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Sample records for necrotic ringspot virus

  1. Papaya Ringspot Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) was coined by Jensen in 1949, to describe a papaya disease in Hawaii. Later work showed that diseases such as papaya mosaic and watermelon mosaic virus-1 were caused by PRSV. The primary host range of PRSV is papaya and cucurbits, with Chenopium amaranticolor ...

  2. Papaya ringspot virus (Potyviridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya ringspot virus, a member of the family Potyviridae, is single stranded RNA plant virus with a monocistronic genome of about 10,326 nucleotides that is expressed via a large polyprotein subsequently cleaved into functional proteins. It causes severe damage on cucurbit crops such as squash and...

  3. Tobacco ringspot virus in Rubus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) has a broad host range among woody and perennial plants and has been reported from blackberry but not from red or black raspberry. The virus has been detected in blackberry in the southeastern United States with a single report from blackberry in British Columbia, Cana...

  4. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente . E-mail: vpallas@ibmcp.upv.es

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  5. A remarkable synergistic effect at the transcriptomic level in peach fruits doubly infected by prunus necrotic ringspot virus and peach latent mosaic viroid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microarray profiling is a powerful technique to investigate expression changes of large amounts of genes in response to specific environmental conditions. The majority of the studies investigating gene expression changes in virus-infected plants are limited to interactions between a virus and a model host plant, which usually is Arabidopsis thaliana or Nicotiana benthamiana. In the present work, we performed microarray profiling to explore changes in the expression profile of field-grown Prunus persica (peach) originating from Chile upon single and double infection with Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) and Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd), worldwide natural pathogens of peach trees. Results Upon single PLMVd or PNRSV infection, the number of statistically significant gene expression changes was relatively low. By contrast, doubly-infected fruits presented a high number of differentially regulated genes. Among these, down-regulated genes were prevalent. Functional categorization of the gene expression changes upon double PLMVd and PNRSV infection revealed protein modification and degradation as the functional category with the highest percentage of repressed genes whereas induced genes encoded mainly proteins related to phosphate, C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism and also protein modification. Overrepresentation analysis upon double infection with PLMVd and PNRSV revealed specific functional categories over- and underrepresented among the repressed genes indicating active counter-defense mechanisms of the pathogens during infection. Conclusions Our results identify a novel synergistic effect of PLMVd and PNRSV on the transcriptome of peach fruits. We demonstrate that mixed infections, which occur frequently in field conditions, result in a more complex transcriptional response than that observed in single infections. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that the simultaneous infection of a viroid and a plant virus synergistically

  6. Genetic divergence of tomato ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Lucia; Zamorano, Alan; Fiore, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) has been detected in Chile, causing economically important diseases in a wide range of hosts. A ToRSV isolate was obtained from raspberry cv Heritage (Rasp-CL) showing leaf yellowing and stunting. The complete genome of Rasp-CL was sequenced by deep sequencing. The Rasp-CL RNA1 sequence shared 97.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with divergent RNA1 of isolate Rasp1-2014, while Rasp-CL RNA2 showed high divergence from all four isolates available in the database, sharing only 63.9-72.7 % nucleotide sequence identity. This difference was mainly based on the X4 coding region, which has been reported to be a high-variability region. Moreover, based on differences in the X4 region, three Rasp-CL RNA2 variants of different length were identified in the same host. One putative recombination event was identified between the Rasp-CL and GYV-2014 X4 genes. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that ToRSV isolates with currently available sequences form three distinct groups. Our results suggest that, for an accurate phylogenetic classification of ToRSV, it is necessary to obtain sequences of both RNAs. This is the first report of a complete ToRSV genome sequence from South America.

  7. Diversity of Papaya ringspot virus isolates in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) devastates papaya production worldwide. In Puerto Rico, papaya fields can be completely infected with PRSV within a year of planting. Information about the diversity of the Puerto Rican PRSV population is relevant in order to establish a control strategy in the island. T...

  8. Epitope mapping for monoclonal antibodies recognizing tuber necrotic isolates of Potato virus Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is an important viral pathogen of potato responsible for reducing tuber yield and quality across the globe. The PVYN and PVYNTN strains, the latter of which induces potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease (PTNRD), are regulated for international potato trade, and have been routin...

  9. Serological Strains of Tobacco Ringspot Virus Transmitted by Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Rush, M C

    1970-07-01

    Five serological strains of tobacco ringspot virus isolated from naturally infected tobacco in North Carolina, and a strain isolated from watermelon in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas were transmitted from cucumber to cucumber by mass-screened and handpicked Xiphinerna americanum from North Carolina. The Eucharis mottle strain from Peru was not transmitted, indicating that a specific strain-vector relationship may exist between the geographically isolated strains from North and South America.

  10. 40 CFR 174.515 - Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.515 Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus are...

  11. 40 CFR 174.515 - Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.515 Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus are...

  12. 40 CFR 174.515 - Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.515 Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus are...

  13. 40 CFR 174.515 - Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.515 Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus are...

  14. 40 CFR 174.515 - Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.515 Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Papaya Ringspot Virus are...

  15. Emergence of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus in U.S. vegetable production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host and geographic ranges, genetic diversity and thrips transmission of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus isolates from the U.S. were characterized. This report provides an overview of these viruses for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory...

  16. Expansion of Groundnut ringspot virus host and geographic ranges in solanaceous vegetables in peninsular Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report provides a timely account of Groundnut ringspot virus infection of additional hosts (pepper, tomatillo and eggplant) and in additional locations to growers, Extension personnel, crop consultants, and state and Federal regulatory and research scientists....

  17. Ambient temperature perception in papaya for papaya ringspot virus interaction.

    PubMed

    Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Singh Shakya, Viplendra P; Jain, R K; Praveen, Shelly

    2009-06-01

    Temperature dramatically affects the host-virus interaction. Outbreaks of viral diseases are frequently associated with the ambient temperature required for host development. Using papaya as a host and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) as a pathogen, we studied the effect of temperature on the intensity of disease symptoms and virus accumulation. The phenotypic expression of symptoms and viral accumulation were found to be maximum at ambient temperature (26-31 degrees C) of papaya cultivation. However, there was a drastic difference, 10 degrees C above and below the ambient temperature. The underlying mechanism of these well-known observations are not yet understood completely; however, these observations might help find answers in RNA silencing mechanism of plants. Since viral-derived silencing suppressor proteins play a significant role in RNA silencing mechanism, here we show that PRSV-derived Helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) protein has an affinity for small RNAs in a temperature-dependent manner. This suggested the probable role of HC-Pro in the temperature-regulated host-virus relationship.

  18. Detection and survey of coffee ringspot virus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, T O; Figueira, A R; Wang, R; Jones, O; Harris, L E; Goodin, M M

    2016-02-01

    Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV) a member of the proposed genus "Dichorhavirus", was surveyed on commercial and research farms spanning an area responsible for the majority of Coffea arabica production in Brazil. Virus-infected plants were found at one hundred percent of locations (n = 45) sampled. All cultivars, regardless of cherry color, were found to serve as hosts, suggesting that there is limited resistance in commercially employed germplasm. Reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed that the virus is contained within symptomatic lesions, with little systemic spread throughout leaves. Phylogenetic analysis based on the ORF1 (nucleocapsid) gene identified a strong geo-spatial relationship among isolates, which clustered into three clades. Despite low genetic diversity among isolates, variation in symptom expression was observed in the experimental host Chenopodium quinoa. Our analyses support the hypothesis that the spread of CoRSV is constrained by the clonal expansion of thelytokous populations of Brevipalpus phoenicis. The widespread occurrence of this virus suggests that it is much more prevalent than previously thought. PMID:26553342

  19. Gene Technology for Papaya Ringspot Virus Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research. PMID:24757435

  20. Gene technology for papaya ringspot virus disease management.

    PubMed

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Amin, Latifah; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research.

  1. Managing papaya ringspot virus: Impact of grass barriers on alate aphid immigration into papaya orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya ringspot virus, transmitted by alate aphids, is the most limiting factor of papaya production in the Caribbean region. Although there are transgenic papaya varieties that provide protection from this virus, these varieties are effective only in certain regions against certain strains of the v...

  2. Detection of Papaya ringspot virus type W infecting the cucurbit weed Cucumis melo var. dudaim in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of Papaya ringspot virus type W infecting Cucumis melo var. dudaim, a cucurbit weed, in Florida. It provides an overview of this virus reservoir for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  3. Engineered Antibody Fragments for Immunodiagnosis of Papaya ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Yogita; Verma, H N; Jain, R K; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to clone and express the genes encoding antibody to the recombinant coat protein (rCP) of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and to assess the engineered antibody for the detection of PRSV. A 33-kDa rCP of PRSV, which was produced in Escherichia coli, generated PRSV specific antibody in immunized mouse. The heavy and light chain variable domain genes (VH and VL) of 351 and 360 nucleotides, respectively, were cloned from the mRNA isolated from the spleen of the immunized mouse with rCP of PRSV. The VH and VL belong to the family IgG1 and kappa chain, respectively, and contained the framework regions and complementarity determining regions. The VH and VL genes were individually used to develop the expression constructs in pET28a (+) vector and 14-kDa proteins were obtained in E. coli. The amount of purified VH and VL proteins was 3-4 mg/l of bacterial culture. Both the antibody fragments recognized PRSV in the crude sap; however, the VL antibody fragment showed higher affinity to PRSV. The mixture of VH and VL detected PRSV as effectively as polyclonal antibody. The recombinant antibody fragments mixture detected PRSV in the field samples with 100 % accuracy in dot immunobinding assay (DIBA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivity of the detection of PRSV using antibody fragments was 1.0 and 10.0 ng in DIBA and ELISA, respectively. The results showed successful isolation of functional single-domain antibody encoding genes to PRSV directly from the immunized spleen cells of mouse. This study for the first time demonstrates application of bacterial expressed recombinant antibody fragments in immunodiagnosis of PRSV.

  4. Phylogenetic and serological analysis of turnip ringspot virus and radish mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2012-03-01

    Turnip ringspot virus (TuRSV) has been proposed to be a member of a new species in the genus Comovirus. Its remarkable host-range similarity to radish mosaic virus (RaMV) may have led to its misrecognition in the past. Findings from both sequence analysis and serological tests support the assignment of TuRSV to a new comovirus species. In addition, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the two genome segments of some TuRSV isolates have a heterogeneous origin. PMID:22160585

  5. Epidemiology of Xiphinema americanum and Tomato ringspot virus on Red Raspberry, Rubus idaeus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population dynamics and the ability of Xiphinema americanum to transmit Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) are poorly understood in the raspberry pathosystem. Soil samples were collected monthly from 1999 through 2002 in a ToRSV infected 'Willamette' red raspberry field in Clark County, WA, USA. Pop...

  6. Coffee ringspot virus vectored by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) in coffee.

    PubMed

    Chagas, C M; Kitajima, E W; Rodrigues, J C V

    2003-01-01

    Coffee ringspot is characterized by conspicuous ringspot symptoms on leaves, berries, and less frequently on twigs. It is caused by coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV), a short, bacilliform virus (40 nm x 100-110 nm). The virus is not seed borne and is transmitted by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes). Transovarial transmission within the mite does not occur. CoRSV has been mechanically transmitted to Chenopodium amaranticolor Coste and Reynaud, C. quinoa Wildenow, Beta vulgaris L., and Alternanthera tenella Colla resulting in local lesions. Systemic infection within both C. amaranticolor and C. quinoa occurs. Virions are found in the nucleus or cytoplasm of infected cells, commonly associated with membranes. Occasionally, membrane bounded particles are found within the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum. A characteristic electron lucent, nuclear inclusion is commonly found in many infected cells. These cytopathic effects place CoRSV among the nuclear type of Brevipalpus-borne viruses. The disease has been reported in several Brazilian states (São Paulo, Paraná, Minas Gerais, and Federal District) and recently found in Costa Rica. A similar disease is known in the Philippines, but no information exists about its relationship to CoRSV. Coffee ringspot had no economical significance until recently when a large scale infection was reported in Minas Gerais that resulted in yield loss. PMID:14756417

  7. Reaction of mid-southern U.S. southern cultivars to Bean pod mottle virus and Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) and Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) are two important viral pathogens causing reduction of seed yield and quality in soybean. There are various BPMV and TRSV isolates observed, but no host resistance reported so far. The objective of this study was to screen modern soybean...

  8. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  9. Zucchini shoestring virus: a distinct potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus cluster.

    PubMed

    Ibaba, J D; Laing, M D; Gubba, A

    2016-08-01

    Zucchini shoestring virus (ZSSV) has been proposed to be a putative potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster, based on the sequence similarity of its coat protein to those of related potyviruses. ZSSV has been associated with the outbreak of a damaging disease of baby marrow (Cucurbita pepo L.) that had been observed throughout the province of KwaZulu-Natal, in the Republic of South Africa (RSA). We report the genome sequence of ZSSV, determined by next-generation sequencing of total RNA extracted from an infected baby marrow (Cucurbita pepo L.). The ZSSV genome is 10,295 nucleotides long excluding the poly(A) tail and displays a typical potyvirus organization. Algerian watermelon mosaic virus (AWMV; EU410442.1) was identified as the closest relative of ZSSV, sharing the highest nucleotide sequence identity of 65.68%. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity values for each protein support the differentiation of ZSSV as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. This taxonomic position was also confirmed using the Pairwise Sequence Comparison online tool from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein coding sequence of ZSSV grouped ZSSV together with AWMV and Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus, but in different clusters. ZSSV is the second cucurbit-infecting virus in the PRSV cluster present in RSA. PMID:27216927

  10. Zucchini shoestring virus: a distinct potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus cluster.

    PubMed

    Ibaba, J D; Laing, M D; Gubba, A

    2016-08-01

    Zucchini shoestring virus (ZSSV) has been proposed to be a putative potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster, based on the sequence similarity of its coat protein to those of related potyviruses. ZSSV has been associated with the outbreak of a damaging disease of baby marrow (Cucurbita pepo L.) that had been observed throughout the province of KwaZulu-Natal, in the Republic of South Africa (RSA). We report the genome sequence of ZSSV, determined by next-generation sequencing of total RNA extracted from an infected baby marrow (Cucurbita pepo L.). The ZSSV genome is 10,295 nucleotides long excluding the poly(A) tail and displays a typical potyvirus organization. Algerian watermelon mosaic virus (AWMV; EU410442.1) was identified as the closest relative of ZSSV, sharing the highest nucleotide sequence identity of 65.68%. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity values for each protein support the differentiation of ZSSV as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. This taxonomic position was also confirmed using the Pairwise Sequence Comparison online tool from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein coding sequence of ZSSV grouped ZSSV together with AWMV and Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus, but in different clusters. ZSSV is the second cucurbit-infecting virus in the PRSV cluster present in RSA.

  11. Transmission of Tomato Ringspot Virus by Xiphinema americanum and X. rivesi from New York Apple Orchards.

    PubMed

    Georgi, L L

    1988-04-01

    Populations of Xiphinema americanum and X. rivesi were collected from apple orchards in eastern and western New York and tested in the laboratory for ability to transmit tomato ringspot virus (TmRSV) to cucumber and dandelion. Populations varied in the frequency with which they transmitted TmRSV, but this variation did not correspond to variation in disease prevalence in the orchard. The lower prevalence of TmRSV-incited disease in apple trees in western New York cannot be attributed to inability of the local Xiphinema spp. to transmit TmRSV.

  12. Nucleotide sequence and newly formed phosphodiester bond of spontaneously ligated satellite tobacco ringspot virus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Buzayan, J M; Hampel, A; Bruening, G

    1986-01-01

    The satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus (STobRV RNA) replicates and becomes encapsidated in association with tobacco ringspot virus. Previous results show that the infected tissue produces multimeric STobRV RNAs of both polarities. RNA that is complementary to encapsidated STobRV RNA, designated as having the (-) polarity, cleaves autolytically at a specific ApG bond. Purified autolysis products spontaneously join in a non-enzymic reaction. We report characteristics of this RNA ligation reaction: the terminal groups that react, the type of bond in the newly formed junction and the nucleotide sequence of the joined RNA. The nucleotide sequence of the ligated RNA shows that joining of the reacting RNAs restored an ApG bond. The junction ApG has a 3'-to-5' phosphodiester bond. Thus the net ligation reaction of STobRV (-)RNA is the precise reversal of autolysis. We discuss this new type of RNA ligation reaction and its implications for the formation of multimeric STobRV RNAs during replication. Images PMID:2433680

  13. Resistance to papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W) in the desert watermelon Citrullus colocynthis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bitter desert watermelon (Citrullus colocynthis) is a valuable source for improving disease or pest resistance in watermelon cultivars. The objective of this study was to identify C. colocynthis accessions displaying resistance to the papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W) that could ...

  14. Characterization of the partial RNA1 and RNA2 3' untranslated region of tomato ringspot virus isolates from North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 3' non-translated regions (NTRs) of RNA1 and RNA2 of Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) are long and virtually identical. In this study, sequences containing most of the 3’ NTRs (1168-1265 bp) were determined from 18 ToRSV isolates collected from fruit trees, small fruits, and grapevines in North Am...

  15. Geographical and Genetic Divergence Among Papaya ringspot virus Populations Within Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Jia, Rui Zong; Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Yun Judy; Zeng, Hui-Cai; Kong, Hua; McCafferty, Heather; Guo, An-Ping; Peng, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) severely affects the global papaya industry. Transgenic papaya has been proven to have effective resistance to PRSV isolates from Hawaii, Thailand, Taiwan, and other countries. However, those transgenic cultivars failed to show resistance to Hainan Island isolates. Some 76 PRSV samples, representative of all traditional papaya planting areas across five cities (Wen Chang, n = 13; Cheng Mai, n = 14; Chang Jiang, n = 11; Le Dong, n = 25; and San Ya, n = 13) within Hainan Province, were investigated. Results revealed three genetic diversity groups (Hainan I, II, and III) that correlated with geographical distribution. Frequent mutations among PRSV isolates from Hainan were also observed. The high genetic divergence in PRSV isolates from Hainan is likely to be the cause of the failure of genetically modified papaya that targets sequence-specific virus.

  16. Geographical and Genetic Divergence Among Papaya ringspot virus Populations Within Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Jia, Rui Zong; Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Yun Judy; Zeng, Hui-Cai; Kong, Hua; McCafferty, Heather; Guo, An-Ping; Peng, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) severely affects the global papaya industry. Transgenic papaya has been proven to have effective resistance to PRSV isolates from Hawaii, Thailand, Taiwan, and other countries. However, those transgenic cultivars failed to show resistance to Hainan Island isolates. Some 76 PRSV samples, representative of all traditional papaya planting areas across five cities (Wen Chang, n = 13; Cheng Mai, n = 14; Chang Jiang, n = 11; Le Dong, n = 25; and San Ya, n = 13) within Hainan Province, were investigated. Results revealed three genetic diversity groups (Hainan I, II, and III) that correlated with geographical distribution. Frequent mutations among PRSV isolates from Hainan were also observed. The high genetic divergence in PRSV isolates from Hainan is likely to be the cause of the failure of genetically modified papaya that targets sequence-specific virus. PMID:27070425

  17. Preliminary X-ray data analysis of crystalline hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ao; Speir, Jeffrey A; Yuan, Y Adam; Johnson, John E; Wong, Sek Man

    2009-06-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a positive-sense monopartite single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Carmovirus genus of the Tombusviridae family, which includes carnation mottle virus (CarMV). The HCRSV virion has a 30 nm diameter icosahedral capsid with T = 3 quasi-symmetry containing 180 copies of a 38 kDa coat protein (CP) and encapsidates a full-length 3.9 kb genomic RNA. Authentic virus was harvested from infected host kenaf leaves and was purified by saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and anion-exchange chromatography. Virus crystals were grown in multiple conditions; one of the crystals diffracted to 3.2 A resolution and allowed the collection of a partial data set. The crystal belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 336.4, c = 798.5 A. Packing considerations and rotation-function analysis determined that there were three particles per unit cell, all of which have the same orientation and fixed positions, and resulted in tenfold noncrystallography symmetry for real-space averaging. The crystals used for the structure determination of southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV) have nearly identical characteristics. Together, these findings will greatly aid the high-resolution structure determination of HCRSV.

  18. Preliminary X-ray Data Analysis of Crystalline Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.; Speir, J; Yuan, Y; Johnson, J; Wong, S

    2009-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a positive-sense monopartite single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Carmovirus genus of the Tombusviridae family, which includes carnation mottle virus (CarMV). The HCRSV virion has a 30 nm diameter icosahedral capsid with T = 3 quasi-symmetry containing 180 copies of a 38 kDa coat protein (CP) and encapsidates a full-length 3.9 kb genomic RNA. Authentic virus was harvested from infected host kenaf leaves and was purified by saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation, sucrose density-gradient centrifugation and anion-exchange chromatography. Virus crystals were grown in multiple conditions; one of the crystals diffracted to 3Synchrotron .2 A resolution and allowed the collection of a partial data set. The crystal belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 336.4, c = 798.5 . Packing considerations and rotation-function analysis determined that there were three particles per unit cell, all of which have the same orientation and fixed positions, and resulted in tenfold noncrystallography symmetry for real-space averaging. The crystals used for the structure determination of southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV) have nearly identical characteristics. Together, these findings will greatly aid the high-resolution structure determination of HCRSV.

  19. A novel emaravirus is associated with redbud yellow ringspot disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow ringspot is the only virus-like disease reported in redbud (Cercis spp.) with symptoms including vein clearing, chlorotic ringspots and oak-leaf pattern. A putative new emaravirus was present in 48 of 48l trees displaying typical yellow ringspot symptoms and the name redbud yellow ringspot as...

  20. Allergenicity assessment of the papaya ringspot virus coat protein expressed in transgenic rainbow papaya.

    PubMed

    Fermín, Gustavo; Keith, Ronald C; Suzuki, Jon Y; Ferreira, Stephen A; Gaskill, Douglas A; Pitz, Karen Y; Manshardt, Richard M; Gonsalves, Dennis; Tripathi, Savarni

    2011-09-28

    The virus-resistant, transgenic commercial papaya Rainbow and SunUp (Carica papaya L.) have been consumed locally in Hawaii and elsewhere in the mainland United States and Canada since their release to planters in Hawaii in 1998. These papaya are derived from transgenic papaya line 55-1 and carry the coat protein (CP) gene of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The PRSV CP was evaluated for potential allergenicity, an important component in assessing the safety of food derived from transgenic plants. The transgene PRSV CP sequence of Rainbow papaya did not exhibit greater than 35% amino acid sequence homology to known allergens, nor did it have a stretch of eight amino acids found in known allergens which are known common bioinformatic methods used for assessing similarity to allergen proteins. PRSV CP was also tested for stability in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid and under various heat treatments. The results showed that PRSV CP was degraded under conditions for which allergenic proteins relative to nonallergens are purported to be stable. The potential human intake of transgene-derived PRSV CP was assessed by measuring CP levels in Rainbow and SunUp along with estimating the fruit consumption rates and was compared to potential intake estimates of PRSV CP from naturally infected nontransgenic papaya. Following accepted allergenicity assessment criteria, our results show that the transgene-derived PRSV CP does not pose a risk of food allergy.

  1. Zucchini tigré mosaic virus is a distinct potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus cluster: molecular and biological insights.

    PubMed

    Romay, G; Lecoq, H; Desbiez, C

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, three new potyviruses have been described in the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster. In addition, two types of PRSV are recognized, type W, infecting cucurbit plants, and type P, infecting papaya and also cucurbits. A third type, PRSV-T, was also partially described in Guadeloupe. Complete genome sequencing of four PRSV-T isolates showed that this virus is a related virus that is distinct from PRSV, and the name zucchini tigré mosaic virus (ZTMV) is proposed, in reference to the typical symptoms observed in zucchini squash. Eleven other viral isolates from different geographic origins were confirmed as ZTMV isolates using the complete sequence of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) coding region, whereas pairwise sequence similarities in the coat protein (CP) coding region did not unambiguously distinguish ZTMV isolates from PRSV isolates. The use of the CI coding region for species demarcation appears more suitable than the CP coding region for closely related viruses. Principal coordinates analysis based on the biological behavior of the viral isolates studied clustered PRSV-P, PRSV-W and ZTMV isolates into three different groups. Therefore, ZTMV is different from PRSV in its molecular and biological properties.

  2. Role of genetic recombination in the molecular architecture of Papaya ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Parameswari, B; Jain, R K; Praveen, Shelly

    2008-12-01

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) has a single-stranded RNA genome and causes severe economic losses both in cucurbits and papaya worldwide. The extent to which the genome of PRSV is shaped by recombination provides an understanding of the molecular evolution of PRSV and helps in studying features such as host specificity, geographic distribution, and its emergence as new epidemics. The PRSV-P-Indian isolate was completely sequenced and compared with 14 other isolates reported from the rest of the world for their phylogenetic survey of recombination events. Cistron-by-cistron sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis based on full-genome polyprotein showed two distinct groupings of Asian and American isolates, although PRSV-P and W-India clustered along with the American isolates. Recombination sites were found throughout the genomes, except in the small 6K1 protein gene. A significant proportion of recombination hotspots was found in the P1 gene, followed by P3, cylindrical inclusion (CI), and helper component proteinase (HcPro). Correlations between the presence of recombination sites, geographic distribution, and phylogenetic relationship provide an opportunity to establish the molecular evolution and geographic route of PRSV.

  3. Toxicity assessment of transgenic papaya ringspot virus of 823-2210 line papaya fruits.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Tang; Yen, Gow-Chin; Huang, Ting-Tzu; Chan, Lit-Fu; Cheng, Ying-Huey; Wu, Jhaol-Huei; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2013-02-20

    The transgenic papaya is a valuable strategy for creating plants resistant to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) infection and increasing production. This study was further performed to evaluate the comparative toxicity effects of the newly developed transgenic line of the fruits of two backcross transgenic papaya lines (2210 and 823) and one hybrid line (823-2210) and compare to their parent non-transgenic (TN-2) counterparts. The stability analysis of coat protein (CP) of PRSV was investigated using the digestion stability assays in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), and bile salts to detect the CP fragments. Results revealed that the CP fragments were rapidly hydrolyzed in SGF and were undetectable in organs and gastrointestinal contents in rats. For the genotoxicity, three in vitro assays were conducted and exhibited that non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits were negative. Moreover, a repeated animal feeding study was conducted by feeding 2 g/kg of body weight (bw) of non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits for 28 days in rats. There were no biological or toxicological significances between non-transgenic and backcross transgenic papaya fruits in rats. The results demonstrated that the backcross transgenic papaya fruit can be recognized as an equivalent substitution for traditional papaya in food safety.

  4. Tomato necrotic streak virus, a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel plant virus has been identified infecting fresh market tomato plants in south and southeast Florida. The virus causes necrosis of tomato leaves, petioles and stems, and necrotic rings or spots on tomato fruits. Symptomatic tomato plant tissue was used to mechanically inoculate tomato plant...

  5. Engineering cherry rootstocks with resistance to Prunus necrotic ring spot virus through RNAi-mediated silencing.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-qing; Sink, Kenneth C; Walworth, Aaron E; Cook, Meridith A; Allison, Richard F; Lang, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is a major pollen-disseminated ilarvirus that adversely affects many Prunus species. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi) vector pART27-PNRSV containing an inverted repeat (IR) region of PNRSV was transformed into two hybrid (triploid) cherry rootstocks, 'Gisela 6' (GI 148-1) and 'Gisela 7'(GI 148-8)', which are tolerant and sensitive, respectively, to PNRSV infection. One year after inoculation with PNRSV plus Prune Dwarf Virus, nontransgenic 'Gisela 6' exhibited no symptoms but a significant PNRSV titre, while the transgenic 'Gisela 6' had no symptoms and minimal PNRSV titre. The nontransgenic 'Gisela 7' trees died, while the transgenic 'Gisela 7' trees survived. These results demonstrate the RNAi strategy is useful for developing viral resistance in fruit rootstocks, and such transgenic rootstocks may have potential to enhance production of standard, nongenetically modified fruit varieties while avoiding concerns about transgene flow and exogenous protein production that are inherent for transformed fruiting genotypes. PMID:23521804

  6. Emergence of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus in Vegetables in Florida and the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Webster, Craig G; Frantz, Galen; Reitz, Stuart R; Funderburk, Joseph E; Mellinger, H Charles; McAvoy, Eugene; Turechek, William W; Marshall, Spencer H; Tantiwanich, Yaowapa; McGrath, Margaret T; Daughtrey, Margery L; Adkins, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) are two emerging tospoviruses in Florida. In a survey of the southeastern United States, GRSV and TCSV were frequently detected in solanaceous crops and weeds with tospovirus-like symptoms in south Florida, and occurred sympatrically with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tomato and pepper in south Florida. TSWV was the only tospovirus detected in other survey locations, with the exceptions of GRSV from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in South Carolina and New York, both of which are first reports. Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were the only non-solanaceous GRSV and/or TCSV hosts identified in experimental host range studies. Little genetic diversity was observed in GRSV and TCSV sequences, likely due to the recent introductions of both viruses. All GRSV isolates characterized were reassortants with the TCSV M RNA. In laboratory transmission studies, Frankliniella schultzei was a more efficient vector of GRSV than F. occidentalis. TCSV was acquired more efficiently than GRSV by F. occidentalis but upon acquisition, transmission frequencies were similar. Further spread of GRSV and TCSV in the United States is possible and detection of mixed infections highlights the opportunity for additional reassortment of tospovirus genomic RNAs. PMID:25317844

  7. A single amino acid substitution in the ORF1 of cymbidium ringspot virus determines the accumulation of two satellite RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Luisa; Russo, Marcello

    2012-09-01

    Tombusviruses may support the replication of satellite (sat) RNAs. In particular, two satRNAs, sat L and Cymsat RNAs, are replicated by carnation Italian ringspot (CIRV) and tomato bushy stunt (TBSV) virus, but not by cymbidium ringspot virus (CymRSV) in vitro transcripts unless they contain a poly(A) tail at the 3' end. Conversely, the replication of both satRNAs was supported by virus particles or viral RNA of the original CymRSV inoculum even in the absence of the poly(A) tail. Sequence and mutational analyses revealed that the full-length infectious CymRSV clone contains one relevant sequence variation in the ORF 1-encoded protein (p33) compared with the original inoculum, i.e. a Ser₁₉ TCC codon instead of a Phe₁₉ TTC codon, which inhibited the replication of sat L and Cymsat RNAs. It is suggested that this amino acid is contained in a domain essential for the replication of some subviral RNAs. PMID:22709553

  8. Characterization of Coffee ringspot virus-Lavras: A model for an emerging threat to coffee production and quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, T.O.; Figueira, A.R.; Sotero, A.J.; Wang, R.; Geraldino Duarte, P.S.; Farman, M.; Goodin, M.M.

    2014-09-15

    The emergence of viruses in Coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora), the most widely traded agricultural commodity in the world, is of critical concern. The RNA1 (6552 nt) of Coffee ringspot virus is organized into five open reading frames (ORFs) capable of encoding the viral nucleocapsid (ORF1p), phosphoprotein (ORF2p), putative cell-to-cell movement protein (ORF3p), matrix protein (ORF4p) and glycoprotein (ORF5p). Each ORF is separated by a conserved intergenic junction. RNA2 (5945 nt), which completes the bipartite genome, encodes a single protein (ORF6p) with homology to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Phylogenetic analysis of L protein sequences firmly establishes CoRSV as a member of the recently proposed Dichorhavirus genus. Predictive algorithms, in planta protein expression, and a yeast-based nuclear import assay were used to determine the nucleophillic character of five CoRSV proteins. Finally, the temperature-dependent ability of CoRSV to establish systemic infections in an initially local lesion host was quantified. - Highlights: • We report genome sequence determination for Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV). • CoRSV should be considered a member of the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. • We report temperature-dependent systemic infection of an initially local lesion host. • We report in planta protein and localization data for five CoRSV proteins. • In silico predictions of the CoRSV proteins were validated using in vivo assays.

  9. An update on sequence diversity of Impatiens necrotic spot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV; genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is an economically important viral pathogen for a wide range of plants, including greenhouse ornamental and vegetable crops. In many cases, symptoms induced by INSV are similar, though not identical, to those induced by Toma...

  10. The complete genome sequences of two isolates of potato black ringspot virus and their relationship to other isolates and nepoviruses.

    PubMed

    Richards, R Souza; Adams, I P; Kreuze, J F; De Souza, J; Cuellar, W; Dullemans, A M; Van Der Vlugt, R A A; Glover, R; Hany, U; Dickinson, M; Boonham, N

    2014-04-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of RNA 1 and RNA 2 of the nepovirus potato black ringspot virus (PBRSV) from two different isolates were determined, as well as partial sequences from two additional isolates. RNA1 is 7,579-7,598 nucleotides long and contains one single open reading frame (ORF), which is translated into a large polyprotein with 2,325 amino acids and a molecular weight of 257 kDa. The complete sequence of RNA2 ranges from 3857 to 3918 nt between the different isolates. It encodes a polyprotein of 1079-1082 amino acids with a molecular weight of 120 kDa. Sequence comparison using the Pro-Pol region and CP showed that all four isolates formed two distinct groups, corresponding to potato and arracacha, that were closely related to each other and also to tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV). Comparing our data to those obtained with other nepoviruses, our results confirm that PBRSV belongs to a distinct species and is a member of subgroup A in the genus Nepovirus based on its RNA2 size, genome organization, and nucleotide sequence.

  11. Detection of tobacco rattle virus RNA in processed potato chips displaying symptoms of corky ringspot disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portion of genomic RNA 1 of tobacco rattle tobravirus (TRV) was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction from each of eight processed potato chips from three different bags purchased at three locations. The positive chips all had symptoms typical of corky ringspot disease, cau...

  12. Analysis of the coding-complete genomic sequence of groundnut ringspot virus suggests a common ancestor with tomato chlorotic spot virus.

    PubMed

    de Breuil, Soledad; Cañizares, Joaquín; Blanca, José Miguel; Bejerman, Nicolás; Trucco, Verónica; Giolitti, Fabián; Ziarsolo, Peio; Lenardon, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) share biological and serological properties, so their identification is carried out by molecular methods. Their genomes consist of three segmented RNAs: L, M and S. The finding of a reassortant between these two viruses may complicate correct virus identification and requires the characterization of the complete genome. Therefore, we present for the first time the complete sequences of all the genes encoded by a GRSV isolate. The high level of sequence similarity between GRSV and TCSV (over 90 % identity) observed in the genes and proteins encoded in the M RNA support previous results indicating that these viruses probably have a common ancestor. PMID:27260536

  13. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Nam, Moon; Koh, Serry; Kim, Sung Uk; Domier, Leslie L; Jeon, Jae Heung; Kim, Hong Gi; Lee, Su-Heon; Bent, Andrew F; Moon, Jae Sun

    2011-11-01

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristic of incompatible reactions. Neither viral replication nor the systemic movement of TRSV was restricted in tolerant or sensitive Arabidopsis ecotypes; therefore, the LSN phenotype shown in the sensitive ecotypes might not be due to viral accumulation. In the present study, we identified the Est TTR1 gene (tolerance to Tobacco ringspot virus 1) encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein that controls the ecotype-dependent tolerant/sensitive phenotypes by a map-based cloning method. The tolerant Col-0 ecotype Arabidopsis transformed with the sensitive Est TTR1 allele developed an LSN phenotype upon TRSV infection, suggesting that the Est TTR1 allele is dominant over the tolerant ttr1 allele of Col-0. Multiple sequence alignments of 10 tolerant ecotypes from those of eight sensitive ecotypes showed that 10 LRR amino acid polymorphisms were consistently distributed across the TTR1/ttr1 alleles. Site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acids in the LRR region revealed that two sites, L956S and K1124Q, completely abolished the LSN phenotype. VIGS study revealed that TTR1 is dependent on SGT1, rather than EDS1. The LSN phenotype by TTR1 was shown to be transferred to Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating functional conservation of TTR1 across plant families, which are involved in SGT-dependent defense responses, rather than EDS1-dependent signaling pathways.

  14. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Nam, Moon; Koh, Serry; Kim, Sung Uk; Domier, Leslie L; Jeon, Jae Heung; Kim, Hong Gi; Lee, Su-Heon; Bent, Andrew F; Moon, Jae Sun

    2011-11-01

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristic of incompatible reactions. Neither viral replication nor the systemic movement of TRSV was restricted in tolerant or sensitive Arabidopsis ecotypes; therefore, the LSN phenotype shown in the sensitive ecotypes might not be due to viral accumulation. In the present study, we identified the Est TTR1 gene (tolerance to Tobacco ringspot virus 1) encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein that controls the ecotype-dependent tolerant/sensitive phenotypes by a map-based cloning method. The tolerant Col-0 ecotype Arabidopsis transformed with the sensitive Est TTR1 allele developed an LSN phenotype upon TRSV infection, suggesting that the Est TTR1 allele is dominant over the tolerant ttr1 allele of Col-0. Multiple sequence alignments of 10 tolerant ecotypes from those of eight sensitive ecotypes showed that 10 LRR amino acid polymorphisms were consistently distributed across the TTR1/ttr1 alleles. Site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acids in the LRR region revealed that two sites, L956S and K1124Q, completely abolished the LSN phenotype. VIGS study revealed that TTR1 is dependent on SGT1, rather than EDS1. The LSN phenotype by TTR1 was shown to be transferred to Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating functional conservation of TTR1 across plant families, which are involved in SGT-dependent defense responses, rather than EDS1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:22057987

  15. Arabidopsis TTR1 Causes LRR-Dependent Lethal Systemic Necrosis, rather than Systemic Acquired Resistance, to Tobacco Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Moon; Koh, Serry; Kim, Sung Uk; Domier, Leslie L.; Jeon, Jae Heung; Kim, Hong Gi; Lee, Su-Heon; Bent, Andrew F.; Moon, Jae Sun

    2011-01-01

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristic of incompatible reactions. Neither viral replication nor the systemic movement of TRSV was restricted in tolerant or sensitive Arabidopsis ecotypes; therefore, the LSN phenotype shown in the sensitive ecotypes might not be due to viral accumulation. In the present study, we identified the Est TTR1 gene (tolerance to Tobacco ringspot virus 1) encoding a TIR-NBS-LRR protein that controls the ecotype-dependent tolerant/sensitive phenotypes by a map-based cloning method. The tolerant Col-0 ecotype Arabidopsis transformed with the sensitive Est TTR1 allele developed an LSN phenotype upon TRSV infection, suggesting that the Est TTR1 allele is dominant over the tolerant ttr1 allele of Col-0. Multiple sequence alignments of 10 tolerant ecotypes from those of eight sensitive ecotypes showed that 10 LRR amino acid polymorphisms were consistently distributed across the TTR1/ttr1 alleles. Site-directed mutagenesis of these amino acids in the LRR region revealed that two sites, L956S and K1124Q, completely abolished the LSN phenotype. VIGS study revealed that TTR1 is dependent on SGT1, rather than EDS1. The LSN phenotype by TTR1 was shown to be transferred to Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating functional conservation of TTR1 across plant families, which are involved in SGT-dependent defense responses, rather than EDS1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:22057987

  16. Tomato ringspot virus coat protein binds to ARGONAUTE 1 and suppresses the translation repression of a reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Karran, Rajita A; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2014-09-01

    RNA silencing regulates plant gene expression and antiviral defenses and functions by cleaving target RNAs or repressing translation. As a counter defense, many plant viruses encode suppressor proteins that sequester small RNAs or inactivate Argonaute (AGO) proteins. All known plant virus silencing suppressor activities eventually inhibit the degradation of target mRNAs. Using a transiently expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene, we show that Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) coat protein (CP) is a suppressor of RNA silencing that enhances GFP expression but does not prevent the degradation of the GFP mRNA or the accumulation of GFP small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Coexpression of the CP with GFP resulted in increased association of residual GFP mRNAs with polysome fractions and reduced association of GFP siRNAs with monosome fractions. AGO1 was co-immunoprecipitated with the CP and CP expression destabilized AGO1. A WG motif within the CP was critical for the enhanced GFP expression, AGO1 interaction, and AGO1 destabilization, suggesting that the ToRSV CP acts as an AGO-hook protein and competes for AGO binding with a plant cellular GW/WG protein involved in translation repression.

  17. The genome sequence of lettuce necrotic stunt virus indicates a close relationship to moroccan pepper virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce necrotic stunt virus (LNSV) causes lettuce dieback, a disease resulting in stunting, necrosis, and lack of marketability in lettuce, and likely was present under the name brown blight since the 1920s. In order to clarify the relationship of LNSV to Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), another vi...

  18. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Ringspot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV), which is spread at a rate of about 6 ft a year in the row by dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum) and possibly related species. It is common in red raspberry in the northern Willamette valley in Oregon and in Clark County in southern Washington. Many weeds also are ...

  19. Distribution, cultivar susceptibility, and epidemiology of Apium virus Y on celery in coastal California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apium virus Y (ApVY) is a potyvirus that was recently found to cause crop loss to celery (Apium graveolens) in California. Symptoms on leaves vary greatly and consist of general chlorosis, chlorotic or necrotic line patterns, chlorotic blotches and mottling, necrotic lesions, ringspots, and distorte...

  20. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya.

  1. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya. PMID:26666186

  2. The genome sequence of an isolate of Indian citrus ringspot virus infecting the sweet orange in India.

    PubMed

    K, Prabha; Baranwal, V K

    2012-11-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of an isolate of Mandarivirus infecting the sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L) Blanco] in the western part of India (Pune) was done. The single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) Pune has 7,560 nucleotides (nt), excluding a poly(A) tail, comprised of 27.98% (2,115 nt) A, 32.12% (2,428 nt) C, 19.68% (1,488 nt) G, and 20.22% (1,529 nt) T residues. The genome, organized into six open reading frames (ORFs), shares 97.7% sequence identity with the complete genome of the ICRSV K1 isolate (AF406744.1) infecting the kinnow (Citrus reticulate Blanco, a hybrid between King and Willow mandarins) in north India. The ICRSV Pune genome formed a complex secondary structure with a large number of unpaired cytosine-rich regions, and recombination analysis highlighted potential recombination in the ICRSV genome.

  3. Antagonism or synergism between papaya ringspot virus and papaya mosaic virus in Carica papaya is determined by their order of infection.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Calvillo, Gabriela; Contreras-Paredes, Carlos A; Mora-Macias, Javier; Noa-Carrazana, Juan C; Serrano-Rubio, Angélica A; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Silva-Rosales, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Antagonism between unrelated plant viruses has not been thoroughly described. Our studies show that two unrelated viruses, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce different symptomatic outcomes during mixed infection depending on the inoculation order. Synergism occurs in plants infected first with PRSV or in plants infected simultaneously with PRSV and PapMV, and antagonism occurs in plants infected first with PapMV and later inoculated with PRSV. During antagonism, elevated pathogenesis-related (PR-1) gene expression and increased reactive oxygen species production indicated the establishment of a host defense resulting in the reduction in PRSV titers. Polyribosomal fractioning showed that PRSV affects translation of cellular eEF1α, PR-1, β-tubulin, and PapMV RNAs in planta, suggesting that its infection could be related to an imbalance in the translation machinery. Our data suggest that primary PapMV infection activates a defense response against PRSV and establishes a protective relationship with the papaya host.

  4. Antagonism or synergism between papaya ringspot virus and papaya mosaic virus in Carica papaya is determined by their order of infection.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Calvillo, Gabriela; Contreras-Paredes, Carlos A; Mora-Macias, Javier; Noa-Carrazana, Juan C; Serrano-Rubio, Angélica A; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Silva-Rosales, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Antagonism between unrelated plant viruses has not been thoroughly described. Our studies show that two unrelated viruses, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce different symptomatic outcomes during mixed infection depending on the inoculation order. Synergism occurs in plants infected first with PRSV or in plants infected simultaneously with PRSV and PapMV, and antagonism occurs in plants infected first with PapMV and later inoculated with PRSV. During antagonism, elevated pathogenesis-related (PR-1) gene expression and increased reactive oxygen species production indicated the establishment of a host defense resulting in the reduction in PRSV titers. Polyribosomal fractioning showed that PRSV affects translation of cellular eEF1α, PR-1, β-tubulin, and PapMV RNAs in planta, suggesting that its infection could be related to an imbalance in the translation machinery. Our data suggest that primary PapMV infection activates a defense response against PRSV and establishes a protective relationship with the papaya host. PMID:26765969

  5. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus. PMID:26742733

  6. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus.

  7. Development of tobacco ringspot virus-based vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing in a variety of plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fumei; Lim, Seungmo; Igori, Davaajargal; Yoo, Ran Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-05-01

    We report here the development of tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)-based vectors for the transient expression of foreign genes and for the analysis of endogenous gene function in plants using virus-induced gene silencing. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was inserted between the TRSV movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) regions, resulting in high in-frame expression of the RNA2-encoded viral polyprotein. GFP was released from the polyprotein via an N-terminal homologous MP-CP cleavage site and a C-terminal foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2 A catalytic peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana. The VIGS target gene was introduced in the sense and antisense orientations into a SnaBI site, which was created by mutating the sequence following the CP stop codon. VIGS of phytoene desaturase (PDS) in N. benthamiana, Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0, cucurbits and legumes led to obvious photo-bleaching phenotypes. A significant reduction in PDS mRNA levels in silenced plants was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.

  8. Development of tobacco ringspot virus-based vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing in a variety of plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fumei; Lim, Seungmo; Igori, Davaajargal; Yoo, Ran Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-05-01

    We report here the development of tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)-based vectors for the transient expression of foreign genes and for the analysis of endogenous gene function in plants using virus-induced gene silencing. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was inserted between the TRSV movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) regions, resulting in high in-frame expression of the RNA2-encoded viral polyprotein. GFP was released from the polyprotein via an N-terminal homologous MP-CP cleavage site and a C-terminal foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2 A catalytic peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana. The VIGS target gene was introduced in the sense and antisense orientations into a SnaBI site, which was created by mutating the sequence following the CP stop codon. VIGS of phytoene desaturase (PDS) in N. benthamiana, Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0, cucurbits and legumes led to obvious photo-bleaching phenotypes. A significant reduction in PDS mRNA levels in silenced plants was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. PMID:26950504

  9. Basic Amino Acid Mutations in the Nuclear Localization Signal of Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus p23 Inhibit Virus Long Distance Movement

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruimin; Wong, Sek-Man

    2013-01-01

    The p23 is a unique protein in the Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus which belongs to Family Tombusviridae Genus Carmovirus. Our previous results showed that the p23 is indispensable for host-specific replication and is localized in the nucleus with a novel nuclear localization signal. To investigate additional function(s) of p23, mutations of basic amino acids lysine (K), arginine (R) and histidine (H) that abolish its nuclear localization, were introduced into a biologically active full-length cDNA clone p223 of HCRSV for testing its effects on virus replication and virus movement in vivo. Primer-specific reverse transcription-PCR was conducted to detect gene transcript level of p23 and viral coat protein separately. Virus replication and its coat protein expression were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization and Western blot, respectively. The effect of p23 was further confirmed by using artificial microRNA inoculation-mediated silencing. Results showed that the two mutants were able to replicate in protoplasts but unable to move from inoculated leaves to newly emerged leaves. Both the p23 and the CP genes of HCRSV were detected in the newly emerged leaves of infected plants but CP was not detected by Western blot and no symptom was observed on those leaves at 19 days post inoculation. This study demonstrates that when p23 is prevented from entering the nucleus, it results in restriction of virus long distance movement which in turn abrogates symptom expression in the newly emerged leaves. We conclude that the p23 protein of HCRSV is required for virus long distance movement. PMID:24019944

  10. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3–7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  11. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  12. A novel emaravirus is associated with redbud yellow ringspot disease.

