markers. OPG concentrations correlated with neopterin (rs = 0.494, p = 0.027), but not with DAS28. OPG concentrations and disease activity scores declined during anti-TNF-treatment (both p < 0.02). Patients who achieved remission (n = 7) or showed a good response according to EULAR criteria (n = 13) presented with initially higher baseline OPG levels, which subsequently decreased significantly during treatment (p = 0.018 for remission, p = 0.011 for good response). Conclusions. Adalimumab therapy was effective in modifying disease activity and reducing proinflammatory and bone remodelling cascades. PMID:26576067

  4. Effects of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy on Osteoprotegerin, Neopterin, and sRANKL Concentrations in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Katharina; Herold, Manfred; Russe, Elisabeth; Klotz, Werner; Weiss, Guenter; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by joint erosions, progressive focal bone loss, and chronic inflammation. 20 female patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis were treated with anti-TNF-antibody adalimumab in addition to concomitant antirheumatic therapies. Patients were assessed for overall disease activity using the DAS28 score, and neopterin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG) and soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (sRANKL) concentrations were determined before therapy and at week 12. Neopterin as well as OPG and sRANKL were determined by commercial ELISAs. Before anti-TNF therapy patients presented with high disease activity and elevated concentrations of circulating inflammatory markers. OPG concentrations correlated with neopterin (rs = 0.494, p = 0.027), but not with DAS28. OPG concentrations and disease activity scores declined during anti-TNF-treatment (both p < 0.02). Patients who achieved remission (n = 7) or showed a good response according to EULAR criteria (n = 13) presented with initially higher baseline OPG levels, which subsequently decreased significantly during treatment (p = 0.018 for remission, p = 0.011 for good response). Adalimumab therapy was effective in modifying disease activity and reducing proinflammatory and bone remodelling cascades.

  5. The clinical importance of the thyroid nodules during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Terlemez, Rana; Akgün, Kenan; Palamar, Deniz; Boz, Sinan; Sarı, Hidayet

    2017-03-30

    The clinical importance of the thyroid nodules in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA) rests with the need to exclude thyroid malignancy. The aim of this study is to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy in ax-SpA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy. From September 2015 until December 2015, 70 patients diagnosed with ax-SpA were included in the research. Forty of the patients had received anti-TNF therapy, and 30 of the patients were anti-TNF naive. All cases were screened for the presence of nodules in the thyroid gland with ultrasound. Of the patients that received anti-TNF therapy, 15 (37.5%); and of the anti-TNF naive patients, 11 (36.7%) had thyroid nodule(s). Four patients from the anti-TNF group underwent fine needle aspiration biopsy of the nodules, and two of them were diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma. None of the nodules in anti-TNF naive patients required biopsy. When compared to the normal population, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was found to be increased in both male (SIR 2.03, 95% CI 1.9 to 18) and female (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 24) cases. It is not yet established whether the development of cancer during the treatment process is the effect of the treatment or if it is a part of the natural course of the disease or if it is coincidental. We saw a mild increase in thyroid malignancies in ax-SpA patients who received anti-TNF therapy. Therefore, we believe that the thyroid gland should also be taken into consideration while screening for malignancy before anti-TNF therapy.

  6. The tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B polymorphisms predict response to anti-TNF therapy in patients with autoimmune disease: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Xu, Hui; Wang, Xiuxiu; Gu, Junying; Xiong, Huizi; Shi, Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Numerous published data on the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B (TNFRSF1B) gene polymorphisms are shown to be associated with response or non-response to anti-TNF therapy in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis and Crohn's Disease (CD). The aim of this study is to investigate whether the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 T/G or TNFRSF1A A/G rs767455 polymorphisms can predict the response to anti-TNF-based therapy in patients with autoimmune diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies on the association between TNFRSF1B rs1061622 T/G polymorphism or TNFRSF1A A/G rs767455 polymorphism and non-responsiveness to anti-TNF therapy in autoimmune diseases. A total of 8 studies involving 929 subjects for TNFRSF1B rs1061622 and 564 subjects for TNFRSF1A rs767455 were finally considered. These studies consisted of seven studies on the TNFRSF1B polymorphism and four studies on the TNFRSF1A polymorphism. Meta-analysis showed significant association between the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 allele and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy [T/G odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.93, p=0.01]. Stratification by disease type indicated an association between the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 allele and non-responders to TNF antagonist in RA (T/G OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.48-0.99, p<0.05) and psoriasis (T/G OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.23-0.67, p<0.001), but not in CD (T/G OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.57-0.93, p=0.57). And there was no association between TNFRSF1A rs767455 genotype and non-responders to the anti-TNF therapy (A/G OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.70-1.23, p=0.59). This meta-analysis demonstrates that TNFRSF1B T allele carriers show a better response to anti-TNF therapy, and individuals carrying TNFRSF1A A allele have no relationship with the response to anti-TNF therapy for autoimmune diseases. The genotyping of this polymorphism could help to optimize the treatment by identifying patients with a likely poor response to biological drugs.

  7. Effect of Dosimetric Factors on Occurrence and Volume of Temporal Lobe Necrosis Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Ou, Xiaomin; Xu, Tingting; Wang, Xiaosheng; Shen, Chunying; Ding, Jianhui; Hu, Chaosu

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine dosimetric risk factors for the occurrence of temporal lobe necrosis (TLN) among nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to investigate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters on the volume of TLN lesions (V-N). Methods and Materials: Forty-three NPC patients who had developed TLN following IMRT and 43 control subjects free of TLN were retrospectively assessed. DVH parameters included maximum dose (Dmax), minimum dose (Dmin), mean dose (Dmean), absolute volumes receiving specific dose (Vds) from 20 to 76 Gy (V20-V76), and doses covering certain volumes (Dvs) from 0.25 to 6.0 cm{sup 3} (D0.25-D6.0). V-Ns were quantified with axial magnetic resonance images. Results: DVH parameters were ubiquitously higher in temporal lobes with necrosis than in healthy temporal lobes. Increased Vds and Dvs were significantly associated with higher risk of TLN occurrence (P<.05). In particular, Vds at a dose of ≥70 Gy were found with the highest odds ratios. A common increasing trend was detected between V-N and DVH parameters through trend tests (P for trend of <.05). Linear regression analysis showed that V45 had the strongest predictive power for V-N (adjusted R{sup 2} = 0.305, P<.0001). V45 of <15.1 cm{sup 3} was relatively safe as the dose constraint for preventing large TLN lesions with V-N of >5 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dosimetric parameters are significantly associated with TLN occurrence and the extent of temporal lobe injury. To better manage TLN, it would be important to avoid both focal high dose and moderate dose delivered to a large area in TLs.

  8. The Significance of Sensitive Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Patients Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu Jung; Woo, Hye In; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Jang, Dong Kyoung; Cha, Hoon Suk; Koh, Eun Mi; Lee, Nam Yong; Kang, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Objective We compared two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB, for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients before and while receiving tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist therapy. This study evaluated the significance of sensitive IGRAs for LTBI screening and monitoring. Methods Before starting TNF-α antagonist therapy, 156 consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases were screened for LTBI using QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB tests. According to our study protocol, QFT-GIT-positive patients received LTBI treatment. Patients positive by any IGRAs were subjected to follow-up IGRA tests after completing LTBI-treatment and/or during TNF-α antagonist therapy. Results At the initial LTBI screening, 45 (28.9%) and 70 (44.9%) patients were positive by QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB, respectively. The agreement rate between IGRA results was 78.8% (k = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.43 to 0.68). Of 29 patients who were positive only by T-SPOT.TB in the initial screening, 83% (19/23) were persistently positive by T-SPOT.TB, while QFT-GIT testing showed that 36% (9/25) had conversion during TNF-α antagonist therapy. By the end of the follow-up period (218 to 1,264 days), four patients (4/137, 2.9%) developed active tuberculosis (TB) diseases during receiving TNF-α antagonist therapy. Among them, one was Q-T+, one was Q+T-, and the remaining two were Q-T- at the initial screening (Q, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube; T, T-SPOT.TB; +, positive; -, negative). Two (2/4, 50%) patients with TB reactivation had at least one prior risk factor consistent with previous TB infection. Conclusion This study demonstrated the need to capitalize on sensitive IGRAs to monitor for LTBI in at-risk patients for a more sensitive diagnosis in countries with an intermediate TB burden. PMID:26474294

  9. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy improves endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: A 6-month prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pina, Trinitario; Corrales, Alfonso; Lopez-Mejias, Raquel; Armesto, Susana; Gonzalez-Lopez, Marcos A; Gómez-Acebo, Ines; Ubilla, Begoña; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Gonzalez-Vela, M Carmen; Blanco, Ricardo; Hernández, Jose L; Llorca, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if the use of the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α monoclonal antibody adalimumab could improve endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. This was a prospective study on a series of consecutive patients with moderate to severe psoriasis who completed 6 months of therapy with adalimumab. Patients with history of cardiovascular events, diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, hypertension or body mass index of 35 kg/m(2) or more were excluded. Assessment of endothelial function by brachial artery reactivity measuring flow-mediated endothelial dependent vasodilatation (FMD%), and carotid arterial stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV) was performed at the onset of treatment (time 0) and at month 6. Twenty-nine patients were studied. Anti-TNF-α adalimumab therapy yielded a significant improvement of endothelial function. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) FMD% values increased from 6.19 ± 2.44% at the onset of adalimumab to 7.46 ± 2.43% after 6 months of treatment with this biologic agent (P = 0.008). Likewise, following the use of adalimumab, PWV levels decreased from 6.28 ± 1.04 m/s at the onset of adalimumab to 5.69 ± 1.31 m/s at 6 months (P = 0.03). In conclusion, patients with moderate to severe psoriasis exhibit improvement of endothelial function and arterial stiffness following anti-TNF-α therapy. These findings are of potential relevance due to increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with severe psoriasis.

  10. Asymmetric dimethylarginine but not osteoprotegerin correlates with disease severity in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy.

    PubMed

    Pina, Trinitario; Genre, Fernanda; Lopez-Mejias, Raquel; Armesto, Susana; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Veronica; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Corrales, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Lopez, Marcos A; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C; Blanco, Ricardo; Hernández, Jose L; Llorca, Javier; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Patients with psoriasis, in particular those with severe disease, have an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events compared with the general population. The aim of the present study is to determine whether correlation between asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), two biomarkers associated with CV disease, and disease severity may exist in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. We also aimed to establish if baseline serum levels of these two biomarkers could correlate with the degree of change in the clinical parameters of disease severity following the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α therapy in these patients. This was a prospective study on a series of consecutive non-diabetic patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis who completed 6 months of therapy with anti-TNF-α-adalimumab. Patients with kidney disease, hypertension or body mass index of 35 kg/m(2) or more were excluded. Metabolic and clinical evaluation was performed immediately prior to the onset of treatment and at month 6. Twenty-nine patients were assessed. Unlike OPG, a significant positive correlation between ADMA and resistin serum levels was found at the onset of adalimumab and also after 6 months of biologic therapy. We also observed a positive correlation between the percent of body surface area affected (BSA) and ADMA levels obtained before the onset of adalimumab and a negative correlation between baseline ADMA levels and a 6-month BSA change compared with baseline results. In patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, ADMA levels correlate with clinical markers of disease severity.

  11. Dose tailoring of anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha therapy delivers useful clinical efficacy in Crohn disease patients experiencing loss of response.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, S; Costello, S; Beswick, L; Pudipeddi, A; Agarwal, A; Sechi, A; Antoniades, S; Headon, B; Connor, S; Lawrance, I C; Sparrow, M; Walsh, A J; Andrews, J M

    2015-02-01

    'Dose tailoring' of anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) therapy in Crohn disease (CD), by dose escalation, or shortening of dosing intervals, has been suggested to regain clinical response following a flare in a proportion of patients. However, reported outcome data are sparse and none exists from Australia. In an observational multicentre, retrospective study, the impact of anti-TNF-α dose tailoring on corticosteroid use, the need for surgery and physician perception of clinical efficacy was examined in a real-world setting at six Australian adult teaching hospitals. Demographics, disease characteristics, medications, indication for and duration of dose tailoring were documented. Fifty-five CD patients were identified as requiring dose tailoring and secondary loss of response was the indication in 96%. Either adalimumab (64%) or infliximab (36%) was dose escalated for a median of 5 months (range 1-47), with a median of 20 months follow up (range 3-65). At 3 months, dose tailoring reduced the mean number of days on high-dose corticosteroids (45 vs 23, P = 0.01). Most (78%) patients remained resection free, and 73% of physicians reported good clinical efficacy of dose tailoring. Of those who de-escalated therapy due to induction of remission, long-term (>12 months) follow up and complete data on steroid use were available in 15/28, with 12/15 (80%) remaining steroid free at 1 year. Short-term dose tailoring regains disease response in the majority of patients with CD. Of these, most will remain free of corticosteroids at 1 year after de-escalating therapy. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Blocking Agents as Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis Intolerant or Refractory to Conventional Medical Therapy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiyong; Wang, Yinjun; Dai, Shixue; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Xuebao

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) blockers for treatment of ulcerative colitis that is unresponsive to conventional therapy is unclear due to recent studies yielding conflicting results. Aim To assess the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF-α agents for treatment of ulcerative colitis patients who were intolerant or refractory to conventional medical therapy. Methods Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane database were searched. Analysis was performed on randomized controlled trials that assessed anti-TNF-α therapy on ulcerative colitis patients that had previously failed therapy with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. The primary outcome focused on was the frequency of patients that achieved clinical remission. Further trial outcomes of interest included rates of remission without patient use of corticosteroids during the trial, extent of mucosal healing, and the number of cases that resulted in colectomy and serious side effects. Results Eight trials from seven studies (n = 2122) met the inclusion criteria and were thus included during analysis. TNF-α blockers demonstrated clinical benefit as compared to placebo control as evidenced by an increased frequency of clinical remission (p<0.00001), steroid-free remission (p = 0.01), endoscopic remission (p<0.00001) and a decrease in frequency of colectomy (p = 0.03). No difference was found concerning serious side effects (p = 0.05). Three small trials (n = 57) comparing infliximab to corticosteroid treatment, showed no difference in frequency of clinical remission (p = 0.93), mucosal healing (p = 0.80), and requirement for a colectomy (p = 0.49). One trial compared infliximab to cyclosporine (n = 115), wherein no difference was found in terms of mucosal healing (p = 0.85), colectomy frequency (p = 0.60) and serious side effects (p = 0.23). Conclusion TNF-α blockers are effective and safe therapies for the induction and maintenance of long

  13. The Physiological Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Immunity and Its Potential Implications in Spinal Manipulative Therapy: A Narrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Yao, Chao Hua

    2016-09-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a well-known inflammatory cytokine in the pathological development of various human diseases, its physiological roles are not widely understood nor appreciated. The molecular mechanisms underlying spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) remain elusive. The relationship between TNF and SMT is unclear. Thus, we performed this literature review to better understand TNF physiology and its potential relationship with SMT, and we propose a novel mechanism by which SMT may achieve clinical benefits by using certain beneficial features of TNF. We searched several databases for relevant articles published between 1975 and 2015 and then reexamined the studies from current immunophysiological perspectives. The history and recent progresses in TNF physiology research were explored. Conflicting reports on the relationship between TNF and SMT were identified. Based on the newly discovered interaction between TNF and regulatory T cells, we proposed a putative biphasic TNF response to SMT, which may resolve the conflicts in the reported observations and interpretations. The current literature about TNF informed our discussion of new physiological roles for TNF, which may help to better understand the physiological effects of SMT.

  14. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha does not potentiate cell killing after photodynamic therapy with a silicon phthalocyanine in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Azizuddin, K; Kalka, K; Chiu, S M; Ahmad, N; Mukhtar, H; Separovic, D

    2001-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel cancer treatment utilizing a photosensitizer, visible light and oxygen. PDT with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, a new photosensitizer, is highly effective in cancer cell destruction and tumor ablation. The mechanisms underlying cancer cell killing by PDT are not fully understood. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) is a multifunctional cytokine that has been implicated in photocytotoxicity. We asked whether recombinant human TNF (rhTNF) affects Pc 4-PDT cytotoxicity in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Co-treatment of A431 cells with various doses of Pc 4-PDT and a sub-lethal rhTNF dose led to a sub-additive reduction in cell survival. In addition, in the presence of Pc 4-PDT or rhTNF, caspase-3 activity and apoptosis were induced. The combined treatment, however, did not potentiate either caspase-3 activity or apoptosis. Similar to previous findings we observed that Pc 4-PDT initiated a time-dependent extracellular TNF accumulation. The data suggest that: a) PDT and rhTNF induce cancer cell killing through different mechanisms; and b) Pc 4-PDT-induced TNF production is a stress response that may not directly affect photocytotoxicity.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Camporesi, Enrico M; Vezzani, Giuliano; Bosco, Gerardo; Mangar, Devanand; Bernasek, Thomas L

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy on a cohort of patients with femoral head necrosis (FHN). This double-blind, randomized, controlled, prospective study included 20 patients with unilateral FHN. All were Ficat stage II, treated with either compressed oxygen (HBO) or compressed air (HBA). Each patient received 30 treatments of HBO or HBA for 6 weeks. Range of motion, stabilometry, and pain were assessed at the beginning of the study and after 10, 20, and 30 treatments by a blinded physician. After the initial 6-week treatment, the blind was broken; and all HBA patients were offered HBO treatment. At this point, the study becomes observational. Pretreatment, 12-month. and 7 year-follow-up magnetic resonance images were obtained. Statistical comparisons were obtained with nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. Significant pain improvement for HBO was demonstrated after 20 treatments. Range of motion improved significantly during HBO for all parameters between 20 and 30 treatments. All patients remain substantially pain-free 7 years later: none required hip arthroplasty. Substantial radiographic healing of the osteonecrosis was observed in 7 of 9 hips. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be a viable treatment modality in patients with Ficat II FHN. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Avascular necrosis of bone complicating corticosteroid replacement therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P L; Corbett, M

    1983-01-01

    Two patients who developed widespread severe avascular necrosis of bone while on steroid replacement therapy are described. One, a diabetic, underwent yttrium-90 pituitary ablation for retinopathy and developed avascular necrosis within 18 months of starting prednisolone. The other, who had Addison's disease, developed avascular necrosis within 14 months of starting cortisol replacement therapy. Both cases came to bilateral total hip replacement. Images PMID:6859959

  17. Longterm safety and efficacy of abatacept through 5 years of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Mark C; Schiff, Michael; Luggen, Michael; Le Bars, Manuela; Aranda, Richard; Elegbe, Ayanbola; Dougados, Maxime

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate abatacept safety and efficacy over 5 years in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had inadequate response to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in the ATTAIN trial. Patients completing the 6-month, double-blind (DB) placebo-controlled period were eligible to enter the longterm extension (LTE), where all patients received abatacept every 4 weeks (∼10 mg/kg, according to weight range). Safety, efficacy, physical function, and health-related quality of life were monitored throughout. In total, 317 patients (218 DB abatacept, 99 DB placebo) entered the LTE; 150 (47.3%) completed it. Overall incidences of serious adverse events, infections, serious infections, malignant neoplasms, and autoimmune events did not increase during the LTE versus the DB period. American College of Rheumatology responses with abatacept at Month 6 were maintained over 5 years. At Year 5, among patients who received abatacept for 5 years and had available data, 38/103 (36.9%) achieved low disease activity as defined by the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)/C-reactive protein (CRP); 23/103 (22.3%) achieved DAS28/CRP-defined remission. Health Assessment Questionnaire response was achieved by 62.5% of patients remaining on treatment at Year 5; mean improvements from baseline in physical component summary and mental component summary scores were 7.34 and 6.42, respectively. High proportions of patients maintained efficacy and physical function benefits or improved their disease state at each timepoint throughout the LTE, if remaining on abatacept treatment. Safety remained consistent, and abatacept efficacy was maintained from 6 months to 5 years, demonstrating the benefits of switching to abatacept in this difficult-to-treat population of patients with RA previously failing anti-TNF therapy.

  18. No effect of tocolytic therapy with atosiban on maternal serum interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in threatened preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Vitoratos, N; Kountouris, A; Makrakis, E; Papadias, K; Creatsas, G

    2007-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of intravenous administration of tocolytic therapy with an oxytocin antagonist drug (atosiban) on maternal serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in women with threatened preterm labor. The study population consisted of 46 women with a singleton pregnancy admitted to our department with a diagnosis of threatened preterm labor at between 26 and 34 weeks of gestation. Atosiban was administered to all women. Nine women (group A) progressed to delivery within 48 hours of admission. The remaining 37 women were divided in two groups: group B consisted of 16 women who remained undelivered at 48 hours but experienced delivery within 7 days and group C consisted of 21 women who did not deliver within the next 7 days. Maternal serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were assessed in duplicate by a high sensitivity ELISA kit on patient admission and again at the end of treatment with atosiban (36 hours post-admission). Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations on admission were significantly higher in group A compared to those found in group B (p = 0.01) and group C (p = 0.04). Comparisons of serum IL-6 values on admission and at 36 hours after the initiation of atosiban treatment were comparable in group A (p = 0.95), group B (p = 0.39), and group C (p = 0.79). Similarly serum TNF-alpha levels on admission were not significantly different compared to those at the end of treatment in all groups (p = 0.85 for group A, p = 0.45 for group B, and p = 0.21 for group C). No effect of tocolytic therapy with atosiban was observed on serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels in women with threatened preterm labor.

  19. Home-based exercise therapy in ankylosing spondylitis: short-term prospective study in patients receiving tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Semra; Sahin, Zerrin; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Aytac, Deniz Hatun

    2013-01-01

    The importance of exercise and regular physiotherapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) under treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFα inhibitors) was reported in some studies, but the literature on this topic is still scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of home-based exercise therapy on functional capacity, disease activity, spinal mobility, quality of life, emotional state and fatigue in patients with AS receiving TNFα inhibitors. Forty-two AS patients were trained on the disease, and home-based exercise program was demonstrated to all the patients. At baseline and at the end of 10 week, we evaluated Bath AS Disease Activity Index, Bath AS Functional Index, Bath AS Metrology Index, Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Short-Form 36. Patients following home-based exercise program five times a week at least 30 min per session (exercise group) were compared with those exercising less than five times a week (control group). At baseline, exercise and control group had similar demographic features. After 10 weeks, all outcome parameters showed statistically significant improvements in exercise group. There were significant differences in all the parameters except social functioning subscale of Short-Form 36 between groups in favor of exercise group at 10th week (P < 0.05). Home-based exercise program is an effective therapy in increasing functional capacity and joint mobility, decreasing disease activity, improving emotional state, fatigue and quality of life for AS patient receiving TNFα inhibitors. We need to find out new ways to provide continuity of AS patients with it.

  20. Long-term anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients sensitizes the pituitary gland and favors adrenal androgen secretion.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Pongratz, Georg; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Kees, Frieder; Schaible, Thomas F; Antoni, Christian; Kalden, Joachim R; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin

    2003-06-01

    New insights into the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have expanded our understanding about the possible mechanisms by which anti-TNF antibody therapy reduces local synovial inflammation. Beyond local effects, anti-TNF treatment may modulate systemic antiinflammatory pathways such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This longitudinal anti-TNF therapy study was designed to assess these effects in RA patients. RA patients were given 5 infusions of anti-TNF at weeks 0, 2, 6, 10, and 14, with followup observation until week 16. We measured serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17[OH]progesterone), cortisol, cortisone, androstenedione (ASD), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and DHEA sulfate in 19 RA patients. Upon treatment with anti-TNF, we observed a fast decrease in the levels of serum IL-6, particularly in RA patients who did not receive parallel prednisolone treatment (P = 0.043). In these RA patients who had not received prednisolone, the mean serum ACTH levels sharply increased after every injection of anti-TNF, which indicates a sensitization of the pituitary gland (not observed for the adrenal gland). During treatment, the ratio of serum cortisol to serum ACTH decreased, which also indicates a sensitization of the pituitary gland (P < 0.001), and which was paralleled by constant cortisol secretion. The adrenal androgen ASD significantly increased relative to its precursor 17(OH)progesterone (P = 0.013) and relative to cortisol (P = 0.009), which indicates a normalization of adrenal androgen production. The comparison of patients previously treated with prednisolone and those without previous prednisolone revealed marked differences in the central and adrenal level of this endocrine axis during long-term anti-TNF therapy. Long-term therapy with anti-TNF sensitizes the pituitary gland and improves adrenal androgen secretion in patients who

  1. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, -0.99; 95% CI, -1.61 to -0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, -0.58; 95% CI, -1.10 to -0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, -0.31; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for

  2. Combination of Gold Nanoparticle-Conjugated Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Radiation Therapy Results in a Synergistic Antitumor Response in Murine Carcinoma Models.

    PubMed

    Koonce, Nathan A; Quick, Charles M; Hardee, Matthew E; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Dent, Judith A; Paciotti, Giulio F; Nedosekin, Dmitry; Dings, Ruud P M; Griffin, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Although remarkable preclinical antitumor effects have been shown for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) alone and combined with radiation, its clinical use has been hindered by systemic dose-limiting toxicities. We investigated the physiological and antitumor effects of radiation therapy combined with the novel nanomedicine CYT-6091, a 27-nm average-diameter polyethylene glycol-TNF-coated gold nanoparticle, which recently passed through phase 1 trials. The physiologic and antitumor effects of single and fractionated radiation combined with CYT-6091 were studied in the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma and SCCVII head and neck tumor squamous cell carcinoma models. In the 4T1 murine breast tumor model, we observed a significant reduction in the tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) 24 hours after CYT-6091 alone and combined with a radiation dose of 12 Gy (P<.05 vs control). In contrast, radiation alone (12 Gy) had a negligible effect on the IFP. In the SCCVII head and neck tumor model, the baseline IFP was not markedly elevated, and little additional change occurred in the IFP after single-dose radiation or combined therapy (P>.05 vs control) despite extensive vascular damage observed. The IFP reduction in the 4T1 model was also associated with marked vascular damage and extravasation of red blood cells into the tumor interstitium. A sustained reduction in tumor cell density was observed in the combined therapy group compared with all other groups (P<.05). Finally, we observed a more than twofold delay in tumor growth when CYT-6091 was combined with a single 20-Gy radiation dose-notably, irrespective of the treatment sequence. Moreover, when hypofractionated radiation (12 Gy × 3) was applied with CYT-6091 treatment, a more than five-fold growth delay was observed in the combined treatment group of both tumor models and determined to be synergistic. Our results have demonstrated that TNF-labeled gold nanoparticles combined with single or fractionated high-dose radiation

  3. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Walker, David; Kelly, Clive; Birrell, Fraser; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Maddison, Peter; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle H

    2015-03-13

    To determine whether intensive combinations of synthetic disease modifying drugs can achieve similar clinical benefits at lower costs to high cost biologics such as tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to initial methotrexate and other synthetic disease modifying drugs. Open label pragmatic randomised multicentre two arm non-inferiority trial over 12 months. 24 rheumatology clinics in England. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were eligible for treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors according to current English guidance were randomised to either the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy or the combined disease modifying drug strategy. Biologic strategy: start tumour necrosis factor inhibitor; second biologic in six month for non-responders. Alternative strategy: start combination of disease modifying drugs; start tumour necrosis factor inhibitors after six months in non-responders. reduction in disability at 12 months measured with patient recorded heath assessment questionnaire (range 0.00-3.00) with a 0.22 non-inferiority margin for combination treatment versus the biologic strategy. quality of life, joint damage, disease activity, adverse events, and costs. Intention to treat analysis used multiple imputation methods for missing data. 432 patients were screened: 107 were randomised to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and 101 started taking; 107 were randomised to the combined drug strategy and 104 started taking the drugs. Initial assessments were similar; 16 patients were lost to follow-up (seven with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, nine with the combined drug strategy); 42 discontinued the intervention but were followed-up (19 and 23, respectively). The primary outcome showed mean falls in scores on the health assessment questionnaire of -0.30 with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy and -0.45 with the alternative combined drug strategy. The difference between

  4. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors versus combination intensive therapy with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in established rheumatoid arthritis: TACIT non-inferiority randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Farewell, Vern; O’Keeffe, Aidan G; Walker, David; Kelly, Clive; Birrell, Fraser; Chakravarty, Kuntal; Maddison, Peter; Heslin, Margaret; Patel, Anita; Kingsley, Gabrielle H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether intensive combinations of synthetic disease modifying drugs can achieve similar clinical benefits at lower costs to high cost biologics such as tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to initial methotrexate and other synthetic disease modifying drugs. Design Open label pragmatic randomised multicentre two arm non-inferiority trial over 12 months. Setting 24 rheumatology clinics in England. Participants Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were eligible for treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors according to current English guidance were randomised to either the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy or the combined disease modifying drug strategy. Interventions Biologic strategy: start tumour necrosis factor inhibitor; second biologic in six month for non-responders. Alternative strategy: start combination of disease modifying drugs; start tumour necrosis factor inhibitors after six months in non-responders. Main outcome measure Primary outcome: reduction in disability at 12 months measured with patient recorded heath assessment questionnaire (range 0.00-3.00) with a 0.22 non-inferiority margin for combination treatment versus the biologic strategy. Secondary outcomes: quality of life, joint damage, disease activity, adverse events, and costs. Intention to treat analysis used multiple imputation methods for missing data. Results 432 patients were screened: 107 were randomised to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors and 101 started taking; 107 were randomised to the combined drug strategy and 104 started taking the drugs. Initial assessments were similar; 16 patients were lost to follow-up (seven with the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor strategy, nine with the combined drug strategy); 42 discontinued the intervention but were followed-up (19 and 23, respectively). The primary outcome showed mean falls in scores on the health assessment questionnaire of −0.30 with the

  5. Newest clinical trial results with antitumor necrosis factor and nonantitumor necrosis factor biologics for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-05-01

    To highlight recent evidence from the clinical trials of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and non anti-TNF biologics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) focused on comparative clinical efficacy including safety outcomes and medication discontinuation. Patients with RA are sometimes able to attain low disease activity or remission since the introduction of biologic therapy for RA. Biologics like anti-TNF, anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6), anti-CD20 and those that modulate T-cell co-stimulation have consistently shown good efficacy in patients with RA. Preliminary data from comparative efficacy studies to evaluate the potential differences between anti-TNF and non anti-TNF biologics have shown little differences among these. There is ongoing work in comparative efficacy to answer this question further. Biologic therapy in RA has significantly changed the course of RA in the last decade. Recently published clinical trials have been focused on comparative efficacy, cardiovascular safety of biologics and potential anti-TNF therapy discontinuation in patients with RA.

  6. Anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy enhances mucosal healing through down-regulation of interleukin-21 expression and T helper type 17 cell infiltration in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Xia, X; Wu, W; Wu, R; Tang, M; Chen, T; Xu, F; Cong, Y; Xu, X; Liu, Z

    2013-07-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibody (mAb) (infliximab, IFX) has been shown to be highly effective in the management of Crohn's disease (CD). Herein we investigated the potential role of IFX in inducing clinical remission and regulating interleukin (IL)-21 expression and T helper type 17 (Th17) cell infiltration in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients. Twenty-six CD patients were treated with IFX at weeks 0, 2 and 6. Clinical response, mucosal healing, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were evaluated at week 10 after IFX administration. Expression of IL-21, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor C (RORC) in intestinal mucosa were analysed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Peripheral blood and lamina propria CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 mAbs in the presence of IFX. Cytokine profiles and RORC were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time PCR. IL-21 and Th17 cells were found to be expressed highly in inflamed mucosa of active CD patients compared with healthy controls. Ten weeks after IFX infusion, CD activity index, ESR, CRP and intestinal mucosal healing were improved markedly in CD patients, and IL-21 expression and Th17 cell infiltration were decreased significantly compared with those before IFX therapy. In-vitro study demonstrated that IFX treatment could suppress IL-21, IL-17A and RORC expression in cultured CD biopsies. Moreover, IFX was also observed to down-regulate markedly IL-17A, IL-21 and RORC expression by CD CD4(+) T cells. IFX is highly effective in inducing clinical remission and promoting intestinal mucosal healing in CD patients through down-regulation of IL-21 expression and Th17 cell infiltration in intestinal mucosa. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme: an encouraging target for various inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Malkeet S; Silakari, Om

    2010-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha is one of the most common pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for various inflammatory disorders. It plays an important role in the origin and progression of rheumatoid arthritis and also in other autoimmune disease conditions. Some anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies like Enbrel, Humira and Remicade have been successfully used in these disease conditions as antagonists of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Inhibition of generation of active form of tumor necrosis factor alpha is a promising therapy for various inflammatory disorders. Therefore, the inhibition of an enzyme (tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme), which is responsible for processing inactive form of tumor necrosis factor alpha into its active soluble form, is an encouraging target. Many tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme inhibitors have been the candidates of clinical trials but none of them have reached in to the market because of their broad spectrum inhibitory activity for other matrix metalloproteases. Selectivity of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme inhibition over matrix metalloproteases is of utmost importance. If selectivity is achieved successfully, side-effects can be over-ruled and this approach may become a novel therapy for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. This cytokine not only plays a pivotal role in inflammatory conditions but also in some cancerous conditions. Thus, successful targeting of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme may result in multifunctional therapy.

  8. Acute-phase serum amyloid A regulates tumor necrosis factor α and matrix turnover and predicts disease progression in patients with inflammatory arthritis before and after biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mary; Mullan, Ronan H; McCormick, Jennifer; Matthews, Clare; Sullivan, Owen; Kennedy, Aisling; FitzGerald, Oliver; Poole, A Robin; Bresnihan, Barry; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between acute-phase serum amyloid A (A-SAA) and joint destruction in inflammatory arthritis. Serum A-SAA and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and levels of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and type I and type II collagen-generated biomarkers C2C and C1,2C were measured at 0-3 months in patients with inflammatory arthritis commencing anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNFα) therapy and were correlated with 1-year radiographic progression. The effects of A-SAA on MMP/TIMP expression on RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), primary human chondrocytes, and RA/psoriatic arthritis synovial explant cultures were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antibody protein arrays, and gelatin zymography. Serum A-SAA levels were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with MMP-3, the MMP-3:TIMP-1 ratio, C1,2C, C2C, and VEGF. The baseline A-SAA level but not the ESR or the CRP level correlated with the 28-joint swollen joint count and was independently associated with 1-year radiographic progression (P = 0.038). A-SAA increased MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and MMP/TIMP expression in RA FLS and synovial explants (P < 0.05). In chondrocytes, A-SAA induced MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 messenger RNA and protein expression (all P < 0.01), resulting in a significant shift in MMP:TIMP ratios (P < 0.05). Gelatin zymography revealed that A-SAA induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity. Blockade of the A-SAA receptor SR-B1 (A-SAA receptor scavenger receptor-class B type 1) inhibited MMP-3, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in synovial explant cultures ex vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that A-SAA has the ability to induce TNFα expression in RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). A-SAA may be involved in joint destruction though MMP induction and collagen cleavage in

  9. Relationship between exposure to tumour necrosis factor inhibitor therapy and incidence and severity of myocardial infarction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Low, Audrey S L; Symmons, Deborah P M; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K; Gale, Chris P; Watson, Kath D; Dixon, William G; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2017-04-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with subjects without RA, with the increased risk driven potentially by inflammation. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may modulate the risk and severity of MI. We compared the risk and severity of MI in patients treated with TNFi with that in those receiving synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs). This analysis included patients with RA recruited from 2001 to 2009 to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis starting TNFi (etanercept/infliximab/adalimumab) and a biologic-naïve comparator cohort receiving sDMARD. All patients were followed via physician and patient questionnaires and national death register linkage. Additionally, all patients were linked to the Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project, a national registry of hospitalisations for MI. Patients were censored at first verified MI, death, 90 days following TNFi discontinuation, last physician follow-up or 20 April 2010, whichever came first. The risk of first MI was compared between cohorts using COX regression, adjusted with propensity score deciles (PD). MI phenotype and severity were compared using descriptive statistics. 6-month mortality post MI was compared using logistic regression. 252 verified first MIs were analysed: 58 in 3058 patients receiving sDMARD and 194 in 11 200 patients receiving TNFi (median follow-up per person 3.5 years and 5.3 years, respectively). The PD-adjusted HR of MI in TNFi referent to sDMARD was 0.61 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.89). No statistically significant differences in MI severity or mortality were observed between treatment groups. Patients with RA receiving TNFi had a decreased risk of MI compared with patients with RA receiving sDMARD therapy over the medium term. This might be attributed to a direct action of TNFi on the atherosclerotic process or better overall disease control. Published by the

  10. Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis With Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor or Tocilizumab Therapy as First Biologic Agent in a Global Comparative Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H; Bernasconi, Corrado; Aassi, Maher; Molina, Jose Fernando; Epis, Oscar Massimiliano

    2017-10-01

    To compare clinical effectiveness between tocilizumab and tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inadequate response to conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs initiating biologic therapy. Patients prescribed tocilizumab (intravenous) or TNFi were prospectively observed in routine clinical practice for 52 weeks across 158 sites in 26 countries. The primary observation was the change from baseline in Disease Activity Score based on 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) at week 24 using analysis of covariance for between-groups comparison. Secondary end points included Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and patient-reported outcomes at weeks 24 and 52. Of 1,216 patients, 35% initiated tocilizumab and 65% initiated TNFi. RA duration was shorter, and disease activity and corticosteroid use were higher in tocilizumab patients. Tocilizumab-treated patients had greater improvement in DAS28-ESR at weeks 24 and 52 (week 24 difference [95% confidence interval] in adjusted means: -0.831 [-1.086, -0.576]; P < 0.001). Change from baseline in CDAI was also greater with tocilizumab (adjusted means difference: week 24, -3.48; week 52, -4.60; both P < 0.001). Tocilizumab-treated patients had more improvement in the Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index than TNFi-treated patients (P < 0.05). The cumulative probability of drug discontinuation at week 52 was lower with tocilizumab (15%) than TNFi (27%; P < 0.001, unadjusted analysis). Unadjusted frequencies (events per 100 patient-years) for tocilizumab and TNFi were 6.44 and 11.99 for serious adverse events, 1.98 and 5.03 for serious infections, and 0.74 and 0.77 for deaths, respectively. Patients initiating tocilizumab experienced greater effectiveness and drug survival than those initiating TNFi in an observational setting. © 2017 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  11. Ketoconazole attenuates radiation-induction of tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D.E.; Virudachalam, S.; Kufe, D.W.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1994-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that inhibitors of phospholipase A2 attenuate ionizing radiation-induced arachidonic acid production, protein kinase C activation, and prevent subsequent induction of the tumor necrosis factor gene. Because arachidonic acid contributes to radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor expression, the authors analyzed the effects of agents which alter arachidonate metabolism on the regulation of this gene. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinicrine, bromphenyl bromide, and pentoxyfylline or the inhibitor of lipoxygenase (ketoconazole) or the inhibitor of cycloxygenase (indomethacine) were added to cell culture 1 h prior to irradiation. Radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by each of the phospholipase A2 inhibitors (quinicrine, bromphenylbromide, and pentoxyfylline). Furthermore, ketoconazole attenuated X ray induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression. Conversely, indomethacin enhanced tumor necrosis factor expression following irradiation. The finding that radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by ketoconazole suggests that the lipoxygenase pathway participates in signal transduction preceding tumor necrosis factor induction. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor expression by indomethacin following irradiation suggests that prostaglandins produced by cyclooxygenase act as negative regulators of tumor necrosis factor expression. Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor induction ameliorate acute and subacute sequelae of radiotherapy. The authors propose therefore, that ketoconazole may reduce acute radiation sequelae such as mucositis and esophagitis through a reduction in tumor necrosis factor induction or inhibition of phospholipase A2 in addition to its antifungal activity. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  12. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  13. Bevacizumab as Therapy for Radiation Necrosis in Four Children With Pontine Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Arthur K.; Macy, Margaret E.; Foreman, Nicholas K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Diffuse pontine gliomas are a pediatric brain tumor that is fatal in nearly all patients. Given the poor prognosis for patients with this tumor, their quality of life is very important. Radiation therapy provides some palliation, but can result in radiation necrosis and associated neurologic decline. The typical treatment for this necrosis is steroid therapy. Although the steroids are effective, they have numerous side effects that can often significantly compromise quality of life. Bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, has been suggested as a treatment for radiation necrosis. We report on our initial experience with bevacizumab therapy for radiation necrosis in pediatric pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods: Four children with pontine gliomas treated at the Children's Hospital in Denver and the University of Colorado Denver developed evidence of radiation necrosis both clinically and on imaging. Those 4 children then received bevacizumab as a treatment for the radiation necrosis. We reviewed the clinical outcome and imaging findings. Results: After bevacizumab therapy, 3 children had significant clinical improvement and were able to discontinue steroid use. One child continued to decline, and, in retrospect, had disease progression, not radiation necrosis. In all cases, bevacizumab was well tolerated. Conclusions: In children with pontine gliomas, bevacizumab may provide both therapeutic benefit and diagnostic information. More formal evaluation of bevacizumab in these children is needed.

  14. VARIAR Study: Assessment of short-term efficacy and safety of rituximab compared to an tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonists as second-line drug therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis refractory to a first tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist.

    PubMed

    Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Acosta Pereira, Asunción; Morla, Rosa; Ruiz, José Miguel; Clavaguera, Teresa; Figuls, Ramon; Corominas, Hector; Geli, Carme; Roselló, Rosa; de Agustín, Juan José; Alegre, Cayetano; Pérez, Carolina; García, Angel; Rodríguez de la Serna, Arturo

    to compare the short-term efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX) therapy versus anti-TNF in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after discontinuation of a first anti-TNF agent. prospective observational multicenter study in the clinical practice setting, involving patients with severe RA refractory to a first anti-TNF agent, who received either RTX or a second anti-TNF (2TNF), comparing the efficacy endpoints, EULAR response (Good/Moderate) and safety at 6 months. 103 patients enrolled, 82 completed 6-month follow-up, 73.7% women. Baseline data for RTX and 2TNF groups, respectively: TJC, 8.6 and 6.6; SJC, 8.8 and 7.5; DAS28 score, 5.45 (±1.28) and 5.18 (±1.21) (p=0.048), ESR, 41 and 38.7mmHg; and HAQ, 1.2 and 1.0. Improvement was observed in all parameters, with no significant differences (except for a more marked reduction in ESR with RTX). There were no serious adverse events. RTX use as second-line therapy after anti-TNF failure led to improvements in the efficacy and functional variables at 6 months, with no serious adverse events. These results were comparable to those observed in patients who used a second anti-TNF agent in the same clinical scenario. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors – state of knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Krzysztof; Kuzawińska, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered a major proinflammatory cytokine, affecting various aspects of the immune reaction. All five TNF inhibitors currently available on the market (i.e., etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab and golimumab) are top sellers, although indicated only in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. This article briefly discusses the background and place for TNF inhibitors in modern therapy. The main safety aspects of TNF inhibitor administration are described in particular, with special consideration of the available meta-analyses. Finally, perspectives on the next-generation TNF inhibitors and their use in the clinic are given. PMID:25624856

  16. [The effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha on hepatic necrosis in viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Si, C; Lang, Z

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) on hepatocyte necrosis in viral hepatitis, TNF alpha with or without D-galactosamine (D-Gal) was injected into the abdominal cavity of rats. No effect was observed after injection of TNF alpha alone. After injection of TNF alpha with D-Gal, the total bilirubin level in rat blood increased and hepatocyte necrosis appeared (P < 0.05). Moreover, anti-TNF alpha McAb blocked the effect of hepatocyte necrosis produced by D-Gal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 130 samples of hepatic tissue were stained with anti-TNF alpha McAb by using ABC immunohistochemistry method. It was found that more severe the hepatocyte necrosis, more the positive cells expressing TNF alpha. There were more TNF alpha positive cells in the tissue of severe hepatitis. These results suggested that TNF alpha is a mediator in hepatocyte necrosis.

  17. Necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrosis is the death of body tissue. It occurs when too little blood flows to the tissue. This can be from injury, radiation, or chemicals. Necrosis cannot be reversed. When large ...

  18. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  19. Pregnancy outcome in women with inflammatory bowel disease treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor and/or thiopurine therapy: a multicenter study from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Shunsuke; Motoya, Satoshi; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Kunisaki, Reiko; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Kagaya, Takashi; Naganuma, Makoto; Hida, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Mamoru; Hibi, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Miura, Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs (anti-TNF) and thiopurines are important treatment options in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including during pregnancy. However, there are limited data on the benefit/risk profile of anti-TNF and thiopurines during pregnancy in Asia. The aim of this study was to analyze pregnancy outcomes of female Japanese IBD patients treated with anti-TNF and/or thiopurines. Methods This cross-sectional study assessed pregnancy outcomes in 72 women with IBD. Pregnancy outcomes were compared among 31 pregnancies without exposure to infliximab (IFX), adalimumab (ADA), or thiopurines; 24 pregnancies with exposure to anti-TNF treatment (23 IFX, 1 ADA); 7 pregnancies with exposure to thiopurines alone; and 10 pregnancies with exposure to both IFX and thiopurines. Results Thirty-five of the 41 pregnancies (85.3%) that were exposed to anti-TNF treatment and/or thiopurines resulted in live births after a median gestational period of 38 weeks. Of the 35 live births, 3 involved premature deliveries; 7, low birth weight; and 1, a congenital abnormality. There were 6 spontaneous abortions in pregnancies that were exposed to anti-TNF treatment (17.7%). Pregnancy outcomes among the 4 groups were similar, except for the rate of spontaneous abortions (P =0.037). Conclusions Exposure to anti-TNF treatment or thiopurines during pregnancy was not related to a higher incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes in Japanese IBD patients except for spontaneous abortion. PMID:27175114

  20. Systematic review of efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in patients with psoriasis previously treated with a different anti-TNF agent.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Paul S; Bissonnette, Robert; Teixeira, Henrique D; Valdecantos, Wendell C

    2016-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists have improved outcomes for patients with psoriasis, but some patients are unresponsive to treatment (primary failure) or lose an initially effective response (secondary failure). We sought to systematically investigate the efficacy and safety of a second TNF antagonist after failure of a first TNF antagonist. Published primary studies evaluating the efficacy of switching TNF antagonists after failure were systematically extracted. Fifteen studies were included. Although response rates to a second TNF antagonist were lower than for a first, a substantial proportion of patients in every study achieved treatment success. Week-24 response rates for a second antagonist were 30% to 74% for a 75% improvement in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score and 20% to 70% for achieving a Physician Global Assessment score of 0/1; mean improvements in Dermatology Life Quality Index ranged from -3.5 to -13. In general, patients who experienced secondary failure achieved better responses than patients with primary failure. Adverse event incidences ranged from 20% to 71%, without unexpected adverse events; 0% to 11% of patients experienced serious adverse events. There was no common definition of treatment failure across these studies of varied design. Some patients benefit from switching to a second TNF antagonist after failure of a first TNF antagonist, with improved quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cocktail therapy for femoral head necrosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Ling; Wang, Ching-Jen; Lee, Mel Shiuann-Sheng; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Yang, Kuender D

    2010-01-01

    Cocktail therapy consists of extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) and alendronate. We hypothesized that this combined therapy may produce better results than ESWT alone when treating hip necrosis. This prospective, randomized study evaluated the effectiveness of cocktail therapy in early hip necrosis, and then compared it to shock wave treatment alone. Sixty-three patients (98 hips) were randomly divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 28 patients (50 hips) who received cocktail therapy, and group B consisted of 35 patients (48 hips) who received only ESWT. Each affected hip was treated with 6,000 shocks of ESWT at 28 kV (equivalent to 0.62 mJ/mm2) in a single session. Cocktail patients also received HBO therapy performed in a multi-place chamber daily for 20 treatments, and they were administered 70 mg of alendronate orally per week for 1 year. The evaluations included clinical assessment, radiograph and MRI. After a minimum of 2-years of follow-up, the overall results showed 74% improved, 16% unchanged and 10% worsened in group A; and 79.2% improved, 10.4% unchanged and 10.4% worsened in group B (P = 0.717). Total hip replacement (THR) was performed for 10% of group A and 10.4% of group B (P = 0.946). MRI showed significant reduction in bone marrow edema and a trend of decrease in the size of the lesions in both groups, however, no difference was noted between the two groups. Cocktail therapy is effective for early hip necrosis, but the results are comparable to ESWT in short-term follow up. The joint effects of HBO and alendronate over EWST were not observed. Long-term results are needed to determine whether or not the synergistic effects of ESWT, HBO and alendronate over ESWT alone exist in early hip necrosis.