    PubMed

    Di Bello, Patrick L; Laney, Alma G; Druciarek, Tobiasz; Ho, Thien; Gergerich, Rose C; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2016-08-15

    Yellow ringspot is the only virus-like disease reported in redbud (Cercis spp.) with symptoms including vein clearing, chlorotic ringspots and oak-leaf pattern. A putative new emaravirus was present in all trees displaying typical yellow ringspot symptoms and the name redbud yellow ringspot associated virus is proposed. The virus genome is composed of at least five RNA segments. Two coding regions were studied to determine isolate diversity with results pointing to a homogeneous virus population. Host range was evaluated using graft transmission and by testing species found in close proximity to infected trees. Mite transmission with Aculops cercidis, the predominant species found in redbud trees in the epicenter of the disease, was evaluated but was not found to be a vector of the virus. Based on this study and the accumulated knowledge on emaravirus evolution we propose that speciation is allopatric, with vectors being a major component of the process.

  13. Biology and Genetics of Lettuce Dieback Disease and Lettuce Necrotic Stunt Virus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce dieback, a new soil-borne disease of lettuce, emerged in the 1990s to cause severe losses for lettuce production in the western United States. The disease is caused by Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and the recently described tombusvirus, Lettuce necrotic stunt virus (LNSV). The complete ge...

  14. Genetic characterization of Blueberry necrotic ring blotch virus, a novel RNA virus with unique genetic features.

    PubMed

    Quito-Avila, Diego F; Brannen, Philip M; Cline, William O; Harmon, Philip F; Martin, Robert R

    2013-06-01

    A new disorder was observed on southern highbush blueberries in several south-eastern states in the USA. Symptoms included irregularly shaped circular spots or blotches with green centres on the upper and lower surfaces of leaves. Double-stranded RNA was extracted from symptomatic leaves suggesting the presence of virus(es) possibly involved in the disease. Sequencing revealed the presence of a novel RNA virus with a ~14 kb genome divided into four RNA segments. Sequence analyses showed that the virus, for which we propose the name Blueberry necrotic ring blotch virus (BNRBV), possesses protein domains conserved across RNA viruses in the alpha-virus-like supergroup. Phylogenetic inferences using different genes placed BNRBV in a clade that includes the Bromoviridae, the genus Cilevirus (CiLV) and the recently characterized Hibiscus green spot virus (HGSV). Despite the strong genetic relationships found among BNRBV, Cilevirus and HGSV, the genome of BNRBV contains three features that distinguish it significantly from its closest relatives: (i) the presence of two helicase domains with different evolutionary pathways, (ii) the existence of three conserved nucleotide stretches located at the 3' non-coding regions of each RNA segment and (iii) the conservation of terminal nucleotide motifs across each segment. Furthermore, CiLV and HGSV possess poly(A)-tailed bipartite and tripartite genomes, respectively, whereas BNRBV has a quadra-partite genome lacking a poly(A) tail. Based on these genetic features a new genus is proposed for the classification of BNRBV.

  15. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd < 300 nM. It has been shown that doxorubicin (Dox) can be infused into the capsid at a mole ratio of ˜1000:1, Dox-to-virus, and unlike other nanoparticles, there is no detectable leakage. The high loading of Dox is most likely due to intercalation into the genome and significant intercalation or exposure to denaturants was observed to cause loss of capsid stability. To better understand the limitations of cargo loading, Dox and other intercalating molecules (rhodamine 800, ethidium bromide, and propidium iodide) were assayed to determine optimum infusion conditions. Dox was observed to have a propensity to aggregate. In order to manage the Dox aggregation, the infusion buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the

  16. Mutagenesis and self-ligation of the self-cleavage domain of the satellite RNA minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus and its binding to polyamines.

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, A; Komatsu, Y; Koizumi, M; Ohtsuka, E

    1991-01-01

    Several mutants for the minus strands of the self-cleaving domain of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus have been synthesized by joining chemically synthesized oligoribonucleotides with RNA ligase. Kinetic properties of the enzyme strands (50 nucleotides) against substrates (15-mer and 18-mer) were investigated. Structural properties of the unpaired part in the cleavage region were estimated from mutagenesis. The catalytic domain alone was proved to be responsible for the rejoining reaction of cleaved substrates. It was also found that the ribozyme could be divided into two strands without loss of activity. Effects of concentration of magnesium ion and polyamines on the cleavage reaction for the two-stranded ribozyme are also reported. Images PMID:1722305

  17. Resistance of non-transgenic papaya plants to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) mediated by intron-containing hairpin dsRNAs expressed in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Yang, G; Chen, Y; Yan, P; Tuo, D; Li, X; Zhou, P

    2014-01-01

    RNA-mediated virus resistance based on natural antiviral RNA silencing has been exploited as a powerful tool for engineering virus resistance in plants. In this study, a conserved 3'-region (positions 9839-10117, 279 nt) of the capsid protein (CP) gene of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), designated CP279, was used to generate an intron-containing hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct by one-step, zero-background ligation-independent cloning (OZ-LIC). The RNaseIII-deficient Escherichia coli strain M-JM109lacY was identified as the best choice for producing large quantities of specific ihpRNA-CP279. Resistance analyses and ELISA data verified that most papaya plants mechanically co-inoculated with TRIzol-extracted ihpRNA-CP279 and PRSV were resistant to PRSV, and resistance was maintained throughout the test period (>2 months post-inoculation). In contrast, a 1-2 day interval between sequential inoculation of PRSV and ihpRNA-CP279 did not result in complete protection against PRSV infection, but delayed the appearance of viral symptoms by 3 to 4 days. These findings indicate that direct mechanical inoculation of papaya plants with bacterially-expressed ihpRNA-CP279 targeting the PRSV CP gene can interfere with virus infection. This work lays a foundation for developing a non-transgenic approach to control PRSV by directly spraying plants with ihpRNA or crude bacterial extract preparations. PMID:25283861

  18. First report of tomato chlorotic spot virus infecting tomatoes in Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An emerging disease, with virus-like symptoms of deformation, discoloration and necrotic ringspots on green and red fruits of tomato, were observed in a commercial high tunnel in Wayne Co., Ohio, in the summer of 2013. Incidence of affected fruit was estimated to be 15%. Four symptomatic fruits we...

  19. Sugar beet storability and the influence of beet necrotic yellow vein virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania in sugar beets caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious problems in sugar beet production. Storage issues associated with outdoor piles may be exacerbated by disease problems such as rhizomania. To investigate the influence of BNYVV on storability...

  20. Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus Coat Protein Is Essential for Cell-to-Cell and Long-Distance Movement but Not for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M.; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro. PMID:25402344

  1. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro. PMID:25402344

  2. Unusual Necrotizing Encephalitis in Raccoons and Skunks Concurrently Infected With Canine Distemper Virus and Sarcocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Kubiski, S V; Sisó, S; Church, M E; Cartoceti, A N; Barr, B; Pesavento, P A

    2016-05-01

    Canine distemper virus commonly infects free-ranging, terrestrial mesopredators throughout the United States. Due to the immunosuppressive effects of the virus, concurrent opportunistic infections are also common. Among these, secondary systemic protozoal infections have been described in a number of species. We report an unusual presentation of necrotizing encephalitis associated withSarcocystissp in four raccoons and one skunk concurrently infected with canine distemper virus. Lesions were characterized by variably sized necrotizing cavitations composed of abundant mineral admixed with inflammatory cells and protozoa.Sarcocystissp was confirmed via immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody toSarcocystis neurona The pathologic changes are similar to lesions in human AIDS patients infected withToxoplasma gondii.

  3. Unusual Necrotizing Encephalitis in Raccoons and Skunks Concurrently Infected With Canine Distemper Virus and Sarcocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Kubiski, S V; Sisó, S; Church, M E; Cartoceti, A N; Barr, B; Pesavento, P A

    2016-05-01

    Canine distemper virus commonly infects free-ranging, terrestrial mesopredators throughout the United States. Due to the immunosuppressive effects of the virus, concurrent opportunistic infections are also common. Among these, secondary systemic protozoal infections have been described in a number of species. We report an unusual presentation of necrotizing encephalitis associated withSarcocystissp in four raccoons and one skunk concurrently infected with canine distemper virus. Lesions were characterized by variably sized necrotizing cavitations composed of abundant mineral admixed with inflammatory cells and protozoa.Sarcocystissp was confirmed via immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody toSarcocystis neurona The pathologic changes are similar to lesions in human AIDS patients infected withToxoplasma gondii. PMID:26374278

  4. Necrotic streak disease of tomato in Florida caused by a new ilarvirus species related to Tulare apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel ilarvirus for which the name Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is proposed was detected in Florida tomato plants beginning in October 2013. Symptoms including necrosis of leaves, petioles and stems, and necrotic rings or spots on fruits were observed. This report provides an overview o...

  5. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  6. NIa-Pro of Papaya ringspot virus interacts with Carica papaya eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit G (CpeIF3G).

    PubMed

    Gao, Le; Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of papaya eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit G (CpeIF3G) with Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) NIa-Pro was validated using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in papaya protoplasts based on the previous yeast two-hybrid assay results. The C-terminal (residues 133-239) fragment of PRSV NIa-Pro and the central domain (residues 59-167) of CpeIF3G were required for effective interaction between NIa-Pro and CpeIF3G as shown by a Sos recruitment yeast two-hybrid system with several deletion mutants of NIa-Pro and CpeIF3G. The central domain of CpeIF3G, which contains a C2HC-type zinc finger motif, is required to bind to other eIFs of the translational machinery. In addition, quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assay confirmed that PRSV infection leads to a 2- to 4.5-fold up-regulation of CpeIF3G mRNA in papaya. Plant eIF3G is involved in various stress response by enhancing the translation of resistance-related proteins. It is proposed that the NIa-Pro-CpeIF3G interaction may impair translation preinitiation complex assembly of defense proteins and interfere with host defense.

  7. Catalytically active geometry in the reversible circularization of 'mini-monomer' RNAs derived from the complementary strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, P A; Bruening, G

    1993-04-25

    The less abundant polarity of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus, designated sTobRV(-)RNA, contains a ribozyme and its substrate. We demonstrate that the ribozyme can catalyze the ligation of substrate cleavage products and that oligoribonucleotides, termed 'mini-monomers' and containing little more than covalently attached ribozyme and substrate cleavage products, circularized spontaneously, efficiently and reversibly. The kinetics of ligation and cleavage of one such mini-monomer was consistent with a simple unimolecular reaction at some temperatures. Evidence suggests that the circular ligation product includes a 5 bp stem that is connected to a 4 bp stem by a bulge loop. Reduction of the bulge loop to one nt is expected to place the 4 and 5 bp helices in a nearly coaxial, rather than an angled or parallel, orientation. Such molecules did not circularize in a unimolecular reaction but did when incubated with second, trans-acting oligoribonucleotides that had either the original or a substituted 4 bp helix. These results suggest that a bulge loop that is too small prevents formation of geometry essential for unimolecular ligation. We suggest the term 'paperclip' to represent the arrangement of RNA strands in the region of sTobRV(-)RNA that participates in the cleavage and ligation reactions.

  8. Host effect on the genetic diversification of beet necrotic yellow vein virus single-plant populations.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Leal, Rodolfo; Bryan, Becky K; Rush, Charles M

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical models predict that, under restrictive host conditions, virus populations will exhibit greater genetic variability. This virus response has been experimentally demonstrated in a few cases but its relation with a virus's capability to overcome plant resistance is unknown. To explore the genetic host effects on Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) populations that might be related to resistance durability, a wild-type virus isolate was vector inoculated into partially resistant Rz1, Rz2, and susceptible sugar beet cultivars during a serial planting experiment. Cloning and sequencing a region of the viral RNA-3, involving the pathogenic determinant p25, revealed that virus diversity significantly increased in direct proportion to the strength of host resistance. Thus, whereas virus titers were highest, intermediate, and lowest in susceptible, Rz1, and Rz2 plants, respectively; the average number of nucleotide differences among single-plant populations was 0.8 (±0.1) in susceptible, 1.4 (±0.1) in Rz1, and 2.4 (±0.2) in Rz2 genotypes. A similar relationship between host restriction to BNYVV root accumulation and virus genetic variability was detected in fields of sugar beet where these specific Rz1- and Rz2-mediated resistances have been defeated.

  9. Host effect on the genetic diversification of beet necrotic yellow vein virus single-plant populations.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Leal, Rodolfo; Bryan, Becky K; Rush, Charles M

    2010-11-01

    Theoretical models predict that, under restrictive host conditions, virus populations will exhibit greater genetic variability. This virus response has been experimentally demonstrated in a few cases but its relation with a virus's capability to overcome plant resistance is unknown. To explore the genetic host effects on Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) populations that might be related to resistance durability, a wild-type virus isolate was vector inoculated into partially resistant Rz1, Rz2, and susceptible sugar beet cultivars during a serial planting experiment. Cloning and sequencing a region of the viral RNA-3, involving the pathogenic determinant p25, revealed that virus diversity significantly increased in direct proportion to the strength of host resistance. Thus, whereas virus titers were highest, intermediate, and lowest in susceptible, Rz1, and Rz2 plants, respectively; the average number of nucleotide differences among single-plant populations was 0.8 (±0.1) in susceptible, 1.4 (±0.1) in Rz1, and 2.4 (±0.2) in Rz2 genotypes. A similar relationship between host restriction to BNYVV root accumulation and virus genetic variability was detected in fields of sugar beet where these specific Rz1- and Rz2-mediated resistances have been defeated. PMID:20649415

  10. Localization of the Carnation Italian ringspot virus replication protein p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by an internal targeting signal and the TOM complex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeen Ting; McCartney, Andrew W; Gidda, Satinder K; Mullen, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Background Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes massive structural alterations of mitochondria in infected host cells, the most conspicuous being the formation of numerous internal vesicles/spherules that are derived from the mitochondrial outer membrane and serve as the sites for viral RNA replication. While the membrane-bound components of the CIRV replication complex, including a 36-kD RNA-binding protein (p36), are known to be essential for these changes in mitochondrial morphology and are relatively well characterized in terms of their roles in nascent viral RNA synthesis, how these proteins are specifically targeted and inserted into mitochondria is poorly defined. Results Here we report on the molecular signal responsible for sorting p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Using a combination of gain-of-function assays with portions of p36 fused to reporter proteins and domain-swapping assays with p36 and another closely-related viral RNA-binding protein, p33, that sorts specifically to the peroxisomal boundary membrane, we show that the mitochondrial targeting information in p36 resides within its two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and intervening hydrophilic loop sequence. Comprehensive mutational analysis of these regions in p36 revealed that the primary targeting determinants are the moderate hydrophobicity of both TMDs and the positively-charged face of an amphipathic helix within the intervening loop sequence. We show also using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) that p36 interacts with certain components of the translocase complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM), but not with the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). Conclusion Our results provide insight to how viruses, such as CIRV, exploit specific host-cell protein sorting pathways to facilitate their replication. The characterization of the targeting and insertion of p36 into the mitochondrial outer membrane also sheds light on

  11. Complete genome sequence and construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of tobacco ringspot Nepovirus, a viral pathogen causing bud blight in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fumei; Hwang, Un Sun; Lim, Seungmo; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV, genus Nepovirus), causes severe diseases in soybean and tobacco plants. TRSV-induced bud blight disease significantly reduced both the yield and quality of soybeans. The function of the encoded viral gene product involved in TRSV infection was unclear due to the limitation of reverse genetics studies on the viral genome. Here, we represent the successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of TRSV genome (RNA1 and RNA2). The cDNAs of TRSV RNA1 and RNA2 were cloned into the binary vector pPZP211 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and upstream of the nopaline synthase terminator. Seven days after agrobacterium-mediated co-inoculation of these two constructs, Nicotiana benthamiana plants developed a systemic infection with necrotic ringspot symptoms and weak stunting of the leaves, similar to that induced by natural TRSV. The systemic infection was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Western blot analysis. Simultaneously, soybean, tomato, and Arabidopsis ecotype Estland were mechanically inoculated with sap prepared from TRSV-agroinfiltrated N. benthamiana leaves, showing typical symptoms of bud blight, necrotic spots, and lethal systemic necrosis, respectively. The system developed herein will be an appealing way to determine TRSV viral gene functions and study host-TRSV interactions. PMID:26159876

  12. Characterization of Melon necrotic spot virus Occurring on Watermelon in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Cho, Jeom-Deog; Lee, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-sung; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) was recently identified on watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) in Korea, displaying as large necrotic spots and vein necrosis on the leaves and stems. The average occurrence of MNSV on watermelon was found to be 30–65% in Hapcheon and Andong City, respectively. Four isolates of the virus (MNSV-HW, MNSV-AW, MNSV-YW, and MNSV-SW) obtained from watermelon plants in different areas were non-pathogenic on ten general indicator plants, including Chenopodium quinoa, while they infected systemically six varieties of Cucurbitaceae. The virus particles purified by 10–40% sucrose density gradient centrifugation had a typical ultraviolet spectrum, with a minimum at 245 nm and a maximum at 260 nm. The morphology of the virus was spherical with a diameter of 28–30 nm. Virus particles were observed scattered throughout the cytoplasm of watermelon cells, but no crystals were detected. An ELISA was conducted using antiserum against MNSV-HW; the optimum concentrations of IgG and conjugated IgG for the assay were 1 μl/ml and a 1:8,000–1:10,000 dilutions, respectively. Antiserum against MNSV-HW could capture specifically both MNSV-MN from melon and MNSV-HW from watermelon by IC/RT-PCR, and they were effectively detected with the same specific primer to produce product of 1,172 bp. The dsRNA of MNSV-HW had the same profile (4.5, 1.8, and 1.6 kb) as that of MNSV-MN from melon. The nucleotide sequence of the coat protein of MNSV-HW gave a different phylogenetic tree, having 17.2% difference in nucleotide sequence compared with MNSV isolates from melon. PMID:26673673

  13. Characterization of Melon necrotic spot virus Occurring on Watermelon in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Cho, Jeom-Deog; Lee, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Sung; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) was recently identified on watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) in Korea, displaying as large necrotic spots and vein necrosis on the leaves and stems. The average occurrence of MNSV on watermelon was found to be 30-65% in Hapcheon and Andong City, respectively. Four isolates of the virus (MNSV-HW, MNSV-AW, MNSV-YW, and MNSV-SW) obtained from watermelon plants in different areas were non-pathogenic on ten general indicator plants, including Chenopodium quinoa, while they infected systemically six varieties of Cucurbitaceae. The virus particles purified by 10-40% sucrose density gradient centrifugation had a typical ultraviolet spectrum, with a minimum at 245 nm and a maximum at 260 nm. The morphology of the virus was spherical with a diameter of 28-30 nm. Virus particles were observed scattered throughout the cytoplasm of watermelon cells, but no crystals were detected. An ELISA was conducted using antiserum against MNSV-HW; the optimum concentrations of IgG and conjugated IgG for the assay were 1 μl/ml and a 1:8,000-1:10,000 dilutions, respectively. Antiserum against MNSV-HW could capture specifically both MNSV-MN from melon and MNSV-HW from watermelon by IC/RT-PCR, and they were effectively detected with the same specific primer to produce product of 1,172 bp. The dsRNA of MNSV-HW had the same profile (4.5, 1.8, and 1.6 kb) as that of MNSV-MN from melon. The nucleotide sequence of the coat protein of MNSV-HW gave a different phylogenetic tree, having 17.2% difference in nucleotide sequence compared with MNSV isolates from melon. PMID:26673673

  14. Characterization of Melon necrotic spot virus Occurring on Watermelon in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Cho, Jeom-Deog; Lee, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Sung; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) was recently identified on watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) in Korea, displaying as large necrotic spots and vein necrosis on the leaves and stems. The average occurrence of MNSV on watermelon was found to be 30-65% in Hapcheon and Andong City, respectively. Four isolates of the virus (MNSV-HW, MNSV-AW, MNSV-YW, and MNSV-SW) obtained from watermelon plants in different areas were non-pathogenic on ten general indicator plants, including Chenopodium quinoa, while they infected systemically six varieties of Cucurbitaceae. The virus particles purified by 10-40% sucrose density gradient centrifugation had a typical ultraviolet spectrum, with a minimum at 245 nm and a maximum at 260 nm. The morphology of the virus was spherical with a diameter of 28-30 nm. Virus particles were observed scattered throughout the cytoplasm of watermelon cells, but no crystals were detected. An ELISA was conducted using antiserum against MNSV-HW; the optimum concentrations of IgG and conjugated IgG for the assay were 1 μl/ml and a 1:8,000-1:10,000 dilutions, respectively. Antiserum against MNSV-HW could capture specifically both MNSV-MN from melon and MNSV-HW from watermelon by IC/RT-PCR, and they were effectively detected with the same specific primer to produce product of 1,172 bp. The dsRNA of MNSV-HW had the same profile (4.5, 1.8, and 1.6 kb) as that of MNSV-MN from melon. The nucleotide sequence of the coat protein of MNSV-HW gave a different phylogenetic tree, having 17.2% difference in nucleotide sequence compared with MNSV isolates from melon.

  15. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kanda, Ayami; Ohnishi, Jun; Ohki, Takehiro; Tsuda, Shinya

    2009-08-01

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  16. Distribution and pathway for phloem-dependent movement of Melon necrotic spot virus in melon plants.

    PubMed

    Gosalvez-Bernal, Blanca; Genoves, Ainhoa; Navarro, Jose Antonio; Pallas, Vicente; Sanchez-Pina, M Amelia

    2008-07-01

    The translocation of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) within tissues of inoculated and systemically infected Cucumis melo L. 'Galia' was studied by tissue-printing and in situ hybridization techniques. The results were compatible with the phloem vascular components being used to spread MNSV systemically by the same assimilate transport route that runs from source to sink organs. Virus RNAs were shown to move from the inoculated cotyledon toward the hypocotyl and root system via the external phloem, whereas the upward spread through the stem to the young tissues took place via the internal phloem. Virus infection was absent from non-inoculated source tissues as well as from both shoot and root apical meristems, but active sink tissues such as the young leaves and root system were highly infected. Finally, our results suggest that the MNSV invasion of roots is due to virus replication although a destination-selective process is probably necessary to explain the high levels of virus accumulation in roots. This efficient invasion of the root system is discussed in terms of natural transmission of MNSV by the soil-borne fungal vector.

  17. First detection in the United States of Ligustrum necrotic ringspot virus in Mazus reptans with mild mosaic symptoms, in mixed infection with Cucumber mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mazus reptans N.E. Br (creeping mazus) is a perennial flowering groundcover plant in the family Scrophulariaceae. A plant of M. reptans ‘Alba’ with mild mosaic symptoms was obtained from a Maryland nursery in 2010. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of slightly flexuous particles of 595-674...

  18. Diversity and evolutionary history of lettuce necrotic yellows virus in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Colleen M; Chang, Wee-Leong; Khan, Subuhi; Tang, Joe; Elliott, Carol; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is the type member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae, and causes a severe disease of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). This virus has been described as endemic to Australia and New Zealand, with sporadic reports of a similar virus in Europe. Genetic variability studies of plant-infecting rhabdoviruses are scarce. We have extended a previous study on the variability of the LNYV nucleocapsid gene, comparing sequences from isolates sampled from both Australia and New Zealand, as well as analysing symptom expression on Nicotiana glutinosa. Phylogenetic and BEAST analyses confirm separation of LNYV isolates into two subgroups (I and II) and suggest that subgroup I is slightly older than subgroup II. No correlation was observed between isolate subgroup and disease symptoms on N. glutinosa. The origin of LNYV remains unclear; LNYV may have moved between native and weed hosts within Australia or New Zealand before infecting lettuce or may have appeared as a result of at least two incursions, with the first coinciding with the beginning of European agriculture in the region. The apparent extinction of subgroup I in Australia may have been due to less-efficient dispersal than that which has occurred for subgroup II - possibly a consequence of suboptimal interactions with plant and/or insect hosts. Introduction of subgroup II to New Zealand appears to be more recent. More-detailed epidemiological studies using molecular tools are needed to fully understand how LNYV interacts with its hosts and to determine where the virus originated.

  19. Melon necrotic spot virus Replication Occurs in Association with Altered Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aix, Cristina; García-García, María; Aranda, Miguel A; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia

    2015-04-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) (genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that has become an experimental model for the analysis of cell-to-cell virus movement and translation of uncapped viral RNAs, whereas little is known about its replication. Analysis of the cytopathology after MNSV infection showed the specific presence of modified organelles that resemble mitochondria. Immunolocalization of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) P protein in these organelles confirmed their mitochondrial origin. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization experiments showed the specific localization of positive-sense viral RNA, capsid protein (CP), and double-stranded (ds)RNA in these organelles meaning that replication of the virus takes place in association with them. The three-dimensional reconstructions of the altered mitochondria showed the presence of large, interconnected, internal dilations which appeared to be linked to the outside cytoplasmic environment through pores and/or complex structures, and with lipid bodies. Transient expression of MNSV p29 revealed that its specific target is mitochondria. Our data document the extensive reorganization of host mitochondria induced by MNSV, which provides a protected environment to viral replication, and show that the MNSV p29 protein is the primary determinant of this effect in the host.

  20. A variant of blueberry necrotic ring blotch virus associated with red lesions in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Cantu-Iris, M; Harmon, P F; Londoño, A; Polston, J E

    2013-10-01

    The complete genome of a variant of the multi-segmented (+) RNA virus blueberry necrotic ring blotch virus (BNRBV), which has not been assigned to a genus, was obtained from foliar red lesions on southern highbush blueberries grown in Alachua Co., Florida. The genome organization of this variant, BNRBV-RL, is the same as that of BNRBV: four genomic segments and seven ORFs (one ORF on each of RNA 1, RNA 2, and RNA 4 and as many as four ORFs on RNA 3). BLAST analysis revealed nucleic acid sequence identities of 89 %, 90 %, 90 % and 86 % to BNRBV RNA 1, RNA 2, RNA 3 and RNA 4, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence of the putative RdRp domain indicated that BNRBV-RL was closely related to BNRBV and less related to citrus leprosis virus type C and three other mite-transmitted viruses. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence differences between BNRBV-RL and BNRBV combined with differences in symptom expression in blueberry would suggest that BNRBV-RL is a strain of BNRBV.

  1. Diversity and evolutionary history of lettuce necrotic yellows virus in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Colleen M; Chang, Wee-Leong; Khan, Subuhi; Tang, Joe; Elliott, Carol; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is the type member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae, and causes a severe disease of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). This virus has been described as endemic to Australia and New Zealand, with sporadic reports of a similar virus in Europe. Genetic variability studies of plant-infecting rhabdoviruses are scarce. We have extended a previous study on the variability of the LNYV nucleocapsid gene, comparing sequences from isolates sampled from both Australia and New Zealand, as well as analysing symptom expression on Nicotiana glutinosa. Phylogenetic and BEAST analyses confirm separation of LNYV isolates into two subgroups (I and II) and suggest that subgroup I is slightly older than subgroup II. No correlation was observed between isolate subgroup and disease symptoms on N. glutinosa. The origin of LNYV remains unclear; LNYV may have moved between native and weed hosts within Australia or New Zealand before infecting lettuce or may have appeared as a result of at least two incursions, with the first coinciding with the beginning of European agriculture in the region. The apparent extinction of subgroup I in Australia may have been due to less-efficient dispersal than that which has occurred for subgroup II - possibly a consequence of suboptimal interactions with plant and/or insect hosts. Introduction of subgroup II to New Zealand appears to be more recent. More-detailed epidemiological studies using molecular tools are needed to fully understand how LNYV interacts with its hosts and to determine where the virus originated. PMID:26526146

  2. Presence of necrotic strains of Potato virus Y in Mexican potatoes

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Victoriano Roberto; Aviña-Padilla, Katia; Frías-Treviño, Gustavo; Silva-Rosales, Laura; Martínez-Soriano, Juan Pablo

    2009-01-01

    As part of a routine screening for the possible presence of the necrotic strains of potato virus Y affecting potatoes in Mexico, five PVY isolates were submitted to biological and molecular analysis. Considering their serological properties, two belong to the common strain (O) and three to the necrotic strain (N). All the isolates induced vein necrosis in Nicotiana tabacum. To characterize the isolates, 5' NTR and P1 genes were sequenced and compared with sequences from GenBank database. Nucleotide sequence similarity ranged from 47–100% in the 5' NTR and from 63–100% in the P1 coding region. The lowest amino acid similarity between sequences of P1 gene was 55%. In phylogenetic trees of 5'NTR analysis, two PVYO Mexican isolates clustered with other PVYO isolates. In turn, the three PVYN isolates grouped with PVYN-NTN isolates. The phylogenetic analysis of P1 sequences (nucleotide and amino acid) showed two PVYO isolates grouping next to N-NTN cluster. A detailed analysis of the PVYO isolates showed two potential recombination regions in the P1 gene, in contrast to 5'NTR where no recombination was detected. PMID:19419565

  3. Complete genome sequence of an emerging melon necrotic spot virus isolate infecting greenhouse cucumber in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome (4,267 nt) of an Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) isolate (ABCA13-01) infecting greenhouse cucumber in Canada was determined through deep sequencing of small RNAs. Its genome sequence was most closely related to MNSV-N (97%), but lacking a 55-nt insertion at the 3’UTR for resista...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita. This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea. PMID:27492000

  5. Genomic and biological characterization of Tomato necrotic streak virus, a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus infecting tomato in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is a recently described ilarvirus that was detected in tomato in Florida. The full TomNSV genome sequence revealed it to be a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus with little nucleotide identity to other previously reported tomato-infecting ilarviruses. Experimental hos...

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Hwan; Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-04

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

  7. Complete genome sequence and biological characterization of Moroccan pepper virus (MPV) and reclassification of Lettuce necrotic stunt virus as MPV.

    PubMed

    Wintermantel, William M; Hladky, Laura L

    2013-05-01

    Moroccan pepper virus (MPV) and Lettuce necrotic stunt virus (LNSV) have been steadily increasing in prevalence in central Asia and western North America, respectively, over the past decade. Recent sequence analysis of LNSV demonstrated a close relationship between the coat proteins of LNSV and MPV. To determine the full extent of the relationship between LNSV and MPV, the genomes of three MPV isolates were sequenced and compared with that of LNSV. Sequence analysis demonstrated that genomic nucleotide sequences as well as virus-encoded proteins of the three MPV isolates and LNSV shared 97% or greater identity. A full-length clone of a California LNSV isolate was developed and virus derived from infectious transcripts was used to evaluate host plant reactions under controlled conditions. Symptoms of LNSV matched those described previously for MPV on most of a select series of host plants, although some differences were observed. Collectively, these molecular and biological results demonstrate that LNSV should be classified as MPV within the family Tombusviridae, genus Tombusvirus, and confirm the presence of MPV in North America. PMID:23360531

  8. A Unique N-Terminal Sequence in the Carnation Italian ringspot virus p36 Replicase-Associated Protein Interacts with the Host Cell ESCRT-I Component Vps23

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lynn G. L.; Clendening, Eric A.; Sheen, Hyukho; Gidda, Satinder K.; White, K. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Like most positive-strand RNA viruses, infection by plant tombusviruses results in extensive rearrangement of specific host cell organelle membranes that serve as the sites of viral replication. The tombusvirus Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) replicates within spherules derived from the peroxisomal boundary membrane, a process that involves the coordinated action of various viral and cellular factors, including constituents of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). ESCRT is comprised of a series of protein subcomplexes (i.e., ESCRT-0 -I, -II, and -III) that normally participate in late endosome biogenesis and some of which are also hijacked by certain enveloped retroviruses (e.g., HIV) for viral budding from the plasma membrane. Here we show that the replication of Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), a tombusvirus that replicates at mitochondrial membranes also relies on ESCRT. In plant cells, CIRV recruits the ESCRT-I protein, Vps23, to mitochondria through an interaction that involves a unique region in the N terminus of the p36 replicase-associated protein that is not conserved in TBSV or other peroxisome-targeted tombusviruses. The interaction between p36 and Vps23 also involves the Vps23 C-terminal steadiness box domain and not its N-terminal ubiquitin E2 variant domain, which in the case of TBSV (and enveloped retroviruses) mediates the interaction with ESCRT. Overall, these results provide evidence that CIRV uses a unique N-terminal sequence for the recruitment of Vps23 that is distinct from those used by TBSV and certain mammalian viruses for ESCRT recruitment. Characterization of this novel interaction with Vps23 contributes to our understanding of how CIRV may have evolved to exploit key differences in the plant ESCRT machinery. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in association with specific host cell membranes. To accomplish this, cellular components responsible for membrane biogenesis and

  9. Clinical efficacy of oral and topical acyclovir in herpes simplex virus stromal necrotizing keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Surabhi; Acharya, Manisha; Gour, Abha; Sapra, Neelam; Chauhan, Lokesh; Mathur, Umang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of systemic and topical antiviral therapy in the treatment of active herpes simplex virus (HSV) necrotizing stromal keratitis (NSK). Design: Prospective interventional case series. Methodology: Patients with a diagnosis of HSV NSK based on history and clinical findings were enrolled in the study. A standard protocol was used for microbiologic investigations. Ten weeks regime of systemic acyclovir and 2 weeks of topical acyclovir was given. Complete ophthalmic examination was performed at every visit. Outcome measures were a reduction in the area of infiltration and improvement in visual acuity. Results: Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of presentation was 51.53 years. The duration of symptoms at presentation ranged from 2 to 8 weeks. HSV1 DNA polymerase chain reaction was positive in 70% cases of those tested. Area of infiltration at trial entry and at the end of 2 weeks of antiviral treatment reduced significantly (P = 0.007). All patients showed a complete resolution of keratitis at the end of study. Conclusion: Topical and systemic acyclovir for treatment of NSK facilitates healing of ulceration. Topical steroids after initial antiviral therapy are safe and decreases inflammation and improve visual recovery. Early initiation of therapy has better outcomes as compared to late presentations. PMID:27221681

  10. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis and pneumonitis in a simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaque due to Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, S V; Rosen, J; MacKey, J; Romsey, C; Xia, D-L; Visvesvera, G S; Mansfield, K G

    2004-07-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause a fatal disease of the brain in humans called granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. We present a case of meningoencephalitis and pneumonitis in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque caused by Acanthamoeba sp. The animal became ill 176 days after intravenous inoculation with SIVmac251 after a short history of weight loss and a sudden onset of hind limb paresis and abnormal head movements. Histopathologic examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissues revealed multifocal to coalescing necrotizing neutrophilic meningoencephalitis and pneumonitis. Immunofluorescence and polymerase chain reaction were used to identify the genus of amoeba as Acanthamoeba. Immunohistochemistry of immune cell markers was used to characterize the animal's immune response to the opportunistic amoebic infection with features of both innate and adaptive cell-mediated immunity. Although not previously reported, the potential transmission to humans, either through environmental contamination or contact with an infected animal, makes this disease a threat to laboratory animal care staff and pathologists. PMID:15232140

  11. Conjunctival Flap Covering Combined with Antiviral and Steroid Therapy for Severe Herpes Simplex Virus Necrotizing Stromal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanni; Li, Suxia; Wang, Ting; Tan, Yaohong; Shi, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) necrotizing stromal keratitis is a common type of herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK). Antiviral medication alone cannot control the disease, and corticosteroid eye drops may aggravate the ulcer and result in corneal perforation. Amniotic membrane transplantation effectively treats superficial corneal ulcer resulting from necrotizing stromal HSK. However, the efficacy of this approach seems to be limited for more serious cases. This study presented the clinical treatment of severe HSV necrotizing stromal keratitis (ulcer depth greater than half of the corneal stroma) by conjunctival flap covering surgery in 25 patients (25 eyes) combined with antivirus and corticosteroid treatment at Shandong Eye Hospital from January 2007 to December 2013. Clinical results showed that the mean best spectacle-corrected visual acuity improved from preoperative 20/333 to postoperative 20/40 (P < 0.05). All patients recovered ocular surface stabilization. There was recurrence in two eyes, which was cured with antiviral medication. Conjunctival flap covering combined with antivirus and corticosteroid treatment is effective in treating severe HSV necrotizing stromal keratitis. PMID:25785282

  12. Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Genome Organization of Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus, a New Member of the Genus Carmovirus: Evidence for the Presence and Expression of Two Novel Open Reading Frames

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mei; Koh, Dora Chin-Yen; Weng, Li-Juan; Chang, Min-Li; Yap, Yun-Kiam; Zhang, Lee; Wong, Sek-Man

    2000-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) was determined. The genomic RNA (gRNA) is 3,911 nucleotides long and has the potential to encode seven viral proteins in the order of 28 (p28), 23 (p23), 81 (p81), 8 (p8), 9 (p9), 38 (p38), and 25 (p25) kDa. Excluding two unique open reading frames (ORFs) encoding p23 and p25, the ORFs encode proteins with high amino acid similarity to those of carmoviruses. In addition to gRNA, two 3′-coterminated subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) species were identified. Full-length cDNA clones derived from gRNA and sgRNA were constructed under the control of a T7 promoter. Both capped and uncapped transcripts derived from the full-length genomic cDNA clone were infectious. In vitro translation and mutagenesis assays confirmed that all the predicted ORFs except the ORF encoding p8 are translatable, and the two novel ORFs (those encoding p23 and p25) may be functionally indispensable for the viral infection cycle. Based on virion morphology and genome organization, we propose that HCRSV be classified as a new member of the genus Carmovirus in family Tombusviridae. PMID:10708431

  13. First report of Impatiens necrotic spot virus infecting greenhouse-grown potatoes in Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In April and May 2010, potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Atlantic) plants grown from pre-nuclear minitubers in three separate greenhouses located at the USDA-ARS facility in Prosser, WA exhibited necrotic spots on leaves similar to those produced by the early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani (Sor.)...

  14. Changes in the intraisolate genetic structure of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus populations associated with plant resistance breakdown.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Leal, Rodolfo; Fawley, Marvin W; Rush, Charles M

    2008-06-20

    The causal agent of rhizomania disease, Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), typically produces asymptomatic root-limited infections in sugar beets (Beta vulgaris) carrying the Rz1-allele. Unfortunately, this dominant resistance has been recently overcome. Multiple cDNA clones of the viral pathogenic determinant p25, derived from populations infecting susceptible or resistant plants, were sequenced to identify host effects on the viral population structure. Populations isolated from compatible plant-virus interactions (susceptible plant-wild type virus and resistant plant-resistant breaking variants) were large and relatively homogeneous, whereas those from the incompatible interaction (resistant plant-avirulent type virus) were small and highly heterogeneous. All populations from susceptible plants had the same dominant haplotype, whereas those from resistant cultivars had a different haplotype surrounded by a spectrum of mutants. Selection and diversification analyses suggest an evolutionary trajectory of BNYVV with positive selection for changes required to overcome resistance, followed by elimination of hitchhiking mutations through purifying selection.

  15. Development of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of an emerging potyvirus: tomato necrotic stunt virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato necrotic stunt virus (ToNStV) is an emerging potyvirus that causes severe stunting to the infected tomato plants. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for a sensitive detection of ToNStV. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP was comparable to th...

  16. Control of Paratrichodorus allius and Corky Ringspot Disease in Potato with Shank-injected Metam Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, R. E.; Hamm, P. B.; Baune, M.; Merrifield, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    Corky ringspot disease (CRS) of potato produces necrotic areas in tubers that are considered quality defects that can lead to crop rejection. CRS is caused by tobacco rattle virus that is vectored by stubby-root nematodes (Paratrichodorus spp., Trichodorus spp.) at very low population densities, making disease management difficult and expensive. Fumigation with metam sodium (MS) is a common practice to control soil-borne fungi and increase potato yield. MS is generally applied in water via chemigation (water-run, WR) but is ineffective at controlling CRS when WR-applied, even at high rates. Therefore, WR MS is often used in combination with 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), aldicarb or oxamyl to attain adequate CRS control. Between 1996 and 2000, fields with a history of CRS were treated with WR MS, shank-injected MS, and/or 1,3-D, and tubers were evaluated for symptoms of CRS. Shank injection of MS (SH MS) at depths of 41 cm, 15 and 30 cm, or 15, 30 and 45 cm controlled CRS over 3 years of testing. All rates of 280 liters/ha or greater were effective. Shank injection of metam potassium (MP) at rates of 448 liters/ha was also effective. 1,3-D controlled CRS alone or in combination with WR or SH MS. Proper shank application of MS or MP may adequately control CRS without the additional cost of other nematicides at low (<10 P. allius/250 g soil) to moderate (10 to 30 P. allius/250 g soil) populations of the nematode vector. Although SH MS was superior to WR MS, additional research is necessary to determine if this practice would be sufficient at higher CRS disease pressure or if addition of other nematicides would be necessary. PMID:19259496

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Cherneski, C L; Embil, J M

    2001-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a devestating condition which has been recognized for several years. In North America a recent increase of cases has led to much media attention and public fear. Necrotizing fasciitis may occur as a consequence of infection with Streptococcus pyogenes or as a result of a polymicrobial synergistic infection caused by aerobic, anaerobic, gram positive and gram negative organisms, often in postoperative patients. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes is mediated by superantigens. The management of necrotizing fasciitis requires a high index of suspicion for diagnosis followed by antimicrobial therapy and early surgical intervention. In cases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, intravenous immunoglobulin may be of benefit.

  18. Antigenic characterization of an H3N2 swine influenza virus isolated from pigs with proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia in Quebec.

    PubMed Central

    Bikour, M H; Cornaglia, E; Weber, J M; Elazhary, Y

    1994-01-01

    A new strain of swine influenza A virus, designated A/Swine/Saint-Hyacinthe/150/90 has been isolated from pigs with severe proliferative and necrotizing pneumonia in Quebec. The antigenic characterization of the hemagglutinin was performed by hemagglutination inhibition test, immunoblot and indirect immunoprecipitation using polyclonal antisera. Only the last test was able to detect an antigenic relationship between the hemagglutinin of this isolate and an H3 subtype influenza virus. The immunoprecipitation test was a useful alternative for determining the hemagglutinin of influenza A virus subtypes. The neuraminidase inhibition test demonstrated a reactivity between the A/Swine/Saint-Hyacinthe/150/90 and antiserum against a N2 subtype influenza virus. Our results indicate that this new strain isolated for the first time in the porcine population of Canada is related to A/Sw/Hong Kong/76 H3N2 swine influenza virus. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7889461

  19. Necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavron, J P; Ardito, J A; Curtis, A W

    1981-07-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia of salivary gland tissue is a benign, self-limiting disease usually confined to the minor salivary glands. To date only 49 cases have been reported. The clinical and histologic appearance may simulate squamous cell carcinoma, and unnecessary mutilating surgery may be performed if an erroneous diagnosis is made. The otolaryngologist must recognize this disease entity since it heals spontaneously and requires no treatment. Necrotizing sialometaplasia has no known premalignant potential.

  20. Identification of amino acids of the beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein required for induction of the resistance response in leaves of Beta vulgaris plants.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Soutaro; Miyanishi, Masaki; Andika, Ida Bagus; Kondo, Hideki; Tamada, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    The RNA3-encoded p25 protein of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is responsible for the production of rhizomania symptoms of sugar beet roots (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Here, it was found that the presence of the p25 protein is also associated with the resistance response in rub-inoculated leaves of sugar beet and wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima) plants. The resistance phenotype displayed a range of symptoms from no visible lesions to necrotic or greyish lesions at the inoculation site, and only very low levels of virus and viral RNA accumulated. The susceptible phenotype showed large, bright yellow lesions and developed high levels of virus accumulation. In roots after Polymyxa betae vector inoculation, however, no drastic differences in virus and viral RNA accumulation levels were found between plants with susceptible and resistant phenotypes, except at an early stage of infection. There was a genotype-specific interaction between BNYVV strains and two selected wild beet lines (MR1 and MR2) and sugar beet cultivars. Sequence analysis of natural BNYVV isolates and site-directed mutagenesis of the p25 protein revealed that 3 aa residues at positions 68, 70 and 179 are important in determining the resistance phenotype, and that host-genotype specificity is controlled by single amino acid changes at position 68. The mechanism of the occurrence of resistance-breaking BNYVV strains is discussed.

  1. Molecular characterization of a Melon necrotic spot virus strain that overcomes the resistance in melon and nonhost plants.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Juan A; Nieto, Cristina; Moriones, Enrique; Truniger, Verónica; Aranda, Miguel A

    2004-06-01

    Resistance of melon (Cucumis melo L.) to Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) is inherited as a single recessive gene, denoted nsv. No MNSV isolates described to date (e.g., MNSV-Malpha5), except for the MNSV-264 strain described here, are able to overcome the resistance conferred by nsv. Analysis of protoplasts of susceptible (Nsv/-) and resistant (nsv/nsv) melon cultivars inoculated with MNSV-264 or MNSV-Malpha5 indicated that the resistance trait conferred by this gene is expressed at the single-cell level. The nucleotide sequence of the MNSV-264 genome has a high nucleotide identity with the sequences of other MNSV isolates, with the exception of its genomic 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), where less than 50% of the nucleotides are shared between MNSV-264 and the other two MNSV isolates completely sequenced to date. Uncapped RNAs transcribed from a full-length MNSV-264 cDNA clone were infectious and caused symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by the parental viral RNA. This cDNA clone allowed generation of chimeric mutants between MNSV-264 and MNSV-Malpha5 through the exchange of the last 74 nucleotides of their coat protein (CP) open reading frames and the complete 3'-UTRs. Analysis of protoplasts of susceptible and resistant melon cultivars inoculated with chimeric mutants clearly showed that the MNSV avirulence determinant resides in the exchanged region. The carboxy-termini of the CP of both isolates are identical; therefore, the avirulence determinant likely consists of the RNA sequence itself. We also demonstrated that this genomic region contains the determinant for the unique ability of the isolate MNSV-264 to infect noncucurbit hosts (Nicotiana benthamiana and Gomphrena globosa).

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Beta macrocarpa and Identification of Differentially Expressed Transcripts in Response to Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huiyan; Zhang, Yongliang; Sun, Haiwen; Liu, Junying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xianbing; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Han, Chenggui

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhizomania is one of the most devastating diseases of sugar beet. It is caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) transmitted by the obligate root-infecting parasite Polymyxa betae. Beta macrocarpa, a wild beet species widely used as a systemic host in the laboratory, can be rub-inoculated with BNYVV to avoid variation associated with the presence of the vector P. betae. To better understand disease and resistance between beets and BNYVV, we characterized the transcriptome of B. macrocarpa and analyzed global gene expression of B. macrocarpa in response to BNYVV infection using the Illumina sequencing platform. Results The overall de novo assembly of cDNA sequence data generated 75,917 unigenes, with an average length of 1054 bp. Based on a BLASTX search (E-value ≤ 10−5) against the non-redundant (NR, NCBI) protein, Swiss-Prot, the Gene Ontology (GO), Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, there were 39,372 unigenes annotated. In addition, 4,834 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were also predicted, which could serve as a foundation for various applications in beet breeding. Furthermore, comparative analysis of the two transcriptomes revealed that 261 genes were differentially expressed in infected compared to control plants, including 128 up- and 133 down-regulated genes. GO analysis showed that the changes in the differently expressed genes were mainly enrichment in response to biotic stimulus and primary metabolic process. Conclusion Our results not only provide a rich genomic resource for beets, but also benefit research into the molecular mechanisms of beet- BNYV Vinteraction. PMID:26196682

  3. Polypeptide synthesis induced in Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by infection with raspberry ringspot nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Acosta, O; Mayo, M A

    1993-01-01

    Infection of Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by raspberry ringspot nepovirus resulted in the accumulation of about 24 polypeptides that differed in M(r) and pI from polypeptides accumulating in mock-inoculated protoplasts. Similar polypeptides accumulated in protoplasts infected with the S and E strains of RRV but different infection-specific polypeptides were detected in protoplasts infected with tobacco ringspot nepovirus. The M(r) of RRV-specific polypeptides ranged from 210,000 to 18,000 and most are presumed to be derived from others by proteolytic cleavage. No evidence was found for marked changes in polypeptide abundance with time after inoculation or for any virus-specific polypeptide becoming disproportionately abundant in the medium during culture.

  4. Polypeptide synthesis induced in Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by infection with raspberry ringspot nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Acosta, O; Mayo, M A

    1993-01-01

    Infection of Nicotiana clevelandii protoplasts by raspberry ringspot nepovirus resulted in the accumulation of about 24 polypeptides that differed in M(r) and pI from polypeptides accumulating in mock-inoculated protoplasts. Similar polypeptides accumulated in protoplasts infected with the S and E strains of RRV but different infection-specific polypeptides were detected in protoplasts infected with tobacco ringspot nepovirus. The M(r) of RRV-specific polypeptides ranged from 210,000 to 18,000 and most are presumed to be derived from others by proteolytic cleavage. No evidence was found for marked changes in polypeptide abundance with time after inoculation or for any virus-specific polypeptide becoming disproportionately abundant in the medium during culture. PMID:8470949

  5. Necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    PubMed

    Sneige, N; Batsakis, J G

    1992-03-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia of salivary tissues is a vascular-based (lobular infarct), benign, and often self-limited disorder. Preponderantly a lesion of palatal salivary glands, it can involve any salivary gland, and it may be mistaken for carcinoma. Adherence to histopathologic criteria should obviate this mistake.

  6. Necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    PubMed

    Gavron, J P; Shugar, M A; Rice, D A

    1983-02-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign inflammatory disease of salivary gland origin. Because of its clinical and histologic resemblance to squamous cell carcinoma, this disease must be recognized. The cause is unknown, but it may be related to oral trauma, tobacco use or inadequate blood supply. The lesion heals spontaneously, regardless of therapy, in two to eight weeks.

  7. Necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, J; Weinstein, M

    1988-02-01

    A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in a 29-year-old man is reported. Characterized by large, deep, well-demarcated ulcerations on the hard palate and other areas where salivary gland tissue is found, the condition is benign and resolves spontaneously. The cause is believed to be infarctive.

  8. Necrotizing fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, Rukshini; Huey, Jason Chan Meng; Pasupathy, Shanker

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To describe the defining characteristics and treatment of necrotizing fasciitis (NF), emphasizng early diagnostic indications. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched using the terms necrotizing fasciitis and necrotizing soft tissue infections, paired with early diagnosis. Results were limited to human studies in English. Additional articles were obtained from references within articles. Evidence is levels II and III. MAIN MESSAGE Necrotizing fasciitis is classified according to its microbiology (polymicrobial or monomicrobial), anatomy, and depth of infection. Polymicrobial NF mostly occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Monomicrobial NF is less common and affects healthy individuals who often have a history of trauma (usually minor). Patients with NF can present with symptoms of sepsis, systemic toxicity, or evidence of skin inflammation, with pain that is disproportional to the degree of inflammation. However, these are also present in less serious conditions. Hyperacute cases present with sepsis and quickly progress to multiorgan failure, while subacute cases remain indolent, with festering soft-tissue infection. Because the condition is rare with minimal specific signs, it is often misdiagnosed. If NF is suspected, histology of tissue specimens is necessary. Laboratory and radiologic tests can be useful in deciding which patients require surgical consultation. Once NF is diagnosed, next steps include early wound debridement, excision of nonviable tissue, and wide spectrum cover with intravenous antibiotics. CONCLUSION Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon disease that results in gross morbidity and mortality if not treated in its early stages. At onset, however, it is difficult to differentiate from other superficial skin conditions such as cellulitis. Family physicians must have a high level of suspicion and low threshold for surgical referral when confronted with cases of pain, fever, and erythema. PMID:19826154

  9. The Use of Collagenase to Improve the Detection of Plant Viruses in Vector Nematodes by RT/PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV) Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) are transmitted to healthy plants by viruliferous nematodes in the soil. We developed a method for extraction of genomic viral RNA from virus particles carried within nematodes and a sensitive nested RT/PCR ...

  10. Simultaneous detection and identification of four cherry viruses by two step multiplex RT-PCR with an internal control of plant nad5 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Noorani, Md Salik; Awasthi, Prachi; Sharma, Maheshwar Prasad; Ram, Raja; Zaidi, Aijaz Asgar; Hallan, Vipin

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) was developed and standardized for the simultaneous detection of four cherry viruses: Cherry virus A (CVA, Genus; Capillovirus), Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV, unassigned species of the Betaflexiviridae), Little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1, Genus; Closterovirus) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV, Genus; Ilarvirus) with nad5 as plant internal control. A reliable and quick method for total plant RNA extraction from pome and stone fruit trees was also developed. To minimize primer dimer formation, a single antisense primer for CVA and CNRMV was used. A mixture of random hexamer and oligo (dT) primer was used for cDNA synthesis, which was highly suited and economic for multiplexing. All four viruses were detected successfully by mRT-PCR in artificially created viral RNA mixture and field samples of sweet cherry. The identity of the viruses was confirmed by sequencing. The assay could detect above viruses in diluted cDNA (10(-4)) and RNA (10(-3), except PNRSV which was detected only till ten times lesser dilution). The developed mRT-PCR will not only be useful for the detection of viruses from single or multiple infections of sweet cherry plants but also for other stone and pome fruits. The developed method will be therefore quite helpful for virus indexing, plant quarantine and certification programs. This is the first report for the simultaneous detection of four cherry viruses by mRT-PCR.

  11. Necrotizing sialometaplasia.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, R; Bernhoft, C H; Gilhuus-Moe, O

    1978-12-01

    Two cases of necrotizing sialometaplasia are reported together with a review of the literature. This self-limiting benign lesion is easily confused with malignant tumors. The lesions are characterized histologically by an extensive necrosis of the salivary gland tissue together with squamous metaplasia of the ducts. The present report of two females who had intense pain in the initial phase differs from previous reports concerning age and symptoms. The importance of rather extensive biopsy specimens is stressed. Antibiotic treatment appears to be insignificant. A clinical history of allergy and a dominance of eosinophilic granulocytes in the inflammatory exudate in both cases may indicate an allergic etiology.

  12. Occurrence and distribution of ten viruses infecting cucurbit plants in Guilan province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Gholamalizadeh, R; Vahdat, A; Keshavarz, T; Elahinia, A; Bananej, K

    2008-01-01

    During the 2006 and 2007 growing seasons, a systematic survey was conducted in open-field of melon (Cucumis melo L.), cucumber (C. sativus L.), squash (Cucurbita sp.), and watermelon (Citrulus lanatus L.) crops in 16 major cucurbit-growing areas of Guilan province in Iran. Symptomatic leaf samples were collected and screened by double-antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS-ELISA) or RT-PCR to detect Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Squash mosaic virus (SqMV), Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W), Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV), Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), Zucchini yellow fleck virus (ZYFV), and Ourmia melon virus (OuMV). The majority of tested samples (73.7%) were infected by at least one of the viruses considered. OuMV, ZYMV, WMV, and WmCSV were the most prevalent viruses and were detected in tested cucurbit plants. The incidence of multiple infections with 2 or more viruses was also relatively high, 63.3, 48.6, 42.7, and 26.7% of the infected samples of melon, cucumber, squash, and watermelon, respectively. The high incidence of OuMV and WmCSV suggested that these viruses might turn out to be an important threat for the melon and cucumber crops in the province. PMID:18564898

  13. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  14. Large-scale codon de-optimisation of the p29 replicase gene by synonymous substitutions causes a loss of infectivity of melon necrotic spot virus.

    PubMed

    Usami, Atsushi; Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Tsuda, Shinya; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2013-09-01

    The effect of synonymous substitutions in the melon necrotic spot virus p29 replicase gene on viral pathogenicity was investigated. The codons in the p29 gene were replaced by the least frequently used synonymous codons in Arabidopsis thaliana or melons. Mechanical inoculation of melon with p29 variants resulted in a loss of viral infectivity when all, one-half, or one-quarter of the gene was de-optimised. The effect of the de-optimisation in one-sixth of the gene was different depending on the de-optimised region. These results demonstrate that large-scale codon bias de-optimisation without amino acid substitutions of the p29 gene alter viral infectivity.

  15. Genetic and serological characterization of chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus, a member of the genus Tospovirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Ru; Chien, Wan-Chu; Okuda, Mitsuru; Takeshita, Minoru; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Wang, Yun-Chi; Chen, Tsung-Chi

    2015-02-01

    Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV) is a member of a tentative tospovirus species. In this study, the complete genomic sequence of the Japanese CSNV isolate TcCh07A was determined. The L RNA is 8960 nt long and encodes the 331.0-kDa RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The M RNA is 4828 nt long and encodes the 34.1-kDa movement protein (NSm) and the 127.7-kDa glycoprotein precursor (Gn/Gc). The S RNA is 2949 nt long and encodes the 52.4-kDa silencing suppressor protein (NSs) and the 29.3-kDa nucleocapsid (N) protein. The N protein of CSNV-TcCh07A was purified from virus-infected plant tissues and used for production of a rabbit polyclonal antiserum (RAs) and a monoclonal antibody (MAb). Results of serological tests by indirect ELISA and western blotting using the prepared RAs and MAb and a previously produced RAs against the N protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) indicated that CSNV-TcCh07A, TSWV, tomato chlorotic spot virus, groundnut ringspot virus, alstroemeria necrotic streak virus and impatiens necrotic spot virus are serologically related. PMID:25427981

  16. Deep Sequencing–Based Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Comprehensive Insights into the Responses of Nicotiana benthamiana to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus Infections Containing or Lacking RNA4

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huiyan; Sun, Haiwen; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Xianbing; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Han, Chenggui

    2014-01-01

    Background Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), encodes either four or five plus-sense single stranded RNAs and is the causal agent of sugar beet rhizomania disease, which is widely distributed in most regions of the world. BNYVV can also infect Nicotiana benthamiana systemically, and causes severe curling and stunting symptoms in the presence of RNA4 or mild symptoms in the absence of RNA4. Results Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analyses showed that the RNA4-encoded p31 protein fused to the red fluorescent protein (RFP) accumulated mainly in the nuclei of N. benthamiana epidermal cells. This suggested that severe RNA4-induced symptoms might result from p31-dependent modifications of the transcriptome. Therefore, we used next-generation sequencing technologies to analyze the transcriptome profile of N. benthamiana in response to infection with different isolates of BNYVV. Comparisons of the transcriptomes of mock, BN3 (RNAs 1+2+3), and BN34 (RNAs 1+2+3+4) infected plants identified 3,016 differentially expressed transcripts, which provided a list of candidate genes that potentially are elicited in response to virus infection. Our data indicate that modifications in the expression of genes involved in RNA silencing, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, cellulose synthesis, and metabolism of the plant hormone gibberellin may contribute to the severe symptoms induced by RNA4 from BNYVV. Conclusions These results expand our understanding of the genetic architecture of N. benthamiana as well as provide valuable clues to identify genes potentially involved in resistance to BNYVV infection. Our global survey of gene expression changes in infected plants reveals new insights into the complicated molecular mechanisms underlying symptom development, and aids research into new strategies to protect crops against viruses. PMID:24416380

  17. Expression of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein induces hormonal changes and a root branching phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Claire; Schmidlin, Laure; Klein, Elodie; Taconnat, Ludivine; Prinsen, Els; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heintz, Dimitri; Weyens, Guy; Lefebvre, Marc; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Gilmer, David

    2011-06-01

    The RNA-3-encoded p25 protein was previously characterized as one of the major symptom determinants of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus. Previous analyses reported the influence of the p25 protein in root proliferation phenotype observed in rhizomania disease on infected sugar beets (Beta vulgaris). A transgenic approach was developed, in which the p25 protein was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) ecotype in order to provide new clues as to how the p25 protein might promote alone disease development and symptom expression. Transgenic plants were characterized by Southern blot and independent lines carrying single and multiple copies of the transgene were selected. Mapping of the T-DNA insertion was performed on the monocopy homozygote lines. P25 protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of epidermal and root cells of transgenic plants. Although A. thaliana was not described as a susceptible host for BNYVV infection, abnormal root branching was observed on p25 protein-expressing A. thaliana plants. Moreover, these transgenic plants were more susceptible than wild-type plants to auxin analog treatment (2,4-D) but more resistant to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), abscisic acid (ABA) and to lesser extend to salicylic acid (SA). Hormonal content assays measuring plant levels of auxin (IAA), jasmonate (JA) and ethylene precursor (ACC) revealed major hormonal changes. Global transcript profiling analyses on roots displayed differential gene expressions that could corroborate root branching phenotype and stress signaling modifications.

  18. Breakdown of host resistance by independent evolutionary lineages of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus involves a parallel c/u mutation in its p25 gene.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Leal, Rodolfo; Bryan, Becky K; Smith, Jessica T; Rush, Charles M

    2010-02-01

    ABSTRACT Breakdown of sugar beet Rz1-mediated resistance against Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) infection was previously found, by reverse genetics, to be caused by a single mutation in its p25 gene. The possibility of alternative breaking mutations, however, has not been discarded. To explore the natural diversity of BNYVV in the field and its effects on overcoming Rz1, wild-type (WT) and resistance-breaking (RB) p25 genes from diverse production regions of North America were characterized. The relative titer of WT p25 was inversely correlated with disease expression in Rz1 plants from Minnesota and California. In Minnesota, the predominant WT p25 encoded the A(67)C(68) amino acid signature whereas, in California, it encoded A(67)L(68). In both locations, these WT signatures were associated with asymptomatic BNYVV infections of Rz1 cultivars. Further analyses of symptomatic resistant plants revealed that, in Minnesota, WT A(67)C(68) was replaced by V(67)C(68) whereas, in California, WT A(67)L(68) was replaced by V(67)L(68). Therefore, V(67) was apparently critical in overcoming Rz1 in both pathosystems. The greater genetic distances between isolates from different geographic regions rather than between WT and RB from the same location indicate that the underlying C to U transition originated independently in both BNYVV lineages. PMID:20055646

  19. Expression of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein induces hormonal changes and a root branching phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Claire; Schmidlin, Laure; Klein, Elodie; Taconnat, Ludivine; Prinsen, Els; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heintz, Dimitri; Weyens, Guy; Lefebvre, Marc; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Gilmer, David

    2011-06-01

    The RNA-3-encoded p25 protein was previously characterized as one of the major symptom determinants of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus. Previous analyses reported the influence of the p25 protein in root proliferation phenotype observed in rhizomania disease on infected sugar beets (Beta vulgaris). A transgenic approach was developed, in which the p25 protein was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) ecotype in order to provide new clues as to how the p25 protein might promote alone disease development and symptom expression. Transgenic plants were characterized by Southern blot and independent lines carrying single and multiple copies of the transgene were selected. Mapping of the T-DNA insertion was performed on the monocopy homozygote lines. P25 protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of epidermal and root cells of transgenic plants. Although A. thaliana was not described as a susceptible host for BNYVV infection, abnormal root branching was observed on p25 protein-expressing A. thaliana plants. Moreover, these transgenic plants were more susceptible than wild-type plants to auxin analog treatment (2,4-D) but more resistant to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), abscisic acid (ABA) and to lesser extend to salicylic acid (SA). Hormonal content assays measuring plant levels of auxin (IAA), jasmonate (JA) and ethylene precursor (ACC) revealed major hormonal changes. Global transcript profiling analyses on roots displayed differential gene expressions that could corroborate root branching phenotype and stress signaling modifications. PMID:20602166

  20. High resolution analysis of the readthrough domain of beet necrotic yellow vein virus readthrough protein: a KTER motif is important for efficient transmission of the virus by Polymyxa betae.

    PubMed

    Tamada, T; Schmitt, C; Saito, M; Guilley, H; Richards, K; Jonard, G

    1996-07-01

    The 5'-terminal cistron of beet necrotic yellow vein furovirus RNA 2 encodes the 21 kDa major viral coat protein and terminates with an amber stop codon which can undergo suppression to give rise to a 75 kDa readthrough (RT) protein referred to as P75. P75 is a minor component of virions and the 54 kDa RT domain following the coat protein sequence is important both for virus assembly and transmission by the fungal vector Polymyxa betae. To better define the regions of the RT domain involved in these two steps, RNA 2 transcripts encoding different in-frame RT domain deletion mutants were tested for their ability to form virions when inoculated to plants with the other viral RNAs and to be fungus-transmitted. All deletions in the N-terminal half of the RT domain interfered with virus assembly and partially or completely inhibited fungus transmission. A 4 1 1 nucleotide deletion within the C-terminal half of the RT domain did not inhibit assembly but blocked fungus transmission of the virus. Alanine scanning mutagenesis within the aforesaid 4 1 1 nucleotide subdomain identified a peptide motif (KTER) which is important for the fungus transmission process. PMID:8757975

  1. Immunofluorescent Localization of Tobacco Ringspot Nepovirus in the Vector Nematode Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Gererich, R C

    1998-09-01

    ABSTRACT An indirect immunofluorescent technique was developed to localize tobacco ringspot nepovirus (TRSV) in the vector nematode Xiphinema americanum sensu stricto. A population of this nematode that efficiently transmitted TRSV was given an acquisition access period of 10 days on TRSV-infected cucumber. Treatment of fragments of viruliferous nematodes with a polyclonal antiserum against TRSV followed by fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G resulted in virus-specific bright fluorescence only in the lumen of the stylet extension and esophagus. Virus-specific fluorescent signals were observed in the virus-retention region of 44% of the nematode fragments examined. The percentage of nematodes labeled with virus-specific fluorescence increased as the acquisition access period increased from 0 to 22 days; the increase paralleled the increase in the transmission efficiency of the nematode population. Visualization of the entire virus-retention region of individual nematodes within a population of vector or nonvector nematodes provides a rapid and simple means of monitoring specific attachment of plant viruses.

  2. Emerging tomato viruses in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) causes crop losses worldwide. This tospovirus is well-known for disease epidemics in vegetable, ornamental and peanut crops in the southeastern U.S. Two other tospoviruses have recently emerged in south Florida. Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) was first detected in ...

  3. Silicon delays tobacco Ringspot virus systemic symptoms in Nicotiana tabacum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soluble silicon (Si) provides protection to plants against a variety of abiotic and biotic stress. However, the role of Si in viral infections has been elusive. To investigate the role of Si in viral infections, hydroponic studies were conducted in Nicotiana tabacum with two pathogens: Tobacco rings...

  4. Necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a group of highly lethal infections that typically occur after trauma or surgery. Many individual infectious entities have been described, but they all have similar pathophysiologies, clinical features, and treatment approaches. The essentials of successful treatment include early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics, and supportive intensive treatment unit care. The two commonest pitfalls in management are failure of early diagnosis and inadequate surgical debridement. These life-threatening infections are often mistaken for cellulitis or innocent wound infections, and this is responsible for diagnostic delay. Tissue gas is not a universal finding in necrotizing soft tissue infections. This misconception also contributes to diagnostic errors. Incision and drainage is an inappropriate surgical strategy for necrotizing soft tissue infections; excisional debridement is needed. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be useful, but it is not as important as aggressive surgical therapy. Despite advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive treatment unit medicine, the mortality of necrotizing soft tissue infections is still high. This article emphasizes common treatment principles for all of these infections, and reviews some of the more important individual necrotizing soft tissue infectious entities.


Keywords: fasciitis; gas gangrene; clostridium infections; streptococcal infections; necrosis; debridement; surgical infections; soft tissue infections PMID:10621873

  5. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  6. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of tongue.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Tanu; Varghese, Ipe; Shameena, Pm; Sudha, S; Nair, Resmi G

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia, is a benign inflammatory lesion primarily involving the minor salivary glands of the hard palate. The lesion often presents itself as a deep-seated palatal ulcer with clinical and histological features similar to those of a malignant neoplasm. Here we report a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in a 40-year-old female, present on the lateral border of the tongue, mimicking squamous cell carcinoma, clinically. A correct diagnosis to avoid mutilant surgical treatments is essential, considering that it is a self-limiting disease.

  7. Sodium sulphite inhibition of potato and cherry polyphenolics in nucleic acid extraction for virus detection by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Nie, X; Singh, M; Coffin, R; Duplessis, P

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic compounds from plant tissues inhibit reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Multiple-step protocols using several additives to inhibit polyphenolic compounds during nucleic acid extraction are common, but time consuming and laborious. The current research highlights that the inclusion of 0.65 to 0.70% of sodium sulphite in the extraction buffer minimizes the pigmentation of nucleic acid extracts and improves the RT-PCR detection of Potato virus Y (PVY) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and Prune dwarf virus (PDV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) in leaves and bark in the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) tree. Substituting sodium sulphite in the nucleic acid extraction buffer eliminated the use of proteinase K during extraction. Reagents phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-Tween 20 and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were also no longer required during RT or PCR phase. The resultant nucleic acid extracts were suitable for both duplex and multiplex RT-PCR. This simple and less expensive nucleic acid extraction protocol has proved very effective for potato cv. Russet Norkotah, which contains a high amount of polyphenolics. Comparing commercially available RNA extraction kits (Catrimox and RNeasy), the sodium sulphite based extraction protocol yielded two to three times higher amounts of RNA, while maintaining comparable virus detection by RT-PCR. The sodium sulphite based extraction protocol was equally effective in potato tubers, and in leaves and bark from the cherry tree.

  8. Vegetable viruses emerging in Florida and the Caribbean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and a natural Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) reassortant (LGMTSG) with GRSV S and L RNAs and a TCSV M RNA have recently emerged and joined previously established Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) as economically important vegetable pathogens in south Florida. TCSV...

  9. Further Insights Into The Epidemiology And Monitoring Practices Of Tomato Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are a number of serious virus threats to tomato production in Florida. These include the whitefly-transmitted Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and, more recently, Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) which are both vectored by thrips. GRSV and TCSV are cl...

  10. The P25 pathogenicity factor of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus targets the sugar beet 26S proteasome involved in the induction of a hypersensitive resistance response via interaction with an F-box protein.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Heike; Hleibieh, Kamal; Gilmer, David; Varrelmann, Mark

    2012-08-01

    P25, a Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) pathogenicity factor, interacts with a sugar beet protein with high homology to Arabidopsis thaliana kelch repeat containing F-box family proteins (FBK) of unknown function in yeast. FBK are members of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) complex that mediate protein degradation. Here, we confirm this sugar beet FBK-P25 interaction in vivo and in vitro and provide evidence for in planta interaction and similar subcellular distribution in Nicotiana tabacum leaf cells. P25 even interacts with an FBK from A. thaliana, a BNYVV nonhost. FBK functional classification was possible by demonstrating the interaction with A. thaliana orthologs of Skp1-like (ASK) genes, a member of the SCF E3 ligase. By means of a yeast two-hybrid bridging assay, a direct effect of P25 on SCF-complex formation involving ASK1 protein was demonstrated. FBK transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression in N. benthamiana leaves induced a hypersensitive response. The full-length F-box protein consists of one F-box domain followed by two kelch repeats, which alone were unable to interact with P25 in yeast and did not lead to cell-death induction. The results support the idea that P25 is involved in virus pathogenicity in sugar beet and suggest suppression of resistance response. PMID:22512382

  11. [Necrotizing autoimmune myopathies].

    PubMed

    Petiot, P; Choumert, A; Hamelin, L; Devic, P; Streichenberger, N

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathies are included in the spectrum of inflammatory myopathies, together with polymyosis, dermatopolymyosis and inclusion body myositis, despite the characteristic feature of marked muscular necrosis without inflammatory infiltrates. The clinical presentation is highly variable, often similar to the other inflammatory myopathies. The most common finding is nevertheless the severe form with rhabdomyolysis. The creatine kinase level is elevated (around 10,000IU/l) and electromyography shows myopathic changes with increased spontaneous activities reflecting the importance of the muscular necrosis. Muscle biopsy is required for diagnosis, revealing active necrosis of the muscle fibers without inflammatory invasion by CDA+ or CD8+ T-cells. Deposition of a microvascular membrane attack complex (C5b9) is often noted, whereas the upregulation of MHC class 1 is rarely detected. Signs of endomysial microangiopathy are frequently reported. Necrotizing autoimmune myopathies can be associated with antisignal recognition particle (SRP) antibodies or more rarely with the usual inflammatory myopathy antibodies. Paraneoplasic forms are described but remain exceptional. Lastly, necrotizing autoimmune myopathies, sometimes associated with statin therapy, have been recently described. They are linked with an antibody directed against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A. Treatment is based on corticosteroid therapy, immunosuppressive drugs or intravenous immunoglobulins. Response is variable, depending on the clinical form. PMID:23999024

  12. Pepino mosaic virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase POL Domain Is a Hypersensitive Response-Like Elicitor Shared by Necrotic and Mild Isolates.

    PubMed

    Sempere, Raquel N; Gómez-Aix, Cristina; Ruíz-Ramón, Fabiola; Gómez, Pedro; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging pathogen that represents a serious threat to tomato production worldwide. PepMV-induced diseases manifest with a wide range of symptoms, including systemic necrosis. Our results showed that PepMV accumulation depends on the virus isolate, tomato cultivar, and environmental conditions, and associates with the development of necrosis. Substitution of lysine for glutamic acid at position 67 in the triple gene block 3 (TGB3) protein, previously described as a necrosis determinant, led to increased virus accumulation and was necessary but not sufficient to induce systemic necrosis. Systemic necrosis both in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana shared hypersensitive response (HR) features, allowing the assessment of the role of different genomic regions on necrosis induction. Overexpression of both TGB3 and the polymerase domain (POL) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) resulted in necrosis, although only local expression of POL triggered HR-like symptoms. Our results also indicated that the necrosis-eliciting activity of POL resides in its highly conserved "palm" domain, and that necrosis was jasmonic acid-dependent but not salicylic acid-dependent. Altogether, our data suggest that the RdRp-POL domain plays an important role in PepMV necrosis induction, with necrosis development depending on the virus accumulation level, which can be modulated by the nature of TGB3, host genotype and environmental conditions. PMID:26667188

  13. Pepino mosaic virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase POL Domain Is a Hypersensitive Response-Like Elicitor Shared by Necrotic and Mild Isolates.

    PubMed

    Sempere, Raquel N; Gómez-Aix, Cristina; Ruíz-Ramón, Fabiola; Gómez, Pedro; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging pathogen that represents a serious threat to tomato production worldwide. PepMV-induced diseases manifest with a wide range of symptoms, including systemic necrosis. Our results showed that PepMV accumulation depends on the virus isolate, tomato cultivar, and environmental conditions, and associates with the development of necrosis. Substitution of lysine for glutamic acid at position 67 in the triple gene block 3 (TGB3) protein, previously described as a necrosis determinant, led to increased virus accumulation and was necessary but not sufficient to induce systemic necrosis. Systemic necrosis both in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana shared hypersensitive response (HR) features, allowing the assessment of the role of different genomic regions on necrosis induction. Overexpression of both TGB3 and the polymerase domain (POL) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) resulted in necrosis, although only local expression of POL triggered HR-like symptoms. Our results also indicated that the necrosis-eliciting activity of POL resides in its highly conserved "palm" domain, and that necrosis was jasmonic acid-dependent but not salicylic acid-dependent. Altogether, our data suggest that the RdRp-POL domain plays an important role in PepMV necrosis induction, with necrosis development depending on the virus accumulation level, which can be modulated by the nature of TGB3, host genotype and environmental conditions.

  14. Severe necrotic dermatitis in the combs of line 6-3 chickens is associated with Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disorder of domestic chickens is characterized by bursal–thymic atrophy and rapid onset of T-cell lymphomas that infiltrate lymphoid tissues, visceral organs, and peripheral nerves. Marek’s disease virus (MDV), the etiological agent of MD, is a highly cel...

  15. Necrotizing enterocolitis: controversies and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is a devastating intestinal disease that affects ~5% of preterm neonates. Despite advancements in neonatal care, mortality remains high (30–50%) and controversy still persists with regards to the most appropriate management of neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis. Herein, we review some controversial aspects regarding the epidemiology, imaging, medical and surgical management of necrotizing enterocolitis and we describe new emerging strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:26918125

  16. Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Scott M.; Berryhill, Taylor F.; Ellenburg, James L.; Jilling, Tamas; Cleveland, Dava S.; Lorenz, Robin G.; Martin, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. The pathophysiology is likely secondary to innate immune responses to intestinal microbiota by the premature infant's intestinal tract, leading to inflammation and injury. This review provides an updated summary of the components of the innate immune system involved in NEC pathogenesis. In addition, we evaluate the animal models that have been used to study NEC with regard to the involvement of innate immune factors and histopathological changes as compared to those seen in infants with NEC. Finally, we discuss new approaches to studying NEC, including mathematical models of intestinal injury and the use of humanized mice. PMID:25447054

  17. [Acute necrotizing enteritis].

    PubMed

    Marincaş, M; Bratucu, E; Straja, D; Daha, C; Boru, C

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective clinical study done on a 13-pacients basis diagnosed during surgery with acute necrotizing enteritis. This study follows the complexity of pathogenic factors and the difficulties one confronts with when establishing a diagnosis since the clinical manifestations are non-specifical and shows the contribution of laboratory data to an earliest possible diagnosis. Both medical and surgical treatment are analyzed depending on the results achieved with an attempt to determine a therapeutic approach as beneficial as possible, aiming at making clear either enterectomy or a conservatory surgical decision should be made. Mortality rate under such therapeutical approach was 38%.

  18. Patterns of Virus Distribution in Single and Mixed Infections of Florida Watermelons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) and Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV), and aphid-transmitted Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W) have had serious impact on watermelon production in southwest and west-central Florida in recent years. Tissue blot nucleic acid hybridizati...

  19. Patterns of Virus Distribution in Single and Mixed Infections of Florida Watermelons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) and Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV), and aphid-transmitted Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W) have had serious impact on watermelon production in southwest and west-central Florida in recent years. To determine the distribution of vir...

  20. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coley-Smith, A; Ellis, S G

    1994-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia, a benign self-limiting disease of minor salivary glands, may be confused both clinically and histologically with squamous cell carcinoma or a minor salivary gland neoplasm. Its sinister appearance has lead to misdiagnosis and some patients have undergone extensive surgery unnecessarily. This paper describes the salient features of necrotizing sialometaplasia and discusses the management of a patient with the condition.

  1. Control of Paratrichodorus allius and Corky Ringspot Disease of Potato in the Columbia Basin of Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, R. E.; Hamm, P. B.; Willams, R. E.; Swanson, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    Corky ringspot disease (CRS) of potato, caused by tobacco rattle virus that is vectored by stubby-root nematodes (Paratrichodorus spp.), is often controlled by aldicarb. When use of aldicarb on potato was suspended in 1989, an increase in crops rejected due to CRS in the Columbia Basin of the U.S. Pacific Northwest occurred. During 1992-94, several fumigant and nonfumigant nematicides were tested alone and in combination for control of P. allius and CRS. Aldicarb alone significantly reduced CRS but not to acceptable levels. Metam sodium or ethoprop alone did not control CRS, but metam sodium plus ethoprop provided adequate control under light disease pressure. Two or three postemergence applications of oxamyl, either with or without metham sodium, appeared to control CRS at low pressure. Fosthiazate reduced CRS incidence when used alone but not in combination with metam sodium. At low P. allius population densities, 1,3 dichloropropene (1,3-D) controlled CRS at 94 liters/ha, and rates of 140 liters/ha or greater were adequate at higher population densities. Treatment with 1,3-D plus chloropicrin was no better than 1,3-D alone and did not always control CRS. Combinations of 1,3-D at 94 liters/ha or greater plus metam sodium at 374 liters/ha or greater controlled CRS. Paratrichodorus allius numbers were higher and severity of CRS greater after wheat than after field corn, but P. allius declined rapidly after potato was planted and remained at low levels until harvest. PMID:19271011

  2. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, John; Ghaneh, Paula; Sutton, Robert; Hartley, Mark; Rowlands, Peter; Garvey, Conall; Hughes, Mark; Neoptolemos, John

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB, and the role of enteral feeding. PMID:11819813

  3. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Madala, Jayakiran; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Korlepara, Rajani; Yeluri, Sivaranjani

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign self-limiting lesion of both major and minor salivary glands although more commonly the latter. The clinical and histological similarity between this entity and a malignant lesion implies a risk of unnecessary radical treatment. We report a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in middle aged women presenting as a non-ulcerated swelling. This case illustrates the need for careful analysis of a biopsy specimen for a correct diagnosis.

  4. Update on the development of virus-resistant papaya: Virus-resistant transgenic papaya for people in rural communities of Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) is one of the most important and preferred crops in rural communities in Thailand. Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is a serious disease of papaya throughout Thailand. Efforts to control the virus by various methods either have not been successful or have not resulted in sustai...

  5. Assessment of SNaPshot and single step RT-qPCR methods for discriminating Potato virus Y (PVY) subgroups.

    PubMed

    Rupar, Matevž; Kogovšek, Polona; Pompe-Novak, Maruša; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Delaunay, Agnes; Jacquot, Emmanuel; Ravnikar, Maja

    2013-04-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is the most important virus infecting potato (Solanum tuberosum), causing potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease (PTNRD), with a great impact on seed potato production. Numerous PVY strain groups with different pathogenicity and economical impact are distributed worldwide. Tools for accurate and reliable detection and discrimination of PVY strain groups are therefore essential for successful disease management. Two state of the art characterization tools based on detecting molecular markers - RT-qPCR (Kogovsek et al., 2008) and SNaPshot (Rolland et al., 2008) - were assessed for their ability to assign PVY accurately to the correct group. The results were validated by bioassay, ELISA and in silico sequence analysis. The spectrum of PVY strain groups distinguished by SNaPshot is broader than that by RT-qPCR. However, the latter was more reliable in discriminating the PVY(NTN) group members, known for their ability to induce PTNRD on selected potato cultivars. The difference in discrimination precision was due to different molecular markers being targeted by RT-qPCR and SNaPshot. Both tools use genotypic markers for detecting PVY(NTN) strain groups. Future development, however, should be focused on identifying the genomic determinants of the tuber necrosis property. Until then, the RT-qPCR and SNaPshot methods remain the most powerful diagnostic tools for detecting the PVY subgroup isolates found in Europe. PMID:23396125

  6. Detection and characterization of tomato viruses: A case study of emerging tospoviruses in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A unique strain of Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV), which has undergone genome reassortment with, and contains the medium RNA segment of, Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) emerged in solanaceous vegetables in south Florida in late 2009. A typical (non-reassorted) strain of TCSV was reported from t...

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis and myositis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Razi-Syed, S; Jafri, S Z

    1994-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a relatively rare, potentially life-threatening infection involving the subcutaneous tissues. We report a case of group A streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis/myositis in which CT played an important role in differential diagnosis.

  8. Hypernatraemic dehydration and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A J; Sibert, J R

    1985-01-01

    Severe hypernatraemic dehydration developed over the first twelve days of life in a breastfed infant girl. Upon oral rehydration with formula milk, no acute neurological problems arose, but she subsequently developed necrotizing enterocolitis. Intravenous rehydration may be preferred to the oral route in such infants.

  9. Prevention of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Carrion, V; Egan, E A

    1990-10-01

    Small premature infants are often hypochlorhydric, and frequently their stomachs are colonized by enteric, gram-negative bacteria. We tested a hypothesis that gastric pH affected the colonization of the stomach with enteric bacteria and that this colonization was causally related to the risk or severity of necrotizing enterocolitis. A prospective, double-blind study was conducted that compared a group of infants supplemented with 0.01-0.02 ml of 1 N HCl/ml of milk to a group with a similar supplement of water. Gastric pH, gastric enteric bacteria counts, and the incidence and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis were monitored. The median gastric pH of the HCl-supplemented group was lower (3.0) than controls (4.0) throughout the study (p less than 0.001). The gastric enteric bacterial colonization rate and the quantitative bacterial counts were strongly correlated with gastric pH over 4 (p less than 0.001). Somatic growth rates in infants in the HCl-supplemented group were equal to, or exceeded, those in the control group. There was 1 case of necrotizing enterocolitis among the 34 infants in the HCl-supplemented group and 8 cases among the 34 in the control group (p = 0.02). It appears that acidifying the feedings of small premature infants to a pH low enough to inhibit bacterial proliferation in the stomach significantly lowers the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis.

  10. Focal transmural necrotic tracheitis in commercial meat turkeys.

    PubMed

    Sentíes-Cué, Gabriel; Crespo, Rocio; Chin, R P

    2003-01-01

    This report describes an unusual presentation of severe focal necrotic tracheitis in a flock of 8-wk-old commercial turkeys. The flock was kept on a range that is located near a cotton field. The cotton field had been chemically defoliated 2 wk before the birds were submitted for necropsy. At necropsy, most of the birds had a 1-cm, yellow-white constricture in the upper third of the trachea at which the lumen was partially occluded by necrotic tissue. Microscopically, there was severe, transmural necrosis with an accumulation of inflammatory exudate in the tracheal lumen and numerous bacteria within the necrotic debris, mucosa, and lamina propria. Mixed bacteria were isolated from the trachea. No viruses were detected. Neither abnormal heavy metal concentrations in the liver nor paraquat in the respiratory tract were detected. The exact cause of this severe, necrotic tracheitis was not determined. Based on the clinical history and laboratory findings, it was concluded that a combination of a toxic irritant, possibly an aerosolized cotton defoliant, and bacterial infections were likely the cause of this lesion. PMID:12713185

  11. Focal transmural necrotic tracheitis in commercial meat turkeys.

    PubMed

    Sentíes-Cué, Gabriel; Crespo, Rocio; Chin, R P

    2003-01-01

    This report describes an unusual presentation of severe focal necrotic tracheitis in a flock of 8-wk-old commercial turkeys. The flock was kept on a range that is located near a cotton field. The cotton field had been chemically defoliated 2 wk before the birds were submitted for necropsy. At necropsy, most of the birds had a 1-cm, yellow-white constricture in the upper third of the trachea at which the lumen was partially occluded by necrotic tissue. Microscopically, there was severe, transmural necrosis with an accumulation of inflammatory exudate in the tracheal lumen and numerous bacteria within the necrotic debris, mucosa, and lamina propria. Mixed bacteria were isolated from the trachea. No viruses were detected. Neither abnormal heavy metal concentrations in the liver nor paraquat in the respiratory tract were detected. The exact cause of this severe, necrotic tracheitis was not determined. Based on the clinical history and laboratory findings, it was concluded that a combination of a toxic irritant, possibly an aerosolized cotton defoliant, and bacterial infections were likely the cause of this lesion.

  12. Comparison of small RNA profiles in Nicotiana benthamiana and Solanum lycopersicum infected by polygonum ringspot tospovirus reveals host-specific responses to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Miozzi, Laura; Ciuffo, Marina; Rosa, Cristina; Axtell, Michael J; Pappu, Hanu R; Turina, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) are one of the key elements involved in RNA silencing-based defense against viruses in plants. We analyzed the vsRNA profiles in Nicotiana benthamiana and Solanum lycopersicum infected by polygonum ringspot virus (PolRSV) (Tospovirus, Bunyaviridae). VsRNAs were abundant in both hosts, but a different size profile was observed, with an abundance peak at 21 in N. benthamiana and at 22 nt in tomato. VsRNAs mapping to the PolRSV L genomic segment were under-represented in both hosts, while S and M segments were differentially and highly targeted in N. benthamiana and tomato, respectively. Differences in preferential targeting of single ORFs were observed, with over-representation of NSs ORF-derived reads in N. benthamiana. Intergenic regions (IGRs)-mapping vsRNAs were under-represented, while enrichment of vsRNAs reads mapping to the NSs positive sense strand was observed in both hosts. Comparison with a previous study on tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) under the same experimental conditions, showed that the relative accumulation of PolRSV-specific and endogenous sRNAs was similar to the one observed for silencing suppressor-deficient TSWV strains, suggesting possible different properties of PolRSV NSs silencing suppressor compared to that of TSWV. PMID:26432447

  13. [Infectious complications in necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Werner, J; Büchler, M W

    2007-10-01

    Patients with CT evidence of more than 50 % necrosis, or an increased CRP or procalcitonin are at risk of developing severe pancreatitis and septic complications and should be monitored in an intensive care unit. ERCP and sphincterotomy are indicated in patients with biliary pancreatitis and impacted gall stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. In septic patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, a FNA should be performed for differentiation of sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis. Adequate volume resuscitation and analgesic treatment are the most important treatment of acute pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces septic complications in severe necrotizing pancreatitis and should be started early. Surgical therapy is indicated in patients with infected pancreatic necrosis. The surgical technique of choice is open necrosectomy with postoperative closed lavage of the lesser sac.

  14. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Merwin, G E; Duckert, L G; Pollak, K

    1979-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is an uncommon salivary gland disease originally described by Abrams et al in 1973. The disease may occur wherever salivary gland tissue is found. Theories on the etiology of this disorder have been advanced, but never definitely determined. Treatment consists of adequate biopsy and observation until healing occurs at six to eight weeks. While the disease is considered benign, its similarity to more aggressive neoplasms can be both disturbing and misleading to the patient and the clinician. Such a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the nasopharynx is presented to demonstrate the clinical and histological similarity of this disease to carcinoma. In this case, the patient first presented with a neck mass which could easily have been mistaken for a regional metastasis. The current literature is reviewed.

  15. Paneth cells and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a common and devastating disease of premature infants. Immaturity of the innate immune system of the gut is central to the pathogenesis of NEC. Recent studies suggest a key role for Paneth cells in this disease. Addressing basic questions on the development and function of immature Paneth cells may shed light on the puzzling pathophysiology of NEC. Current animal models of NEC are limited in their capacity to answer these questions.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Panter, S J; Bramble, M G; Bell, J R

    2001-04-01

    We report a case of a 34-year-old woman, presenting initially with anaemia followed by sacro-iliac pain, and subsequently found to have necrotizing fasciitis complicating Crohn's disease where the organisms were introduced via a fistulous tract. It is perhaps surprising that this is not a more common complication of fistulating Crohn's disease, but we believe this is the first case report of this particular complication. PMID:11338075

  17. Identification and map location of TTR1, a single locus in Arabidopsis thaliana that confers tolerance to tobacco ringspot nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Hartman, G L; Domier, L L; Bent, A F

    1996-11-01

    The interaction between Arabidopsis and the nepovirus tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) was characterized. Of 97 Arabidopsis lines tested, all were susceptible when inoculated with TRSV grape strain. Even though there was systemic spread of the virs, there was a large degree of variation in symptoms as the most sensitive lines died 10 days after inoculation, while the most tolerant lines either were symptomless or developed only mild symptoms. Four lines were selected for further study based on their differential reactions to TRSV. Infected plants of line Col-0 and Col-0 gl1 flowered and produced seeds like noninfected plants, while those of lines Estland and H55 died before producing seeds. Symptoms appeared on sensitive plants approximately 5 to 6 days after inoculation. Serological studies indicated that in mechanically inoculated seedlings, the virus, as measured by coat protein accumulation, developed at essentially the same rates and to the same levels in each of the four lines, demonstrating that differences in symptom development were not due to a suppression of virus accumulation. Two additional TRSV strains gave similar results when inoculated on the four lines. Genetic studies with these four Arabidopsis lines revealed segregation of a single incompletely dominant locus controlling tolerance to TRSV grape strain. We have designated this locus TTR1. By using SSLP and CAPS markers, TTR1 was mapped to chromosome V near the nga129 marker. Seed transmission frequency of TRSV for Col-0 and Col-0 gl1 was over 95% and their progeny from crosses all had seed transmission frequencies of over 83%, which made it possible to evaluate the segregation of TTR1 in F2 progeny from infected F1 plants without inoculating F2 plants. Seed transmission of TRSV will be further exploited to streamline selection of individuals for fine mapping the TTR1 gene. The identification of tolerant and sensitive interactions between TRSV and A. thaliana lines provides a model system for

  18. Thrips-transmitted Viruses Infect a Number of Florida Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ilarviruses Tomato necrotic streak virus and Tobacco streak virus are present in south Florida. Both species cause economically significant disease in vegetable crop. Control of these viruses makes use of integrated pest management approaches....

  19. An umbra-like virus of papaya discovered in Ecuador: detection, occurrence and phylogenetic relatedness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) extractions from papaya leaves infected with Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) revealed the presence of an unusual 4kb band, in addition to the presumed PRSV-associated 10kb band. Partial sequence of RT-PCR products from the 4kb dsRNA revealed homology to genomes of several me...

  20. First report of Pelargonium zonate spot virus from tomato in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonium zonate spot virus (PZSV) was first isolated from tomato in southern Italy in 1982, and later was also reported from Spain and France. Infected tomato plants showed stunting, malformation, yellow rings and line patterns on the leaves, and concentric chlorotic ringspots on the stems. In Ju...

  1. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: frequency of histologic misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mesa, M L; Gertler, R S; Schneider, L C

    1984-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is said to mimic carcinoma, both clinically and histologically. A review of approximately 10,000 oral biopsy specimens revealed only three cases of necrotizing sialometaplasia, all of which had been misdiagnosed as other benign entities. While this suggests that necrotizing sialometaplasia represents only 0.03 percent of biopsied oral lesions, it does not deal with the frequency of cases of this condition which heal spontaneously without being biopsied.

  2. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T

    1982-01-01

    A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia involving the mucous membrane of a nasal turbinate is described. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limited process characterized by necrosis and squamous metaplasia of the salivary or mucous glands. Typically, the lesion manifests as an ulcer of the hard palate. Nonulcerated lesions and involvement of sites other than the hard palate have also been reported. This case appears to be the second reported case of involvement of the nasal cavity by necrotizing sialometaplasia.

  3. Disseminated histoplasmosis and necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Small, P.; Levitt, P.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old man with congestive heart failure was found to have Histoplasma capsulatum in a lesion of the right nasal septum. His initial treatment with amphotericin B was inadequate because of severe intolerance to the drug. Three months after initial presentation H. capsulatum was detected in his blood and bone marrow. Slightly elevated purpuric lesions on the arms, lower legs and trunk showed the typical features of necrotizing vasculitis. Cutaneous anergy was reversed after treatment with transfer factor. Skin involvement in disseminated histoplasmosis is unusual and there are no previous reports of vasculitis associated with this infection. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1253047

  4. New ilarvirus species in south Florida tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is a novel ilarvirus discovered infecting tomatoes in south Florida starting in fall 2013. It was found during surveys of vegetable fields for Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus because all four viruses induce sim...

  5. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Simulating Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Erik Friedrich Alex; da Silva, Guilherme Almeida Rosa; dos Santos, Gustavo Randow; Motta, Heloisa Loureiro de Sá Neves; Cardoso, Pedro Afonso Nogueira Moisés; de Azevedo, Marcelo Costa Velho Mendes; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Motta, Rogerio Neves; Silva, Walter de Araujo Eyer; Ferry, Fernando Raphael de Almeida; Pinto, Jorge Francisco da Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum received this name due to the notion that this disease was related to infections caused by bacteria in the genus Streptococcus. In contrast to this initial assumption, today the disease is thought to have an autoimmune origin. Necrotizing fasciitis was first mentioned around the fifth century AD, being referred to as a complication of erysipelas. It is a disease characterized by severe, rapidly progressing soft tissue infection, which causes necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and the fascia. On the third day of hospitalization after antecubital venipuncture, a 59-year-old woman presented an erythematous and painful pustular lesion that quickly evolved into extensive ulceration circumvented by an erythematous halo and accompanied by toxemia. One of the proposed etiologies was necrotizing fasciitis. The microbiological results were all negative, while the histopathological analysis showed epidermal necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of dermal neutrophils. Pyoderma gangrenosum was considered as a diagnosis. After 30 days, the patient was discharged with oral prednisone (60 mg/day), and the patient had complete healing of the initial injury in less than two months. This case was an unexpected event in the course of the hospitalization which was diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum associated with myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:26783395

  6. [Necrotizing periodontal disease: a manifestation of systemic disorders].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Escribano-Bermejo, Marta

    2005-11-19

    Necrotizing periodontal disease (NPD) is an infection characterized by gingival necrosis presenting as "punched-out" papillae, with gingival bleeding, and pain. Prevotella intermedia and spirochetes have been associated with the gingival lesions. Predisposing factors may include emotional stress, immunosuppression, especially secondary to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cigarette smoking, poor diet and pre-existing gingivitis. During the last few years, diagnosis of NPD has became more important not only because of its contribution to the appearance of clinical attachment loss and gingival sequelae, but also because it has been revealed as a marker for immune deterioration in HIV-seropositive patients.