  2. [Factors of avascular necrosis of femoral head and osteoporosis in SARS patients' convalescence].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-ming; Wang, Shi-xin; Gao, Hong-sheng; Wang, Jing-gui; Wei, Chuan-she; Chen, Li-ming; Hui, Wu-li; Yuan, Shu-ling; Jiao, Zhen-shan; Yang, Zhen; Su, Bin

    2004-08-17

    To explore the factors affecting the pathogenesis of avascular necrosis of femoral head and osteoporosis of SARS patients during convalescent stage. The clinical data of 40 SARS patients, 12 males and 28 females, aged 29 +/- 9, hospitalized from April to June 2003, were reviewed, targeted on the use of glucocorticoids. Three months after the discharge ELISA and indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) assay were used to detect the serum IgG. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to detect the damage of the head of femur and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) was used to detect osteoporosis at the left heel. The average total dosage of methylprednisolone was (4949 +/- 2959) mg, and the average course of treatment was (24 +/- 5) days (16 to 30 days). Twenty-three patients underwent ictus therapy of corticosteroids for (8 +/- 4) days. The extenuation time of corticosteroid' dosage was (33 +/- 26) mg/d. Of the 40 patients, 36 were IgG positive with an average A value of (0.91 +/- 0.24) and 4 patients were IgG negative. Twelve patients (30%) were with type I avascular necrosis of femoral head, including 3 cases with unilateral left--necrosis and 9 cases of bilateral necrosis. The other 28 patients were without necrosis. Two patients were suffering from osteoporosis and 30 patients were with bone density decrement. The average Z values of the parameter BUA and VOS were (-1.26 +/- 0. 53) and (-0.53 +/- 0.30) respectively. The corresponding T values of the parameter BUA and VOS were (-1.49 +/- 0.59) and (-0.65 +/- 0.05) respectively. The influencing factors of femoral necrosis included the degree of healing activity, the dosage summation of corticosteroids, and length of ictus therapy. The influencing factors of bone density included age, dosage summation, and length of ictus therapy. The influencing factors of the bone fabric and flexibility included the use and length of ictus therapy. Statistics showed that serum IgG was not related with avascular necrosis of femoral

  3. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  4. Polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 gene promoter region in chronic hepatitis C virus patients and their effect on pegylated interferon-α therapy response.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Gaurav; Chakravarti, Anita; Kar, Premashish; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar

    2011-10-01

    The development and resolution of an inflammatory process is regulated by a complex interplay among cytokines that have pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. Regulatory mechanisms that control the production of cytokines include genetic polymorphism in particular promoter/leader region. Polymorphisms may directly or indirectly affect the binding of transcriptional factors, consequently increasing or decreasing the production of mRNA, thus regulating cytokine production. A total of 70 hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-positive patients and 70 healthy control subjects were included in the present study, who were attending the medical outpatient department (OPD) and wards of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi during 2006-2008. This study was designed to determine the polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 genes in patients with chronic HCV infection patients and their effect on pegylated interferon-α therapy response. Polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor-α G/G, G/A, and A/A genotype was significant between HCV patients and healthy controls. Interleukin-10 variants (G/G, G/A) were nonsignificant among HCV patients compared with healthy controls. As this is a preliminary study on small sample size, we believe that our findings may stimulate further studies on larger number of patients from this geographic region.

  5. Evaluation of Th9 lymphocytes in peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients and correlation with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: results from an in vitro pivotal study.

    PubMed

    Talotta, R; Berzi, A; Atzeni, F; Dell'Acqua, D; Sarzi Puttini, P; Trabattoni, D

    2016-09-09

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of T helper 9 (Th9) lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to identify a possible association between the percentage of Th9 and the discontinuation of a biological treatment with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (infliximab). We collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 55 consecutive RA outpatients and 10 healthy controls. Among RA patients, 15 were not receiving any immunosuppressive drug, 20 were successfully treated with infliximab and 20 discontinued infliximab because of adverse events or inefficacy and were treated with other biological agents. PBMCs were cultured with/without infliximab 50 mg/L for 18 h, and the percentage of Th9 cells was assessed by means of flow cytometry. Th9 lymphocytes were identified as interferon gamma, interleukin (IL)4-, IL17-, IL9-secreting cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4)+ T cells. Cytometric analysis revealed no significant decrease in the percentage of Th9 cells after infliximab exposure in any of the groups, although it was lower in healthy controls than RA patients either before and after the infliximab stimulation assay. Th9 cells are IL-9-secreting T helper lymphocytes whose role in RA is still poorly known. IL-9 levels are increased in RA patients, in whom this cytokine plays a crucial role. Th9 cells are the major producers of IL-9, and their prevalence is higher in RA patients than in healthy subjects; however our experiment in vitro does not demonstrate an association between Th9 lymphocytes and the response to infliximab. Further studies are required to evaluate the real involvement of Th9 population in the immunogenicity of anti-TNF agents.

  6. A comparative study of the effects of meloxicam and flunixin meglumine (NSAIDs) as adjunctive therapy on interferon and tumor necrosis factor production in calves suffering from enzootic bronchopneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, D; Zdzisińska, B; Kondracki, M; Rzeski, W; Paduch, R; Kandefer-Szerszeń, M

    2003-01-01

    The study was performed on 18 Black-and-White Lowland Breed calves with clinical signs of enzootic bronchopneumonia divided into three groups and respectively treated with oxytetracycline and meloxicam--Group I (9 animals); oxytetracycline and flunixin meglumine--Group II (3 animals); and oxytetracycline only--Group III (6 animals--control). The following observations were recorded before treatment (1st day) and two days later (3rd day): body temperature, the serum level of interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as well as cytokine production by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. The treatment of calves with a combination of oxytetracycline and meloxicam (Group I) and especially with oxytetracycline and flunixin meglumine (Group II) caused a significantly faster, in comparison to the control group, normalization of body temperature. Both drugs, meloxicam and especially flunixin meglumine, inhibited excessive TNF production in the organism (measured as the serum level of cytokine). Moreover, BAL cells isolated from calves treated with both NSAIDs were still able, ex vivo, to release TNF, in contrast to the control group (treated only with tetracycline) which lost the ability to produce TNF. The treatment of the calves with meloxicam and flunixin meglumine did not significantly influence the levels of IFN in sera but normalized ex vivo IFN production in BAL cells. These results suggest that the combination of meloxicam with an antibiotic or flunixin meglumine with an antibiotic which does not exert an immunosuppressive influence on the organism of calves suffering from enzootic bronchopneumonia is equally effective in the treatment of calves and superior to the antibiotic alone.

  7. Tumour necrosis factor-α/interleukin-10 ratio in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Cao, H; Wang, P; Liu, W; Cao, F; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    To explore the significance of the tumour necrosis factor-α/interleukin-10 ratio and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure in patients with different degrees of obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome severity. This study comprised 135 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome and 94 control subjects. Tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α/interleukin-10 ratio values were significantly higher in the obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome group than in the control group, but interleukin-10 was significantly lower. Tumour necrosis factor-α/interleukin-10 ratio values increased in line with the severity of obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome. In multivariate analysis, the tumour necrosis factor-α/interleukin-10 ratio correlated positively with the apnoea-hypopnoea index and all indices of obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome, except for age, body mass index and neck circumference. After one month of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, levels of tumour necrosis factor-α decreased; interleukin-10 showed no change. The results suggest that inflammation is activated and anti-inflammatory cytokines are decreased in obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome patients. Tumour necrosis factor-α/interleukin-10 ratio may prove useful for severity monitoring and management of obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome patients, and may reduce the need for polysomnography.

  8. A Phase IIb Study of ABT‐494, a Selective JAK‐1 Inhibitor, in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis and an Inadequate Response to Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Camp, Heidi S.; Friedman, Alan; Wang, Li; Othman, Ahmed A.; Khan, Nasser; Pangan, Aileen L.; Jungerwirth, Steven; Keystone, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of ABT‐494, a novel selective JAK‐1 inhibitor, with placebo in patients with moderate‐to‐severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response or intolerance to at least 1 anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti‐TNF) agent. Methods In this 12‐week, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, dose‐ranging study, 276 RA patients receiving a stable dose of methotrexate (MTX) who had previously received treatment with at least 1 anti‐TNF agent were randomized equally to receive immediate‐release ABT‐494 at 3, 6, 12, or 18 mg twice daily or matching placebo twice daily. The primary end point was the proportion of patients meeting the American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (achieving an ACR20 response) at week 12. Results At week 12, significantly more patients receiving ABT‐494 (53–71%) than those receiving placebo (34%) achieved an ACR20 response (by nonresponder imputation analysis) (P < 0.05), with a dose‐response relationship among all ABT‐494 doses (P < 0.001). ACR50 and ACR70 response rates were significantly higher in those receiving ABT‐494 (36–42% and 22–26%, respectively) than in those receiving placebo (16% and 4%, respectively). Changes from baseline in the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the C‐reactive protein level (DAS28‐CRP) were significantly greater for all doses of ABT‐494 than for placebo (P ≤ 0.01). Onset of action of ABT‐494 was rapid, with significant differences from placebo at week 2 both in ACR20 response rate (for 12 and 18 mg) and in change in the DAS28‐CRP (P < 0.001 for 6–18 mg). The most frequent adverse events (AEs) were headache, nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, and urinary tract infection. Infection rates were higher at higher doses of ABT‐494, but no infections were serious. No deaths were reported among those receiving ABT‐494. Conclusion In patients with an inadequate response or

  9. Therapeutic inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Srinivasan; Travis, Simon P L; Ahmad, Tariq; Jazrawi, Riadh

    2002-09-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with refractory ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease have recently been augmented by the introduction of biological therapies. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is present in elevated concentrations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and inhibitors of TNF alpha have proved effective as treatment. Strategies aimed at reducing TNF in patients with Crohn's disease, include the mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, infliximab (Centocor Inc), the humanized monoclonal antibody, CDP-571 (Celltech Group plc), the human recombinant TNF receptor fusion protein, etanercept (Immunex Corp), and thalidomide. New approaches, including the use of soluble TNF receptors, appear promising. This article reviews the evidence of therapeutic inhibition of TNF.

  10. Cocktail therapy for hip necrosis in SARS patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, To; Wang, Ching-Jen; Hsu, Shan-Lin; Chou, Wen-Yi; Lin, Po-Chun; Huang, Chung-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    There are no treatment guidelines for hip necrosis in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. A new regimen of cocktail therapy that consists of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) and oral alendronate was utilized in four patients with eight hips. This study evaluated the outcomes of cocktail therapy with a 4-year followup. There were 3 women and 1 man with an average age of 26 +/- 3.8 years. Each hip was treated with 6000 impulses of ESWT at 0.62 mJ/mm2 energy flux density in a single session. Each patient received HBO treatment for 100 sessions and oral alendronate for one year. The evaluations included pain score and Harris hip score, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected hips. At the 4-year follow-up, significant improvements in pain score and Harris hip score were observed in all cases (p < 0.001). All patients returned to work as healthcare providers. None required surgical intervention including hip replacement. MRI showed a trend of reduction in bone marrow edema and the size of the lesion, but no changes in the stage of the lesion. Cocktail therapy seems promising in delaying the disease progression of SARS-associated femoral head necrosis in the short-term.

  11. Changes in Vitamin D-Related Mineral Metabolism After Induction With Anti-Tumor Necrosis FactorTherapy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Marianne V.; Leonard, Mary B.; Thayu, Meena; Baldassano, Robert N.; de Boer, Ian H.; Shults, Justine; Denson, Lee A.; DeBoer, Mark D.; Herskovitz, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Preclinical studies suggest that TNF-α suppresses PTH synthesis, inhibits renal 1α-hydroxylase activity, and impairs fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) degradation. The impact of inflammation on vitamin D and mineral metabolism has not been well-characterized in Crohn's disease (CD). Objective: The objective of the study was to assess short-term changes in vitamin D-related mineral metabolism in CD after anti-TNF-α induction therapy. Design/Participants: Eighty-seven CD participants, aged 5–39 years, were assessed at the initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy and 10 weeks later. Outcomes: Indices of clinical disease activity and serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), calcium, PTH, FGF23, IL-6, and TNF-α were measured at each visit. A multivariable generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis was used to examine the correlates of PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] concentrations at each visit. Results: After anti-TNF-α therapy, cytokines and inflammatory markers [IL-6, TNF-α, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP)] concentrations decreased (all P < .0001), and PTH and 1,25(OH)2D concentrations increased (median 21 vs 30 pg/mL, P < .0001, and median 41.7 vs 48.1 pg/mL, P = .014, respectively). Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, DBP, and FGF23 did not change. In GEE analyses, higher IL-6, TNF-α, ESR, and CRP were associated with lower PTH concentrations (all P < .001), adjusted for corrected calcium and 25(OH)D levels. Higher PTH was associated with higher 1,25(OH)2D concentrations (P < .001) at each visit, independent of 25(OH)D concentrations. Higher levels of all inflammatory markers were associated with lower 1,25(OH)2D concentrations (all P < .05). However, when PTH was added to these models, the inflammatory markers (with the exception of CRP) were no longer significantly associated with 1,25(OH)2D. Conclusions: Greater

  12. [Avascular necrosis of the jaw bone after bisphosphonate therapy].

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Binyamin; Levy, Yaacov; Kleinman, Shlomi; Better, Hadar; Kahn, Adi; Shtabsky, Alexander; Chaushu, Gavriel

    2005-08-01

    Bisphosphonates have an antiosteolytic effect by the inhibition of osteoclastic action. Although the exact mode of action is not completely understood, major progress on both the cellular and molecular levels has been made in recent years. Bisphosphonates alleviate pain and reduce complications, such as pathologic fractures, or hypercalcemia. Dental and periodontal research has shown great interest in clinical applications of bisphosphonates' antiosteolytic and antiosteoclastic traits, since they can be applied to counteract bone loss in chronic periodontitis. Investigations have associated avascular necrosis events in the jawbones with bisphosphonate therapy. Maxillary and mandibular osteonecrotic foci accompanied by pain, inconvenience and purulent exudates were incidentally found in patients who were taking pamidronate (Aredia), zolendronate (Zometa) and even alendronate (Fosalan). Our institutional database search over the past year yielded ten patients who were admitted to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, due to an osteonecrotic bone lesion coupled with a prior history of bisphosphonate therapy. All these patients also had a recent dental extraction. They were all treated according to the osteomyelitis protocol, and their response to therapy varied from several weeks to many months, with some cases requiring repeat surgical intervention (curettage or sequestrectomy). This article strives to alert on the possible linkage between drug therapy using bisphosphonates and the serious event of avascular jawbone necrosis. The important role of the oral surgeon in following up on this group of patients should not be underestimated.

  13. Irradiation enhances the tumor tropism and therapeutic potential of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-secreting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Muk; Oh, Ji Hyeon; Park, Soon A; Ryu, Chung Heon; Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Dal-Soo; Chang, Jong Wook; Oh, Wonil; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2010-12-01

    Irradiation is a standard therapy for gliomas and many other cancers. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is one of the most promising candidates for cancer gene therapy. Here, we show that tumor irradiation enhances the tumor tropism of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) and the therapeutic effect of TRAIL delivered by UCB-MSCs. The sequential treatment with irradiation followed by TRAIL-secreting UCB-MSCs (MSC-TRAIL) synergistically enhanced apoptosis in either TRAIL-sensitive or TRAIL-resistant glioma cells by upregulating the death receptor 5 and by inducing caspase activation. Migration assays showed greater MSC migration toward irradiated glioma cells and the tumor site in glioma-bearing mice compared with unirradiated tumors. Irradiated glioma cells had increased expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), which leads to the upregulation of the IL-8 receptor on MSCs. This upregulation, which is involved in the migratory capacity of UCB-MSCs, was confirmed by siRNA inhibition and an antibody-neutralizing assay. In vivo survival experiments in orthotopic xenografted mice showed that MSC-based TRAIL gene delivery to irradiated tumors had greater therapeutic efficacy than a single treatment. These results suggest that clinically relevant tumor irradiation increases the therapeutic efficacy of MSC-TRAIL by increasing tropism of MSCs and TRAIL-induced apoptosis, which may be a more useful strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  14. Vasculitis Associated With Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sokumbi, Olayemi; Wetter, David A.; Makol, Ashima; Warrington, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical characteristics, histopathologic features, and outcomes of patients in whom vasculitis developed in association with use of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors. Patients and Methods This is a retrospective review of patients evaluated at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, from January 1, 1998, through March 31, 2011, with a diagnosis of vasculitis induced by anti–TNF-α therapy. Results Of 8 patients with vasculitis associated with anti–TNF-α therapy (mean age, 48.5 years), 6 (75%) were female. Four (50%) had rheumatoid arthritis, 1 (13%) had Crohn disease, and 3 (38%) had ulcerative colitis. Five (63%) were treated with infliximab, 2 (25%) with etanercept, and 1 (13%) with adalimumab. The mean duration of treatment before development of vasculitis was 34.5 months. The skin was the predominant organ affected (5 patients [63%]), with the most common cutaneous lesion being palpable purpura (4 of 5 [80%]). Two organs involved in systemic vasculitis were the peripheral nervous system (4 patients [50%]) and kidney (1 patient [13%]). All cases of vasculitis were histopathologically confirmed. Seven of 8 patients improved with discontinuation of therapy (mean time to resolution, 6.9 months) and adjuvant treatment (all 8 received prednisone; another agent was also used in 7); rechallenge with anti–TNF-α therapy was not attempted in any patient. At last follow-up, no patients had experienced a recurrence of vasculitis after therapy discontinuation. Conclusion Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis was the most common finding, but systemic vasculitis, including peripheral nerve and renal vasculitis, was also frequently observed. PMID:22795634

  15. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mewar, Devesh; Wilson, Anthony G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the key mediators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have resulted in the development of novel therapies primarily targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) are the most widely used of the biological therapies at present with five different agents currently available; four are based on monoclonal anti-TNF antibodies and a soluble TNF receptor-Fc fusion protein. Long-term use of these molecules has proven to be highly effective in the majority of patients; however, around one-third have a suboptimal response potentially leading to further cartilage and bone damage, furthermore these agents are expensive compared with conventional therapies such as methotrexate. Many recent studies have attempted to identify therapeutic response biomarkers of TNF inhibitors which could be used to improve therapeutic targeting. The presence of rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citullinated protein antibodies, present in around 65% of RA patients, are associated with a poorer response to anti-TNF agents. Poorer response is also associated with levels of C-reactive protein and cartilage degradation product at initiation of treatment. Intriguingly, genetic studies of variants of TNF and of genes encoding members of the Toll-like receptors, nuclear factor-kappa B and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling families have been associated with response to individual anti-TNF agents. Continued advances in technologies such as ultra high throughput sequencing and proteomics should facilitate the discovery of additional biomarkers of response to anti-TNF resulting in improved disease control and quality of life for RA patients and reduced costs for healthcare funders. PMID:21039421

  16. Risk of serious infections, cutaneous bacterial infections, and granulomatous infections in patients with psoriasis treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor agents versus classic therapies: Prospective meta-analysis of Psonet registries.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Doval, Ignacio; Cohen, Arnon D; Cazzaniga, Simone; Feldhamer, Ilan; Addis, Antonio; Carretero, Gregorio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Stern, Robert S; Naldi, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in psoriasis has been associated with an increased risk of serious infections compared with nonbiologic systemic therapies. We sought to quantify the risk of: (1) serious infections (leading to hospitalization, sequelae, or death); and (2) "any infection," bacterial cutaneous infections, and granulomatous infections among patients receiving anti-TNF therapy compared with nonbiologics (acitretin, methotrexate, cyclosporine). We used prospective meta-analysis to combine data from the Psocare registry (Italy), Biobadaderm registry (Spain), and Clalit Health Services database (Israel), including 17,739 patients and 23,357.5 person-years of follow-up. For serious infections, age, gender, and Charlson morbidity index adjusted hazard ratio of exposure to anti-TNFs compared with nonbiologics was 0.98 (95% confidence interval 0.80-1.19), for bacterial cutaneous infections it was 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.62-1.61), and for granulomatous infections it was 1.23 (95% confidence interval 0.82-1.84). Using methotrexate as comparator and comparing first year of exposure with later exposure did not modify the results. For any infectious episode, risks and relative risks were heterogeneous among registries, probably because of different definitions of outcome. There was lack of power to describe risk of single drugs. In current clinical practice, treatment with anti-TNF drugs was not associated with a higher risk of serious infections than treatment with nonbiologic systemic therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Safe re-administration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis who developed active tuberculosis on previous anti-TNFα therapy.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Sun; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Park, Kyung-Su; Park, Sung-Hwan; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus on whether it is safe to re-administer tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) flared after withdrawal of TNFα inhibitors due to active tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated the safety of restarting anti-TNFα therapy in patients with TNFα-associated TB. We used data of 1,012 patients with RA or AS treated with TNFα inhibitors at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital between January 2003 and July 2013 to identify patients who developed active TB. Demographic and clinical data including the results of tuberculin skin tests (TST) and interferon-γ releasing assays (IGRA) were collected. Fifteen patients developed active TB. Five cases were occurred in RA and 10 cases in AS. Nine of 15 patients had a negative TST or IGRA and 6 TST-positive patients had received prophylaxis prior to initiating anti-TNFα therapy. All patients discontinued TNFα inhibitors with starting the treatment of TB. Eight patients were re-administered TNFα inhibitors due to disease flares and promptly improved without recurrence of TB. TNFα inhibitors could be safely resumed after starting anti-TB regimen in patients with RA or AS.

  18. Effects of periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein, sE-selectin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by peripheral blood-derived macrophages in diabetes. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lalla, E; Kaplan, S; Yang, J; Roth, G A; Papapanou, P N; Greenberg, S

    2007-06-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for vascular disease and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of periodontal treatment in diabetes with respect to alterations in the pro-inflammatory potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ten patients with diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis received full-mouth subgingival debridement. Blood samples for serum/plasma and mononuclear cell isolation were collected prior to and 4 wk after therapy. Mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or ionomycin/phorbol ester to determine the pro-inflammatory capacity of macrophages and lymphocytes, respectively. Following periodontal treatment, all patients demonstrated a significant improvement in clinical periodontal status (p < 0.05), despite only modest reduction in subgingival bacterial load or homologous serum immunoglobulin G titers. CD14(+) blood monocytes decreased by 47% (p < 0.05), and the percentage of macrophages spontaneously releasing tumor necrosis factor-alpha decreased by 78% (p < 0.05). There were no significant changes in the capacity of lymphocytes to secrete interferon-gamma. Among a number of serum inflammatory markers tested, high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein significantly decreased by 37% (p < 0.01) and soluble E-selectin decreased by 16.6% (p < 0.05). These data suggest a reduced tendency for monocyte/macrophage-driven inflammation with periodontal therapy and a potential impact on atherosclerosis-related complications in diabetic individuals.

  19. Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma arising in patients with immunodysregulatory disorders: a study of 7 patients who did not receive tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Mariko; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Daneshbod, Yahya; Davanlou, Masoud; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Moran, Elisa J; Young, Ken H; Miranda, Roberto N

    2017-02-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare and aggressive extranodal T-cell lymphoma that can arise in patients with underlying immune disorders. Others have suggested that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor therapy for immune disorders increases the risk of HSTCL. To assess for a potential relationship between HSTCL and the use of TNF-α inhibitors, we searched for patients with HSTCL and underlying immune disorders at our institution. We identified 7 patients with a median age of 38 years. Five patients had Crohn disease, 1 ulcerative colitis, and 1 rheumatoid arthritis. In 6 patients, medication history for the immune disorder was available: 6 patients received 6-mercaptopurine or azathioprine, and 2 patients received steroids; no patients received TNF-α inhibitors. In all 7 patients, the histologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic findings were similar to cases of HSTCL that arise in immunocompetent patients. We reviewed the literature and identified 60 patients with immune disorders who subsequently developed HSTCL. These patients were treated with immunosuppressive drugs in 89%, TNF-α inhibitors in 56%, and both therapies in 54%, and 1 (2%) patient was treated with TNF-α inhibitors only. Our cohort and literature review indicates that TNF-α inhibitor therapy is not essential for the development of HSTCL in patients with immunodysregulatory disorders, and implies that immunosuppressive drugs or other factors (eg, genetic predisposition, chronic antigenic stimulation) may be more critical in the pathogenesis in this context. Although these data are observational, they have implications for the use of TNF-α inhibitors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other immunodysregulatory disorders.

  20. [Graner's intercarpal arthrodesis as therapy of aseptic lunate bone necrosis].

    PubMed

    Ehall, R; Neubauer, W; Stampfel, O; Peicha, G

    1990-07-01

    From 1978 till 1989 at the Department of Orthopaedics (University of Graz, Faculty of Medicine, Division of Surgery) 25 patients were operated for the reason of an avascular necrosis of the lunate bone when the bone structures were already destroyed. The form of therapy was the intercarpal-arthrodesis, developed by Orlando Graner 1966, in a slightly modified way. On the one hand through creating an intercarpal block it is possible to create more or less plain sides of the radiocarpal joint and on the other hand one can stop the carpal collapse what explains long-term-results rather acceptable. The most important disadvantage of this form of therapy is the often found loss of range of movement in the operated radiocarpal joint.

  1. One-Year Tuberculosis Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Starting Their First Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy from 2008 to 2012 in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chao, Wen-Cheng; Liao, Tsai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of tuberculosis (TB) among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients within 1 year after initiation of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy from 2008 to 2012. Methods We used the 2003–2013 Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to identify RA patients who started any RA-related medical therapy from 2008 to 2012. Those who initiated etanercept or adalimumab therapy during 2008–2012 were selected as the TNFi group and those who never received biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy were identified as the comparison group after excluding the patients who had a history of TB or human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We used propensity score matching (1:6) for age, sex, and the year of the drug index date to re-select the TNFi group and the non-TNFi controls. After adjusting for potential confounders, hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to examine the 1-year TB risk in the TNFi group compared with the non-TNFi controls. Subgroup analyses according to the year of treatment initiation and specific TNFi therapy were conducted to assess the trend of 1-year TB risk in TNFi users from 2008 to 2012. Results This study identified 5,349 TNFi-treated RA patients and 32,064 matched non-TNFi-treated controls. The 1-year incidence rates of TB were 1,513 per 105 years among the TNFi group and 235 per 105 years among the non-TNFi controls (incidence rate ratio, 6.44; 95% CI, 4.69–8.33). After adjusting for age, gender, disease duration, comoridities, history of TB, and concomitant medications, TNFi users had an increased 1-year TB risk (HR, 7.19; 95% CI, 4.18–12.34) compared with the non-TNFi-treated controls. The 1-year TB risk in TNFi users increased from 2008 to 2011 and deceased in 2012 when the Food and Drug Administration in Taiwan announced the Risk Management Plan for patients scheduled to receive TNFi therapy. Conclusion This

  2. One-Year Tuberculosis Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Starting Their First Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy from 2008 to 2012 in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chong-Hong; Lin, Ching-Heng; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chao, Wen-Cheng; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the risk of tuberculosis (TB) among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients within 1 year after initiation of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy from 2008 to 2012. We used the 2003-2013 Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to identify RA patients who started any RA-related medical therapy from 2008 to 2012. Those who initiated etanercept or adalimumab therapy during 2008-2012 were selected as the TNFi group and those who never received biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug therapy were identified as the comparison group after excluding the patients who had a history of TB or human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We used propensity score matching (1:6) for age, sex, and the year of the drug index date to re-select the TNFi group and the non-TNFi controls. After adjusting for potential confounders, hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to examine the 1-year TB risk in the TNFi group compared with the non-TNFi controls. Subgroup analyses according to the year of treatment initiation and specific TNFi therapy were conducted to assess the trend of 1-year TB risk in TNFi users from 2008 to 2012. This study identified 5,349 TNFi-treated RA patients and 32,064 matched non-TNFi-treated controls. The 1-year incidence rates of TB were 1,513 per 105 years among the TNFi group and 235 per 105 years among the non-TNFi controls (incidence rate ratio, 6.44; 95% CI, 4.69-8.33). After adjusting for age, gender, disease duration, comoridities, history of TB, and concomitant medications, TNFi users had an increased 1-year TB risk (HR, 7.19; 95% CI, 4.18-12.34) compared with the non-TNFi-treated controls. The 1-year TB risk in TNFi users increased from 2008 to 2011 and deceased in 2012 when the Food and Drug Administration in Taiwan announced the Risk Management Plan for patients scheduled to receive TNFi therapy. This study showed that the 1-year TB risk in RA

  3. Predicting low disease activity and remission using early treatment response to antitumour necrosis factor therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: exploratory analyses from the TEMPO trial.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Lang; Park, Grace S; Bitman, Bojena; Wang, Brian; Navarro-Millan, Iris; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2012-02-01

    To derive and validate decision trees to categorise rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients 12 weeks after starting etanercept with or without methotrexate into three groups: patients predicted to achieve low disease activity (LDA) at 1 year; patients predicted not to achieve LDA at 1 year and patients who needed additional time on therapy to be categorised. Data from RA patients enrolled in the TEMPO trial were analysed. Classification and regression trees were used to develop and validate decision tree models with week 12 and earlier assessments that predicted long-term LDA. LDA, defined as disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) ≤3.2 or clinical disease activity index ≤10.0, was measured at 52 or 48 weeks. Demographics, laboratory data and clinical data at baseline and to week 12 were analysed as predictors of response. 39% (67/172) of patients receiving etanercept and 60% (115/193) of patients receiving etanercept plus methotrexate achieved LDA at week 52. For patients receiving etanercept, 53% were predicted to have LDA, 39% were predicted not to have LDA and 8% could not be categorised using DAS28 criteria at week 12. For patients receiving etanercept plus methotrexate, 63% were predicted to have LDA, 25% were predicted not to have LDA and 12% could not be categorised. Most (80-90%) patients in TEMPO initiating etanercept with or without methotrexate could be predicted within 12 weeks of starting therapy as likely to have LDA or not at week 52. However, approximately 10-20% of patients needed additional time on therapy to decide whether to continue treatment.

  4. Rebound in Measures of Disease Activity and Symptoms in Corrona Registry Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis Who Discontinue Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy after Achieving Low Disease Activity.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Leslie R; Stolshek, Bradley S; Rebello, Sabrina; Collier, David H; Mutebi, Alex; Wade, Sally W; Malley, Wendi; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Etzel, Carol J

    2017-10-01

    Rebound may occur in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who discontinue TNF inhibitor (TNFi) therapy in low disease activity (LDA). Using physician and patient reports, we quantified rebound following TNFi discontinuation [defined as Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score > 10 or TNFi restart] and time to rebound in adults with PsA in LDA (CDAI score ≤ 10) at TNFi discontinuation. Rebound occurred in 73% (69/94) of patients soon after discontinuation (median time to rebound 8.0 mos, 95% CI 6.0-12.0). Rebound occurred frequently in patients with PsA after TNFi discontinuation. TNFi discontinuation after achieving LDA should be carefully considered.

  5. Non-length-dependent and length-dependent small-fiber neuropathies associated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: expanding the spectrum of neurological disease associated with TNF-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Julius; Bingham, Clifton O

    2014-04-01

    Small-fiber neuropathy causes severe burning pain, requires diagnostic approaches such as skin biopsy, and encompasses two subtypes based on distribution of neuropathic pain. Such biopsy-proven subtypes of small-fiber neuropathies have not been previously described as complications of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor therapy. We therefore characterized clinical and skin biopsy findings in three rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who developed small-fiber neuropathies associated with TNF-inhibitors. We also conducted a systematic review of the literature to characterize subtypes of neuropathies previously reported in association with TNF-inhibitor therapy. Two patients presented with a "non-length-dependent" small-fiber neuropathy, experiencing unorthodox patterns of burning pain affecting the face, torso, and proximal extremities. Abnormal skin biopsy findings were limited to the proximal thigh, which is a marker of proximal-most dorsal root ganglia degeneration. In contrast, one patient presented with a "length-dependent" small-fiber neuropathy, experiencing burning pain only in the feet. Abnormal skin biopsy findings were limited to the distal feet, which is a marker of distal-most axonal degeneration. One patient developed a small-fiber neuropathy in the context of TNF-inhibitor-induced lupus. In all patients, neuropathies occurred during TNF-inhibitor-induced remission of RA disease activity and improved on withdrawal of TNF-inhibitors. We describe a spectrum of small-fiber neuropathies not previously reported in association with TNF-inhibitor therapy, with clinical and skin biopsy findings suggestive of dorsal root ganglia as well as axonal degeneration. The development of small-fiber neuropathies during inactive joint disease and improvement of neuropathic pain upon withdrawal of TNF-inhibitor suggest a causative role of TNF-inhibitors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Non-length-dependent and length-dependent small-fiber neuropathies associated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Expanding the spectrum of neurological disease associated with TNF-inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Julius; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Small-fiber neuropathy causes severe burning pain, requires diagnostic approaches such as skin biopsy, and encompasses two subtypes based on distribution of neuropathic pain. Such biopsy-proven subtypes of small-fiber neuropathies have not been previously described as complications of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor therapy. Methods We therefore characterized clinical and skin biopsy findings in three rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who developed small-fiber neuropathies associated with TNF-inhibitors. We also conducted a systematic review of the literature to characterize subtypes of neuropathies previously reported in association with TNF-inhibitor therapy. Results Two patients presented with a “non-length-dependent” small-fiber neuropathy, experiencing unorthodox patterns of burning pain affecting the face, torso, and proximal extremities. Abnormal skin biopsy findings were limited to the proximal thigh, which is a marker of proximal-most dorsal root ganglia degeneration. In contrast, one patient presented with a “length-dependent” small-fiber neuropathy, experiencing burning pain only in the feet. Abnormal skin biopsy findings were limited to the distal feet, which is a marker of distal-most axonal degeneration. One patient developed a small-fiber neuropathy in the context of TNF-inhibitor-induced lupus. In all patients, neuropathies occurred during TNF-inhibitor-induced remission of RA disease activity and improved on withdrawal of TNF-inhibitors. Conclusions We describe a spectrum of small-fiber neuropathies not previously reported in association with TNF-inhibitor therapy, with clinical and skin biopsy findings suggestive of dorsal root ganglia as well as axonal degeneration. The development of small-fiber neuropathies during inactive joint disease and improvement of neuropathic pain upon withdrawal of TNF-inhibitor suggest a causative role of TNF-inhibitors. PMID:24439654

  7. The 6-month safety and efficacy of abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent a washout after anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy or were directly switched to abatacept: the ARRIVE trial

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, M; Pritchard, C; Huffstutter, J E; Rodriguez-Valverde, V; Durez, P; Zhou, X; Li, T; Bahrt, K; Kelly, S; Le Bars, M; Genovese, M C

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety, tolerability and efficacy of abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had failed anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy and were switched to abatacept directly or after completing washout. Methods: In this international, 6-month, open-label trial, patients had active RA, an inadequate response to anti-TNF therapy for 3 months or longer and a disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28 (C-reactive protein; CRP) of 5.1 or greater. “Washout” patients discontinued anti-TNF therapy 2 months or longer pre-screening; “direct-switch” patients began abatacept (∼10 mg/kg) at their next scheduled anti-TNF therapy dose. Results: 1046 patients were treated (449 washout, 597 direct-switch; baseline characteristics were similar between groups). At 6 months, adverse events (AE; 78.0% vs 79.2%), serious AE (11.1% vs 9.9%) and discontinuations due to AE (3.8% vs 4.0%) and serious AE (2.0% vs 1.3%) were comparable in washout versus direct-switch patients. There were no opportunistic infections. At 6 months, in washout versus direct-switch patients, similar clinically meaningful improvements were seen in DAS28 (CRP) (⩾1.2 unit improvement, 59.5% vs 53.6%, respectively; low disease activity state, 22.5% vs 22.3%; DAS28-defined remission, 12.0% vs 13.7%), physical function (health assessment questionnaire disability index ⩾0.22 improvement; 46.3% vs 47.1%) and health-related quality of life (mean change in short-form 36 scores: physical component summary, 5.5 vs 6.1; mental component summary, 4.8 vs 5.4). Conclusion: Abatacept demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability and clinically meaningful efficacy over 6 months in patients with inadequate response to anti-TNF therapy. Results were comparable with or without a washout, supporting direct switching from anti-TNF therapy to abatacept as an option in clinical practice. Trial registration number: NCT00124982. PMID:19074911

  8. Tumor necrosis factor blockade and the risk of viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Young; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers have been widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. An increased risk of tuberculosis and opportunistic infections with TNF-α blockers has been well reported because of the primary role of TNF-α in host defense and immune response. However, little is known about the association between TNF-α blockers and viral infections. Because interferon-γ and TNF-α play critical roles in the control of viral infection, depletion of TNF by treatment with TNF-α blockade may facilitate the risk of or reactivation of viral infection. Several large observational studies have recently found an increased risk of herpes zoster in patients receiving TNF-α blockers for rheumatoid arthritis. This review draws attention to several important viral infections such as human immunodeficiency, varicella-zoster and Epstein-Barr viruses, cytomegalovirus, and human papillomavirus in patients receiving TNF-α blocking therapy, their implications in clinical practice, and possible preventative approach with vaccination. PMID:20142812

  9. Cutaneous adverse events during treatment of chronic inflammatory rheumatic conditions with tumor necrosis factor antagonists: study using the Spanish registry of adverse events of biological therapies in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M Victoria; Sanmartí, Raimon; Cañete, Juan D; Descalzo, Miguel A; Alsina, Mercè; Carmona, Loreto; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the incidence rate (IR) and risk factors of cutaneous adverse events (CAE) in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. We analyzed all patients from the BIOBADASER (Base de Datos de Productos Biológicos de la Sociedad Española de Reumatología) registry treated with a TNF antagonist (infliximab, etanercept, or adalimumab). Data collected included age, sex, diagnosis and duration of rheumatic disease, type of TNF antagonist, and concomitant treatment. Type of CAE was classified as local or systemic cutaneous manifestation related to treatment administration (infusion reaction), infection, malignancy, or autoimmune skin disease. Time of onset of CAE and outcome were also recorded. The IRs of CAE per 1,000 patient-years of exposure with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors for CAE. A total of 5,437 patients were included, representing 17,330 patient-years of exposure. A total of 920 CAE were reported; the IRs per 1,000 patient-years were 53 (95% CI 50-57) for CAE, 28 (95% CI 25-30) for infection, 15 (95% CI 13-17) for infusion reactions, 5 (95% CI 4-6) for autoimmune skin diseases, and 3 (95% CI 2-4) for skin malignancy. The mean time between starting TNF antagonist treatment and CAE was 1.78 years. In 32% of patients, CAE required TNF antagonist withdrawal. The main risk factors for CAE were female sex and treatment with infliximab, leflunomide, and glucocorticoids. The IR of CAE in patients treated with TNF antagonists is significant and should be addressed carefully, and withdrawal of therapy is required in some cases. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Linton, Okechukwu R.; Calley, Cynthia S.J.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3}, or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3} or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving

  11. Evidence for ovarian tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roby, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    Ovarian folliculogenesis and luteal formation occur concomitantly with the development of new blood vessels that function in nutritional support of the developing follicles. As follicles undergo atresia and the corpus luteum regresses, blood vessels supplying these tissues degenerate. The first study determined if the ovary contained factors that might regulate ovarian angiogenesis. The bovine ovary was subjected to ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation and the precipitates (ppt.) were assayed in vitro for effects on endothelial cell (CPAE) and fibroblast (3T3 and L929) incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine. Heparin sepharose (HS) chromatography of the 80% AS ppt. revealed the inhibitory activity on CPAE and L929 cells did not bind to HS but was found in the HS column breakthrough (80% BT). Sizing chromatography of the 80% BT indicated thymidine incorporation inhibitory activity exhibited a molecular weight of 30,000-50,000 Daltons. TNF was immunohistochemically localized in the human, bovine and rat ovary. Frozen sections were incubated with polyclonal antibody to human recombinant TNF. Antigen-antibody binding was visualized using a Biotin-StreptAvidin peroxidase technique. Immunoreactive TNF (I-TNF) was localized in corpora lutea and the more antral layers of granulosa cells in antral follicles. Incubation of sections with anti-TNF in the presence of excess TNF resulted in lose of immunostaining. Cell blotting and ELISA further indicated I-TNF was present in granulosa cells. In order to determine whether TNF had an effect on follicular steroidogenesis, preovulatory follicles from cyclic proestrus rats were incubated in vitro for up to 24 hours with various doses of human recombinant TNF. Stepwise increases in progesterone (P) accumulation in the incubation media were observed with 30-300 pM TNF.

  12. Inhibition of NF-κB Pathway and Modulation of MAPK Signaling Pathways in Glioblastoma and Implications for Lovastatin and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi Chu; Lu, Gang; Deng, Yi; Wang, Cheng Dong; Su, Xian Wei; Zhou, Jing Ye; Chan, Tat Ming; Hu, Xiang; Poon, Wai Sang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a common malignant brain tumor and it is refractory to therapy because it usually contains a mixture of cell types. The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to induce apoptosis in a range of tumor cell types. Previously, we found that two human glioblastoma cell lines are resistant to TRAIL, while lovastatin sensitizes these glioblastoma cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma cell lines by lovastatin. Furthermore, we have confirmed the anti-tumor effect of combination therapy with lovastatin and TRAIL in the subcutaneous brain tumor model. We showed that lovastatin significantly up-regulated the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5) in glioblastoma cell lines as well as in tumor-bearing mice with peri-tumoral administration of lovastatin. Further study in glioblastoma cell lines suggested that lovastatin treatment could inhibit NF-κB and Erk/MAPK pathways but activates JNK pathway. These results suggest that lovastatin sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of DR5 level via NF-κB inactivation, but also directly induces apoptosis by dysregulation of MAPK pathway. Our in vivo study showed that local peri-tumoral co-injection of lovastatin and TRAIL substantially reduced tumor growth compared with single injection of lovastatin or TRAIL in subcutaneous nude mice model. This study suggests that combined treatment of lovastatin and TRAIL is a promising therapeutic strategy to TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma.

  13. Inhibition of NF-κB Pathway and Modulation of MAPK Signaling Pathways in Glioblastoma and Implications for Lovastatin and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi; Wang, Cheng Dong; Su, Xian Wei; Zhou, Jing Ye; Chan, Tat Ming; Hu, Xiang; Poon, Wai Sang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a common malignant brain tumor and it is refractory to therapy because it usually contains a mixture of cell types. The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to induce apoptosis in a range of tumor cell types. Previously, we found that two human glioblastoma cell lines are resistant to TRAIL, while lovastatin sensitizes these glioblastoma cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human glioblastoma cell lines by lovastatin. Furthermore, we have confirmed the anti-tumor effect of combination therapy with lovastatin and TRAIL in the subcutaneous brain tumor model. We showed that lovastatin significantly up-regulated the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5) in glioblastoma cell lines as well as in tumor-bearing mice with peri-tumoral administration of lovastatin. Further study in glioblastoma cell lines suggested that lovastatin treatment could inhibit NF-κB and Erk/MAPK pathways but activates JNK pathway. These results suggest that lovastatin sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of DR5 level via NF-κB inactivation, but also directly induces apoptosis by dysregulation of MAPK pathway. Our in vivo study showed that local peri-tumoral co-injection of lovastatin and TRAIL substantially reduced tumor growth compared with single injection of lovastatin or TRAIL in subcutaneous nude mice model. This study suggests that combined treatment of lovastatin and TRAIL is a promising therapeutic strategy to TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma. PMID:28135339

  14. Influence of variants of Fc gamma receptors IIA and IIIA on the American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism responses to anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cañete, J D; Suárez, B; Hernández, M V; Sanmartí, R; Rego, I; Celis, R; Moll, C; Pinto, J A; Blanco, F J; Lozano, F

    2009-10-01

    Fc gamma receptor (Fc gammaR) polymorphism influences the affinity of the receptor for Ig, which may, in turn, affect the efficacy of Ig-based therapies. The relationship between functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of the FCGR2A and FCGR3A genes and the response to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha therapy (infliximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed. A total of 91 patients with RA (89% female; 76.7% rheumatoid factor (RF) positive) starting therapy with infliximab were evaluated at 0, 6 and 30 weeks using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria and the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) was evaluated using three parameters, including C-reactive protein (CRP) (DAS28 3v-CRP) changes during the follow-up. Genotyping of FCGR2A-R131H and FCGR3A-F158V polymorphisms was performed by allele-specific PCR and PCR sequence-based typing, respectively. The chi(2) and Fisher exact tests were used to show differences in the outcome variables, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to analyse the evolution of DAS28 3v-CRP. A generalised linear models multivariable analysis was also performed. At week 6 of follow-up, the proportion of patients achieving 50% improvement as per ACR criteria (ACR50) and EULAR good responses were significantly higher among homozygotes of the low affinity FCGR3A allele (FF: 24.1% and VV-VF:2.2%; p = 0.003 and FF: 44.8% and VV-VF: 22.9%; p = 0.040, respectively). At week 30, homozygotes of the low affinity FCGR2A allele had a better ACR20 response (RR: 60% and HH-RH: 33.3%; p = 0.035). Changes in DAS28 3v-CRP during follow-up were consistent with those observed in ACR and EULAR responses. The response to anti-TNFalpha treatment with infliximab in patients with RA is influenced by the FCGR2A and FCGR3A genotypes. This effect is observed at different times in the follow-up (6 and 30 weeks, respectively) indicating the dynamic nature of the Fc gamma

  15. Polymorphisms within the human leucocyte antigen-E gene and their associations with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis as well as clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwaszko, M; Świerkot, J; Kolossa, K; Jeka, S; Wiland, P; Bogunia-Kubik, K

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the non-classical human leucocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) in both innate and acquired immune response suggests its possible role in development of autoimmune pathologies. This study was undertaken to investigate relationships between the HLA-E gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as to evaluate a potential of these polymorphisms to modulate clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in female patients. A total of 223 female patients with RA receiving anti-TNF biological therapy and 134 female healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Genotypings for two SNPs within the HLA-E gene (rs1264457 HLA-E*01:01/01:03; rs1059510 HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:02) were performed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification employing LightSNiP assays. Clinical response was evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at 12 and 24 weeks after initiation of the therapy. The frequency of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype was decreased significantly in RA patients in comparison to controls (P = 0.031). The presence of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype in patients correlated with better EULAR response after 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment, while 01:03 allele carriers were generally unresponsive to the treatment (P = 0.014). The HLA-E*01:03/01:03 genotype was also over-represented among non-responding patients in comparison to HLA-E*01:01/01:01 homozygotes (P = 0.021). With respect to the HLA-E rs1059510 variation, a better response after 12 weeks was observed more frequently in patients carrying the HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:01 genotype than other genotypes (P = 0.009). The results derived from this study imply that HLA-E polymorphisms may influence RA susceptibility and affect clinical outcome of anti-TNF therapy in female RA patients.