  7. Necrotizing Fasciltis Case Presentation and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Louis; Evans, Heath; Cundick, David; McShane, Matt; Penna, Kevin; Sadoff, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly progressing in- fection with significant morbidity and high mortality rates. Rarely does necrotizing fasciitis appear in the head and neck region; rather, it usually affects the limbs and abdomen of patients. This article presents our institution's experience with the disease and pro- vides a discussion of proposed treatment options.

  8. Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatitis of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions are common in captive reptiles. Although these conditions have distinct differences histologically, they are commonly sequelae to each other. This article examines the anatomy and physiology of reptile skin; discusses reported causes of vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions; and reviews various management options.

  9. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  10. What next in necrotizing enterocolitis?

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants, with a mortality rate of 10-50%. It is uncommon in term infants and in premature infants who have not yet been fed. Most commonly NEC develops suddenly in a preterm infant who was otherwise well, with initial symptoms of abdominal distention, bilious or bloody emesis or gastric aspirates, hematochezia, and pneumatosis intestinalis, and sometimes progresses quickly to include bowel perforation, acidosis, shock, and death. Trigger factors (i.e. perinatal hypoxia, mild infection or formula feeding) cause focal mild intestinal mucosal injury. In the presence of proliferation of commensal bacteria, local breakdown of mucosal barrier may cause entry of bacterial products (e.g. lipopolysaccharides, platelet-activating factor). Endothelial platelet-activating factor and/or tumor necrotizing factor and/or direct stimulating effects of polymorphonuclear leukocytes cause proinflammatory cascade and focal necrosis, which increase the entry of large amounts of bacterial toxins, and then severe NEC, sepsis, and shock develop. Therapies for the prevention of NEC that appear to have some benefit are breastfeeding and antenatal steroids, and probably probiotics. Enteral immunoglobulin, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and arginine or glutamine supplementation are therapies for the prevention of NEC that do not appear to be of benefit. Enteral erythropoietin and enteral granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are promising novel therapies. Treatment options are limited to gut rest, parenteral nutrition, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and surgical interventions for enteral perforation. Two commonly used methods for NEC with intestinal perforation are laparotomy or primary peritoneal drainage ("patch, drain and wait"); however, the preferred method is controversial.

  11. Necrotizing Scleritis, Conjunctivitis, and Other Pathologic Findings in the Left Eye and Brain of an Ebola Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) With Apparent Recovery and a Delayed Time of Death.

    PubMed

    Alves, Derron A; Honko, Anna N; Kortepeter, Mark G; Sun, Mei; Johnson, Joshua C; Lugo-Roman, Luis A; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-01

    A 3.5-year-old adult female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) manifested swelling of the left upper eyelid and conjunctiva and a decline in clinical condition 18 days following intramuscular challenge with Ebola virus (EBOV; Kikwit-1995), after apparent clinical recovery. Histologic lesions with strong EBOV antigen staining were noted in the left eye (scleritis, conjunctivitis, and peri-optic neuritis), brain (choriomeningoencephalitis), stomach, proximal duodenum, and pancreas. Spleen, liver, and adrenal glands, common targets for acute infection, appeared histologically normal with no evidence of EBOV immunoreactivity. These findings may provide important insight for understanding sequelae seen in West African survivors of Ebola virus disease.

  12. Necrotizing Scleritis, Conjunctivitis, and Other Pathologic Findings in the Left Eye and Brain of an Ebola Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) With Apparent Recovery and a Delayed Time of Death.

    PubMed

    Alves, Derron A; Honko, Anna N; Kortepeter, Mark G; Sun, Mei; Johnson, Joshua C; Lugo-Roman, Luis A; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-01

    A 3.5-year-old adult female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) manifested swelling of the left upper eyelid and conjunctiva and a decline in clinical condition 18 days following intramuscular challenge with Ebola virus (EBOV; Kikwit-1995), after apparent clinical recovery. Histologic lesions with strong EBOV antigen staining were noted in the left eye (scleritis, conjunctivitis, and peri-optic neuritis), brain (choriomeningoencephalitis), stomach, proximal duodenum, and pancreas. Spleen, liver, and adrenal glands, common targets for acute infection, appeared histologically normal with no evidence of EBOV immunoreactivity. These findings may provide important insight for understanding sequelae seen in West African survivors of Ebola virus disease. PMID:26153408

  13. [Risk factors of necrotizing enterocolitis].

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rombo, C A; Velasco-Lavín, M R; Nieto-Caldelas, A

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare risk factors of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) between two group: group A, newborns with the disease and group B, newborns with other diseases different from NEC, in order to know if these risk factors are more frequent or not in the first group. We assessed the clinical records of all the patients hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Neonatology Service of the La Raza General Hospital between 1987 and 1991 with the diagnosis of NEC. They were compared with 65 clinical records chosen at random of patients hospitalized in the same Unit with other diagnosis at the same time, and who were discharged by improvement or deceased. In all of them were look for known risk factors for NEC generally accepted such as: prematurity, neonatal asphyxia, poliglobulia, cyanotic congenital heart disease, patent ductus arteriosus, respiratory distress syndrome, catheterization of umbilical vessels, early feeding of elevated formula increases, exchange exchange transfusion, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, infection, etc. Just 25 records of the possible 50 with the diagnosis of NEC full filled inclusion criteria. There were no statistically significant difference in weight, sex, mortality and known risk factors of NEC between both groups. Were concluded that NEC is a disease of unknown etiology that should be studied more thoroughly. The known risk factors must be avoided because the patient susceptibility probably play an important role. PMID:8373546

  14. Statin-associated necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Geórgea Hermogenes; Zanoteli, Edmar; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a severe adverse effect of statins. We report a 66-year-old Caucasian female who had progressive proximal muscle weakness after treatment with statins. Results of a muscle biopsy showed necrotizing myopathy with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrate and increased major histocompatibility class I antigen expression in muscle fibers. The clinical and laboratory parameters improved significantly with immunosuppressive treatment. Although it is a rare event, statin-induced NAM should be included as a differential diagnosis of myopathies.

  15. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela.

    PubMed

    Yuen, K Y; Ma, L; Wong, S S; Ng, W F

    1993-01-01

    A patient who succumbed to fulminant necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela after injury by a rabbitfish is described. Despite the absence of any known underlying illness, he did not respond to appropriate antibiotic therapy and radical surgical intervention. This represents the first documented case of necrotizing fasciitis due to this organism, and is also the first reported case in Southeast Asia inflicted by rabbitfish.

  16. Necrotizing sialometaplasia. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Myers, E N; Bankaci, M; Barnes, E L

    1975-10-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia occurred in a 46-year-old woman. This is an uncommon benign disease that typically begins with an ulcerated lesion on the hard palate and surrounding tissues. Clinical and microscopic findings show obvious similarity with a malignant neoplasm. Necrotizing sialometapiasis is a benign minor salivary gland disease. It is important since it may easily be confused with squamous cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

  17. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: an early, nonulcerative presentation.

    PubMed

    Santis, H R; Kabani, S P; Roderiques, A; Driscoll, J M

    1982-04-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia usually presents as a painless, deeply excavating ulcer and is considered in the differential diagnosis of large palatal ulcers along with mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. This case is presented to illustrate that the early signs and symptoms of necrotizing sialometaplasia may be swelling with a purulent exudate, diffuse, vague pain, and numbness. It also demonstrates the rapidity with which initial signs of healing become apparent. This latter clinically suggests a benign process.

  18. Community-acquired necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yuko; Nagae, Masaaki; Omae, Takahito; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Horitani, Ryosuke; Maeda, Daigen; Yoshinaga, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen and right lower limb. He had a history of hepatitis B virus-induced liver cirrhosis, but had not been visiting the outpatient clinic and did not receive any medication. Cutaneous necrosis and bulla were observed on his abdomen and right lower limb. The necrotic skin was incised, and he was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. A nonfermentative Gram-negative bacillus infection was confirmed from aspirated fluid and blood cultures. Therefore, meropenem and immunoglobulins were administered. Because necrosis was widespread, surgical debridement was performed. Thereafter, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus infection was confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR using the bullous fluid and blood cultures. Meropenem was administered for 3 weeks, followed by levofloxacin alone for 1 week. The patient's condition improved; therefore, skin grafting was performed as planned and yielded a favorable response. After rehabilitation, the patient could walk without support and infection did not recur. However, he had severe liver cirrhosis and large esophageal varices, and he eventually died from sudden varix rupture. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Although this is a very rare case of the occurrence of necrotizing fasciitis due to A. calcoaceticus infection, we believe that this organism can be pathogenic in immunocompromised patients such as those with liver cirrhosis by reporting this case.

  19. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  20. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  1. Necrotic Colitis in Two Cats — A Description of the Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, J. S. Nimmo

    1982-01-01

    The lesions in two cases of necrotic colitis in old cats are described. Both had gross lesions of a necrotic, hemorrhagic colitis without gross lesions in the small intestine. Histologically the lesions resembled those of feline panleukopenia virus infection, namely: necrosis and loss of crypt epithelium, dilation of crypts and lining of crypts by flattened epithelium, subsequent collapse of the lamina propria and hemorrhage from subepithelial capillaries. Both grossly and histologically these lesions were restricted to the colon without similar involvement of the small intestine. The histories and clinical signs, the virological and hematological studies suggest that feline panleukopenia virus was not the etiological agent in these cases. No other causal agent was identified. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17422154

  2. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garcia, N G; Oliveira, D T; Faustino, S E S; Azevedo, A L R

    2012-01-01

    Background. Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is an uncommon benign reactive necrotizing inflammatory process involving minor salivary gland that often mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically. Case Report. We report the case of a healthy 26-year-old man with a painless swelling in the hard palate near the middle raphe, asymptomatic, well limited, and raised edges. The patient was submitted to incisional biopsy and histopathological examination. The histological diagnosis was necrotizing sialometaplasia. Discussion. The clinical and histological similarity between this entity and a malignant lesion implies a risk of unnecessary or mistreatment. Therefore, clinicians and pathologists should be aware of this lesion as to avoid errors in the diagnosis and treatment of this benign pathologic condition.

  3. [Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate].

    PubMed

    Topstad, T K; Olofsson, J; Myking, A

    1991-11-30

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-healing disease of salivary gland tissue and is usually confined to the minor salivary glands of the hard palate. It has clinical and histological features that simulate malignancies such as mucoepidermoid and squamous cell carcinomas. Wrong diagnosis has led to unnecessary mutilating surgical procedures. The etiology of the disease is unknown, but an ischaemic process is considered most likely. We describe two patients with necrotizing sialometaplasia, one with midline and one with bilateral symmetrical affection of the hard palate.

  4. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mieczysław; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Gudziol, Silke; Hauptmann, Steffen; Bloching, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a potentially lethal soft tissue infection characterized by cutaneous necrosis, suppurative fasciitis, vascular thrombosis and extreme systemic toxicity. It is a rare entity in the head and neck region, but occur most frequently in patients with diabetes and chronic alcoholism. Mostly involved are immunodeficient patients with banal infections of the upper aerodigestive tract, small traumas, but also after surgical procedures. Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection caused by aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms. A strong complication is a streptococcus-associated-toxic shock-syndrome which should be prevented because it is often associated with letal outcome. Septicemia and systemic toxic effects may lead to death within as short a time as 2 to 4 days. Necrotizing fasciitis is often misdiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed with a mortality rate of approximately 30-70%. Once identified, treatment consists of antimicrobial therapy and surgical debridement followed at a later date with reconstructive surgery. We present a fatal case of craniofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in a 63-year-old diabetic and chronic alcoholic man and discuss it's pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and the best therapeutic choice for this disease. A review of the literature with the clinical presentations, bacteriology diagnosis and treatment was presented.

  5. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the liver.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chung Kuao; Chou, Shih-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    A 73-year-old patient with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the liver is presented. The computed tomography demonstrated 2 hypodense tumors with progressive enhancement in the liver. They became nearly isodense to the normal hepatic parenchyma on the delayed phase. PMID:27594940

  6. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mieczysław; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Gudziol, Silke; Hauptmann, Steffen; Bloching, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a potentially lethal soft tissue infection characterized by cutaneous necrosis, suppurative fasciitis, vascular thrombosis and extreme systemic toxicity. It is a rare entity in the head and neck region, but occur most frequently in patients with diabetes and chronic alcoholism. Mostly involved are immunodeficient patients with banal infections of the upper aerodigestive tract, small traumas, but also after surgical procedures. Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection caused by aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms. A strong complication is a streptococcus-associated-toxic shock-syndrome which should be prevented because it is often associated with letal outcome. Septicemia and systemic toxic effects may lead to death within as short a time as 2 to 4 days. Necrotizing fasciitis is often misdiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed with a mortality rate of approximately 30-70%. Once identified, treatment consists of antimicrobial therapy and surgical debridement followed at a later date with reconstructive surgery. We present a fatal case of craniofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in a 63-year-old diabetic and chronic alcoholic man and discuss it's pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and the best therapeutic choice for this disease. A review of the literature with the clinical presentations, bacteriology diagnosis and treatment was presented. PMID:16521446

  7. [Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the nasal cavity].

    PubMed

    Deubel, M; Meister, F; Podvinec, M; Stamm, B

    1994-11-01

    In the present paper we report two cases of "necrotizing sialometaplasia" in uncommon locations. The relevant literature is reviewed. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is self-limiting and is characterized by necrosis and squamous pseudohypertrophy. Typically occurring in the minor salivary glands of the oral mucosa, our cases appear to be the sixth and seventh cases of involvement of the nasal cavity reported in the literature. Owing to the similarity of histological findings, the term "sialometaplasia" is also used for this disorder. This rare disease is a benign process but may be misdiagnosed as mucoepidermoid or squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the possibility of this disease in the nose should again be presented. Both of our cases show that with a histological examination considering defined morphological findings, the diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia can be verified and a diagnosis of a carcinoma can be excluded. Especially with regard to radical and possibly unnecessary invasive therapeutic procedures we emphasize the importance of considering "necrotizing sialometaplasia" as part of the differential diagnosis of nasal lesions.

  8. Necrotizing sialometaplasia affecting the minor labial glands.

    PubMed

    Matilla, A; Flores, T; Nogales, F F; Galera, H

    1979-02-01

    A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lower lip, a previously unreported location for this lesion, is presented. In the past, other cases of this benign process occuring in this site may have been confused with squamous-cell or mucoepidermoid carcinoma. In order to arrive at the correct diagnosis, an ample biopsy of the lesion is mandatory.

  9. Emaravirus: a novel genus of multipartite, negative strand RNA plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Mielke-Ehret, Nicole; Mühlbach, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    Ringspot symptoms in European mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L.), fig mosaic, rose rosette, raspberry leaf blotch, pigeonpea sterility mosaic (Cajanus cajan) and High Plains disease of maize and wheat were found to be associated with viruses that share several characteristics. They all have single-stranded multipartite RNA genomes of negative orientation. In some cases, double membrane-bound virus-like particles of 80 to 200 nm in diameter were found in infected tissue. Furthermore, at least five of these viruses were shown to be vectored by eriophyid mites. Sequences of European mountain ash ringspot-associated virus (EMARaV), Fig mosaic virus (FMV), rose rosette virus (RRV), raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus and High Plains virus strongly support their potential phylogenetic relationship. Therefore, after characterization of EMARaV, the novel genus Emaravirus was established, and FMV was the second virus species assigned to this genus. The recently sequenced RRV and RLBV are supposed to be additional members of this new group of plant RNA viruses.

  10. The replication of cymbidium ringspot tombusvirus defective interfering-satellite RNA hybrid molecules.

    PubMed

    Burgyán, J; Dalmay, T; Rubino, L; Russo, M

    1992-10-01

    A DNA copy of DI RNA of cymbidium ringspot tombusvirus was cloned downstream of a phage T7 promoter. In vitro-transcribed RNA replicated in Nicotiana clevelandii when co-inoculated with full-length viral genomic RNA transcripts and protected plants from apical necrosis. Artificial deletion mutants derived from the DI RNA clone showed that most of the central sequence block is necessary for replication. Hybrid DI RNA-satRNA clones were prepared and in vitro-synthesized RNA was inoculated to plants in the presence of helper viral RNA. There was replication only of in vitro transcripts derived from hybrid clones where satRNA sequences were inserted upstream or downstream from the central block, but not of those derived from clones where satRNA sequence replaced the central block. Progeny RNA of biologically active clones was either full-length or showed deletions depending on the insertion of satRNA sequences in DI RNA. DI RNA-satRNA constructs having part of the 5' region exchanged were not replicated.

  11. [Face necrotizing fasciitis following spinocellular epithelioma excision].

    PubMed

    Gindre, S; Dellamonica, J; Couadau, E; Carles, M; Vandenbos, F; Delgiudice, P; Grimaud, D; Ichai, C

    2005-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial dermo-hypodermitis with superficial aponevrosis necrosis due to Streptococcus pyogenes. Head and neck region are some rare localization of this infection especially after surgery. We report herein a case of a face necrotizing fasciitis following minor face surgery. A 86 year-old Caucasian male without any antecedents, nor treatment, has been operated for a fronthead spinocellular epithelioma under local anesthesia. Twelve hours later, a severe pain localized to the face occurred, with sleeplessness, followed up with a face orbitary oedema and fever. Twenty-four hours later, an intravenous antibiotherapy was therefore started and surgical treatment was performed as soon as the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was considered. An important inflammatory oedema was noticed, associated to a large necrotic softening of the face, the eyelid and the neck sub-cutaneous tissues. Then, the patient has been transferred in intensive care unit because multi-organ failure clinical and biological signs occurred. Pre-operatory bacteriological samples culture identified Streptococcus pyogenes. Repeated surgical explorations and debridement (excision, cleaning, draining and bandages recovery) were performed daily as needed until all the necrotic tissue was all eradicated. The antibiotherapy was prescribed to totalised 15 days. Our report underlines the importance of an early recognition of the diagnosis of soft tissue infection, because early surgical treatment has a better prognosis and antibiotic treatment alone is inefficient for the recovery. Alert is delivered by the local signs quickly followed up by skin changes. Anti-inflammatory therapy must be avoid in case of any soft tissue infection sign: they may increase the lesions, hide alarm signs and delay surgical treatment.

  12. [Face necrotizing fasciitis following spinocellular epithelioma excision].

    PubMed

    Gindre, S; Dellamonica, J; Couadau, E; Carles, M; Vandenbos, F; Delgiudice, P; Grimaud, D; Ichai, C

    2005-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial dermo-hypodermitis with superficial aponevrosis necrosis due to Streptococcus pyogenes. Head and neck region are some rare localization of this infection especially after surgery. We report herein a case of a face necrotizing fasciitis following minor face surgery. A 86 year-old Caucasian male without any antecedents, nor treatment, has been operated for a fronthead spinocellular epithelioma under local anesthesia. Twelve hours later, a severe pain localized to the face occurred, with sleeplessness, followed up with a face orbitary oedema and fever. Twenty-four hours later, an intravenous antibiotherapy was therefore started and surgical treatment was performed as soon as the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was considered. An important inflammatory oedema was noticed, associated to a large necrotic softening of the face, the eyelid and the neck sub-cutaneous tissues. Then, the patient has been transferred in intensive care unit because multi-organ failure clinical and biological signs occurred. Pre-operatory bacteriological samples culture identified Streptococcus pyogenes. Repeated surgical explorations and debridement (excision, cleaning, draining and bandages recovery) were performed daily as needed until all the necrotic tissue was all eradicated. The antibiotherapy was prescribed to totalised 15 days. Our report underlines the importance of an early recognition of the diagnosis of soft tissue infection, because early surgical treatment has a better prognosis and antibiotic treatment alone is inefficient for the recovery. Alert is delivered by the local signs quickly followed up by skin changes. Anti-inflammatory therapy must be avoid in case of any soft tissue infection sign: they may increase the lesions, hide alarm signs and delay surgical treatment. PMID:15963844

  13. Concurrent herpes simplex type 1 necrotizing encephalitis, cytomegalovirus ventriculoencephalitis and cerebral lymphoma in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Vital, C; Monlun, E; Vital, A; Martin-Negrier, M L; Cales, V; Leger, F; Longy-Boursier, M; Le Bras, M; Bloch, B

    1995-01-01

    Unlike cytomegalovirus (CMV) ventriculoencephalitis, herpes simplex virus type 1 necrotizing encephalitis has only rarely been observed in AIDS patients. A 40-year-old bisexual man was followed for an HIV1 infection from 1987 onwards. In June 1993 he was referred for sudden confusion, left hemiparesia and fever. The blood contained less than 10 CD4 lymphocytes/mm3. The patient remained comatose and febrile, and died 4 weeks later. In coronal sections of the brain there was necrosis of the internal parts of the left temporal lobe, necrosis of certain areas of the ventricular walls and a small tumor at the top of the right frontal lobe, which proved to be a polymorphic high-grade lymphoma. CMV ventriculoencephalitis lesions were prominent in the ventricular walls of the occipital lobes and there was a strong nuclear signal for CMV using in situ hybridization. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was shown in the nuclei and cytoplasm of certain neurons and astrocytes in the borders of the necrotized temporal lobe areas by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and electron microscopy, whereas in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for CMV were negative in such areas. Necrotizing type 1 encephalitis must not be overlooked in immunodeficient patients. PMID:7709722

  14. Contact lens-associated nocardial necrotizing scleritis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Ryan B

    2013-08-01

    A 52 year-old, contact lens-wearing man presented with progressive right eye pain and redness for one month. He had been evaluated and treated for necrotizing scleritis by multiple eye care specialists prior to presentation. He underwent a complete systemic work-up for both autoimmune and infectious causes of scleritis, including a culture. The culture revealed heavy growth of Nocardia asteroides complexes. The patient was treated with topical amikacin and oral Bactrim. Following several weeks of antibiotic treatment, the patient's infection resolved completely, and his visual acuity returned to baseline status. Nocardia is a rare but potentially devastating cause of necrotizing scleritis that may affect contact lens wearers without an associated keratitis. Prompt recognition and early treatment with appropriate antimicrobial agents are critical to achieve a favorable outcome. PMID:23908577

  15. [Necrotizing enterocolitis. Pathogenesis and iatrogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Obladen, M

    1986-08-01

    Following clinical observations, measurements of osmolarity of liquid drugs, and determination of blood loss due to sampling in very low birthweight infants, the following hypothesis on iatrogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis is proposed: Due to diagnostic blood sampling during intensive care, premature infants may become severely anemic. Therefore their intestinal perfusion is reduced, causing hypoxia and hypoperfusion in the submucosa. Especially in infants with oral feeding and hyperosmolar medication, mechanical factors, hyperosmolarity and infection can affect the mucosa from the luminal side. Simultaneous hypoperfusion and hyperosmolar load may contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis. This hypothesis, which needs experimental verification, explains the different incidence of the disease in different hospitals.

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Galust, Henrik; Oliverio, Matthew H; Giorgio, Daniel J; Espinal, Alexis M

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare and rapidly progressing life-threatening infectious process. By progressing through a simulation involving a patient with NF and participating in a post-scenario debriefing, learners will gain the necessary skills and knowledge to properly diagnose and manage patients with NF. Learners are taught to initiate appropriate and timely treatment and to advocate on behalf of their patient after inappropriate pushback from consultants to improve outcomes. PMID:27733963

  17. Identifying statin-associated autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Albayda, Jemima; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Statins up-regulate expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis and the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. As muscle cells regenerate, they express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statin therapy is stopped. Awareness of this entity will help physicians who prescribe statins to take action to limit the associated morbidity.

  18. Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: a focus on.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Lagrasta, N; Garcìa Garcìa, C; Campos Serna, J; Zicari, E; Marzocca, G

    2002-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a multifactorial worldwide problem, representing the most frequent gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. Extremely common in preterm infants, it is also registered in fullterm low birth weight neonates. Despite extensive research, its etiopathogenesis is not completely understood and this neonatal disease remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This review proposes an interdisciplinary focus on recent developments in NEC etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management. PMID:12608653

  19. Necrotizing sialometaplasia (adenometaplasia) of the trachea.

    PubMed

    Romagosa, V; Bella, M R; Truchero, C; Moya, J

    1992-09-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign condition first described in minor salivary glands of the soft palate with morphological changes which can be misinterpreted as squamous-cell carcinoma. Similar lesions have been subsequently reported in other locations including major salivary glands, lip, breast and skin (the term syringometaplasia has been applied for the latter). We report three cases of such a process involving submucosal glands in the trachea following prolonged translaryngeal intubation.

  20. Necrotizing sialometaplasia. A condition simulating malignancy.

    PubMed

    Raugi, G J; Kessler, S

    1979-03-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia occurred in a 55-year-old woman. The ulcerated lesion on the hard palate was treated conservatively and resolved spontaneously in about three months. The histology of the lesion consisted of coagulative necrosis of the salivary gland lobules and prominent squamous metaplasia within adjacent viable lobules. Since this benign lesion has frequently been mistaken for mucoepidermoid carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, recognition of it may spare the patient a radical surgical procedure.

  1. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: literature review and case reports.

    PubMed

    Imbery, T A; Edwards, P A

    1996-07-01

    The authors describe necrotizing sialometaplasia, a benign inflammatory lesion primarily involving the minor salivary glands of the hard palate. The lesion presents itself as a deep-seated palatal ulcer with clinical and histologic features mimicking those of a malignant neoplasm. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia initiated by trauma. An incisional biopsy is required to confirm the diagnosis, and the lesion heals by secondary intention within four to 10 weeks.

  2. [Necrotizing sialometaplasia. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, F; Ficarra, G

    1999-06-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign lesion of the minor and major salivary glands. It occurs with a palatal swelling which rapidly becomes a deep ulcer. Histopathological aspects include ulceration of the surface epithelium, squamous metaplasia and acinar necrosis. In general no treatment is necessary and the lesion heals spontaneously in 4-10 weeks. This condition must be distinguished from more serious diseases such as squamous cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

  3. [Descendending necrotizing mediastinitis single center experience].

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Ivan; Kovacić, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    The descending necrotizing mediastinitis is a rare but life-threatening inflammation, and occurs as a complication of deep inflammation of the neck. The mortality rate is still high by 40% despite the use of a variety of potent antimicrobial drugs. We describe 7 patients with the descending necrotizing mediastinitis treated in our hospital during the last 12 years. The primary site of infection in 5 patients were tonsils and pharynx, and in the other two patients odontogenic inflammation of the lower molars. Most of the patients belonged to the risk groups (diabetes mellitus, alcoholism), the average age of 60.4 years. After the diagnosis with computed tomography (CT), we surgically intervened in all patients. Deep neck infections are treated with aggressive surgical cervicotomy and high quality mediastinal drainage was performed with transcervical approach in all patients. Perioperative tracheotomy (n=3) was performed for the upper airway edema and postoperative tracheostomy for extended intubation (n = 1).Only in one case, we subsequently conducted a secondary surgical procedure, lateral thoracotomy because of pleural decortication. All patients were successfully cured with an average length of hospitalization was 24.6 days. For successful treatment of the descending necrotizing mediastinitis diagnosis must be set as early as possible and with the use of computed tomography scanning. Treatment requires the simultaneous application of potent antimicrobial drugs, aggressive surgical debridement of the neck and high-quality drainage of the mediastinum, which can be achieved through the transcervical approach.

  4. A rare case of necrotic thymoma*

    PubMed Central

    DE PALMA, A.; PAGLIARULO, V.; LORUSSO, M.; VERARDO, L.; DI GENNARO, F.; GENUALDO, M.; QUERCIA, R.; MONTRONE, T.; GENTILE, A.; LOIZZI, M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Authors report the case of a patient who underwent resection of a huge anterior mediastinal mass, revealing to be a necrotic thymoma. The patient had been previously submitted to surgical biopsies of the mass yielding non-diagnostic results due to extensive necrosis. A sternotomy was then performed to resect the mediastinal mass originating from the thymus, en-bloc with the mediastinal fat and the apparently infiltrated lung. Histopathology showed a possible cyst/thymoma in massive necrosis, not further definable; revision by a specialized experienced pathologist (J. Rosai) confirmed total mass necrosis and no lung infiltration, thus orientating diagnosis towards a necrotic thymoma and excluding a lymphoblastic lymphoma, with similar histopathological features but more frequent in children or characterized by neoplastic infiltration of surrounding lung. Total body computed tomography (CT) scan and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET)/CT, show neither local recurrence, nor distant metastases two years after surgery. In case of anterior mediastinal mass with difficult histopathological diagnosis due to massive necrosis, the hypothesis of a necrotic thymoma should be considered. After radical removal prognosis is generally favourable and no adjuvant treatment is required. PMID:24690340

  5. Herpes simplex induced necrotizing tonsillitis in an immunocompromised patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Laura; Vos, Xander G; Löwenberg, Mark

    2016-02-16

    We here present the case of a 22-year-old female of Suriname ethnicity with ulcerative colitis who received treatment with mercaptopurine and infliximab. She presented herself with a severe necrotizing tonsillitis due to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). Combination therapy consisting of immunomodulators and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents is increasingly being used. Anti-TNF therapy is associated with an increased risk of developing serious infections, and especially patients receiving combination treatment with thiopurines are at an increased risk. We here show that HSV infections can cause a severe tonsillitis in immunocompromised patients. Early recognition is essential when there is no improvement with initial antibiotic therapy within the first 24 to 72 h. HSV infections should be in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients presenting with a necrotizing tonsillitis and can be confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Early treatment with antiviral agents should be considered especially if antibiotic treatment fails in such patients. PMID:26881193

  6. Epidemiology of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Melnick, S L; Roseman, J M; Engel, D; Cogen, R B

    1988-01-01

    In the last 60 years, there have been approximately 50 studies of various suspected risk factors associated with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. Two thirds of these studies have been either surveys or case reports; nearly all the rest have been case-control studies. There have been only a few longitudinal and population-based studies, most of which were in high-risk populations. The findings of many studies pertain to gingivitis in general rather than in acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in particular; the findings of other studies are based on small numbers or solely on case histories without the inclusion of control subjects. There are comparisons between the epidemiology of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis as it occurs in military populations and the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis (98-103). Both diseases have been reported in closed communities such as in young recruits away from home and in new surroundings. A temporal trend upward in disease frequency was described for both infections during World War II. Both infections appear to be characterized by low communicability, with no documented transmission by fomites or vectors. Furthermore, active disease in both cases is associated with markedly increased numbers of normally indigenous flora: B. intermedius in the case of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and Neisseria meningococcus in the case of epidemic meningococcal meningitis. Risk factors associated with both diseases include crowding, physical fatigue, increased stress, low socioeconomic status, and failure of host defense mechanisms. In general, there is potential for longitudinal studies of young people such as new military recruits and college students who are undergoing the transition from dependence to independence. It is intriguing that these young adults are suddenly at increased risk of this disease in late adolescence when they should be at peak fitness and, just as suddenly, at decreased risk after their

  7. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate. Ulcerative or necrotizing stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati?

    PubMed

    Philipsen, H P; Petersen, J K; Simonsen, B H

    1976-12-01

    A typical case of the recently described tumor-suspect lesion, necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) of the palate, in a 54-year old Caucasian male is presented. Results of complete blood- and urinanalysis including serum electrophoresis and labial salivary gland biopsy strongly pointed at a local etiologic factor. Previous statements that the disease represents a new entity are questioned. The present authors favor the idea that NS is the necrotizing (ulcerative) or terminal stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (nicotinic stomatitis). It is of particular importance that this lesion is not diagnosed as a malignancy, as it heals spontaneously and uneventfully.

  8. Incidence of sweet cherry viruses in Shandong Province, China and a case study on multiple infection with five viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the occurrence of viruses in sweet cherry in China, leaf samples displaying leaf necrotic lesions or chlorotic spots were collected from trees in six orchards in the Shandong province. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated that Prunus necrotic rin...

  9. DESCENDING NECROTIZING MEDIASTINITIS SECONDARY TO RETROPHARYNGEAL ABSCESS.

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Dželalija, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to a nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess is very rare. This form of mediastinitis in the era of potent antibiotics often ends up with lethal outcome. It usually occurs in immunocompromised patients and requires intensive multidisciplinary treatment approach. We report a case of nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess complicated by descending necrotizing mediastinitis in a 70-year-old man with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The patient was admitted to our hospital after clinical and radiological diagnosis of retropharyngeal abscess. During treatment for retropharyngeal abscess with antibiotic therapy and transoral incision, the patient showed mild clinical improvement but his condition suddenly aggravated on day 4 of hospital stay. He had high fever, chest pain with tachypnea, tachycardia, hypotension, and showed signs of occasional disorientation. Emergency computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck and thorax showed inflammation in the retropharyngeal space, as well as thickening of the upper posterior mediastinum fascia with the presence of air. Emergency surgery including cervicotomy and drainage of the retropharyngeal space and posterior mediastinum was performed. The patient promptly recovered with improvement of the clinical status and laboratory findings. After 16 days of treatment he was discharged from the hospital in good condition. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis can be a serious and life threatening complication of deep neck infection if the diagnosis is not quickly established. Besides inevitable application of antimicrobial drugs, good drainage of the mediastinum is necessary. We believe that transcervical approach can achieve high-quality drainage of the upper mediastinum, especially if it is done timely as in this case. Its efficacy can be verified by intensive monitoring of the patient clinical condition, by CT scan of the thorax, and by laboratory tests. In the case of inefficacy of this type

  10. DESCENDING NECROTIZING MEDIASTINITIS SECONDARY TO RETROPHARYNGEAL ABSCESS.

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Dželalija, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to a nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess is very rare. This form of mediastinitis in the era of potent antibiotics often ends up with lethal outcome. It usually occurs in immunocompromised patients and requires intensive multidisciplinary treatment approach. We report a case of nontraumatic retropharyngeal abscess complicated by descending necrotizing mediastinitis in a 70-year-old man with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The patient was admitted to our hospital after clinical and radiological diagnosis of retropharyngeal abscess. During treatment for retropharyngeal abscess with antibiotic therapy and transoral incision, the patient showed mild clinical improvement but his condition suddenly aggravated on day 4 of hospital stay. He had high fever, chest pain with tachypnea, tachycardia, hypotension, and showed signs of occasional disorientation. Emergency computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck and thorax showed inflammation in the retropharyngeal space, as well as thickening of the upper posterior mediastinum fascia with the presence of air. Emergency surgery including cervicotomy and drainage of the retropharyngeal space and posterior mediastinum was performed. The patient promptly recovered with improvement of the clinical status and laboratory findings. After 16 days of treatment he was discharged from the hospital in good condition. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis can be a serious and life threatening complication of deep neck infection if the diagnosis is not quickly established. Besides inevitable application of antimicrobial drugs, good drainage of the mediastinum is necessary. We believe that transcervical approach can achieve high-quality drainage of the upper mediastinum, especially if it is done timely as in this case. Its efficacy can be verified by intensive monitoring of the patient clinical condition, by CT scan of the thorax, and by laboratory tests. In the case of inefficacy of this type

  11. [Necrotizing enterocolitis in the preterm infant: etiopathogenic considerations].

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Michele; Lagrasta, Nancy; Campos Serna, Javier; Garcìa Garcìa, Covadonga; Marzocca, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NE) represents the most frequent gastrointestinal emergency encountered in neonatal intensive care units. This necrotic-inflammatory bowel disease affects primarily premature patients and it is recorded as an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The NE aetiology seems to be multifactorial: prematurity, enteral feeding, hypoxia and micro-organisms toxicity are registered as the most important risk factors, able to trigger the phlogistic and necrotic way at the basis of necrotizing enterocolitis. Despite the NE first report was in the past century, the correct pathogenic sequence of this neonatal disease is still hypothetical. PMID:15303550

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas caviae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Simit; Mukhopadhyay, Prabir; Chatterjee, Mitali; Bandyopadhyay, Manas K; Bandyopadhyay, Maitreyi; Ghosh, Tapashi; Samaddar, Debopriyo

    2012-10-01

    Aeromonads are rarely associated with human intestinal and extra-intestinal diseases and syndromes, ranging from relatively mild illnesses such as acute gastroenteritis to life-threatening conditions, including septicemia, necrotizing fasciitis, and myonecrosis. Among the aeromonas species known to cause human infection, Aeromonas caviae has been associated with septicemia and only one reported case of human soft tissue infection. Most of the infections due to aeromonas occur in immunocompromised patients. Herein we describe a successfully treated case of post-traumatic skin and soft-tissue infections due to A. caviae in an otherwise immunocompetent individual.

  13. Carpal tunnel release complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, R J; Curtsinger, L J

    1993-06-01

    We report a 31-year-old diabetic woman who underwent carpal tunnel release for median nerve compression followed by a laparoscopic tubal ligation. The procedure was complicated by a severe postoperative necrotizing fasciitis infection of the carpal tunnel release incision. This has not been previously reported. The wound was poorly responsive to antibiotic therapy and serial wound debridements. Control of the woman's infection required total excision of the palmar skin and fascia. Complicating factors in this case included the woman's long history of insulin-dependent diabetes and a concomitant clean-contaminated procedure.

  14. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections: Surgeon's Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shashi Prakash; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) are fulminant infections of any layer of the soft tissue compartment associated with widespread necrosis and systemic toxicity. Delay in diagnosing and treating these infections increases the risk of mortality. Early and aggressive surgical debridement with support for the failing organs significantly improves the survival. Although there are different forms of NSTIs like Fournier's gangrene or clostridial myonecrosis, the most important fact is that they share common pathophysiology and principles of treatment. The current paper summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical features, the diagnostic workup required and the treatment principles to manage these cases. PMID:24455410

  15. The surgical management of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Kastenberg, Zachary J; Sylvester, Karl G

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a common cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, is strongly associated with prematurity and typically occurs following initiation of enteral feeds. Mild NEC is adequately treated by cessation of enteral feeding, empiric antibiotics, and supportive care. Approximately 50% of affected infants will develop progressive intestinal necrosis requiring urgent operation. Several surgical techniques have been described, but there is no clear survival benefit for any single operative approach. While debate continues regarding the optimal surgical management for infants with severe NEC, future progress will likely depend on the development of improved diagnostic tools and preventive therapies. PMID:23415269

  16. Necrotizing sialometaplasia involving the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Maisel, R H; Johnston, W H; Anderson, H A; Cantrell, R W

    1977-03-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a disease process which affects minor salivary glands. It may clinically and microscopically resemble squamous cell or mucoepidermoid carcinoma but is histologically benign. Thirteen patients with this process occurring on the hard palate have been reported in the past two years. We describe two cases in the nasal cavity and propose that compromise of the blood supply contributed to the occurrence of these lesions. This apparently benign lesion may represent nonspecific reaction of salivary and mucous glands to ischemic injury and must be distinguished from carcinoma.

  17. Growth of Necrotic Cores in Vulnerable Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Pak-Wing

    2011-03-01

    Plaques are fatty deposits that grow mainly in arteries and develop as a result of a chronic inflammatory response. Plaques are called vulnerable when they are prone to mechanical rupture. Vulnerable Plaques (VPs) are characterized by lipid-rich, necrotic cores that are heavily infiltrated with macrophages. The rupture of VPs releases thrombogenic agents into the bloodstream, usually resulting in myocardial infarctions. We propose a quantitative model to predict the development of a plaque's necrotic core. By solving coupled reaction-diffusion equations for macrophages and dead cells, we explore the joint effects of hypoxic cell death and chemo-attraction to Ox-LDL, a molecule that is strongly linked to atherosclerosis. Our model predicts cores that have approximately the right size and shape. Normal mode analysis and subsequent calculation of the smallest eigenvalues allow us to compute the times required for the system to reach its steady state. This study allows us to make quantitative predictions for how quickly vulnerable plaques develop and how their growth depends on system parameters such as chemotactic coefficients and cell death rates.

  18. Necrotic enteritis predisposing factors in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis in chickens develops as a result of infection with pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens and the presence of predisposing factors. Predisposing factors include elements that directly change the physical properties of the gut, either damaging the epithelial surface, inducing mucus production, or changing gut transit times; factors that disrupt the gut microbiota; and factors that alter the immune status of birds. In the past research into necrotic enteritis predisposing factors was directed by the simple hypothesis that low-level colonization of C. perfringens commonly occurred within the gut of healthy chickens and the predisposing factors lead to a proliferation of those bacteria to produce disease. More recently, with an increasing understanding of the major virulence factors of C. perfringens and the application of molecular techniques to define different clades of C. perfringens strains, it has become clear that the C. perfringens isolates commonly found in healthy chickens are generally not strains that have the potential to cause disease. Therefore, we need to re-evaluate hypotheses regarding the development of disease, the origin of disease causing isolates of C. perfringens, and the importance of interactions with other C. perfringens strains and with predisposing factors. Many predisposing factors that affect the physical and immunological characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract may also change the resident microbiota. Research directed towards defining the relative importance of each of these different actions of predisposing factors will improve the understanding of disease pathogenesis and may allow refinement of experiment disease models. PMID:26926926

  19. Necrotic enteritis predisposing factors in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis in chickens develops as a result of infection with pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens and the presence of predisposing factors. Predisposing factors include elements that directly change the physical properties of the gut, either damaging the epithelial surface, inducing mucus production, or changing gut transit times; factors that disrupt the gut microbiota; and factors that alter the immune status of birds. In the past research into necrotic enteritis predisposing factors was directed by the simple hypothesis that low-level colonization of C. perfringens commonly occurred within the gut of healthy chickens and the predisposing factors lead to a proliferation of those bacteria to produce disease. More recently, with an increasing understanding of the major virulence factors of C. perfringens and the application of molecular techniques to define different clades of C. perfringens strains, it has become clear that the C. perfringens isolates commonly found in healthy chickens are generally not strains that have the potential to cause disease. Therefore, we need to re-evaluate hypotheses regarding the development of disease, the origin of disease causing isolates of C. perfringens, and the importance of interactions with other C. perfringens strains and with predisposing factors. Many predisposing factors that affect the physical and immunological characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract may also change the resident microbiota. Research directed towards defining the relative importance of each of these different actions of predisposing factors will improve the understanding of disease pathogenesis and may allow refinement of experiment disease models.

  20. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  1. Use of superparamagnetic beads for the isolation of a peptide with specificity to cymbidium mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Diana Jia Miin; Dzulkurnain, Adriya; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Lim, Saw Hoon; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2006-09-01

    A modified method for the rapid isolation of specific ligands to whole virus particles is described. Biopanning against cymbidium mosaic virus was carried out with a commercial 12-mer random peptide display library. A solution phase panning method was devised using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads. The solution based panning method was more efficient than conventional immobilized target panning when using whole viral particles of cymbidium mosaic virus as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cymbidium mosaic virus-binding peptides isolated from the library identified seven peptides with affinity for cymbidium mosaic virus and one peptide which was specific to cymbidium mosaic virus and had no significant binding to odontoglossum ringspot virus. This method should have broad application for the screening of whole viral particles towards the rapid development of diagnostic reagents without the requirement for cloning and expression of single antigens.

  2. How are necrotic cells recognized by their predators?

    PubMed

    Li, Zao; Zhou, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Necrosis is a type of cell death often caused by cell injury and is linked to human diseases including neuron degeneration, stroke, and cancer. Cells undergoing necrosis are engulfed and degraded by engulfing cells, their predators. The mechanisms by which necrotic cells are recognized and removed remain elusive. Here we comment on our recent findings that reveal new molecular mechanisms of necrotic-cell recognition. Through studying the C. elegans touch neurons undergoing excitotoxic necrosis, we identified a receptor/ligand pair that enables engulfing cells to recognize necrotic neurons. The phagocytic receptor CED-1 is activated through interaction with its ligand phosphatidylserine (PS), exposed on the surface of necrotic cells. Furthermore, against the common belief that necrotic cells have ruptured plasma membrane, we found that necrotic C. elegans touch neurons actively present PS on their outer surfaces while maintaining plasma membrane integrity. We further identified 2 mechanisms governing the presentation of PS, one of which is shared with cells undergoing apoptosis, a "cell suicide" event, whereas the other is unique to necrotic neurons. The influx of Ca(2+), a key necrosis-triggering factor, is implicated in activating a neuronal PS-scramblase for PS exposure. We propose that the mechanisms controlling PS-exposure and necrotic-cell recognition by engulfing cells are likely conserved from worms to humans. PMID:27073733

  3. Case 11: large, infected, necrotic mixed-aetiology leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Price, Juliet; Boulton, Zoe

    2016-03-01

    This painful and malodorous ulcer was covered with 40% necrotic tissue. Combined use of octenilin Wound gel and Wound Irrigation Solution gently debrided the necrotic tissue, and helped reduce the pain and malodour. Within 6 weeks, the wound was covered with granulation tissue. PMID:26949855

  4. Case 9: heavily exuding, malodorous, necrotic pressure ulcer.

    PubMed

    Simon, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the necrotic tissue was so hard it was not possible to categorise the ulcer. Octenilin products were able to debride the necrotic tissue, so that the wound depth could be determined. After 4 weeks, the wound was covered with granulation tissue, improving the patient's quality of life.

  5. Necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants and newborns.

    PubMed

    Mϋller, M J; Paul, T; Seeliger, S

    2016-09-16

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common acquired disease of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in premature infants and newborns. It is defined as an ulcerative inflammation of the intestinal wall. The clinical signs of incipient NEC are often very discrete, and range from localized intestinal symptoms to generalized signs of sepsis. NEC is classified depending on its severity into disease states according to the modified Bell's Classification. Treatment of NEC ranges, depending on its severity, from a conservative therapeutic approach to surgery with resection of the affected parts of the intestine. Mortality is considerably high in extremely small preterm infants reaching up to 42% of the affected children. Measures such as breastfeeding or alternatively nutrition with pasteurized human donor milk from a milk bank, administration of probiotics, avoidance of histamine type II receptor antagonists, and restrictive antibiotic treatment should be considered early on for prevention of NEC. PMID:27589549

  6. Pure White Cell Aplasia and Necrotizing Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter Geon; Suh, Joome; Adelman, Max W.; Oduro, Kwadwo; Williams, Erik; Brunner, Andrew M.; Kuter, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Pure white cell aplasia (PWCA) is a rare hematologic disorder characterized by the absence of neutrophil lineages in the bone marrow with intact megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. PWCA has been associated with autoimmune, drug-induced, and viral exposures. Here, we report a case of a 74-year-old female who presented with severe proximal weakness without pain and was found to have PWCA with nonspecific inflammatory necrotizing myositis and acute liver injury on biopsies. These findings were associated with a recent course of azithromycin and her daily use of a statin. Myositis improved on prednisone but PWCA persisted. With intravenous immunoglobulin and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapies, her symptoms and neutrophil counts improved and were sustained for months. PMID:27073704

  7. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended. PMID:10599332

  8. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chi-Woong; Yoon, Hyun-Joong; Jung, Da-Woon; Lee, Sang-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is defined as rapidly progressive necrosis of subcutaneous fat and fascia. Although NF of the face is rare, its mortality rate is nearly 30%. It usually originates from dental infection and can lead to involvement of the neck, mediastinum, and chest wall. Complications resulting from pre-existing systemic diseases can increase the mortality rate. Known complication factors for NF include diabetes, malnutrition, advanced age, peripheral vascular disease, renal failure, and obesity. Here, we report a case of NF originating from dental infection in an 88-year-old woman already diagnosed with hypertension, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and renal diseases. Such conditions limited adequate surgical and antibiotic treatment. However, interdisciplinary treatment involving multiple departments was implemented with good results. PMID:27489813

  9. Epizootic necrotic enteritis in wild geese.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G; Rainnie, D J

    1987-07-01

    Outbreaks of a disease characterized by severe necrotic enteritis occurred among Canada geese (Branta canadensis), lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens), Ross' geese (A. rossi), and white-fronted geese (A. albifrons) on lakes in Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the autumn of 1983, 1984 and 1985. Ducks using the lakes were apparently not affected. Lesions in the geese closely resembled those described in enteritides in other species associated with the proliferation of Clostridium perfringens in the small intestine. Clostridium perfringens was present in large numbers in the affected areas of the intestine of the geese; other pathogens were not identified. It is hypothesized that an abrupt change in diet as geese begin to feed on grain disrupts the intestinal microflora, allowing C. perfringens to proliferate in the upper small intestine. Toxins produced by the bacteria then cause mucosal necrosis. Protease-inhibitory substances in some grains might also have a role in the disease. PMID:3625893

  10. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the glans penis.

    PubMed

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Bunker, Christopher B; Trevisan, Giorgia; Muneer, Asif

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with a 10-month history of an ulcerating lesion on the glans penis. Initially this was thought to be an invasive squamous cell carcinoma but a biopsy showed histological features consistent with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Extensive serological, immunological and microbiological tests only showed a positive antinuclear and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies indicating a possible autoimmune aetiology but an underlying systemic cause was not identified. Treatment with oral corticosteroids limited the inflammatory process but due to the gross destruction of the glans penis, he still required a glansectomy and split-skin graft reconstruction from which he recovered well. Although this patient ultimately required surgery for this rare presentation, this case highlights the differential diagnosis of penile ulceration (that transcends neoplasia) and the importance of performing and interpreting penile biopsies before undertaking potentially mutilating definitive surgery. PMID:27558192

  11. Necrotizing vasculitis in a case of disseminated neonatal herpes simplex infection.

    PubMed

    Phinney, P R; Fligiel, S; Bryson, Y J; Porter, D D

    1982-02-01

    A term newborn suffered disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) type II infection five days after cesarean section delivery for fetal distress. The mother had no history or evidence of herpetic lesions; the father had a history of genital herpetic lesions. The infant's terminal course was dominated by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with hepatic and renal failure. Microscopic examination revealed a necrotizing vasculitis of small and medium-sized lung and peripancreatic arteries. Nuclear inclusions characteristic of HSV were found in these arteries, as well as in the adrenal parenchyma, spleen, and lymph node; electron microscopy confirmed replication of virus within the arterial endothelial cells. The mechanism of arterial damage in severe herpetic infection contrasts with the immune-complex mechanism postulated for other viral vasculitides. Direct, virally induced arterial damage resulting in exposure of collagen may set the stage of DiC, a commonly fatal complication of this disease.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis of the nose complicated with cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminath, D; Narayanan, R; Orellana-Barrios, M A; Temple, B

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative. PMID:24876978

  13. A Case of Necrotizing Epiglottitis Due to Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jessica A; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Suchi, Mariko; Chun, Robert H; Willoughby, Rodney E

    2015-07-01

    Diphtheria is a rare cause of infection in highly vaccinated populations and may not be recognized by modern clinicians. Infections by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae are emerging. We report the first case of necrotizing epiglottitis secondary to nontoxigenic C diphtheriae. A fully vaccinated child developed fever, poor oral intake, and sore throat and was found to have necrotizing epiglottitis. Necrotizing epiglottitis predominantly occurs in the immunocompromised host. Laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of aggressive infections that identify immunocompromised patients. This case highlights the features of a reemerging pathogen, C diphtheriae.

  14. Polymicrobial abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis after cesarean section.

    PubMed

    DeMuro, Jp; Hanna, Af; Chalas, E; Cunha, Ba

    2012-09-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy woman after an uneventful caesarean section who developed polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. She was given a non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) after her delivery. Her post-delivery course was complicated by septic shock, and required multiple debridements before abdominal reconstruction. This case describes the increased risk of necrotizing fasciitis with NSAID use. Unusual were the organisms causing the polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter agglomerans, Acinetobacter baumannii, and two strains of Enterobacter cloacae.

  15. The use of maggots in head and neck necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Christopher; Raghavan, Ullas; Pfleiderer, A G

    2002-01-01

    Historically maggots have been used to clean necrotic war wounds. With the ready availability of sterile maggots, they are being used increasingly in surgical practice. Although maggots have most frequently been employed in the management of necrotic wounds and ulcers involving the lower limb, we have identified a particularly useful application in the head and neck and describe a case in which maggots played a significant part in the successful treatment of a florid necrotizing cervical fasciitis in a patient, who was unfit for repeated surgical debridement.

  16. Fatal Systemic Necrotizing Infections Associated with a Novel Paramyxovirus, Anaconda Paramyxovirus, in Green Anaconda Juveniles

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Martelli, Paolo; Hui, Suk-Wai; Lau, Candy C. Y.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Groff, Joseph M.; Tam, Emily W. T.; Chan, Kwok-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in July 2011, 31 green anaconda (Eunectes murinus) juveniles from an oceanarium in Hong Kong died over a 12-month period. Necropsy revealed at least two of the following features in 23 necropsies: dermatitis, severe pan-nephritis, and/or severe systemic multiorgan necrotizing inflammation. Histopathological examination revealed severe necrotizing inflammation in various organs, most prominently the kidneys. Electron microscopic examination of primary tissues revealed intralesional accumulations of viral nucleocapsids with diameters of 10 to 14 nm, typical of paramyxoviruses. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results were positive for paramyxovirus (viral loads of 2.33 × 104 to 1.05 × 108 copies/mg tissue) in specimens from anaconda juveniles that died but negative in specimens from the two anaconda juveniles and anaconda mother that survived. None of the other snakes in the park was moribund, and RT-PCR results for surveillance samples collected from other snakes were negative. The virus was isolated from BHK21 cells, causing cytopathic effects with syncytial formation. The virus could also replicate in 25 of 27 cell lines of various origins, in line with its capability for infecting various organs. Electron microscopy with cell culture material revealed enveloped virus with the typical “herringbone” appearance of helical nucleocapsids in paramyxoviruses. Complete genome sequencing of five isolates confirmed that the infections originated from the same clone. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses and mRNA editing experiments revealed a novel paramyxovirus in the genus Ferlavirus, named anaconda paramyxovirus, with a typical Ferlavirus genomic organization of 3′-N-U-P/V/I-M-F-HN-L-5′. Epidemiological and genomic analyses suggested that the anaconda juveniles acquired the virus perinatally from the anaconda mother rather than from other reptiles in the park, with subsequent interanaconda juvenile transmission. PMID:25078906

  17. Fatal systemic necrotizing infections associated with a novel paramyxovirus, anaconda paramyxovirus, in green anaconda juveniles.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Martelli, Paolo; Hui, Suk-Wai; Lau, Candy C Y; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Groff, Joseph M; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-10-01

    Beginning in July 2011, 31 green anaconda (Eunectes murinus) juveniles from an oceanarium in Hong Kong died over a 12-month period. Necropsy revealed at least two of the following features in 23 necropsies: dermatitis, severe pan-nephritis, and/or severe systemic multiorgan necrotizing inflammation. Histopathological examination revealed severe necrotizing inflammation in various organs, most prominently the kidneys. Electron microscopic examination of primary tissues revealed intralesional accumulations of viral nucleocapsids with diameters of 10 to 14 nm, typical of paramyxoviruses. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results were positive for paramyxovirus (viral loads of 2.33 × 10(4) to 1.05 × 10(8) copies/mg tissue) in specimens from anaconda juveniles that died but negative in specimens from the two anaconda juveniles and anaconda mother that survived. None of the other snakes in the park was moribund, and RT-PCR results for surveillance samples collected from other snakes were negative. The virus was isolated from BHK21 cells, causing cytopathic effects with syncytial formation. The virus could also replicate in 25 of 27 cell lines of various origins, in line with its capability for infecting various organs. Electron microscopy with cell culture material revealed enveloped virus with the typical "herringbone" appearance of helical nucleocapsids in paramyxoviruses. Complete genome sequencing of five isolates confirmed that the infections originated from the same clone. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses and mRNA editing experiments revealed a novel paramyxovirus in the genus Ferlavirus, named anaconda paramyxovirus, with a typical Ferlavirus genomic organization of 3'-N-U-P/V/I-M-F-HN-L-5'. Epidemiological and genomic analyses suggested that the anaconda juveniles acquired the virus perinatally from the anaconda mother rather than from other reptiles in the park, with subsequent interanaconda juvenile transmission. PMID:25078906

  18. Fatal systemic necrotizing infections associated with a novel paramyxovirus, anaconda paramyxovirus, in green anaconda juveniles.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Martelli, Paolo; Hui, Suk-Wai; Lau, Candy C Y; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Groff, Joseph M; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-10-01

    Beginning in July 2011, 31 green anaconda (Eunectes murinus) juveniles from an oceanarium in Hong Kong died over a 12-month period. Necropsy revealed at least two of the following features in 23 necropsies: dermatitis, severe pan-nephritis, and/or severe systemic multiorgan necrotizing inflammation. Histopathological examination revealed severe necrotizing inflammation in various organs, most prominently the kidneys. Electron microscopic examination of primary tissues revealed intralesional accumulations of viral nucleocapsids with diameters of 10 to 14 nm, typical of paramyxoviruses. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results were positive for paramyxovirus (viral loads of 2.33 × 10(4) to 1.05 × 10(8) copies/mg tissue) in specimens from anaconda juveniles that died but negative in specimens from the two anaconda juveniles and anaconda mother that survived. None of the other snakes in the park was moribund, and RT-PCR results for surveillance samples collected from other snakes were negative. The virus was isolated from BHK21 cells, causing cytopathic effects with syncytial formation. The virus could also replicate in 25 of 27 cell lines of various origins, in line with its capability for infecting various organs. Electron microscopy with cell culture material revealed enveloped virus with the typical "herringbone" appearance of helical nucleocapsids in paramyxoviruses. Complete genome sequencing of five isolates confirmed that the infections originated from the same clone. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses and mRNA editing experiments revealed a novel paramyxovirus in the genus Ferlavirus, named anaconda paramyxovirus, with a typical Ferlavirus genomic organization of 3'-N-U-P/V/I-M-F-HN-L-5'. Epidemiological and genomic analyses suggested that the anaconda juveniles acquired the virus perinatally from the anaconda mother rather than from other reptiles in the park, with subsequent interanaconda juvenile transmission.

  19. Predictors of Monomicrobial Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, Christopher A.; Horn, Christopher B.; Gilsdorf, Daniel; Davies, Stephen W.; Dietch, Zachary C.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is critical in the management of necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) in the emergency setting. Clindamycin often is included empirically to cover monomicrobial gram-positive pathogens but probably is of little value for polymicrobial infections and is associated with significant side effects, including the induction of Clostridium difficile colitis. However, there have been no studies predicting monomicrobial infections prior to obtaining cultures. The purpose of this study was to identify independent predictors of monomicrobial NSTI where the use of clindamycin would be most beneficial. We hypothesized that monomicrobial infections are characterized by involvement of the upper extremities and fewer co-morbid diseases. Methods: We reviewed all cases of potential NSTI occurring between 1996 and 2013 in a single tertiary-care center. The infection was diagnosed by the finding of rapidly progressing necrotic fascia during debridement with positive cultures of tissue. Univariable analysis was performed using the Student t-, Wilcoxon rank sum, χ2, and Fisher exact tests as appropriate. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent variables associated with outcomes. Results: A group of 151 patients with confirmed NSTI with complete data was used. Of the monomicrobial infections, 61.8% were caused by Group A streptococci, 20.1% by Staphylococcus aureus, and 12.7% by Escherichia coli. Of the polymicrobial infections, E. coli was involved 13.7% of the time, followed by Candida spp. at 12.9%, and Bacteroides fragilis at 11.3%. On univariable analysis, immunosuppression, upper extremity infection, and elevated serum sodium concentration were associated with monomicrobial infection, whereas morbid obesity and a perineal infection site were associated with polymicrobial infection. On multivariable analysis, the strongest predictor of monomicrobial infection was immunosuppression (odds ratio [OR

  20. Metabolomic determinants of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in premature infants and animals show that carbohydrate malabsorption and gut microbiota colonisation are key elements for triggering necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Our aim was to determine how dietary carbohydrate composition affects the metabolomic profile and whether unique metabolite s...

  1. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis associated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM), a severe infection with a high fatality rate, develops in mediastinal spaces due mainly to deep cervical abscesses. The majority of causative microbes of DNM are Streptococci and oral anaerobes. DNM associated with Lactobacillus-infection is rather rare. Case presentation A 69-year-old male with an unremarkable past medical history was referred to our hospital for surgical resection of advanced laryngeal cancer. Full examination revealed a neck abscess and DNM with a background of untreated diabetes mellitus. Initially, he was treated with meropenem. However, Lactobacillus plantarum was isolated from surgical drainage of a mediastinal abscess. Despite using antibiotics capable of eradicating all isolates with susceptibilities not differing significantly from those of the neck and mediastinal abscesses, we attributed DNM to the L. plantarum detected only in the mediastinal abscess. After DNM treatment, he underwent total pharyngolaryngectomy with bilateral neck dissection followed by reconstruction using free jejunum. He was discharged fully recovered. Conclusion We concluded that L. plantarum as the sole cause of the mediastinal abscess in the present case cannot be ruled out. As the number of immunocompromised patients increases, we should be cautious regarding this “familiar” microbe. PMID:23987907

  2. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae.

    PubMed

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 10(3)/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 10(3)/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy. PMID:26171271

  3. [Digestive stenoses following ulcero-necrotizing enterocolitis].

    PubMed

    Dahreddine, M; Fremond, B; Babut, J M

    1995-01-01

    Over a 10-year period, the authors followed the course of 112 neonates treated for primary acute necrotizing enterocolitis. Ten cases of gastrointestinal stricture were diagnosed, regardless of initial treatment, after an interval of 20 days to 6 months. The site of the stricture was colonic in 6 patients, ileal in three other patients and ileal and colonic in the remaining patient. The stricture was treated surgically in 9 patients (resection-anastomosis in 6 cases, resection with gastrointestinal diversion in 2 cases and isolated gastrointestinal diversion in 1 case). A follow-up barium enema in 1 patient showed spontaneous resolution of the stricture. With a mean follow-up of 5 years, the over all result was considered to be good in 7 cases and poor in one case. Two deaths were observed, one on the 10th day and the other at the 3rd postoperative day. These complications appeared to be related to the delayed diagnosis and treatment of the stricture. PMID:8787322

  4. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae

    PubMed Central

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A.; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 103/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 103/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy. PMID:26171271

  5. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/μl of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/μl of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed.

  6. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/μl of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/μl of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed. PMID:24937806

  7. Necrotic enteritis in broilers: an updated review on the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Timbermont, L; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis and related subclinical disease have become economically significant problems for the broiler industry. Fortunately, scientific interest in this topic has grown: new C. perfringens virulence factors have been discovered and new insight gained about the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. It has been shown that alpha toxin, for a long time thought to be the key virulence factor, is not essential for the development of the disease. Moreover, it is now clearly established that only certain C. perfringens strains are capable of inducing necrotic enteritis under specific conditions that predispose to the disease and they constitute only a minority in the intestinal tract of healthy chickens. A novel pore-forming toxin, NetB, has been identified in these virulent avian C. perfringens strains. Using a gene knockout mutant, it has been shown that NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. In addition to toxin production, other factors have been described that contribute to the ability of certain C. perfringens strains to cause necrotic enteritis in broilers. It has been suggested that proteolytic enzymes play an important role in the initial stages of necrotic enteritis since the villi are first affected at the level of the basement membrane and the lateral domain of the enterocytes. In field outbreaks of necrotic enteritis, a single clone of C. perfringens is dominant in intestines of all affected birds, as opposed to the mixture of different C. perfringens strains that can be isolated from healthy bird intestines. It has been proposed that bacteriocin production is responsible for the dominance of a single strain in necrotic enteritis cases. Furthermore, it has been shown that virulent strains are more able to adhere to extracellular matrix molecules than non-virulent strains. The current knowledge on the pathogenesis of the disease has been summarized in this short review.

  8. Emaravirus-specific degenerate PCR primers allowed the identification of partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequences of Maize red stripe virus and Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Whitfield, Anna; Sharma, Mamta; Digiaro, Michele

    2013-03-01

    Emaravirus is a recently established viral genus that includes two approved virus species: European mountain ash ringspot-associated virus (EMARaV) and Fig mosaic virus (FMV). Other described but unclassified viruses appear to share biological characteristics similar to emaraviruses, including segmented, negative-single stranded RNA genomes with enveloped virions approximately 80-200nm in diameter. Sequence analysis of emaravirus genomes revealed the presence of conserved amino acid sequences in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (RdRp) denoted as pre-motif A, motifs A and C. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were developed to these conserved sequences and were shown to amplify in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) DNA fragments of 276bp and 360bp in size. These primers efficiently detected emaraviruses with known sequences available in the database (FMV and EMARaV); they also detected viruses with limited sequence information such as Pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV) and Maize red stripe virus (MRSV). The degenerate primers designed on pre-motif A and motif A sequences successfully amplified the four species used as positive controls (276bp), whereas those of motifs A and C failed to detect only MRSV. The amino acid sequences obtained from PPSMV and MRSV shared the highest identity with those of two other tentative species of the Emaravirus genus, Rose rosette virus (RRV) (69%) and Redbud yellow ringspot virus (RYRV) (60%), respectively. The phylogenetic tree constructed with 92 amino acid-long portions of polypeptide putatively encoded by RNA1 of definitive and tentative emaravirus species clustered PPSMV and MRSV in two separate clades close to RRV and Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), respectively. The newly developed degenerate primers have proved their efficacy in amplifying new emaravirus-specific sequences; accordingly, they could be useful in identifying new emaravirus-like species in nature.

  9. Eliminating Tobacco Rattle Virus from Viruliferous Paratrichodorus allius and Establishing a New Virus-Vector Combination.

    PubMed

    Mojtahedi, Hassan; Santo, G S; Thomas, P E; Crosslin, J M; Boydston, R A

    2002-03-01

    A reliable method to eliminate tobacco rattle virus (TRV) from viruliferous Paratrichodorus allius populations was developed. This virus is vectored by P. allius in the Pacific Northwest and causes corky ringspot disease (CRS) of potato. The viruliferous nematodes that were reared on 'Vernema' alfalfa or '770' scotch spearmint for at least 3 months did not transmit TRV to 'Samsun NN' tobacco, a suitable indicator plant, and did not cause CRS symptoms on 'Russet Norkotah' tubers. A new isolate of TRV was introduced into a nonviruliferous population of P. allius. First, tobacco plants were inoculated with a field population of P. allius that transmitted an isolate of TRV that caused severe symptoms on potato. The tobacco roots were then washed free from soil and dipped in 0.525% sodium hypochlorite to remove the initial nematode inoculum. After the disinfected tobacco plants recovered and began to grow, the virus-free population of P. allius was introduced around the root system to acquire the new virus isolate from tobacco roots. The newly established virus-vector combination caused CRS symptoms on 'Russet Norkotah' that were characteristic of the more virulent virus isolate, indicating that the virus-free P. allius population had reacquired virus.

  10. The use of collagenase to improve the detection of plant viruses in vector nematodes by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert R; Pinkerton, Jack N; Kraus, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV), Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) are transmitted to healthy plants by viruliferous nematodes in the soil. A method was developed for extraction of genomic viral RNA from virus particles carried within nematodes and a sensitive nested RT-PCR detection assay. The procedure has been adapted to microscale for handling multiple samples. This assay is effective for detection of ToRSV or TRSV in Xiphinema americanum or TRV in Paratrichodorus allius. With this method, viruses can be detected in nematodes fed on infected plants or from field-collected nematodes where the percentage of viruliferous nematodes is unknown. Soil samples from four red raspberry fields infected with ToRSV were collected in 2003 and 2004. Nematodes isolated from these samples were assayed for ToRSV by RT-PCR and compared to cucumber baiting bioassay for virus transmission from the same soil samples. ToRSV was detected in nematodes throughout the season with similar frequencies by the RT-PCR assay and the transmission bioassay.

  11. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase to treat necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Biesterveld, Ben E.; Koehler, Shannon M.; Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Rentea, Rebecca M.; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R.; Gourlay, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity is decreased in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and IAP supplementation prevents NEC development. It is not known if IAP given after NEC onset can reverse the course of the disease. We hypothesized that enteral IAP given after NEC induction would not reverse intestinal injury. Materials and methods NEC was induced in Sprague–Dawley pups by delivery preterm followed by formula feedings with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and hypoxia exposure and continued up to 4 d. IAP was added to feeds on day 2 until being sacrificed on day 4. NEC severity was scored based on hematoxylin and eosin-stained terminal ileum sections, and AP activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. IAP and interleukin-6 expression were measured using real time polymerase chain reaction. Results NEC pups' alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was decreased to 0.18 U/mg compared with controls of 0.57 U/mg (P < 0.01). Discontinuation of LPS and hypoxia after 2 d increased AP activity to 0.36 U/mg (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation in matched groups did not impact total AP activity or expression. Discontinuing LPS and hypoxia after NEC onset improved intestinal injury scores to 1.14 compared with continued stressors, score 2.25 (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation decreased interleukin-6 expression two-fold (P < 0.05), though did not reverse NEC intestinal damage (P = 0.5). Conclusions This is the first work to demonstrate that removing the source of NEC improves intestinal damage and increases AP activity. When used as a rescue treatment, IAP decreased intestinal inflammation though did not impact injury making it likely that IAP is best used preventatively to those neonates at risk. PMID:25840489

  12. Necrotizing cellulitis with multiple abscesses on the leg caused by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Hau, Estelle; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Saussine, Anne; Masson, Vincent; Rausky, Jonathan; Bagot, Martine; Guibal, Fabien

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is an unusual cause of severe skin infection initially described in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of necrotizing cellulitis of the leg caused by S marcescens in a 68-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus and a history of chronic lymphoedema of the leg. We reviewed the literature and found 49 cases of severe skin infections from S marcescens that included 20 cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) as well as 29 cases of severe skin infections without NF (non-NF cases). Patients were immunocompromised in 59% to 70% of cases. The mortality rate was high in NF cases (60%) versus non-NF cases (3%). Surgery was required in 95% of NF cases and in 24% of non-NF cases. The other clinical manifestations of S marcescens skin infection reported in the literature included disseminated papular eruptions in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus with folliculitis on the trunk. Serratia marcescens is naturally resistant to amoxicillin alone and amoxicillin associated with clavulanic acid. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are indicated to treat S marcescens skin infections, and surgery should be promptly considered in cases of severe skin infections if appropriate antibiotic therapy does not lead to rapid improvement.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall Caused by Serratia Marcescens.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Naheed A; Narsinghani, Umesh; Kumar, Ritu

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we present the first case of necrotizing fasciitis affecting the abdominal wall caused by Serratia marcescens and share results of a focused review of S. marcescens induced necrotizing fasciitis. Our patient underwent aorto-femoral bypass grafting for advanced peripheral vascular disease and presented 3 weeks postoperatively with pain, erythema and discharge from the incision site in the left lower abdominal wall and underwent multiple debridement of the affected area. Pathology of debrided tissue indicated extensive necrosis involving the adipose tissue, fascia and skeletal muscle. Wound cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. She was successfully treated with antibiotics and multiple surgical debridements. Since necrotizing fasciitis is a medical and surgical emergency, it is critical to examine infectivity trends, clinical characteristics in its causative spectrum. Using PubMed we found 17 published cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens, and then analyzed patterns among those cases. Serratia marcescens is prominent in the community and hospital settings, and information on infection presentations, risk factors, characteristics, treatment, course, and complications as provided through this study can help identify cases earlier and mitigate poor outcomes. Patients with positive blood cultures and those patients where surgical intervention was not provided or delayed had a higher mortality. Surgical intervention is a definite way to establish the diagnosis of necrotizing infection and differentiate it from other entities.

  14. A necrotic cell death model in a protist.

    PubMed

    Laporte, C; Kosta, A; Klein, G; Aubry, L; Lam, D; Tresse, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    2007-02-01

    While necrotic cell death is attracting considerable interest, its molecular bases are still poorly understood. Investigations in simple biological models, taken for instance outside the animal kingdom, may benefit from less interference from other cell death mechanisms and from better experimental accessibility, while providing phylogenetic information. Can necrotic cell death occur outside the animal kingdom? In the protist Dictyostelium, developmental stimuli induced in an autophagy mutant a stereotyped sequence of events characteristic of necrotic cell death. This sequence included swift mitochondrial uncoupling with mitochondrial 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, ATP depletion and increased oxygen consumption. This was followed by perinuclear clustering of dilated mitochondria. Rapid plasma membrane rupture then occurred, which was evidenced by time-lapse videos and quantified by FACS. Of additional interest, developmental stimuli and classical mitochondrial uncouplers triggered a similar sequence of events, and exogenous glucose delayed plasma membrane rupture in a nonglycolytic manner. The occurrence of necrotic cell death in the protist Dictyostelium (1) provides a very favorable model for further study of this type of cell death, and (2) strongly suggests that the mechanism underlying necrotic cell death was present in an ancestor common to the Amoebozoa protists and to animals and has been conserved in evolution.

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis and death following an insect bite.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh Malcolm G; Kaluarachchi, Chandishni I; Ratnatunga, Champa N

    2013-09-01

    A healthy man who presented to hospital with painful swelling of the left arm following a history of insect (tick) bite developed shock and died within 48 hours. The postmortem examination revealed swelling and desquamation of skin and erythema on the left arm extending below the elbow. The subcutaneous tissue was necrotic with healthy underlying muscles. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus was isolated from postmortem swabs of the infected tissue. Histopathologic changes were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.Secondary bacterial infection is an important possible complication following insect bite, and a high degree of suspicion with aggressive early treatment is required in cases of necrotizing fasciitis to prevent fatalities. Both clinicians and pathologists need to be aware of this rare, rapidly fatal condition that may follow an insect bite.

  16. Necrotizing sialometaplasia masquerading as residual cancer of the lip.

    PubMed

    Granick, M S; Solomon, M P; Benedetto, A V; Hannegan, M W; Sohn, M

    1988-08-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign disorder that histologically can mimic carcinoma. It is thought to develop as a result of ischemia or adjacent tissue injury. A patient is described who underwent a Mohs' micrographical fresh-tissue excision of one-third of the upper lip for basal cell carcinoma. By the time she was ready for reconstruction, a marked eczematous reaction developed to a polymyxin neomycin preparation (Neosporin ointment) at the wound edges. Reexcision of the wound margins before a flap reconstruction revealed necrotizing sialometaplasia on histopathological examination. This incidental finding fortunately was not mistaken for residual tumor. To prevent over-diagnosis and over-treatment of presumed malignancies, an awareness of necrotizing sialometaplasia is essential for all surgeons operating on mucosal surfaces in the head and neck.

  17. Craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin with mediastinal extension.

    PubMed

    Edwards, John D; Sadeghi, Nader; Najam, Farzad; Margolis, Mark

    2004-08-01

    We review an interesting case of craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis with thoracic extension in an immunocompetent 44-year-old man. The patient underwent aggressive medical and surgical management during a long hospitalization. Multiple surgical debridements, including transcervical mediastinal debridement, and eventually a thoracotomy for mediastinal abscess were required. The patient eventually recovered, and 3 months later he showed no sign of complications or recurrence. Craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft-tissue infection, usually of odontogenic origin, that requires prompt identification and treatment to ensure survival. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, aggressive surgical debridement and wound care, hyperbaric oxygen, and good intensive care are the mainstays of treatment.

  18. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: literature review and presentation of five cases.

    PubMed

    Grillon, G L; Lally, E T

    1981-10-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, ulcerative, inflammatory process of the minor salivary glands, primarily found in the hard palate. It is often mistaken clinically and histologically for a malignant tumor (that is, mucoepidermoid or squamous cell carcinoma). The lesion heals spontaneously in six to 12 weeks. It occurs primarily in persons between the ages of 40 and 60 and has been reported more frequently in men than women. In necrotizing sialometaplasia the squamous metaplasia and tissue necrosis is confined to the existing ductal and lobular pattern of the salivary glands, a unique characteristic that aids in diagnosis. Five additional cases are presented.

  19. [Method and procedures in bacteriological study of necrotic teeth].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ponce, A; López Campos, A; López Paz, J; Pazos Sierra, R

    1991-01-01

    Research was conducted of 160 radicular canals with necrotic pulp. Results of different bacteriological analyses are presented. Culture analyses in aerobic and anaerobic media, resulted in the isolation of Staphylococcus Epidermidis, Streptococcus Viridans and Corynebacterium sp in the group studied, as the most frequent bacteria. There was no evidence of a specific germ linked with the pulp necrosis.

  20. IVIG-mediated protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by MRSA.

    PubMed

    Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Badiou, Cedric; Le, Hoan N; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Duong, Au H; Wang, Xing; Dip, Etyene Castro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; Basuino, Li; Marbach, Helene; Mai, Thuy T; Sarda, Marie N; Kajikawa, Osamu; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Tkaczyk, Christine; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Sellman, Bret R; Chambers, Henry F; Lina, Gerard

    2016-09-21

    New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed to improve survival outcomes for patients with necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus One such approach is adjunctive treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), but clinical practice guidelines offer conflicting recommendations. In a preclinical rabbit model, prophylaxis with IVIG conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia caused by five different epidemic strains of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) as well as a widespread strain of hospital-associated MRSA. Treatment with IVIG, either alone or in combination with vancomycin or linezolid, improved survival outcomes in this rabbit model. Two specific IVIG antibodies that neutralized the toxic effects of α-hemolysin (Hla) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) conferred protection against necrotizing pneumonia in the rabbit model. This mechanism of action of IVIG was uncovered by analyzing loss-of-function mutant bacterial strains containing deletions in 17 genes encoding staphylococcal exotoxins, which revealed only Hla and PVL as having an impact on necrotizing pneumonia. These results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of IVIG in the treatment of severe pneumonia induced by S. aureus. PMID:27655850

  1. Identification of cultivable microorganisms from primary teeth with necrotic pulps.

    PubMed

    Ledezma-Rasillo, Gildardo; Flores-Reyes, Hector; Gonzalez-Amaro, Ana M; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Ruiz-Rodriguez, M del Socorro; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify cultivable microorganisms from primary teeth with necrotic pulps. This experimental study included 21 patients of both sexes between 4 and 7 years of age with necrotic pulps in primary teeth. Twenty-one maxillary and mandibular molars containing at least 1 necrotic canal, an abscess or sinus tract, one or more radiolucent areas in the furcation or periapical region, teeth having at least two thirds of root length, and carious lesions directly exposed to the oral environment were included. After antisepsis of the oral cavity, anesthesia of the affected tooth, and isolation and disinfection of the operative field, 3 sterile absorbent paper points were sequentially placed for 30 seconds for the collection of samples. The samples were immediately processed in an anaerobic chamber, and all isolated microorganisms were identified. Anaerobic species (anaerobic facultative and moderate anaerobes) were isolated in all root canals; 68.4% of root canal samples studied showed a polymicrobial nature. Most of the isolate consisted of Bifidobacterium Spp2 and Streptococcus intermedius. Other less frequently encountered species were Actinomyces israelii, Bifidobacterium spp 1, Clostridium spp, and Candida albicans. Results indicate the existence of combinations of bacterial species in root canal infections of the primary dentition with necrotic pulps, anaerobic bacteria predominating.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis – a diagnostic dilemma: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Necrotizing soft tissue infections can affect various tissue planes. Although predisposing etiologies are many, they mostly center on impaired immunity occurring directly or indirectly and loss of integrity of protective barriers which predispose to infection. The nonspecific presentation may delay diagnosis and favor high mortality. Case presentation Two case vignettes are presented. The first patient, a 44-year-old healthy South Asian man with a history of repeated minor traumatic injury presented to a primary health care center with a swollen left lower limb. He was treated with antibiotics with an initial diagnosis of cellulitis. Because he deteriorated rapidly and additionally developed intestinal obstruction, he was transferred to our hospital which is a tertiary health care center for further evaluation and management. Prompt clinical diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infection was made and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging as necrotizing fasciitis. Urgent debridement was done, but the already spread infection resulted in rapid clinical deterioration with resultant mortality. The second patient was a 35-year-old South Asian woman with systemic lupus erythematous receiving immunosuppressive therapy who developed left lower limb pain and fever. Medical attention was sought late as she came to the hospital after 4 days. Her condition deteriorated rapidly as she developed septic shock and died within 2 days. Conclusions Necrotizing fasciitis can be fatal when not recognized and without early intervention. Clinicians and surgeons alike should have a greater level of suspicion and appreciation for this uncommon yet lethal infection. PMID:24965382

  3. [Method and procedures in bacteriological study of necrotic teeth].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ponce, A; López Campos, A; López Paz, J; Pazos Sierra, R

    1991-01-01

    Research was conducted of 160 radicular canals with necrotic pulp. Results of different bacteriological analyses are presented. Culture analyses in aerobic and anaerobic media, resulted in the isolation of Staphylococcus Epidermidis, Streptococcus Viridans and Corynebacterium sp in the group studied, as the most frequent bacteria. There was no evidence of a specific germ linked with the pulp necrosis. PMID:1659855

  4. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains the most severe gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. It is associated with the initiation of enteral nutrition and may be related to immature carbohydrate digestive capacity. We tested the hypothesis that a formula containing maltodextrin vs. lactose ...

  5. Temporary feed restriction partially protects broilers from necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, Chr; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feed restriction on the intestinal ecosystem and on the pathogenesis of experimental necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. To induce subclinical necrotic enteritis, an experimental challenge model using a specific diet formulation, Gumboro vaccination, oral inoculation of broilers with a 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens was adopted. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old Cobb 500 broilers were randomly allocated to four groups: feed restricted, challenged, both feed restricted and challenged, and negative control. At 21, 22, 23 and 24 days of age, the intestines, gizzard and liver were collected from 15 birds in each group and scored for gross lesions. The intestinal digesta was collected for pH and viscosity determination. One caecum from each bird was taken for microbiological analysis. The application of feed restriction in birds challenged with C. perfringens reduced the necrotic enteritis lesion score significantly (P ≤ 0.05) and feed restriction significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) pH in the small intestine, the viscosity of the jejunum digesta as well as the C. perfringens counts in the caeca compared with the controls. In conclusion, feed restriction of broilers has a positive effect on the intestinal ecosystem and a significant protective effect against necrotic enteritis in the subclinical experimental model.

  6. Two cases of an atypical presentation of necrotizing stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of two rare cases of necrotizing stomatitis, and the outcomes of a non-invasive treatment protocol applied in both cases. Methods We report two cases of necrotizing stomatitis in a rare location in the hard palate of a 40-year-old woman and a 28-year-old man. Neither had a relevant medical history and both presented with highly painful ulceration in the palate and gingival margin that was accompanied by suppuration and necrosis. 3% hydrogen peroxide was applied to the lesions using sterile swabs, and antibiotic and anti-inflammatory treatment was prescribed to both patients in addition to two daily oral rinses of 0.2% chlorhexidine. Results In both cases, radiological examination ruled out bone involvement, and exfoliative cytology revealed a large inflammatory component and the presence of forms compatible with fusobacteria and spirochetes. There was a rapid response to treatment and a major improvement was observed after 48 hours, with almost complete resolution of the ulcerated lesions and detachment of necrotic areas with partial decapitation of gingival papillae. Conclusions Necrotizing periodontal lesions can hinder periodontal probing and the mechanical removal of plaque in some cases due to the extreme pain suffered by the patients. We present a non-invasive treatment approach that can manage these situations effectively. PMID:26734496

  7. [Acute necrotizing esophagitis (black esophagus) with secondary severe stenosis].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Álvaro A; Guerrero, Diego; Hani, Albis C; Cañadas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 67 years old patient with a history of diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and chronic renal failure, who developed diabetic ketoacidosis and severe sepsis, later presenting an acute necrotizing esophagitis, and then a esophageal stenosis requiring treatment with self-expanding esophageal prosthesis with good clinical results. PMID:26802889

  8. [Necrotizing sialometaplasia--diagnostic difficulties--literature review].

    PubMed

    Jamróz-Wilkońskaa, Lidia; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Wilkoński, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting inflammatory process, which concerns small salivary glands. This kind of lesion is very rare, with difficulties in clinical and histopathological diagnosis. Ulceration is the dominating symptom, which may suggest that it is a malignancy. Lesions usually heal spontaneously.

  9. Molecular beacons: a new approach to plant virus detection.

    PubMed

    Eun, A J; Wong, S M

    2000-03-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular beacons are single-stranded nucleic acid molecules with a stem-loop conformation. The stem portion consists of complementary sequences at the 5' and 3' terminals of the molecule, while the loop portion consists of probe sequences that are complementary to the target sequences of choice. A fluorescent moiety is attached to one end, while a quenching moiety is attached to the opposite end. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions are carried out with primers that amplify specific genome sequences of interest, yielding targets complementary to their respective molecular beacons for subsequent detection. Here, we have designed four molecular beacons specific to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and coat protein genes of two orchid viruses, namely Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV). This technology is successfully applied to detect as little as 0.5 ng of viral RNA of both orchid viruses simultaneously in 100 mg of coinfected Oncidium orchid leaves. This rapid and specific technique is applicable to the orchid industry, which routinely carries out virus indexing and screening for virus-resistant cultivars. We belief that use of this molecular beacon approach can be extended to the detection of multiple plant viruses in various crops.

  10. Necrotizing sialometaplasia in the mouth floor secondary to reconstructive surgery for tongue carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Kuwabara, N; Shiotsu, H; Fukuda, Y; Yanai, A; Ichikawa, G

    1991-09-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign inflammatory process, which histologically can mimic squamous cell carcinoma. A 63-year-old man underwent left hemiglossectomy involving transplantation of a myocutaneous flap for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. One month after the operation, necrotizing sialometaplasia occurred in the minor salivary gland tissue of the mouth floor, compressed by the necrotic flap. This case is very unusual because of the occurrence of necrotizing sialometaplasia in the floor of the mouth. The etiology of the lesion was considered to be ischemia secondary to compression by the necrotic myocutaneous flap.

  11. Localization of Transmissible and Nontransmissible Viruses in the Vector Nematode Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouhua; Gergerich, Rose C; Wickizer, Sandra L; Kim, Kyung S

    2002-06-01

    ABSTRACT The inner lining of the food canal of nematodes that transmit plantinfecting viruses is regarded as the retention region of viruses. To characterize the location of transmissible and nontransmissible viruses in the vector nematode Xiphinema americanum, three nepoviruses, Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), Tomato ringspot virus(TomRSV), and Cherry leaf roll virus(CLRV), and one non-nematode-transmissible virus, Squash mosaic virus (SqMV), were evaluated for transmission efficiency and localization sites in the nematode. Transmission trials showed highest transmission efficiency for TomRSV (38% with 1 and 100% with 10 nematodes, respectively), intermediate efficiency for TRSV (27% with 1 and 65% with 10 nematodes, respectively), and no transmission for CLRV and SqMV. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescent labeling revealed that TRSV was primarily localized to the lining of the lumen of the stylet extension and the anterior esophagus, but only rarely in the triradiate lumen. Within a nematode population, particles of TRSV were no longer observed in these three regions 10 weeks after acquisition, and it is assumed that there was gradual and random loss of the virus from these areas. The percentage of nematodes that were labeled by virus-specific immunofluorescent labeling in a population of viruliferous nematodes decreased gradually after TRSV acquisition when the nematodes were placed on a nonhost of the virus, and the loss of immunofluorescent labeling paralleled the decrease in the ability of the nematode population to transmit the virus. TomRSV was localized only in the triradiate lumen based on thin-section electron microscopy. No virus-like particles were observed in any part of the food canal of nematodes that had fed on CLRV-infected plants. Virus-like particles that appeared to be partially degraded were observed only in the triradiate lumen of nematodes that had fed on SqMV-infected plants. These results clarified the status of localization of two

  12. Treatment of Necrotic Calcified Tooth Using Intentional Replantation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Arvin, Armita; Darvish, Alireza; Aflaki, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. If the teeth are impacted by a chronic irritant, the pulp space possibly will undergo calcific changes that may impede access opening during root canal treatment. In such cases that conventional endodontic treatment is impossible or impractical, intentional replantation may be considered as a last solution to preserve the tooth. Methods. After failing to perform conventional root canal therapy for a necrotic calcified right mandibular second premolar, the tooth was gently extracted. The root apex was resected and the root end cavity was prepared and filled with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Then, the extracted tooth was replanted in its original position. Results. After a year the tooth was asymptomatic, and the size of periapical radiolucency was remarkably reduced and no clinical sign of ankylosis was observed. Conclusion. Intentional replantation of the necrotic calcified teeth could be considered as an alternative to teeth extraction, especially for the single-rooted teeth and when nonsurgical and surgical endodontic procedures seem impossible. PMID:24716000

  13. Treatment of necrotic calcified tooth using intentional replantation procedure.

    PubMed

    Moradi Majd, Nima; Arvin, Armita; Darvish, Alireza; Aflaki, Sareh; Homayouni, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. If the teeth are impacted by a chronic irritant, the pulp space possibly will undergo calcific changes that may impede access opening during root canal treatment. In such cases that conventional endodontic treatment is impossible or impractical, intentional replantation may be considered as a last solution to preserve the tooth. Methods. After failing to perform conventional root canal therapy for a necrotic calcified right mandibular second premolar, the tooth was gently extracted. The root apex was resected and the root end cavity was prepared and filled with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Then, the extracted tooth was replanted in its original position. Results. After a year the tooth was asymptomatic, and the size of periapical radiolucency was remarkably reduced and no clinical sign of ankylosis was observed. Conclusion. Intentional replantation of the necrotic calcified teeth could be considered as an alternative to teeth extraction, especially for the single-rooted teeth and when nonsurgical and surgical endodontic procedures seem impossible.

  14. Transfusion-associated Necrotizing Enterocolitis (TANEC): Evidence and Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Gephart, Sheila M.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-associated Necrotizing Enterocolitis (TANEC) has been described as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that arises within 48 hours of a blood transfusion. [1, 2] TANEC is concerning to clinicians and has been shown to be associated with 25–35% of NEC in recent studies. Evidence related to TANEC is limited to observational, retrospective studies. Infants who develop TANEC tend to be smaller, born at earlier gestation, more severely ill and develop NEC after 30 days of age. Evidence in two studies support holding feedings during transfusion to protect the preterm gut from the cascade of events that lead to NEC but higher quality research, including prospective randomized controlled trials, is needed to evaluate the effect of feeding on TANEC. PMID:22864004

  15. A mesenteric hernia complicated with a triple necrotic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Davide; Santoro, Stefano; Bernardi, Filippo; Lima, Mario

    2012-09-24

    A 6-year-old girl was admitted to the paediatric emergency department with colicky abdominal pain. She had a significant medical history, with four previous admissions due to recurrent abdominal pain in the past year. On examination the abdomen was soft, there was no rebound tenderness and Rovsing's sign was negative. Her blood tests revealed a raised white cells count, although her C reactive protein was within the normal range. Abdominal x-ray revealed small bowel obstruction. During her assessment the patient rapidly deteriorated and seemed to go into shock. Her clinical state in addition to the radiological findings meant that she was taken to theatre for surgical exploration. This showed a triple volvulus with necrotic bowel loops that had herniated through a mesenteric defect. The necrotic bowel was subsequently resected.

  16. Brevipalpus-transmitted plant virus and virus-like diseases: cytopathology and some recent cases.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, E W; Chagas, C M; Rodrigues, J C V

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of diseases transmitted by Brevipalpus mite species (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) is being identified that affect economically important plants such as citrus, coffee, passion fruit, orchids, and several ornamentals. All of these diseases are characterized by localized lesions (chlorotic, green spots, or ringspots) on leaves, stems, and fruits. Virus or virus-like agents are considered to be the causal agents, possibly transmitted in a circulative-propagative manner by Brevipalpus mites. The virus or virus-like particles are short, rod-like, or bacilliform, that induce two characteristic types of cell alteration: (1) 'Nuclear type'--nuclei of parenchyma and epidermal cells in the lesions often contain a large electron lucent inclusion. Short, naked, rod-like (40-50 nm x 100-110 nm) particles may be seen in the viroplasm or nucleoplasm and in the cytoplasm. These particles are commonly arranged perpendicularly on the membranes of the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In a very few instances, they were found to be membrane-bound, within the ER cavities. (2) 'Cytoplasmic type'--short bacilliform particles (60-70 nm x 110-120 nm) are present within the cisternae of the ER and often have electron dense viroplasm of varied shapes present in the cytoplasm. Bacilliform particles may be seen budding into the ER lumen near the viroplasm. These particles resemble those of members of the Rhabdoviridae, but are shorter. The only sequenced virus of this group, orchid fleck virus (OFV), has a negative sense (bipartite) type ssRNA genome, but its organization is similar to known rhabdoviruses, which are monopartite. Both types of cytopathological effects have been found associated with citrus leprosis. In orchids, OFV has a 'nuclear type' of cytopathology, but in some species the 'cytoplasmic type' has been found associated with ringspot symptoms. In Hibiscus and Clerodendron, green spot symptoms have been associated with the cytoplasmic type of cell

  17. A case of Apophysomyces trapeziformis necrotizing soft tissue infection.

    PubMed

    Echaiz, Jose F; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Bailey, Thomas C

    2013-12-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare and devastating disease. Apophysomyces trapeziformis is an environmental mold that was recently implicated in several cases of cutaneous and soft tissue mucormycosis in victims of a tornado in Joplin, Missouri. Here, we report a case of Apophysomyces trapeziformis necrotizing soft tissue infection in a resident of Joplin 10 months after the disaster and without preceding trauma. Aspects of histological and microbiological diagnosis are also reviewed. PMID:23891642

  18. Ahmed glaucoma valve surgery for necrotizing scleritis with secondary glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Abhishek; Rao, Aparna

    2014-04-01

    To report the challenges in management in a case of scleritis with extensive staphylomas with secondary glaucoma. A 35-year-old one eyed female, a known case of scleromalacia perforans, presented with raised intraocular pressure on maximum medical treatment. She underwent successful Ahmed glaucoma valve surgery with exposure of the implant following a repeat episode of necrotizing scleritis after 3 months. Management of eyes with scleritis and secondary glaucoma can be challenging with unexpected complications and postoperative course.

  19. Current trends in the management of infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Lappas, Christos; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Delis, Spiros G; Safioleas, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with an aggravated prognosis, while superimposed infection is almost always lethal without surgery. Bacterial translocation mainly from the gut is the most widely accepted mechanism in the pathogenesis of infected pancreatic necrosis. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be suspected in the presence of the usual markers of systemic inflammation (i.e., fever and leukocytosis), organ failure, or a protracted severe clinical course. The diagnostic method of choice to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis is contrast-enhanced computed tomography, where necrotic areas are evidenced as regions without enhancement. The presence of pancreatic necrotic infection should be based on a combination of clinical manifestations, results of laboratory investigation (mainly increased levels of CRP and / or procalcitonin), and can be confirmed by image-guided fine-needle aspiration and gram stain /culture of the aspirates. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for the management of infected pancreatic necrosis and involves open necrosectomy (debridement) and wide drainage of the peripancreatic areas, often in association with continuous irrigation. Planned reoperations may be required to achieve complete removal of the necrotic / infected material. The timing of surgery is of paramount importance; ideally, surgery should be performed after 2 or 3 weeks from the onset of pancreatitis. Recently, various minimally invasive approaches have been described, but they have not been compared in prospective trials with the classical open surgery. Antibiotic therapy is routinely used in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, in conjunction with surgical debridement; its role, however, in the management of patients with sterile necrosis is recently questioned. Nutritional support should be taken into consideration in these patients; enteral nutrition should be preferred over

  20. Membranous glomerulopathy with superimposed pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Huma; Siew, Edward D.; Dwyer, Jamie P.; Paueksakon, Paisit

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 61-year-old woman with acute kidney injury, nephrotic range proteinuria and hematuria. Kidney biopsy showed membranous glomerulopathy (MG) with superimposed pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis (PNCGN). Coexistent MG and PNCGN is a rare occurrence. The diagnosis of such an exceptionally rare combination relies on the combination of renal biopsy findings and serologic testing. We also review previous reported cases and discuss possible pathogenesis of this rare dual glomerulopathy. PMID:26069808

  1. Necrotizing hepatitis in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Himmel, L; O'Connor, M; Premanandan, C

    2014-11-01

    An adult male domestic pigeon (Columba livia) was presented for necropsy following natural death after a period of chronic weight loss and severe intestinal ascariasis. Histopathologic examination of the liver found moderate to marked, multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with large, basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy of affected hepatocytes demonstrated numerous intra- and perinuclear icosahedral virions arranged in a lattice structure, consistent with adenoviral infection.