  16. Polymorphisms within the human leucocyte antigen-E gene and their associations with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis as well as clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iwaszko, M; Świerkot, J; Kolossa, K; Jeka, S; Wiland, P; Bogunia-Kubik, K

    2015-01-01

    Involvement of the non-classical human leucocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) in both innate and acquired immune response suggests its possible role in development of autoimmune pathologies. This study was undertaken to investigate relationships between the HLA-E gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as to evaluate a potential of these polymorphisms to modulate clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in female patients. A total of 223 female patients with RA receiving anti-TNF biological therapy and 134 female healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Genotypings for two SNPs within the HLA-E gene (rs1264457 HLA-E*01:01/01:03; rs1059510 HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:02) were performed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification employing LightSNiP assays. Clinical response was evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at 12 and 24 weeks after initiation of the therapy. The frequency of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype was decreased significantly in RA patients in comparison to controls (P = 0·031). The presence of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype in patients correlated with better EULAR response after 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment, while 01:03 allele carriers were generally unresponsive to the treatment (P = 0·014). The HLA-E*01:03/01:03 genotype was also over-represented among non-responding patients in comparison to HLA-E*01:01/01:01 homozygotes (P = 0·021). With respect to the HLA-E rs1059510 variation, a better response after 12 weeks was observed more frequently in patients carrying the HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:01 genotype than other genotypes (P = 0·009). The results derived from this study imply that HLA-E polymorphisms may influence RA susceptibility and affect clinical outcome of anti-TNF therapy in female RA patients. PMID:26307125

  17. Necrosis prediction of photodynamic therapy applied to skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Romanov, O. G.; López-Escobar, M.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2009-02-01

    The great selectivity and the lack of side effects of Photodynamic Therapy make it more advantageous than radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The application of PDT to skin diseases is particularly appropriate, due to the accessibility of this tissue. Common disorders like nonmelanoma skin cancer, that includes basocelullar or squamous cell carcinomas, can be treated with PDT. Conventional procedures, like surgery or radiotherapy, are not so efficient and do not, in general, obtain the same favourable results. PDT in dermatology medical praxis uses fixed protocols depending on the photosensitizer and the optical source used. These protocols are usually provided by the photosensitizer laboratory, and every lesion is treated with the same parameters. In this work we present a photo-chemical model of PDT applied to skin disorders treated with topical photosensitizers. Optical propagation inside the tissue is calculated by means of a 3D diffusion equation, solved via a finite difference numerical method. The photosensitizer degradation or photobleaching is taken into account, as the drug looses efficiency with the irradiation time. With these data the necrosis area is estimated, so this model could be used as a predictive tool to adjust the optical power and exposition time for the particular disease under treatment.

  18. Anti-Interleukin-6 Receptor Tocilizumab for Severe Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis Refractory to Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy: A Multicenter Study of Twenty-Five Patients.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Santos-Gómez, Montserrat; Calvo, Inmaculada; González-Fernández, M Isabel; López-Montesinos, Berta; Mesquida, Marina; Adán, Alfredo; Hernández, María Victoria; Maíz, Olga; Atanes, Antonio; Bravo, Beatriz; Modesto, Consuelo; Díaz-Cordovés, Gisela; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Loricera, Javier; González-Vela, M C; Demetrio-Pablo, Rosalía; Hernández, J L; González-Gay, Miguel A; Blanco, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ) for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. We conducted a multicenter study of patients with JIA-associated uveitis that was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents. We assessed 25 patients (21 female; 47 affected eyes) with a mean ± SD age of 18.5 ± 8.3 years. Uveitis was bilateral in 22 patients. Cystoid macular edema was present in 9 patients. Ocular sequelae found at initiation of TCZ included cataracts (n = 13), glaucoma (n = 7), synechiae (n = 10), band keratopathy (n = 12), maculopathy (n = 9), and amblyopia (n = 5). Before TCZ, patients had received corticosteroids, conventional immunosuppressive drugs, and biologic agents (median 2 [range 1-5]), including adalimumab (n = 24), etanercept (n = 8), infliximab (n = 7), abatacept (n = 6), rituximab (n = 2), anakinra (n = 1), and golimumab (n = 1). Patients received 8 mg/kg TCZ intravenously every 4 weeks in most cases. TCZ yielded rapid and maintained improvement in all ocular parameters. After 6 months of therapy, 79.2% of patients showed improvement in anterior chamber cell numbers, and 88.2% showed improvement after 1 year. Central macular thickness measured by optical coherence tomography in patients with cystoid macular edema decreased from a mean ± SD of 401.7 ± 86.8 μm to 259.1 ± 39.5 μm after 6 months of TCZ (P = 0.012). The best-corrected visual acuity increased from 0.56 ± 0.35 to 0.64 ± 0.32 (P < 0.01). After a median follow-up of 12 months, visual improvement persisted, and complete remission of uveitis was observed in 19 of 25 patients. Significant reduction in the prednisone dosage was also achieved. The main adverse effects were severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, pneumonia and then autoimmune anemia and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, and viral

  19. Renal papillary necrosis and pyelonephritis accompanying fenoprofen therapy.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Lange, R K; Kantrow, C M

    1979-10-26

    Renal papillary necrosis occurred after fenoprofen calcium administration in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and urinary tract infection. Possible mechanisms of renal damage may be hypersensitivity, decreased blood flow, and decreased production of a prostaglandin E-like substance.

  20. What factors determine patients' preference for tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Fajri, Dessy W; Brand, Caroline A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Martin, Belinda J; Buchanan, Russell R C; Schachna, Lionel

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, either intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ), demonstrates similar efficacy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of this study was to examine factors influencing patient preference of TNFi. Fifty-nine (79.7%) participants were male with mean age 43.9 years and disease duration of 22.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (79.7%) agreed with the statement 'My doctor gave me a choice and I made a decision based on my personal preference'. Patients commenced first on IV TNFi most commonly cited reduced frequency of injections (96.6%), administration by a trained professional (89.7%) and use of infusion time for leisure activities (86.2%). Patients commenced on SQ TNFi cited flexibility with timing of treatment (80%), shortened administration time (73.3%) and the convenience of home therapy (73.3%). Shared clinical decision-making between clinicians and patients may be desirable for AS patients commencing TNFi therapy.

  1. Tumour necrosis factor alpha and use of infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Shrim, Alan; Koren, Gideon

    2005-01-01

    QUESTION A 27-year-old patient of mine with rheumatoid arthritis has been treated with infliximab for the last 5 years. She is planning her first pregnancy. How should I advise her regarding use of infliximab during pregnancy, bearing in mind that infliximab substantially improved her medical condition? ANSWER Infliximab (Remicade) has not been tested in pregnant animals because it does not interact with non–human tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. Several case reports describing women who used infliximab during pregnancy do not suggest a strong association with adverse pregnancy outcomes. More studies are required to determine infliximab’s safety during pregnancy. PMID:15934268

  2. Radiation necrosis of the mandible: a 10 year study. Part II. Dental factors; onset, duration and management of necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.G.; Herson, J.; Daly, T.E.; Zimmerman, S.

    1980-05-01

    In a review of patients receiving radiation for cancer in the oral region the rate of radiation necrosis of the mandible was found to be similar for patients who had dental extractions before radiation therapy and for the remainder of the dentate population. It was suggested that diseased teeth should be removed prior to irradiation and sufficient healing time should be allowed. Teeth should not be extracted after irradiation. Dental prostheses can be provided for most irradiated patients if adequate care is exercised. The probability of necrosis commencing was highest three to twelve months after the start of therapy; it diminished gradually after that period. The duration of necrosis was depicted as an exponential curve with a constant probability of necrosis termination at each time point after onset. In 46.8% of the patients in study II (1971-1975), the necrosis was healed by conservative means. This was a significant increase over study I (1966-1969), and a complementary reduction in the necessity for surgical intervention was also found.

  3. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

  4. The role of tumour necrosis factor alpha and soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptors in the symptomatology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Levent; Batmaz, Sedat; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Soygur, Arif Haldun

    2016-07-01

    Background Immunological mechanisms may be responsible for the development and maintenance of schizophrenia symptoms. Aim The aim of this study is to measure tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor I (sTNF-αRI), and soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor II (sTNF-αRII) levels in patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals, and to determine their relationship with the symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Serum TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were measured. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered for patients with schizophrenia (n = 35), and the results were compared with healthy controls (n = 30). Hierarchical regression analyses were undertaken to predict the levels of TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII. Results No significant difference was observed in TNF-α levels, but sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were lower in patients with schizophrenia. Serum sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were found to be negatively correlated with the negative subscale score of the PANSS, and sTNF-αRI levels were also negatively correlated with the total score of the PANSS. Smoking, gender, body mass index were not correlated with TNF-α and sTNF-α receptor levels. Conclusions These results suggest that there may be a change in anti-inflammatory response in patients with schizophrenia due to sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels. The study also supports low levels of TNF activity in schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms.

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor/Tumor Necrosis Factor Family Members in Antiviral CD8 T-Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    CD8 memory T cells can play a critical role in protection against repeated exposure to infectious agents such as viruses, yet can also contribute to the immunopathology associated with these pathogens. Understanding the mechanisms that control effective memory responses has important ramifications for vaccine design and in the management of adverse immune reactions. Recent studies have implicated several members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family as key stimulatory and inhibitory molecules involved in the regulation of CD8 T cells. In this review, we discuss their control of the generation, persistence, and reactivation of CD8 T cells during virus infection. PMID:20377415

  6. Histoplasmosis Complicating Tumor Necrosis Factor–α Blocker Therapy: A Retrospective Analysis of 98 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Vergidis, Paschalis; Avery, Robin K.; Wheat, L. Joseph; Dotson, Jennifer L.; Assi, Maha A.; Antoun, Smyrna A.; Hamoud, Kassem A.; Burdette, Steven D.; Freifeld, Alison G.; McKinsey, David S.; Money, Mary E.; Myint, Thein; Andes, David R.; Hoey, Cynthia A.; Kaul, Daniel A.; Dickter, Jana K.; Liebers, David E.; Miller, Rachel A.; Muth, William E.; Prakash, Vidhya; Steiner, Frederick T.; Walker, Randall C.; Hage, Chadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Histoplasmosis may complicate tumor necrosis factor (TNF)–α blocker therapy. Published case series provide limited guidance on disease management. We sought to determine the need for long-term antifungal therapy and the safety of resuming TNF-α blocker therapy after successful treatment of histoplasmosis. Methods. We conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 98 patients diagnosed with histoplasmosis between January 2000 and June 2011. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate risk factors for severe disease. Results. The most commonly used biologic agent was infliximab (67.3%). Concomitant corticosteroid use (odds ratio [OR], 3.94 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.06–14.60]) and higher urine Histoplasma antigen levels (OR, 1.14 [95% CI, 1.03–1.25]) were found to be independent predictors of severe disease. Forty-six (47.4%) patients were initially treated with an amphotericin B formulation for a median duration of 2 weeks. Azole treatment was given for a median of 12 months. TNF-α blocker therapy was initially discontinued in 95 of 98 (96.9%) patients and later resumed in 25 of 74 (33.8%) patients at a median of 12 months (range, 1–69 months). The recurrence rate was 3.2% at a median follow-up period of 32 months. Of the 3 patients with recurrence, 2 had restarted TNF-α blocker therapy, 1 of whom died. Mortality rate was 3.2%. Conclusions. In this study, disease outcomes were generally favorable. Discontinuation of antifungal treatment after clinical response and an appropriate duration of therapy, probably at least 12 months, appears safe if pharmacologic immunosuppression has been held. Resumption of TNF-α blocker therapy also appears safe, assuming that the initial antifungal therapy was administered for 12 months. PMID:25870331

  7. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Mediation of mouse natural cytotoxic activity by tumour necrosis factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortaldo, John R.; Mason, Llewellyn H.; Mathieson, Bonnie J.; Liang, Shu-Mei; Flick, David A.; Herberman, Ronald B.

    1986-06-01

    Natural cell-mediated cytotoxic activity in the mouse has been associated with two types of effector cells, the natural killer (NK) cell and the natural cytotoxic (NC) cell, which seem to differ with regard to their patterns of target selectivity, cell surface characteristics and susceptibility to regulatory factors1. During studies on the mechanism of action of cytotoxic molecules, it became evident that WEHI-164, the prototype NC target cell, was highly susceptible to direct lysis by both human and mouse recombinant tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Here we show that NC, but not NK activity mediated by normal splenocytes, is abrogated by rabbit antibodies to recombinant and natural TNF, respectively. Thus, the cell-mediated activity defined as NC is due to release of TNF by normal spleen cells and does not represent a unique natural effector mechanism.

  9. Aloe emodin inhibits the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Harhaji, Ljubica; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Popadic, Dusan; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2007-07-30

    We demonstrate the capacity of an herbal anthraquinone aloe emodin to reduce the cytotoxicity of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) towards L929 mouse fibrosarcoma and U251 human glioma cell lines. Aloe emodin inhibited both TNF-induced cell necrosis and apoptosis, but it did not reduce cell death induced by UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide. Aloe emodin inhibited both basal and TNF-triggered activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and a selective blockade of ERK activation mimicked the cytoprotective action of the drug. On the other hand, aloe emodin did not affect TNF-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or generation of reactive oxygen species. The combination of aloe emodin and TNF caused an intracellular appearance of acidified autophagic vesicles, and the inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine efficiently blocked the cytoprotective action of aloe emodin. These data indicate that aloe emodin could prevent TNF-triggered cell death through mechanisms involving induction of autophagy and blockade of ERK activation.

  10. Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. Case Report A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. Conclusion VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24926266

  11. Progressive outer retinal necrosis and immunosuppressive therapy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Coisy, Solène; Ebran, Jean-Marc; Milea, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is a rare but devastating infectious retinitis associated with varicella zoster virus (VZV) and responsible for severe visual loss. A 59-year-old man treated for generalized myasthenia with oral azathioprine and prednisone presented with severe unilateral necrotizing retinitis. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous and vitreous humors was diagnostic for VZV PORN. VZV PORN is a severe potential ocular complication of immunosuppression, prompting urgent diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  12. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  13. Tumour necrosis factor-α in nasal allergy

    PubMed Central

    Ganbo, T.; Nakazawa, T.; Nakajima, T.; Ko, J.; Goto, R.; Murakami, Y.; Misui, K.

    1995-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) by radio-immunoassay to evaluate TNF-α in nasal allergy. There was no significant difference either between the mean concentrations of TNF-α in nasal secretions from the patients with perennial nasal allergy and those of normal subjects, or between the TNF-α and ECP concentrations. However, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed a specific increase of TNF-α mRNA and IFN-γ mRNA in allergic nasal mucosa after allergen challenge in vitro. These findings suggest a possibility that T cell-derived IFN-γ up-regulates macrophages to elaborate TNF-α, which may play a role in amplifying allergic inflammation in the nose through the cytokine network. PMID:18475667

  14. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor-ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor-ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and lymphotoxin production in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, C; Jones, D B; Morrison, K; Schlüter, C; Feist, W; Ulmer, A J; Arnoldi, J; Matthes, J; Diamantstein, T; Flad, H D

    1990-08-01

    It is likely that the characteristic histologic features of Hodgkin's disease reflect cytokine production by the tumor cell population. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor beta [TNF-beta]) are important inflammatory mediators with wide-ranging effects within the lymphoreticular system. The aim of the present study was to investigate TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin production in the Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines L428 and L540. At the product level, both cytokines could be demonstrated by immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibodies. TNF-alpha could be demonstrated by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in culture supernatants from both cell lines as well as in cell lysates of L428 and L540 cells. Cytotoxic activity could be achieved only in L428 supernatants. This cytotoxic activity could not be blocked by the addition of a polyclonal antibody against TNF-alpha, but was partially inhibited with the monoclonal antibody against lymphotoxin. Synthesis of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin in both L428 and L540 was confirmed by demonstrating the intracellular-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) using specific cDNA clones in Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization studies with the TNF-alpha cDNA probe gave positive hybridization signals in L428 and in L540. These results demonstrate the transcription, translation, and export of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin in cultured Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines. In addition, results of preliminary experiments are presented in which we demonstrate Reed-Sternberg cells positive for TNF-alpha protein and mRNA in different Hodgkin's disease tissue biopsies, indicating that, at least for TNF-alpha, our cell line data are relevant to the neoplastic population present in Hodgkin's disease tissue.

  16. Cellular localization of interleukin-8 and its inducer, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in psoriasis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Karabin, G. D.; Barker, J. N.; Griffiths, C. E.; Sarma, V.; Mitra, R. S.; Elder, J. T.; Kunkel, S. L.; Dixit, V. M.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of immunologic mechanisms in psoriasis has been deduced from the ability of immunosuppressive therapies to ameliorate this common and chronic skin disease. Certainly the histology of psoriatic lesions suggests a dialogue between the hyperplastic keratinocytes and infiltrating T lymphocytes and macrophages. To begin dissecting the cytokine network involved in the pathophysiology of psoriasis, the location, in both epidermal and dermal compartments, of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and transforming growth factor-alpha at the protein and/or mRNA levels were identified. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was selected as a potentially key regulatory cytokine, first because it induces cultured keratinocyte interleukin-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and transforming growth factor-alpha production, and second because intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by keratinocytes in psoriatic epidermis had been identified previously. Using immunohistochemical localization, tumor necrosis factor-alpha was identified in 12 psoriatic lesions as intense and diffuse expression by dermal dendrocytes (macrophages) in the papillary dermis (without significant staining of endothelial cells, mast cells, or dermal Langerhans cells), and focally by keratinocytes and intraepidermal Langerhans cells. Functional interaction between the dermal dendrocytes and keratinocytes was suggested by the presence of interleukin-8 expression of suprabasal keratinocytes immediately above the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-positive dermal dendrocytes. Interleukin-8 mRNA and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA were detectable in the epidermal roof of psoriatic lesions, but neither was detectable at the protein or mRNA levels in any normal skin specimens. Treatment of cultured human keratinocytes with phorbol ester (which experimentally produces psoriasiform changes on mouse skin) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha also increased interleukin-8 and

  17. Tumour necrosis factor blockade and the risk of osteoporosis: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common clinical problem, especially in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A reduction in bone mineral density (BMD) of the axial and appendicular skeleton ranging from 7% to 15% has been reported in RA in studies employing a variety of densitometric techniques. Reports consistent with a beneficial effect of tumour necrosis factor blockade on BMD have begun to emerge in recent years, and in Arthritis Research and Therapy, a case control study reports that patients treated with infliximab for RA had preservation of BMD in the lumbar spine and femoral neck compared to those treated with methotrexate.

  18. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hallahan, D E; Spriggs, D R; Beckett, M A; Kufe, D W; Weichselbaum, R R

    1989-01-01

    We report that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA is increased after treatment with x-rays in certain human sarcoma cells. An increase in TNF-alpha mRNA is accompanied by the increased production of TNF-alpha protein. TNF-alpha enhances radiation lethality in both TNF-alpha-producing and -nonproducing tumor cells. These data suggest that, in addition to the direct cytotoxic effects of x-rays, production of TNF-alpha may add to radiation lethality through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Combinations of TNF-alpha and therapeutic radiation may be useful in clinical cancer therapy. Images PMID:2602359

  19. Human cobalamin deficiency: alterations in serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Peracchi, M; Bamonti Catena, F; Pomati, M; De Franceschi, M; Scalabrino, G

    2001-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that vitamin B12 (cobalamin)-deficient central neuropathy in the rat is associated with local overexpression of neurotoxic tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha combined with locally decreased synthesis of neurotrophic epidermal growth factor (EGF). The aims of this study were to investigate whether a similar imbalance also occurs in the serum of adult patients with clinically confirmed cobalamin deficiency and whether it can be corrected by vitamin B12 replacement therapy. We studied 34 adult patients with severe cobalamin deficiency, 12 patients with pure iron deficiency anaemia and 34 control subjects. Haematological markers of cobalamin deficiency and serum TNF-alpha and EGF levels were measured using commercial kits. Thirteen cobalamin-deficient patients were re-evaluated after 3 and 6 months of parenteral vitamin B12 treatment. TNF-alpha was significantly higher (p < 0.01) and EGF significantly lower (p < 0.01) in the patients with cobalamin deficiency, but both were unchanged in patients with pure iron deficiency anaemia. In cobalamin-deficient patients the serum TNF-alpha levels correlated significantly with plasma total homocysteine levels (r = 0.425; p < 0.02). In the treated patients TNF-alpha and EGF levels normalised concomitantly with clinical and haematological disease remission. In humans, as in rats, cobalamin concentration appears to be correlated with the synthesis and release of TNF-alpha and EGF in a reciprocal manner, because cobalamin deficiency is accompanied by overproduction of TNF-alpha and underproduction of EGF.

  20. [Profile of use of anti tumor necrosis factor in Colombian patients].

    PubMed

    Machado, Jorge; Moncada, Juan Carlos; Pineda, Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists (anti-TNFα) have shown an increasing consumption and generate a significant economic burden on health systems. The prescribing patterns of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists were determined in a patient population associated with the Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud in Colombia. A descriptive observational study was conducted in 316 patients with respect to use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists during a treatment period from January 2008 to June 2009. The database examined contained indications of use, inclusion criteria to medication, duration of illness, co-morbidities and adverse reactions. The data were retrieved from the clinical histories. Student's t test was used for the comparison of quantitative variables, and the chi-square test was used to establish associations between categorical variables and multivariate analysis were used. Mean age was 44.613.9 years; 63.9% of participants were female. Of the 316 patients, 17.1% received monotherapy. The order of prescription drugs was as follows: adalimumab (37.3%), infliximab (37.3%) and etanercept (25.4%), all were prescribed in appropriately defined daily doses. Co-medication drugs most frequently prescribed were: disease-modifying anti-rheumatic (82.9%), NSAIDs (29.1%), omeprazole (22.5%), antihypertensives (21.2%), folic acid (19.9%) calcium plus vitamin D (9.8%), calcitriol (6.0%). 10.4% of patients had a record of some adverse drug reaction. The average cost of therapy per patient per year was US$23,464. Anti-TNFα are being used at recommended doses, particularly in rheumatoid arthritis and in combination with other anti-rheumatic drugs. The direct cost of therapy was high for the country's health system.

  1. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Risk factors associated with intestinal necrosis in children with failed non-surgical reduction for intussusception.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Ya; Huang, Xiao-Zhong; Han, Yi-Jiang; Zhu, Li-Bin; Huang, Kai-Yu; Lin, Jing; Li, Zhong-Rong

    2017-05-01

    Intestinal necrosis is the most serious complication of intussusception. The risk factors associated with intestinal necrosis in pediatric patients with intussusception have not been well characterized. This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with intestinal necrosis in pediatric patients with failed non-surgical reduction for intussusception. Hospitalized patients who failed the air-enema reduction for intussusception in the outpatient department and subsequently underwent surgery were retrospectively reviewed. All cases were categorized into two groups: intestinal necrosis group and non-intestinal necrosis group based on the surgical findings. Demographic and clinical features including the findings from the surgery were recorded and analyzed. Factors associated with intestinal necrosis were analyzed using univariate and multivariate unconditional logistic regression analyses. A total of 728 cases were included. Among them, 171 had intestinal necrosis at the time of surgery. The group with intestinal necrosis had a longer duration of symptom or length of illness (P = 0.000), and younger (P = 0.000) than the non-intestinal necrosis group. Complex/compound type of intussusceptions is more likely to have intestinal necrosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of grossly bloody stool (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.19-3.76, P = 0.010) and duration of symptom (OR = 1.07; 95% CI 1.06-1.08, P = 0.000) were independent risk factors for intestinal necrosis in patients hospitalized for surgical reduction for intussusceptions. At time of admission, the presence of bloody stools and duration of symptom are the important risk factors for developing intestinal necrosis for those patients who failed non-surgical reduction. The length of illness has the highest sensitivity and specificity to correlate with intestinal necrosis. This finding may suggest that we should take the intussusception cases that have the longer duration of

  3. Effects of tumour necrosis factor on protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Evans, D A; Jacobs, D O; Wilmore, D W

    1993-08-01

    Increased skeletal muscle breakdown and negative nitrogen balance are features of sepsis that may be mediated by cytokines. The effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) on protein metabolism were studied. When administered to anaesthetized dogs (0.57 x 10(5) units per kg body-weight over 6h), TNF caused urinary nitrogen excretion to increase (mean(s.e.m.) 165(15) mg kg-1 for dogs that received TNF versus 113(8) mg kg-1 for control animals, P < 0.01). Amino acid nitrogen release from the hindlimbs showed no change over the study period, indicating that the additional urinary nitrogen was not derived from peripheral protein stores. In a second study the same dose of TNF or saline was infused after the intestine had been removed. The mean(s.e.m.) urinary nitrogen excretion in control dogs that had undergone enterectomy (101(7) mg kg-1) was similar to that of intact animals, and addition of TNF did not significantly increase nitrogen excretion (86(18) mg kg-1). The results suggest that nitrogen excreted in the urine during administration of TNF is derived, at least initially, from the intestinal tract.

  4. Endothelial cell activation induced by tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Cavender, D. E.; Edelbaum, D.; Ziff, M.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations in the morphology and histochemistry of vascular endothelial cells (EC) have been repeatedly observed at sites of chronic inflammation and immune reactions. These changes, which are most prominent in the EC postcapillary venules present in areas with large lymphocytic infiltrates, include the acquisition of a columnar or cuboidal morphology, the development of ribonuclease-sensitive metachromasia, and an increase in intracellular organelles. Thus, EC at sites of inflammation appear to be activated and to demonstrate increased metabolic activity. This study reports that both tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and lymphotoxin (LT) can activate cultured human umbilical vein EC, as measured by: 1) increased adhesiveness for lymphocytes, 2) increased cell metabolism, as measured by RNA and protein synthesis, and 3) increased cell volume. Although gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) have been shown previously to stimulate EC adhesiveness for lymphocytes, these two cytokines had only marginal effects on EC RNA and protein synthesis, and both caused a decrease in EC volume. These findings suggest that TNF and LT play a role in the type of activation of EC in vivo that leads to the development of tall endothelium and increased lymphocyte emigration. PMID:2466402

  5. Production of polyclonal antibodies to feline tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, C M; Niagro, F; McGraw, R A; Rawlings, C A

    1997-01-01

    Two 13-amino-acid peptides were synthesized based on the putative feline tumor necrosis factor (FeTNF) sequence. The synthesized peptides were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, and injected into rabbits. The gene for FeTNF was cloned into the FLAG (International Biotechnologies Inc. [IBI], Kodak, New Haven, Conn.) fusion protein expression vector. The expressed fusion protein was purified by using the M-1 anti-FLAG octapeptide monoclonal antibody (IBI, Kodak). The fusion protein was emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and injected into chickens. The immune sera generated to the synthetic peptides and the fusion protein recognized the recombinant FeTNF fusion protein on Western or dot blot assay. The preimmune and immune sera were incubated with naturally occurring FeTNF (supernatants from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cultured feline peritoneal exudate or peripheral mononuclear cells). The antibody raised to the recombinant FeTNF fusion protein and N-terminal synthetic peptide neutralized bioactivity of native FeTNF and recombinant human TNF. Preimmune sera did not have any neutralizing activity. The polyclonal antibodies were not specific for FeTNF, since both porcine and human recombinant TNF were neutralized by the fusion protein antibodies. The synthetic peptide antibodies recognized recombinant feline and equine TNF on a Western blot. PMID:9220170

  6. Modulation of topoisomerase activities by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Z; Cohen, S; Fresa, K; Coffman, F D

    1995-01-01

    A number of chemotherapeutic agents which inhibit the DNA topoisomerases markedly potentiate cell death mediated by tumor necrosis factor, suggesting a role for these enzymes in the TNF cytotoxic mechanism. To investigate this possibility, topoisomerase I and II activities were assayed following TNF addition to murine L929 cells. Topoisomerase I and II activities increased within 15 min of TNF addition and returned to baseline levels within 1 and 2 hr, respectively. The increases in both topoisomerase activities were blocked by H-7 (but not H-8) and similar increases were seen following PMA addition. However, concentrations of H-7 which blocked the increased topoisomerase activities had no effect on TNF cytotoxicity nor on the enhancement of TNF cytotoxicity by topoisomerase inhibitors. Thus, in these cells topoisomerase activities are directly modified by TNF during the initial phases of a cytotoxic response. However, neither TNF cytotoxicity nor the enhancement of TNF cytotoxicity by topoisomerase inhibitors appears to require the TNF-mediated increases in topoisomerase activities.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor production by human sarcoid alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bachwich, P. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Larrick, J.; Spengler, M.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an oncolytic peptide that may also exert many other biologic effects. Experimentally, immunologically activated mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with endotoxin (LPS) produce TNF, while resting mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with LPS produce little TNF. To date, the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to produce TNF has not been clearly delineated. As pulmonary sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disorder characterized by immunologically activated AMs, we investigated the production of TNF by AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 7 normal volunteers and 13 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. The AMs were cultured with and without LPS, and TNF production was assessed by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Unstimulated sarcoid and normal AMs produced little TNF, but LPS stimulation enhanced TNF production by both normal and sarcoid AMs. Furthermore, LPS-stimulated sarcoid AMs produced more TNF than normal AMs (84.9 +/- 16.7 versus 32.5 +/- 10.2 units/million cells, P less than 0.05). It is concluded that human AMs can produce TNF and that sarcoid AMs are primed and can produce significantly more TNF, compared with normal AMs. PMID:3799813

  8. Immunoregulation by tumor necrosis factor superfamily member LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yugang; Zhu, Mingzhao; Miller, Mendy; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Summary LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, inducible expression, competes with herpesvirus glycoprotein D for herpesvirus entry mediator, a receptor expressed on T lymphocytes) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that contributes to the regulation of immune responses. LIGHT can influence T-cell activation both directly and indirectly by engagement of various receptors that are expressed on T cells and on other types of cells. LIGHT, LIGHT receptors, and their related binding partners constitute a complicated molecular network in the regulation of various processes. The molecular cross-talk among LIGHT and its related molecules presents challenges and opportunities for us to study and to understand the full extent of the LIGHT function. Previous research from genetic and functional studies has demonstrated that dysregulation of LIGHT expression can result in the disturbance of T-cell homeostasis and activation, changing the ability of self-tolerance and of the control of infection. Meanwhile, blockade of LIGHT activity can ameliorate the severity of various T-cell-mediated diseases. These observations indicate the importance of LIGHT and its involvement in many physiological and pathological conditions. Understanding LIGHT interactions offers promising new therapeutic strategies that target LIGHT-engaged pathways to fight against cancer and various infectious diseases. PMID:19426225

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Innate Immunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor–ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator [HVEM], a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes), lymphotoxin-β receptor (LT-βR), and HVEM are used by embryonic and adult innate lymphocytes to promote the development and homeostasis of lymphoid organs. Lymphotoxin-expressing innate-acting B cells construct microenvironments in lymphoid organs that restrict pathogen spread and initiate interferon defenses. Recent results illustrate how the communication networks formed among these cytokines and the coreceptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 both inhibit and activate innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), innate γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Understanding the role of TNFSF/TNFRSF and interacting proteins in innate cells will likely reveal avenues for future therapeutics for human disease. PMID:25524549

  10. Fatigue mechanisms in patients with cancer: effects of tumor necrosis factor and exercise on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St Pierre, B. A.; Kasper, C. E.; Lindsey, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue is a common adverse effect of cancer and its therapy. However, the specific mechanisms underlying cancer fatigue are unclear. One physiologic mechanism may involve changes in skeletal muscle protein stores or metabolite concentration. A reduction in skeletal muscle protein stores may result from endogenous tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or from TNF administered as antineoplastic therapy. This muscle wasting would require patients to exert an unusually high amount of effort to generate adequate contractile force during exercise performance or during extended periods of sitting or standing. This additional effort could result in the onset of fatigue. Additionally, cancer fatigue may develop or become exacerbated during exercise as a consequence of changes in the concentration of skeletal muscle metabolites. These biochemical alterations may interfere with force that is produced by the muscle contractile proteins. These physiologic changes may play a role in the decision to include exercise in the rehabilitation plans of patients with cancer. They also may affect ideas about fatigue.

  11. Use of anti tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibody for ulcerative jejunoileitis

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Gulseren; Assaad, Adel; Biehl, Thomas; Kozarek, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative jejunoileitis is an uncommon clinical syndrome consisting of abdominal pain, weight loss associated with diarrhea, and multiple inflammatory ulcerations and strictures of the small bowel. Ulcerative jejunoileitis can complicate established celiac disease or develop in patients de novo. Increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the small intestine of patients with untreated celiac disease are associated with a role in the immune pathogenesis of this disorder. No specific therapy has been shown to change the course of ulcerative jejunoileitis. We report a case of severe ulcerative jejunoileitis previously unresponsive to traditional therapies, including high dose corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The patient had a dramatic resolution of symptoms and a complete normalization of endoscopic findings after anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, infliximab (Remicade®). PMID:23049226

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, Kidney function and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mehaffey, Eamonn; Majid, Dewan Syed Abdul

    2017-07-19

    Hypertension is considered to be a low-grade inflammatory condition characterized by the presence of various pro-inflammatory cytokines. The inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a constituent of the pro-inflammatory environment that is associated with salt-sensitive hypertension (SSH) and related renal injury. Elevated angiotensin II (AngII) and other factors such as oxidative stress conditions promote TNF-α formation. Many recent studies have provided evidence that TNF-α exerts a direct renal action by regulating hemodynamic and excretory function in the kidney. The cytokine incites a strong natriuretic response and plays a part in regulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system. The exact mechanistic role of TNF-α in the development of SSH is yet poorly understood. While TNF-α antagonism has been shown to attenuate hypertensive responses in many hypertensive animal models, contrasting findings demonstrate that the direct systemic administration of TNF-α usually induces hypotensive as well as natriuretic responses, indicating a counter-regulatory role of TNF-α in SSH. Differential activities of two cell surfaced receptors of TNF-α (receptor type 1 and type 2) may explain the contradictory functions of TNF-α in the setting of hypertension. This mini-review will evaluate ongoing research studies that investigate the action of TNF-α within the kidney and its role as an influential pathophysiologic variable in the development of SSH and renal injury. This information may help to develop specific TNF-α receptor targeting as an effective treatment strategy in this clinical condition. Copyright © 2016, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  13. Use of the tumor necrosis factor-blockers for Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Gupta, Milli; Freeman, Hugh J

    2012-01-01

    The use of anti-tumor necrosis factortherapy for inflammatory bowel disease represents the most important advance in the care of these patients since the publication of the National Co-operative Crohn’s disease study thirty years ago. The recommendations of numerous consensus groups worldwide are now supported by a wealth of clinical trials and several meta-analyses. In general, it is suggested that tumor necrosis factor-α blockers (TNFBs) are indicated (1) for persons with moderately-severe Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have failed two or more causes of glucocorticosteroids and an acceptably long cause (8 wk to 12 wk) of an immune modulator such as azathioprine or methotrexate; (2) non-responsive perianal disease; and (3) severe UC not responding to a 3-d to 5-d course of steroids. Once TNFBs have been introduced and the patient is responsive, therapy given by the IV and SC rate must be continued. It remains open to definitive evidence if concomitant immune modulators are required with TNFB maintenance therapy, and when or if TNFB may be weaned and discontinued. The supportive evidence from a single study on the role of early versus later introduction of TNFB in the course of a patient’s illness needs to be confirmed. The risk/benefit profile of TNFB appears to be acceptable as long as the patient is immunized and tested for tuberculosis and viral hepatitis before the initiation of TNFB, and as long as the long-term adverse effects on the development of lymphoma and other tumors do not prone to be problematic. Because the rates of benefits to TNFB are modest from a population perspective and the cost of therapy is very high, the ultimate application of use of TNFBs will likely be established by cost/benefit studies. PMID:23002356

  14. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  15. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-inducing activities of Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Migliardo, M; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Corradini, C; Teti, G

    1996-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production may lead to increased human immunodeficiency virus replication in patients with AIDS. In order to identify cryptococcal components that are predominantly responsible for stimulating TNF production, various concentrations of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), galactoxylomannan (GalXM), mannoproteins (MP), and alpha(1-3) [corrected] glucan were added to whole-blood cultures. All of the cryptococcal components tested, as well as whole heat-killed cryptococci, were capable of inducing TNF-alpha release in a dose-dependent manner. MP were significantly more potent than any of the other cryptococcal components tested or heat-killed cryptococci in stimulating TNF-alpha production (P < 0.05). GXM, in contrast, was significantly less potent in this activity than either GalXM or MP (P < 0.05). As little as 0.5 microg of MP per ml was sufficient to produce moderate but significant elevations of TNF-alpha release. Maximal MP-induced TNF-alpha levels were similar to those induced by Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide, our positive control. Further experiments using isolated leukocytes suggested that monocytes were the cell population mainly responsible for TNF-alpha production, although the participation of other cell types could not be excluded. The presence of complement-sufficient plasma was a necessary requirement for TNF-alpha induction by GXM, GalXM, and low doses of MP. High MP concentrations (100 microg/ml) were also capable of stimulating TNF-alpha production in the absence of plasma. These data indicate that soluble products released by C. neoformans are capable of inducing TNF-alpha secretion in human leukocytes. This may be clinically relevant, since high concentrations of such products are frequently found in the body fluids of AIDS patients infected with C. neoformans. PMID:8945566

  17. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha in diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kilickap, Mustafa; Gurlek, Adalet; Dandachi, Rabih; Dincer, Irem; Tutkak, Huseyin; Oral, Dervis

    2004-10-01

    Active relaxation develops as a result of sequestration of calcium into the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and is controlled mainly by sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) and phospholamban.Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) downregulates both of these proteins, so it may play a role in the development of abnormal relaxation. However, a possible relationship between TNF-alpha and diastolic dysfunction has not been sufficiently evaluated in vivo. We investigated whether circulating levels of TNF-alpha increased in patients with relaxation abnormality. Forty hypertensive patients with normal left ventricular systolic function were enrolled in the study. Age-adjusted values of echocardiographically measured mitral inflow velocities, E-wave deceleration time and isovolemic relaxation time were used to define normal and abnormal relaxation. Twenty of the patients (mean age 59.2 +/- 10.6) had a relaxation abnormality (group I), and the twenty other patients (mean age 45.9 +/- 7.9) had a normal diastolic function (group II). TNF-alpha levels were measured by ELISA. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of interventricular septal thickness, posterior wall thickness, left ventricular mass, ejection fraction, plasma creatinin level, and medication. Patients with a relaxation abnormality were older than those with a normal diastolic function (p < 0.001). TNF-alpha levels were similar in both groups (62.1 +/- 46.0 pg/ml for group I, and 48.7 +/- 51.4 pg/ml for group II, p = 0.089). In this preliminary study, we demonstrated that TNF-alpha levels did not increase in patients with a relaxation abnormality. However, we think that a possible relationship between TNF-alpha and diastolic dysfunction should be clarified by further studies involving a larger number of patients with a wider spectrum of diastolic dysfunction.

  18. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Loparev, Vladimir N.; Parsons, Joseph M.; Knight, Janice C.; Panus, Joanne Fanelli; Ray, Caroline A.; Buller, R. Mark L.; Pickup, David J.; Esposito, Joseph J.

    1998-01-01

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-α (LTα) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTα and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  19. Cannabinoids act as necrosis-inducing factors in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Sugawa, Chitomi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is well known to produce unique secondary metabolites called cannabinoids. We recently discovered that Cannabis leaves induce cell death by secreting tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into leaf tissues. Examinations using isolated Cannabis mitochondria demonstrated that THCA causes mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) though opening of MPT pores, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction (the important feature of necrosis). Although Ca(2+) is known to cause opening of animal MPT pores, THCA directly opened Cannabis MPT pores in the absence of Ca(2+). Based on these results, we conclude that THCA has the ability to induce necrosis though MPT in Cannabis leaves, independently of Ca(2+). We confirmed that other cannabinoids (cannabidiolic acid and cannabigerolic acid) also have MPT-inducing activity similar to that of THCA. Moreover, mitochondria of plants which do not produce cannabinoids were shown to induce MPT by THCA treatment, thus suggesting that many higher plants may have systems to cause THCA-dependent necrosis.

  20. Dehydrocostus lactone enhances tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis of human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, G S; Pae, H O; Chung, H T; Kwon, J W; Lee, J H; Kwon, T O; Kwon, S Y; Chon, B H; Yun, Young Gab

    2004-05-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones have raised considerable interest because of their ability to block the activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). NF-kappaB plays an important role in the resistance of cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by anticancer drugs and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB offers the promise of enhancing the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Here, we demonstrate that dehydrocostus lactone (DL), the major sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the roots of Saussurea lappa, inhibits NF-kappaB activation by preventing TNF-alpha-induced degradation and phosphorylation of its inhibitory protein I-kappaB alpha in human leukemia HL-60 cells and that DL renders HL-60 cells susceptible to TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis by enhancing caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities.

  1. Comparison of health-related quality of life and disability in ulcerative colitis patients following restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis versus anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy.

    PubMed

    van Gennep, Sara; Sahami, Saloomeh; Buskens, Christianne J; van den Brink, Gijs R; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; D'Hoore, André; de Buck van Overstraeten, Anthony; van Assche, Gert; Ferrante, Marc; Vermeire, Séverine; Bemelman, Willem A; D'Haens, Geert R A M; Löwenberg, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) and disability were compared in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy versus patients who received treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents. UC patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy or started anti-TNF treatment between January 2010 and January 2015 were included at two tertiary referral centers. A matched cohort was created using propensity score matching for the covariates disease duration, Montreal classification, age, and sex. HRQL and disability were assessed using the Colorectal Functional Outcome (COREFO), Inflammatory Bowel Disease Disability Index (IBD-DI), EuroQol-5D-3L, and Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaires. In total, 297 patients were included, of whom 205 (69%) patients responded. Fifty-nine pouch patients were matched to 59 anti-TNF-treated patients. Pouch patients reported better general health scores (P=0.042) compared with the anti-TNF group (SF-36). No differences were found for the EuroQol-5D-3L and IBD-DI between the two groups. Pouch patients had significantly higher COREFO scores compared with anti-TNF-treated patients for 'stool frequency' (P<0.001), 'antidiarrheal medication use' (P<0.001), and 'stool-related aspects' (P=0.004), of which the latter was because of a higher perianal skin irritation frequency (P<0.001). UC patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy reported a higher bowel movement frequency and more perianal skin irritation compared with anti-TNF-treated patients, but this did not affect overall disease-specific disability outcomes. Patients in the surgery group reported better outcomes for generic health compared with those in the anti-TNF group.

  2. Lack of validation of genetic variants associated with anti–tumor necrosis factor therapy response in rheumatoid arthritis: a genome-wide association study replication and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study, our aim was to elucidate the role of four polymorphisms identified in a prior large genome-wide association study (GWAS) in which the investigators analyzed the responses of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). The authors of that study reported that the four genetic variants were significantly associated. However, none of the associations reached GWAS significance, and two subsequent studies failed to replicate these associations. Methods The four polymorphisms (rs12081765, rs1532269, rs17301249 and rs7305646) were genotyped in a total of 634 TNFi-treated RA patients of Spanish Caucasian origin. Four outcomes were evaluated: changes in the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) after 6 and 12 months of treatment and classification according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria at the same time points. Association with DAS28 changes was assessed by linear regression using an additive genetic model. Contingency tables of genotype and allele frequencies between EULAR responder and nonresponder patients were compared. In addition, we combined our data with those of previously reported studies in a meta-analysis including 2,998 RA patients. Results None of the four genetic variants showed an association with response to TNFi in any of the four outcomes analyzed in our Spanish patients. In addition, only rs1532269 yielded a suggestive association (P = 0.0033) with the response to TNFi when available data from previous studies were combined in the meta-analysis. Conclusion Our data suggest that the rs12081765, rs1532269, rs17301249 and rs7305646 genetic variants do not have a role as genetic predictors of TNFi treatment outcomes. PMID:24612463

  3. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis diagnosed on clinical grounds and treated with maggot debridement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Biscoe, Anna Louise; Bedlow, Alison

    2013-01-01

    A patient with a history of deep vein thrombosis presented with painful bruising and blistering on his left leg 7–10 days after warfarin treatment. A complicated 2-month treatment followed, where vasculitis was originally diagnosed from histological findings before the final diagnosis of warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) was made on clinical grounds. Warfarin was stopped, reversed and low molecular weight heparin started but, the lesions had progressed to full thickness necrosis. This was originally treated with conventional surgical debridement before introducing maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in an effort to try to salvage the limb. PMID:23362073

  4. Increased concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in "cachectic" patients with severe chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, J; Abdullah, I; Dargie, H J; Shapiro, D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain whether patients with cardiac failure and reduced body weight ("cardiac cachexia") have increased circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (cachectin). DESIGN--Patients with cardiac failure were prospectively identified as "cachectic" (body fat less than 27% in men and less than 29% in women measured by skinfold thickness callipers) or "non-cachectic". Tumour necrosis factor was assayed blind to patient group. SETTING--Cardiology unit in a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--26 consecutive patients (10 women) (mean age 61) admitted for investigation or treatment of chronic heart failure. All were in New York Heart Association class III or IV. RESULTS--In nine of the 16 cachectic patients the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was increased (mean (SEM) 74 (20) pg/ml) compared with one of the 10 "non-cachectic" patients (22 pg/ml, p less than 0.001). Patients with a raised circulating concentration of tumour necrosis factor weighed significantly less (55.6 (3.5) kg) than those in whom the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was normal (69.0 (4.1) kg) (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS--Circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor were increased in a significant proportion of patients with chronic heart failure and low body weight. Tumour necrosis factor stimulates catabolism experimentally and it may be a factor in the weight loss seen in patients with "cardiac cachexia". PMID:1747295

  5. Purification of human immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor using affinity chromatography and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, S V; Golikova, E A; Kireev, F D; Lopatnikova, J A

    2013-04-30

    Autoantibodies to cytokines are important biological effector molecules that can regulate cytokine activities. The aim of the study was to develop a protocol to purify autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor from human serum, for use as a calibration material to determine the absolute content of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The proposed protocol includes a set of affinity chromatography methods, namely, Bio-Gel P6DG sorbent to remove albumin from serum, Protein G Sepharose 4 Fast Flow to obtain a total immunoglobulin G fraction of serum immunoglobulins, and Affi-Gel 15 to obtain specifically antibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The addition of a magnetic separation procedure to the protocol eliminated contaminant tumor necrosis factor from the fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor. The protocol generated a pure fraction of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor, and enabled us to determine the absolute concentrations of different subclasses of immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor in apparently healthy donors.

  6. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  7. New advances in the mesenchymal stem cells therapy against skin flaps necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-Gui; Tang, Xiu-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), multipotential cells that reside within the bone marrow, can be induced to differentiate into various cells, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, vascular endothelial progenitor cells, and other cell types. MSCs are being widely studied as potential cell therapy agents due to their angiogenic properties, which have been well established by in vitro and in vivo researches. Within this context, MSCs therapy appears to hold substantial promise, particularly in the treatment of conditions involving skin grafts, pedicle flaps, as well as free flaps described in literatures. The purpose of this review is to report the new advances and mechanisms underlying MSCs therapy against skin flaps necrosis. PMID:25258671

  8. Flare and change of psoriasis morphology during the course of treatment with tumour necrosis factor blockers.

    PubMed

    Goiriz, R; Daudén, E; Pérez-Gala, S; Guhl, G; García-Díez, A

    2007-03-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers represent an exciting advance in the management of psoriasis. However, the safety profile of these drugs is not completely established. We present a review of the literature, and report on eight patients: two with the unexpected appearance of psoriasis, and the remaining six with exacerbation and change in morphology of their existing psoriasis, all of which occurred during treatment with the TNF blockers adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab. The two new cases, neither of whom had any personal or family history of psoriasis, developed pustular psoriasis on the palms and/or soles. The other six patients, previously diagnosed with severe chronic plaque psoriasis (four patients), generalized pustular psoriasis (one) and erythrodermic psoriasis (one), developed eruptive guttate psoriasis between 15 days and 18 months after the beginning of therapy. These patients had never before presented guttate-type psoriatic lesions, and the lesions appeared in areas of the body that were free of psoriatic plaques at baseline.

  9. Psoriasiform lesions induced by tumour necrosis factor antagonists: a skin-deep medical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Carter, J D; Gerard, H C; Hudson, A P

    2008-08-01

    Rarely, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha antagonist therapy has been associated with de novo psoriasiform eruptions. This is unusual in that these same drugs are used to treat psoriasis. Most of these cases involve the palms and soles, yet palmoplantar pustular psoriasis represents only 1.7% of all cases of psoriasis. Keratoderma blenorrhagicum is a psoriasiform rash that occurs primarily on the palms and soles of some patients with reactive arthritis. It is grossly and histologically indistinguishable from pustular psoriasis. Chlamydia trachomatis is a common aetiological agent for reactive arthritis, and in vitro studies have shown that chlamydial replication is inversely proportional to TNFalpha levels. Three patients taking TNFalpha antagonists are presented who developed such lesions and who were found to be positive for C trachomatis DNA in the affected skin. It is proposed that these psoriasiform lesions may not be psoriasis, but rather keratoderma blenorrhagicum.

  10. Concomitant disseminated histoplasmosis and disseminated tuberculosis after tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Oca, Juan E; Villarreal Morales, Martha L; Nieves-Rodriguez, Aracelis; Martínez-Bonilla, Lemuel

    2017-01-13

    Tumor necrosis factor antagonist inhibitors have transformed the approach to patients with severe autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Although the therapy can be highly effective, TNF-α inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. Here, we report a case of concomitant disseminated histoplasmosis and tuberculosis in a 65-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis treated with TNF-α inhibitor. Both conditions can be found in disseminated form in immunosuppressed hosts, but co-infection is rare with only a few cases having been reported, to our knowledge, all in HIV patients. This case posed a considerable challenge for diagnosis and treatment due to the unusual disseminated co-infection, the overlapping symptoms, and the interactions between medications.

  11. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy modulates serum OPG/RANKL in femoral head necrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Giuliano; Quartesan, Silvia; Cancellara, Pasqua; Camporesi, Enrico; Mangar, Devanand; Bernasek, Thomas; Dalvi, Prachiti; Yang, Zhongjin; Paoli, Antonio; Rizzato, Alex; Bosco, Gerardo

    2017-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has beneficial effects on avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH), but its mechanism of action is still unclear. We investigated if HBOT upregulates serum osteoprotegerin (OPG) and/or inhibits osteoclast activation. 23 patients with unilateral ANFH at stage I, II and III consented to the study: the patients received standard HBOT. Serum OPG levels were obtained at the beginning of HBOT (T0), after 15 sessions (T1), 30 sessions (T2), after a 30-day break (T3), and after 60 sessions (T4). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained at T0 and about one year from the end of HBO treatments. Lesion size was compared between pre- and post-HBOT. 19 patients completed the study. HBOT reduced pain symptoms in all patients. HBOT significantly reduced lesion size in all stage I and II patients and in 2 of 11 stage III patients. HBOT increased serum OPG levels but receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) levels did not change.

  13. Lactulose inhibits endotoxin induced tumour necrosis factor production by monocytes. An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Greve, J W; Gouma, D J; von Leeuwen, P A; Buurman, W A

    1990-01-01

    Preoperative oral treatment with lactulose is used to prevent complications after surgery in patients with obstructive jaundice. The effect is perhaps the result of an inactivation of gut derived endotoxins but the exact mechanism of action is, however, unknown. Tumour necrosis factor is an important mediator of endotoxin toxicity. The cytokine tumour necrosis factor is mainly produced by mononuclear phagocytes. In this study, the effect of lactulose on the endotoxin induced tumour necrosis factor release by monocytes was investigated. The direct effect of lactulose on endotoxin was tested in a chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate assay. Polymyxin B a known inactivator of endotoxin was used as control in both experiments. Lactulose has a limited capacity to inactivate endotoxin as measured in the endotoxin assay. In contrast lactulose significantly reduced endotoxin induced tumour necrosis factor production by monocytes. In conclusion lactulose inhibits tumour necrosis factor production by a direct inhibitory effect on monocytes, rather than by inactivation of endotoxin. Because tumour necrosis factor is an important mediator of endotoxin toxicity, this inhibitory effect could explain the beneficial effect of lactulose in obstructive jaundice. PMID:2311978

  14. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  15. Soluble biomarkers associated with response to treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Vinod; Shen, Hua; Pollock, Remy A; Pellett, Fawnda J; Carty, Adele; Cook, Richard J; Gladman, Dafna D

    2013-06-01

    To identify soluble biomarkers associated with response to therapy with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The study was conducted at a PsA clinic where patients are assessed every 6 months, and serum samples are collected and stored once a year at the time of clinical assessment. Forty patients with active PsA who gave serum samples prior to treatment with TNFi and after at least 3 months of therapy were identified. Patients were classified as TNFi responders if tender joint count was < 3, swollen joint count was 0, and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score was < 4 at the time the second sample was collected. The following biomarkers were tested by ELISA: TNF superfamily 14, matrix metalloprotease-3 (MMP-3), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, osteoprotegerin, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), CPII, C2C and C1-2C, CS-846, and highly sensitive C-reactive protein. Paired t tests and logistic regression was used for statistical analyses. After a mean treatment duration of 11 months with TNFi (etanercept 28 patients, adalimumab 6, golimumab 4, infliximab 2), 29 patients were classified as TNFi responders. Baseline level of MMP-3 was independently associated with responder status (OR 1.067 for each 1-unit increase, p = 0.045). A reduction in MMP-3 levels with therapy increased the odds of achieving response (OR 1.213 for each 1-unit change, p = 0.030), whereas a reduction in COMP decreased the odds (OR 0.587, for each 100-unit increase, p = 0.039). None of the other biomarkers was associated with response. Baseline as well as reduction in serum MMP-3 and increase in serum COMP are independently associated with response to TNFi therapy in patients with PsA.

  16. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  17. Analysis of risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Jiang, Tao; You, Zhen-Jun; Yuan, De-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Femoral head necrosis is a rare but devastating complication following femoral neck fracture. The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fracture. This retrospective study included 166 patients with femoral neck fractures treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation at the authors' institution from January 2004 to December 2008. Eight patients died for reasons unrelated to the surgery, and 12 patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 fractures) were followed until union or until conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The patients included 61 males and 85 females with an average age of 47.5 years (range, 18-68 years). The authors analyzed the following factors: age, sex, Garden classification, reduction quality, surgical methods, injury-to-surgery interval, preoperative traction, weight-bearing time, and implant removal. All patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 6-90 months). The incidence of femoral head necrosis was 14.4% (21/146). Garden classification (P=.012), reduction quality (P=.008), implant removal (P=.020), and preoperative traction (P=.003) were significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. Patient age (P=.990), sex (P=.287), injury-to-surgery interval (P=.360), weight-bearing time (P=.868), and surgical methods (P=.987) were not significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was not a significant risk factor for femoral head necrosis development (P=.498). Garden classification, reduction quality, and preoperative traction had a significant effect on femoral head necrosis development. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 is a positive regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Luo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a common early symptom of heart failure, is regulated by numerous signaling pathways. Here, we identified tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), an adaptor protein in tumor necrosis factor-related signaling cascades, as a key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 expression was upregulated in hypertrophied mice hearts and failing human hearts. Four weeks after aortic banding, cardiac-specific conditional TRAF3-knockout mice exhibited significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. Conversely, transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in the heart developed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 also promoted an angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic response in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, TRAF3 directly bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), causing increased TBK1 phosphorylation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. This interaction between TRAF3 and TBK1 further activated AKT signaling, which ultimately promoted the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Our findings not only reveal a key role of TRAF3 in regulating the hypertrophic response but also uncover TRAF3-TBK1-AKT as a novel signaling pathway in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for this pathological process.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 5 is an essential mediator of ischemic brain infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang; Lu, Yanyun; Guan, Hongjing; Jiang, Dingsheng; Guan, Yu; Zhang, Xin; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Li; Li, Hongliang

    2013-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 5 (TRAF5) is an adaptor protein of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily and the interleukin-1 receptor/Toll-like receptor superfamily and plays important roles in regulating multiple signaling pathways. This study was conducted to investigate the role of TRAF5 in the context of brain ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was performed on TRAF5 knockout mice (KO), neuron-specific TRAF5 transgene (TG), and the appropriate controls. Compared with the WT mice, the TRAF5 KO mice showed lower infarct volumes and better outcomes in the neurological tests. A low neuronal apoptosis level, an attenuated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and an inhibited inflammatory response were exhibited in TRAF5 KO mice. TRAF5 TG mice exhibited an opposite phenotype. Moreover, the Akt/FoxO1 signaling pathway was enhanced in the ischemic brains of the TRAF5 KO mice. These results provide the first demonstration that TRAF5 is a critical mediator of I/R injury in an experimental stroke model. The Akt /FoxO1 signaling pathway probably plays an important role in the biological function of TRAF5 in this model. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Comparison of drug survival rates for tumor necrosis factor antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Santana, Virginia; González-Sarmiento, E; Calleja-Hernández, MA; Sánchez-Sánchez, T

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistence of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an overall marker of treatment success. Objective To assess the survival of anti-TNF treatment and to define the potential predictors of drug discontinuation in RA, in order to verify the adequacy of current practices. Design An observational, descriptive, longitudinal, retrospective study. Setting The Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain. Patients RA patients treated with anti-TNF therapy between January 2011 and January 2012. Measurements Demographic information and therapy assessments were gathered from medical and pharmaceutical records. Data is expressed as means (standard deviations) for quantitative variables and frequency distribution for qualitative variables. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was used to assess persistence, and Cox multivariate regression models were used to assess potential predictors of treatment discontinuation. Results In total, 126 treatment series with infliximab (n = 53), etanercept (n = 51) or adalimumab (n = 22) were administered to 91 patients. Infliximab has mostly been used as a first-line treatment, but it was the drug with the shortest time until a change of treatment. Significant predictors of drug survival were: age; the anti-TNF agent; and the previous response to an anti-TNF drug. Limitation The small sample size. Conclusion The overall efficacy of anti-TNF drugs diminishes with time, with infliximab having the shortest time until a change of treatment. The management of biologic therapy in patients with RA should be reconsidered in order to achieve disease control with a reduction in costs. PMID:24023512

  1. Molecular mechanism of action of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Billmeier, Ulrike; Dieterich, Walburga; Neurath, Markus F; Atreya, Raja

    2016-11-14

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies are successfully used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the molecular mechanism of action of these agents is still a matter of debate. Apart from neutralization of TNF, influence on the intestinal barrier function, induction of apoptosis in mucosal immune cells, formation of regulatory macrophages as well as other immune modulating properties have been discussed as central features. Nevertheless, clinically effective anti-TNF antibodies were shown to differ in their mode-of-action in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the anti-TNF agent etanercept is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but failed to induce clinical response in Crohn's disease patients, suggesting different contributions of TNF in the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. In the following, we will review different aspects regarding the mechanism of action of anti-TNF agents in general and analyze comparatively different effects of each anti-TNF agent such as TNF neutralization, modulation of the immune system, reverse signaling and induction of apoptosis. We discuss the relevance of the membrane-bound form of TNF compared to the soluble form for the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, we review reports that could lead to personalized medicine approaches regarding treatment with anti-TNF antibodies in chronic intestinal inflammation, by predicting response to therapy.

  2. Molecular mechanism of action of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Billmeier, Ulrike; Dieterich, Walburga; Neurath, Markus F; Atreya, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies are successfully used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the molecular mechanism of action of these agents is still a matter of debate. Apart from neutralization of TNF, influence on the intestinal barrier function, induction of apoptosis in mucosal immune cells, formation of regulatory macrophages as well as other immune modulating properties have been discussed as central features. Nevertheless, clinically effective anti-TNF antibodies were shown to differ in their mode-of-action in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the anti-TNF agent etanercept is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but failed to induce clinical response in Crohn’s disease patients, suggesting different contributions of TNF in the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. In the following, we will review different aspects regarding the mechanism of action of anti-TNF agents in general and analyze comparatively different effects of each anti-TNF agent such as TNF neutralization, modulation of the immune system, reverse signaling and induction of apoptosis. We discuss the relevance of the membrane-bound form of TNF compared to the soluble form for the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, we review reports that could lead to personalized medicine approaches regarding treatment with anti-TNF antibodies in chronic intestinal inflammation, by predicting response to therapy. PMID:27895418

  3. Personalized medicine: theranostics (therapeutics diagnostics) essential for rational use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    With the discovery of the central pathogenic role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in many immunoinflammatory diseases, specific inhibition of this pleiotropic cytokine has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several non-infectious inflammatory disorders. As a result, genetically engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety can be severely impaired by immunogenicity, i.e., the ability of a drug to induce anti-drug antibodies (ADA). Assessment of ADA is therefore an important component of the evaluation of drug safety in both pre-clinical and clinical studies and in the process of developing less immunogenic and safer biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutics diagnostics, also called theranostics, i.e., monitoring functional drug levels and neutralizing ADA in the circulation, is central to more effective use of biopharmaceuticals. Hence, testing-based strategies rather than empirical dose-escalation may provide more cost-effective use of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists and to highlight some of the methodological obstacles that have obscured cost-effective ways of using these therapies.

  4. Regulatory Roles of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor BCMA

    PubMed Central

    Coquery, Christine M.; Erickson, Loren D.

    2012-01-01

    B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a tumor necrosis family receptor (TNFR) member that is predominantly expressed on terminally differentiated B cells and, upon binding to its ligands B cell activator of the TNF family (BAFF) and a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL), delivers pro-survival cell signals. Thus, BCMA is most known for its functional activity in mediating the survival of plasma cells that maintain long-term humoral immunity. The expression of BCMA has been also linked to a number of cancers, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases that suggest additional roles for BCMA activity. Despite the recent advances in our understanding of the roles for the related TNFR members BAFF-R and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), the signaling pathway used by BCMA for mediating plasma cell survival as well as its putative function in certain disease states are not well understood. By examining the expression, regulation, and signaling targets of BCMA we may gain further insight into this receptor and how it operates within cells in both health and disease. This information is important for identifying new therapeutic targets that may be relevant in treating diseases that involve the BAFF/APRIL cytokine network. PMID:23237506

  5. Molecular design of conjugated tumor necrosis factor-alpha: synthesis and characteristics of polyvinyl pyrrolidone modified tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kamada, H; Tsutsumi, Y; Tsunoda, S; Kihira, T; Kaneda, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Nakagawa, S; Horisawa, Y; Mayumi, T

    1999-04-13

    We conjugated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) with the synthetic polymeric modifier polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) to facilitate its clinical use for anti-tumor therapy. TNF-alpha was chemically conjugated with the terminal carboxyl-bearing PVP at one end of its main chain, which was radically polymerized via the formation of an amide bond between the lysine amino groups of TNF-alpha and carboxyl group of PVP. In vitro specific bioactivity of PVP-conjugated TNF-alpha (PVP-TNF-alpha) relative to that of native TNF-alpha gradually decreased with increases in the degree of PVP attachment. In contrast, PVP-TNF-alpha in which 40% of TNF-alpha lysine residues were coupled with PVP (MPVP-TNF-alpha) exhibited the highest anti-tumor activity among the conjugated derivatives examined. MPVP-TNF-alpha had more than 200-fold higher anti-tumor efficacy than native TNF-alpha, and the anti-tumor activity of MPVP- TNF-alpha was more than 5-fold stronger than that MPEG- TNF-alpha which had the highest anti-tumor activity among PEG-conjugated TNF-alphas examined. Additionally, a high dose of native TNF-alpha induced toxic side-effects such as body weight reduction, piloerection and tissue inflammation, while no side effects were observed following i.v. administration of MPVP-TNF-alpha. The plasma half-life of MPVP-TNF-alpha (360 min) was about 80 and 3-fold longer than those of native TNF-alpha (4.6 min) and MPEG-TNF-alpha (122 min), respectively. These results suggested that PVP is a useful polymeric modifier for increasing the anti-tumor activity of PVP.

  6. Role of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death induced by nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattani, Varun P.; Shah, Jay; Atalis, Alexandra; Sharma, Anirudh; Tunnell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Current cancer therapies can cause significant collateral damage due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, we explored the cell death pathway response to gold nanorod (GNR)-mediated photothermal therapy as a highly specific cancer therapeutic to understand the role of apoptosis and necrosis during intense localized heating. By developing this, we can optimize photothermal therapy to induce a maximum of `clean' cell death pathways, namely apoptosis, thereby reducing external damage. GNRs were targeted to several subcellular localizations within colorectal tumor cells in vitro, and the cell death pathways were quantitatively analyzed after photothermal therapy using flow cytometry. In this study, we found that the cell death response to photothermal therapy was dependent on the GNR localization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nanorods targeted to the perinuclear region irradiated at 37.5 W/cm2 laser fluence rate led to maximum cell destruction with the `cleaner' method of apoptosis, at similar percentages as other anti-cancer targeted therapies. We believe that this indicates the therapeutic potential for GNR-mediated photothermal therapy to treat cancer effectively without causing damage to surrounding tissue.

  7. Differences and Similarities in TRAIL- and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Necroptotic Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Stephan; Fuchslocher Chico, Johaiber; Saggau, Carina; Fritsch, Jürgen; Föll, Alexandra; Plenge, Johannes; Arenz, Christoph; Pinkert, Thomas; Kalthoff, Holger; Trauzold, Anna; Schmitz, Ingo; Schütze, Stefan; Adam, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a type of regulated necrosis (RN) called necroptosis was identified to be involved in many pathophysiological processes and emerged as an alternative method to eliminate cancer cells. However, only a few studies have elucidated components of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis useful for anticancer therapy. Therefore, we have compared this type of cell death to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated necroptosis and found similar signaling through acid and neutral sphingomyelinases, the mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi, Atg5, and vacuolar H+-ATPase. Notably, executive mechanisms of both TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis are independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), and depletion of p38α increases the levels of both types of cell death. Moreover, we found differences in signaling between TNF- and TRAIL-mediated necroptosis, e.g., a lack of involvement of ubiquitin carboxyl hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) and Atg16L1 in executive mechanisms of TRAIL-mediated necroptosis. Furthermore, we discovered indications of an altered involvement of mitochondrial components, since overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 protected Jurkat cells from TRAIL- and TNF-mediated necroptosis, and overexpression of Bcl-XL diminished only TRAIL-induced necroptosis in Colo357 cells. Furthermore, TRAIL does not require receptor internalization and endosome-lysosome acidification to mediate necroptosis. Taken together, pathways described for TRAIL-mediated necroptosis and differences from those for TNF-mediated necroptosis might be unique targets to increase or modify necroptotic signaling and eliminate tumor cells more specifically in future anticancer approaches. PMID:27528614

  8. Harnessing tumor necrosis factor receptors to enhance antitumor activities of drugs.

    PubMed

    Muntané, Jordi

    2011-10-17

    Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the U.S. behind heart disease and over stroke. The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human tumors. The inhibition of cell death pathways is one of these tumor characteristics which also include sustained proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressor signaling, replicative immortality, angiogenesis, and promotion of invasion and metastasis. Cell death is mediated through death receptor (DR) stimulation initiated by specific ligands that transmit signaling to the cell death machinery or through the participation of mitochondria. Cell death involving DR is mediated by the superfamily of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R) which includes TNF-R type I, CD95, DR3, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor-1 (TRAIL-R1) and -2 (TRAIL-R2), DR6, ectodysplasin A (EDA) receptor (EDAR), and the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (NGFR). The expression of these receptors in healthy and tumor cells induces treatment side effects that limit the systemic administration of cell death-inducing therapies. The present review is focused on the different therapeutic strategies such as targeted antibodies or small molecules addressed to selective stimulated DR-mediated apoptosis or reduce cell proliferation in cancer cells.

  9. Relapsed Pulmonary Cryptococcosis during Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Takazono, Takahiro; Sawai, Toyomitsu; Tashiro, Masato; Saijo, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Suyama, Naofumi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    A 35-year-old non-HIV patient developed pulmonary cryptococcosis after the initiation of infliximab. He recovered by fluconazole treatment and completed the therapy for a total of 6 months. However, he experienced a relapse 16 months later during retreatment with infliximab, revealing an interesting clinical course contradicting retreatment. This case also represents the first case of relapsed pulmonary cryptococcosis suspected during treatment with a biologic agent. Both of these aspects generated important clinical questions about the length of pulmonary cryptococcosis treatment and the necessity of introducing a second prophylaxis for such patients.

  10. Relapsed Pulmonary Cryptococcosis during Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Takazono, Takahiro; Sawai, Toyomitsu; Tashiro, Masato; Saijo, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Suyama, Naofumi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old non-HIV patient developed pulmonary cryptococcosis after the initiation of infliximab. He recovered by fluconazole treatment and completed the therapy for a total of 6 months. However, he experienced a relapse 16 months later during retreatment with infliximab, revealing an interesting clinical course contradicting retreatment. This case also represents the first case of relapsed pulmonary cryptococcosis suspected during treatment with a biologic agent. Both of these aspects generated important clinical questions about the length of pulmonary cryptococcosis treatment and the necessity of introducing a second prophylaxis for such patients. PMID:27725552

  11. Polymorphism in the tumour necrosis factor receptor II gene is associated with circulating levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glossop, John R; Dawes, Peter T; Nixon, Nicola B; Mattey, Derek L

    2005-01-01

    Levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) are elevated in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although these receptors can act as natural inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor-α, levels of sTNFRs in RA appear to be insufficient to prevent tumour necrosis factor-α induced inflammation. The factors that regulate circulating levels of sTNFRs are unclear, but polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor receptor genes may play a role. We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor receptor I (TNF-RI) and II (TNF-RII) genes and levels of sTNFRs in two groups of Caucasian RA patients: one with early (disease duration ≤2 years; n = 103) and one with established disease (disease duration ≥5 years; n = 151). PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype patients for the A36G polymorphism in the TNF-RI gene and the T676G polymorphism in TNF-RII. Levels of sTNFRs were measured using ELISA. We also isolated T cells from peripheral blood of 58 patients with established RA with known TNF-R genotypes, and release of sTNFRs into the culture medium was measured in cells incubated with or without phytohaemagglutinin. Serum levels of the two sTNFRs (sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII) were positively correlated in both populations, and the level of each sTNFR was significantly higher in the patients with established disease (P < 0.0001). Multiple regression analyses corrected for age, sex and disease duration revealed a significant trend toward decreasing sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII levels across the TNF-RII genotypes (TT > TG > GG) of patients with established disease (P for trend = 0.01 and P for trend = 0.03, respectively). A similar nonsignificant trend was seen for early disease. No relationship with the TNF-RI A36G polymorphism was observed. sTNFRs released by isolated T cells exhibited a similar trend toward decreasing levels according to TNF-RII genotype, although only the association

  12. Efficacy of scaling and root planning with and without adjunct Nd:YAG laser therapy on clinical periodontal parameters and gingival crevicular fluid interleukin 1-beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels among patients with periodontal disease: A prospective randomized split-mouth clinical study.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Tariq; Vohra, Fahim; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Javed, Fawad

    2017-04-01

    Limited evidence exists regarding the role of scaling and root planning (SRP) with adjunct neodymium yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser therapy in reducing periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP] and probing pocket depth [PPD]) and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) among patients with periodontal disease (PD). The aim was to assess the effect of SRP with and without adjunct Nd:YAG laser therapy on clinical periodontal parameters and GCF interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels among patients with PD. Demographic data was collected using a questionnaire. Mandibular right and left quadrants were randomly divided into test- (SRP+Nd:YAG laser) and control-sites (SRP alone). PI, BOP and PPD were assessed and GCF IL-1β and TNF-α levels were measured at baseline and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Level of significance was set at P<0.05. Twenty-eight male patients with PD were included. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, PI (P<0.01), BOP (P<0.01) and PPD (P<0.01) were significantly higher in the control-sites than test-sites. In the test-sites, PI, BOP and PPD and GCF IL-1β and TNF-α levels were comparable at 3- and 6-month follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, IL-1β (P<0.05) and TNF-α (P<0.05) levels were significantly higher in control-sites than test-sites at 3- and 6-month follow-up. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, SRP+Nd:YAG therapy was more effective in reducing periodontal inflammatory parameters and GCF IL-1β and TNF-α levels compared with SRP alone. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q; Møller, H J; Pfeiffer Jensen, M; Drewes, A M; Farmer, A D

    2016-12-12

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t-VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which warrants further evaluation in larger controlled studies.

  14. Photobiomodulation therapy: management of mucosal necrosis of the oropharynx in previously treated head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Song, Paul Y; Ho, Allen S; Larian, Babak; Asher, Arash; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean

    2017-04-01

    Necrosis of the oral mucosa following head and neck cancer radiation therapy presents considerable clinical management challenges. We report three cases of symptomatic persisting oral ulcerations where the addition of photobiomodulation therapy resulted in a rapid resolution of the oral lesions and in patient symptoms. These cases suggest that photobiomodulation may represent an adjunct to care of these difficult to manage complications in oncology.

  15. Predisposing Factors of Liver Necrosis after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization in Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Joskin, Julien Baere, Thierry de; Auperin, Anne; Tselikas, Lambros Guiu, Boris Farouil, Geoffroy; Boige, Valérie Malka, David; Leboulleux, Sophie; Ducreux, Michel; Baudin, Eric; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo investigate predictive factors for liver necrosis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of neuroendocrine liver metastases.MethodsA total of 164 patients receiving 374 TACE were reviewed retrospectively to analyze predictive factors of liver necrosis. We analyzed patient age and sex; metastasis number and location; percentage of liver involvement; baseline liver function test; and pretreatment imaging abnormalities such as bile duct dilatation (BDD), portal vein narrowing (PVN), and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We analyzed TACE technique such as Lipiodol or drug-eluting beads (DEB) as the drug’s vector; dose of chemotherapy; diameter of DEB; and number, frequency, and selectivity of TACE.ResultsLiver necrosis developed after 23 (6.1 %) of 374 TACE. In multivariate analysis, DEB > 300 μm in size induced more liver necrosis compared to Lipiodol (odds ratio [OR] 35.20; p < 0.0001) or with DEB < 300 μm in size (OR 19.95; p < 0.010). Pretreatment BDD (OR 119.64; p < 0.0001) and PVT (OR 9.83; p = 0.030) were predictive of liver necrosis. BDD or PVT responsible for liver necrosis were present before TACE in 59 % (13 of 22) and were induced by a previous TACE in 41 % (9 of 22) of cases.ConclusionDEB > 300 μm in size, BDD, and PVT are responsible for increased rate of liver necrosis after TACE. Careful analysis of BDD or PVT on pretreatment images as well as images taken between two courses can help avoid TACE complications.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibits Glucocorticoid Receptor Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Tom; Vandevyver, Sofie; Dejager, Lien; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Pinheiro, Iris; Petta, Ioanna; Engblom, David; Kleyman, Anna; Schütz, Günther; Tuckermann, Jan; Libert, Claude

    2011-01-01

    As glucocorticoid resistance (GCR) and the concomitant burden pose a worldwide problem, there is an urgent need for a more effective glucocorticoid therapy, for which insights into the molecular mechanisms of GCR are essential. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that TNFα, a strong pro-inflammatory mediator in numerous inflammatory diseases, compromises the protective function of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) against TNFα-induced lethal inflammation. Indeed, protection of mice by dexamethasone against TNFα lethality was completely abolished when it was administered after TNFα stimulation, indicating compromised GR function upon TNFα challenge. TNFα-induced GCR was further demonstrated by impaired GR-dependent gene expression in the liver. Furthermore, TNFα down-regulates the levels of both GR mRNA and protein. However, this down-regulation seems to occur independently of GC production, as TNFα also resulted in down-regulation of GR levels in adrenalectomized mice. These findings suggest that the decreased amount of GR determines the GR response and outcome of TNFα-induced shock, as supported by our studies with GR heterozygous mice. We propose that by inducing GCR, TNFα inhibits a major brake on inflammation and thereby amplifies the pro-inflammatory response. Our findings might prove helpful in understanding GCR in inflammatory diseases in which TNFα is intimately involved. PMID:21646349

  17. Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Ameliorates Joint Disease in Murine Collagen- Induced Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard O.; Feldmann, Marc; Maini, Ravinder N.

    1992-10-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This evidence is based not only on the universal presence of TNF-α in arthritic joints accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-α receptors but also on the effects of neutralizing TNF-α in joint cell cultures. Thus, neutralization of TNF-α in vitro results in inhibition of the production of interleukin 1, which like TNF-α, is believed to contribute to joint inflammation and erosion. To determine the validity of this concept in vivo, the effect of administering TNF-neutralizing antibodies to mice with collagen-induced arthritis has been studied. This disease model was chosen because of its many immunological and pathological similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis. TN3-19.12, a hamster IgG1 monoclonal antibody to murine TNF-α/β, was injected i.p. into mice either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Anti-TNF administered prior to disease onset significantly reduced paw swelling and histological severity of arthritis without reducing the incidence of arthritis or the level of circulating anti-type II collagen IgG. More relevant to human disease was the capacity of the antibody to reduce the clinical score, paw swelling, and the histological severity of disease even when injected after the onset of clinical arthritis. These results have implications for possible modes of therapy of human arthritis.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Hepatocellular Apoptosis Induced by Trovafloxacin-Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) continues to be a significant human health problem. IDILI is characterized as occurring in a minority of individuals exposed to a drug, yet it accounts for as much as 17% of all cases of acute liver failure. Despite these concerns, the mechanisms underlying IDILI remain unknown. Trovafloxacin (TVX), which causes IDILI in humans, also causes hepatocellular death in vitro when combined with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this toxicity are not fully characterized. The purpose of this study was to identify mechanisms by which TVX and TNF interact to cause hepatocellular death, with a focus on a human hepatocyte cell line. TVX and TNF interacted to cause cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells at drug concentrations similar to those in people undergoing TVX therapy. TVX/TNF treatment caused apoptosis and DNA damage in HepG2 cells that depended on caspase activation. Prolonged activation of JNK occurred in TVX/TNF-induced cytotoxicity, and treatment with the JNK selective inhibitor SP600125 attenuated cytotoxicity. TVX/TNF cotreatment also caused cytotoxicity in isolated primary murine hepatocytes that was dependent on caspase activation. These results increase understanding of molecular signaling pathways involved in hepatocellular death caused by a drug with idiosyncratic liability in the presence of TNF. PMID:24097668

  19. Immunological control of tuberculosis: role of tumour necrosis factor and more

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, S

    2005-01-01

    Therapy of autoimmune diseases with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) neutralising agents has provided a unique opportunity to learn about the significance of TNF in the maintenance of latent bacterial infections in humans. The remarkably high incidence of tuberculosis in patients treated with TNF antagonists raises the intriguing question about the physiological role of TNF in maintaining the lifelong latency of tubercle bacilli in granulomas in infected patients. Basic research during the past decade(s) combined with thoughtful observations in human subjects with tuberculosis and autoimmune diseases has provided several potential explanations for the recurrence of tuberculosis if TNF supply is withdrawn. TNF is involved in at least four key functions that contribute towards beneficial effects on the symptoms of autoimmune disorders on the one hand, and the attenuation of immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the other hand. These are outlined in this review: induction of apoptosis, maturation of dendritic cells, activation of antimicrobial activity in macrophages, and orchestration of leucocyte movement. PMID:16239381

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Superfamily 15 Gene Expression in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Özçimen, Ahmet Ata; Ünal, Selma; Canacankatan, Necmiye; Antmen, Şerife Efsun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between tumor necrosis factor-superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) gene expression and clinical findings in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and Methods: Forty-nine patients with SCD and 38 healthy controls were included in this study. TNFSF15 gene expression and plasma levels were analyzed. TNFSF15 gene expression was compared in subgroups considering the frequency of painful crises and acute chest syndrome (ACS). Results: It was found that TNFSF15 gene expression was significantly higher in patients with SCD than the controls (p=0.001), whereas there was no significant difference between the patients with SCD and the control groups considering plasma levels of TNFSF15. TNFSF15 gene expression was also significantly higher in SCD patients with ACS (p=0.008). Conclusion: These findings suggest that TNFSF15 may have a role in the pathogenesis of SCD presenting with ACS. Further studies on larger groups are needed to determine the function of TNFSF15 in SCD patients with ACS and pulmonary hypertension. Analysis of TNFSF15 expression may also serve as a promising approach in ACS therapy. PMID:25330517

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: comparative effectiveness of tocilizumab with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshio; Hishitani, Yoshihiro; Ogata, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation, systemic inflammation, and immunological abnormalities. Because cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 play a major role in the development of RA, their targeting could constitute a reasonable novel therapeutic strategy for treating RA. Indeed, worldwide clinical trials of TNF inhibiting biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) including infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab pegol, and etanercept as well as the humanized anti-human IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, have demonstrated outstanding clinical efficacy and tolerable safety profiles, resulting in worldwide approval for using these bDMARDs to treat moderate to severe active RA in patients with an inadequate response to synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs). Although bDMARDs have elicited to a paradigm shift in the treatment of RA due to the prominent efficacy that had not been previously achieved by sDMARDs, a substantial percentage of patients failed primary or secondary responses to bDMARD therapy. Because RA is a heterogeneous disease in which TNF-α and IL-6 play overlapping but distinct pathological roles, further studies are required to determine the best use of TNF inhibitors and tocilizumab in individual RA patients. PMID:24741293

  2. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2014-03-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn's disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn's disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF(+) immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF(+) cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF(+) cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders.

  3. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  4. Prognostic and Therapeutic Values of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianmin; Hu, Xuemei; Liu, Shanshan; He, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) causes many deaths worldwide every year, especially in Asia. It is characterized by high malignancy, recurrence, and short survival time. Inflammation is closely related to the initiation and development of HCC. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), an essential inflammatory mediator, has been studied as a potential therapy target in many cancers. However, its potential role in HCC diagnosis and therapy is still unclear. Material/Methods In our study, we detected the TNF-α expression in both human HCC tumor tissue and HCC cell lines HepG2 and HuH7. Then, we detected the effect of anti-TNF-α treatment and it synergistic function with 5-FU in an HCC xenograft mouse model and in HCC cell lines. Results Survival analysis and Cox regression analysis based on 97 HCC patients indicated that a high level of TNF-α is an independent predictor of poor survival in HCC patients. Anti-TNF-α treatment by infliximab synergizes with Fluorouracil (5-FU) by promoting apoptosis of HCC tumor cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) effects. Conclusions Based on these data, we conclude that anti-TNF-α treatment could be a good way to increase the effect of classic chemotherapy of HCC patients, especially for the patients who have modest response to classic chemotherapy, such as 5-FU. TNF-α could also be used as a biomarker to help in early diagnosis of HCC. PMID:27739418

  5. Complicated Whipple’s disease and endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test whether treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFI) is associated with complications of Tropheryma whipplei (T. whipplei) infection. METHODS: Because unexplained arthritis is often the first Whipple’s disease (WD) symptom, patients may undergo treatment with TNFI before diagnosis. This may influence the course of infection with T. whipplei, which causes WD, because host immune defects contribute to the pathogenesis of WD. A literature search and cross referencing identified 19 reports of TNFI treatment prior to WD diagnosis. This case-control study compared clinical data in patients receiving TNFI therapy (group I, n = 41) with patients not receiving TNFI therapy (group II, n = 61). Patients from large reviews served as controls (group III, n = 1059). RESULTS: The rate of endocarditis in patient group I was significantly higher than in patient group II (12.2% in group I vs 1.6% in group II, P < 0.05), and group III (12.2% in group I vs 0.16% in group III, P < 0.01). Other, severe systemic or local WD complications such as pericarditis, fever or specific organ manifestations were increased also in group I as compared to the other patient groups. However, diarrhea and weight loss were somewhat less frequent in patient group I. WD is typically diagnosed with duodenal biopsy and periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining. PAS-stain as standard diagnostic test had a very high percentage of false negative results (diagnostic failure in 63.6% of cases) in group I. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for T. whipplei was more accurate than PAS-stainings (diagnostic accuracy, rate of true positive tests 90.9% for PCR vs 36.4% for PAS, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: TNFI trigger severe WD complications, particularly endocarditis, and lead to false-negative PAS-tests. In case of TNFI treatment failure, infection with T. whipplei should be considered. PMID:25548618

  6. Symptomatic Avascular Necrosis: An Understudied Risk Factor for Acute Care Utilization by Patients with SCD.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tiffany; Campbell, Timothy; Ciuffetelli, Isabella; Haywood, Carlton; Carroll, Christopher Patrick; Resar, Linda; Strouse, John J; Lanzkron, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with high healthcare utilization rates and poor outcomes in a subset of patients, although the underlying factors that predict this phenotype are poorly understood. Prior studies suggest that comorbid avascular necrosis (AVN) contributes to high healthcare utilization. We sought to clarify whether AVN independently predicts acute care utilization in adults with SCD and to identify characteristics of those with AVN that predict higher utilization. We reviewed the medical records of 87 patients with SCD with symptomatic AVN and compared acute care utilization and clinical characteristics with 87 sex- and age-matched patients with SCD without symptomatic AVN. Patients with ≥2 years of follow-up were included. Outcomes were compared using bivariate analysis and multivariate regression. Our study included 1381 follow-up years, with a median of 7 years per patient. The AVN cohort had greater median rates of urgent care visits (3.2/year vs 1.3/year; P = 0.0155), admissions (1.3/year vs 0.4/year; P = 0.0002), and admission days (5.1 days/year vs 1.8 days/year; P = 0.0007). History of high utilization (odds ratio [OR] 4.28; P = 0.001), acute chest syndrome (OR 3.12; P = 0.005), pneumonia (OR 3.20; P = 0.023), hydroxyurea therapy (OR 2.23; P = 0.0136), and long-term transfusion (OR 2.33; P = 0.014) were associated with AVN. In a median regression model, AVN, acute chest syndrome, and pneumonia were independently associated with greater urgent care visits and admissions. Symptomatic AVN was found to be an independent risk factor for acute care utilization in patients with SCD. Because this is a potentially modifiable factor, further studies are urgently needed to determine whether AVN prevention/early treatment interventions will alter utilization and improve outcomes for patients with SCD.

  7. Induction of tumor necrosis factor in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells by proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Desser, L; Rehberger, A

    1990-01-01

    We could demonstrate that polyenzyme preparations as well as bromelain and papain stimulate the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cell cultures in a time-dependent manner. We give evidence that immunomodulation and especially the release of cytokines may contribute to the therapeutic effect of these preparations.

  8. Reduction of Burn Progression with Topical Delivery of (Antitumor Necrosis Factor-alpha )-Hyaluronic Acid Conjugates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    and are used to treat a broad range of inflammatory conditions, such as psoriasis , rheuma- toid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. That each...Reactive oxygen species in tumor necrosis factor- alpha-activated primary human keratinocytes: implications for psoriasis and inflammatory skin

  9. Structural Biology of Tumor Necrosis Factor Demonstrated for Undergraduates Instruction by Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The…

  10. Structural Biology of Tumor Necrosis Factor Demonstrated for Undergraduates Instruction by Computer Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a three-dimensional (3D) modeling exercise for undergraduate students in chemistry and health sciences disciplines, focusing on a protein-group linked to immune system regulation. Specifically, the exercise involves molecular modeling and structural analysis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) proteins, both wild type and mutant. The…

  11. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. PMID:1828792

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated release of platelet-derived growth factor from cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a 30,000-Mr glycoprotein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). It is also a potent vasoconstrictor. In the present study, we found that the macrophage-derived polypeptide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), releases a factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) that is mitogenic for SMC. Postculture medium from TNF-stimulated EC induced a 90% increase in mitogenesis is compared with controls. This effect was half-maximal at a TNF dose of 114 pM, reflected a 2.5-fold increase in PDGF-specific mRNA synthesis, and peaked at 15 h of TNF stimulation. Mitogenic activity was completely abrogated by preincubation of postculture medium with antibody to platelet PDGF. Stimulation of EC with IL-1 (60-240 pM) led to the release of similar mitogenic activity. Thus, in addition to its effects on the hemostatic and adhesive properties of EC, TNF also promotes release of PDGF, which may serve to modulate proliferation of vascular SMC during wound healing, inflammation, and atherogenesis. PMID:3598461

  13. Necrosis response to photodynamic therapy using light pulses in the femtosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Clóvis; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Cosci, Alessandro; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Kurachi, Cristina

    2013-07-01

    One of the clinical limitations of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) is the reduced light penetration into biological tissues. Pulsed lasers may present advantages concerning photodynamic response when compared to continuous wave (CW) lasers operating under the same average power conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate PDT-induced response when using femtosecond laser (FSL) and a first-generation photosensitizer (Photogem) to evaluate the induced depth of necrosis. The in vitro photodegradation of the sensitizer was monitored during illumination either with CW or an FSL as an indirect measurement of the PDT response. Healthy liver of Wistar rats was used to evaluate the tissue response. The photosensitizer was endovenously injected and 30 min after, an energy dose of 150 J cm(-2) was delivered to the liver surface. We observed that the photodegradation rate evaluated via fluorescence spectroscopy was higher for the FSL illumination. The FSL-PDT produced a necrosis nearly twice as deep when compared to the CW-PDT. An increase of the tissue temperature during the application was measured and was not higher than 2.5 °C for the CW laser and not higher than 4.5 °C for the pulsed laser. FSL should be considered as an alternative in PDT applications for improving the results in the treatment of bulky tumors where higher light penetration is required.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  15. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients.

  16. Shock wave therapy as a treatment of nonunions, avascular necrosis, and delayed healing of stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Furia, John P; Rompe, Jan D; Cacchio, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) stimulates angiogenesis and osteogenesis. SWT is commonly used to treat soft tissue musculoskeletal conditions such as fasciopathies and tendinopathies. Recent basic science and clinical data suggest that SWT can also be used to treat disorders of bone. Nonunions, avascular necrosis, and delayed healing of stress fractures have all been successfully treated with SWT. Success rates with SWT are equal to those with standard surgical treatment, but SWT has the advantage of decreased morbidity. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, yields few complications, and, typically, can be performed on an outpatient basis. SWT is a viable noninvasive alternative to stimulate healing of bone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. miR-29a suppresses MCF-7 cell growth by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiling; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Wenyuan; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Li; Chen, Lifei; Liu, Yancui; Sun, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is the main receptor mediating many tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cellular events. Some studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 promotes tumorigenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, while other studies have confirmed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plays an inhibitory role in tumors growth by inducing apoptosis in breast cancer. Therefore, the function of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in breast cancer requires clarification. In this study, we first found that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was significantly increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by small interfering RNA inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. In addition, miR-29a was predicted as a regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by TargetScan and was shown to be inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-29a negatively regulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region. In our functional study, miR-29a overexpression remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell. Furthermore, in combination with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 transfection, miR-29a significantly reversed the oncogenic role caused by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in MCF-7 cell. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-29a suppressed MCF-7 cell growth by inactivating the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway and by decreasing cyclinD1 and Bcl-2/Bax protein levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29a is an important regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in breast cancer and functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 to

  18. Requirement of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor–Associated Factor (Traf)6 in Interleukin 17 Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Schwandner, Ralf; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Cao, Zhaodan

    2000-01-01

    Signaling through its widely distributed cell surface receptor, interleukin (IL)-17 enhances the transcription of genes encoding proinflammatory molecules. Although it has been well documented that IL-17 activates the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), the upstream signaling events are largely unknown. Here we report the requirement of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor (TRAF)6 in IL-17–induced NF-κB and JNK activation. In embryonic fibroblasts (EFs) derived from TRAF6 knockout mice, IL-17 failed to activate the IκB kinases (IKKs) and JNK. Consequently, IL-17–induced IL-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression in the TRAF6-deficient cells was abolished. Lack of TRAF6 appeared to be the sole defect responsible for the observed failure to respond to IL-17, because transient transfection of TRAF6 expression plasmid into the TRAF6-deficient cells restored IL-17–induced NF-κB activation in a luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, the levels of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) on the TRAF6-deficient EFs were comparable to those on the wild-type control cells. Defect in IL-17 response was not observed in TRAF2-deficient EFs. Moreover, when TRAF6 and IL-17R were coexpressed in 293 cells, TRAF6 coimmunoprecipitated with IL-17R. Together, these results indicate that TRAF6, but not TRAF2, is a crucial component in the IL-17 signaling pathway leading to proinflammatory responses. PMID:10748240

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the tumour necrosis factor alpha-tumour necrosis factor receptor type 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Yohei; Nakamura, Teruya; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Kamada, Haruhiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Yamagata, Yuriko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2009-03-01

    Tumour necrosis factor receptor type 2 (TNFR2, TNFRSF1B) is an essential receptor for various host-defence functions of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF). As part of studies to determine the structure of TNFR2, the formation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the TNF-TNFR2 complex are described. The TNF-TNFR2 complex, which comprises one TNF trimer and three TNFR2 monomers, was confirmed and purified by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the TNF-TNFR2 complex were obtained using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystal belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 74.5, b = 117.4, c = 246.8 A. Assuming the presence of two TNF-TNFR2 complexes in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient V(M) was 2.49 A(3) Da(-1) and the solvent content of the crystal was 50.7%. The crystal diffracted to 2.95 A resolution.