  2. Necrotizing sialometaplasia involving the mucous glands of the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, W H

    1977-09-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia was found in maxillary sinus mucous glands of an 83 year old woman who had undergone a radical maxillectomy for basal cell carcinoma 10 days earlier. Previously recognized as an ulcerating lesion involving salivary glands in the oral cavity, this benign reactive process may also occur in the mucous glands of the nasal cavity and sinuses and can simulate squamous cell or mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Ischemia appears to be pathogenetic.

  3. NetB and necrotic enteritis: the hole movable story.

    PubMed

    Rood, Julian I; Keyburn, Anthony L; Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the primary causative agent of avian necrotic enteritis. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of this economically important disease has been enhanced by the discovery of C. perfringens NetB toxin, which belongs to the α-haemolysin family of β-pore-forming toxins. In a chicken disease model, the analysis of an isogenic set of strains comprising the wild type, a netB mutant, and its complemented derivative, fulfilled molecular Koch's postulates and revealed that NetB was essential for disease. These results were consistent with epidemiological surveys, which generally found that there was a higher prevalence of netB carriage in C. perfringens isolates from diseased poultry compared to healthy birds. The netB gene has been shown to be located on large conjugative plasmids that are closely related to other toxin plasmids from C. perfringens, which has potential implications for the epidemiology of necrotic enteritis infections. The crystal structures of both monomeric NetB and the heptameric NetB pore have been determined, the latter revealed a central pore diameter of approximately 26 Å. Finally, it has been shown that vaccine preparations that include NetB can protect chickens against disease and a series of single amino acid substitution derivatives of NetB that have potential value for vaccine formulations have been isolated and analysed. It is likely that NetB will be an important antigen to include in an effective, commercially viable, necrotic enteritis vaccine. PMID:27009522

  4. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  5. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  6. Bacteriological analysis of necrotic pulp and fistulae in primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    FABRIS, Antônio Scalco; NAKANO, Viviane; AVILA-CAMPOS, Mario Júlio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Primary teeth work as guides for the eruption of permanent dentition, contribute for the development of the jaws, chewing process, preparing food for digestion, and nutrient assimilation. Treatment of pulp necrosis in primary teeth is complex due to anatomical and physiological characteristics and high number of bacterial species present in endodontic infections. The bacterial presence alone or in association in necrotic pulp and fistula samples from primary teeth of boys and girls was evaluated. Material and Methods Necrotic pulp (103) and fistula (7) samples from deciduous teeth with deep caries of 110 children were evaluated. Bacterial morphotypes and species from all clinical samples were determined. Results A predominance of gram-positive cocci (81.8%) and gram-negative coccobacilli (49.1%) was observed. In 88 out of 103 pulp samples, a high prevalence of Enterococcus spp. (50%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (49%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (25%) and Prevotella nigrescens (11.4%) was observed. Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in three out of seven fistula samples, Enterococcus spp. in two out of seven samples, and F. nucleatum, P. nigrescens and D. pneumosintes in one out of seven samples. Conclusions Our results show that Enterococcus spp. and P. gingivalis were prevalent in necrotic pulp from deciduous teeth in boys from 2 to 5 years old, and that care of the oral cavity of children up to five years of age is important. PMID:24676582

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis: epidemiology and clinical predictors for amputation

    PubMed Central

    Khamnuan, Patcharin; Chongruksut, Wilaiwan; Jearwattanakanok, Kijja; Patumanond, Jayanton; Tantraworasin, Apichat

    2015-01-01

    Background Necrotizing fasciitis, a relatively uncommon infection involving the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia, is a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection and a medical and surgical urgency. Delayed debridement, with subsequent huge soft tissue loss is associated with loss of limb and infection and is the most common cause of mortality. The purpose of this work is to describe the epidemiology of necrotizing fasciitis and to identify the clinical characteristics that may be used to predict amputation in routine clinical practice. Methods Retrospective cohort study data were collected from three general hospitals located in the Chiang Rai, Kamphaeng Phet, and Phayao provinces in northern Thailand. Epidemiologic data for all patients with a surgically confirmed diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis between 2009 and 2012 were collected. Medical records and reviews were retrieved from inpatient records, laboratory reports, and registers. Clinical predictors for amputation were analyzed by multivariable risk regression. Results A total of 1,507 patients with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis were classified as being with amputation (n=127, 8.4%) and without amputation (n=1,380, 91.6%). The most common causative Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens were Streptococcus pyogenes (33.3% in the amputation group and 40.8% in the non-amputation group) and Escherichia coli (25% in the amputation group and 17.1% in the non-amputation group). Predictive factors for amputation included gangrene (risk ratio [RR] 4.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.70–8.44), diabetes mellitus (RR 3.08, 95% CI 1.98–4.78), skin necrosis (RR 2.83, 95% CI 2.52–3.18), soft tissue swelling (RR 1.76, 95% CI 1.24–2.49), and serum creatinine values ≥1.6 mg/dL on admission (RR 1.71, 95% CI 1.38–2.12). All data were analyzed using the multivariable risk regression generalized linear model. Conclusion The most causative pathogens were S. pyogenes and E. coli. Clinical predictors for

  8. Severity of necrotizing enterocolitis: influence on outcome at 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M C; Kliegman, R M; Hack, M

    1989-11-01

    The long-term outcome of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants with necrotizing enterocolitis has been reported to be similar to that of other VLBW infants. To examine the influence of disease severity on outcome, the growth and neurodevelopment of survivors of necrotizing enterocolitis were evaluated when the babies were 20 months' corrected age. Between 1975 and 1983, 1506 VLBW infants were admitted to the hospital, and necrotizing enterocolitis developed in 84 (5.6%). Forty infants (48%) survived to be 20 months' corrected age, and complete follow-up data were available for 36. Survivors were classified by modified Bell's criteria into four groups by increasing severity of disease; 13 had mild necrotizing enterocolitis (stage IIA, IIB), and 23 had severe necrotizing enterocolitis (stage IIIA, IIIB). The 36 survivors were compared with 766 surviving VLBW infants without necrotizing enterocolitis. There were no perinatal or socioeconomic differences between groups. Compared with infants with stage II necrotizing enterocolitis at 20 months, infants with stage III necrotizing enterocolitis had a higher rate of subnormal body weight (39% vs 15%) and subnormal head circumference (30% vs 0%). Thirty-three percent of necrotizing enterocolitis survivors had significant neurodevelopmental impairment; the majority of impaired infants (10 of 12) were survivors of stage III necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings highlight the importance of continued evaluations for medical and neurodevelopmental sequelae.

  9. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the larynx associated with necrotizing sialometaplasia--a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Tomaas; Trolle, Waldemar; Kiss, Katalin; Balle, Viggo Hulthin

    2009-12-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting, inflammatory process involving salivary glands, commonly associated with tissue ischemia. Clinically, necrotizing sialometaplasia is most often found in the hard palate as a deep ulcer with raised, indurated edges that can be indolent. This, as well as the histopathologic findings of necrotizing sialometaplasia, can be confused with those of a malignant neoplasm. We report a rare case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in the larynx, probably initiated by an underlying malignant process. We suggest an aggressive diagnostic approach, when necrotizing sialometaplasia involves the larynx and no recent exposure to radiation, surgery or trauma has been recorded. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the larynx should be regarded as secondary to malignancy until proven otherwise.

  10. Necrotizing Sialometaplasia of the Hard Palate: A Rare Entity of Dilemma on Cytology, Confirmatory on Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Archana; Chowdappa, Vijaya; Devasamudra, Chidananda R; Janardhan, Jayalakshmi Valligari

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a rare, benign reactive necrotizing lesion, involving sites where salivary gland tissue is usually present. The importance of this lesion is that it mimics malignancy clinically leading to treatments ranging from conservative excision to total maxillectomy. Cytologically and histologically also the lesion is often confused with neoplasms. We present a case of a lady with a hard palatal swelling, which was non - ulcerative unlike typical cases of necrotizing sialometaplsia. FNAC features made us strongly suspect a low grade mucoepidermiod carcinoma, following which the swelling was excised. Histopathology came to the rescue, on which the final diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate was made. Necrotizing siaometaplasia is often misdiagnosed by the inexperienced cytologist, with histopathological examination being confirmatory. We also emphasize the fact that lesions like necrotizing sialometaplasia need a high degree of suspicion along with clinical co relation before subjecting the patient to unnecessary surgical procedures.

  11. A Fatal Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by a Highly Virulent Escherichia coli Strain

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, André; Lin, Alex; Harel, Josée; Côté, Jean-Charles; Tremblay, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious disease characterized by the necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. E. coli as the etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is a rare occurrence. A 66-year-old woman underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She rapidly developed necrotizing fasciitis which led to her death 68 hours following surgery. An E. coli strain was isolated from blood and fascia cultures. DNA microarray revealed the presence of 20 virulence genes. PMID:27366162

  12. pH-dependent recognition of apoptotic and necrotic cells by the human dendritic cell receptor DEC205

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Longxing; Shi, Xiangyi; Chang, Haishuang; Zhang, Qinfen; He, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play important roles in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. DEC205 (CD205) is one of the major endocytotic receptors on dendritic cells and has been widely used for vaccine generation against viruses and tumors. However, little is known about its structure and functional mechanism. Here we determine the structure of the human DEC205 ectodomain by cryoelectron microscopy. The structure shows that the 12 extracellular domains form a compact double ring-shaped conformation at acidic pH and become extended at basic pH. Biochemical data indicate that the pH-dependent conformational change of DEC205 is correlated with ligand binding and release. DEC205 only binds to apoptotic and necrotic cells at acidic pH, whereas live cells cannot be recognized by DEC205 at either acidic or basic conditions. These results suggest that DEC205 is an immune receptor that recognizes apoptotic and necrotic cells specifically through a pH-dependent mechanism. PMID:26039988

  13. pH-Dependent recognition of apoptotic and necrotic cells by the human dendritic cell receptor DEC205.

    PubMed

    Cao, Longxing; Shi, Xiangyi; Chang, Haishuang; Zhang, Qinfen; He, Yongning

    2015-06-01

    Dendritic cells play important roles in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. DEC205 (CD205) is one of the major endocytotic receptors on dendritic cells and has been widely used for vaccine generation against viruses and tumors. However, little is known about its structure and functional mechanism. Here we determine the structure of the human DEC205 ectodomain by cryoelectron microscopy. The structure shows that the 12 extracellular domains form a compact double ring-shaped conformation at acidic pH and become extended at basic pH. Biochemical data indicate that the pH-dependent conformational change of DEC205 is correlated with ligand binding and release. DEC205 only binds to apoptotic and necrotic cells at acidic pH, whereas live cells cannot be recognized by DEC205 at either acidic or basic conditions. These results suggest that DEC205 is an immune receptor that recognizes apoptotic and necrotic cells specifically through a pH-dependent mechanism.

  14. Necrotizing hepatitis in pet birds associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M K; Phillips, S N

    1996-01-01

    Six pet birds, from a flock of 100 birds of various species, died within a 2-day period. Drinking water had recently been changed from potable water to irrigation water. Three birds submitted for necropsy had hepatic necrosis with numerous gram-negative rodshaped bacteria present in necrotic areas and Kuppfer cells. Pseudomonas fluorescens was isolated in pure culture from the livers of all three birds and from other organs. This is the first report of naturally occurring disease in which P. fluorescens was the sole etiologic agent identified. PMID:8790902

  15. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-01-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs. PMID:18159451

  16. Update in Pathogenesis and Prospective in Treatment of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Terrin, Gianluca; Scipione, Antonella; De Curtis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is among the most common and devastating diseases in neonates and, despite the significant advances in neonatal clinical and basic science investigations, its etiology is largely understood, specific treatment strategies are lacking, and morbidity and mortality remain high. Improvements in the understanding of pathogenesis of NEC may have therapeutic consequences. Pharmacologic inhibition of toll-like receptor signaling, the use of novel nutritional strategies, and microflora modulation may represent novel promising approaches to the prevention and treatment of NEC. This review, starting from the recent acquisitions in the pathogenic mechanisms of NEC, focuses on current and possible therapeutic perspectives. PMID:25147804

  17. Olanzapine-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Yadlapalli, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1996 for treatment of psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Since that time, numerous case reports have been published that describe the association of olanzapine and the development of pancreatitis. Furthermore, 3 reports suggest the mechanism of olanzapine-induced hypertriglyceridemia as the etiology of this progression. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who developed necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to olanzapine-induced hypertriglyceridemia. This case, to our knowledge, is the most severe case of this progression and the first case requiring plasmapheresis for acute management. PMID:27807566

  18. Detecting necrotic neurons with fluoro-jade stain.

    PubMed

    Krinke, G J; Classen, W; Vidotto, N; Suter, E; Würmlin, C H

    2001-10-01

    Fluoro-jade, a novel stain for detection of neuropathic lesions by fluorescence microscopy, was validated on the models of toxic neuropathy induced with 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP) or with acrylamide (ACR). Groups of male and female albino rats of Wistar strain were either exposed to a single administration of 80 mg/kg i.p. 3-AP followed 5 hours later by 300 mg/kg of nicotinamide i.p. and examined at days 3 and 15, or to 15 daily doses of 30 mg/kg p.o. ACR and examined at day 15. Following in-life behavioral observations and measurements, the rats were fixed by perfusion with formalin. Additional animals treated with same dose of 3-AP and nicotinamide were submitted to purposeful autolysis for 4 or 16 hours before immersion fixation with formalin on test day 3. In-life observations showed in 3-AP-treated animals signs of severe general toxicity, sensorimotor dysfunction and decreased motor activity starting shortly after the treatment and persisting throughout the observation period. ACR-treated rats started to develop abnormal gait on test day 8 and by day 15 developed reduced grip strength, increased landing footsplay and decreased motor activity. Fluoro-jade, applied to paraffin sections of the nervous system, detected selectively and sensitively the necrotic neurons in the brain, especially those in the inferior olivary nucleus of animals treated with 3-AP, at test day 3, as well as the necrotic Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of ACR-treated animals at test day 15. Chromatolytic neurons in the dorsal root ganglia of ACR-treated animals did not stain positively, indicating that this kind of reversible neuronal remodeling is not detectable using fluoro-jade. Necrotic neurons were still stained by fluoro-jade after 4 hour autolysis, but following 16 hour autolysis the results became false negative. There was no false positive fluorescence in fresh or autolytic tissues, except that emitted by red blood cells in unperfused specimens. The study confirmed the validity of

  19. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sat; Harding, Godfrey

    2003-05-01

    Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs. PMID:18159451

  20. Nuclear scanning in necrotizing progressive ''malignant'' external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Parisier, S.C.; Lucente, F.E.; Som, P.M.; Hirschman, S.Z.; Arnold, L.M.; Roffman, J.D.

    1982-09-01

    The usefulness of radionuclear scanning in the treatment of 18 patients with necrotizing progressive ''malignant'' external otitis is discussed. A Tc 99-m bone scan, a valuable test since results are positive in early cases of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and base of skull, showed increased uptake in all 18 patients. In 6 patients, Ga-67 citrate scans were obtained at the start of therapy and at 5-6 week intervals thereafter. The serial gallium scans were useful in evaluating the effectiveness of therapy since the uptake decrease with control of infection.

  1. Necrotizing sialometaplasia. A self-limited pseudotumoral palatal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Spark, R P; Duncan, D G

    1978-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate, an enigmatic pseudomalignant penetrating ulcer, is a benign lesion which heals spontaneously in three to ten weeks. Relative painlessness contributes to patient delay in seeking medical attention, and suggest that many cases are subclinical. Clinically, the patient age group and morbid gross appearance mimic malignant palatal tumors. Lack of awareness of this entity has led to the misdiagnosis of carcinoma in several previous cases. However, the histopathologic features of sialadenitis, focal lobular necrosis with mucosal ulceration and glandular squamous metaplasia, are distinctly benign. A typical case and literature review are presented.

  2. Severe necrotizing encephalitis in a Yorkshire terrier: topographic and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Lezmi, S; Toussaint, Y; Prata, D; Lejeune, T; Ferreira-Neves, P; Rakotovao, F; Fontaine, J J; Marchal, T; Cordonnier, N

    2007-05-01

    Necrotizing encephalitis of the Yorkshire terrier is a chronic non-suppurative encephalitis that was reported in approximately 15 cases worldwide. We report the case of a 10-year-old female Yorkshire terrier with gross evidence of severe cortical degeneration and necrosis. Microscopically, affected areas were mainly located in the cortical white matter and in the mesencephalon without implication of the cerebellum. Cavitation necrosis, demyelination, gemistocytic astrocytosis, marked perivascular lymphocytic cuffing with a diffuse lymphocytic/histiocytic/gitter cell infiltration characterized the lesions. Immunohistochemical analysis identified the major infiltration of T lymphocytes and macrophages with implication of some cytotoxic lymphocytes and IgG-producing plasma cells; depositions of IgG in the affected white matter were also observed. Specific stains did not reveal fungal, protozoal or bacterial organisms and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis for distemper virus was also negative. The lympho-histiocytic inflammation suggests a T-cell-mediated and a delayed-type immune reaction as a possible pathogenic mechanism for this brain disorder.

  3. Predicting development of infected necrosis in acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dambrauskas, Zilvinas; Pundzius, Juozas; Barauskas, Giedrius

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of severe acute pancreatitis is about 30 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, and it carries an overall mortality rate of 10-15%. Infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 20-30% of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and triples the mortality rate. Therefore, early prediction and diagnosis of infection in necrotizing pancreatitis are extremely important. The aim of the studies included in this review was to investigate the potential of specific prognostic factors to predict the development of secondary pancreatic infection in severe acute pancreatitis. This is seen as an important tool allowing to perform a computed tomography- or ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for bacteriological sampling at the right moment, to confirm the diagnosis, and, finally, to select the subgroup of patients who would benefit from the antibiotic prophylaxis. Precise patients' selection could possibly result in more rational use of antibiotics in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis and reduction of multi-resistant bacteria. Recent studies show that C-reactive protein is an important prognostic marker of pancreatic necrosis with the highest sensitivity and negative prognostic value in this respect. Procalcitonin alone or in combination with interleukin-6 best identifies patients not at risk for infection. However, a review of the clinical studies suggests that we still do not have an optimal model, thus there is a need for new more reliable biochemical and/or clinical predictive systems.

  4. Biofilm in group A streptococcal necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, Nikolai; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Shambat, Srikanth Mairpady; Morgan, Marina; Bergsten, Helena; Skrede, Steinar; Madsen, Martin B.; Johansson, Linda; Juarez, Julius; Bosnjak, Lidija; Mörgelin, Matthias; Svensson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with foreign devices. Here, we present a case of a previously healthy male presenting with NSTI caused by GAS. The infection persisted over 24 days, and the surgeon documented the presence of a “thick layer biofilm” in the fascia. Subsequent analysis of NSTI patient tissue biopsies prospectively included in a multicenter study revealed multiple areas of biofilm in 32% of the patients studied. Biopsies associated with biofilm formation were characterized by massive bacterial load, a pronounced inflammatory response, and clinical signs of more severe tissue involvement. In vitro infections of a human skin tissue model with GAS NSTI isolates also revealed multilayered fibrous biofilm structures, which were found to be under the control of the global Nra gene regulator. The finding of GAS biofilm formation in NSTIs emphasizes the urgent need for biofilm to be considered as a potential complicating microbiological feature of GAS NSTI and, consequently, emphasizes reconsideration of antibiotic treatment protocols.

  5. Aspergillus fumigatus Endophthalmitis with Necrotizing Scleritis following Pars Plana Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Anna M; Allen, Felicity; Stanford, Miles R; Graham, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of Aspergillus fumigatus endophthalmitis complicated by necrotizing scleritis in a 68-year-old man with diet-controlled diabetes, after retinal detachment repair. He was initially treated with systemic steroids for surgically induced necrotizing scleritis following routine pars plana vitrectomy. An additional diagnosis of endophthalmitis was made when the patient developed a hypopyon. Repeat vitreous culture isolated Aspergillus fumigatus. Symptoms improved following antifungal treatment leaving the patient with scleromalacia and an advanced postoperative cataract. Fungal scleritis and endophthalmitis are rare complications of intraocular surgery with sight-threatening consequences, and, as this case demonstrates, may even occur concomitantly. The overlapping features of both conditions can make differentiating one from the other difficult. A fungal aetiology should be considered in cases of postoperative scleritis and endophthalmitis that are protracted and refractory to standard therapy. Even in cases of early diagnosis and treatment, visual outcomes in Aspergillus endophthalmitis and scleritis are variable and often disappointing, not infrequently necessitating enucleation of a painful blind eye.

  6. Biofilm in group A streptococcal necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, Nikolai; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Shambat, Srikanth Mairpady; Morgan, Marina; Bergsten, Helena; Skrede, Steinar; Madsen, Martin B.; Johansson, Linda; Juarez, Julius; Bosnjak, Lidija; Mörgelin, Matthias; Svensson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with foreign devices. Here, we present a case of a previously healthy male presenting with NSTI caused by GAS. The infection persisted over 24 days, and the surgeon documented the presence of a “thick layer biofilm” in the fascia. Subsequent analysis of NSTI patient tissue biopsies prospectively included in a multicenter study revealed multiple areas of biofilm in 32% of the patients studied. Biopsies associated with biofilm formation were characterized by massive bacterial load, a pronounced inflammatory response, and clinical signs of more severe tissue involvement. In vitro infections of a human skin tissue model with GAS NSTI isolates also revealed multilayered fibrous biofilm structures, which were found to be under the control of the global Nra gene regulator. The finding of GAS biofilm formation in NSTIs emphasizes the urgent need for biofilm to be considered as a potential complicating microbiological feature of GAS NSTI and, consequently, emphasizes reconsideration of antibiotic treatment protocols. PMID:27699220

  7. Regenerative endodontic treatment for necrotic immature permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Ling-Huey; Ho, Yi-Ching; Kuo, Tien-Chun; Lai, Wing-Hong; Chen, Yea-Huey Melody; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2009-02-01

    This retrospective study included 23 necrotic immature permanent teeth treated for either short-term (treatment period <3 months) or long-term (treatment period >3 months) using conservative endodontic procedures with 2.5% NaOCl irrigations without instrumentation but with Ca(OH)(2) paste medication. For seven teeth treated short-term, the gutta-percha points were filled onto an artificial barrier of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). For 16 teeth treated long-term, the gutta-percha points, amalgam, or MTA were filled onto the Ca(OH)(2)-induced hard tissue barrier in the root canal. We found that all apical lesions showed complete regression in 3 to 21 (mean, 8) months after initial treatment. All necrotic immature permanent teeth achieved a nearly normal root development 10 to 29 (mean, 16) months after initial treatment. We conclude that immature permanent teeth with pulp necrosis and apical pathosis can still achieve continued root development after proper short-term or long-term regenerative endodontic treatment procedures. PMID:19166764

  8. Aspergillus fumigatus Endophthalmitis with Necrotizing Scleritis following Pars Plana Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Anna M; Allen, Felicity; Stanford, Miles R; Graham, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of Aspergillus fumigatus endophthalmitis complicated by necrotizing scleritis in a 68-year-old man with diet-controlled diabetes, after retinal detachment repair. He was initially treated with systemic steroids for surgically induced necrotizing scleritis following routine pars plana vitrectomy. An additional diagnosis of endophthalmitis was made when the patient developed a hypopyon. Repeat vitreous culture isolated Aspergillus fumigatus. Symptoms improved following antifungal treatment leaving the patient with scleromalacia and an advanced postoperative cataract. Fungal scleritis and endophthalmitis are rare complications of intraocular surgery with sight-threatening consequences, and, as this case demonstrates, may even occur concomitantly. The overlapping features of both conditions can make differentiating one from the other difficult. A fungal aetiology should be considered in cases of postoperative scleritis and endophthalmitis that are protracted and refractory to standard therapy. Even in cases of early diagnosis and treatment, visual outcomes in Aspergillus endophthalmitis and scleritis are variable and often disappointing, not infrequently necessitating enucleation of a painful blind eye. PMID:27379189

  9. Computed tomography of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in 3 Yorkshire Terriers.

    PubMed

    Ducoté, J M; Johnson, K E; Dewey, C W; Walker, M A; Coates, J R; Berridge, B R

    1999-01-01

    A necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Yorkshire terriers has recently been reported in 6 dogs in Switzerland, 1 dog in Japan and 1 dog in the United States. The purpose of this report is to describe the computed tomographic (CT) findings in 3 dogs with this disease, and to correlate the CT abnormalities with the clinical and pathologic findings in each case. Three Yorkshire Terriers between 2 and 10 years old were evaluated. Physical and neurologic examinations, complete blood count (CBC), serum biochemistry profile, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and CT scan were performed on all 3 dogs. Brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) were evaluated for 2 dogs. Two dogs were euthanized at the owners' request and necropsies were performed. Neurologic examination findings were consistent with a multifocal/diffuse encephalitis involving the cerebrum and brainstem in all 3 dogs. Complete blood count and biochemistry profiles were normal. Elevated protein concentration and a mononuclear pleocytosis were demonstrated in 2 of 3 dogs on cerebrospinal fluid evaluation. Multifocal, extensive areas of decreased opacity throughout the cerebral hemispheres, asymmetric ventriculomegaly, and lack of contrast enhancement were appreciated on CT images of all three dogs. No mass effect was seen. These findings correlated well with pathologic findings at necropsy, which included multiple malacic cavitations within the brain, representing areas of locally extensive necrosis. CT abnormalities in combination with signalment, clinical findings and cerebrospinal fluid analysis should facilitate a presumptive diagnosis of Yorkshire Terrier necrotizing meningoencephalitis.

  10. Paediatric necrotizing fasciitis complicating third molar extraction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, P; Engroff, S L; Jansisyanont, P; Ord, R A

    2004-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but well-described entity. In the paediatric population compromising risk factors are frequently absent. We describe the successful treatment of a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy 14-year-old male following routine extraction of an uninfected wisdom tooth for orthodontic purposes. PMID:15145048

  11. Bilateral Necrotizing Fasciitis around the Hips Differentiated from Fournier Gangrene: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo Kyu; Yi, Seung Rim; Lee, Ye Hyun; Kim, Hyun See; Nam, Seok Woo; Ahn, Young Joon; Kim, Seong Wan; Yang, Sung Wook

    2014-01-01

    As an emergency encountered in orthopedic practice requiring prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment, necrotizing fasciitis around the hip must be discriminated from Fournier gangrene. The current case report describes a patient who suffered from bilateral type I necrotizing fasciitis around the hips, which was alleviated by prompt surgical debridement and intensive postoperative care. PMID:27536594

  12. Effect of bismuth citrate, lactose, and organic acid on necrotic enteritis in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens – associated necrotic enteritis causes significant losses and increased morbidity in poultry. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bismuth citrate and acidifiers on the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. The first study was a dose response t...

  13. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: review of the literature and report of nonulcerative case.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, H; Minton, G A; Yuen, Y L

    1979-08-01

    A review of the literature and a report of a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate is presented. Because necrotizing sialometaplasia may be misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma or mucoepidermoid carcinoma, it is important that the clinician and pathologist take the necessary precautions to prevent any further mutilative surgery for this benign disease entity.

  14. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  15. The Tuberculosis Necrotizing Toxin kills macrophages by hydrolyzing NAD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jim; Siroy, Axel; Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Speer, Alexander; Doornbos, Kathryn S.; Cingolani, Gino; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induces necrosis of infected cells to evade immune responses. Recently, we found that Mtb utilizes the protein CpnT to kill human macrophages by secreting its C-terminal domain, named tuberculosis necrotizing toxin (TNT) that induces necrosis by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that TNT gains access to the cytosol of Mtb-infected macrophages, where it hydrolyzes the essential co-enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Expression or injection of a non-catalytic TNT mutant showed no cytotoxicity in macrophages or zebrafish zygotes, respectively, demonstrating that the NAD+-glycohydrolase activity is required for TNT-induced cell death. To prevent self-poisoning, Mtb produces an immunity factor for TNT (IFT) that binds TNT and inhibits its activity. The crystal structure of the TNT-IFT complex revealed a novel NAD+-glycohydrolase fold of TNT, which constitutes the founding member of a toxin family wide-spread in pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26237511

  16. A decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis after prenatal glucocorticoid therapy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, C R; Morrison, J C; Poole, W K; Korones, S B; Boehm, J J; Rigatto, H; Zachman, R D

    1984-05-01

    In a large multicentered, collaborative randomized and blinded trial utilizing antenatal corticosteroids, the goals included determining the effectiveness of these agents in accelerating lung maturation, as well as monitoring any short-term or long-term adverse effects of this treatment on the parturient, fetus, and/or infant. More than 100 specific items, pertaining to diagnoses, complications, and outcomes were recorded for the 696 mothers enrolled in the study and their 745 infants. A significantly decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (P = .002) was found in the infants treated with steroids. The possibility of accelerated intestinal maturation induced by antenatal maternal steroid therapy exists. This treatment regimen is particularly attractive as adverse aspects of steroid therapy at the dosage utilized have not been demonstrated. PMID:6371696

  17. Necrotizing enterocolitis--150 years of fruitless search for the cause.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is not a new disease but one that has been reported since special care units began to house preterm infants. It was observed in foundling hospitals in Paris [Billard, 1828] and Vienna [Bednar, 1850] and, as it occurred in clusters, was regarded as a nosocomial infection in the infant hospitals of Zurich [Willi, 1944] and Berlin [Ylppo, 1931]. Clinical and patho-anatomic characterization was achieved by Schmidt and Quaiser in 1952. The unproven hypothesis of mesenteric hypoperfusion as a major etiological factor arose from animal models and analogous perforating disorders in term infants. Despite similarities between NEC and clostridial infections, few studies employed anaerobic culture techniques. The pathogenesis remains unclear and its distinction from related disorders uncertain. It is unlikely that strategies to prevent NEC will be successful unless the disease is better understood.

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an infection that spreads along the fascial planes, causing subcutaneous tissue death characterized by rapid progression, systemic toxicity, and even death. NF often appears as a red, hot, painful, and swollen wound with an ill-defined border. As the infective process continues, local pain is replaced by numbness or analgesia. As the disease process continues, the skin initially becomes pale, then mottled and purple, and finally, gangrenous. The ability of NF to move rapidly along fascial planes and cause tissue necrosis is secondary to its polymicrobial composition and the synergistic effect of the enzymes produced by the bacteria. Treatment involves securing the airway, broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy, intensive care support, and prompt surgical debridement, repeated as needed. Reducing mortality rests on early diagnosis and prompt aggressive treatment. PMID:25922821

  19. Propolis-induced descending necrotizing mediastinitis and aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jeng-Yuan; Hsu, Nan-Yung

    2013-04-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance collected by bees as a sealant for their hives. It is also used in traditional medicine as an antioxidant and antiinflammatory agent to treat ulcers, superficial burns, and microbial diseases. In this report, a 40-year-old woman who took liquid propolis for relief of her common cold experienced severe sore throat, dysphagia, and easy choking followed by fever and chills. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis and concomitant aspiration pneumonia were evident on the image studies. We performed video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to achieve immediate and adequate drainage, and the patient resumed normal deglutition 2 months later. Early diagnosis and prompt video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery intervention are paramount to manage this life-threatening situation.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to enterocutaneous fistula: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guo-Li; Wang, Lin; Wei, Xue-Ming; Li, Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-06-28

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon, rapidly progressive, and potentially fatal infection of the superficial fascia and subcutaneous tissue. NF caused by an enterocutaneous fistula has special clinical characters compared with other types of NF. NF caused by enterocutaneous fistula may have more rapid progress and more severe consequences because of multiple germs infection and corrosion by digestive juices. We treated three cases of NF caused by postoperative enterocutaneous fistula since Jan 2007. We followed empirically the principle of eliminating anaerobic conditions of infection, bypassing or draining digestive juice from the fistula and changing dressings with moist exposed burn therapy impregnated with zinc/silver acetate. These three cases were eventually cured by debridement, antibiotics and wound management. PMID:24976737

  1. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Jeroen I; Jacobs, Jimmy M; Op de Beeck, Bart; Huyghe, Ivan A; Pelckmans, Paul A; Moreels, Tom G

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with hypercalcemia as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a benign parathyroid adenoma. Initially the acute pancreatitis was treated conservatively. The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma and surgical clearance of a large infected pancreatic pseudocyst. Although the association of parathyroid adenoma-induced hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis is a known medical entity, it is very uncommon. The pathophysiology of hypercalcemia-induced acute pancreatitis is therefore not well known, although some mechanisms have been proposed. It is important to treat the provoking factor. Therefore, the cause of hypercalcemia should be identified early. Surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma is the ultimate therapy. PMID:20556845

  2. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the parotid gland in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Young; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Bae, You-Chan; Park, Yeon-Hee; Joo, Yi-Seok

    2010-11-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a self-limiting, benign, ischemic, inflammatory disease that is most often described in the submandibular glands of dogs, with clinical and histologic features that resemble malignancy. Unilateral swelling of the parotid salivary gland in a 7-year-old Cocker Spaniel dog was diagnosed as NS. The dog also had otitis externa on the same side as the parotid gland lesions. The main histologic features were included lobular necrosis of salivary tissue; fibrinoid necrosis of some arteries; marked squamous metaplasia of duct and/or acinar epithelium, with intercellular bridge formation; preservation of salivary lobular morphology; and variable inflammation and fibrosis. Etiologic factors for NS in both humans and animals remain obscure.

  3. Necrotizing sialometaplasia obscuring an underlying malignancy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Poulson, T C; Greer, R O; Ryser, R W

    1986-07-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia poses many diagnostic problems, both clinically and microscopically. Caution had most frequently been urged for distinguishing between malignancy and NS, so as to avoid mutilating surgical treatment resulting from the misdiagnosis of a lesion that is benign and self-limiting. This case has been presented to alert the practitioner to the possibility that NS may obscure an underlying malignant disease process, possibly resulting in delays in referral or treatment. The exceedingly rapid growth of this mesenchymal neoplasm may have caused obstruction of the blood supply to the overlying mucosa and submucosa, thereby producing the ischemic alterations observed in the first biopsy specimens. Some of the difficulties encountered in the detection and diagnosis of neoplasms arising in the parapharyngeal space were discussed, and some previously published suggestions to aid in these efforts were reiterated.

  4. Current Concepts in the Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Misiakos, Evangelos P.; Bagias, George; Patapis, Paul; Sotiropoulos, Dimitrios; Kanavidis, Prodromos; Machairas, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe, rare, potentially lethal soft tissue infection that develops in the scrotum and perineum, the abdominal wall, or the extremities. The infection progresses rapidly, and septic shock may ensue; hence, the mortality rate is high (median mortality 32.2%). Prognosis becomes poorer in the presence of co-morbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, chronic alcohol disease, chronic renal failure, and liver cirrhosis. NF is classified into four types, depending on microbiological findings. Most cases are polymicrobial, classed as type I. The clinical status of the patient varies from erythema, swelling, and tenderness in the early stage to skin ischemia with blisters and bullae in the advanced stage of infection. In its fulminant form, the patient is critically ill with signs and symptoms of severe septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The clinical condition is the most important clue for diagnosis. However, in equivocal cases, the diagnosis and severity of the infection can be secured with laboratory-based scoring systems, such as the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score or Fournier’s gangrene severity index score, especially in regard to Fournier’s gangrene. Computed tomography or ultrasonography can be helpful, but definitive diagnosis is attained by exploratory surgery at the infected sites. Management of the infection begins with broad-spectrum antibiotics, but early and aggressive drainage and meticulous debridement constitute the mainstay of treatment. Postoperative management of the surgical wound is also important for the patient’s survival, along with proper nutrition. The vacuum-assisted closure system has proved to be helpful in wound management, with its combined benefits of continuous cleansing of the wound and the formation of granulation tissue. PMID:25593960

  5. Primary sterile necrotic cells fail to cross-prime CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Ormandy, Lars A; Heimesaat, Markus M; Kirschning, Carsten J; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2012-10-01

    Necrotic cells are known to activate the innate immune system and trigger inflammation by releasing damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). However, how necrotic cells influence the induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses under sterile conditions, in the absence of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), remains poorly understood. Here, we examined antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses to primary sterile necrotic tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. We found that primary necrotic cells alone fail to generate CD8(+) T cell-dependent immune responses toward cell-associated antigens. We show that necrotic cells trigger CD8(+) T-cell immunity only in the presence of PAMPs or analogs, such as p(dI-dC) and/or unmethylated CpG DNA. The electroporation of tumor cells with these PAMPs prior to necrosis induction triggered antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses through a TLR9/MyD88-dependent pathway. In addition, we found that necrotic cells contain factors that can block the cross-priming of CD8(+) T cells even under non-sterile conditions and can serve as a possible mechanism of immunosuppression. These results suggest that antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses to primary necrotic tumor cells can be induced in the presence of PAMPs and thus have a substantial impact on the development of antitumor vaccination strategies.

  6. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants with Spontaneous Intestinal Perforation or Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Rajan; Oh, William; Hintz, Susan R; Blakely, Martin L; Das, Abhik; Bell, Edward F.; Saha, Shampa; Laptook, Abbot R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Stoll, Barbara J.; Walsh, Michele C.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if extremely low birth weight infants with surgical necrotizing enterocolitis have a higher risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment and neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors (secondary outcome) at 18–22 months corrected age compared to infants with spontaneous intestinal perforation and infants without necrotizing enterocolitis or spontaneous intestinal perforation. Study Design Retrospective analysis of the Neonatal Research Network very low birth weight registry, evaluating extremely low birth weight infants born between 2000–2005. The study infants were designated into 3 groups: 1) Spontaneous intestinal perforation without necrotizing enterocolitis; 2) Surgical necrotizing enterocolitis (Bell's stage III); and 3) Neither spontaneous intestinal perforation nor necrotizing enterocolitis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the clinical group and death or neurodevelopmental impairment, controlling for multiple confounding factors including center. Results Infants with surgical necrotizing enterocolitis had the highest rate of death prior to hospital discharge (53.5%) and death or neurodevelopmental impairment (82.3%) compared to infants in the spontaneous intestinal perforation group (39.1% and 79.3%) and no necrotizing enterocolitis/no spontaneous intestinal perforation group (22.1% and 53.3%; p<0.001). Similar results were observed for neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors. On logistic regression analysis, both spontaneous intestinal perforation and surgical necrotizing enterocolitis were associated with increased risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment (adjusted OR 2.21, 95% CI: 1.5, 3.2 and adjusted OR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.5, 2.9 respectively) and neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors (adjusted OR 2.17, 95% CI: 1.4, 3.2 and adjusted OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.4 respectively). Conclusions Spontaneous intestinal perforation and surgical necrotizing

  7. Paraneoplastic Necrotizing Myopathy with a Mild Inflammatory Component: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Susanne; Bremer, Juliane; Komminoth, Paul; Jung, Hans H.; Weller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies such as dermatomyositis and polymyositis are well-recognized paraneoplastic syndromes. Little is known, however, about necrotizing myopathies in association with cancer. We here describe a case of paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathy with a mild inflammatory infiltrate in a patient with adenocarcinoma. After the rapid development of a severe, disabling muscle weakness, the patient experienced near complete recovery within 4 months under oral prednisone treatment. In the context of the presented case, we will review current knowledge about paraneoplastic necrotizing myopathies. PMID:20740165

  8. Limb salvage in a diabetic with necrotizing fasciitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Carlow, S B; Jacobs, R L; Vedder, D K

    1986-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis must be considered in a diabetic with cutaneous ulceration. A case report of limb salvage in a 48-year-old diabetic female with progressive necrotizing fasciitis is presented. Methods of early diagnosis including clinical signs, radiographs, and soft tissue biopsy of the involved extremity are reviewed. The microbiology of the disease is also discussed. A modification of the Orr technique using infrequent dressing changes in the management of necrotizing fasciitis is presented. In our case this resulted in preservation of life and a functional limb.

  9. Genome-wide association and genomic prediction identifies associated loci and predicts the sensitivity of Tobacco ringspot virus in soybean plant introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a useful tool for detecting and characterizing traits of interest including those associated with disease resistance in soybean. The availability of 50,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers (SoySNP50K iSelect BeadChip; www.soybase.org) on 19,652...

  10. Regulatory and necrotic volume increase in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Petrunkina, A M; Jebe, E; Töpfer-Petersen, E

    2005-08-01

    subsequent volume decrease. RVI was inhibited by the vanadate. Hypertonic stress did not result in an increase in early apoptotic cells, but produced a shift toward late necrotic cells. Substitution of sodium and chloride by choline and sulfate resulted in decreased isotonic volume of sperm treated with lavendustin. Tyrosine phosphorylation levels were reduced after 20 min under hypertonic conditions. It was concluded that RVI is regulated via a protein tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway, and that dephosphorylation occurs when volume regulation is required. The necrotic volume increase (NVI) is associated with the accumulation of sodium and chloride following uncontrolled opening of the channels. The ability to regulate volume after exposure to hypertonic conditions is important for sperm functionality and can have practical applications in spermatological diagnostics and cryopreservation. PMID:15744775

  11. Morphology of certain viruses of Salmonid fishes. II. In vivo studies of infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amend, Donald F.; Chambers, Velma C.

    1970-01-01

    Juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were injected with the infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus, and tissue samples from the anterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, and pyloric caeca of moribund fish were prepared for electron microscopy. Bullet-shaped virus particles measuring 158 × 90 mμ were observed in the hematopoietic tissues of the anterior kidney and spleen. Virus particles were also observed in the outer connective tissues of the pancreas or pyloric caeca, or both. No virus was found in the intestine or liver. The healthy appearance of erythrocytes, reticular cells, and endothelial cells in necrotic areas of the spleen and anterior kidney, and the absence of lymphocytes in these areas, suggested that lymphocytes might be one source of the virus.

  12. Differential Life History Trait Associations of Aphids with Nonpersistent Viruses in Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Angelella, G M; Egel, D S; Holland, J D; Nemacheck, J A; Williams, C E; Kaplan, I

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of vectors and fleeting nature of virus acquisition and transmission renders nonpersistent viruses a challenge to manage. We assessed the importance of noncolonizing versus colonizing vectors with a 2-yr survey of aphids and nonpersistent viruses on commercial pumpkin farms. We quantified aphid alightment using pan traps, while testing leaf samples with multiplex RT-PCR targeting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Overall, we identified 53 aphid species (3,899 individuals), from which the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, a pumpkin-colonizing species, predominated (76 and 37% of samples in 2010 and 2011, respectively). CMV and ZYMV were not detected, but WMV and PRSV were prevalent, both regionally (WMV: 28/29 fields, PRSV: 21/29 fields) and within fields (infection rates = 69 and 55% for WMV in 2010 and 2011; 28 and 25% for PRSV in 2010 and 2011). However, early-season samples showed extremely low infection levels, suggesting cucurbit viruses are not seed-transmitted and implicating aphid activity as a causal factor driving virus spread. Interestingly, neither noncolonizer and colonizer alightment nor total aphid alightment were good predictors of virus presence, but community analyses revealed species-specific relationships. For example, cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) and spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii Monell f. maculata) were associated with PRSV infection, whereas the oleander aphid (Aphis nerii Bover de Fonscolombe) was associated with WMV spread within fields. These outcomes highlight the need for tailored management plans targeting key vectors of nonpersistent viruses in agricultural systems. PMID:26313961

  13. Differential Life History Trait Associations of Aphids with Nonpersistent Viruses in Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Angelella, G M; Egel, D S; Holland, J D; Nemacheck, J A; Williams, C E; Kaplan, I

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of vectors and fleeting nature of virus acquisition and transmission renders nonpersistent viruses a challenge to manage. We assessed the importance of noncolonizing versus colonizing vectors with a 2-yr survey of aphids and nonpersistent viruses on commercial pumpkin farms. We quantified aphid alightment using pan traps, while testing leaf samples with multiplex RT-PCR targeting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Overall, we identified 53 aphid species (3,899 individuals), from which the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, a pumpkin-colonizing species, predominated (76 and 37% of samples in 2010 and 2011, respectively). CMV and ZYMV were not detected, but WMV and PRSV were prevalent, both regionally (WMV: 28/29 fields, PRSV: 21/29 fields) and within fields (infection rates = 69 and 55% for WMV in 2010 and 2011; 28 and 25% for PRSV in 2010 and 2011). However, early-season samples showed extremely low infection levels, suggesting cucurbit viruses are not seed-transmitted and implicating aphid activity as a causal factor driving virus spread. Interestingly, neither noncolonizer and colonizer alightment nor total aphid alightment were good predictors of virus presence, but community analyses revealed species-specific relationships. For example, cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) and spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii Monell f. maculata) were associated with PRSV infection, whereas the oleander aphid (Aphis nerii Bover de Fonscolombe) was associated with WMV spread within fields. These outcomes highlight the need for tailored management plans targeting key vectors of nonpersistent viruses in agricultural systems.

  14. Protection against avian necrotic enteritis after immunisation with NetB genetic or formaldehyde toxoids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Mot, Dorien; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Savva, Christos G; Basak, Ajit K; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W

    2013-08-20

    NetB (necrotic enteritis toxin B) is a recently identified β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens. This toxin has been shown to play a major role in avian necrotic enteritis. In recent years, a dramatic increase in necrotic enteritis has been observed, especially in countries where the use of antimicrobial growth promoters in animal feedstuffs has been banned. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunisation with a NetB toxoid would provide protection against necrotic enteritis. The immunisation of poultry with a formaldehyde NetB toxoid or with a NetB genetic toxoid (W262A) resulted in the induction of antibody responses against NetB and provided partial protection against disease.

  15. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-11-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding. The phylum Synergistetes is a novel bacterial phylum consisting of Gram-negative anaerobes, with evidence of presence in biofilms associated with periodontal and endodontic infections. To date, the involvement of members of this phylum in NUG has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and levels of known human oral Synergistetes bacterial clusters in dental plaque from patients with NUG and compare them with those found in gingivitis. Marginal dental plaque samples from 21 NUG and 21 gingivitis patients were analysed quantitatively by fluorescent in situ hybridization and microscopy for members of two oral Synergistetes clusters (A and B) and for Jonquetella anthropi. Synergistetes cluster A bacteria were detected in all samples but at higher levels (9.4-fold) and proportions (2.5-fold) in NUG patients than in gingivitis patients. However, with regard to Synergistetes cluster B bacteria, there were no differences between NUG and gingivitis patients. J. anthropi was detected in only half of the samples and at lower levels than the other taxa. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that Synergistetes cluster A bacteria, but not cluster B bacteria or J. anthropi, are more strongly associated with NUG than with gingivitis.

  16. Necrotizing retinitis due to syphilis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Shinha, Takashi; Weaver, Bree A

    2016-01-01

    The ocular manifestations of syphilis are varied. Ocular syphilis can occur during any stage of infection and involve virtually any part of the eye. In immunocompetent individuals, the most common etiologies include syphilitic uveitis. Although the clinical presentation of ocular syphilis in HIV-infected patients is also widespread, posterior segment involvement has been more commonly described particularly in patients with AIDS. The diagnosis of syphilitic retinitis is challenging since its clinical presentation mimics retinitis caused by other viral etiologies. In addition, HIV-infected individuals with syphilis are more likely to develop aberrant serologic responses. Recognition of syphilitic retinitis and prompt initiation of penicillin therapy is of critical importance since syphilitic retinitis generally responds well to treatment and loss of vision is reversible. In this report, we describe a 39-year-old female with advanced stages of AIDS who developed necrotizing retinitis due to syphilis. Prompt initiation of intravenous penicillin led to excellent visual outcome for this patient despite significantly decreased visual acuity on presentation. PMID:27635383

  17. Novel Phaeoacremonium species associated with necrotic wood of Prunus trees.

    PubMed

    Damm, U; Mostert, L; Crous, P W; Fourie, P H

    2008-06-01

    The genus Phaeoacremonium is associated with opportunistic human infections, as well as stunted growth and die-back of various woody hosts, especially grapevines. In this study, Phaeoacremonium species were isolated from necrotic woody tissue of Prunus spp. (plum, peach, nectarine and apricot) from different stone fruit growing areas in South Africa. Morphological and cultural characteristics as well as DNA sequence data (5.8S rDNA, ITS1, ITS2, beta-tubulin, actin and 18S rDNA) were used to identify known, and describe novel species. From the total number of wood samples collected (257), 42 Phaeoacremonium isolates were obtained, from which 14 species were identified. Phaeoacremonium scolyti was most frequently isolated, and present on all Prunus species sampled, followed by Togninia minima (anamorph: Pm. aleophilum) and Pm. australiense. Almost all taxa isolated represent new records on Prunus. Furthermore, Pm. australiense,Pm. iranianum, T. fraxinopennsylvanica and Pm. griseorubrum represent new records for South Africa, while Pm. griseorubrum, hitherto only known from humans, is newly reported from a plant host. Five species are newly described, two of which produce a Togninia sexual state. Togninia africana, T. griseo-olivacea and Pm. pallidum are newly described from Prunus armeniaca, while Pm. prunicolum and Pm. fuscum are described from Prunus salicina.

  18. Transfusion-related necrotizing enterocolitis: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Marin, Terri; Strickland, Ora L

    2013-06-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a disease primarily of prematurity characterized by partial or entire gut necrosis and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Recent studies report that approximately 25% to 35% of very low-birth-weight infants less than 1500 g receiving packed red blood cell transfusions develop temporally associated NEC, known as transfusion-related NEC (TR-NEC). Although there are many known risk factors for NEC, this article focuses on 3 contributing factors: packed red blood cell transfusions, enteral feedings, and gastrointestinal immaturity. Previous data suggest that these factors may interact to affect neonatal intestinal tissue oxygenation, which may lead to tissue ischemia, resulting in intestinal injury. This article presents a conceptual framework that combines current theoretical perspectives for TR-NEC, and reviews previous research examining related variables and how their interaction may increase the risk for TR-NEC development. In addition, incorporation of the proposed framework to guide future research and nursing care in this area is discussed.

  19. Argininosuccinate lyase in enterocytes protects from development of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, M. H.; Sule, G.; Nagamani, S. C.; Chakkalakal, S.; Nordin, A.; Jain, M.; Ruan, M. Z.; Bertin, T.; Dawson, B.; Zhang, J.; Schady, D.; Bryan, N. S.; Campeau, P. M.; Erez, A.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), the most common neonatal gastrointestinal emergency, results in significant mortality and morbidity, yet its pathogenesis remains unclear. Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is the only enzyme in mammals that is capable of synthesizing arginine. Arginine has several homeostatic roles in the gut and its deficiency has been associated with NEC. Because enterocytes are the primary sites of arginine synthesis in neonatal mammals, we evaluated the consequences of disruption of arginine synthesis in the enterocytes on the pathogenesis of NEC. We devised a novel approach to study the role of enterocyte-derived ASL in NEC by generating and characterizing a mouse model with enterocyte-specific deletion of Asl (Aslflox/flox; VillinCretg/+, or CKO). We hypothesized that the presence of ASL in a cell-specific manner in the enterocytes is protective in the pathogenesis of NEC. Loss of ASL in enterocytes resulted in an increased incidence of NEC that was associated with a proinflammatory state and increased enterocyte apoptosis. Knockdown of ASL in intestinal epithelial cell lines resulted in decreased migration in response to lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that enterocyte-derived ASL has a protective role in NEC. PMID:24904080

  20. Necrotizing Autoimmune Myopathy: A Unique Subset of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Matthew B; Newkirk, Michelle R; Sumner, Nathan S

    2016-10-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a recently recognized entity within the spectrum of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Diagnosis critically rests on histopathologic demonstration of macrophage predominant myocyte destruction, with few to no lymphocytes. We report our experience with identifying and treating this subset of inflammatory myositis, highlighting the importance of muscle biopsy in diagnosis, association with statin use and malignancy, and challenges of therapy.We present 3 cases that presented to 2 hospitals within our academic system in calendar year 2014 with acute/subacute onset of profound proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated creatine kinase levels. All patients had been exposed to statins for varying periods. While each electromyogram (EMG) study showed changes with a diffuse inflammatory myopathy, it was not until muscle biopsy was performed when histopathologic features consistent with NAM solidified the diagnosis in all 3 cases. While high-dose glucocorticoids helped provide some degree of improvement in symptoms, none of our cases returned to their preillness baseline independent functioning. Additional immunosuppressive therapy was considered in each case but limited because of comorbidities.These cases demonstrate the importance of pursuing muscle biopsy in all patients with proximal muscle weakness and markedly elevated creatine kinase levels. While symptoms appear consistent with polymyositis, only through muscle biopsy can the diagnosis of NAM be made. Statins have been implicated in NAM, acting through an antibody-dependent mechanism. Combination immunosuppressive therapy has been advocated, but our patient's comorbidities precluded safe use of medications beyond glucocorticoids. PMID:27660937

  1. Necrotic platelets provide a procoagulant surface during thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Vu Minh; Abeynaike, Latasha; Glaros, Elias; Campbell, Heather; Pasalic, Leonardo; Chen, Vivien M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    A subpopulation of platelets fulfills a procoagulant role in hemostasis and thrombosis by enabling the thrombin burst required for fibrin formation and clot stability at the site of vascular injury. Excess procoagulant activity is linked with pathological thrombosis. The identity of the procoagulant platelet has been elusive. The cell death marker 4-[N-(S-glutathionylacetyl)amino]phenylarsonous acid (GSAO) rapidly enters a subpopulation of agonist-stimulated platelets via an organic anion-transporting polypeptide and is retained in the cytosol through covalent reaction with protein dithiols. Labeling with GSAO, together with exposure of P-selectin, distinguishes necrotic from apoptotic platelets and correlates with procoagulant potential. GSAO+ platelets form in occluding murine thrombi after ferric chloride injury and are attenuated with megakaryocyte-directed deletion of the cyclophilin D gene. These platelets form a procoagulant surface, supporting fibrin formation, and reduction in GSAO+ platelets is associated with reduction in platelet thrombus size and fibrin formation. Analysis of platelets from human subjects receiving aspirin therapy indicates that these procoagulant platelets form despite aspirin therapy, but are attenuated by inhibition of the necrosis pathway. These findings indicate that the major subpopulation of platelets involved in fibrin formation are formed via regulated necrosis involving cyclophilin D, and that they may be targeted independent of platelet activation. PMID:26474813

  2. An update on necrotizing enterocolitis: pathogenesis and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the most critical morbidities in preterm infants. The incidence of NEC is 7% in very-low-birth-weight infants, and its mortality is 15 to 30%. Infants who survive NEC have various complications, such as nosocomial infection, malnutrition, growth failure, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and neurodevelopmental delays. The most important etiology in the pathogenesis of NEC is structural and immunological intestinal immaturity. In preterm infants with immature gastrointestinal tracts, development of NEC may be associated with a variety of factors, such as colonization with pathogenic bacteria, secondary ischemia, genetic polymorphisms conferring NEC susceptibility, anemia with red blood cell transfusion, and sensitization to cow milk proteins. To date, a variety of preventive strategies has been accepted or attempted in clinical practice with regard to the pathogenesis of NEC. These strategies include the use of breast feeding, various feeding strategies, probiotics, prebiotics, glutamine and arginine, and lactoferrin. There is substantial evidence for the efficacy of breast feeding and the use of probiotics in infants with birth weights above 1,000 g, and these strategies are commonly used in clinical practice. Other preventive strategies, however, require further research to establish their effect on NEC. PMID:22232629

  3. Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics for the Prevention of Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Henry, Kathene C; Abrahamsson, Thomas R; Wu, Richard You; Sherman, Philip M

    2016-09-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating intestinal disease in preterm infants characterized by barrier disruption, intestinal microbial dysbiosis, and persistent inflammation of the colon, which results in high mortality rates. Current strategies used to manage this disease are not sufficient, although the use of human breast milk reduces the risk of NEC. Mother's milk is regarded as a fundamental nutritional source for neonates, but pasteurization of donor breast milk affects the composition of bioactive compounds. Current research is evaluating the benefits and potential pitfalls of adding probiotics and prebiotics to pasteurized milk so as to improve the functionality of the milk and thereby reduce the burden of illness caused by NEC. Probiotics (live micro-organisms that confer health to the host) and prebiotics (nondigestible oligosaccharides that stimulate the growth of healthy bacteria) are functional foods known to mediate immune responses and modulate microbial populations in the gut. Clinical research shows strain- and compound-specific responses when probiotics or prebiotics are administered in conjunction with donor breast milk for the prevention of NEC. Despite ongoing controversy surrounding optimal treatment strategies, randomized controlled studies are now investigating the use of synbiotics to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. Synbiotics, a combination of probiotics and prebiotics, have been proposed to enhance beneficial health effects in the intestinal tract more than either agent administered alone. This review considers the implications of using probiotic-, prebiotic-, and synbiotic-supplemented breast milk as a strategy to prevent NEC and issues that could be encountered with the preparations. PMID:27633108

  4. Solitary necrotizing granulomas of the lung: differentiating features and etiology.

    PubMed

    Ulbright, T M; Katzenstein, A L

    1980-02-01

    The clinical and pathologic features of 86 roentgenographically solitary pulmonary granulomas were reviewed to determine etiology and to provide guidelines for histologic evaluation. Fungal or acid-fast organisms were identified within the tissue in 60 cases (70%) and fragments of a helminth were found in one. The organisms were almost always present in the center of necrotic granulomas, and examination of two blocks containing active granulomas was usually sufficient for their identification. Microbiological cultures were less productive than direct examination of the tissue. In 25 cases an infectious etiology could not be identified: two were diagnosed as hyalinizing granuloma, one as Wegener's granulomatosis, and 22 were not further classified. A prominent overlapping spectrum of histologic features was found between infectious granulomas and Wegener's granulomatosis, suggesting that the latter may represent an abnormal immune response to an infectious agent that is no longer identifiable within the tissue. Caution is urged in diagnosing limited Wegener's granulomatosis and other pulmonary angiitides in patients with roentgenographically solitary granulomas. PMID:7361992

  5. Specific HLA genotypes confer susceptibility to acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, A; Saitoh, M; Miyagawa, T; Kubota, M; Takanashi, J-I; Miyamoto, A; Tokunaga, K; Oka, A; Mizuguchi, M

    2016-09-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare and severe syndrome of acute encephalopathy triggered by viral infections. Cytokine storm is considered as the main pathogenetic mechanism of ANE. ANE is prevalent in East Asia, suggesting the association of host genetic factors. To elucidate the genetic background of Japanese ANE, we examined genotypes of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, C, B, DRB1, DQB1 and DPB1 in 31 patients. Significant positive association was observed in both the allele frequency and positivity of DRB1*09:01 (P=0.043 and 0.025, respectively), as well as those of DQB1*03:03 (P=0.034 and 0.026, respectively). The carrier frequency of DRB1*09:01 and DQB1*03:03 alleles was higher in the patients (45.16%) than in controls (28.57%). These alleles are more common in East Asian than in European populations, and are reportedly associated with various autoimmune diseases in Japanese patients. Our data provide further evidence that altered immune response based on individual HLA genotypes may contribute to ANE pathogenesis. PMID:27467284

  6. A cluster of cases of streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis in Gloucestershire.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, K.; Logan, M.; McNulty, C.; Harrison, S.; George, R.; Efstratiou, A.; McEvoy, M.; Begg, N.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first cluster of cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in this century in the United Kingdom (UK). Between 1 January and 30 June 1994 there were six cases (five confirmed, one probable) of Streptococcus pyogenes NF in west Gloucestershire, population 320,000. Two cases died. The first two patients probably acquired their infections during the course of elective surgery performed in the same operating theatre, possibly from a nasopharyngeal carrier amongst the theatre staff. The remaining infections were community-acquired. Of 5 S. pyogenes isolates there were 2 M1 strains, 1 M3, 1 M5 and 1 M non-typeable strain. S. pyogenes NF had not been recorded in west Gloucestershire in the preceding 10 years and the incidence of S. pyogenes bacteraemia in England and Wales had not risen in the past 5 years. The two presumably theatre-acquired infections raised several issues. The need for detailed bacteriological investigation of all cases of post-surgical NF was confirmed. Clusters of S. pyogenes infection following surgery should be managed by closure of the operating theatre until all staff have been screened for carriage. Closure of an operating theatre and screening of staff following a sporadic case is probably not justified because of the infrequency of surgical cross-infection with S. pyogenes. Regular, routine screening of theatre staff is neither practical nor necessary. PMID:8557070

  7. The use of drotrecogin alpha for necrotizing soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Rosing, David K; Malepati, Sarath; Yaghoubian, Arezou; Putnam, Brant A; Neville, Angela; Kaji, Amy H; De Virgilio, Christian

    2010-10-01

    The use of Drotrecogin alfa (DAA) (Xigris) in select patients with sepsis has had demonstrable improvement in survival, though its benefit in necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) is unclear. A retrospective review of NSTI patients receiving DAA at our institution from 2006 to 2009 was performed. Our previously derived mortality prediction model, based on classification and regression tree analysis, was applied to patients and the predicted mortality was compared with the actual mortality rate. Ten patients with severe NSTI received DAA. The median admission values were: white blood cell count of 27,000/mm3, serum lactate of 4.0 mmol/L, and serum sodium of 128 mEq/L. Four (40%) patients had systemic complications, five (50%) patients required amputation, and one died (10%). Median time to DAA administration was 12 hours after debridement. There were no bleeding complications attributed to DAA use. Mortality in this series of severe NSTI was only 10 per cent, which compares favorably with the predicted mortality of 18 per cent based on classification and regression tree analysis (P = 0.2). A prospective, randomized study is warranted to determine if the use of DAA should be part of the standard therapy for NSTI patients with a predicted high mortality. PMID:21105620

  8. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.

  9. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis and myositis in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Allender, M C; McCain, S L; Ramsay, E C; Schumacher, J; Ilha, M R S

    2009-06-01

    A 39-yr-old wild-caught, female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) died during an immobilization to assess swelling and apparent pain of the cervical region. Necropsy revealed a fistulous tract containing plant material in the oropharynx, above the soft palate, communicating with a left-sided cervical necrotizing fasciitis and myositis. Alpha-hemolytic Streptococcus and Prevotella sp. were isolated from the cervical lesion. This is a report of cervical necrotizing fasciitis in a western lowland gorilla.

  10. Responses of macrophages to the danger signals released from necrotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Sayama, Aoi; MaruYama, Takashi; Muta, Tatsushi

    2014-12-01

    The immune system maintains homeostasis by recognizing and responding to cell death caused by various stresses. The immune response is considered to be elicited by 'danger signals' released from necrotic cells. However, the identity of the danger signals remains elusive. In this study, we focused on the expression of chemokines by macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. In mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3 was induced at both the mRNA and protein levels in response to heat-killed murine cells. The induction of MCP-3 was also observed in MyD88-deficient macrophages, indicating that Toll-like receptors and the IL-1 receptor are not involved in this response. Consistent with this observation, the activation of NF-κB was not detected in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. Treatments with proteinase K, DNaseI or RNaseA did not affect the ' STIMULATING ACTIVITY': of necrotic cells. In contrast, treatment with apyrase, which removes phosphates from nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates, abolished the inducing activity. Purified UDP at 30 µM concentration elicited similar induction of MCP-3 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the UDP receptor P2Y6 in RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells, but not its induction by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the P2Y6 receptor in HEK293 cells conferred responsiveness to necrotic cells. These results suggest that UDP released by necrotic cells plays a critical role as an endogenous danger signal and that P2Y6 is required for the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells.

  11. Necrotic seminoma of the testis: establishing the diagnosis with Masson trichrome stain and immunostains.

    PubMed

    Florentine, Barbara D; Roscher, Arno A; Garrett, Jerry; Warner, Nancy E

    2002-02-01

    We describe an infarcted mass in the testis containing "ghost" cells suspicious for neoplasm. The entire lesion was necrotic. A Masson trichrome stain greatly improved nuclear and cytologic detail, confirming the suspicion of neoplasm. Placental alkaline phosphatase revealed specific membrane staining of the neoplastic cells and established a diagnosis of seminoma. Masson trichrome plus selected immunostains offer a promising approach to the diagnosis of certain necrotic neoplasms.

  12. Necrotizing Periodontal Diseases in Children: A Literature Review and Adjustment of Treatment.

    PubMed

    Marty, Mathieu; Palmieri, James; Noirrit-Esclassan, Emmanuelle; Vaysse, Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, sometimes observed in young children, may lead to necrotizing stomatitis and noma. Therefore, its interception is a necessity and a challenge for the paediatric practitioners. First, this article aims to propose a systematic review of recent literature on the use of local antiseptic and antibiotic prescription in this particular periodontal condition. Then, a protocol is proposed to have a simple, costless and reproducible treatment on children. PMID:26966241

  13. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Scambia, J; Gandillon, C; Aversano, F; Batista, R

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a common procedure in the treatment of renal calculi. There have been major complications reported with ESWL such as acute pancreatitis, bower perforation, venous thrombosis, and biliary obstruction. There are few reports in the literature of necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to ESWL. We have a case report of a 29-year-old female that developed an abdominal compartment syndrome with an acute necrotizing pancreatitis hours after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:27462545

  14. Proteolytic processing of tomato ringspot nepovirus 3C-like protease precursors: definition of the domains for the VPg, protease and putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Carrier, K; Chisholm, J; Wieczorek, A; Huguenot, C; Sanfaçon, H

    1999-03-01

    Tomato ringspot nepovirus (TomRSV) RNA-1 encodes a putative NTP-binding protein (NTB), a putative viral genome-linked protein (VPg), a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Pol) and a serine-like protease (Pro), which have been suggested to be involved in viral RNA replication. Proteolytic processing of protease precursors containing these proteins was studied in Escherichia coli and in vitro. The TomRSV protease could cleave the precursor proteins and release the predicted mature proteins or intermediate precursors. Although processing was detected at all three predicted cleavage sites (NTB-VPg, VPg-Pro and Pro-Pol), processing at the VPg-Pro cleavage site was inefficient, resulting in accumulation of the VPg-Pro intermediate precursor in E. coli and in vitro. In addition, the presence of the VPg sequence in the precursor resulted in increased cleavage at the Pro-Pol cleavage site in E. coli and in vitro. Direct N-terminal sequencing of the genomic RNA-linked VPg, of the mature protease purified from E. coli extracts and of radiolabelled mature polymerase purified from in vitro translation products revealed the sequences of the NTB-VPg, VPg-Pro and Pro-Pol dipeptide cleavage sites to be Q/S, Q/G and Q/S, respectively. In vitro processing at the NTB-VPg and Pro-Pol cleavage sites was not detected upon mutation or deletion of the conserved glutamine at the -1 position of the cleavage site. These results are discussed in light of the cleavage site specificity of the TomRSV protease.

  15. High risk of cancer in autoimmune necrotizing myopathies: usefulness of myositis specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Allenbach, Yves; Keraen, Jeremy; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Jooste, Valérie; Champtiaux, Nicolas; Hervier, Baptiste; Schoindre, Yoland; Rigolet, Aude; Gilardin, Laurent; Musset, Lucile; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Boyer, Olivier; Jouen, Fabienne; Drouot, Laurent; Martinet, Jeremie; Stojkovic, Tanya; Eymard, Bruno; Laforêt, Pascal; Behin, Antony; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Fain, Olivier; Meyer, Alain; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Mariampillai, Kuberaka; Grados, Aurelie; Benveniste, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Cancer can occur in patients with inflammatory myopathies. This association is mainly observed in dermatomyositis, and myositis-specific antibodies have allowed us to delineate patients at an increased risk. Malignancy is also reported in patients with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies, but the risk remains elusive. Anti-signal recognition particle or anti-HMGCR antibodies have been specifically associated with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. We aimed at screening the incidence of cancer in necrotizing autoimmune myopathies. A group of patients (n = 115) with necrotizing autoimmune myopathies with or without myositis-specific antibodies was analysed. Malignancy occurred more frequently in seronegative necrotizing autoimmune myopathies patients and in HMGCR-positive patients compared to anti-signal recognition particle positive patients. Synchronous malignancy was diagnosed in 21.4% and 11.5% of cases, respectively, and incidence of cancer was higher compared to the general population in both groups. No specific type of cancer was predominant. Patients suffering from a synchronous cancer had a decreased median survival time. Cancer screening is necessary in seronegative necrotizing autoimmune myopathies and in HMGCR-positive patients but not in anti-signal recognition particle-positive patients. PMID:27086869

  16. Characterization and detection of Tomato necrotic stunt virus, a novel potyvirus infecting greenhouse tomatoes in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouse tomato production has increased significantly in recent years in North America. Nearly 40% of fresh tomato supplies in the U.S. are produced in greenhouses. The highly intensive and hydroponic production system has created some unique ecological conditions for disease epidemic, especial...

  17. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    PubMed Central

    Thymann, Thomas; Møller, Hanne K.; Stoll, Barbara; Støy, Ann Cathrine F.; Buddington, Randal K.; Bering, Stine B.; Jensen, Bent B.; Olutoye, Oluyinka O.; Siggers, Richard H.; Mølbak, Lars; Sangild, Per T.

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains the most severe gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. It is associated with the initiation of enteral nutrition and may be related to immature carbohydrate digestive capacity. We tested the hypothesis that a formula containing maltodextrin vs. a formula containing lactose as the principal source of carbohydrate would predispose preterm pigs to a higher NEC incidence. Cesarean-derived preterm pigs were given total parenteral nutrition for 48 h followed by total enteral nutrition with a lactose-based (n = 11) or maltodextrin-based (n = 11) formula for 36 h. A higher incidence (91% vs. 27%) and severity (score of 3.3 vs. 1.8) of NEC were observed in the maltodextrin than in the lactose group. This higher incidence of NEC in the maltodextrin group was associated with significantly lower activities of lactase, maltase, and aminopeptidase; reduced villus height; transiently reduced in vivo aldohexose uptake; and reduced ex vivo aldohexose uptake capacity in the middle region of the small intestine. Bacterial diversity was low for both diets, but alterations in bacterial composition and luminal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids were observed in the maltodextrin group. In a second study, we quantified net portal absorption of aldohexoses (glucose and galactose) during acute jejunal infusion of a maltodextrin- or a lactose-based formula (n = 8) into preterm pigs. We found lower net portal aldohexose absorption (4% vs. 42%) and greater intestinal recovery of undigested carbohydrate (68% vs. 27%) in pigs acutely perfused with the maltodextrin-based formula than those perfused with the lactose-based formula. The higher digestibility of the lactose than the maltodextrin in the formulas can be attributed to a 5- to 20-fold higher hydrolytic activity of tissue-specific lactase than maltases. We conclude that carbohydrate maldigestion is sufficient to increase the incidence and severity of NEC in preterm pigs. PMID:19808655

  18. Necrotizing enterocolitis complicating the management of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Pierro, A; Manalang, L R; May, P L; Cooke, R W; Cudmore, R E; Lloyd, D A

    1993-08-01

    The case notes of all newborn infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) operated over the past 10 years at our institution were reviewed to establish the incidence and the effect of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) on morbidity and mortality following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting. Thirteen neonates had both PHH and NEC (group A); 7 of these patients were initially treated by ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt and six by ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt. Seventy-five patients had PHH alone (group B); all were treated by VP shunt. Eight patients in group A required an abdominal operation for NEC. The two groups were comparable for birth weight, gestational age, and other complications of prematurity. Episodes of shunt malfunction (infection and/or obstruction) and deaths occurring within 12 months from shunt insertion, in the two groups were compared. Shunt malfunction was more frequent in group A (72%) than in group B (27%) (P < .001). Shunt infection was observed in 39% of group A patients versus 14% in group B (P = .03). Distal shunt obstructions occurred in 28% of group A patients and only 3% of group B patients (P = .001). There were more deaths in group A (62% v 9%; P < .001). Thirty-one percent of group A patients and 4% of group B patients died following shunt complications (P = .006). In group A, there was no significant difference in mortality and shunt malfunction between patients with VA or VP shunts. The method of treatment and the stage of NEC did not influence morbidity and mortality after internal drainage for PHH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide’s antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide’s direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17. PMID:26062019

  20. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide's antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide's direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17.

  1. Systemic necrotizing vasculitides in severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mazodier, P; Elzouki, A N; Segelmark, M; Eriksson, S

    1996-08-01

    We describe the clinical presentation and outcome in a series of eight patients with systemic necrotizing vasculitis and severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency followed up at three Swedish hospitals during 1968-92. We also review six other cases reported in the literature during the same period. Diagnosis of severe AAT deficiency was based on the presence of the PiZZ phenotype, or low plasma total trypsin inhibitory capacity, or a low plasma AAT concentration (10-40% of the normal mean value) and presence of the PiSZ or PiFZ phenotype. The diagnosis of systemic vasculitis was biopsy-verified in all eight patients. Pretreatment laboratory findings, treatment protocol, and outcome were reviewed in each of the 14 patients. Of the eight patients in the Swedish series, six had systemic vasculitis of the microscopic polyangiitis form, one had Wegener's granulomatosis, and another had Henoch-Schönlein purpura. In the series as a whole (n = 14), median age at diagnosis was 48 years (range 44-84), the median number of affected organs was eight, and all 14 patients had skin involvement, and either renal or joint involvement (in most cases both); 71% (10/14) had emphysema; 57% (8/14) had hepatic abnormalities (two having cirrhosis, two fibrosis, and one multiple aneurysms in hepatic arteries); one patient who presented with acute ulcerative colitis developed manifest vasculitic syndrome three years later; and 64% (9/14) died, the major cause of death being renal failure. This syndrome, characterized by multiple organ involvement and fatal outcome, has been underdiagnosed. Physicians should be alert to the presence of the PiZ AAT deficiency gene in patients with systemic vasculitis, especially when the course is progressive or when the patient also has emphysema or cirrhosis. Awareness of those features may aid prompt recognition and enable early treatment.

  2. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide's antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide's direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17. PMID:26062019

  3. Anaerobic Antimicrobial Therapy After Necrotizing Enterocolitis in VLBW Infants

    PubMed Central

    Autmizguine, Julie; Hornik, Christoph P.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Clark, Reese H.; Cotten, C. Michael; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of anaerobic antimicrobial therapy for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) on clinical outcomes in very low birth weight (≤1500 g) infants. METHODS: We identified very low birth weight infants with NEC from 348 US NICUs from 1997 to 2012. Anaerobic antimicrobial therapy was defined by antibiotic exposure on the first day of NEC. We matched (1:1) infants exposed to anaerobic antimicrobial therapy with infants who were not exposed by using a propensity score stratified by NEC severity (medical and surgical). The primary composite outcome was in-hospital death or intestinal stricture. We assessed the relationship between anaerobic antimicrobial therapy and outcome by using a conditional logistic regression on the matched cohort. RESULTS: A total of 1390 infants exposed to anaerobic antimicrobial therapy were matched with 1390 infants not exposed. Mean gestational age and birth weight were 27 weeks and 946 g, respectively, and were similar in both groups. We found no significant difference in the combined outcome of death or strictures, but strictures as a single outcome were more common in the anaerobic antimicrobial therapy group (odds ratio 1.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.11–2.72). Among infants with surgical NEC, mortality was less common with anaerobic antimicrobial therapy (odds ratio 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.95). CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobic antimicrobial therapy was not associated with the composite outcome of death or strictures but was associated with an increase in intestinal strictures. This higher incidence of intestinal strictures may be explained by the fact that death is a competing outcome for intestinal strictures, and mortality was slightly lower in the anaerobic cohort. Infants with surgical NEC who received anaerobic antimicrobial therapy had lower mortality. PMID:25511117

  4. Correlation of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with microvascular density in necrotic, partial necrotic, and viable liver tumors in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jungwon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Dongil; Yang, Jehoon; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Yoon-La; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with microvessel density (MVD) in necrotic, partial necrotic, and viable tumors using a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Nine rabbits were used for this study. The complete necrotic area (CNA), partial necrotic area (PNA), and viable tumor area (VTA) of liver tumors were experimentally induced by radiofrequency ablation (RFA). DCE-MRI data were processed based on the extended Kety model to estimate Ktrans, ve and vp parameters. The boundaries among CNA, PNA, and VTA were delineated based on H&E stain images, and MVD was assessed for each subregion of each VX2 tumor based. There were no correlations between ph-parameters (Ktrans, ve, and vp) and MVD for CNA. For PNA, the Ktrans values were positively correlated with the MVD (r = 0.8124, p < 0.001). For VTA, we found a positive correlation between Ktrans values and the MVD (r = 0.5743, p < 0.05). Measuring from both the PNA and the VTA, mean Ktrans values were positively correlated with mean MVD (r = 0.8470, p < 0.0001). In a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model, Ktrans values correlated well with MVD counts of PNA and VTA in liver tumors. PMID:27685133

  5. Metagenomic Detection of Viral Pathogens in Spanish Honeybees: Co-Infection by Aphid Lethal Paralysis, Israel Acute Paralysis and Lake Sinai Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Guerri, Consuelo; Karlsson, Oskar E.; Kukielka, Deborah; Belák, Sándor; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The situation in Europe concerning honeybees has in recent years become increasingly aggravated with steady decline in populations and/or catastrophic winter losses. This has largely been attributed to the occurrence of a variety of known and “unknown”, emerging novel diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that colonies often can harbour more than one pathogen, making identification of etiological agents with classical methods difficult. By employing an unbiased metagenomic approach, which allows the detection of both unexpected and previously unknown infectious agents, the detection of three viruses, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV), Israel Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV), and Lake Sinai Virus (LSV), in honeybees from Spain is reported in this article. The existence of a subgroup of ALPV with the ability to infect bees was only recently reported and this is the first identification of such a strain in Europe. Similarly, LSV appear to be a still unclassified group of viruses with unclear impact on colony health and these viruses have not previously been identified outside of the United States. Furthermore, our study also reveals that these bees carried a plant virus, Turnip Ringspot Virus (TuRSV), potentially serving as important vector organisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate the new possibilities opened up by high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to study emerging new diseases in domestic and wild animal populations, including honeybees. PMID:23460860

  6. Development of multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for simultaneous detection of clostero-, badna- and mandari-viruses along with huanglongbing bacterium in citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ram Prasnna; Baranwal, V K

    2016-09-01

    Citrus trees harbor a large number of viral and bacterial pathogens. Citrus yellow vein clearing virus (CYVCV), Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV), Citrus yellow mosaic virus (CYMV), Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and a bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLa) associated with huanglongbing (HLB) disease, the most prevalent pathogens in citrus orchards of different regions in India and are responsible for debilitating citriculture. For detection of these viral and bacterial pathogens a quick, sensitive and cost effective detection method is required. With this objective a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay was developed for simultaneous detection of four viruses and a bacterium in citrus. Several sets of primers were designed for each virus based on the retrieved reference sequences from the GenBank. A primer pair published previously was used for greening bacterium. Each pair of primers was evaluated for their sensitivity and differentiation by simplex and mPCR. The constant amplified products were identified on the basis of molecular size in mPCR and were compared with standard PCR. The amplicons were cloned and results were confirmed with sequencing analysis. The mPCR assay was validated using naturally infected field samples for one or more citrus viruses and the huanglongbing bacterium. The mPCR assay developed here will aid in the production of virus free planting materials and rapid indexing for certification of citrus budwood programme. PMID:27208471

  7. A Proteolytic Cascade Controls Lysosome Rupture and Necrotic Cell Death Mediated by Lysosome-Destabilizing Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Muehlbauer, Stefan M.; Chandran, Kartik; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have linked necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins to the adaptive immune response mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants, alum and Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). However, the mechanism by which lysosome-destabilizing agents trigger necrosis and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins is poorly understood. The proteasome is a cellular complex that has been shown to regulate both necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins. We found that the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitors, MG115 and MG132, block lysosome rupture, degradation of inflammatory proteins and necrotic cell death mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing peptide LLOMe. However, non-aldehyde proteasome inhibitors failed to prevent LLOMe-induced cell death suggesting that aldehyde proteasome inhibitors triggered a pleotropic effect. We have previously shown that cathepsin C controls lysosome rupture, necrotic cell death and the adaptive immune response mediated by LLOMe. Using recombinant cathepsin C, we found that aldehyde proteasome inhibitors directly block cathepsin C, which presumably prevents LLOMe toxicity. The cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me also blocks lysosome rupture and necrotic cell death mediated by a wide range of necrosis inducers, including LLOMe. Using cathepsin-deficient cells and recombinant cathepsins, we demonstrate that the cathepsins B and C are not required for the CA-074-Me block of necrotic cell death. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants trigger an early proteolytic cascade, involving cathepsin C and a CA-074-Me-dependent protease. Identification of these early events leading to lysosome rupture will be crucial in our understanding of processes controlling necrotic cell death and immune responses mediated by lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants. PMID:24893007

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Form a Barrier between Necrotic and Viable Areas in Acute Abdominal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bilyy, Rostyslav; Fedorov, Volodymyr; Vovk, Volodymyr; Leppkes, Moritz; Dumych, Tetiana; Chopyak, Valentyna; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) of decondensed DNA and histones that trap and immobilize particulate matter and microbial pathogens like bacteria. NET aggregates reportedly surround and isolate large objects like monosodium urate crystals, which cannot be sufficiently cleared from tissues. In the setting of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, massive tissue necrosis occurs, which is organized as pancreatic pseudocysts (1). In contrast to regular cysts, these pseudocysts are not surrounded by epithelial layers. We hypothesize that, instead, the necrotic areas observed in necrotizing pancreatitis are isolated from the surrounding healthy tissues by aggregated NETs. These may form an alternative, putatively transient barrier, separating necrotic areas from viable tissue. To test this hypothesis, we investigated histological samples from the necropsy material of internal organs of two patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and peritonitis accompanied by multiple organ failure. Tissues including the inflammatory zone were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and evaluated for signs of inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils and NETs were detected by immunohistochemistry for DNA, neutrophil elastase (NE), and citrullinated histone H3. Interestingly, in severely affected areas of pancreatic necrosis or peritonitis, chromatin stained positive for NE and citrullinated histone H3, and may, therefore, be considered NET-derived. These NET structures formed a layer, which separated the necrotic core from the areas of viable tissue remains. A condensed layer of aggregated NETs, thus, spatially shields and isolates the site of necrosis, thereby limiting the spread of necrosis-associated proinflammatory mediators. We propose that necrotic debris may initiate and/or facilitate the formation of the NET-based surrogate barrier. PMID:27777576

  9. What is new with rhizomania and curly top management and effects of these viruses on storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania is a serious yield limiting viral disease in sugarbeet first identified in California, USA in 1984. The disease has since spread to all major production areas in the United States. Rhizomania is caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and vectored by the plasmodiophorid (a fun...

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV⁺-AIDS patient: pathological diagnosis confirmed by PCR using formalin-fixed- and paraffin-embedded-tissues.

    PubMed

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV(+) patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV+-AIDS Patient: Pathological Diagnosis Confirmed by PCR Using Formalin-Fixed- and Paraffin-Embedded-Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A.; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV+ patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease. PMID:25763312

  12. Expression of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Duan, F; Liu, P; Wang, P F; Wang, M X

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to determine the expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies in muscle tissues of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy patients. Results demonstrated that anti-SRP19 antibody was expressed in 71.4% (20/28) of muscle tissue specimens from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Anti-SRP19 antibody expression was mainly localized in cytoplasm of necrotic muscle fibers surrounding the small blood vessels and interstitial cells. There were no significant differences in the age, course of disease, muscle, and creatine kinase levels between patients with positive or negative expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies. The expression levels of anti-SRP19, serum anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as anti-Ro-52, anti- SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were not significantly different among groups. This study demonstrates that anti-SRP19 antibody is highly expressed in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy, and suggests that this protein may be involved in the origin and progression of the disease. PMID:27525944

  13. Day-of-hatch vaccination is not protective against necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mot, Dorien; Timbermont, Leen; Delezie, Evelyne; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Necrotic enteritis, caused by netB toxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A, is an important disease in broiler chickens worldwide. Earlier attempts to prevent necrotic enteritis by vaccination have not sufficiently taken into account the practical limitations of broiler vaccination. In most published studies on vaccination against necrotic enteritis, multiple doses at different ages are administered, which is not practical for broilers. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of subcutaneous single vaccination at day 1 or day 3 and double vaccination at day 3 and day 12, using crude supernatant containing active toxin or formaldehyde-inactivated supernatant (toxoid) of a netB-positive C. perfringens strain in a subclinical necrotic enteritis model. Double vaccination with crude supernatant resulted in a significant decrease in the number of chickens with necrotic enteritis lesions. The efficacy of vaccination using toxoid was lower compared with crude supernatant. Single vaccination with crude supernatant at day 3 resulted in significant protection, while vaccination of 1-day-old chickens with crude supernatant or toxoid, as envisaged for practical field application, did not induce protection.

  14. Detection of Enterococcus faecalis in Necrotic Teeth Root Canals by Culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cogulu, Dilsah; Uzel, Atac; Oncag, Ozant; Aksoy, Semiha C.; Eronat, Cemal

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Enterococcus faecalis in endodontic infections in both deciduous and permanent teeth by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Methods A total of 145 children aged 5–13 years old were involved in this study. The presence of E. faecalis in necrotic deciduous and permanent teeth root canals was studied using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods. Results Among 145 molar teeth, 57% (n=83) presented necrotic asymptomatic pulp tissues and were included in this study. Culture and PCR methods detected the test species in 18 and 22 of 83 teeth involved, respectively. E. faecalis was cultured from 8 (18%) of 45 necrotic deciduous teeth and from 10 (26%) of 38 necrotic permanent teeth. PCR detection identified the target species in 10 (22%) and 12 (32%) of necrotic deciduous and permanent teeth respectively. Statistically significant difference in the presence of E. faecalis in deciduous and permanent teeth was found by culture and PCR methods (P=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The difference in the presence of E. faecalis between two different methods was not statistically significant (P>.05). Conclusions The results of the present study confirm that both culture and PCR methods are sensitive to detect E. faecalis in root canals. PMID:19212470

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis – a rare complication following common obstetric operative procedures: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Medhi, Robin; Rai, Suditi; Das, Arpana; Ahmed, Mansur; Das, Banani

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis, a near-fatal soft-tissue infection complicating obstetric operative wounds, is a rare entity in obstetrics. Herein, we report two cases of necrotizing fasciitis in severely undernourished and anemic women following obstetric operative procedures. Both undernourishment and anemia compounded the already existing immune-suppressed state in pregnancy and may have lead to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis. One of the patients developed necrotizing fasciitis following episiotomy and the other following cesarean section. Both the cases were diagnosed clinically. Management was done by total parenteral nutrition, prompt correction of anemia, and surgical debridement under broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage. The raw areas were later reconstructed by split skin grafting in the first case, whereas, in the second case, due to the patient’s refusal of skin grafting, the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. Both patients survived, although with morbidity. Our study aims to emphasize prompt correction of comorbidities along with aggressive management of necrotizing fasciitis for better outcomes in the obstetric population. Prompt correction of nutritional status improves the survival rate. PMID:25897266

  16. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus infection of a resistant tomato line with a silenced sucrose transporter gene LeHT1 results in inhibition of growth, enhanced virus spread, and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Eybishtz, Assaf; Peretz, Yuval; Sade, Dagan; Gorovits, Rena; Czosnek, Henryk

    2010-02-01

    To identify genes involved in resistance of tomato to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), cDNA libraries from lines resistant (R) and susceptible (S) to the virus were compared. The hexose transporter LeHT1 was found to be expressed preferentially in R tomato plants. The role of LeHT1 in the establishment of TYLCV resistance was studied in R plants where LeHT1 has been silenced using Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV VIGS). Following TYLCV inoculation, LeHT1-silenced R plants showed inhibition of growth and enhanced virus accumulation and spread. In addition, a necrotic response was observed along the stem and petioles of infected LeHT1-silenced R plants, but not on infected not-silenced R plants. This response was specific of R plants since it was absent in infected LeHT1-silenced S plants. Necrosis had several characteristics of programmed cell death (PCD): DNA from necrotic tissues presented a PCD-characteristic ladder pattern, the amount of a JNK analogue increased, and production of reactive oxygen was identified by DAB staining. A similar necrotic reaction along stem and petioles was observed in LeHT1-silenced R plants infected with the DNA virus Bean dwarf mosaic virus and the RNA viruses Cucumber mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus. These results constitute the first evidence for a necrotic response backing natural resistance to TYLCV in tomato, confirming that plant defense is organized in multiple layers. They demonstrate that the hexose transporter LeHT1 is essential for the expression of natural resistance against TYLCV and its expression correlates with inhibition of virus replication and movement. PMID:19946703

  17. Gut bacteria are rarely shared by co-hospitalized premature infants, regardless of necrotizing enterocolitis development.

    PubMed

    Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Thomas, Brian C; Singh, Andrea; Firek, Brian; Brooks, Brandon; Castelle, Cindy J; Sharon, Itai; Baker, Robyn; Good, Misty; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-03-03

    Premature infants are highly vulnerable to aberrant gastrointestinal tract colonization, a process that may lead to diseases like necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, spread of potential pathogens among hospitalized infants is of great concern. Here, we reconstructed hundreds of high-quality genomes of microorganisms that colonized co-hospitalized premature infants, assessed their metabolic potential, and tracked them over time to evaluate bacterial strain dispersal among infants. We compared microbial communities in infants who did and did not develop necrotizing enterocolitis. Surprisingly, while potentially pathogenic bacteria of the same species colonized many infants, our genome-resolved analysis revealed that strains colonizing each baby were typically distinct. In particular, no strain was common to all infants who developed necrotizing enterocolitis. The paucity of shared gut colonizers suggests the existence of significant barriers to the spread of bacteria among infants. Importantly, we demonstrate that strain-resolved comprehensive community analysis can be accomplished on potentially medically relevant time scales.

  18. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aram; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Cho, Joong Bum; Kim, Yae-Jean; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Choe, Yon Ho

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is responsible for approximately 20% to 30% of community-acquired pneumonia, and is well known for its diverse extrapulmonary manifestations. However, acute necrotizing pancreatits is an extremely rare extrapulmonary manifestation of M. pneumoniae infection. A 6-year-old girl was admitted due to abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, and confused mentality. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was diagnosed according to symptoms, laboratory test results, and abdominal computed tomography scans. M. pneumoniae infection was diagnosed by a 4-fold increase in antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by particle agglutination antibody assay. No other etiologic factors or pathogens were detected. Despite the occurrence of a large infected pseudocyst during the course, the patient was able to discharge without morbidity by early aggressive supportive care. This is the first case in Korea of a child with acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26473143

  19. [Hyperthermic ulcero-necrotic parapsoriasis "en gouttes" with naso-pharyngeal lesions].

    PubMed

    Robledo; País; Tabernero; Nine; Fonseca; Cruces; Taboada; Santiago; Fernández

    1981-01-01

    The clinical history of a patient affected by a chronic relapsing eruption is presented. Successive papulopustular, necrotic and ulcerous lesions with fever and general distress appeared. There was no visceral affectation. The case corresponded to the necrotic and hyperthermic parapsoriasis "en gouttes" or acute pityriasis lichenoides as described by Degos and col., 1966. The presence of vasculitis with lymphohistiocytic inflammation invading the epidermis is described. The aspect was similar to the parapsoriasis "en gouttes" pattern even though a biopsy showed the presence of necrotizing angeitis of small vessels, as previously reported. The patient also presented oral and nasopharyngeal ulcerous lesions similar to those found in malignant midline granuloma and Wegener granulomatosis, even though histopathologically different. It is interesting to note the absence of any visceral involvement in a 12 years evolution. PMID:7022059

  20. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  1. Limited surgical treatment of suspected necrotizing fasciitis of the upper extremity with a benign clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gander, Brian; Kaye, Marc; Wollstein, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly evolving, potentially fatal infection. Current recommendations advocate antibiotic administration and early aggressive surgical debridement. Aggressive surgery is associated with significant morbidity, leaving patients with substantial tissue loss and complex wounds. A case of suspected necrotizing fasciitis treated with minimal surgery is described. A previously healthy 48-year-old man presented with increased erythema, swelling and blistering of his left upper extremity. Despite a benign systemic clinical presentation, the hand and forearm were suspicious for necrotizing fasciitis, prompting surgical treatment. Surgical exploration found a significant amount of intradermal and subdermal clear fluid. It was decided to limit the amount of debridement. The diagnosis was Wells syndrome, eosinophilic cellulitis. Treated with steroids, the wounds healed uneventfully. It is important to consider the complete clinical picture before aggressive surgical treatment. A negative history for diabetes, atypical clinical presentation and benign operative findings are suggestive of a more benign diagnosis. PMID:23997598

  2. A Report of Peritonitis from Aeromonas sobria in a Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) Patient with Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Janma, Jirayut; Linasmita, Patcharasarn; Changsirikulchai, Siribha

    2015-11-01

    A 70-years of age, male patient with underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and ischemic heart disease had undergone continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)for 3 years without any episodes of peritonitis. He was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis and later developed peritonitis after receiving a laceration from an aquatic injury suffered during the flood disaster of 2011. The blood culture, necrotic tissue and the clear dialysate collected upon admission had shown Aeromonas sobria. The route of peritonitis may be from the hematogenous spread of A. sobria resulting in necrotizing fasciitis. A. sobria should be considered as the pathogen of peritonitis in PD patients who have history of wounds from contaminated water. We suggest that the PD patients who present with septicemia and did not meet the criteria for peritonitis, the initial dialysate effluent should be sent for culture. The benefit of this is to allow early recognition and treatment of peritonitis.