  20. A novel tumor necrosis factor-responsive transcription factor which recognizes a regulatory element in hemopoietic growth factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.F.; Pell, L.M.; Kuczek, E.S.; Occhiodoro, F.S.; Dunn, S.M.; Vadas, M.A. ); Lenardo, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    A conserved DNA sequence element, termed cytokine 1 (CK-1), is found in the promoter regions of many hemopoietic growth factor (HGF) genes. Mutational analyses and modification interference experiments show that this sequence specifically binds a nuclear transcription factor, NF-GMa, which is a protein with a molecular mass of 43 kilodaltons. It interacts with different affinities with the CK-1-like sequence from a number of HGF genes, including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF, interleukin 3 (IL-3), and IL-5. The authors show that the level of NF-GMa binding is induced in embryonic fibroblasts by tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) treatment and that the CK-1 sequence from the G-CSF gene is a TNF-{alpha}-responsive enhancer in these cells.

  1. Monocyte Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Converting Enzyme Catalytic Activity and Substrate Shedding in Sepsis and Noninfectious Systemic Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, David J. P.; O’Dea, Kieran P.; Scott, Alasdair J.; Takata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of severe sepsis on monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme baseline and inducible activity profiles. Design: Observational clinical study. Setting: Mixed surgical/medical teaching hospital ICU. Patients: Sixteen patients with severe sepsis, 15 healthy volunteers, and eight critically ill patients with noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Monocyte expression of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide, sol-tumor necrosis factor production, tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme expression and catalytic activity, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 expression, and shedding at 48-hour intervals from day 0 to day 4, as well as p38-mitogen activated protein kinase expression. Compared with healthy volunteers, both sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients’ monocytes expressed reduced levels of human leukocyte antigen-D-related peptide and released less sol-tumor necrosis factor on in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation, consistent with the term monocyte deactivation. However, patients with sepsis had substantially elevated levels of basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity that were refractory to lipopolysaccharide stimulation and this was accompanied by similar changes in p38-mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. In patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, monocyte basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme, and its induction by lipopolysaccharide, appeared similar to healthy controls. Changes in basal tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity at day 0 for sepsis patients correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and the attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme response to lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased mortality. Similar changes in monocyte tumor necrosis factor-α–converting enzyme activity could

  2. Novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies: synergy and antagonism with tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One-third of breast cancers display amplifications of the ERBB2 gene encoding the HER2 kinase receptor. Trastuzumab, a humanized antibody directed against an epitope on subdomain IV of the extracellular domain of HER2 is used for therapy of HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors. However, many tumors are either natively resistant or acquire resistance against Trastuzumab. Antibodies directed to different epitopes on the extracellular domain of HER2 are promising candidates for replacement or combinatorial therapy. For example, Pertuzumab that binds to subdomain II of HER2 extracellular domain and inhibits receptor dimerization is under clinical trial. Alternative antibodies directed to novel HER2 epitopes may serve as additional tools for breast cancer therapy. Our aim was to generate novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cells, either alone or in combination with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Methods Mice were immunized against SK-BR-3 cells and recombinant HER2 extracellular domain protein to produce monoclonal antibodies. Anti-HER2 antibodies were characterized with breast cancer cell lines using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation, western blot techniques. Antibody epitopes were localized using plasmids encoding recombinant HER2 protein variants. Antibodies, either alone or in combination with TNF-α, were tested for their effects on breast cancer cell proliferation. Results We produced five new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies, all directed against conformational epitope or epitopes restricted to the native form of the extracellular domain. When tested alone, some antibodies inhibited modestly but significantly the growth of SK-BR-3, BT-474 and MDA-MB-361 cells displaying ERBB2 amplification. They had no detectable effect on MCF-7 and T47D cells lacking ERBB2 amplification. When tested in combination with TNF-α, antibodies acted synergistically on SK-BR-3 cells, but antagonistically on BT

  3. Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor Function Using the Resonant Recognition Model.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Irena; Cosic, Drasko; Lazar, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a complex protein that plays a very important role in a number of biological functions including apoptotic cell death, tumor regression, cachexia, inflammation inhibition of tumorigenesis and viral replication. Its most interesting function is that it is an inhibitor of tumorigenesis and inductor of apoptosis. Thus, the TNF could be a good candidate for cancer therapy. However, the TNF has also inflammatory and toxic effects. Therefore, it would be very important to understand complex functions of the TNF and consequently be able to predict mutations or even design the new TNF-related proteins that will have only a tumor inhibition function, but not other side effects. This can be achieved by applying the resonant recognition model (RRM), a unique computational model of analysing macromolecular sequences of proteins, DNA and RNA. The RRM is based on finding that certain periodicities in distribution of free electron energies along protein, DNA and RNA are strongly correlated to the biological function of these macromolecules. Thus, based on these findings, the RRM has capabilities of protein function identification, prediction of bioactive amino acids and protein design with desired biological function. Using the RRM, we separate different functions of TNF as different periodicities (frequencies) within the distribution of free energy electrons along TNF protein. Interestingly, these characteristic TNF frequencies are related to previously identified characteristics of proto-oncogene and oncogene proteins describing TNF involvement in oncogenesis. Consequently, we identify the key amino acids related to the crucial TNF function, i.e. receptor recognition. We have also designed the peptide which will have the ability to recognise the receptor without side effects.

  4. Comparative Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Viral and Human Secreted Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Decoy Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Pontejo, Sergio M.; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by etanercept, a soluble version of the human TNF receptor 2 (hTNFR2), is a well established strategy to inhibit adverse TNF-mediated inflammatory responses in the clinic. A similar strategy is employed by poxviruses, encoding four viral TNF decoy receptor homologues (vTNFRs) named cytokine response modifier B (CrmB), CrmC, CrmD, and CrmE. These vTNFRs are differentially expressed by poxviral species, suggesting distinct immunomodulatory properties. Whereas the human variola virus and mouse ectromelia virus encode one vTNFR, the broad host range cowpox virus encodes all vTNFRs. We report the first comprehensive study of the functional and binding properties of these four vTNFRs, providing an explanation for their expression profile among different poxviruses. In addition, the vTNFRs activities were compared with the hTNFR2 used in the clinic. Interestingly, CrmB from variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is the most potent TNFR of those tested here including hTNFR2. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new immunomodulatory activity of vTNFRs, showing that CrmB and CrmD also inhibit the activity of lymphotoxin β. Similarly, we report for the first time that the hTNFR2 blocks the biological activity of lymphotoxin β. The characterization of vTNFRs optimized during virus-host evolution to modulate the host immune response provides relevant information about their potential role in pathogenesis and may be used to improve anti-inflammatory therapies based on soluble decoy TNFRs. PMID:25940088

  5. Blocking of tumor necrosis factor activity promotes natural repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knee

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Osteochondral defects have a limited capacity for repair. We therefore investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signal blockade by etanercept (human recombinant soluble TNF receptor) on the repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knees. Material and methods Osteochondral defects (5 mm in diameter) were created in the femoral patellar groove in rabbits. Soon after the procedure, a first subcutaneous injection of etanercept was performed. This single injection or, alternatively, 4 injections in total (twice a week for 2 weeks) were given. Each of these 2 groups was divided further into 3 subgroups: a low-dose group (0.05 μg/kg), an intermediate-dose group (0.4 μ g/kg), and a high-dose group (1.6 μ g /kg) with 19 rabbits in each. As a control, 19 rabbits were injected with water alone. The rabbits in each subgroup were killed 4 weeks (6 rabbits), 8 weeks (6 rabbits), or 24 weeks (7 rabbits) after surgery and repair was assessed histologically. Results Histological examination revealed that the natural process of repair of the osteochondral defects was promoted by 4 subcutaneous injections of intermediate-dose etanercept and by 1 or 4 injections of high-dose etanercept at the various time points examined postoperatively (4, 8, and 24 weeks). Western blot showed that rabbit TNFα had a high affinity for etanercept. Interpretation Blocking of TNF by etanercept enabled repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knee. Anti-TNF therapy could be a strategy for the use of tissue engineering for bone and cartilage repair. PMID:19916697

  6. Risk Factors for Symptomatic Avascular Necrosis in Childhood-onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yelin; Kumar, Sathish; Lim, Lily Siok Hoon; Silverman, Earl D; Levy, Deborah M

    2015-12-01

    To examine the frequency and risk factors for symptomatic avascular necrosis (AVN) in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE). A single-center, nested, matched, case-control design was used. There were 617 patients with cSLE followed at the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) Lupus Clinic between July 1982 and June 2013 included in the study. The AVN cohort consisted of 37 patients identified with clinical findings of symptomatic AVN and diagnosis was confirmed by 1 or more imaging modalities. Three controls were matched to each patient with AVN by date and age at diagnosis. Baseline clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics were compared between patients with AVN and controls by univariable analyses and if statistically significant, were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. A total of 37/617 patients (6%) developed symptomatic AVN in 91 joints during followup at SickKids. The mean duration to disease was 2.3 years. The hip was the most commonly involved joint (26/37, 70%). Compared with the matched non-AVN cohort, patients with AVN had a higher incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement and nephritis, required greater cumulative prednisone (PRED) from cSLE diagnosis to AVN, received a greater maximal daily PRED dose, and had more frequent use of pulse methylprednisolone therapy. Multivariable regression analysis confirmed major organ involvement (CNS disease and/or nephritis) and maximal daily PRED dose as significant predictors of symptomatic AVN development. Patients with cSLE with severe organ involvement including nephritis and CNS disease and higher maximal daily dose of PRED are more likely to develop symptomatic AVN.

  7. Redeeming an old foe: protective as well as pathophysiological roles for tumor necrosis factor in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Philip E.; Punit, Shivesh

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 are major therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel disease. Research advances have demonstrated that TNF produces pleiotropic responses in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although in excess TNF can contribute to GI pathology, TNF is also a critical protective factor to promote GI homeostasis following injury and inflammation. Genetic studies using candidate and genome-wide association study approaches have identified variants in TNF or its receptors that are associated with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis in multiple populations, although the basis for these associations remains unclear. This review considers the efficacy and mechanism of anti-TNF therapies for inflammatory bowel disease to reconcile the many disparate aspects of TNF research and to consider the potential protective effects of TNF signaling in GI health. PMID:25477373

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a treatment for stage-I avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Reis, N D; Schwartz, O; Militianu, D; Ramon, Y; Levin, D; Norman, D; Melamed, Y; Shupak, A; Goldsher, D; Zinman, C

    2003-04-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the head of the femur is a potentially crippling disease which mainly affects young adults. Although treatment by exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is reported as being beneficial, there has been no study of its use in treated compared with untreated patients. We selected 12 patients who suffered from Steinberg stage-I AVN of the head of the femur (four bilateral) whose lesions were 4 mm or more thick and/or 12.5 mm or more long on MRI. Daily HBO therapy was given for 100 days to each patient. All smaller stage-I lesions and more advanced stages of AVN were excluded. These size criteria were chosen in order to compare outcomes with an identical size of lesion in an untreated group described earlier. Overall, 81% of patients who received HBO therapy showed a return to normal on MRI as compared with 17% in the untreated group. We therefore conclude that hyperbaric oxygen is effective in the treatment of stage-I AVN of the head of the femur.

  9. Radiation Necrosis Secondary to Trigeminal Nerve TomoTherapy: A Cautionary Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Montoure, Andrew; Zaidi, Hasan; Sheehy, John P; Shetter, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    New radiation delivery modalities have recently challenged Gamma Knife surgery as the historic gold standard in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). TomoTherapy, a relative newcomer, has been approved by the U.S. FDA for various intracranial pathologies but is currently off label for the treatment of TN. A 73-year-old female presented with gait instability, intermittent headaches, and confusion. She was treated with TomoTherapy for refractory TN at an outside facility, which failed to reduce her symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion in the right mesial temporal lobe. A standard right anterior temporal lobectomy was performed and the final pathological report was notable for necrosis, gliosis, and edema consistent with a remote radiation injury. The patient improved postoperatively, but at her two-year follow up, she continued to have persistent bilateral TN and new onset seizures. Imaging revealed no new mass in the resection field. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an evolving field with broadening indications, which makes it ever more important for physicians to be aware of differences between various SRS modalities. This case report highlights a cautionary example, and emphasizes the need for a more systematic evaluation of novel SRS methods before clinical application. PMID:26180667

  10. Structure/Function analysis of p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor and fas-associated death domain. Effect on necrosis in L929sA cells.

    PubMed

    Boone, E; Vanden Berghe, T; Van Loo, G; De Wilde, G; De Wael, N; Vercammen, D; Fiers, W; Haegeman, G; Vandenabeele, P

    2000-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) induces a typical apoptotic cell death program in various cell lines by interacting with the p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R55). In contrast, triggering of the fibrosarcoma cell line L929sA gives rise to characteristic cellular changes resulting in necrosis. The intracellular domain of TNF-R55 can be subdivided into two parts: a membrane-proximal domain (amino acids 202-325) and a C-terminal death domain (DD) (amino acids 326-413), which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for apoptosis. Structure/function analysis of TNF-R55-mediated necrosis in L929sA cells demonstrated that initiation of necrotic cell death, as defined by swelling of the cells, rapid membrane permeabilization, absence of nuclear condensation, absence of DNA hypoploidy, and generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen intermediates, is also confined to the DD. The striking synergistic effect of the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone on TNF-induced necrosis was also observed with receptors solely containing the DD. TNF-R55-mediated necrosis is not affected by the dominant negative deletion mutant of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD-(80-205)) that lacks the N-terminal death effector domain. Moreover, overexpression of FADD-(80-205) in L929sA is cytotoxic and insensitive to CrmA, while the cytotoxicity due to overexpression of the deletion mutant FADD-(1-111) lacking the DD is prevented by CrmA. These results demonstrate that the death domain of FADD can elicit an active necrotic cell death pathway.

  11. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Antonio J.; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E.; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis. PMID:26159717

  12. Tumour Necrosis Factor Superfamily Members in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ślebioda, Tomasz J.; Kmieć, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unclear aetiology of which two major forms are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). CD and UC are immunologically distinct, although they both result from hyperactivation of proinflammatory pathways in intestines and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier. Members of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) are molecules of broad spectrum of activity, including direct disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity and costimulation of proinflammatory functions of lymphocytes. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has a well-established pathological role in IBD which also serves as a target in IBD treatment. In this review we discuss the role of TNF and other TNFSF members, notably, TL1A, FasL, LIGHT, TRAIL, and TWEAK, in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:25045210

  13. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro.

  15. Improvement of ACTH response to insulin tolerance test in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis due to tumor necrosis factor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Daza, Leonel; Martin-Jimenez, Raul; De la Torre, Pío X; Hernández, Enrique; Murillo, Blanca

    2007-07-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis evaluation has been conflicting in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Our aim was to evaluate the HPA axis response to the insulin tolerance test (ITT) in premenopausal female patients with RA before and after anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy (anti-TNF therapy). A comparative cross-sectional analysis. Ten females with RA and without previous anti-TNF therapy were included. Five healthy females were included as controls. An ITT was performed before first dose of anti-TNF therapy and then after week 12. Anti-TNF therapy was applied every 14 days for 12 weeks. Cortisol and ACTH levels were measured at 0, 30, 45, and 65 min. Prolactin was measured at 0, 30, 45, 90, 120, and 150 min. The ACTH basal plasma levels at weeks 0 and 12 did not show statistical differences, at 1.26 (0.41-2.12) vs 1.54 (0.60-2.49) respectively (P = 0.68). The controls demonstrated a higher ACTH response than in the RA patients at week 0 before the anti-TNF therapy (349.12 area under curve (AUC)), (P = 0.004) and a similar ACTH response to ITT to those of RA patients at week 12 after the use of the anti-TNF therapy (1087.42 AUC). Serum cortisol levels did not show significant changes when the ITT was performed before and after the anti-TNF therapy. Our findings support a role for the TNF on the pituitary gland in premenopausal female patients with RA. An adequate control of RA in early stages of the disease diminishing TNF levels improves ACTH response to stress situations.

  16. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Development of Immunity against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lean, I-Sarah; Lacroix-Lamandé, Sonia; Laurent, Fabrice; McDonald, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) significantly reduced Cryptosporidium parvum development in a murine enterocyte cell line, and a key mechanism of action appeared to be inhibition of parasite invasion. However, TNF-α-deficient mice controlled infection as effectively as wild-type mice. This suggests that TNF-α might have only a redundant role for establishing immunity against C. parvum. PMID:16790816

  17. Tumour necrosis factor alpha increases melphalan concentration in tumour tissue after isolated limb perfusion

    PubMed Central

    de Wilt, J H W; ten Hagen, T L M; de Boeck, G; van Tiel, S T; de Bruijn, E A; Eggermont, A M M

    2000-01-01

    Several possible mechanisms for the synergistic anti-tumour effects between tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and melphalan after isolated limb perfusion (ILP) have been presented. We found a significant sixfold increase in melphalan tumour tissue concentration after ILP when TNF-α was added to the perfusate, which provides a straightforward explanation for the observed synergism between melphalan and TNF-α in ILP. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10737379

  18. The tumour necrosis factor/TNF receptor superfamily: therapeutic targets in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, D S; Kwon, B S

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the body's ability to mount immune attacks on self. This results from recognition of self-proteins and leads to organ damage due to increased production of pathogenic inflammatory molecules and autoantibodies. Over the years, several new potential therapeutic targets have been identified in autoimmune diseases, notable among which are members of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily. Here, we review the evidence that certain key members of this superfamily can augment/suppress autoimmune diseases. PMID:21401577

  19. Activation of the neutrophil bactericidal activity for nontypable Haemophilus influenzae by tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tan, A M; Ferrante, A; Goh, D H; Roberton, D M; Cripps, A W

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that, in vivo, activated T lymphocytes and neutrophils are important in immunity to nontypable Haemophilus influenzae. We now extend this work by showing that neutrophils pretreated with products of activated T lymphocytes or activated macrophages show significantly enhanced killing of nontypable H. influenzae. Lymphotoxin, a product of activated T lymphocytes, significantly enhanced the neutrophil-mediated killing of nontypable H. influenzae, and tumor necrosis factor, produced by activated T lymphocytes as well as macrophages stimulated by activated T lymphocytes, also significantly increased the bactericidal activity of neutrophils. These cytokine-induced effects were seen with short pretreatment times of neutrophils and were maximal by 30 min. The killing of H. influenzae by neutrophils required the presence of heat-labile opsonins. In the absence of these opsonins, both tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin were unable to promote the killing of the bacteria by neutrophils. Furthermore, the results showed that tumor necrosis factor-primed neutrophils displayed significantly increased expression of CR3 and CR4 that was associated with increased phagocytosis of complement-opsonized nontypable H. influenzae. These cytokines may play an important role in immunity toward nontypable H. influenzae by stimulating neutrophil bactericidal activity.

  20. Risk Factor Analysis for Mastectomy Skin Flap Necrosis: Implications for Intraoperative Vascular Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reintgen, Christian; Leavitt, Adam; Pace, Elizabeth; Molas-Pierson, Justine; Mast, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    Skin flap necrosis after mastectomy can be a devastating complication significantly affecting patient outcomes. Routine vascular analysis (fluorescein or laser angiography) of mastectomy skin flaps in all patients has been advocated but is of questionable cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causative risk factors for mastectomy skin flap necrosis and thereby calculate the fiscal reality of intraoperative vascular screening. This is an institutional review board-approved retrospective study of all patients from 2007 to 2013 who underwent mastectomy related to breast cancer. Skin flap necrosis was defined as major if it necessitated return to the operating room. Data analysis was done for determination of causative factors of necrosis, including age, body mass index, smoking, previous irradiation, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, asthma, diabetes, thyroid disease, history of lumpectomy, and breast reduction or augmentation. During this time, intraoperative vascular screening was not done. Five hundred eighty-one patients underwent 616 mastectomies with a total of 34 necrotic events (5.5%)-16 major and 18 minor. Analyses via Student t tests, univariate analyses, χ testing, and logistic regression showed that history of smoking was the only patient factor associated with postoperative necrosis (P = 0.008). More frequently represented in the necrosis group, but without statistical significance, are previous lumpectomy (P = 0.069) and immediate reconstruction (P = 0.078).For the entire study period, the actual cost to the hospital for major necrotic events was $7,123.10 or $445.19 for each of the 16 major necrotic events and $209.50 for all 34 necrotic events. Per-patient cost-effective screening would need to be less than $11.54 for all patients, $100.33 for highest risk patients (smokers), and $21.65 for

  1. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein BZLF1 inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced signaling and apoptosis by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas E; Mauser, Amy; Klingelhutz, Aloysius; Kenney, Shannon C

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a key mediator of host immune and inflammatory responses and inhibits herpesvirus replication by cytolytic and noncytolytic mechanisms. TNF-alpha effects are primarily mediated through the major TNF-alpha receptor, TNF-R1, which is constitutively expressed in most cell types. Here we show that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immediate-early protein BZLF1 prevents TNF-alpha activation of target genes and TNF-alpha-induced cell death. These effects are mediated by down-regulation of the promoter for TNF-R1. Additionally, we demonstrate that expression of TNF-R1 is downregulated during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Thus, EBV has developed a novel mechanism for evading TNF-alpha antiviral effects during lytic reactivation or primary infection.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and epidermal growth factor: a novel function for vitamin B12?

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua W

    2002-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency was recently shown to be associated with elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and decreased levels of epidermal growth factor in both rats and humans. These findings suggest a novel pathogenetic mechanism underlying the neuropathology of vitamin B12 deficiency. They may also explain putative relationships between vitamin B12 deficiency and certain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and AIDS.

  3. An update on the use of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Mohammed S; Maksymowych, Walter P

    2017-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease affecting the sacroiliac joints and the spine manifesting with new bone formation and osteopenia. Over the past decade, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors (TNFi) have become the cornerstone for therapy in improving functional outcomes, and decreasing disease activity in patients with a marginal benefit from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) therapy. At this time, it remains to be determined whether these agents decrease new bone formation, although some studies have recently suggested that. Areas covered: In this review we discuss the factors that favour a good response to these agents both initially and during maintenance, and some of the more recent studies outlining strategies for dose reduction. Expert commentary: Finally, we discuss the importance of using more objective tools for disease activity, such as magnetic resonance imaging, as a complementary tool for clinical assessments in both predicting responses to treatment but also in selecting patients most suited for targeted therapy.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene polymorphisms and haplotypes in Egyptian children with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Doaa M; El-Shal, Amal S; Hussein, Samia; Salah, Khaled; Ahmed, Abd El Rahman E

    2017-08-10

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) characterized by complex pathogenesis and clinical course with relapses; and needs novel breakthroughs for decades. Polymorphisms of cytokines genes including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)may influence susceptibility to NS as well as different patients' steroid responses. In the current study, we demonstrated the potential roles of TNF-α promoter gene polymorphisms [-238, -308, -863] and haplotypes in susceptibility to childhood NS. Also, elucidating their possible influence on patients' steroid response and serum TNF-α level. This case-control study included 150 children suffering from NS and 150 healthy children. Polymerase chain reaction- restriction-fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to evaluate different TNF-α gene polymorphism. TNF-α serum levels were assessed by ELISA. Serum TNF-α levels were significantly higher in NS patients than in controls and in steroid resistant NS (SRNS) than in steroid sensitive NS (SSNS) (P<0.001 for each). The risk of NS in patients carrying TNF-α-238GA genotype, and TNF-α-308GA or AA genotypes and allele A was significantly increased compared to healthy children. While no significant association was detected between TNF-α-863 and NS. The risk of resistance to steroid therapy was significantly high in NS carrying TNF-α-238GA genotype and A allele, TNF-α-308, AA genotypes and A allele, and TNF-α-863CA, AA genotypes and A allele. The TNF-α GCG (-308/-863/-238) haplotype has protective roles against NS and steroid resistance. However, the risk of NS was significantly high in TNF-α AAG and AAA haplotype's carriers compared to healthy children. Additionally the risk of steroid resistance was significantly high in TNF-α AAA haplotype's NS carrier (OR (95%CI): 2.2 (1.19-4.36), P=0.01). Moreover, we found significant higher serum TNF-α levels NS patients including SSNS and SRNS carrying mutant allele TNF-α-238GA genotype, -308GA and AA and -863CA and AA wild genotype

  5. A case of severe psoriasis with an apparent incomplete response to anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha treatment.

    PubMed

    Agnusdei, Concetto P; Mastronardi, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This report covers a case of severe psoriasis that appeared to respond well to treatment with subcutaneous etanercept, with good recovery of the arthropathic component. However, there were distinct areas at the patient's hands and wrists that failed to respond to such treatment. A standard series of patch tests yielded strong positive responses to the vaseline ointment and mercaptobenzothiazole mix, substances that the patient had constantly applied, twice daily, before and during the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy course, as an emollient, rubber-gloved topical treatment. This case is reported to provide further evidence of the efficacy of etanercept treatment, and to confirm that the immunopathological pathway leading to psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) sometimes goes into 'overdrive' in ACD, giving a mixed pattern, involving each of the branches of the immune system.

  6. Acute tubular necrosis associated with mTOR inhibitor therapy: a real entity biopsy-proven.

    PubMed

    Izzedine, H; Escudier, B; Rouvier, P; Gueutin, V; Varga, A; Bahleda, R; Soria, J C

    2013-09-01

    The protein kinase mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. Inhibitors of mTOR have immunosuppressive and anti-cancer effects, but their effects on the progression of kidney disease are not fully understood. Their most common side-effects include stomatitis, rash, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, fatigue, and pneumonitis. However, to the best of our knowledge these agents have not been previously reported to cause severe acute kidney injury (AKI). We describe four cases of patients with cancer who developed AKI after starting mTOR inhibitor therapy. A kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis (ATN) with prominent tubular dysfunction. Withdrawal of the drug leads to a rapid recovery in two cases. However, a fixed renal dysfunction was noted in the other two cases, one of which will remain dialysis-dependent. Such patients lead to a broad differential diagnosis of AKI including prerenal AKI, ATN, cancer-related GN, and drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis. Accurate history, physical examination, laboratory data, and kidney biopsy are highlighted in establishing the correct diagnosis in such patients. ATN have not been reported with mTOR inhibitor use. These cases demonstrated a potentially new and serious adverse consequence occurring with the use of an mTOR inhibitor, of which physicians need to be aware.

  7. Multimodal assessment of the magnitude of necrosis in the tracheobronchial tree after laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hu-Jang; Park, Eun-Kee; Kurimoto, Noriaki; Jung, Mannhong; Won Jang, Tae; Chun, Bong-Kwon; Jung, Sangbong; Park, Daejin; Oak, Chulho; Ahn, Yeh-Chan

    2013-07-01

    The use of lasers for treating cancerous lesions of the tracheobronchial tree has gained world-wide interest. As the prevalence of superficial cancer increases, lasers have been increasingly used to ablate superficial lesions. The extent of the effects of laser ablation on bronchial tissue is still unknown, and there may be a risk of bronchial wall perforation. In order to explore the magnitude of necrosis after laser treatment in the tracheobronchial tree, we investigated the microscopic appearance, histologic changes, and images of damaged mucosal lesions taken by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Endoscopic OCT is complementary to endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS), which has a spatial resolution of about 100 μm and a penetration depth of about a few centimeters. Multimodal investigation using both OCT and EBUS is a powerful in vivo tool for evaluating the efficacy of laser therapy in the tracheobronchial tree. In this study, we performed an ex vivo feasibility test that provided an adequate laser dose without cartilage injury. Injury extent was evaluated using OCT, EBUS, and histologic images.

  8. Reduction by cobra venom factor of myocardial necrosis after coronary artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Maroko, P R; Carpenter, C B; Chiariello, M; Fishbein, M C; Radvany, P; Knostman, J D; Hale, S L

    1978-03-01

    Components of the complement system are known to play an important role in the cytolytic process and in chemotaxis of leukocytes. Cobra venom factor specifically cleaves C3 activity via activation of the alternative (properdin) complement pathway. It does not act directly on C3. If C3 is involved in tissue necrosis after ischemic injury, cobra venom factor might reduce tissue damage after acute coronary occlusion. Accordingly, in 14 control dogs occlusion of the left anterior descending artery was carried out for 24 h. Epicardial electrograms were recorded 15 min after occlusion, and 24 h later transmural specimens for creatine phosphokinase activity (CPK) and for histological analysis were obtained from the same sites. In another 14 experimental dogs, 20 U/kg cobra venom factor was given intravenously 30 min after occlusion. Serum complement levels fell within 2-4 h to <20% of normal. In the control dogs, the relationship between ST-segment elevation and CPK activity 24 h later was: log CPK = -0.06 ST + 1.48 (n = 111 specimens, 14 dogs, r = 0.77). In the experimental dogs, log CPK = -0.024 ST + 1.46 (n = 111 specimens, 14 dogs, r = 0.60), showing significantly different slopes (P < 0.001), i.e., less CPK depression for any level of ST-segment elevation. Histologically, 69 of 71 sites (97%) with ST-segment elevation exceeding 2 mV in the control dogs showed signs of necrosis 24 h later, whereas in the experimental group only 43 of 79 sites (54%) with abnormal ST-segment elevations showed signs of necrosis (P < 0.0005). At the same time, it was shown that the administration of cobra venom factor did not alter cardiac performance, collateral blood flow to the ischemic myocardium or the clotting system, but infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the myocardium was decreased. It is concluded that cobra venom factor, by reducing the amount of C3 and C5 substrate available for chemotactic factor generation, or other as yet undefined mechanisms, protects the

  9. Psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis associated with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors: the Mayo Clinic experience, 1998 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Shmidt, Eugenia; Wetter, David A; Ferguson, Sara B; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2012-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists have been associated with the induction of de novo or worsening psoriasis. We sought to retrospectively examine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with psoriasis associated with anti-TNF-α therapy. We performed a retrospective review of patients with new-onset or worsening psoriasis during TNF-α inhibitor therapy between 1998 and 2010. Of the 56 patients (mean age at psoriasis onset, 48.1 years), 41 (73%) were female. In all, 22 patients (39%) had Crohn's disease and 14 (25%) had rheumatoid arthritis. Thirty patients (54%) were treated with infliximab, 19 (34%) with adalimumab, and 7 (12%) with etanercept. New-onset or worsening psoriasis occurred after a mean treatment duration of 17.1 months. Plaque psoriasis (n = 27), palmoplantar pustulosis (n = 25), scalp psoriasis (n = 12), generalized pustular psoriasis (n = 7), erythrodermic psoriasis (n = 2), and inverse psoriasis (n = 2) were the cutaneous presentations. Among the 39 patients for whom full treatment response data were available, 33 (85%) had a complete or partial response; combined response rates (complete and partial) were slightly higher among those who discontinued anti-TNF-α therapy (16 of 17 patients [94%]) than among those who continued anti-TNF-α therapy (17 of 22 patients [77%]). Retrospective nature, possible referral bias, and lack of complete follow-up for some patients are limitations. Although some patients sufficiently controlled their psoriasis while continuing anti-TNF-α therapy, those who discontinued therapy achieved higher rates of complete response. Further studies should explore the efficacy and safety of switching to an alternative anti-TNF-α agent. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Real-life outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor α in the ambulatory treatment of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Baki, Enayatullah; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Ehehalt, Robert; Gotthardt, Daniel; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gauss, Annika

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy in outpatients with ulcerative colitis at a tertiary referral center. METHODS: All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of ulcerative colitis undergoing therapy with infliximab and/or adalimumab at the outpatient clinic for inflammatory bowel diseases at the University Hospital Heidelberg between January 2011 and February 2014 were retrospectively enrolled. Patients with a follow-up period of less than 6 mo from start of anti-TNFα therapy were excluded. Medical records of all eligible individuals were carefully reviewed. Steroid-free clinical remission of a duration of at least 3 mo, colectomy rate, duration of anti-TNFα therapy, need for anti-TNFα dose escalation, and the occurrence of adverse events were evaluated as the main outcome parameters. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients were included (35 treated with infliximab, 17 with adalimumab, 20 with both consecutively). Median follow-up was 27 mo (range: 6-87 mo). Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 22.2% of the patients (median duration: 21 mo until end of follow-up; range: 3-66 mo). Patients attaining steroid-free clinical remission displayed lower hemoglobin and albumin blood levels at the start of treatment than those who did not achieve remission. The overall colectomy rate was 20.8%. Nearly 50% of the patients underwent anti-TNFα dose escalation during the follow-up period. For both the infliximab and the adalimumab treated patients, non-response to anti-TNFα therapy was the major reason for treatment discontinuation. 18.2% of the infliximab-treated patients and 13.5% of the adalimumab-treated patients had to discontinue their therapy due to adverse events. CONCLUSION: Real-life remission rates of ulcerative colitis under anti-TNFα are overall low, but some patients have a clear long-term benefit. PMID:25805935

  11. Real-life outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor α in the ambulatory treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Baki, Enayatullah; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Ehehalt, Robert; Gotthardt, Daniel; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gauss, Annika

    2015-03-21

    To evaluate the outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy in outpatients with ulcerative colitis at a tertiary referral center. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of ulcerative colitis undergoing therapy with infliximab and/or adalimumab at the outpatient clinic for inflammatory bowel diseases at the University Hospital Heidelberg between January 2011 and February 2014 were retrospectively enrolled. Patients with a follow-up period of less than 6 mo from start of anti-TNFα therapy were excluded. Medical records of all eligible individuals were carefully reviewed. Steroid-free clinical remission of a duration of at least 3 mo, colectomy rate, duration of anti-TNFα therapy, need for anti-TNFα dose escalation, and the occurrence of adverse events were evaluated as the main outcome parameters. Seventy-two patients were included (35 treated with infliximab, 17 with adalimumab, 20 with both consecutively). Median follow-up was 27 mo (range: 6-87 mo). Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 22.2% of the patients (median duration: 21 mo until end of follow-up; range: 3-66 mo). Patients attaining steroid-free clinical remission displayed lower hemoglobin and albumin blood levels at the start of treatment than those who did not achieve remission. The overall colectomy rate was 20.8%. Nearly 50% of the patients underwent anti-TNFα dose escalation during the follow-up period. For both the infliximab and the adalimumab treated patients, non-response to anti-TNFα therapy was the major reason for treatment discontinuation. 18.2% of the infliximab-treated patients and 13.5% of the adalimumab-treated patients had to discontinue their therapy due to adverse events. Real-life remission rates of ulcerative colitis under anti-TNFα are overall low, but some patients have a clear long-term benefit.

  12. Augmentation of the effect of doxorubicin with low-dose tumor necrosis factor in experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bloom, N D; Norbergs, D A; Sherman, B; Sadjadi, M; Ramaswamy, G; Jacobs, R; Ackerman, N

    1990-06-01

    The antitumor activity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor was studied in vivo as a single agent and in combination with a conventional chemotherapeutic agent. Dosages of tumor necrosis factor of 100 micrograms, 50 micrograms, and 25 micrograms were injected intraportally in Sprague-Dawley rats containing hepatic implants of Walker carcinosarcoma. An effect on the tumor was seen but was associated with a significant acute mortality. Lower dosages of tumor necrosis factor, 10 micrograms, 5 micrograms, and 1 microgram, administered with 10 mg/kg of doxorubicin (Adriamycin) significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of doxorubicin without an acute mortality. This suggests that lower dosages of tumor necrosis factor with conventional chemotherapy may augment the latter's effect without any added toxicity.

  13. Persistent periodontal disease hampers anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Savioli, Cynthia; Ribeiro, Ana Cristina M; Fabri, Gisele Maria Campos; Calich, Ana Luisa; Carvalho, Jozélio; Silva, Clovis A; Viana, Vilma S T; Bonfá, Eloísa; Siqueira, José Tadeu T

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate prospectively the influence and the evolution of periodontal disease (PD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients submitted to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Eighteen patients with RA (according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria) were assessed for PD before (BL) and after 6 months (6M) of anti-TNF treatment: 15 infliximab, 2 adalimumab, and 1 etanercept. Periodontal assessment included plaque and gingival bleeding indices, probing pocket depth, cementoenamel junction, and clinical attachment level. Rheumatologic evaluation was performed blinded to the dentist's assessment: demographic data, clinical manifestations, and disease activity (Disease Activity Score using 28 joints [DAS28], erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], and C-reactive protein [CRP]). The median age and disease duration of patients with RA were 50 years (25-71 y) and 94% were female. Periodontal disease was diagnosed in 8 patients (44.4%). Comparing BL to 6M, periodontal parameters in the entire group remained stable (P > 0.05) throughout the study (plaque and gingival bleeding indices, probing pocket depth, cementoenamel junction, and clinical attachment level), whereas an improvement in most analyzed RA parameters was observed in the same period: DAS28 (5.5 vs. 3.9, P = 0.02), ESR (21 vs. 12.5 mm/first hour, P = 0.07), and CRP (7.8 vs. 2.8 mg/dL, P = 0.25). Further analysis revealed that this improvement was restricted to the group of patients without PD (DAS28 [5.5 vs. 3.6, P = 0.04], ESR [23.0 vs. 11.5 mm/first hour, P = 0.008], and CRP [7.4 vs. 2.1, P = 0.01]). In contrast, patients with PD had lack of response, with no significant differences in disease activity parameters between BL and 6M: DAS28 (5.2 vs. 4.4, P = 0.11), ESR (17.0 vs. 21.0, P = 0.56), and CRP (9.0 vs. 8.8, P = 0.55). This study supports the notion that PD may affect TNF blocker efficacy in patients with RA. The possibility that a sustained gingival inflammatory state may

  14. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gatanaga, T; Hwang, C D; Kohr, W; Cappuccini, F; Lucci, J A; Jeffes, E W; Lentz, R; Tomich, J; Yamamoto, R S; Granger, G A

    1990-01-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28 kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-alpha and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-alpha more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-alpha when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-alpha in clinical trials with human cancer patients. Images PMID:2174164

  15. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gatanaga, Tetsuya; Whang, Chenduen; Cappuccini, F.; Lucci, J.A. III; Jeffes, E.W.B. ); Kohr, W. ); Lentz, R. ); Tomich, J. ); Yamamoto, R.S. ); Granger, G.A. Memorial Cancer Inst., Long Beach, CA )

    1990-11-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin activity of TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-{alpha} more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-{alpha} when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-{alpha} and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-{alpha} in clinical trials with human cancer patients.

  16. RXFP1 is Targeted by Complement C1q Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Factor 8 in Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Glogowska, Aleksandra; Burg, Maxwell; Wong, G. William; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The relaxin-like RXFP1 ligand–receptor system has important functions in tumor growth and tissue invasion. Recently, we have identified the secreted protein, CTRP8, a member of the C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein (CTRP) family, as a novel ligand of the relaxin receptor, RXFP1, with functions in brain cancer. Here, we review the role of CTRP members in cancers cells with particular emphasis on CTRP8 in glioblastoma. PMID:26322020

  17. Effect of tetrandrine on calcium-dependent tumour necrosis factor-alpha production in glia-neurone mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Yang, Li; Yan, Hong-Li; Wang, Meng; Xiao, Ji-Gao

    2005-10-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha is believed to have a deleterious role in the pathophysiology of brain injury. Tetrandrine has protective effect on neuronal cells, however, the mechanisms involved in its action have not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of tetrandrine on calcium-dependent tumour necrosis factor-alpha production in glia-neurone mixed cultures. Glia-neurone mixed cultures were treated by addition of Ca2+ regulating agents for a period of 6 hr. Tetrandrine or/and TMB-8 were added 30 min. before the stimulation. The supernatant tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Exposure of lipopolysaccharide 10 and 100 ng/ml caused significant increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha production respectively, with no alteration in cultures treated with 1 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide. Glia-neurone mixed cultures exhibited a marked elevation in tumour necrosis factor-alpha production after exposure to CaCl2, KCl, thapsigargin, BHQ and norepinephrine in the presence of lipopolysaccharide at 1 ng/ml respectively. Tetrandrine 0.3, 1, and 3 microM concentration-dependently reduced tumour necrosis factor-alpha production evoked by CaCl2 or KCl. Tetrandrine preincubation had no significant effect on the response to Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin or BHQ. Norepinephrine-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha production was significantly reduced by tetrandrine and almost abolished by combination of tetrandrine and intracellular Ca2+ release inhibitor TMB-8. These results suggested that tetrandrine at a concentration of 0.3, 1, or 3 microM inhibited tumour necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Ca2+ entry in glia-neurone mixed cultures.

  18. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene promoter polymorphism in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Higham, M A; Pride, N B; Alikhan, A; Morrell, N W

    2000-02-01

    Tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-alpha levels are elevated in airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may contribute to its pathogenesis. A guanine to adenine substitution at position -308 of the TNF-alpha gene promoter (TNF1/2) has been associated with chronic bronchitis of various aetiologies in a Taiwanese population. The authors performed a study investigating association of the polymorphism with smoking-related COPD in Caucasians. Frequencies of TNF1/2 alleles in 86 Caucasians (52 males) with COPD were compared with 63 (52 males) asymptomatic smoker/exsmoker control subjects and a population control of 199 (99 males) blood donors. Genotyping was performed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique on genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) obtained from peripheral blood. There were no significant differences in TNF1/2 allele frequencies between groups: 0.85/0.15 in COPD, 0.85/0.15 in smoker control subjects, 0.83/0.17 in population control subjects. Within the COPD group there was no association of TNF1/2 alleles with indices of airflow obstruction (% predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and % predicted FEV1/vital capacity ratio) nor gas transfer (% predicted carbon monoxide transfer coefficient and % predicted carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung). It is concluded that: 1) the tumour necrosis factor gene promoter allele does not influence the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a Caucasian population of smokers; and 2) there is no association of the tumour necrosis factor gene promoter genotype with severity of airflow obstruction nor degree of emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  20. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aringer, Martin; Smolen, Josef S

    2008-01-01

    Murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have shown apparently contradictory evidence in that either (a) tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression was low and TNF administration helpful or (b) TNF was high and TNF blockade of therapeutic benefit, depending on the mouse model investigated. In fact, TNF apparently has both effects, checking autoimmunity, at least to some degree, and fostering inflammation. TNF blockade regularly, but transiently, induces or increases autoantibodies to chromatin and to phospholipids. At the same time, open-label data suggest that TNF blockade suppresses inflammatory manifestations of SLE, and long-term benefit was seen in patients with lupus nephritis. A controlled clinical trial is under way. PMID:18226185

  1. Grepafloxacin inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-8 expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Matsumoto, K; Gon, Y; Maruoka, S; Hayashi, S; Asai, Y; Machino, T; Horie, T

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effect of grepafloxacin (GPFX), a new fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, on interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated human airway epithelial cells (AEC). GPFX inhibited IL-8 protein production as well as mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5 - 25 micro g/ml), but the inhibition of IL-8 expression by corresponding concentrations of GPFX to serum and airway lining fluids was not complete. We discuss the modulatory effect of GPFX on IL-8 production in the context of its efficacy on controlling chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  2. Harms of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatic diseases: A focused Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Archana; Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2013-01-01

    We performed a focused review of risk of harms of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in adult rheumatic diseases. Increased risk of serious infections, tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections has been reported across various studies, with etanercept appearing to have modestly better safety profile in terms of tuberculosis and opportunistic infections and infliximab with higher risk of serious infections. Evidence suggests no increase in risk of cancer with anti-TNF biologics, but there is an increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancer. Elderly patients appear to be at increased risk of incident or worsening heart failure with anti-TNF biologic use. PMID:23444956

  3. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) in leishmaniasis. I. TNF alpha mediates host protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Parkinson, C; Millott, S; Severn, A; Carrier, M

    1990-01-01

    Genetically resistant CBA mice developed significantly larger lesions to Leishmania major infection when they were injected with rabbit anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific antibodies compared to control mice injected with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. BALB/c mice recovered from a previous infection following prophylactic sublethal irradiation also developed exacerbated lesions when treated with the anti-TNF antibody. Injection of TNF into the lesion of infected CBA mice significantly reduced the lesion development. Furthermore, TNF activates macrophages to kill Leishmania in vitro. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in mediating host-protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:2335376

  4. High Serum Interleukin-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Levels in Chronic Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, M. C.; Bava, A. J.; Guereño, M. T.; Berardi, V. E.; Silaf, M. R.; Negroni, R.; Diez, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    In patients with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis (n = 10), levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-10, and interleukin-2 in serum, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (in picograms per milliliter, as mean ± standard error of the mean), were higher than in normal controls (n = 8): 186 ± 40 versus 40 ± 7 (P < 0.05), 203 ± 95 versus 20 ± 8 (P = 0.001), and 96.3 ± 78.57 versus 1.19 ± 1.19 (P = 0.045), respectively. Gamma interferon and interleukin-4 levels were similar in patients and controls. PMID:11527826

  5. The role of tumor necrosis factor-α in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Salas-Alanis, Julio C

    2013-10-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired immune disorder of the skin characterized by the presence of white depigmented macules. Its immunopathogenesis is not completely understood, but inflammatory alterations in the skin microenvironment, and particularly increased expression of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), are thought to be essential regulators of melanocyte dysfunction and death. In this article we review the evidence that implicates TNFα in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, including studies on serum and tissue levels of TNFα, TNFα gene polymorphisms, in vitro studies, and therapeutic trials using TNFα inhibitors. TNFα emerges as a complex mediator with apparently conflicting roles in vitiligo.

  6. Effects of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on macrophage enzyme levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Measurements of changes in acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase levels were made as an indication of activation by cytokine treatment. IFN-gamma or TNF-gamma treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of both enzymes measured in the cell lysates. This increase was observable after 6 h of incubation, but reached its maximum level after 24 h of incubation. The effect of the treatment of the cell with both cytokines together was additive. No synergistic effect of addition of both cytokines on the enzyme levels was observed.

  7. Raised serum levels of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha in renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay was used for monitoring serum levels of endogenous cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) in 10 renal transplant recipients. Acute allograft rejections were associated with marked elevations of circulating TNF. The peak levels of TNF (median 140 pg/ml) were in the same concentration range as previously reported in parasitic infections. The results show that the release of TNF into circulation is an early event in renal allograft rejection and that raised levels of TNF in man can also be induced by noninfectious stimuli. PMID:3309124

  8. Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha on Sin Nombre Virus Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Netski, Dale M.; Krumpe, Peter; St. Jeor, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    Previous data indicate that immune mechanisms may be involved in developing capillary leakage during Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infection. Therefore, we investigated production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by human alveolar macrophages and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) after infection with SNV. In addition, we examined the effect of TNF-α on HUVEC monolayer leakage. Our results reveal that although TNF-α decreases accumulation of viral nucleoproteins, TNF-α levels do not change in SNV-infected cells. In addition, supernatants from SNV-infected human alveolar macrophages did not cause a significant increase in endothelial monolayer permeability. PMID:11090198

  9. Interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha serum levels in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Filella, Xabier; Montoto, Silvia; Bosch, Francesc; Rosiñol, Laura; Coca, Francesca; Giné, Eva; Nadal, Elisabeth; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Montserrat, Emili

    2002-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to compare the interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) serum levels of individuals with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) with those of healthy controls, and to ascertain the predictor value of these cytokines in the evolution from MGUS to multiple myeloma. After a median follow-up of 7 years from the initial cytokine measurements, nine patients with MGUS have evolved to a malignant condition. The actuarial probability of malignant transformation in patients with increased IL-6 and TNF-alpha was not significantly higher than in those with normal values.

  10. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  11. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor-induced psoriasis: Systematic review of clinical features, histopathological findings, and management experience.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabrielle; Wang, Eva; Leon, Argentina; Huynh, Monica; Wehner, Mackenzie; Matro, Rebecca; Linos, Eleni; Liao, Wilson; Haemel, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors have been reported to induce new-onset psoriasis. To better define the demographic, clinical features, and treatment approach of TNF-α inhibitor-induced psoriasis. Systematic review of published cases of TNF-α inhibitor-induced psoriasis. We identified 88 articles with 216 cases of new-onset TNF-α inhibitor-induced psoriasis. The mean age at psoriasis onset was 38.5 years. The most common underlying diseases were Crohn disease (40.7%) and rheumatoid arthritis (37.0%). Patients underwent TNF-α therapy for an average of 14.0 months before psoriasis onset with 69.9% of patients experiencing onset within the first year. The majority of patients received skin-directed therapy, though patients who discontinued TNF therapy had the greatest resolution of symptoms (47.7%) compared with those who switched to a different TNF agent (36.7%) or continued therapy (32.9%). Retrospective review that relies on case reports and series. While TNF-α inhibitor cessation may result in resolution of induced psoriasis, lesions may persist. Decisions regarding treatment should be weighed against the treatability of TNF-α inhibitor-induced psoriasis, the severity of the background rheumatologic or gastrointestinal disease, and possible loss of efficacy with cessation followed by retreatment. Skin-directed therapy is a reasonable initial strategy except in severe cases. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment patterns in the first year after initiating tumor necrosis factor blockers in real-world settings.

    PubMed

    Bonafede, Machaon; Fox, Kathleen M; Watson, Crystal; Princic, Nicole; Gandra, Shravanthi R

    2012-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blockers are approved for use in several immune-related conditions, but treatment patterns, such as switching between TNF blockers or restarting treatment after a gap in therapy, are not clearly established. This analysis examined TNF blocker treatment patterns within the first year after initiating treatment with etanercept, adalimumab, or infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis. Administrative claims data from the MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters Database (Thomson Reuters, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) were analyzed for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis who were continuously enrolled and newly initiated etanercept, adalimumab, or infliximab treatment between January 1, 2005 and July 1, 2009. Persistence (no treatment gap ≥45 days), restarting index therapy (after a ≥45-day treatment gap), switching to a different biologic of interest (certolizumab, golimumab, ustekinumab, alefacept, abatacept, rituximab, or tocilizumab), and stopping (≥45-day treatment gap with no restart or switch) were analyzed for the first year after the index date. A total of 8,454 patients had an index claim for etanercept (n = 4,224), adalimumab (n = 2,941), or infliximab (n = 1,289). Treatment patterns in the first year across all four conditions combined for etanercept, adalimumab, or infliximab, respectively, were: persistence, 42%, 47%, and 56%; restarting, 25%, 19%, and 12%; switching, 13%, 12%, and 13%; and stopping, 20%, 22%, and 19%. The combined rates of either persistence or restarting initial therapy after a treatment gap were 67%, 66%, and 68%, for etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab, respectively. Most switches (66-92%) were between the three TNF blockers. In the first year after initiating TNF blocker therapy, patients often have a ≥45-day treatment gap; however, approximately two-thirds of patients are

  14. Periodontal and serum protein profiles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitor adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Tomoko; Ito, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamagata, Akira; Okada, Moe; Oofusa, Ken; Narita, Ichiei; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2014-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor has been shown to affect the periodontal condition of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study is to assess the effect of a fully humanized anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, adalimumab (ADA), on the periodontal condition of patients with RA and to compare serum protein profiles before and after ADA therapy. The study participants consisted of 20 patients with RA treated with ADA. Clinical periodontal and rheumatologic parameters and serum cytokine levels were evaluated at baseline and 3 months later. Serum protein spot volume was examined with two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins with significant difference in abundance before and after ADA therapy were found and identified using mass spectrometry and protein databases. The patients showed a significant decrease in gingival index (P = 0.002), bleeding on probing (P = 0.003), probing depth (P = 0.002), disease activity score including 28 joints using C-reactive protein (P <0.001), and serum levels of TNF-α (P <0.001) and interleukin-6 (P <0.001) after ADA medication, although plaque levels were comparable. Among a total of 495 protein spots obtained, nine spots were significantly decreased in abundance at reassessment, corresponding to complement factor H, phospholipase D, serum amyloid A, complement component 4, and α-1-acid glycoprotein (P <0.01). These results suggest a beneficial effect of ADA therapy on the periodontal condition of patients with RA, which might be related to differences in serum protein profiles before and after ADA therapy.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism by the murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 2-Fc fusion protein exacerbates histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Deepe, George S

    2007-06-01

    Treatment of some inflammatory conditions with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists is efficacious, but such treatments are associated with infections with intracellular pathogens, including Histoplasma capsulatum. We explored protective immunity to H. capsulatum in mice given a fusion protein consisting of TNF-alpha receptor 2 (TNFR2) bound to the Fc portion of mouse IgG1. Intraperitoneal administration of this inhibitor exacerbated primary or secondary pulmonary infection at dosages ranging from 1 to 5 mg/kg. All mice with primary infection given the inhibitor succumbed to infection within 10-21 days of treatment. In secondary histoplasmosis, mice receiving 1, but not 5, mg/kg survived treatment. Fungal burden was increased even if treatment with the inhibitor was initiated after the onset of infection. The inflammatory response of the lungs of mice given the inhibitor did not differ from that of mice given control vehicle. Susceptibility was not associated with major alterations in cytokines known to protect or exacerbate infection. However, expression of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) was depressed early in primary infection. These results demonstrate that antagonism of endogenous TNF-alpha by this fusion protein modulates susceptibility. Impaired immunity is not a result of altered cytokine responses or changes in the inflammation and may not be demonstrable in other murine strains.

  16. Brief Report: Treatment of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Transgenic Mice With Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Restores Lymphatic Contractions, Repairs Lymphatic Vessels, and May Increase Monocyte/Macrophage Egress.

    PubMed

    Bouta, Echoe M; Kuzin, Igor; de Mesy Bentley, Karen; Wood, Ronald W; Rahimi, Homaira; Ji, Rui-Cheng; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Bottaro, Andrea; Xing, Lianping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that there is an inverse relationship between lymphatic egress and inflammatory arthritis in affected joints. As a model, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-transgenic mice develop advanced arthritis following draining lymph node (LN) collapse, and loss of lymphatic contractions downstream of inflamed joints. It is unknown if these lymphatic deficits are reversible. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that anti-TNF therapy reduces advanced erosive inflammatory arthritis, associated with restoration of lymphatic contractions, repair of damaged lymphatic vessels, and evidence of increased monocyte egress. TNF-transgenic mice with advanced arthritis and collapsed popliteal LNs were treated with anti-TNF monoclonal antibody (10 mg/kg weekly) or placebo for 6 weeks, and effects on knee synovitis, lymphatic vessel ultrastructure and function, and popliteal LN cellularity were assessed by ultrasound, histology, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), near-infrared indocyanine green imaging, and flow cytometry. Anti-TNF therapy significantly decreased synovitis (∼5-fold; P < 0.05 versus placebo), restored lymphatic contractions, and significantly increased the number of popliteal LN monocyte/macrophages (∼2-fold; P < 0.05 versus placebo). TEM demonstrated large activated macrophages attached to damaged lymphatic endothelium in mice with early arthritis, extensively damaged lymphatic vessels in placebo-treated mice with advanced arthritis, and rolling leukocytes in repaired lymphatic vessels in mice responsive to anti-TNF therapy. These findings support the concept that anti-TNF therapy ameliorates erosive inflammatory arthritis, in part via restoration of lymphatic vessel contractions and potential enhancement of inflammatory cell egress. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    El-Kebir, M.; van der Kuip, M.; van Furth, A.M.; Kirschner, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveal a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23542051

  18. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urbaschek, R.; Urbaschek, B.

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are known to induce tumor necrosis; enhanced nonspecific resistance to bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and to radiation sickness; and tolerance to lethal doses of endotoxin. These beneficial effects are achieved by pretreatment with minute amounts of endotoxin. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) are among the mediators capable of invoking radioprotection or resistance to the consequences of cecal ligation and puncture. Both cytokines are potent inducers of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in C3H/HeJ mice (low responders to endotoxin). The number of splenic granulocyte-macrophage precursors was found to increase 5 days after injection of TNF in these mice. Although with IL-1 no increase in the number of granulocyte-macrophage colonies occurred in culture in the presence of serum CSF, a marked stimulation was observed when TNF was added. This stimulation of myelopoiesis observed in vivo and in vitro may be related to the radioprotective effect of TNF. The data presented suggest that TNF and IL-1 released after injection of endotoxin participate in the mediation of endotoxin-induced enhancement of nonspecific resistance and stimulation of hematopoiesis. 76 references.

  20. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    El-Kebir, M; van der Kuip, M; van Furth, A M; Kirschner, D E

    2013-07-07

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveals a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor and the pathogenesis of Pichinde virus infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J F; Herzog, N K; Jerrells, T R

    1995-03-01

    Pichinde virus (PIC) is a reticuloendothelial arenavirus of the New World tropics. A guinea pig passage-adapted strain of this virus (adPIC) is uniformly lethal for inbred guinea pigs, while the related, prototype strain (PIC3739) has attenuated virulence. The abilities of adPIC and PIC3739 to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vivo and in cultured macrophages were compared. Infection with adPIC, but not PIC3739, was associated with detectable serum TNF that peaked in week 2 of infection. Tumor necrosis factor was found in the spleens of adPIC- and PIC3739-infected animals in week 1 of infection; TNF alpha mRNA levels in spleens and livers of adPIC infected animals increased and remained high throughout infection, whereas PIC3739-infected organs showed down regulation of TNF alpha mRNA late in infection. Peritoneal macrophages explanted from adPIC-infected animals showed enhanced lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF production. Altered regulation of TNF production may play a role in the pathogenesis of guinea pig arenavirus disease.

  2. Tumor Necrosis Factor and the Pathogenesis of Pichinde Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Judith F.; Herzog, Norbert K.; Jerrells, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    Pichinde virus (PIC) is a reticuloendothelial arenavirus of the New World tropics. A guinea pig passage–adapted strain of this virus (adPIC) is uniformly lethal for inbred guinea pigs, while the related, prototype strain (PIC3739) has attenuated virulence. The abilities of adPIC and PIC3739 to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vivo and in cultured macrophages were compared. Infection with adPIC, but not PIC3739, was associated with detectable serum TNF that peaked in week 2 of infection. Tumor necrosis factor was found in the spleens of adPIC- and PIC3739-infected animals in week 1 of infection ; TNFα mRNA levels in spleens and livers of adPIC infected animals increased and remained high throughout infection, whereas PIC3739-infected organs showed down regulation of TNFα mRNA late in infection. Peritoneal macrophages explanted from adPIC-infected animals showed enhanced lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF production. Altered regulation of TNF production may play a role in the pathogenesis of guinea pig arenavirus disease. PMID:7694969

  3. Interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels in chronic Chagas disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, R H T; Azevedo, E de A N; Diniz, G T N; Cavalcanti, M da G A de M; de Oliveira, W; de Morais, C N L; Gomes, Y de M

    2015-07-01

    In Chagas disease, chronically infected individuals may be asymptomatic or may present cardiac or digestive complications, and it is well known that the human immune response is related to different clinical manifestations. Different patterns of cytokine levels have been previously described in different clinical forms of this disease, but contradictory results are reported. Our aim was to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in patients with asymptomatic and cardiac Chagas disease. The serum interleukin-10 levels in patients with cardiomyopathy were higher than those in asymptomatic patients, mainly in those without heart enlargement. Although no significant difference was observed in serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels among the patients, we found that cardiac patients also present high levels of this cytokine, largely those with heart dilatation. Therefore, these cytokines play an important role in chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. Follow-up investigations of these and other cytokines in patients with chronic Chagas disease need to be conducted to improve the understanding of the immunopathology of this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. In vivo role of tumor necrosis-like factor in Eimeria tenella infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Lillehoj, H S; Ruff, M D

    1995-01-01

    The effect of tumor necrosis-like factor (TNLF) on the pathogenesis of coccidiosis was investigated. Injection of crude chicken TNLF enhanced the weight loss caused by Eimeria tenella infection. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rhTNF) partially restored E. tenella-induced weight loss in SC chickens, but not in TK chickens. However, injection of chickens with chicken TNLF, rhTNF, and rabbit serum against rhTNF had no significant effect on cecal lesions. Both SC and TK chickens produced circulating TNLF following primary, but not secondary infection, and SC chickens showed higher level of TNLF production than TK chickens. Peripheral blood leukocyte-derived macrophages from SC and TK chickens produced a significant amount of TNLF compared to the preinfection condition when cocultured with sporozoites. In general, macrophages from SC chickens produced higher levels of TNLF than those from TK chickens. No significant difference was observed between primary and secondary infection. These results suggest that the excessive TNF production may be involved in weight loss caused by E. tenella infection in SC chickens.

  5. Familial clustering of recurrent pericarditis may disclose tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Laghi Pasini, Franco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Although several causes of recurrent pericarditis have been identified, the etiology remains obscure in most cases. The tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder and is caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kD receptor for tumour necrosis factor-(TNF)-alpha. Serosal membrane inflammation is a common feature of TRAPS, usually in the form of polyserositis. In addition, patients affected with recurrent pericarditis as the only clinical manifestation of TRAPS have been recently described. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene in a cohort of patients affected with idiopathic recurrent pericarditis. Twenty consecutive patients diagnosed with idiopathic recurrent pericarditis were enrolled. Each patient underwent detailed examinations in order to rule out underlying diseases such as infections, connective tissue disorders and malignancies, and mutations of the TNFRSF1A gene were searched for by amplifying, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), genomic DNA, and direct sequencing. TNFRSF1A mutations were found in 2 of the 20 patients. They were siblings, and they both carried a heterozygous low-penetrance R92Q mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene. Familial clustering has been recently reported in up to 10% of patients with recurrent pericarditis, thus suggesting in some cases a possible genetic predisposition. Our study suggests that familial clustering may represent a clue for investigating mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene in these patients and eventually disclose TRAPS.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 by tumor necrosis factor and its relationship with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Zhu, Danhong; He, Shikun; Spee, Christine; Ryan, Stephen J.; Hinton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) may be involved in the molecular switch that determines which late form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) an individual develops. BMP4 expression is high in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in late, dry AMD patients, while BMP4 expression is low in the wet form of the disease, characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Here, we sought to determine the mechanism by which BMP4 is down-regulated in CNV. BMP4 expression was decreased within laser-induced CNV lesions in mice at a time when tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression was high (7 d postlaser) and was reexpressed in RPE when TNF levels declined (14 d postlaser). We found that TNF, an important angiogenic stimulus, significantly down-regulates BMP4 expression in cultured human fetal RPE cells, ARPE-19 cells, and RPE cells in murine posterior eye cup explants. We identified two specificity protein 1 (Sp1) binding sites in the BMP4 promoter that are required for basal expression of BMP4 and its down-regulation by TNF. Through c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, TNF modulates Sp1 phosphorylation, thus decreasing its affinity to the BMP4 promoter. The down-regulation of BMP4 expression by TNF in CNV and mechanisms established might be useful for defining novel targets for AMD therapy.—Xu, J., Zhu, D., He, S., Spee, C., Ryan, S. J., Hinton, D. R. Transcriptional regulation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 by tumor necrosis factor and its relationship with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21411747

  7. Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takuya; Tsuchida, Mei; Kogue, Yosuke; Spadini, Christian; Hirata, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. PMID:27834853

  8. Insulin-like growth factor I accelerates recovery from ischemic acute tubular necrosis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S B; Martin, D R; Kissane, J; Hammerman, M R

    1992-01-01

    The effects of administering insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were examined in a model of ischemic acute tubular necrosis in rats. Injury was induced by 75 min of bilateral renal artery occlusion. Compared to rats administered vehicle, rats administered IGF-I (100 micrograms/day via continuous subcutaneous infusion) had significantly lower serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels over the course of 7 days postocclusion. Glomerular filtration rate as determined by inulin clearance was examined on day 2 postocclusion and was significantly increased in IGF-I-treated animals (0.16 +/- 0.02 ml per min per 100 g of body weight) compared to vehicle-treated controls (0.08 +/- 0.02 ml per min per 100 g of body weight). The weight loss that occurred during the course of acute tubular necrosis was ameliorated by IGF-I. Mortality was reduced from 36.7% in vehicle-treated rats to 7.1% in rats administered IGF-I. Histologically, there was much less renal injury evident at day 7 postocclusion in the IGF-I-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated controls. In contrast, growth hormone (200 micrograms administered subcutaneously for 4 days) did not affect recovery of renal function or reduce mortality postreperfusion. This report demonstrates a beneficial effect of IGF-I administration in the setting of acute tubular necrosis. Several properties of IGF-I render it a pharmacological agent with excellent potential for treatment of this condition in humans. Images PMID:1465411

  9. Insulin-like growth factor I accelerates recovery from ischemic acute tubular necrosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Miller, S B; Martin, D R; Kissane, J; Hammerman, M R

    1992-12-15

    The effects of administering insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were examined in a model of ischemic acute tubular necrosis in rats. Injury was induced by 75 min of bilateral renal artery occlusion. Compared to rats administered vehicle, rats administered IGF-I (100 micrograms/day via continuous subcutaneous infusion) had significantly lower serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels over the course of 7 days postocclusion. Glomerular filtration rate as determined by inulin clearance was examined on day 2 postocclusion and was significantly increased in IGF-I-treated animals (0.16 +/- 0.02 ml per min per 100 g of body weight) compared to vehicle-treated controls (0.08 +/- 0.02 ml per min per 100 g of body weight). The weight loss that occurred during the course of acute tubular necrosis was ameliorated by IGF-I. Mortality was reduced from 36.7% in vehicle-treated rats to 7.1% in rats administered IGF-I. Histologically, there was much less renal injury evident at day 7 postocclusion in the IGF-I-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated controls. In contrast, growth hormone (200 micrograms administered subcutaneously for 4 days) did not affect recovery of renal function or reduce mortality postreperfusion. This report demonstrates a beneficial effect of IGF-I administration in the setting of acute tubular necrosis. Several properties of IGF-I render it a pharmacological agent with excellent potential for treatment of this condition in humans.

  10. Tumour necrosis factor receptor trafficking dysfunction opens the TRAPS door to pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark D.; Chaudhry, Anupama; Nedjai, Belinda

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines are secreted from macrophages and other cells of the immune system in response to pathogens. Additionally, in autoinflammatory diseases cytokine secretion occurs in the absence of pathogenic stimuli. In the case of TRAPS [TNFR (tumour necrosis factor receptor)-associated periodic syndrome], inflammatory episodes result from mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene that encodes TNFR1. This work remains controversial, however, with at least three distinct separate mechanisms of receptor dysfunction having been proposed. Central to these hypotheses are the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) families of transcriptional activators that are able to up-regulate expression of a number of genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. The present review examines each proposed mechanism of TNFR1 dysfunction, and addresses how these processes might ultimately impact upon cytokine secretion and disease pathophysiology. PMID:22115362

  11. Tumor necrosis factor negative bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exhibit deficient IL-10 expression.

    PubMed

    Roomberg, Alicia; Kling, Jessica; Fromm, Phillip; Körner, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    The effective maturation of dendritic cells (DC) is complex and highly regulated and requires the presence of a variety of signals. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors or innate pattern recognition receptors such as the toll-like receptors have been shown to contribute to this process. DC derived from bone marrow cells in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor can be used as a model to ascertain the contribution of different signals to DC maturation. Analysis of DC activated by addition of the mycobacterial vaccine strain Bacillus Calmette-Guérin showed that of the effector molecules studied only interleukin-10 expression was significantly reduced in TNF-negative (B6.TNF(-/-)) DC. Another effector molecule produced by DC, inducible nitric oxide synthase, was largely unchanged.

  12. Interferon and tumor necrosis factor as humoral mechanisms coupling hematopoietic activity to inflammation and injury.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced hematopoiesis accompanies systemic responses to injury and infection. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced by injured cells and interferons (IFNs) secreted by inflammatory cells is a co-product of the process of clearance of debris and removal of still viable but dysfunctional cells. Concomitantly, these cytokines induce hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) activity as an intrinsic component of the systemic response. The proposed scenario includes induction of HSPC activity by type I (IFNα/β) and II (IFNγ) receptors within the quiescent bone marrow niches rendering progenitors responsive to additional signals. TNFα converges as a non-selective stimulant of HSPC activity and both cytokines synergize with other growth factors in promoting differentiation. These physiological signaling pathways of stress hematopoiesis occur quite frequent and do not cause HSPC extinction. The proposed role of IFNs and TNFs in stress hematopoiesis commends revision of their alleged involvement in bone marrow failure syndromes.

  13. Synovial expression of IL-15 in rheumatoid arthritis is not influenced by blockade of tumour necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Ernestam, Sofia; af Klint, Erik; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Sundberg, Erik; Engström, Marianne; Klareskog, Lars; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Blockade of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is an effective treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but both non-responders and partial responders are quite frequent. This suggests that other pro-inflammatory cytokines may be of importance in the pathogenesis of RA and as possible targets for therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF blockade (infliximab) on the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA in relation to different cell types and expression of other cytokines, to elucidate whether or not IL-15 is a possible target for therapy, independently of TNF blockade. Two arthroscopies with multiple biopsies were performed on nine patients with RA and knee-joint synovitis before and after three infusions of infliximab (3 mg/kg). Synovial biopsies were analysed with immunohistochemistry for expression of IL-15, TNF, IL-1α, IL-1ß and IFN-γ, and for the cell surface markers CD3, CD68 and CD163. Stained synovial biopsy sections were evaluated by computerized image analysis. IL-15 expression was detected in all synovial biopsies taken at baseline. After infliximab therapy, the expression of IL-15 was increased in four patients and reduced in five. Synovial expression of IL-15 was not correlated with any CD marker or with the presence of any other cytokine. Synovial cellularity was decreased after 8 to 10 weeks of treatment with a significant reduction of the CD68-positive synovial cells, whereas no significant change was seen in the number of CD3-positive T cells and CD163-expressing macrophages. The number of TNF-producing cells in the synovial tissue at baseline was correlated with a good response to therapy. Thus, in this study the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA was not consistently influenced by TNF blockade, being apparently independent of TNF expression in the synovium. Consequently, we propose that IL-15 should remain as a therapeutic target in RA, regardless of the response to TNF blockade. PMID:16507118

  14. Treatment effectiveness and treatment patterns among rheumatoid arthritis patients after switching from a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor to another medication

    PubMed Central

    Bonafede, Machaon MK; Curtis, Jeffrey R; McMorrow, Donna; Mahajan, Puneet; Chen, Chieh-I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives After treatment failure with a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi), patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can switch to another TNFi (TNFi cyclers) or to a targeted disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) with a non-TNFi mechanism of action (non-TNFi switchers). This study compared treatment patterns and treatment effectiveness between TNFi cyclers and non-TNFi switchers in patients with RA. Methods The analysis included a cohort of patients from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial database with RA who switched from a TNFi (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, or infliximab) either to another TNFi or to a non-TNFi targeted DMARD (abatacept, tocilizumab, or tofacitinib) between January 1, 2010 and September 30, 2014. A claims-based algorithm was used to estimate treatment effectiveness based on six criteria (adherence, no dose increase, no new conventional therapy, no switch to another targeted DMARD, no new/increased oral glucocorticoid, and intra-articular injections on <2 days). Results The cohort included 5,020 TNFi cyclers and 1,925 non-TNFi switchers. Non-TNFi switchers were significantly less likely than TNFi cyclers to switch therapy again within 6 months (13.2% vs 19.5%; P<0.001) or within 12 months (29.7% vs 34.6%; P<0.001) and significantly more likely to be persistent on therapy at 12 months (61.8% vs 58.2%; P<0.001). Non-TNFi switchers were significantly more likely than TNFi cyclers to achieve all six of the claims-based effectiveness algorithm criteria for the 12 months after the initial switch (27% vs 24%; P=0.011). Conclusion Although the absolute differences were small, these results support switching to a non-TNFi targeted DMARD instead of TNFi cycling when patients with RA require another therapy after TNFi failure. PMID:27980429

  15. Human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis through inhibiting Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor invasion and metastasis are the major reasons for leading death of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, to identify molecules that can suppress invasion and metastasis of tumor will provide novel targets for HCC therapies. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2, TIPE2, is a novel immune negative molecule and an inhibitor of the oncogenic Ras in mice but its function in human is unclear. Our previous research has shown that TIPE2 is downregulated in human primary HCC compared with the paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Results In present study, we provide evidence that TIPE2 inhibits effectively human hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis. The forced expression of TIPE2 in HCC-derived cell lines markedly inhibits tumor cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro and suppresses growth and metastasis of HCC in vivo. Clinical information from a cohort of 112 patients reveals that loss or reduced expression of TIPE2 in primary HCC tissues is significantly associated with tumor metastasis. Mechanically, TIPE2 inhibits the migration and invasion through targeting Rac1 and then reduces F-actin polymerization and expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Conclusion Our results indicate that human TIPE2 is endogenous inhibitor of Rac1 in HCC by which it attenuates invasion and metastasis of HCC. The data suggest that TIPE2 will be a new target for HCC therapy. PMID:24274578

  16. Novel mutation identified in severe early-onset tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishna, Suhas M; Grimm, Amy; Broderick, Lori

    2017-04-20

    Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) is the second most common heritable autoinflammatory disease, typically presenting in pre-school aged children with fever episodes lasting 1-3 weeks. Systemic symptoms can include rash, myalgia, ocular inflammation, and serositis. Here we report an unusual presentation of TRAPS in a 7 month old girl who presented with only persistent fever. She was initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki Disease and received IVIG and infliximab; however, her fevers quickly recurred. Subsequent testing revealed a urinary tract infection, but she did not improve despite appropriate therapy. As fever continued, she developed significant abdominal distension with imaging concerning for appendicitis, followed by hyperthermia and hemodynamic instability. Given her protracted clinical course and maternal history of a poorly defined inflammatory condition, an autoinflammatory disease was considered. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, resulting in rapid resolution of fever and normalization of inflammatory markers. She was found to have a previously unreported mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene associated with TRAPS. This novel mutation was also confirmed in the patient's mother and maternal uncle. This report reviews a severe case of TRAPS in infancy associated with a novel mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene, and emphasizes that autoinflammatory disease should be considered in the differential of infants with fever of unknown origin.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  18. Role of tissue factor in the antitumor effect of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, F; Miyayasu, K; Tsujimoto, S; Manda, T; Shimomura, K

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) inhibited tumor growth of Meth A fibrosarcoma (Meth A) solid tumor in mice, and the antitumor effect of rTNF-alpha was significantly decreased by pretreatment with small doses or rTNF-alpha in mice. In in vitro experiments, incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with rTNF-alpha enhanced procoagulant activity (PCA), which was drastically augmented after an addition of the conditioned medium of Meth A tumor cells. Furthermore, rTNF-alpha-induced PCA was decreased by pretreatment with rTNF-alpha in endothelial cells. This PCA was completely blocked after the addition of anti-human tissue factor (TF) murine monoclonal antibody. These results imply that in vivo antitumor effects of rTNF-alpha are mediated by expression of TF in endothelial cells, which is augmented by tumor released factor(s).

  19. Metabolic and lactational responses during recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, S; Hodate, K; Shingu, H; Obara, Y; Touno, E; Shinoda, M; Yokomizo, Y

    2003-03-01

    This study examined the effects of recombinant bovine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rbTNF) administration on metabolic and hormonal responses and lactational performance in dairy cows. Twelve lactating Holstein cows were injected subcutaneously with rbTNF (2.5 microg per kg per d) or saline (3 ml per head per d) at 1200 h daily for 7 d (d 0-6) and used in a crossover design. The rbTNF treatment induced increases in plasma haptoglobin, nonesterified fatty acid, cortisol, and growth hormone levels compared with the control levels. The rbTNF-treated cows had lower triiodothyronine and insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations than control cows. In a somatoliberin challenge on d 6, the somatotropin response to somatoliberin (0.25 microg/kg) was smaller in the rbTNF group than in the control. The rbTNF treatment also produced increases of the nitrite plus nitrate concentration in plasma and milk during the period between d 1 and 7. Milk yield was reduced by rbTNF administration from d 1 to 8. The percentage of milk fat was increased on d 1-7 by rbTNF treatment, but milk protein content in the rbTNF group was decreased on d 5 and 7 as compared with that in the control group. These results support the possibility that tumor necrosis factor-alpha is responsible for the changes in hormone secretion, milk production and composition, and inflammatory parameters observed during coliform mastitis.

  20. [Cardiovascular exercise on obese women: effects on adiponectine, leptine, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha].

    PubMed

    Landeros-Olvera, Erick; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Nava-González, Edna J; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther; Lavalle-González, Fernando; Bastarrachea, Raúl A; Salazar González, Bertha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship of hormones adiponectin, leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in adipose tissue on the atherogenic process is one of the most promising models in preventive medicine. The numerous tests performed to identify the effect of exercise on these hormones have not been clear on the type of exercise routine and physical effort calculated to contribute to changing plasma concentrations in obese women. Analyze controlledcardiovascular exercise effect on serum level of adiponectin, leptin, and tumournecrosis factor-alpha in obese young women. A simple blind clinical essay. The intervention covered a 10-week controlled, cardiovascular exercise program by 34 women (cases n=17, controls n=17) with a body mass index>27kg/m(2). Molecular analysis was performed by immune-fluorescence. Following the intervention, cases and controls means were as follows: adiponectin 19.0 vs. 12.2μ/ml (P=.008); leptin 20.0 vs. 28.0μ/L (P=.02); and tumour necrosis factor-alpha 4.7 vs. 5.1pg/ml (P=.05). The established exercise (5 sessions a week of exercise of 40min each for 10 weeks with a heart rate reserve of 40 to 80%) improved plasma concentrations of these hormones in the expected direction. This finding highlights an unpublished amount of exercise, controlled by the reserve cardiac frequency that might contribute the cardiovascular and metabolic protection to obese women. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Combination Systemic and Intravitreal Antiviral Therapy in The Management of Acute Retinal Necrosis Syndrome (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Flaxel, Christina J.; Yeh, Steven; Lauer, Andreas K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of combination systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy vs systemic antiviral therapy alone for treating acute retinal necrosis syndrome (ARN). We hypothesize that combination therapy might result in superior visual acuity (VA) and retinal detachment (RD) outcomes vs traditional systemic antiviral therapy alone. Methods: A retrospective, interventional, comparative single-center study of patients with ARN. We reviewed demographic data, herpesvirus diagnoses, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results, VA, RD, and the use of systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy. Outcome measures included VA improvement by 2 or more lines, severe visual loss, VA ≤20/200, and RD. Results: We studied 29 eyes of 24 patients, treated from 1987 through 2009. Mean age was 42.6 years and mean follow-up was 44.0 months. Twelve patients (14 eyes) were treated with combined systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy and 12 patients (15 eyes) with systemic therapy alone. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients receiving combination intravitreal and systemic antiviral therapy were more likely to have VA improved by 2 lines or greater (P=.006). Patients receiving combination therapy also showed a decreased incidence of progression to severe visual loss (0.13/patient-years [PY]) compared to patients receiving systemic therapy alone (0.54/PY, P=.02) and had decreased incidence of RD (0.29/PY vs 0.74/PY, P=.03). Conclusions: Combination oral and intravitreal antiviral therapy may improve visual and functional outcomes in patients with ARN. Clinicians should consider prompt administration of combination systemic and intravitreal antiviral therapy as first-line treatment for patients with clinical features of ARN. PMID:24385671

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits pre-osteoblast differentiation through its type-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiha; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Clohisy, John C; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2003-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a profound role in many skeletal diseases. The cytokine has been described as a mediator of bone loss in osteolysis and other inflammatory bone diseases. In addition to its known bone resorptive action, TNF reduces bone formation by inhibiting osteoblast differentiation. Using primary and transformed osteoblastic cells, we first document that TNF inhibits expression of alkaline phosphatase and matrix deposition, both considered markers of osteoblast differentiation. The effects are dose- and time-dependent. Core-binding factor A1 (cbfa1) is a transcription factor critical for osteoblast differentiation, and we show here that it is activated by the osteoblast differentiation agent, beta-glycerophosphate. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibitory effects of TNF were associated with altered activity of this transcription factor. Using retardation assays, we show that TNF significantly inhibits cbfal activation by beta-glycerophosphate, manifested by reduced DNA-binding activity. Next, we turned to determine the signaling pathway by which TNF inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Utilizing animals lacking individual TNF receptors, we document that TNFr1 is required for transmitting the cytokine's inhibitory effect. In the absence of this receptor, TNF failed to impact all osteoblast differentiation markers tested. In summary, TNF blocks expression of osteoblast differentiation markers and inhibits beta-glycerophosphate-induced activation of the osteoblast differentiation factor cbfa1. Importantly, these effects are mediated via a mechanism requiring the TNF type-1 receptor.

  3. Troxis necrosis, a novel mechanism for drug-induced hepatitis secondary to immunomodulatory therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Christina H.; Penunuri, Andrew; Karpouzas, George; Fleishman, Wayne; French, Samuel W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A case of drug-induced hepatitis mediated by troxis necrosis, a form of autoimmune hepatitis, is described. METHODS Clinical data, light and electron microscopy of an ultrasound-guided core needle liver biopsy specimen, were examined to investigate the cause of transaminitis in a 26 year old male patient on Cellcept and Plaquenil for the treatment of lupus erythematosus. A systematic PUBMED review of troxis necrosis as the underlying mechanism for drug-induced hepatitis was performed. RESULTS Liver function tests (LFT) were significant for elevated AST (305) and ALT (174); autoimmune workup was significant for anti-ANA positivity and α-SMA negativity. On light microscopy, the liver biopsy shows focal areas of lymphocytic infiltrate surrounding and forming immunologic synapses with lobular hepatocytes, indicating lobular hepatitis of autoimmune nature. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of immunologic synapses. Upon cessation of the offending medications, the LFT returned to baseline with no further intervention. Literature search yielded 7 previously reported cases of drug-induced hepatitis mediated by troxis necrosis. CONCLUSION Troxis necrosis is a novel mechanism for drug-induced hepatitis, including immunomodulatory medications including monoclonal anti-TWEAK antibody, Cellcept and Plaquenil, two widely used immunosuppression/anti-rejection medications. PMID:26297838

  4. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, Jason P.; Cuff, Simone M.; Yong, Audrey A.; Wang, Eddie C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members’ roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined. PMID:21861782

  5. Stable Escherichia coli-Clostridium acetobutylicum shuttle vector for secretion of murine tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Theys, J; Nuyts, S; Landuyt, W; Van Mellaert, L; Dillen, C; Böhringer, M; Dürre, P; Lambin, P; Anné, J

    1999-10-01

    Recombinant plasmids were constructed to secrete mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (mTNF-alpha) from Clostridium acetobutylicum. The shuttle plasmids contained the clostridial endo-beta1, 4-glucanase (eglA) promoter and signal sequence that was fused in frame to the mTNF-alpha cDNA. The construction was first tested in Escherichia coli and then introduced in C. acetobutylicum DSM792 by electroporation. Controls confirmed the presence and stability of the recombinant plasmids in this organism. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an in vitro cytotoxic assay were used to monitor expression and secretion of mTNF-alpha during growth. Significant levels of biologically active mTNF-alpha were measured in both lysates and supernatants. The present report deals with investigations on the elaboration of a gene transfer system for cancer treatment using anaerobic bacteria.

  6. Role of Eosinophils and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Interleukin-25-Mediated Protection from Amebic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Zannatun; Watanabe, Koji; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Buonomo, Erica L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a cause of diarrhea in infants in low-income countries. Previously, it was shown that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was associated with increased risk of E. histolytica diarrhea in children. Interleukin-25 (IL-25) is a cytokine that is produced by intestinal epithelial cells that has a role in maintenance of gut barrier function and inhibition of TNF-α production. IL-25 expression was decreased in humans and in the mouse model of amebic colitis. Repletion of IL-25 blocked E. histolytica infection and barrier disruption in mice, increased gut eosinophils, and suppressed colonic TNF-α. Depletion of eosinophils with anti-Siglec-F antibody prevented IL-25-mediated protection. In contrast, depletion of TNF-α resulted in resistance to amebic infection. We concluded that IL-25 provides protection from amebiasis, which is dependent upon intestinal eosinophils and suppression of TNF-α. PMID:28246365

  7. Absence of tumour necrosis factor facilitates primary and recurrent herpes simplex virus-1 infections.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Koji; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2004-02-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine in the innate immune response against various infections, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. It has recently become a molecular target of anti-cytokine treatment in certain inflammatory diseases. TNF depletion resulted in a more rapid emergence of infectious HSV-1 in the explant cultures of latently infected trigeminal ganglia (TG), compared with controls. To further evaluate the importance of TNF in the host's defence responses against HSV-1, TNF-knockout mice were challenged via scarified cornea. These mice were more susceptible to primary acute corneal HSV-1 infection than controls, as manifested by an increased mortality rate and higher infectious virus titres in the eyes and TG, indicating that TNF is critical for defence during acute HSV infection. These results imply that the administration of anti-inflammatory TNF antagonists might facilitate the propagation of infectious HSV, resulting in an exacerbation of primary and recurrent acute lesions.

  8. Formation of Ion-Permeable Channels by Tumor Necrosis Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Baldwin, Rae Lynn; Munoz, David; Wisnieski, Bernadine J.

    1992-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, cachectin), a protein secreted by activated macrophages, participates in inflammatory responses and in infectious and neoplastic disease states. The mechanisms by which TNF exerts cytotoxic, hormonal, and other specific effects are obscure. Structural studies of the TNF trimer have revealed a central pore-like region. Although several amino acid side chains appear to preclude an open channel, the ability of TNF to insert into lipid vesicles raised the possibility that opening might occur in a bilayer milieu. Acidification of TNF promoted conformational changes concordant with increased surface hydrophobicity and membrane insertion. Furthermore, TNF formed pH-dependent, voltage-dependent, ion-permeable channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes and increased the sodium permeability of human U937 histiocytic lymphoma cells. Thus, some of the physiological effects of TNF may be elicited through its intrinsic ion channel-forming activity.

  9. Passive Immunization against Cachectin/Tumor Necrosis Factor Protects Mice from Lethal Effect of Endotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, B.; Milsark, I. W.; Cerami, A. C.

    1985-08-01

    A highly specific polyclonal rabbit antiserum directed against murine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was prepared. When BALB/c mice were passively immunized with the antiserum or with purified immune globulin, they were protected against the lethal effect of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide produced by Escherichia coli. The prophylactic effect was dose-dependent and was most effective when the antiserum was administered prior to the injection of the endotoxin. Antiserum to cachectin/TNF did not mitigate the febrile response of endotoxin-treated animals, and very high doses of endotoxin could overcome the protective effect. The median lethal dose of endotoxin in mice pretreated with 50 microliters of the specific antiserum was approximately 2.5 times greater the median lethal dose for controls given nonimmune serum. The data suggest that cachectin/TNF is one of the principal mediators of the lethal effect of endotoxin.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter polymorphism in posttransplantation diabetes mellitus of renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kao, C-C; Lian, J-D; Chou, M-C; Chang, H-R; Yang, S-F

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a major complication in renal transplant recipients. Some studies have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression and its genetic polymorphism are associated with diabetes mellitus. We investigated this association in Asian renal transplant recipients. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction-fragment length polymorphism was used to measure TNF-α G-238A and G-308A gene polymorphisms among 241 nonposttransplantation diabetic subjects and 73 PTDM patients. PTDM patients showed higher values of body weight and body mass index (BMI) than the non-PTDM group. However, no significant association was observed between TNF-α G-238A and TNF-α G-308A polymorphisms with PTDM incidence, gender, age at transplantation, follow-up duration, BMI, or type of immunosuppression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulation of Endogenous Hormone Action by Recombinant Human Tumor Necrosis Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Robert S.; Donner, David B.; Fletcher Starnes, H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1987-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in the toxic manifestations of overwhelming bacterial infection and in the tissue wasting that often accompanies prolonged infections and malignancy. We have examined a possible role of TNF in the early metabolic alterations following acute tissue injury or sepsis. Recombinant human TNF stimulated rat liver amino acid uptake up to 5-fold in vivo and there was a concomitant increase in plasma glucagon. In vitro TNF had no direct effect on hepatocyte amino acid uptake, but it markedly enhanced the stimulation of amino acid transport by glucagon, without an alteration in binding of glucagon to hepatocytes. This permissive effect of TNF on glucagon action represents an interrelationship between the immune and endocrine systems, and it may help to explain the mechanism of hormonal regulation of both the anabolic and catabolic responses to acute injury.

  12. Insulitis in transgenic mice expressing tumor necrosis factor beta (lymphotoxin) in the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Picarella, D E; Kratz, A; Li, C B; Ruddle, N H; Flavell, R A

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta) (lymphotoxin) may play an important role in the immune response and pathologic inflammatory diseases. Insulitis is an important early step in the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. To understand better the role of TNF-beta in the regulation of inflammation and type 1 diabetes, we produced transgenic mice in which the murine TNF-beta gene was regulated by the rat insulin II promoter. The transgene was expressed in the pancreas, kidney, and skin of transgenic mice. The expression of TNF-beta in the pancreas of transgenic mice resulted in a leukocytic inflammatory infiltrate consisting primarily of B220+ IgM+ B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The insulitis is reminiscent of the early stages of diabetes, though the mice did not progress to diabetes. Images PMID:1279667

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α impairs oligodendroglial differentiation through a mitochondria-dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, M; De Marchi, E; Patergnani, S; Suski, J M; Celsi, F; Bononi, A; Giorgi, C; Marchi, S; Rimessi, A; Duszyński, J; Pozzan, T; Wieckowski, M R; Pinton, P

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects, affecting parameters such as mitochondrial number and shape, levels of respiratory chain complex components and markers of oxidative stress, have been associated with the appearance and progression of multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, mitochondrial physiology has never been monitored during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation, especially in OPCs challenged with proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we show that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibits OPC differentiation, accompanied by altered mitochondrial calcium uptake, mitochondrial membrane potential, and respiratory complex I activity as well as increased reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with a mitochondrial uncoupler (FCCP) to mimic mitochondrial impairment also causes cells to accumulate at the progenitor stage. Interestingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels increase during TNF-α exposure and inhibit OPC differentiation. Overall, our data indicate that TNF-α induces metabolic changes, driven by mitochondrial impairment and AMPK activation, leading to the inhibition of OPC differentiation. PMID:24658399

  14. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Twohig, Jason P; Cuff, Simone M; Yong, Audrey A; Wang, Eddie C Y

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members' roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined.

  15. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  16. [Tumor necrosis factor alfa in cardiovascular diseases: molecular biology and genetics].

    PubMed

    Fragoso Lona, José Manuel; Sierra Martínez, Mónica; Vargas Alarcón, Gilberto; Barrios Rodas, Angélica; Ramírez Bello, Julián

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major public health problem globally. In 1997, cardiovascular disease caused 41% of deaths in the United States. It has been reported that about 60 million people in the United States have some form of cardiovascular disease. These entities are chronic conditions initiated by a dysregulation of the immune response. One gene and its protein product -tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α)- a powerful pleiotropic cytokine with multiple cellular functions, plays a role in the inflammation, initiation, development, susceptibility, severity, and response to treatment, etc. of coronary artery disease (CAD). The focus of the present review is to summarize recent evidence showing the biological role of TNF-α in the initiation and progression of endothelial dysfunction and complications of atherosclerosis, and as a genetic variation of TNF-α confer susceptibility, severity, and treatment response in CAD: ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and coronary restenosis.

  17. Inherited variability of tumor necrosis factor production and susceptibility to infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, J C; Kwiatkowski, D

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical mediator of host defense against infection but may cause severe pathology when produced in excess. Individuals vary in the amount of TNF produced when their peripheral blood mononuclear cells are stimulated in vitro, and family studies indicate that much of this variability is genetically determined. Since the TNF response to infection is partly regulated at the transcriptional level, TNF promoter polymorphisms have been the subject of intense interest as potential determinants of disease susceptibility. A single nucleotide polymorphism at nucleotide -308 relative to the transcriptional start site has been associated with susceptibility to severe malaria, leishmaniasis, scarring trachoma, and lepromatous leprosy. Some experimental data indicate that this polymorphism acts to upregulate TNF transcription, but this remains controversial. Detailed analysis of multiple genetic markers at this locus and more sophisticated investigations of TNF transcriptional regulation, in different cell types and with a wide range of stimuli, are required to understand the molecular basis of these disease associations.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha selectively sensitizes human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells to heat and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.H.; McHugh, T.; Weber, R.; Goeddel, D.V. )

    1991-05-15

    We report here that infection of the human T-cell line HUT-78 with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases its sensitivity to heat and radiation toxicity. A possible explanation for this result may be the reduced expression of manganous superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in HIV-infected cells compared to uninfected cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) further sensitizes HIV-infected cells but not uninfected cells to heat and radiation. This is consistent with the ability of TNF-alpha to induce the expression of MnSOD in uninfected but not in HIV-infected cells. HIV-infected HUT-78 cell lines engineered to overexpress MnSOD are more resistant to heat and radiation than HIV-infected cells that do not overexpress MnSOD. However, treatment with TNF-alpha still sensitizes these cells to heat and radiation.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-α: regulation of renal function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic cytokine that becomes elevated in chronic inflammatory states such as hypertension and diabetes and has been found to mediate both increases and decreases in blood pressure. High levels of TNF-α decrease blood pressure, whereas moderate increases in TNF-α have been associated with increased NaCl retention and hypertension. The explanation for these disparate effects is not clear but could simply be due to different concentrations of TNF-α within the kidney, the physiological status of the subject, or the type of stimulus initiating the inflammatory response. TNF-α alters renal hemodynamics and nephron transport, affecting both activity and expression of transporters. It also mediates organ damage by stimulating immune cell infiltration and cell death. Here we will summarize the available findings and attempt to provide plausible explanations for such discrepancies. PMID:23515717

  20. Paradoxical Roles of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Prostate Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Brian W. C.; Scott, Kieran F.; Russell, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with dual roles in cancer biology including prostate cancer (PCa). On the one hand, there is evidence that it stimulates tumour angiogenesis, is involved in the initiation of PCa from an androgen-dependent to a castrate resistant state, plays a role in epithelial to mesenchymal plasticity, and may contribute to the aberrant regulation of eicosanoid pathways. On the other hand, TNF has also been reported to inhibit neovascularisation, induce apoptosis of PCa cells, and stimulate antitumour immunity. Much of the confusion surrounding its seemingly paradoxical roles in cancer biology stems from the dependence of its effects on the biological model within which TNF is investigated. This paper will address some of these issues and also discuss the therapeutic implications. PMID:23326670

  1. Binding and regulation of cellular functions by monoclonal antibodies against human tumor necrosis factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to further characterize the interaction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors with different targets, and to assess their ability to influence TNF effects on U937 and human endothelial cell (HEC) functions. Actions of recombinant TNF-alpha on U937 and HEC were effectively inhibited by Htr-5 and Utr-1, and to a greater extent by a combination of both mAbs. These observations indicate that TNF interaction with antigenically different components of membrane receptors (p55 and p75) represents a crucial step in transduction of signals for TNF toxicity against U937 and TNF activation of HEC functions. PMID:2172437

  2. Modulation of the transcripts for tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Kossodo, S; Critico, B; Grau, G E

    1994-03-01

    We investigated the effects of a single bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in vivo on the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and its receptors: TNF receptor type I (TNF-R 55 kDa or TNF-R1) and TNF receptor type II (TNF-R 75 kDa or TNF-R2) in various tissues and white blood cells. While TNF mRNA rapidly accumulated in most tissues, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mRNA levels were found to be differentially regulated in lung, spleen, lymph nodes and white blood cells. In most cases, TNF-R mRNA levels did not parallel TNF mRNA levels. These observations indicate that TNF-R of both types of capable of modulating the host response to LPS, not only by shedding of their extracellular domains, but also by strict regulation of their gene expression.

  3. Role of Agents other than Tumor Necrosis Factor Blockers in the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Costa, Luisa; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by possible peripheral and axial joint involvement, enthesitis, dactylitis, and skin and nail disease. It affects up to one-third of psoriatic patients, and may be associated with comorbidities such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The usually prescribed initial treatment of moderate-severe PsA is methotrexate, which may be accompanied or replaced by a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor such as etanercept, infliximab, or adalimumab. However, some patients may become unresponsive (or have contraindications) to available anti-TNF agents and require alternative treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential role of some new immunomodulatory agents.

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum: a consequence of immunosuppression resulting from inhibiting tumour necrosis factor (TNF)?

    PubMed Central

    Silverton, Alexandra; Raad, Roy A; Katz, Leah; Downey, Andrea; Muggia, Franco M

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists may lead to enhanced susceptibility to certain malignancies. In particular, an association is seen emerging between TNF antagonists and development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin (in association with psoriasis), the oral cavity, and in the anogenital areas (possibly related to prior human papilloma virus infection). We present here a case of a 53-year old woman with a history of severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), most recently treated with the TNF antagonist etanercept plus methotrexate, presented to our service after several months of increasing left pelvis and buttock pain. Evaluation with a computerised tomography (CT)-directed biopsy of a pelvic side wall mass revealed a metastatic SCC. On a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) an additional area of uptake was identified in the left posterior rectum corresponding to a 1 cm nodule palpable on digital exam. Colonoscopic biopsy revealed a basaloid SCC of the rectum as the likely primary site. Immunosuppression following TNF antagonist therapy may have given arise to this unrestrained neoplastic growth. It thereby underscores the need for an initial baseline study of risk factors and identification of patients who are at higher risk for development of a malignancy, in order to achieve a diagnosis at an early stage. PMID:27350791

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the rectum: a consequence of immunosuppression resulting from inhibiting tumour necrosis factor (TNF)?

    PubMed

    Silverton, Alexandra; Raad, Roy A; Katz, Leah; Downey, Andrea; Muggia, Franco M

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists may lead to enhanced susceptibility to certain malignancies. In particular, an association is seen emerging between TNF antagonists and development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin (in association with psoriasis), the oral cavity, and in the anogenital areas (possibly related to prior human papilloma virus infection). We present here a case of a 53-year old woman with a history of severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), most recently treated with the TNF antagonist etanercept plus methotrexate, presented to our service after several months of increasing left pelvis and buttock pain. Evaluation with a computerised tomography (CT)-directed biopsy of a pelvic side wall mass revealed a metastatic SCC. On a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) an additional area of uptake was identified in the left posterior rectum corresponding to a 1 cm nodule palpable on digital exam. Colonoscopic biopsy revealed a basaloid SCC of the rectum as the likely primary site. Immunosuppression following TNF antagonist therapy may have given arise to this unrestrained neoplastic growth. It thereby underscores the need for an initial baseline study of risk factors and identification of patients who are at higher risk for development of a malignancy, in order to achieve a diagnosis at an early stage.

  6. Chronic heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy, necrosis, and changes in myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Paula F; Okoshi, Katashi; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Carvalho, Robson F; Oliveira Junior, Silvio A; Lima, Aline R R; Campos, Dijon H S; Damatto, Ricardo L; Padovani, Carlos R; Nogueira, Celia R; Dal Pai-Silva, Maeli; Okoshi, Marina P

    2010-12-01

    Although intrinsic skeletal muscle abnormalities can influence exercise intolerance during heart failure (HF), the factors responsible for muscle changes have not been elucidated. In this study we evaluated the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRF), myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms, and fiber trophism in the soleus muscle of rats with myocardial infarction-induced heart failure. Six months after surgery, 2 groups of rats were studied: sham, and infarcted rats with HF (MI/HF+, MI size: 41.1±6.3% of total left ventricular area). In the infarcted group, microscopic evaluation revealed scattered foci of fiber necrosis in combination with inflammatory cells, phagocytosis, and increased fibrous tissue. The frequency of necrotic fibers was significantly higher in the MI/HF+ group than in the sham. The MI/HF+ group had atrophy of type I, IC/IIC, and IIA fibers compared to the sham group (P<0.05). MyoD gene expression was higher in the MI/HF+ group (sham: 1.00±0.49; MI/HF+: 2.53±0.71 arbitrary units; P<0.001). Myogenin and MRF4 gene expression was similar in both groups. Myogenin protein levels were reduced in the MI/HF+ group (sham: 1.00±0.21; MI/HF+: 0.74±0.21 arbitrary units; P=0.026). MyoD and MRF4 protein levels, as well as the MyHC distribution, were not different between groups. The MI/HF+ group had higher TNF-α and IL-6 serum concentrations than the sham group. Heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is combined with fiber necrosis, increased MyoD gene expression and decreased myogenin protein levels.

  7. Biodentine Reduces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-induced TRPA1 Expression in Odontoblastlike Cells.

    PubMed

    El Karim, Ikhlas A; McCrudden, Maelíosa T C; McGahon, Mary K; Curtis, Tim M; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Giraud, Thomas; Irwin, Chris R; Linden, Gerard J; Lundy, Fionnuala T; About, Imad

    2016-04-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have emerged as important cellular sensors in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, with TRPA1 playing a central role in nociception and neurogenic inflammation. The functionality of TRP channels has been shown to be modulated by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inflammation on odontoblast TRPA1 expression and to determine the effect of Biodentine (Septodent, Paris, France) on inflammatory-induced TRPA1 expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to study TRPA1 expression in pulp tissue from healthy and carious human teeth. Pulp cells were differentiated to odontoblastlike cells in the presence of 2 mmol/L beta-glycerophosphate, and these cells were used in quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, calcium imaging, and patch clamp studies. Immunofluorescent staining revealed TRPA1 expression in odontoblast cell bodies and odontoblast processes, which was more intense in carious versus healthy teeth. TRPA1 gene expression was induced in cultured odontoblastlike cells by tumor necrosis factor alpha, and this expression was significantly reduced in the presence of Biodentine. The functionality of the TRPA1 channel was shown by calcium microfluorimetry and patch clamp recording, and our results showed a significant reduction in tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced TRPA1 responses after Biodentine treatment. In conclusion, this study showed TRPA1 to be modulated by caries-induced inflammation and that Biodentine reduced TRPA1 expression and functional responses. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. p53 and tumor necrosis factor alpha regulate the expression of a mitochondrial chloride channel protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Salas, E; Sagar, M; Cheng, C; Yuspa, S H; Weinberg, W C

    1999-12-17

    A novel chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) gene, clone mc3s5/mtCLIC, has been identified from differential display analysis of differentiating mouse keratinocytes from p53+/+ and p53-/- mice. The 4.2-kilobase pair cDNA contains an open reading frame of 762 base pairs encoding a 253-amino acid protein with two putative transmembrane domains. mc3s5/mtCLIC protein shares extensive homology with a family of intracellular organelle chloride channels but is the first shown to be differentially regulated. mc3s5/mtCLIC mRNA is expressed to the greatest extent in vivo in heart, lung, liver, kidney, and skin, with reduced levels in some organs from p53-/- mice. mc3s5/mtCLIC mRNA and protein are higher in p53+/+ compared with p53-/- basal keratinocytes in culture, and both increase in differentiating keratinocytes independent of genotype. Overexpression of p53 in keratinocytes induces mc3s5/mtCLIC mRNA and protein. Exogenous human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha also up-regulates mc3s5/mtCLIC mRNA and protein in keratinocytes. Subcellular fractionation of keratinocytes indicates that both the green fluorescent protein-mc3s5 fusion protein and the endogenous mc3s5/mtCLIC are localized to the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Similarly, mc3s5/mtCLIC was localized to mitochondria and cytoplasmic fractions of rat liver homogenates. Furthermore, mc3s5/mtCLIC colocalized with cytochrome oxidase in keratinocyte mitochondria by immunofluorescence and was also detected in the cytoplasmic compartment. Sucrose gradient-purified mitochondria from rat liver confirmed this mitochondrial localization. This represents the first report of localization of a CLIC type chloride channel in mitochondria and the first indication that expression of an organellular chloride channel can be regulated by p53 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  9. Growth and Adult Height in Patients with Crohn's Disease Treated with Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Damir; Viala, Jérôme; Carel, Jean-Claude; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Simon, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation contributes to growth failure associated with inflammatory bowel diseases. Anti-TNFα therapy induces sustained remission and short-term improvements in height velocity and/or height standard deviation score (H-SDS) patients with Crohn’s disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth and adult height in patients with Crohn’s disease taking maintenance infliximab or adalimumab therapy.This university-hospital based retrospective study included 61 patients, with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (2.0; 3.3). 38 patients (62%) reached their adult height. H-SDS was collected at diagnosis and together with disease activity markers (Harvey-Bradshaw Index, albumin, and C-reactive protein) at treatment initiation (baseline), and follow-up completion. Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test was chosen for comparisons. Median H-SDS decreased from diagnosis to baseline (-0.08 [-0.73; +0.77] to -0.94 [-1.44; +0.11], p<0.0001) and then increased to follow-up completion (-0.63 [-1.08; 0.49], p = 0.003 versus baseline), concomitantly with an improvement in disease activity. Median adult H-SDS was within the normal range (-0.72 [-1.25; +0.42]) but did not differ from baseline H-SDS and was significantly lower than the target H-SDS (-0.09 [-0.67; +0.42], p = 0.01). Only 2 (6%) males had adult heights significantly below their target heights (10.5 and -13.5 cm [-1.75 and -2.25 SD]). In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) therapy prevented loss of height without fully restoring the genetic growth potential in this group of patients with CD. Earlier treatment initiation might improve growth outcomes in these patients. PMID:27636201

  10. Interleukin 10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Pregnancy: Aspects of Interest in Clinical Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Brogin Moreli, Jusciele; Cirino Ruocco, Ana Maria; Vernini, Joice Monaliza; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding the action of the cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in pregnancy and to emphasize the factors that are of interest to clinical obstetrics. The literature highlights several actions of IL-10 and TNF-α during pregnancy. The actions of these cytokines seem to be antagonistic and dependent on the balance between them, which is orchestrated by the specific immunosuppressive action of IL-10. TNF-α has a characteristic inflammatory action, and it is an additional diabetogenic factor in pregnancy. The loss of the control of the production of these cytokines, with increase of TNF-α, is related to the risk for developing obstetric complications, particularly recurrent fetal loss, gestational diabetes mellitus, hypertensive syndromes, and fetal growth restriction. However, study results are controversial and are not clearly defined. These issues are attributed to the heterogeneity of the studies, particularly regarding their sample sizes and sources, the evaluation methods, and the multiplicity of factors and conditions that influence cytokine production. These questions are fundamental and should be addressed in future investigations to obtain more consistent results that can be applied to obstetric practice. PMID:22462002

  11. Signaling by the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily in B-cell biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Robert C; Jellusova, Julia; Miletic, Ana V

    2011-11-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) participate prominently in B-cell maturation and function. In particular, B-cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family receptor (BAFF-R), B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) play critical roles in promoting B-cell survival at distinct stages of development by engaging a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and/or BAFF. CD40 is also essential for directing the humoral response to T-cell-dependent antigens. Signaling by the TNFRSF is mediated primarily, albeit not exclusively, via the TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) proteins and activation of the canonical and/or non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. Dysregulated signaling by TNFRSF members can promote B-cell survival and proliferation, causing autoimmunity and neoplasia. In this review, we present a current understanding of the functions of and distinctions between APRIL/BAFF signaling by their respective receptors expressed on particular B-cell subsets. These findings are compared and contrasted with CD40 signaling, which employs similar signaling conduits to achieve distinct cellular outcomes in the context of the germinal center response. We also underscore how new findings and conceptual insights into TNFRSF signaling are facilitating the understanding of B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases.

  12. Acne conglobata and adalimumab: use of tumour necrosis factor-α antagonists in treatment-resistant acne conglobata, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Z Z N; Madan, V; Griffiths, C E M

    2015-06-01

    Acne conglobata (AC) is a chronic, severe, inflammatory variant of acne characterized by development of cystic nodules, abscesses and sinus tracts. AC may prove resistant to conventional acne therapy. The off-label use of adalimumab for the treatment of AC has been reported recently. We present a 26-year-old man with AC resistant to conventional treatment, who was treated with 40 mg adalimumab every other week, with significant clinical improvement. We review the evidence for the use of tumour necrosis factor antagonists in AC and related conditions. This case provides further evidence supporting the role of adalimumab in the treatment of AC.

  13. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne syndrome (PAPA syndrome) associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels.

    PubMed

    Edrees, Amr F; Kaplan, David L; Abdou, Nabih I

    2002-10-01

    Pyogenic aseptic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and cystic acne (PAPA) syndrome is an unusual triad that was recently mapped to a chromosome 15q mutation. We describe a patient from this kindred in whom hypogammaglobulinemia and elevated tumor necrosis factor-alpha serum levels were detected. The patient responded well to intravenous gammaglobulin and intra-articular corticosteroid therapy. Immune abnormalities can be found in PAPA syndrome and could be the consequence of the chromosomal abnormalities affecting candidate genes on this chromosome with subsequent abnormalities in cytokine or chemokine secretion. Rheumatologists should be alert for this syndrome. Correction of the immune abnormalities may be effective in controlling the disease manifestations.

  14. Multiorgan chronic inflammatory hepatobiliary pancreatic murine model deficient in tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To provoke persistent/chronic multiorgan inflammatory response and to contribute to stones formation followed by fibrosis in hepatobiliary and pancreatic tissues. METHODS: Tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNFR1/R2) deficient mice reared in-house were given dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) twice within 10 d by oral gavage delivery. Sham control animals received vehicle treatment and naïve animals remained untreated throughout the study. Animals were monitored daily for symptoms of pain and discomfort. The abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity were assessed with von Frey microfilaments. Exploratory behaviors were recorded at the baseline, after initiation of treatment, and before study termination. Histopathological changes were examined postmortem in tissues. Collagen accumulation and fibrosis were confirmed with Sirius Red staining. RESULTS: Animals lost weight after oral administration of DBTC and developed persistent inflammatory abdominal and hindpaw hypersensitivity compared to sham-treated controls (P < 0.0001). These pain related secondary mechanical hypersensitivity responses increased more than 2-fold in DBTC-treated animals. The drastically diminished rearing and grooming rates persisted after DBTC administration throughout the study. Gross as well as micropathology at one month confirmed that animals treated with DBTC developed chronic hepatobiliary injuries evidenced with activation of stellate cells, multifocal necrosis, fatty degeneration of hepatocytes, periportal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and prominent biliary ductal dilation. The severity of hepatitis was scored 3.7 ± 0.2 (severe) in DBTC-treated animals vs score 0 (normal) in sham-treated animals. Fibrotic thickening was extensive around portal ducts, in hepatic parenchyma as well as in lobular pancreatic structures and confirmed with Sirius Red histopathology. In addition, pancreatic microarchitecture was presented with distortion of islets, and parenchyma, infiltration of

  15. Survival rate of antitumour necrosis factor-α treatments for psoriasis in routine dermatological practice: a multicentre observational study.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Gisondi, P; Cassano, N; Ferrucci, G; Del Giglio, M; Loconsole, F; Giunta, A; Vena, G A; Chimenti, S; Girolomoni, G

    2013-09-01

    Adherence is an overall marker of treatment success, and it depends on multiple factors including efficacy and safety. Despite the wide use of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers in the treatment of plaque-type psoriasis, few data regarding treatment adherence in routine clinical practice are available. To estimate the long-term survival rate of anti-TNF-α therapy in a cohort of patients with psoriasis in routine clinical practice; to evaluate the reasons for and predictors of treatment discontinuation. The Outcome and Survival rate Concerning Anti-TNF Routine treatment (OSCAR) study was based on a retrospective analysis to estimate the long-term survival rate of the first anti-TNF-α treatment in patients with psoriasis, from three Italian academic referral centres. Adult patients (n = 650) with plaque psoriasis treated with a first course of adalimumab, etanercept or infliximab for ≥ 3 months were included. Global adherence to anti-TNF-α treatments after 28·9 ± 15·4 months (867 ± 462 days) of observation was 72·6%. Etanercept showed a longer survival (mean 51·4 months, 1565 days; P < 0·001) compared with infliximab (36·8 months, 1120 days) and adalimumab (34·7 months, 1056 days). Treatment discontinuation due to primary and secondary inefficacy was observed in 5·2% and 14·5% of patients, respectively, whereas discontinuation due to adverse events was reported in 29 subjects (4·5%). Independent predictors of treatment withdrawal were female gender [hazards ratio (HR) 1·3], treatment with adalimumab or infliximab compared with etanercept (HR 2·7 and 1·7, respectively), and the concomitant use of traditional systemic treatment, as a rescue therapy, compared with monotherapy (HR 1·9). Overall survival of anti-TNF-α agents in psoriasis is elevated, with drug discontinuation mostly due to inefficacy. Etanercept showed a longer adherence compared with adalimumab and infliximab. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. RNAseq Analyses Identify Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Inflammation as a Major Abnormality in ALS Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Brohawn, David G; O'Brien, Laura C; Bennett, James P

    2016-01-01

    ALS is a rapidly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative illness of adults that produces disabling weakness and spasticity arising from death of lower and upper motor neurons. No meaningful therapies exist to slow ALS progression, and molecular insights into pathogenesis and progression are sorely needed. In that context, we used high-depth, next generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq, Illumina) to define gene network abnormalities in RNA samples depleted of rRNA and isolated from cervical spinal cord sections of 7 ALS and 8 CTL samples. We aligned >50 million 2X150 bp paired-end sequences/sample to the hg19 human genome and applied three different algorithms (Cuffdiff2, DEseq2, EdgeR) for identification of differentially expressed genes (DEG's). Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) identified inflammatory processes as significantly elevated in our ALS samples, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) found to be a major pathway regulator (IPA) and TNFα-induced protein 2 (TNFAIP2) as a major network "hub" gene (WGCNA). Using the oPOSSUM algorithm, we analyzed transcription factors (TF) controlling expression of the nine DEG/hub genes in the ALS samples and identified TF's involved in inflammation (NFkB, REL, NFkB1) and macrophage function (NR1H2::RXRA heterodimer). Transient expression in human iPSC-derived motor neurons of TNFAIP2 (also a DEG identified by all three algorithms) reduced cell viability and induced caspase 3/7 activation. Using high-density RNAseq, multiple algorithms for DEG identification, and an unsupervised gene co-expression network approach, we identified significant elevation of inflammatory processes in ALS spinal cord with TNF as a major regulatory molecule. Overexpression of the DEG TNFAIP2 in human motor neurons, the population most vulnerable to die in ALS, increased cell death and caspase 3/7 activation. We propose that therapies targeted to reduce inflammatory TNFα signaling may be helpful

  17. [Transfer factors in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Dolores J; Sosa-Luna, Carlos A; Vásquez-Moctezuma, Ismael

    2011-09-10

    Transfer factor (TF) consists of messenger peptides produced by activated T lymphocytes as part of cellular immunity, and it acts in virgin lymphocytes through TF inducers, suppressors and specific antigens. TF is not immunogenic because it is not species-specific, since it contains a consensus sequence of amino acids LLYAQDL/VEDN. TF extracted from leukocytes can transfer immunity from a human to another species. TF extracts are complex, containing more than 200 molecules with molecular weights ranging from 1 to 20 kDa. The antigen specific transfer factors (STF) have molecular weights between 3,5 and 5 kDa. TF is easy to prepare and well tolerated. It does not contain HL-A antigens against potential receptors and it can used as adjuvant therapy in several diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Prognostic and predictive impact of central necrosis and fibrosis in early breast cancer. Results from two International Breast Cancer Study Group randomized trials of chemoendocrine adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maiorano, Eugenio; Regan, Meredith M.; Viale, Giuseppe; Mastropasqua, Mauro G.; Colleoni, Marco; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Coates, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A minority of early invasive breast cancers show a pattern of central necrosis and fibrosis (CNF). Previous studies have documented an adverse prognostic impact and association with other adverse pathological features, but its predictive importance for therapy selection is unknown. Methods We examined the prognostic and predictive value of CNF in two randomized clinical trials comparing chemoendocrine therapy with endocrine therapy alone in patients with node-negative breast cancer. A total of 1850 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups comparing endocrine with chemoendocrine therapy, and with centrally-assessed CNF, ER, PgR and HER2 were included in the analytic cohort. The median follow up was 10 years. Results CNF was present in 84 of 1850 trial patients (4.5%). It was associated with tumor characteristics suggesting poor outcome, but was an independent adverse factor for disease-free survival. In the presence of CNF outcome was worse regardless of tumor grade, whereas in the absence of CNF, patients with grade 3 tumors had poorer outcome than those with grade 1-2 tumors. Among patients with estrogen receptor-absent tumors chemoendocrine therapy was superior to endocrine therapy alone only in the absence of CNF [HR (chemoendocrine:endocrine)=0.46 in CNF-absent, 0.90 in CNF-present], while among those with receptor-positive disease chemoendocrine therapy was beneficial only in the presence of CNF [HR=0.34 CNF-present, 0.96 CNF-absent]. Conclusion The results suggest that the presence of CNF reflects a biological difference in early breast cancer that is important in modulating the efficacy of standard therapies. Accordingly we believe that its presence should be routinely reported. PMID:19280340

  19. Environmental and Pathogenic Factors Inducing Brown Apical Necrosis on Fruit of English (Persian) Walnut.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Michele; Bortolin, Enrico; Fiorin, Antonio; Belisario, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Brown apical necrosis (BAN) is a most recently described disease affecting English (Persian) walnut fruit. BAN was only recorded in intensively managed walnut orchards and was found to be a disease complex mainly caused by Fusarium species. All fungi associated with this disease are polyphagous and ubiquitous, not specific to walnut. Consequently, BAN occurrence is more strictly dependent, than generally, on the interaction between pathological features and environmental conditions. Environmental variables identified with regression analysis showed that maximum temperature, angle of main wind direction versus tree row orientation, and orchard distance to the closest river/canal, all representative of climatic conditions occurring in the orchard, were related to fruit drop. The factor displaying the highest influence on severity of BAN fruit drop was maximum temperature and only subordinately factors are associated with relative humidity. BAN symptoms were reproduced with in planta artificial inoculation, and fruit drop of symptomatic fruit was significantly higher than that of the noninoculated trees for each type of inoculum (Fusarium semitectum, F. graminearum, and Alternaria spp.). F. semitectum and F. graminearum were more aggressive than Alternaria species, and the earliest artificial inoculations in mid-May resulted in the highest fruit drop. The extension of walnut fruit susceptibility and the conducive environmental factors to BAN are discussed.

  20. Erythropoietin protects myocardin-expressing cardiac stem cells against cytotoxicity of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Shelat, Harnath; Xue, Qun; Willerson, James T.; De Caterina, Raffaele; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2009-10-15

    Cardiac stem cells are vulnerable to inflammation caused by infarction or ischemic injury. The growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), ameliorates the inflammatory response of the myocardium to ischemic injury. This study was designed to assess the role of Epo in regulation of expression and activation of the cell death-associated intracellular signaling components in cardiac myoblasts stimulated with the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. Cardiac myoblasts isolated from canine embryonic hearts characterized by expression of myocardin A, a promyogenic transcription factor for cardiovascular muscle development were pretreated with Epo and then exposed to TNF-{alpha}. Compared to untreated cells, the Epo-treated cardiac myoblasts exhibited better morphology and viability. Immunoblotting revealed lower levels of active caspase-3 and reductions in iNOS expression and NO production in Epo-treated cells. Furthermore, Epo pretreatment reduced nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and inhibited phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B) in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cardiac myoblasts. Thus, Epo protects cardiac myocyte progenitors or myoblasts against the cytotoxic effects of TNF-{alpha} by inhibiting NF-{kappa}B-mediated iNOS expression and NO production and by preventing caspase-3 activation.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto; Ramos, Adrian M

    2014-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) cytokine has been linked to kidney injury by functional studies in experimental animals, and has biomarker potential in kidney disease. TWEAK was known to promote tubular cell injury and kidney inflammation. Recent studies have expanded these observations, identifying additional targets of TWEAK relevant to kidney injury. Thus, TWEAK upregulates the chemokine and cholesterol scavenger receptor CXCL16 and downregulates the antiaging and antifibrotic molecule Klotho in tubular cells. Furthermore, fibrogenic TWEAK actions on renal fibroblasts were described. TWEAK or factor-inducible molecule 14 targeting decreased the kidney fibrosis resulting from immune and nonimmune kidney injury induced by transient tubular or glomerular insults or by persistent urinary tract obstruction. TWEAK might also contribute to the link between chronic kidney disease and kidney cancer, as suggested by its role in other genitourinary cancers. Progress has also been made in TWEAK targeting. A phase I clinical trial showed that TWEAK targeting is well tolerated in humans, and an ongoing trial is exploring efficacy in lupus nephritis. Nanomolecules and inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway may also protect from the adverse effects of TWEAK in the kidney. These findings suggest that TWEAK targeting has clinical potential in kidney injury of immune and nonimmune origin.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor SNP haplotypes are associated with iron deficiency anemia in West African children

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Morgan, Gareth; Bejon, Philip A.; Sirugo, Giorgio; O'Connell, Maria A.; Hanchard, Neil; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Prentice, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are significantly raised in malaria infection and TNF-α is thought to inhibit intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release. This study investigated putative functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region, including TNF and its immediate neighbors nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (lκBL), inhibitor-like 1 and lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), in relation to nutritional iron status and anemia, in a cohort of 780 children across a malaria season. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) increased over the malaria season (P < .001). The TNF−308 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of iron deficiency (adjusted OR 8.1; P = .001) and IDA (adjusted OR 5.1; P = .01) at the end of the malaria season. No genotypes were associated with IDA before the malaria season. Thus, TNF appears to be a risk factor for iron deficiency and IDA in children in a malaria-endemic environment and this is likely to be due to a TNF-α–induced block in iron absorption. PMID:18716131

  3. Genetic markers of tumour necrosis factor alpha in aggressive and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Susanne; Machulla, Helmut K G; Altermann, Wolfgang; Klapproth, Jana; Zimmermann, Uta; Gläser, Christiane; Kluttig, Alexander; Stein, Jamal; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Reichert, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. TNFalpha production is influenced by gene polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate links between genetic variants and chronic/aggressive periodontitis in a multivariate model. One hundred and twenty-three periodontitis patients (chronic: n=54, aggressive: n=69) and 52 healthy controls without periodontitis were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) c.-308G>A, c.-238G>A and haplotypes were analysed by a polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The clinical investigation included smoking status, plaque and bleeding indexes, pocket depth and attachment loss. Prevotella intermedia occurred more frequently in individuals positive for the -308GG/-238GG haplotype combination (Odds Ratio=2, 95% Confidence interval: 1.1-3.7, p=0.037, 1-beta=61%). In binary logistic regression analyses, this TNFalpha haplotype could not be shown to be associated with periodontitis considering smoking, age, gender and approximal plaque index or subgingival bacterial colonization as confounding factors. Although the genetic background of TNFalpha could be shown to be associated with subgingival colonization with P. Intermedia, there is no evidence that it is an independent risk factor for periodontitis in multivariate models.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-α modifies the effects of Shiga toxin on glial cells.

    PubMed

    Leu, Hue; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shimizu, Masaki; Toma, Tomoko; Wada, Taizo; Ohta, Kunio; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin (STX) is one of the main factors inducing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in infections with STX-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Approximately 62% of patients with HUS showed symptoms of encephalopathy in the 2011 Japanese outbreak of STEC infections. At that time, we reported elevated serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in patients with acute encephalopathy during the HUS phase. In the current study, we investigated whether TNF-α augments the effects of STX in glial cell lines and primary glial cells. We found that TNF-α alone or STX in combination with TNF-α activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling and inhibits growth of glial cells. The magnitude of the NF-κB activation and the inhibition of cell growth by the STX and TNF-α combination was greater than that obtained with TNF-α alone or STX alone. Thus, this in vitro study reveals the role of TNF-α in glial cells during STEC infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognostic significance of ligands belonging to tumour necrosis factor superfamily in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Bolkun, L; Lemancewicz, D; Jablonska, E; Szumowska, A; Bolkun-Skornicka, U; Moniuszko, M; Dzieciol, J; Kloczko, J

    2015-03-01

    Altered activities of ligands belonging to tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, namely B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) were demonstrated in several haematological diseases including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). BAFF, APRIL and TRAIL provide crucial survival signals to immature, naive and activated B cells. These ligands are capable of activating a broad spectrum of intracellular signalling cascades that can either induce apoptosis or protect from programmed cell death. BAFF and APRIL, which can directly activate the NF-κB pathway, have been identified as crucial survival factors for ALL cells. Here, we have analyzed serum BAFF, APRIL and TRAIL concentrations in 48 patients with newly diagnosed ALL and 44 healthy volunteers. The levels of APRIL and BAFF were significantly higher in ALL patients as compared to healthy volunteers. In contrast, concentrations of TRAIL were significantly lower in ALL patients. Moreover, following induction, the levels of APRIL, but not BAFF or TRAIL, were significantly lower in a group of patients with complete remission (CR) as compared to non-respondent (NR) ALL patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated statistically significant differences in concentrations of APRIL between CR MRD-negative and CR, MRD-positive ALL patients. Notably detection of higher concentrations of APRIL was associated with shorter leukaemia-free survival and overall survival. Altogether, our data indicate that APRIL can play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALL and the measurement of APRIL levels can improve prognostication in ALL patients.

  6. Factors responsible for the development of avascular necrosis secondary to the treatment of congenital dislocation of the hip.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Flores, J; Ocete-Guzman, G; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Hevia-Sierra, E; Amaya-Alarcon, S

    1993-11-01

    We present 104 cases of unilateral congenital dislocation of the hip treated with the same regime between 1977 and 1988. The patients had an average age of 12 months (range 4-24). The average age at follow-up was 6 years (range 3-13). The incidence of avascular necrosis was 37%. Avascular necrosis presented most frequently in babies of 7 months at the start of treatment, in Tonnis type IV when an adductor tenotomy was not performed, and after open reductions. The most influential factor was the absence of the femoral head descent at the end of the period of traction. The "effective" prereduction traction and the performance of an adductor tenotomy when necessary were the principle factors in avoiding avascular necrosis.

  7. The clinical significance of tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma level in patients having chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Manshouri, Taghi; Giles, Francis J; Dey, Amanda; Estrov, Zeev; Koller, Charles A; Kurzrock, Razelle; Thomas, Deborah A; Faderl, Stefan; Lerner, Susan; O'Brien, Susan; Albitar, Maher

    2002-08-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine possessing pleiotropic biological activities, is produced by leukemic lymphocytes in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acts as an autocrine and paracrine growth factor in this disease. In this study, TNF-alpha levels were determined in 150 patients with CLL and correlated with disease characteristics, prognostic factors, and survival. The mean TNF-alpha plasma concentration in the patients with CLL was significantly higher than in the healthy control population (16.4 versus 8.7 pg/mL; P <.0001). Patients having an elevated TNF-alpha level had more advanced Rai and Binet stage disease, higher serum beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)M) levels, a greater percentage of cells expressing CD38, and lower hemoglobin and platelet levels. Patients having chromosomal abnormalities such as 11q deletion, trisomy 12, and chromosome 17 aberrations had a higher mean TNF-alpha level (27.5 pg/mL) than patients having a diploid karyotype or other miscellaneous cytogenetic abnormalities (14.2 pg/mL; P <.001). The TNF-alpha level was a predictor of survival when the Cox proportional hazards model was used with TNF-alpha entered as a continuous variable (P =.0001). Also, patients having a TNF-alpha level above the mean value of 14 pg/mL had significantly shorter survival duration (P =.00001). The TNF-alpha level remained predictive of survival in Cox multivariate analysis independent of Rai staging and beta(2)M, hemoglobin, prior therapy, white cell count, and platelet level (P =.005). We conclude that the TNF-alpha level serves as a prognostic factor in patients with CLL and that inhibition of TNF-alpha in these patients could have therapeutic importance.

  8. Depression and Insomnia in Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Taking Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yun-Ting; Juan, Chao-Kuei; Shen, Jui-Lung; Lin, Yu-Pu; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Liu, Han-Nan; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    Psoriasis patients with moderate to severe disease often present with depression and insomnia. Treatment targeting both psoriasis and psychological comorbidities is needed to improve the quality of life of these patients.In this nationwide cohort study, a total of 980 patients with psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis who had received nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics therapy between 2009 and 2012 were identified. The prevalence rates of patients taking medications for depression and insomnia were compared before and after biologics therapy. Logistic regression method was used to investigate the risk factors for depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses were performed to examine the prevalence of use of medications for depression and insomnia among different patient subgroups.The prevalence of patients taking regular antidepressants before starting biologics therapy was about 20%. There was a more than 40% reduction in this prevalence after biologics therapy for 2 years. Age higher than 45 years, female sex, presence of comorbidities, and psoriatic arthritis were independently associated with depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses revealed a more rapid and significant reduction in depression/insomnia in those undergoing continuous biologics therapy, younger than 45 years, without psoriatic arthritis and not taking concomitant methotrexate, when compared with their counterparts.The results suggest that biologics therapy may be associated with reduced rates of depression and insomnia, and a reduced rate of regular antidepressants use in psoriasis patients.

  9. Depression and Insomnia in Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Taking Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yun-Ting; Juan, Chao-Kuei; Shen, Jui-Lung; Lin, Yu-Pu; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Liu, Han-Nan; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psoriasis patients with moderate to severe disease often present with depression and insomnia. Treatment targeting both psoriasis and psychological comorbidities is needed to improve the quality of life of these patients. In this nationwide cohort study, a total of 980 patients with psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis who had received nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics therapy between 2009 and 2012 were identified. The prevalence rates of patients taking medications for depression and insomnia were compared before and after biologics therapy. Logistic regression method was used to investigate the risk factors for depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses were performed to examine the prevalence of use of medications for depression and insomnia among different patient subgroups. The prevalence of patients taking regular antidepressants before starting biologics therapy was about 20%. There was a more than 40% reduction in this prevalence after biologics therapy for 2 years. Age higher than 45 years, female sex, presence of comorbidities, and psoriatic arthritis were independently associated with depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses revealed a more rapid and significant reduction in depression/insomnia in those undergoing continuous biologics therapy, younger than 45 years, without psoriatic arthritis and not taking concomitant methotrexate, when compared with their counterparts. The results suggest that biologics therapy may be associated with reduced rates of depression and insomnia, and a reduced rate of regular antidepressants use in psoriasis patients. PMID:27258525

  10. Effect of chronic excess of tumour necrosis factor-alpha on contractile proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheema, I R; Hermann, C; Postell, S; Barnes, P

    2000-01-01

    The effect of chronic tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) treatment on the synthesis of specific myofibrillar proteins such as heavy chain myosin, light chain myosin and G-actin in rat diaphragm were evaluated. Muscles (diaphragm) from control and experimental groups (TNF-alpha i.v. at 50 microg/kg body wt for 5 days) were incubated in the presence of 35S-methionine for 2 h. Myofibrillar protein extracts were prepared and protein was electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels. Heavy chain myosin, light chain myosin and G-actin were identified by Western blot analysis using specific monoclonal antibodies. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) followed by Western blot analysis revealed two types of heavy chain myosin (206 and 212 kD), all four types of light chain myosin (15, 16.5, 18 and 20 kD) and a single type of G-actin (42 kD). Chronic TNF-alpha treatment produced a significant decline in the synthesis of all types of myofibrillar proteins, namely heavy chain myosin, light chain myosin and G-actin. TNF-alpha impaired peptide-chain initiation in diaphragm muscle which was reversed by the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) therapy of TNF-alpha treated rats. These findings indicate a significant role for TNF-alpha in the translational regulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle.

  11. Long non-coding RNA Gm4419 promotes trauma-induced astrocyte apoptosis by targeting tumor necrosis factor α.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunhu; Cao, Fang; Ran, Qishan; Wang, Fei

    2017-09-16

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a life-threatening disease. Accumulating evidences have showed that neuroinflammatory response is a critical biological event in the progression of TBI induced astrocyte damage. However, the exact mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) Gm4419 promoted trauma-induced astrocyte apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). We observed that Gm4419 was aberrantly induced after injury on astroglial cells in vitro. Overexpression of Gm4419 in injury-treated astrocytes increased protein expressions of TNF-α, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9, decreased levels of Bcl-2 and CyclinD1, and significantly led to cellular apoptosis. Mechanically, Gm4419 transcript could function as a sponge for miR-466l and miR-466l could target TNF-α 3' UTR for degradation and translation inhibition. Therefore, Gm4419 could up-regulate TNF-α expression by competitively binding miR-466l and then contribute to inflammatory damage as well as astrocyte apoptosis during TBI. Generally speaking, our findings provide better understandings of the mechanism underlying Gm4419 in trauma-induced neuroinflammation and neurological deficits. Thus, the present study would expand the insight into the novel approaches for TBI therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Canakinumab efficacy and long-term tocilizumab administration in tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    La Torre, Francesco; Muratore, Maurizio; Vitale, Antonio; Moramarco, Fulvio; Quarta, Laura; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene. Treatment is aimed at preventing acute disease attacks, improving quality of life, and preventing long-term complications such as systemic reactive amyloidosis. Biologic agents have significantly improved TRAPS management. In particular, interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition either with the recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or with the human IgG1 anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody canakinumab has recently shown to induce a prompt and stable disease remission. Conversely, the successful experience with IL-6 inhibition is nowadays limited to a single patient. Anyway, introduction of new treatment options for patients requiring a lifelong therapy is desirable. We describe two TRAPS patients (son and father) successfully treated with canakinumab and tocilizumab, respectively. In particular, we highlight the clinical and laboratory efficacy as well as the good safety profile of tocilizumab during a 42-month follow-up period.

  13. The dietary flavonoid apigenin sensitizes malignant tumor cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand.

    PubMed

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Shiraishi, Takumi; Nakata, Susumu; Wakada, Miki; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2006-04-01

    Dietary flavonoid apigenin is expected to have preventive and therapeutic potential against malignant tumors. In this report, we show for the first time that apigenin markedly induces the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5) and synergistically acts with exogenous soluble recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to induce apoptosis in malignant tumor cells. TRAIL is a promising candidate for cancer therapeutics due to its ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The combined use of apigenin and TRAIL at suboptimal concentrations induces Bcl-2-interacting domain cleavage and the activation of caspases-8, -10, -9, and -3. Furthermore, human recombinant DR5/Fc chimera protein and caspase inhibitors dramatically inhibit apoptosis induced by the combination of apigenin and TRAIL. On the other hand, apigenin-mediated induction of DR5 expression is not observed in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, apigenin does not sensitize normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that this combined treatment with apigenin and TRAIL might be promising as a new therapy against malignant tumors.

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor α Regulates Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration via CADM1 and NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Prisco, Anthony R; Hoffmann, Brian R; Kaczorowski, Catherine C; McDermott-Roe, Chris; Stodola, Timothy J; Exner, Eric C; Greene, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Shortly after the discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in 1997, many clinical trials were conducted using EPCs as a cellular based therapy with the goal of restoring damaged organ function by inducing growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). Results were disappointing, largely because the cellular and molecular mechanisms of EPC-induced angiogenesis were not clearly understood. Following injection, EPCs must migrate to the target tissue and engraft prior to induction of angiogenesis. In this study EPC migration was investigated in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, to test the hypothesis that organ damage observed in ischemic diseases induces an inflammatory signal that is important for EPC homing. In this study, EPC migration and incorporation were modeled in vitro using a coculture assay where TNFα treated EPCs were tracked while migrating toward vessel-like structures. It was found that TNFα treatment of EPCs increased migration and incorporation into vessel-like structures. Using a combination of genomic and proteomic approaches, NF-kB mediated upregulation of CADM1 was identified as a mechanism of TNFα induced migration. Inhibition of NF-kB or CADM1 significantly decreased migration of EPCs in vitro suggesting a role for TNFα signaling in EPC homing during tissue repair. Stem Cells 2016;34:1922-1933. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. The Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-α on Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Differentiation and the Related Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaochen; Tan, Guang-Rong; Yu, Mengfei; Cai, Xia; Zhou, Yi; Ding, Huifen; Xie, Han; Qu, Fan; Zhang, Runju; Lam, Carolina Un; Cui, Peng; Fu, Baiping

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration plays an integral role in the treatment of periodontal diseases, with important clinical significance for the preservation and functional recovery of affected teeth. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), which were found in the periodontal ligament tissues possessing properties of pluripotency and self-renewing, could repair damaged periodontium with great promise. However, in a chronic inflammatory micro-environment, these cells suffered from reduced capacity to differentiate and regenerate. There has been a growing appreciation that tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in periodontal tissues drives cellular responses to chronic periodontitis. Several new advances, including an increased understanding of the mechanism of interaction between TNF-α and PDLSCs provides insight into inflamed cell regeneration, which in turn reveal strategies to improve the effectiveness of therapy. Here we gave a comprehensive review on the role of TNF-α in chronic periodontitis, its effect on PDLSCs differentiation and periodontal regeneration, related signaling pathways and concluded with future perspectives of research on PDLSCs-based periodontal tissue regeneration.

  16. Serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha in mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ghiri, Emiliano; Goglia, Fernando; Pampana, Alessandro; Bruschi, Fabrizio; Fallahi, Poupak

    2009-12-01

    No single previous study has evaluated serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia (HCV-MC). This study was undertaken to evaluate serum levels of these cytokines in patients with HCV-MC. Serum IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNFalpha were assayed in 43 patients with HCV-MC, in 43 sex- and age-matched patients with chronic HCV without cryoglobulinemia, and in 43 sex- and age-matched controls. HCV-MC patients showed significantly higher mean IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNFalpha levels than did the controls (P<0.01) or the HCV patients (Ptherapies for MC.

  17. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2015-01-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn’s disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn’s disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF+ immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF+ cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF+ cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn’s disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders. PMID:24562382

  18. Human Tumour Necrosis Factor: Physiological and Pathological Roles in Placenta and Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Haider, S.; Knöfler, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) is a well known member of the TNF superfamily consisting of at least 18 ligands and 29 different receptors involved in numerous cellular processes. TNF signals through two distinct receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 thereby controlling expression of cytokines, immune receptors, proteases, growth factors and cell cycle genes which in turn regulate inflammation, survival, apoptosis, cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Since expression of TNF was discovered in amnion and placenta many studies demonstrated the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the diverse human reproductive tissues. Whereas TNF has been implicated in ovulation, corpus luteum formation and luteolysis, this review focuses on the functions of TNF in human placental, endometrial and decidual cell types of normal tissues and also discusses its role in endometrial and gestational diseases. Physiological levels of the cytokine could be important for balancing cell fusion and apoptotic shedding of villous trophoblasts and to limit trophoblast invasion into maternal decidua. Regulation of the TNF/TNFR system by steroid hormones also suggests a role in uterine function including menstrual cycle-dependent destruction and regeneration of endometrial tissue. Aberrant levels of TNF, however, are associated with diverse reproductive diseases such as amniotic infections, recurrent spontaneous abortions, preeclampsia, preterm labour or endometriosis. Hence, concentrations, receptor distribution and length of stimulation determine whether TNF has beneficial or adverse effects on female reproduction and pregnancy. PMID:19027157

  19. Inhibition of human erythroid colony-forming units by tumor necrosis factor requires beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Means, R T; Krantz, S B

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that inhibition of human CFU-erythroid (E) colony formation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an indirect effect mediated by a soluble factor released from a fraction of marrow accessory cells which are predominantly stromal elements (Means, R. T., Jr., E. N. Dessypris, and S. B. Krantz. 1990. J. Clin. Invest. 86:538-541). Further studies reported here identify a mediator of this effect. The inhibitory effect of recombinant TNF on marrow CFU-E is ablated by neutralizing antibodies to human beta IFN, but not by antibodies to gamma IFN or IL-1. Anti-beta IFN also neutralizes the inhibitory effect of conditioned medium prepared from marrow cells exposed to TNF. Human beta IFN inhibits colony formation by unpurified marrow CFU-E as well as highly purified CFU-E generated from peripheral blood progenitors, and limiting dilution analysis shows that this is a direct inhibitory effect. TNF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the anemia of chronic diseases since blood TNF levels are elevated in many patients with this syndrome, and since exposure to TNF produces a similar anemia in either humans or mice. The present study demonstrates that beta IFN is a required mediator of this inhibitory effect on erythropoiesis. PMID:8432849

  20. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  1. Tumour-necrosis factor from the rabbit. I. Mode of action, specificity and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Matthews, N; Watkins, J F

    1978-08-01

    Sera from rabbits injected with BCG and then with endotoxin contain a factor (tumour-necrosis factor TNF) which, even at high dilutions, is cytotoxic in vitro for mouse L cells and some other cell lines. Using a 51Cr-release assay, cytotoxicity was detected as early as 7-8 h after addition of TNF serum to L cells and cell death was evident microscopically by 24 h. TNF was cytotoxic at 37 degrees C but not at 21 degrees C or 4 degrees C, and acted on both dividing and non-dividing cells. The antimetabolites sodium azide and dinitrophenol partially protected L cells from TNF, suggesting that actively metabolizing cells are the most sensitive. Treatment of L cells with trypsin did not delay cytotoxicity nor was cytotoxicity inhibited in the presence of various saccharide derivatives of cell-surface glycoproteins. Rabbit TNF was remarkably stable with a mol. wt. of 40-50,000. It was eluted with the more acidic serum proteins on ion-exchange chromatography, but precipitated in 50%-saturated ammonium sulphate. Sensitivity to TNF could not be correlated with tumourigenicity of several animal and human lines tested nor with the production of C-type viruses.

  2. Molecular Basis for Defining the Pineal Gland and Pinealocytes as Targets for Tumor Necrosis Factor

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia Emanuele; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Tamura, Eduardo Koji; Fernandes, Pedro A. C. M.; Pinato, Luciana; Muxel, Sandra M.; Cecon, Erika; Markus, Regina P.

    2011-01-01

    The pineal gland, the gland that translates darkness into an endocrine signal by releasing melatonin at night, is now considered a key player in the mounting of an innate immune response. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), the first pro-inflammatory cytokine to be released by an inflammatory response, suppresses the translation of the key enzyme of melatonin synthesis (arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase, Aanat). Here, we show that TNF receptors of the subtype 1 (TNF-R1) are expressed by astrocytes, microglia, and pinealocytes. We also show that the TNF signaling reduces the level of inhibitory nuclear factor kappa B protein subtype A (NFKBIA), leading to the nuclear translocation of two NFKB dimers, p50/p50, and p50/RelA. The lack of a transactivating domain in the p50/p50 dimer suggests that this dimer is responsible for the repression of Aanat transcription. Meanwhile, p50/RelA promotes the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of nitric oxide, which inhibits adrenergically induced melatonin production. Together, these data provide a mechanistic basis for considering pinealocytes a target of TNF and reinforce the idea that the suppression of pineal melatonin is one of the mechanisms involved in mounting an innate immune response. PMID:22654792

  3. Tumor necrosis factor gene polymorphisms in patients with cirrhosis from chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yee, L J; Tang, J; Herrera, J; Kaslow, R A; van Leeuwen, D J

    2000-08-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumour necrosis factor (TNF) mediate the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The distribution of TNF gene polymorphisms was examined among cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients infected with HCV. Thirty Caucasians with cirrhosis due to chronic HCV infection and 114 HCV-infected patients histopathologically free of cirrhosis were genotyped for genetic variants in TNF, lymphotoxin alpha and TNF-receptor type I using PCR-based techniques. Variability in the progression of HCV-related cirrhosis was assessed in a multivariate model including genetic and non-genetic factors such as gender, estimated duration of infection, alcohol consumption, and viral genotype. Viral genotype and non-genetic host features were not independently related to the occurrence or rate of development of cirrhosis in the patient population. In contrast, the TNF promoter variants TNF2 (-238A) and TNF3 (-308A) conferred a 3.2-fold and 5.1-fold risk of cirrhosis respectively (P = 0.03 for both). Reciprocal effects were observed with several TNF alleles and haplotypes defined by the -238G/A and -308G/A dimorphic sequences. Polymorphisms in the TNF alpha promoter appear to be associated with variability in the histological severity of chronic hepatitis C infection.

  4. PPARγ regulates the mitochondrial dysfunction in human neural stem cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Chiang, M-C; Cheng, Y-C; Lin, K-H; Yen, C-H

    2013-01-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) belongs to a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, and its ligands are known to control many physiological and pathological conditions. The hypothesis of our study was that the PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) could mediate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) related to the regulation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs), by which TNFα possibly fulfills important roles in neuronal impairment. The results show that PPARγ mediates the cell viability of hNSCs via the downregulation of the activity of caspase 3, indicating that this rescue effect of PPARγ could improve the reduced levels of two mitochondrial regulators, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in the hNSCs with TNFα. The stimulation of mitochondrial function by PPARγ was associated with activation of the PPAR coactivator1 alpha (PGC1α) pathway by up-regulation of oxidative defense and mitochondrial systems. The above protective effects appeared to be exerted by a direct activation of the rosiglitazone, because it protected hNSCs from TNFα-evoked oxidative stress and mitochondrial deficiency. Here we show that the rosiglitazone protects hNSCs against Aβ-induced apoptosis and promotes cell survival. These findings extend our understanding of the central role of PPARγ in TNFα-related neuronal impairment, which probably increases risks of neurodegenerative diseases. The anti-inflammatory effects of PPARγ in the hNSCs with TNFα, and the involved mechanisms were also characterized.

  5. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  6. Involvement of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the pathogenesis of autoimmune orchitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suescun, María O; Rival, Claudia; Theas, María S; Calandra, Ricardo S; Lustig, Livia

    2003-06-01

    We studied the testicular macrophages of rats with experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) and analyzed whether the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is involved in germ cell apoptosis and in Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The EAO was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by active immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants. In the experimental group, a severe orchitis was observed 80 days after the first immunization. ED1- and ED2-positive macrophages were quantified by immunohistochemistry. The TNFalpha concentration of conditioned media from testicular macrophages (TMCM) was determined by ELISA. The number of apoptotic TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1)-positive germ cells was identified by combining in situ end labeling of apoptotic DNA and immunohistochemical techniques. The effect of TNFalpha on Leydig cell testosterone production was determined by RIA. In rats with EAO, we observed a significant increase in the number of TNFalpha-positive testicular macrophages, the TNFalpha concentration in TMCM, and the number of TNFR1-positive germ cells. Sixty percent of TNFR1-positive germ cells were apoptotic. These results suggest that TNFalpha could be involved in the pathogenesis of EAO. Acting together with other local factors such as Fas-FasL, TNFalpha could trigger germ cell apoptosis. We also demonstrated that TNFalpha inhibited in vitro testosterone production in basal and hCG-stimulated Leydig cells from rats with orchitis.

  7. Cardiotrophin-1 induces tumor necrosis factor alpha synthesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fritzenwanger, Michael; Meusel, Katharina; Jung, Christian; Franz, Marcus; Wang, Zhenhua; Foerster, Martin; Figulla, Hans-R

    2009-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with elevated concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) and altered peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) function. Therefore, we tested whether CT-1 induces TNFalpha in PBMC of healthy volunteers. CT-1 induced in PBMC TNFalpha protein in the supernatant and TNFalpha mRNA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner determined by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Maximal TNFalpha protein was achieved with 100 ng/mL CT-1 after 3-6 hours and maximal TNFalpha mRNA induction after 1 hour. ELISA data were confirmed using immunofluorescent flow cytometry. Inhibitor studies with actinomycin D and brefeldin A showed that both protein synthesis and intracellular transport are essential for CT-1 induced TNFalpha expression. CT-1 caused a dose dependent nuclear factor (NF) kappaB translocation. Parthenolide inhibited both NFkappaB translocation and TNFalpha protein expression indicating that NFkappaB seems to be necessary. We revealed a new mechanism for elevated serum TNFalpha concentrations and PBMC activation in CHF besides the hypothesis of PBMC activation by bacterial translocation from the gut.

  8. An ent-kaurene diterpene enhances apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikue; Kondoh, Masuo; Harada, Motoki; Koizumi, Naoya; Fujii, Makiko; Nagashima, Fumihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2004-08-01

    Some antitumor agents, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and camptothecin (CPT), often cause resistance of tumor cells to antitumor agents through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) pathway that leads to up-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Therefore, co-treatment of an inhibitor of the NF-kappa B pathway with antitumor agents is a useful strategy for chemotherapy. Here we report that ent-11 alpha-hydroxy-16-kauren-15-one (KD) selectively inhibits NF-kappa B-dependent gene expression due to treatment with TNF-alpha. KD in combination with TNF-alpha caused a dramatic increase in apoptosis in human leukemia cells accompanied by activation of caspases. A broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases decreased the apoptosis induced by treatment with KD and TNF-alpha. KD in combination with CPT also caused an increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that the apoptotic potency of co-treatment of KD with TNF-alpha or CPT is elicited through selective inhibition of NF-kappa B-dependent anti-apoptotic proteins and thus may provide a basis for the development of useful approaches to the treatment of leukemia.

  9. Effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in epidermal keratinocytes revealed using global transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Banno, Tomohiro; Gazel, Alix; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2004-07-30

    Identification of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) as the key agent in inflammatory disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis, led to TNF alpha-targeting therapies, which, although avoiding many of the side-effects of previous drugs, nonetheless causes other side-effects, including secondary infections and cancer. By controlling gene expression, TNF alpha orchestrates the cutaneous responses to environmental damage and inflammation. To define TNF alpha action in epidermis, we compared the transcriptional profiles of normal human keratinocytes untreated and treated with TNF alpha for 1, 4, 24, and 48 h by using oligonucleotide microarrays. We found that TNF alpha regulates not only immune and inflammatory responses but also tissue remodeling, cell motility, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Specifically, TNF alpha regulates innate immunity and inflammation by inducing a characteristic large set of chemokines, including newly identified TNF alpha targets, that attract neutrophils, macrophages, and skin-specific memory T-cells. This implicates TNF alpha in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, fixed drug eruption, atopic and allergic contact dermatitis. TNF alpha promotes tissue repair by inducing basement membrane components and collagen-degrading proteases. Unexpectedly, TNF alpha induces actin cytoskeleton regulators and integrins, enhancing keratinocyte motility and attachment, effects not previously associated with TNF alpha. Also unanticipated was the influence of TNF alpha upon keratinocyte cell fate by regulating cell-cycle and apoptosis-associated genes. Therefore, TNF alpha initiates not only the initiation of inflammation and responses to injury, but also the subsequent epidermal repair. The results provide new insights into the harmful and beneficial TNF alpha effects and define the mechanisms and genes that achieve these outcomes, both of which are important for TNF alpha-targeted therapies.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-α accelerates the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis in mice by targeting profibrotic lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Redente, Elizabeth F; Keith, Rebecca C; Janssen, William; Henson, Peter M; Ortiz, Luis A; Downey, Gregory P; Bratton, Donna L; Riches, David W H

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a relentless, fibrotic parenchymal lung disease in which alternatively programmed macrophages produce profibrotic molecules that promote myofibroblast survival and collagen synthesis. Effective therapies to treat patients with IPF are lacking, and conventional therapy may be harmful. We tested the hypothesis that therapeutic lung delivery of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α into wild-type fibrotic mice would reduce the profibrotic milieu and accelerate the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrosis was assessed in bleomycin-instilled wild-type and TNF-α(-/-) mice by measuring hydroxyproline levels, static compliance, and Masson's trichrome staining. Macrophage infiltration and programming status was assessed by flow cytometry of enzymatically digested lung and in situ immunostaining. Pulmonary delivery of TNF-α to wild-type mice with established pulmonary fibrosis was found to reduce their fibrotic burden, to improve lung function and architecture, and to reduce the number and programming status of profibrotic alternatively programmed macrophages. In contrast, fibrosis and alternative macrophage programming were prolonged in bleomycin-instilled TNF-α(-/-) mice. To address the role of the reduced numbers of alternatively programmed macrophages in the TNF-α-induced resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis, we conditionally depleted macrophages in MAFIA (MAcrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis) mice. Conditional macrophage depletion phenocopied the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis observed after therapeutic TNF-α delivery. Taken together, our results show for the first time that TNF-α is involved in the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis via a mechanism involving reduced numbers and programming status of profibrotic macrophages. We speculate that pulmonary delivery of TNF-α or augmenting its signaling pathway represent a novel therapeutic strategy to resolve

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Accelerates the Resolution of Established Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice by Targeting Profibrotic Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Redente, Elizabeth F.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Janssen, William; Henson, Peter M.; Ortiz, Luis A.; Downey, Gregory P.; Bratton, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a relentless, fibrotic parenchymal lung disease in which alternatively programmed macrophages produce profibrotic molecules that promote myofibroblast survival and collagen synthesis. Effective therapies to treat patients with IPF are lacking, and conventional therapy may be harmful. We tested the hypothesis that therapeutic lung delivery of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α into wild-type fibrotic mice would reduce the profibrotic milieu and accelerate the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrosis was assessed in bleomycin-instilled wild-type and TNF-α−/− mice by measuring hydroxyproline levels, static compliance, and Masson’s trichrome staining. Macrophage infiltration and programming status was assessed by flow cytometry of enzymatically digested lung and in situ immunostaining. Pulmonary delivery of TNF-α to wild-type mice with established pulmonary fibrosis was found to reduce their fibrotic burden, to improve lung function and architecture, and to reduce the number and programming status of profibrotic alternatively programmed macrophages. In contrast, fibrosis and alternative macrophage programming were prolonged in bleomycin-instilled TNF-α−/− mice. To address the role of the reduced numbers of alternatively programmed macrophages in the TNF-α–induced resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis, we conditionally depleted macrophages in MAFIA (MAcrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis) mice. Conditional macrophage depletion phenocopied the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis observed after therapeutic TNF-α delivery. Taken together, our results show for the first time that TNF-α is involved in the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis via a mechanism involving reduced numbers and programming status of profibrotic macrophages. We speculate that pulmonary delivery of TNF-α or augmenting its signaling pathway represent a novel therapeutic strategy to resolve

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induces cytotoxicity specific to osteosarcoma by microRNA response elements.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Chen, Juwu; Lian, Chuanju; Han, Pengchao; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    As the most common primary bone neoplasm, osteosarcoma is highly aggressive and represents a high risk to human health. Biological agents, including tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), are considered promising therapeutic strategies for osteosarcoma. The current issue limiting the application of TRAIL gene therapy is that normal cells are also affected due to the lack of tumor selectivity. The present study aimed to employ the miRNA response elements (MREs) of microRNA (miR)-34 and miR-122, which are tumor suppressors, to enable the selective expression of TRAIL by adenoviral vectors in osteosarcoma cells. The results revealed that miR-34 and miR-122 were underexpressed in osteosarcoma tissues, compared with normal tissues. The MREs of miR-34 and miR-122 ensured that the luciferase gene was expressed selectively in osteosarcoma cells. Adenovirus (Ad)-TRAIL-34-122, which expressed TRAIL in an miR-34 and miR-122-regulated manner, selectively expressed TRAIL in the osteosarcoma cells assessed, which was detected using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and ELISA. Apoptosis and cytotoxicity were also detected in the osteosarcoma cells, compared with the normal cells. Animal experiments further indicated that Ad-TRAIL-34-122 was able to reduce the growth of osteosarcoma xenografts without toxicity to the liver. In conclusion, the present study identified a novel miRNA-regulated biological cancer therapy against osteosarcoma, which is tumor selective and may be promising for future clinical treatment.

  13. Incidence of tuberculosis among anti-tumor necrosis factor users in patients with a previous history of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jo, Kyung-Wook; Hong, Yoonki; Jung, Young Ju; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Chang-Keun; Kim, Yong-Gil; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Kyung Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Lee, Sang-Do; Kim, Woo Sung; Kim, Dong Soon; Shim, Tae Sun

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to investigate the results of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy in patients with a previous history of tuberculosis (TB). A total of 101 patients with a previous history of TB receiving TNF antagonists between December 2004 and September 2012 at the Asan Medical Center in South Korea were retrospectively analyzed. The mean age of the 101 subjects was 40.4 ± 16.0 years and 51 patients (50.5%) were male. The underlying immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) were Crohn's disease in 55 (54.5%), rheumatoid arthritis in 27 (26.7%), and ankylosing spondylitis in 13 (12.9%) patients. Chest radiography findings were suggestive of previous TB lesions in 33 (32.7%) patients. The rates of positivity in the tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay were 21.8% (22/101) and 44.6% (45/101), respectively. Latent TB infection (LTBI) treatment was initiated in 11 subjects (10.9%) based on previous inappropriate anti-TB treatments (n = 10) or recent TB contact history (n = 1), irrespective of the LTBI test results. The median follow-up duration after the initiation of TNF antagonist therapy was 31.5 months. Active TB developed, six years after the initiation of TNF antagonist, in one patient (1.0%) who had not received LTBI treatment. The incidence rate of TB was calculated at 336 per 100,000 person-year (PY). Patients with IMIDs who have a previous history of TB can be treated with TNF antagonists with an acceptable incidence of TB, if LTBI treatment is performed based on clinical judgments including the adequacy of previous anti-TB treatment and recent contact history. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α excites subfornical organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Nick J; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2017-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in cardiovascular and autonomic regulation via actions in the central nervous system. TNF-α(-/-) mice do not develop angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension, and administration of TNF-α into the bloodstream of rats increases blood pressure and sympathetic tone. Recent studies have shown that lesion of the subfornical organ (SFO) attenuates the hypertensive and autonomic effects of TNF-α, while direct administration of TNF-α into the SFO increases blood pressure, suggesting the SFO to be a key site for the actions of TNF-α. Therefore, we used patch-clamp techniques to examine both acute and long-term effects of TNF-α on the excitability of Sprague-Dawley rat SFO neurons. It was observed that acute bath application of TNF-α depolarized SFO neurons and subsequently increased action potential firing rate. Furthermore, the magnitude of depolarization and the proportion of depolarized SFO neurons were concentration dependent. Interestingly, following 24-h incubation with TNF-α, the basal firing rate of the SFO neurons was increased and the rheobase was decreased, suggesting that TNF-α elevates SFO neuron excitability. This effect was likely mediated by the transient sodium current, as TNF-α increased the magnitude of the current and lowered its threshold of activation. In contrast, TNF-α did not appear to modulate either the delayed rectifier potassium current or the transient potassium current. These data suggest that acute and long-term TNF-α exposure elevates SFO neuron activity, providing a basis for TNF-α hypertensive and sympathetic effects.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Considerable recent evidence has suggested important links between inflammation and the pathological mechanisms underlying hypertension. The present study describes cellular mechanisms through which acute and long-term exposure of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) influences the activity of subfornical organ neurons by

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Stimulates the Overproduction of Intestinal Apolipoprotein B48-containing Very Low Density Lipoproproteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha(a)(TNFa), a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in obesity-associated pathologies including type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. TNFa enhanced postprandial apoB48-VLDL1 overproduction by about 89% compared with the control after 90 min olive oil loading; TNFa did not si...

  16. Platelet-activating factor, tumor necrosis factor, hypoxia and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, W; Caplan, M S; Sun, X; Tan, X; MacKendrick, W; Gonzalez-Crussi, F

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is poorly understood. We have established several animal models of NEC by using a combination of various stimuli and stress, including endotoxin, PAF, TNF, and hypoxia. We discuss the mechanism of their actions and the possible roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of human NEC.

  17. Comparative proteome analysis of Tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in response to melittin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bee venom has been used to relieve pain and to treat inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, in humans. To better understand the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis effect of bee venom, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins whose expression was altered in human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (hVSMCs) stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha after 12 h in the presence of melittin. Results To obtain valuable insights into the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis mechanisms of melittin, two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF were used. The proteome study, we showed 33 significant proteins that were differentially expressed in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melittin. Thirteen proteins were significantly increased in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha, and those proteins were reduced in the cells treated with melittin. Five of the proteins that showed increased expression in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha are involved in cell migration, including calreticulin, an essential factor of development that plays a role in transcription regulation. The proteins involved in cell migration were reduced in the melittin treated cells. The observed changes in the expression of GRP75, prohibitin, and a select group of other proteins were validated with reverse transcribed-PCR. It was confirmed that the observed change in the protein levels reflected a change in the genes level. In addition, the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK was validated by analyzing the protein pathway. Conclusion Taken together, these data established that the expression of some proteins was significantly changed by melittin treatment in tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated the cells and provided insights into the mechanism of the melittin function for its potential use as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23651618

  18. Influence of Genetic Polymorphisms of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin 10 Genes on the Risk of Liver Cirrhosis in HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Corchado, Sara; Márquez, Mercedes; Montes de Oca, Montserrat; Romero-Cores, Paula; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Clotilde; Girón-González, José-Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Objective Analysis of the contribution of genetic (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at position -238 and -308 of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and -592 of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promotor genes) and of classical factors (age, alcohol, immunodepression, antirretroviral therapy) on the risk of liver cirrhosis in human immunodeficiency (HIV)-hepatitis C (HCV) virus coinfected patients. Patients and Methods Ninety one HIV-HCV coinfected patients (50 of them with chronic hepatitis and 41 with liver cirrhosis) and 55 healthy controls were studied. Demographic, risk factors for the HIV-HCV infection, HIV-related (CD4+ T cell count, antiretroviral therapy, HIV viral load) and HCV-related (serum ALT concentration, HCV viral load, HCV genotype) characteristics and polymorphisms at position -238 and -308 of the tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF- α) and -592 of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promotor genes were studied. Results Evolution time of the infection was 21 years in both patients’ groups (chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis). The group of patients with liver cirrhosis shows a lower CD4+ T cell count at the inclusion in the study (but not at diagnosis of HIV infection), a higher percentage of individuals with previous alcohol abuse, and a higher proportion of patients with the genotype GG at position -238 of the TNF-α promotor gene; polymorphism at -592 of the IL-10 promotor gene approaches to statistical significance. Serum concentrations of profibrogenic transforming growth factor beta1 were significantly higher in healthy controls with genotype GG at -238 TNF-α promotor gene. The linear regression analysis demonstrates that the genotype GG at -238 TNF-α promotor gene was the independent factor associated to liver cirrhosis. Conclusion It is stressed the importance of immunogenetic factors (TNF-α polymorphism at -238 position), above other factors previously accepted (age, gender, alcohol, immunodepression), on the evolution to liver cirrhosis

  19. Correlations between skin lesions induced by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α and selected cytokines in Crohn's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Marcin; Sobolewska, Aleksandra; Wójcik, Bartosz; Loga, Karolina; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between the appearance of skin lesions and concentration of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-23 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients during anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy METHODS: A prospective study included 30 adult patients with CD of Caucasian origin (19 men and 11 women; mean age ± SD 32.0 ± 8.6 years) during biological therapy with anti-TNF-α antibodies from January 2012 to March 2013. Eighteen patients were treated with infliximab, seven with adalimumab and five with certolizumab. Inclusion criteria were exacerbation of the underlying disease, Crohn’s Disease Activity Index over 300 and the ineffectiveness of previously used non-biological therapies. Patients with a history of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other autoimmune skin lesions were excluded from the study. The control group consisted of 12 healthy subjects. A diagnostic survey was carried out, blood tests and careful skin examination were performed, and the serum levels of IL-17, IL-23 and IFN-γ were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays technique. Dermatoses that have developed in the course of biological therapy in patients who had no pre-existing skin lesions of similar character were qualified as skin lesions induced by anti-TNF-α therapy. RESULTS: Skin manifestations occurred in 18 of CD patients during the anti-TNF-α therapy (60%), in the average time of 10.16 ± 3.42 mo following the beginning of the 52-wk treatment cycle. Skin lesions observed in CD patients during biological therapy included psoriasiform lesions (44.4%), and eczema forms lesions (22.2%). In CD patients with drug induced skin lesions significantly higher levels of hemoglobin (13.3 ± 1.5 g/dL vs 10.8 ± 1.9 g/dL, P = 0.018) and hematocrit (39.9% ± 4.5% vs 34.3% ± 5.4%, P = 0.01), as well as a significantly lower level of platelets (268 ± 62 × 103/μL vs 408 ± 239 × 103/μL, P = 0.046) was observed compared with CD patients

  20. Successful plasma exchange combined with rituximab therapy in aggressive APS-related cutaneous necrosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rubens; Fazal, Salman; Kaplan, Robert B; Spero, Joel; Costa, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by venous and/or arterial thrombosis or recurrent fetal loss associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and/or a lupus anticoagulant. The skin appears to be an important target organ and many cases of APS may present with skin manifestations. These lesions may be manifold and may take the form of livedo reticularis, livedo racemosa, ulcerations, digital gangrene, subungeal splinter hemorrhages, superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenic purpura, pseudovasculitic manifestations, extensive cutaneous necrosis, or primary anetoderma. We report a case of fulminant APS-related cutaneous necrosis. A 38-year-old Caucasian male with a past history of APS, multiple deep vein thrombi/pulmonary emboli, presented with necrotic lesions on his right upper and right lower extremities. Initially, baseline anticoagulation was increased without improvement. Subsequently, plasma exchange was initiated on a daily schedule. Furthermore, rituximab 1,000 mg IV was administered on days 1 and 15. After six consecutive daily sessions of plasma exchange, there was significant regression of the necrotic lesions. After a 22-day hospital stay, the patient was discharged to home on fondaparinux. The patient presented approximately 2 months later after missing follow-up appointments. At the time, his initial lesions looked remarkably improved.

  1. Systematic assessment of factors influencing preferences of Crohn's disease patients in selecting an anti-tumor necrosis factor agent (CHOOSE TNF TRIAL).

    PubMed

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Bentele, Nicoletta; Scharl, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Zeitz, Jonas; Frei, Pascal; Straumann, Alex; Binek, Janek; Schoepfer, Alain M; Fried, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Infliximab (IFX), adalimumab (ADA), and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have similar efficacy in induction and maintenance of clinical remission in Crohn's disease (CD). Given the comparable nature of these drugs, patient preferences may influence the choice of the product. We aimed to identify factors that may contribute to CD patients' decision in selecting one anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agent over the others. A prospective survey was performed among anti-TNF-naïve CD patients. Prior to completion of a questionnaire, patients were provided with a written description of the three anti-TNF agents, focusing on indications, mode of administration, side effects, and scientific evidence of efficacy and safety for each drug. One hundred patients (47 females, mean age 45 ± 16 years, range 19-81) with an ileal, colonic, or ileocolonic (33%, 40%, and 27%, respectively) disease location completed the questionnaire. Based on the information provided, 36% of patients preferred ADA, 28% CZP, and 25% IFX, whereas 11% were undecided. The patients' decision in selecting a specific anti-TNF drug was influenced by the following factors: ease of use (69%), time required for therapy (34%), time interval between application of the drug (31%), scientific evidence for efficacy (19%), and fear of syringes (10%). The majority of patients preferred anti-TNF medications that were administered by subcutaneous injection rather than by intravenous infusion. Ease of use and time required for therapy were two major factors influencing the patients' selection of a specific anti-TNF drug. Patients' individual preferences should be taken into account when prescribing anti-TNF drugs. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  2. Does the Use of Incisional Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy Prevent Mastectomy Flap Necrosis in Immediate Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Young; Park, Sun-June; Bang, Sa-Ik; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Pyon, Jai-Kyong

    2016-09-01

    Mastectomy flap necrosis is one of the most common and significant complications in immediate expander-based breast reconstruction. Negative-pressure wound therapy is widely used for open wounds but is not commonly used for closed incisional wounds. However, the postoperative use of incisional negative-pressure wound therapy is demonstrated to reduce complication rates. The authors evaluate the incidence of mastectomy flap necrosis in patients with incisional negative-pressure wound therapy after immediate expander-based breast reconstruction compared with the incidence in patients with conventional dressing. A retrospective review was conducted to identify patients who underwent immediate expander-based breast reconstruction between January of 2010 and February of 2015 at a single institution. Patients were divided into a conventional dressing group and an incisional negative-pressure wound therapy group. Patient demographics, intraoperative findings, and complications were compared between the two groups. A total of 228 breasts (206 patients) were included in this study. Of these, the incisional negative-pressure wound therapy group included 45 breasts (44 patients) and the conventional dressing group included 183 breasts (162 patients). The incisional negative-pressure wound therapy group had a lower overall complication rate (11.1 percent versus 27.9 percent; p = 0.019), overall mastectomy flap necrosis rate (8.9 percent versus 23.5 percent; p = 0.030), and major mastectomy flap necrosis rate (2.2 percent versus 13.7 percent; p = 0.031) compared with the conventional dressing group. Incisional negative-pressure wound therapy reduced the incidence of mastectomy flap necrosis. This simple and reliable dressing technique can be effective in preventing mastectomy flap necrosis in immediate expander-based breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  3. Expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha and accumulation of fibronectin in coronary artery restenotic lesions retrieved by atherectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Clausell, N.; de Lima, V. C.; Molossi, S.; Liu, P.; Turley, E.; Gotlieb, A. I.; Adelman, A. G.; Rabinovitch, M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The formation of coronary artery neointima experimentally induced in piglets after cardiac transplantation is related to an immune-inflammatory reaction associated with increased expression of T cells and inflammatory mediators (tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1 beta) and upregulation of fibronectin. In vivo blockade of tumour necrosis factor alpha in rabbits after cardiac transplantation results in reduced neointimal formation. The objective of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that coronary restenosis after atherectomy or percutaneous balloon angioplasty is associated with a similar inflammatory cascade initiated by mechanical injury. METHODS--Specimens taken at coronary atherectomy were analysed from 16 patients. Nine had had the procedure performed twice, firstly, to remove a primary lesion, and secondly, to remove a restenotic lesion. Seven had percutaneous balloon angioplasty after removal of restenotic tissue. Coronary atherectomy specimens were analysed by immunohistochemistry for the presence of T cells, macrophages, major histocompatibility complex II, interleukin 1 beta, tumour necrosis factor alpha, fibronectin, and the receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility. RESULTS--The groups were clinically and angiographically similar with equivalent lumens before and after atherectomy. Restenotic lesions had increased expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha and fibronectin compared with the primary lesions (P < 0.05 for both). There was also a trend towards a greater number of T cells and increased expression of interleukin 1 beta. CONCLUSIONS--Restenosis is associated with increased expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha and fibronectin, suggesting that an immune-inflammatory reaction probably contributes to neointimal formation and may represent a form of wound healing and repair secondary to mechanical injury. Images PMID:7626352

  4. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  5. Historical perspectives on tumor necrosis factor and its superfamily: 25 years later, a golden journey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kim, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    Although activity that induced tumor regression was observed and termed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as early as the 1960s, the true identity of TNF was not clear until 1984, when Aggarwal and coworkers reported, for the first time, the isolation of 2 cytotoxic factors: one, derived from macrophages (molecular mass 17 kDa), was named TNF, and the second, derived from lymphocytes (20 kDa), was named lymphotoxin. Because the 2 cytotoxic factors exhibited 50% amino acid sequence homology and bound to the same receptor, they came to be called TNF-α and TNF-β. Identification of the protein sequences led to cloning of their cDNA. Based on sequence homology to TNF-α, now a total of 19 members of the TNF superfamily have been identified, along with 29 interacting receptors, and several molecules that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of these receptors. The roles of the TNF superfamily in inflammation, apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and morphogenesis have been documented. Their roles in immunologic, cardiovascular, neurologic, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases are becoming apparent. TNF superfamily members are active targets for drug development, as indicated by the recent approval and expanding market of TNF blockers used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease, and osteoporosis, with a total market of more than US $20 billion. As we learn more about this family, more therapeutics will probably emerge. In this review, we summarize the initial discovery of TNF-α, and the insights gained regarding the roles of this molecule and its related family members in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22053109

  6. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  7. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  8. Apolipoprotein A-I Limits the Negative Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor on Lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bisoendial, Radjesh; Tabet, Fatiha; Tak, Paul P; Petrides, Francine; Cuesta Torres, Luisa F; Hou, Liming; Cook, Adam; Barter, Philip J; Weninger, Wolfgang; Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2015-11-01

    Lymphatic endothelial dysfunction underlies the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known for its role in disrupting the function of the lymphatic vasculature. This study investigates the ability of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the principal apolipoprotein of high-density lipoproteins, to preserve the normal function of lymphatic endothelial cells treated with TNF. TNF decreased the ability of lymphatic endothelial cells to form tube-like structures. Preincubation of lymphatic endothelial cells with apoA-I attenuated the TNF-mediated inhibition of tube formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, apoA-I reversed the TNF-mediated suppression of lymphatic endothelial cell migration and lymphatic outgrowth in thoracic duct rings. ApoA-I also abrogated the negative effect of TNF on lymphatic neovascularization in an ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-dependent manner. At the molecular level, this involved downregulation of TNF receptor-1 and the conservation of prospero-related homeobox gene-1 expression, a master regulator of lymphangiogenesis. ApoA-I also re-established the normal phenotype of the lymphatic network in the diaphragms of human TNF transgenic mice. ApoA-I restores the neovascularization capacity of the lymphatic system during TNF-mediated inflammation. This study provides a proof-of-concept that high-density lipoprotein-based therapeutic strategies may attenuate chronic inflammation via its action on lymphatic vasculature. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene regulation by virus and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, A E; Doyle, C; Maniatis, T

    1990-12-01

    We have identified a region of the human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter that is necessary for maximal constitutive, virus-induced, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription. This region contains three sites that match an NF-kappa B binding-site consensus sequence. We show that these three sites specifically bind NF-kappa B in vitro, yet each of these sites can be deleted from the TNF-alpha promoter with little effect on the induction of the gene by virus or LPS. Moreover, when multimers of these three sites are placed upstream from a truncated TNF-alpha promoter, or a heterologous promoter, an increase in the basal level of transcription is observed that is influenced by sequence context and cell type. However, these multimers are not sufficient for virus or LPS induction of either promoter. Thus, unlike other virus- and LPS-inducible promoters that contain NF-kappa B binding sites, these sites from the TNF-alpha promoter are neither required nor sufficient for virus or LPS induction. Comparison of the sequence requirements of virus induction of the human TNF-alpha gene in mouse L929 and P388D1 cells reveals significant differences, indicating that the sequence requirements for virus induction of the gene are cell type-specific. However, the sequences required for virus and LPS induction of the gene in a single cell type, P388D1, overlap.

  10. Downregulation of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 exacerbates tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated cardiac inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Wang, Nadan; Bisetto, Sara; Yi, Bing; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation contributes significantly to cardiac dysfunction. Although the initial phase of inflammation is essential for repair and healing, excessive proinflammatory cytokines are detrimental to the heart. We found that adenine nucleotide translocator isoform-1 (ANT1) protein levels were significantly decreased in the inflamed heart of C57BL/6 mice following cecal ligation and puncture. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we performed small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ANT1 and studied tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced inflammatory responses in myocardium-derived H9c2 cells and cardiomyocytes. ANT1 knockdown significantly increased swollen mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, concomitant with increased TNFα-induced NF-κB reporter gene activity and interleukin-6 and TNFα expression. A mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO attenuated TNFα-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, NF-κB reporter gene activity, and cytokine expression in ANT1 knockdown cells. Interestingly, TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment significantly decreased ANT1 protein levels, suggesting a feed-forward regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression activated by ANT1 downregulation. These data suggest that ANT1 downregulation contributes to cardiac inflammation post-cecal ligation and puncture. Preventing ANT1 downregulation could provide a novel molecular target to temper cardiac inflammation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Downregulation of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 exacerbates tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated cardiac inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shi; Wang, Nadan; Bisetto, Sara; Yi, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation contributes significantly to cardiac dysfunction. Although the initial phase of inflammation is essential for repair and healing, excessive proinflammatory cytokines are detrimental to the heart. We found that adenine nucleotide translocator isoform-1 (ANT1) protein levels were significantly decreased in the inflamed heart of C57BL/6 mice following cecal ligation and puncture. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we performed small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ANT1 and studied tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced inflammatory responses in myocardium-derived H9c2 cells and cardiomyocytes. ANT1 knockdown significantly increased swollen mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, concomitant with increased TNFα-induced NF-κB reporter gene activity and interleukin-6 and TNFα expression. A mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO attenuated TNFα-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, NF-κB reporter gene activity, and cytokine expression in ANT1 knockdown cells. Interestingly, TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment significantly decreased ANT1 protein levels, suggesting a feed-forward regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression activated by ANT1 downregulation. These data suggest that ANT1 downregulation contributes to cardiac inflammation post-cecal ligation and puncture. Preventing ANT1 downregulation could provide a novel molecular target to temper cardiac inflammation. PMID:25380814

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α gene polymorphisms in FMF and their association with amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Bonyadi, Mortaza; Bahrami, Salahadin; Jahanafrooz, Zohreh; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2012-11-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by periodic provocative attacks of fever with peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or eriseplemya. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in the regulation of the immune response as a part of the cytokine network, including activation of macrophages and apoptosis. We investigated the possible association of TNF-α promoter -1031T/C and -308G/A polymorphisms in 86 FMF patients carrying M694 V homozygous mutation and 100 matched healthy controls both from Iranian Azeri Turks. Our data showed that patients with TNF-α -308 GG are more susceptible to the development of amyloidosis and arthritis (P value <.05). These data also showed that the frequency of TNF-α -308 A allele is considerably low among patients with amyloidosis, and it may have protective role among them (odds ratio [OR] = 0.083, χ(2) = 5.46, P value = .003). Further evaluation of this polymorphism may be important and need further studies.

  13. Processing of newly synthesized cachectin/tumor necrosis factor in endotoxin-stimulate macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jue, Dae-Myung; Sherry, B.; Luedke, C.; Manogue, K.R.; Cerami, A. )

    1990-09-11

    The biosynthesis and processing of cachetin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were examined in the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7. Lipipolysaccharide-stimulated cells secreted both glycosylated and nonglycosylated 17-kilodalton (kDa) mature cachectin/TNF into the culture medium. Secreted cachectin/TNF was derived from membrane-associated precursors that were precipitated by polyclonal antisera raised against either the mature protein or synthetic peptide fragments of the 79 amino acid cachectin/TNF prohormone sequence. About half of the precursors were N-glycosylated, apparently cotranslationally. The cachectin/TNF precursors were then proteolytically cleaved to release soluble mature cytokine into the medium, while the membrane-bound 14-kDa prosequence remained cell associated. During the period of LPS stimulation, the amount of macrophage cell surface cachectin/TNF remained at a low level, suggesting that both nonglycosylated and glycosylated precursors of cachectin/TNF are efficiently cleaved by these cells. These findings suggest the presence of a unique mechanism for the secretion of cachectin/TNF.

  14. Imbalance of tumor necrosis factor receptors during progression in bovine leukemia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Konnai, Satoru . E-mail: konnai@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ikeda, Manabu; Kohara, Junko; Hirata, Toh-ichi; Okada, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-09-01

    Previously, we found an up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-{alpha} and an imbalance of TNF receptors in sheep experimentally infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). In order to investigate the different TNF-{alpha}-induced responses, in this study we examined the TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferative response and the expression levels of two distinct TNF receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from BLV-uninfected cattle and BLV-infected cattle that were aleukemic (AL) or had persistent lymphocytosis (PL). The proliferative response of PBMC isolated from those cattle with PL in the presence of recombinant bovine TNF-{alpha} (rTNF-{alpha}) was significantly higher than those from AL cattle and uninfected cattle and the cells from PL cattle expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of TNF receptor type II (TNF-RII) than those from AL and BLV-uninfected cattle. No difference was found in TNF-RI mRNA levels. Most cells expressing TNF-RII in PL cattle were CD5{sup +} or sIgM{sup +} cells and these cells showed resistance to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between the changes in provirus load and TNF-RII mRNA levels, and TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferation and TNF-RII mRNA levels. These data suggest that imbalance in the expression of TNF receptors could at least in part contribute to the progression of lymphocytosis in BLV infection.

  15. CrmE, a Novel Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Encoded by Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Cytokines and chemokines play a critical role in both the innate and acquired immune responses and constitute prime targets for pathogen sabotage. Molecular mimicry of cytokines and cytokine receptors is a mechanism encoded by large DNA viruses to modulate the host immune response. Three tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFRs) have been identified in the poxvirus cowpox virus. Here we report the identification and characterization of a fourth distinct soluble TNFR, named cytokine response modifier E (CrmE), encoded by cowpox virus. The crmE gene has been sequenced in strains of the orthopoxviruses cowpox virus, ectromelia virus, and camelpox virus, and was found to be active in cowpox virus. crmE is expressed as a secreted 18-kDa protein with TNF binding activity. CrmE was produced in the baculovirus and vaccinia virus expression systems and was shown to bind human, mouse, and rat TNF, but not human lymphotoxin α, conjugates of lymphotoxins α and β, or seven other ligands of the TNF superfamily. However, CrmE protects cells only from the cytolytic activity of human TNF. CrmE is a new member of the TNFR superfamily which is expressed as a soluble molecule that blocks the binding of TNF to high-affinity TNFRs on the cell surface. The remarkable finding of a fourth poxvirus-encoded TNFR suggests that modulation of TNF activity is complex and represents a novel viral immune evasion mechanism. PMID:11119592

  16. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors on ambulatory 24-h blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Chagai; Bornstein, Gil; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors are increasingly being used in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD). The risk of cardiovascular disease is elevated in patients with IRD and TNF-α inhibitors reduce this risk. We assessed whether the beneficial effect of TNF-α inhibitors on cardiovascular risk is mediated by blood pressure reduction. We measured blood pressure levels with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements device in patients with IRD before and 3 months after treatment with TNF-α inhibitors. The study population consisted of 15 subjects (6 men; mean age 45.9 ± 14.1 years). Most patients had either rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis and adalimumab was the most common TNF-α inhibitor used. Mean 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels remained the same after treatment (121 ± 12/66 ± 7 before and 123 ± 11/67 ± 10 mm Hg after; p = 0.88 and 0.66, respectively). The study demonstrates that TNF-α inhibitors have no effect on blood pressure levels.

  17. Plasma levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors are increased in coal miners with pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Schins, R P; Borm, P J

    1995-10-01

    Among other cytokines, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is considered to play a key role in the development of mineral dust related fibrosis. Previously, we showed that ex-vivo release of TNF by peripheral blood monocytes is a marker for progression of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). Since soluble TNF receptors (sTNF-Rs) are believed to play an important regulatory role in systemic effects of TNF, we measured plasma levels of sTNF-R55 and sTNF-R75 in coal miners with (n = 28) or without (n = 76) CWP and in nonexposed controls (n = 29). sTNF-R75 levels were significantly increased in miners with CWP (2.09 +/- 0.44 ng.mL-1) versus the nonexposed controls (1.86 +/- 0.23 ng.mL-1). Neither sTNF-R55 nor sTNF-R75 were related to exposure, stage of pneumoconiosis, smoking, or (spontaneous or ex-vivo induced) monocyte TNF-release. sTNF-R55 was increased in subjects with medication (especially those using cardiovascular drugs); upon exclusion of these subjects, sTNF-R55 was found also to be significantly increased in CWP. In conclusion, bearing in mind a confounding effect of medication, soluble TNF receptors are elevated in plasma of retired miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis. These observations further support the important role of TNF-mediated pathways in the pathogenesis of mineral dust related fibrosis.

  18. Treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitor oxpentifylline does not improve corticosteroid dependent chronic active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, J; Haemling, J; Ortner, M; Lochs, H; Raedler, A; Schreiber, S

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Crohn's disease, inflammation is presumably sustained by an increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL 1 beta). TNF alpha can induce a host of cellular effector events resulting in perpetuation of the inflammatory process. In vivo studies with anti-TNF alpha antibody treatment have led to impressive clinical results. AIMS: To investigate whether treatment with the TNF alpha inhibitor oxpentifylline results in clinical improvement in corticosteroid dependent chronic active Crohn's disease. METHODS: Sixteen Crohn's disease patients received oxpentifylline 400 mg four times a day in a four week open label study. RESULTS: Blockade of TNF alpha production in 16 patients with corticosteroid dependent Crohn's disease did not improve the clinical disease activity (CDAI mean (SEM) 188.75 (5.65) versus 185.13 (10.87) or the endoscopic degree of inflammation (CDEIS 14.9 (2.87) versus 14.8 (2.27) or laboratory parameters. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, use of the TNF alpha inhibitor oxpentifylline does not improve inflammation in Crohn's disease. This finding suggests that there may be more key mediators than only TNF alpha in the inflammatory process in Crohn's disease. PMID:9176073

  19. Effects of Combined Tristetraprolin/Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Deficiency on the Splenic Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Young, W. Scott; Ward, James M.; Flake, Gordon P.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) acts by binding to AU-rich elements in certain mRNAs, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA, and increasing their decay rates. TTP knockout mice exhibit a profound inflammatory syndrome that is largely due to increased TNF levels. Although TTP's effects on gene expression have been well studied in cultured cells, little is known about its functions in intact tissues. We performed deep RNA sequencing on spleens from TTP knockout mice that were also deficient in both TNF receptors (“triple knockout” mice) to remove the secondary effects of excess TNF activity. To help identify posttranscriptionally regulated transcripts, we also compared changes in mature mRNA levels to levels of transiently expressed pre-mRNA. In the triple knockout spleens, levels of 3,014 transcripts were significantly affected by 1.5-fold or more, but only a small fraction exhibited differential mRNA/pre-mRNA changes suggestive of increased mRNA stability. Transferrin receptor mRNA, which contains two highly conserved potential TTP binding sites, was significantly upregulated relative to its pre-mRNA. This was reflected in increased transferrin receptor expression and increased splenic iron/hemosiderin deposition. Our results suggest that TTP deficiency has profound effects on the splenic transcriptome, even in the absence of secondary increases in TNF activity. PMID:26976640

  20. Capacity of tumor necrosis factor to augment lymphocyte-mediated tumor cell lysis of malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.V.; Manning, L.S.; Davis, M.R.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rHuTNF) was evaluated both for direct anti-tumor action against human malignant mesothelioma and for its capacity to augment the generation and lytic phases of lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against this tumor. rHuTNF was directly toxic by MTT assay to one of two mesothelioma cell lines evaluated, but had no effect on susceptibility to subsequent lymphocyte-mediated lysis of either line. TNF alone was incapable of generating anti-mesothelioma lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) activity. Furthermore, it did not augment the degree or LAK activity produced by submaximal interleukin-2 (IL-2) concentrations nor did it augment lysis of mesothelioma cells by natural killer (NK) or LAK effector cells during the 4-hr 51chromium release cytolytic reaction. The studies also suggest that mesothelioma targets are less responsive to TNF plus submaximal IL-2 concentrations than the standard LAK sensitive target Daudi, raising the possibility that intermediate LAK sensitive tumors such as mesothelioma may require separate and specific evaluation in immunomodulation studies. This in vitro study indicates that use of low-dose rHuTNF and IL-2 is unlikely to be an effective substitute for high-dose IL-2 in generation and maintenance of LAK activity in adoptive immunotherapy for mesothelioma.

  1. [Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in spinal cord injury of rabbits with decompression sickness].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiaohong; Qi, Ruixia; Cao, Yongcheng; Mao, Ruiqi; Bi, Liquan; Geng, Ming

    2015-10-01

    To observe the pathological changes in rabbits with spinal cord injury induced by decompression sickness (DCS), and to investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in spinal cord injury induced by DCS. Rabbits were randomly divided into normal control group, DCS group, and safe decompression group. The rabbit model of DCS was established. Light microscopy, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemical method were used to observe the pathomorphological changes in the thoracolumbar spinal cord and the mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α, respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to observe the apoptosis i