  3. Necrotizing fasciitis in a young patient with acute myeloid leukemia – a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by a fulminant destruction of the soft tissue with an alarmingly high mortality rate. One of the main reasons for the continued high mortality is due to the challenge to punctual recognize and diagnose this disease, as specific cutaneous signs can vary or even be missing early in its evolution – especially in case of simultaneous first manifestation of an acute leukemia. Case presentation An untypical case of necrotizing fasciitis disease in a young patient with the first diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia is presented. After her induction chemotherapy the only presenting clinical sign was fever in the presence of severe neutropenia without an evident infectious focus. After a few days a painless confluent, erythematous, pustular skin rash with a central necrosis on lateral thigh appeared. Escherichia coli was isolated from blood cultures. Surgical debridement was performed and showed subcutaneous tissue, fascia and underlying muscle around the site of initial cutaneous manifestation with typical necrosis on exploration. But, initially taken skin biopsy did not show any typical histopathological findings like bacteria or inflammatory cells confirming necrotizing fasciitis. Nevertheless, the intraoperative findings were impressive and highly indicative for a necrotizing soft tissue infection, so that the patient was treated according to clinical guidelines with extensive recurrent surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intensive care therapy. After recovering from NF, she successfully underwent further chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation. Conclusion The presented case highlights the risk of potential misinterpretation, delayed diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing fasciitis in patients presenting with an untypical clinical and histopathological manifestation of necrotizing fasciitis as a result of severe neutropenia following chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25002906

  4. Alternatives to Antibiotics to Prevent Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens: A Microbiologist's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Caly, Delphine L; D'Inca, Romain; Auclair, Eric; Drider, Djamel

    2015-01-01

    Since the 2006 European ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed, numerous studies have been published describing alternative strategies to prevent diseases in animals. A particular focus has been on prevention of necrotic enteritis in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens by the use of microbes or microbe-derived products. Microbes produce a plethora of molecules with antimicrobial properties and they can also have beneficial effects through interactions with their host. Here we review recent developments in novel preventive treatments against C. perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens that employ yeasts, bacteria and bacteriophages or secondary metabolites and other microbial products in disease control. PMID:26648920

  5. Alternatives to Antibiotics to Prevent Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens: A Microbiologist's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Caly, Delphine L.; D'Inca, Romain; Auclair, Eric; Drider, Djamel

    2015-01-01

    Since the 2006 European ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed, numerous studies have been published describing alternative strategies to prevent diseases in animals. A particular focus has been on prevention of necrotic enteritis in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens by the use of microbes or microbe-derived products. Microbes produce a plethora of molecules with antimicrobial properties and they can also have beneficial effects through interactions with their host. Here we review recent developments in novel preventive treatments against C. perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens that employ yeasts, bacteria and bacteriophages or secondary metabolites and other microbial products in disease control. PMID:26648920

  6. Systemic Spread and Propagation of a Plant-Pathogenic Virus in European Honeybees, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji Lian; Cornman, R. Scott; Evans, Jay D.; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Zhao, Yan; Murphy, Charles; Peng, Wen Jun; Wu, Jie; Hamilton, Michele; Boncristiani, Humberto F.; Zhou, Liang; Hammond, John; Chen, Yan Ping

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Emerging and reemerging diseases that result from pathogen host shifts are a threat to the health of humans and their domesticates. RNA viruses have extremely high mutation rates and thus represent a significant source of these infectious diseases. In the present study, we showed that a plant-pathogenic RNA virus, tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), could replicate and produce virions in honeybees, Apis mellifera, resulting in infections that were found throughout the entire body. Additionally, we showed that TRSV-infected individuals were continually present in some monitored colonies. While intracellular life cycle, species-level genetic variation, and pathogenesis of the virus in honeybee hosts remain to be determined, the increasing prevalence of TRSV in conjunction with other bee viruses from spring toward winter in infected colonies was associated with gradual decline of host populations and winter colony collapse, suggesting the negative impact of the virus on colony survival. Furthermore, we showed that TRSV was also found in ectoparasitic Varroa mites that feed on bee hemolymph, but in those instances the virus was restricted to the gastric cecum of Varroa mites, suggesting that Varroa mites may facilitate the spread of TRSV in bees but do not experience systemic invasion. Finally, our phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRSV isolates from bees, bee pollen, and Varroa mites clustered together, forming a monophyletic clade. The tree topology indicated that the TRSVs from arthropod hosts shared a common ancestor with those from plant hosts and subsequently evolved as a distinct lineage after transkingdom host alteration. This study represents a unique example of viruses with host ranges spanning both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:24449751

  7. Vaccinia Virus Induces Programmed Necrosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Archibald, Kyra M; Kulbe, Hagen; Balkwill, Frances R; Öberg, Daniel; McNeish, Iain A

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which oncolytic vaccinia virus induces tumor cell death are poorly understood. We have evaluated cell death pathways following infection of ovarian cancer cells with both wild-type and thymidine kinase-deleted (dTK) Lister strain vaccinia. We show that death does not rely upon classical apoptosis despite the appearances of some limited apoptotic features, including phosphatidylserine externalization and appearance of sub-G1 DNA populations. Vaccinia infection induces marked lipidation of LC3 proteins, but there is no general activation of the autophagic process and cell death does not rely upon autophagy induction. We show that vaccinia induces necrotic morphology on transmission electron microscopy, accompanied by marked by reductions in intracellular adenosine triphosphate, altered mitochondrial metabolism, and release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. This necrotic cell death appears regulated, as infection induces formation of a receptor interacting protein (RIP1)/caspase-8 complex. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of both RIP1 and substrates downstream of RIP1, including MLKL, significantly attenuate cell death. Blockade of TNF-α, however, does not alter virus efficacy, suggesting that necrosis does not result from autocrine cytokine release. Overall, these results show that, in ovarian cancer cells, vaccinia virus causes necrotic cell death that is mediated through a programmed series of events. PMID:23985697

  8. Water-soluble germanium nanoparticles cause necrotic cell death and the damage can be attenuated by blocking the transduction of necrotic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chin-Ping; Tsai, Jia-Shiuan; Shen, Mo-Yuan; Li, Yaw-Kuen; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2011-12-15

    Water-soluble germanium nanoparticles (wsGeNPs) with allyamine-conjugated surfaces were fabricated and emit blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light. The wsGeNP was physically and chemically stable at various experimental conditions. Cytotoxicity of the fabricated wsGeNP was examined. MTT assay demonstrated that wsGeNP possessed high toxicity to cells and clonogenic survival assay further indicated that this effect was not resulted from retarding cell growth. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that wsGeNP did not alter the cell cycle profile but the sub-G1 fraction was absent from treated cells. Results from DNA fragmentation and propidium iodide exclusion assays also suggested that apoptotic cell death did not occur in cells treated with wsGeNP. Addition of a necrosis inhibitor, necrostatin-1, attenuated cell damage and indicated that wsGeNP caused necrotic cell death. Cell signaling leads to necrotic death was investigated. Intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased upon wsGeNP treatment. These effects can be abrogated by BAPTA-AM and N-acetyl cysteine respectively, resulting in a reduction in cell damage. In addition, wsGeNP caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) which could be recovered by cyclosporine A. The cellular signaling events revealed that wsGeNP increase the cellular calcium level which enhances the production of ROS and leads to a reduction of MMP, consequentially results in necrotic cell death.

  9. Making a Virus Visible: Francis O. Holmes and a biological assay for tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2014-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, viruses had yet to be defined in a material way. Instead, they were known better by what they were not - not bacteria, not culturable, and not visible with a light microscope. As with the ill-defined "gene" of genetics, viruses were microbes whose nature had not been revealed. Some clarity arrived in 1929 when Francis O. Holmes, a scientist at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (Yonkers, NY) reported that Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) could produce local necrotic lesions on tobacco plants and that these lesions were in proportion to dilutions of the inoculum. Holmes' method, the local lesion assay, provided the first evidence that viruses were discrete infectious particles, thus setting the stage for physicochemical studies of plant viruses. In a field where there are few eponymous methods or diseases, Holmes' assay continues to be a useful tool for the study of plant viruses. TMV was a success because the local lesion assay "made the virus visible" and standardized the work of virology towards determining the nature of the virus. PMID:23494396

  10. Abdominal near-infrared spectroscopy measurements are lower in preterm infants at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a noninvasive method of measuring local tissue oxygenation (StO[2]). Abdominal StO[2] measurements in preterm piglets are directly correlated with changes in intestinal blood flow and markedly reduced by necrotizing enterocolitis. The objectives of this study were to us...

  11. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum a...

  12. Genetically disparate Fayoumi chicken lines show different response to avian Necrotic Enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) has reemerged as a significant problem as a result of growing restrictions of antibiotics in agricultural animal production and increasing concerns over antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. To enhance our understanding of host-pathogen immunobiology in NE, transcriptomi...

  13. Microbial and metabolic signatures of necrotizing enterocolitis in formula-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) include premature birth, formula feeding, and microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that feeding formula composed of lactose vs corn syrup solids protects against NEC in preterm pigs, however the microbial an...

  14. Delayed initiation of enteral formula feeding reduces the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major complication of enteral feeding in premature infants with a high morbidity and mortality. Early enteral feeding of fortified human milk is considered optimal nutrition for the preterm infant. However, human milk is not always available, and commercial formu...

  15. Oral lactoferrin for the treatment of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) cause significant neonatal mortality and morbidity in spite of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Enhancing host defence and modulating inflammation by using lactoferrin as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of sepsis and/or NEC may improve cl...

  16. Oral lactoferrin for the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolotis in preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactoferrin, a normal component of human colostrum, milk, tears and saliva can enhance host defence and may be effective in the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm neonates. To assess the safety and effectiveness of oral lactoferrin in the prevention of sepsis and NEC...

  17. Oral lactoferrin for the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactoferrin, a normal component of human colostrum, milk, tears, and saliva can enhance host defence and may be effective in the prevention of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm neonates. To assess the safety and effectiveness of oral lactoferrin in the prevention of sepsis and NE...

  18. Modulation of microrna in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a re-emerging disease as a result of an increased restriction on the use of antibiotics in poultry. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of NE are unclear. Therefore, we carried out small RNA transcriptome analysis in an experimentally induced NE m...

  19. Attenuation of cadmium-induced necrotic cell death by necrostatin-1: Potential necrostatin-1 acting sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.-S.; Yang, P.-M.; Tsai, J.-S.; Lin, L.-Y.

    2009-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces necrotic death in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cells and we have established the responsible signaling pathway. Reportedly, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) rescues cells from necrotic death by mediating through the death domain receptor (DR) signaling pathway. We show here that Nec-1 also effectively attenuates necrotic death triggered by Cd. Two other treatments that cause necrotic cell death, one can (z-VAD-fmk/TNF-{alpha} on U937 cells) and the other cannot (etherynic acid (EA) on DLD-1 cells) be rescued by Nec-1, were also studied in parallel for comparison. Results show that Nec-1 is ineffectual in modulating intracellular calcium contents, calpain activity (a downstream protease), or reactive oxygen species production. It can counteract the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) caused by treating CHO K1 or U937 cells with necrosis-inducing agent. However, this effect was not found in EA-treated DLD-1 cells. Notably, Nec-1 elevates NF-{kappa}B activity in the presence or absence of necrosis-inducing agents. Our study shows that, in addition to DR-mediated necrosis, Nec-1 is effective in attenuating Cd-induced necrosis. It rescues cells with reduced MMP implying that mitochondrion is its major acting site.

  20. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Here we describe three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is strongly implicated as a causative agent of necrotic pharyngitis. ...

  1. Dietary supplementation of young broiler chickens with Capsicum and turmeric oleoresins increases resistance to necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Clostridium-related poultry disease, necrotic enteritis (NE), causes substantial economic losses on a global scale. In this study, a mixture of two plant-derived phytonutrients, Capsicum oleoresin and turmeric oleoresin (XT), was evaluated for its effects on local and systemic immune responses ...

  2. Role of Wheat Based Diet on the Pathology of Necrotic Enteritis in Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Sajid; Younus, Muhammad; Shahzad, Muhammad; Aqil, Kiran; Qayyum, Rizwan; Mushtaq, Aqsa; Shah, Muhammad Ali Abdullah; Munir, Muhammad Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of wheat based diet on the pathology of necrotic enteritis in turkeys. Turkeys were divided into four groups. Groups A and B were kept as noninoculated and fed normal commercial diet while groups C and D were challenged orally with C. perfringens and fed wheat based diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Infected turkeys showed clinical signs of depression, ruffled feathers, and dark yellowish faeces showing the most prominent disease signs in turkeys of group D with 30% mortality. Similarly, turkeys of group D showed more striking gross and histopathologic lesions as compared to turkeys of group C. The most severe gross lesions comprised intestinal distension, small necrotic spots and haemorrhages on intestine, fragile intestinal wall, and gas bubble formation in the small intestine. Histologically, inoculated turkeys showed patchy necrosis, desquamation of intestinal epithelium, and intense leukocyte infiltration in the intestine. Microscopic examination showed significant decrease in the height of intestinal villi of inoculated birds. Haematological studies showed significant influence of necrotic enteritis on the blood profile of turkeys in group D. The findings revealed that simultaneous feeding of wheat enhanced the pathology of necrotic enteritis in turkeys. PMID:27239373

  3. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to group A streptococcus. Morbidity and mortality still high.

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, H. A.; Palepu, A.; Fernandes, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To update physicians on Group A streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis, including current methods of diagnosis and treatment. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Current literature (1990-1998) was searched via MEDLINE using the MeSH headings necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and Streptococcus. Articles were selected based on clinical relevance and design. Most were case reports, case series, or population-based surveys. There were no randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: The hallmark of clinical diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is pain out of proportion to physical findings. Suspicion of underlying soft tissue infection should prompt urgent surgical examination. Therapy consists of definitive excisional surgical debridement in conjunction with high-dose intravenous penicillin G and clindamicin. Risk factors for mortality include advanced age, underlying illness, hypotension, and bacteremia. CONCLUSION: Necrotizing soft tissue infections due to Group A streptococcus might be increasing in frequency and aggression. Overall mortality remains high (20% to 34% in larger series). Clinical diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and should prompt urgent surgical referral. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10925760

  4. Role of Wheat Based Diet on the Pathology of Necrotic Enteritis in Turkeys.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sajid; Younus, Muhammad; Shahzad, Muhammad; Aqil, Kiran; Qayyum, Rizwan; Mushtaq, Aqsa; Shah, Muhammad Ali Abdullah; Munir, Muhammad Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of wheat based diet on the pathology of necrotic enteritis in turkeys. Turkeys were divided into four groups. Groups A and B were kept as noninoculated and fed normal commercial diet while groups C and D were challenged orally with C. perfringens and fed wheat based diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Infected turkeys showed clinical signs of depression, ruffled feathers, and dark yellowish faeces showing the most prominent disease signs in turkeys of group D with 30% mortality. Similarly, turkeys of group D showed more striking gross and histopathologic lesions as compared to turkeys of group C. The most severe gross lesions comprised intestinal distension, small necrotic spots and haemorrhages on intestine, fragile intestinal wall, and gas bubble formation in the small intestine. Histologically, inoculated turkeys showed patchy necrosis, desquamation of intestinal epithelium, and intense leukocyte infiltration in the intestine. Microscopic examination showed significant decrease in the height of intestinal villi of inoculated birds. Haematological studies showed significant influence of necrotic enteritis on the blood profile of turkeys in group D. The findings revealed that simultaneous feeding of wheat enhanced the pathology of necrotic enteritis in turkeys. PMID:27239373

  5. A Case of Descending Necrotizing MediastinitisPenetrating to the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Yuichiro; Tokano, Hisashi; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kitamura, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present the case of a 78-year-old man with a deep neck infection that caused descending necrotizing mediastinitis that extended from the pharynx to the stomach and was accompanied by two large esophageal fistulas and multiple gastric ulcers. We believe that the series of lesions were the signs of a hidden carcinoma. PMID:25648975

  6. Peptidases released by necrotic cells control CD8+ T cell cross-priming

    PubMed Central

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Kapanadze, Tamar; Han, Miaojun; Wissing, Josef; Ma, Chi; Jaensch, Lothar; Manns, Michael P.; Armstrong, Todd; Jaffee, Elizabeth; White, Ayla O.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-priming of CD8+ T cells and generation of effector immune responses is pivotal for tumor immunity as well as for successful anticancer vaccination and therapy. Dead and dying cells produce signals that can influence Ag processing and presentation; however, there is conflicting evidence regarding the immunogenicity of necrotic cell death. We used a mouse model of sterile necrosis, in which mice were injected with sterile primary necrotic cells, to investigate a role of these cells in priming of CD8+ T cells. We discovered a molecular mechanism operating in Ag donor cells that regulates cross-priming of CD8+ T cells during primary sterile necrosis and thereby controls adaptive immune responses. We found that the cellular peptidases dipeptidyl peptidase 3 (DPP-3) and thimet oligopeptidase 1 (TOP-1), both of which are present in nonimmunogenic necrotic cells, eliminated proteasomal degradation products and blocked Ag cross-presentation. While sterile necrotic tumor cells failed to induce CD8+ T cell responses, their nonimmunogenicity could be reversed in vitro and in vivo by inactivation of DPP-3 and TOP-1. These results indicate that control of cross-priming and thereby immunogenicity of primary sterile necrosis relies on proteasome-dependent oligopeptide generation and functional status of peptidases in Ag donor cells. PMID:24216478

  7. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both

  8. Influenza A virus-infected hosts boost an invasive type of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shigefumi; Kawabata, Shigetada; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Goto, Toshiyuki; Sano, Kouichi; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2003-04-01

    The apparent worldwide resurgence of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection in the last two decades remains unexplained. At present, animal models in which toxic shock-like syndrome or necrotizing fasciitis is induced after S. pyogenes infection are not well developed. We demonstrate here that infection with a nonlethal dose of influenza A virus 2 days before intranasal infection with a nonlethal dose of S. pyogenes strains led to a death rate of more than 90% in mice, 10% of which showed necrotizing fasciitis. Infection of lung alveolar epithelial cells by the influenza A virus resulted in viral hemagglutinin expression on the cell surface and promoted internalization of S. pyogenes. However, treatment with monoclonal antibodies to hemagglutinin markedly decreased this internalization. Our results indicate that prior infection with influenza A virus induces a lethal synergism, resulting in the induction of invasive S. pyogenes infection in mice.

  9. Imaging and analysis of microcalcifications and lipid/necrotic core calcification in fibrous cap atheroma.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Natalia; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Laudier, Damien; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Cardoso, Luis

    2015-06-01

    The presence of microcalcifications (µCalcs) >5 µm within the cap of human fibroatheroma has been shown to produce a 200-700% increase in peak circumferential stress, which can transform a stable plaque into a vulnerable one, whereas µCalcs < 5 µm do not appear to increase risk. We quantitatively examine the possibility to distinguish caps with µCalcs > 5 µm based on the gross morphological features of fibroatheromas, and the correlation between the size and distribution of µCalcs in the cap and the calcification in the lipid/necrotic core beneath it. Atherosclerotic lesions (N = 72) were imaged using HR-μCT at 2.1-μm resolution for detailed analysis of atheroma morphology and composition, and validated using non-decalcified histology. At 2.1-μm resolution one observes four different patterns of calcification within the lipid/necrotic core, and is able to elucidate the 3D spatial progression of the calcification process using these four patterns. Of the gross morphological features identified, only minimum cap thickness positively correlated with the existence of µCalcs > 5 µm in the cap. We also show that µCalcs in the cap accumulate in the vicinity of the lipid/necrotic core boundary with few on the lumen side of the cap. HR-μCT enables three-dimensional assessment of soft tissue composition, lipid content, calcification patterns within lipid/necrotic cores and analysis of the axial progression of calcification within individual atheroma. The distribution of µCalcs within the cap is highly non-uniform and decreases sharply as one proceeds from the lipid pool/necrotic core boundary to the lumen. PMID:25837377

  10. Distinct cathepsins control necrotic cell death mediated by pyroptosis inducers and lysosome-destabilizing agents.

    PubMed

    Brojatsch, Jürgen; Lima, Heriberto; Palliser, Deborah; Jacobson, Lee S; Muehlbauer, Stefan M; Furtado, Raquel; Goldman, David L; Lisanti, Michael P; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death triggers a range of biological responses including a strong adaptive immune response, yet we know little about the cellular pathways that control necrotic cell death. Inhibitor studies suggest that proteases, and in particular cathepsins, drive necrotic cell death. The cathepsin B-selective inhibitor CA-074-Me blocks all forms of programmed necrosis by an unknown mechanism. We found that cathepsin B deficiency does not prevent induction of pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis suggesting that CA-074-Me blocks necrotic cell death by targeting cathepsins other than cathepsin B. A single cathepsin, cathepsin C, drives necrotic cell death mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing agent Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). Here we present evidence that cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing in a distinct and cell type-specific fashion. Cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing of all myeloid cells, except for neutrophils. Cathepsin C-deficiency, but not CA-074-Me, blocks LLOMe killing of neutrophils suggesting that CA-074-Me does not target cathepsin C directly, consistent with inhibitor studies using recombinant cathepsin C. Unlike other cathepsins, cathepsin C lacks endoproteolytic activity, and requires activation by other lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsin D. Consistent with this theory, we found that lysosomotropic agents and cathepsin D downregulation by siRNA block LLOMe-mediated necrosis. Our findings indicate that a proteolytic cascade, involving cathepsins C and D, controls LLOMe-mediated necrosis. In contrast, cathepsins C and D were not required for pyroptotic cell death suggesting that distinct cathepsins control pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis. PMID:25830414

  11. Necrotic cells influence migration and invasion of glioblastoma via NF-κB/AP-1-mediated IL-8 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, So-Hee; Park, Hyunju; Ahn, Young-Ho; Kim, Sewha; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial tumor in adults and has poor prognosis. Diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma, rapid growth, and the presence of necrosis are remarkable hallmarks of GBM. However, the effect of necrotic cells on GBM growth and metastasis is poorly understood at present. In this study, we examined the biological significance of necrotic tissues by exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling network between necrotic tissues and GBM cells. The migration and invasion of the GBM cell line CRT-MG was significantly enhanced by treatment with necrotic cells, as shown by assays for scratch wound healing and spheroid invasion. Incubation with necrotic cells induced IL-8 secretion in CRT-MG cells in a dose-dependent manner. In human GBM tissues, IL-8 positive cells were mainly distributed in the perinecrotic region, as seen in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. Necrotic cells induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and their binding to the IL-8 promoter, leading to enhanced IL-8 production and secretion in GBM cells. Our data demonstrate that when GBM cells are exposed to and stimulated by necrotic cells, the migration and invasion of GBM cells are enhanced and facilitated via NF-κB/AP-1 mediated IL-8 upregulation. PMID:27076368

  12. Inventing Viruses.

    PubMed

    Summers, William C

    2014-11-01

    In the nineteenth century, "virus" commonly meant an agent (usually unknown) that caused disease in inoculation experiments. By the 1890s, however, some disease-causing agents were found to pass through filters that retained the common bacteria. Such an agent was called "filterable virus," the best known being the virus that caused tobacco mosaic disease. By the 1920s there were many examples of filterable viruses, but no clear understanding of their nature. However, by the 1930s, the term "filterable virus" was being abandoned in favor of simply "virus," meaning an agent other than bacteria. Visualization of viruses by the electron microscope in the late 1930s finally settled their particulate nature. This article describes the ever-changing concept of "virus" and how virologists talked about viruses. These changes reflected their invention and reinvention of the concept of a virus as it was revised in light of new knowledge, new scientific values and interests, and new hegemonic technologies.

  13. Inventing Viruses.

    PubMed

    Summers, William C

    2014-11-01

    In the nineteenth century, "virus" commonly meant an agent (usually unknown) that caused disease in inoculation experiments. By the 1890s, however, some disease-causing agents were found to pass through filters that retained the common bacteria. Such an agent was called "filterable virus," the best known being the virus that caused tobacco mosaic disease. By the 1920s there were many examples of filterable viruses, but no clear understanding of their nature. However, by the 1930s, the term "filterable virus" was being abandoned in favor of simply "virus," meaning an agent other than bacteria. Visualization of viruses by the electron microscope in the late 1930s finally settled their particulate nature. This article describes the ever-changing concept of "virus" and how virologists talked about viruses. These changes reflected their invention and reinvention of the concept of a virus as it was revised in light of new knowledge, new scientific values and interests, and new hegemonic technologies. PMID:26958713

  14. The effects of necrotic enteritis, aflatoxin B1, and virginiamycin on growth performance, necrotic enteritis lesion scores, and mortality in young broilers.

    PubMed

    Cravens, R L; Goss, G R; Chi, F; De Boer, E D; Davis, S W; Hendrix, S M; Richardson, J A; Johnston, S L

    2013-08-01

    The effects of increasing aflatoxin B1 concentration (0, 0.75, 1.5 mg/kg) on broilers with or without necrotic enteritis or virginiamycin were determined. In the 23-d study, 22 male Cobb 500 chicks per pen were allotted to 12 treatments (3 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement) with 8 replications. Intestines of 5 birds per pen were examined for lesions on d 21. Birds were allowed to consume feed and water ad libitum. Aflatoxin was included in the diets from d 0. All birds received a 10× dose of coccidiosis vaccine on d 10. Pens of birds where necrotic enteritis was being induced were on Clostridium perfringens pathogen (CPP) contaminated litter from d 0. Aflatoxin decreased gain and feed intake and resulted in poorer feed:gain, increased mortality, and higher lesion scores. Inducing necrotic enteritis increased lesion scores and decreased feed intake and gain. Adding virginiamycin to the diets improved gain, feed intake, feed conversion, and decreased mortality. There was a 3-way interaction (aflatoxin × virginiamycin × CPP) on gain; increasing aflatoxin decreased gain and the effects of CPP and virginiamycin were dependent on aflatoxin concentration. In the absence of aflatoxin virginiamycin increased gain but was unable to prevent the growth suppression caused by CPP. At 0.75 mg/kg of aflatoxin virginiamycin no longer increased growth in non-CPP challenged birds but was able to increase growth in CPP-challenged birds. At the 1.5 mg/kg of aflatoxin concentration, virginiamycin increased gain in non-CPP-challenged birds but challenging birds with CPP had no effect on gain. Virginiamycin improved overall feed conversion with the greatest improvement at 1.5 mg/kg (aflatoxin × virginiamycin, P < 0.05). Aflatoxin increased lesion scores in unchallenged birds but not in challenged birds (aflatoxin × CPP, P < 0.001). Aflatoxin and necrotic enteritis decrease broiler performance and interact to decrease weight gain, virginiamycin helps improve gain in challenged birds at

  15. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  16. Identification and characterization of citrus yellow vein clearing virus, a putative new member of the genus Mandarivirus.

    PubMed

    Loconsole, G; Onelge, N; Potere, O; Giampetruzzi, A; Bozan, O; Satar, S; De Stradis, A; Savino, V; Yokomi, R K; Saponari, M

    2012-12-01

    Molecular features and genomic organization were determined for Citrus yellow vein clearing virus (CYVCV), the putative viral causal agent of yellow vein clearing disease of lemon trees, reported in Pakistan, India, and more recently in Turkey and China. CYVCV isolate Y1 from Adana, Turkey, was used for deep sequencing analysis of the virus-induced small RNA fractions and for mechanical and graft inoculation of herbaceous and citrus indicator plants. A polyclonal antiserum was developed from CYVCV-Y1 purified from Phaseolus vulgaris and used in western blot assays to characterize the coat protein of CYVCV-Y1 and determine its serological relationship with related viruses. Contigs assembled from the Illumina sequenced short reads were used to construct the whole genome of Citrus yellow vein clearing virus (CYVCV), consisting in a positive-sense RNA of 7,529 nucleotides and containing six predicted open reading frames. The CYVCV genome organization and size resembled that of flexiviruses, and search for sequence homologies revealed that Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) (Mandarivirus, Alphaflexiviridae) is the most closely related virus. However, CYVCV had an overall nucleotide sequence identity of ≈74% with ICRSV. Although the two viruses were similar with regard to genome organization, viral particles, and herbaceous host range, CYVCV caused different symptoms in citrus and was serologically distinct from ICRSV. Primer pairs were designed and used to detect the virus by conventional and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on yellow vein clearing symptomatic field trees as well as graft- and mechanically inoculated host plants. Collectively, these data suggest that CYVCV is the causal agent of yellow vein clearing disease and represents a new species in the genus Mandarivirus.

  17. Enrichment of Phosphatidylethanolamine in Viral Replication Compartments via Co-opting the Endosomal Rab5 Small GTPase by a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses build extensive membranous replication compartments to support replication and protect the virus from antiviral responses by the host. These viruses require host factors and various lipids to form viral replication complexes (VRCs). The VRCs built by Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) are enriched with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) through a previously unknown pathway. To unravel the mechanism of PE enrichment within the TBSV replication compartment, in this paper, the authors demonstrate that TBSV co-opts the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound active form of the endosomal Rab5 small GTPase via direct interaction with the viral replication protein. Deletion of Rab5 orthologs in a yeast model host or expression of dominant negative mutants of plant Rab5 greatly decreases TBSV replication and prevents the redistribution of PE to the sites of viral replication. We also show that enrichment of PE in the viral replication compartment is assisted by actin filaments. Interestingly, the closely related Carnation Italian ringspot virus, which replicates on the boundary membrane of mitochondria, uses a similar strategy to the peroxisomal TBSV to hijack the Rab5-positive endosomes into the viral replication compartments. Altogether, usurping the GTP-Rab5–positive endosomes allows TBSV to build a PE-enriched viral replication compartment, which is needed to support peak-level replication. Thus, the Rab family of small GTPases includes critical host factors assisting VRC assembly and genesis of the viral replication compartment. PMID:27760128

  18. Necrotizing sialometaplasia in an HIV positive cocaine user: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alfaya, T A; Frazão, C O; Rocha, M L; Polignano, G A; Barcelos, R; Gouvêa, C V

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to present a case report of a male patient attending a Semiology and Stomatology Clinic with an erythematous ulcerated lesion on his palate. The patient reported that he was HIV positive as well as being addicted to cocaine. After a biopsy and a histopathological exam, he was diagnosed as having necrotizing sialometaplasia. The lesion diminished spontaneously in thirty days after the exam. Correct diagnosis as well as physical and complementary exams are paramount to avoid any incorrect therapy. As drug addiction and HIV infection have both been associated to necrotizing sialometaplasia, as in the present case, it is difficult to establish if the aetiological factor was drug usage or the HIV infection or even, the combination of these two factors. Although considering the influence of HIV infection on the oral health, we may assume that, at least, it favored the onset of this oral lesion. PMID:24217688

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis and infective endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Fang, Yu-Wei; Hsieh, Shih-Chung

    2015-10-01

    Patients with uremia are often immunocompromised and uremia patients undergoing maintenance dialysis are often vulnerable to uncommon infections. We report a 40-year-old man who was undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and was initially diagnosed with monomicrobal necrotizing fasciitis of the lower limbs, based on blood and pus cultures that yielded Escherichia coli. His condition improved after surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. However, he eventually died of intracranial hemorrhage related to septic emboli. Concurrent infective endocarditis was diagnosed based on an echocardiogram that indicated vegetation in the left ventricular region. Escherichia coli-related necrotizing fasciitis and infective endocarditis is rarely seen in clinical practice. There should be a high index of suspicion for multiple infections when a hemodialysis patient presents with an uncommon infection.

  20. Fungal scleritis masquerading as surgically induced necrotizing scleritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The object of this case is to report the clinical findings, microbiological findings and management of a case of fungal scleritis following cataract surgery, which mimicked surgically induced necrotizing scleritis. Case presentation A 72-year-old Asian (Indian) man presented with scleritis following cataract surgery at another facility. He had been treated elsewhere for suspected scleritis, primarily with steroids followed by empiric antibiotic and antifungal agents. At our institute he underwent a complete microbiological workup and a scleral patch graft. The scleral scraping revealed fungal filaments. He was treated postoperatively with topical and systemic antifungal agent along with topical cyclosporine. The follow-up examination at 5 months revealed that the scleral patch graft was successful in maintaining the integrity of his globe and restoring partial vision. Conclusions Fungal scleritis may mimic surgically induced necrotizing scleritis. Early diagnosis and prompt management can prevent progression of the disease and further devastating complications. PMID:24377770

  1. [Use of probiotics in the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis in premature newborns].

    PubMed

    Suárez Rodríguez, Marta; Solís Sánchez, G

    2015-02-07

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is the most frequent and life threatening pathology of the neonatal period and causes high morbi-mortality. According to the most recent metaanalyses, prophylactic treatment of premature newborns with probiotics significantly lowers the risk of suffering from severe necrotizing enterocolitis (stages II and III). This treatment also reduces the mortality, the hospitalization period and the days after which exclusive enteral nutrition is reached. Based in these facts, the Nutrition and Neonatal Metabolism Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology considers that probiotics should be taken into consideration for use on less than 32 weeks- gestation premature newborns and/or those born with a weight lower than 1,500 g, although their use has to be submitted to close monitoring.

  2. Prevalence of Candida species in necrotic pulp with chronic periapical processes.

    PubMed

    Nastri, Natalia; Nastri, Maria; Jewtuchowicz, Virginia; Mujica, Maria; Lovanniti, Cristina; Gualtieri, Ariel; Ponton, José; Rosa, Alcira

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify species of the genus Candida in mucosa of oral cavity and in single-rooted teeth with pulp necrosis with chronic endodontic periapical processes, with radiographic images 2+/-4 mm and without clinical symptomatology, in immunocompetent patients. The study included 82 immunocompetent patients of both sexes aged 18-70 years with a clinical dental diagnosis of septic pulp necrosis. Samples were taken from root canals with sterile # 25 paper points and from oral mucosa with a sterile swab. Seven different Candida species were identified (C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. guilliermondii, C. krusei, C. parapsilopsis, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata). All of them were present in oral mucosa, while two of them (C. parapsilopsis and C. glabrata) were not identified in the periapical zone of necrotic canals. Considering all the samples isolated from oral mucosa, there was a significantly greater frequency of C. albicans than there was in the periapical zone of necrotic canals.

  3. Octreotide in a Critically Ill Extremely Preterm Infant With Perforated Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Lima, Mario; Maffi, Michela; Faldella, Giacomo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most severe gastrointestinal complication of prematurity. Surgery, either peritoneal drainage placement or laparotomy with resection of the intestinal necrotic tracts, is the definitive treatment of perforated NEC; however, when clinical conditions contraindicate surgical approaches, little is known about medical treatments adjuvant or alternative to surgery. Octreotide is a synthetic somatostatin analog that inhibits pancreatic secretion and leads to splanchnic vasoconstriction. In preterm neonates, it is mainly used off-label for chylothorax and congenital hyperinsulinism, whereas gastrointestinal indications are limited. We describe the case of a critically ill extremely low birth weight infant with perforated NEC, who had unsuccessfully undergone peritoneal drainage placement and laparotomy. Her unstable condition contraindicated a further laparotomy, thus off-label treatment with octreotide was attempted. No adverse events occurred. The infant's condition gradually improved and progressive reduction of peritoneal outputs and successful resolution of pneumoperitoneum were achieved, with no relapse after octreotide discontinuation. PMID:27405769

  4. [ROLE OF ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF SUPPURATIVE-NECROTIC COMPLICATIONS OF DIABETIC FOOT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, O M

    2015-07-01

    The microbial landscape of wounds with suppurative-necrotic complications in diabetic foot syndrome (DFS) was investigated. Capabilities by inhibiting the formation of bacterial biofilms using ultrasonic cavitation (USC) were determined. In 32 patients over the purulent necrotic complications DFS USC applied using the apparatus "Sonoca-180" company Soring (Germany), 20 patients performed a basic therapy. Qualitative and quantitative composition of microflora were determined by the results of microbiological investigations using parallel transmission electron microscopy dynamics with USC. In patients with DFS noted the formation of bacterial biofilms that contained clusters of microorganisms in a polysaccharide matrix and were fixed to the wound surface. In the microbial landscape of wounds dominated gram-negative microorganisms. Application of USC contributed to the rapid cleanse wounds.

  5. Familial aggregation of Crohn’s disease and necrotizing sarcoid-like granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Albuhairan, Intisar; Muzaffer, Mohammed; AlMehaidib, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammatory diseases are disorders of an undetermined etiology, affecting different organs and having a diverse clinical course. Familial aggregation of these disorders is being reported increasingly, most commonly familial Crohn’s disease. We described the coexistence of Crohn’s disease and necrotizing sarcoid-like granulomatous disease in two siblings from a first-degree consanguineous Saudi family. The first child presented with recurrent abdominal pain associated with bloody stool and arthritis, whereas the second child presented with fever of unknown origin and lymphadenopathy as well as hepatomegaly without gastrointestinal tract disease. They are phenotypically different; however, they share a novel risk locus and allele. This report supports the heritability and familial aggregation of granulomatous inflammatory diseases and suggests that one causal mutation underlies both Crohn’s disease and necrotizing sarcoid-like granulomatous disease.

  6. [Tularemia lymphadenitis. An emerging differential diagnosis of necrotizing granulomatous cervical lymphadenitis].

    PubMed

    Strehl, J; Schoerner, C; Hartmann, A; Agaimy, A

    2014-03-01

    Tularemia is emerging as an important differential diagnosis of necrotizing granulomatous lymphadenitis, particularly in the head and neck region. The causal organism, Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative coccoid bacterium. Tularemia usually presents with necrotizing granulomatous purulent lymphadenitis featuring multiple mostly small granulomas with geographic necrosis bordered by palisades of histiocytes. Diagnosis is mainly based on these characteristic but non-pathognomonic histological features in conjunction with negative tests for mycobacterial infections and serological confirmation of tularemia-specific antibodies or detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This article describes our experiences with five patients with tularemia lymphadenitis and gives an overview of the diverse histopathological features and the differential diagnosis of this uncommon but possibly underrecognized disease.

  7. New uses of fluorescence in the surgical management of necrotizing soft tissue infection.

    PubMed

    Bongard, F S; Elings, V B; Markison, R E

    1985-08-01

    The planning of incisions in the management of necrotizing soft tissue infections has largely been carried out by subjective methods. Because of disruption of the fasciocutaneous circulation, the perfusion of randomly based flaps is frequently tenuous. A method that provides safe, rapid, and accurate evaluation of tissue perfusion would therefore prove invaluable in the preoperative planning, as well as in the postoperative management of these infections. The digital dermofluorometer is a recently introduced instrument that objectively evaluates skin blood flow based on the cutaneous delivery of sodium fluorescein. We have used the technique successfully and without incident in patients who presented with necrotizing soft tissue infections. The theory, methods, and application of the test have been presented along with two case reports.

  8. Necrotizing sialometaplasia in a patient who is HIV positive: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alessandra Dutra; Silva, Carolina Amália Barcellos; Furuse, Cristiane; Nunes e Souza, Rodrigo Calado; da Costa, Mauro Henrique Melo; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a self-limiting, benign, inflammatory disease of the minor salivary glands of the hard palate. The main significance of the NS lesion lies in the fact that it may be mistaken for mucoepidermoid or squamous cell carcinoma. A case report is presented of a patient with NS who was HIV positive; the lesion was located in the minor salivary glands of the hard palate. Clinically, the lesion presented as a deep ulcer with slightly elevated irregular borders and a necrotic base in the hard palate. Histologically, the tissue was characterized by squamous metaplasia of ducts and acini, lobular coagulation necrosis, and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the overlying epithelium. The lesion disappeared completely after 2 weeks.

  9. Role Bending: Complex Relationships Between Viruses, Hosts, and Vectors Related to Citrus Leprosis, an Emerging Disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Hartung, John S; Schneider, William L; Shao, Jonathan; Leon, Guillermo; Melzer, Michael J; Beard, Jennifer J; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Bauchan, Gary R; Ochoa, Ronald; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-07-01

    Citrus leprosis complex is an emerging disease in the Americas, associated with two unrelated taxa of viruses distributed in South, Central, and North America. The cytoplasmic viruses are Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), Citrus leprosis virus C2 (CiLV-C2), and Hibiscus green spot virus 2, and the nuclear viruses are Citrus leprosis virus N (CiLV-N) and Citrus necrotic spot virus. These viruses cause local lesion infections in all known hosts, with no natural systemic host identified to date. All leprosis viruses were believed to be transmitted by one species of mite, Brevipalpus phoenicis. However, mites collected from CiLV-C and CiLV-N infected citrus groves in Mexico were identified as B. yothersi and B. californicus sensu lato, respectively, and only B. yothersi was detected from CiLV-C2 and CiLV-N mixed infections in the Orinoco regions of Colombia. Phylogenetic analysis of the helicase, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 domains and p24 gene amino acid sequences of cytoplasmic leprosis viruses showed a close relationship with recently deposited mosquito-borne negevirus sequences. Here, we present evidence that both cytoplasmic and nuclear viruses seem to replicate in viruliferous Brevipalpus species. The possible replication in the mite vector and the close relationship with mosquito borne negeviruses are consistent with the concept that members of the genus Cilevirus and Higrevirus originated in mites and citrus may play the role of mite virus vector. PMID:25775106

  10. Role Bending: Complex Relationships Between Viruses, Hosts, and Vectors Related to Citrus Leprosis, an Emerging Disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Hartung, John S; Schneider, William L; Shao, Jonathan; Leon, Guillermo; Melzer, Michael J; Beard, Jennifer J; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Bauchan, Gary R; Ochoa, Ronald; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-07-01

    Citrus leprosis complex is an emerging disease in the Americas, associated with two unrelated taxa of viruses distributed in South, Central, and North America. The cytoplasmic viruses are Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), Citrus leprosis virus C2 (CiLV-C2), and Hibiscus green spot virus 2, and the nuclear viruses are Citrus leprosis virus N (CiLV-N) and Citrus necrotic spot virus. These viruses cause local lesion infections in all known hosts, with no natural systemic host identified to date. All leprosis viruses were believed to be transmitted by one species of mite, Brevipalpus phoenicis. However, mites collected from CiLV-C and CiLV-N infected citrus groves in Mexico were identified as B. yothersi and B. californicus sensu lato, respectively, and only B. yothersi was detected from CiLV-C2 and CiLV-N mixed infections in the Orinoco regions of Colombia. Phylogenetic analysis of the helicase, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 domains and p24 gene amino acid sequences of cytoplasmic leprosis viruses showed a close relationship with recently deposited mosquito-borne negevirus sequences. Here, we present evidence that both cytoplasmic and nuclear viruses seem to replicate in viruliferous Brevipalpus species. The possible replication in the mite vector and the close relationship with mosquito borne negeviruses are consistent with the concept that members of the genus Cilevirus and Higrevirus originated in mites and citrus may play the role of mite virus vector.

  11. Hepatitis B virus-related polyarteritis nodosa presenting with multiple lung nodules and cavitary lesions.

    PubMed

    Naniwa, Taio; Maeda, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Ito, Rei

    2010-07-01

    The patient presented here is a 59-year-old Japanese man with active chronic hepatitis B with precore and core promoter mutated virus, presenting with high fever, bloody sputum, and multiple lung nodules with excavation. Surgical biopsy of the lung nodule showed necrotizing vasculitis affecting pulmonary arteries without granulomatous changes. The pulmonary manifestations of this patient resembled Wegener granulomatosis. However, the pathologic findings showing nongranulomatous necrotizing vasculitis involving the small pulmonary arteries, presence of circulating immune complex, absence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, and excellent response to the combination therapy of corticosteroid and an anti-hepatitis B virus agent, entecavir, led us to the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus-related polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). Radiographic evidence of lung nodules or cavitations seen in systemic vasculitis patients has been considered a sign suggestive of granulomatous disease and a diagnostic surrogate marker for necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis, but a clinical relevance to hepatitis B virus-related PAN has not been reported before this case. PMID:20605819

  12. A fatal case of descending necrotizing mediastinitis as a complication of odontogenic infection. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Bogumił; Wołek, Wojciech; Jednakiewicz, Mariusz; Nicpoń, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 26-year-old female patient in whom descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) developed as a complication of an odontogenic purulent infection of the mouth. Despite the efforts of a multidisciplinary treatment team, the patient died with symptoms of septic shock and multiple organ failure. According to the literature, and as confirmed by our own observations, successful treatment requires early tomographic diagnosis, radical surgery, combination antibiotic therapy, and intensive care. PMID:26336443

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis of anterior abdominal wall following cesarean section in a low-risk patient

    PubMed Central

    Chhetry, Manisha; Banerjee, Basudeb; Subedi, Shanti; Koirala, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a mono-microbial post-cesarean necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a low-risk healthy woman who presented with acute fulminant infection, sepsis and features of multi-organ dysfunction syndrome on sixth post-operative day. Aggressive management with multiple surgical debridement and supportive therapy was the key to favorable outcome in this case. PMID:27402541

  14. [Necrotizing tonsillitis and renal vein thrombosis due to acute myeloid leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Akram, Javed; Josefsson, Pernilla; Rømeling, Frans

    2012-09-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with severe tonsillitis with unilateral necrotizing tonsillitis. She suddenly got fever, malaise, difficulties swallowing, pain in the throat and deterioration despite four days of penicillin treatment. During hospitalisation, she experienced abdominal pain, and blood tests showed pancytopenia. She was transferred to a haematological department, where a bone marrow biopsy showed acute myeloid leukaemia. Subsequently, an abdominal computed tomography with intravenous contrast revealed bilateral renal vein thrombosis, probably because of coagulopathy due to leukaemia.

  15. Host defense mechanisms of human milk and their relations to enteric infections and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Buescher, E S

    1994-06-01

    Human milk contains components that can mediate protection against symptomatic infection by means of classical and novel mechanisms. It has been demonstrated to protect infants against symptomatic infection by a variety of enteric pathogens. To date, mechanisms involving pathogen-specific sIgA are the best documented; however, roles for nonimmunoglobulin glycoconjugate and anti-inflammatory components may also exist. Based on both laboratory and clinical studies, human milk feeding appears to have protective effects against development of necrotizing enterocolitis.

  16. Mapping the New World of Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC): Review and Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Phillip; Christensen, Robert; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive review of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is provided; including history, biological basis and frequently asked questions. In addition, a system of improved NEC classification is explained in detail (consisting of five NEC subsets and four NEC-like diseases), to aid the bedside clinician in therapy and prevention. The authors offer opinion for therapeutics in italics at the end of each definition. PMID:23730536

  17. Poultry management: a useful tool for the control of necrotic enteritis in poultry.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, Vasilios

    2016-06-01

    The intestinal ecosystem of poultry has been inevitably changed as a result of the ban of antimicrobial growth promoters. The re-emergence of necrotic enteritis has been the most significant threat for the poultry industry, which, in clinical form, causes high mortality and in subclinical forms, affects growth and feed conversion. It is one of the most common and economically devastating bacterial diseases in modern broiler flocks in terms of performance, welfare and mortality. Necrotic enteritis is a multi-factorial disease process, in which a number of co-factors are usually required to precipitate an outbreak of the disease. Although, Clostridium perfringens has been identified as the aetiological agent of the disease, the predisposing factors that lead to over-proliferation of C. perfringens and the subsequent progression to disease are poorly understood. Any factor that causes stress in broiler chicks could suppress the immune system and disturb the balance of the intestinal ecosystem, in such a way that the risk of a necrotic enteritis (NE) outbreak increases. Poultry management could significantly affect the pathogenesis of NE. In particular, feed restriction and coccidiosis vaccination can protect against NE, while extreme house temperature, feed mycotoxins and high stocking density predispose to NE. It becomes really important to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as to clarify the interactions between husbandry, nutritional and infectious factors and the outbreak of necrotic enteritis. This is necessary and extremely important in order to develop managerial strategies at the farm level to control the incidence and severity of the disease in the post-antibiotic era.

  18. Vaccination with recombinant NetB toxin partially protects broiler chickens from necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Keyburn, Anthony L; Portela, Ricardo W; Sproat, Kathy; Ford, Mark E; Bannam, Trudi L; Yan, Xuxia; Rood, Julian I; Moore, Robert J

    2013-07-16

    NetB toxin from Clostridium perfringens is a major virulence factor in necrotic enteritis in poultry. In this study the efficacy of NetB as a vaccine antigen to protect chickens from necrotic enteritis was examined. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with purified recombinant NetB (rNetB), formalin treated bacterin and cell free toxoid with or without rNetB supplementation. Intestinal lesion scores and NetB antibody levels were measured to determine protection after mild oral gavage, moderate in-feed and heavy in-feed challenges with virulent C. perfringens isolates. Birds immunized with rNetB were significantly protected against necrotic enteritis when challenged with a mild oral dose of virulent bacteria, but were not protected when a more robust challenge was used. Bacterin and cell free toxoid without rNetB supplementation did not protect birds from moderate and severe in-feed challenge. Only birds immunized with bacterin and cell free toxoid supplemented with rNetB showed significant protection against moderate and severe in-feed challenge, with the later giving the greatest protection. Higher NetB antibody titres were observed in birds immunized with rNetB compared to those vaccinated with bacterin or toxoid, suggesting that the in vitro levels of NetB produced by virulent C. perfringens isolates are too low to induce the development of a strong immune response. These results suggest that vaccination with NetB alone may not be sufficient to protect birds from necrotic enteritis in the field, but that in combination with other cellular or cell-free antigens it can significantly protect chickens from disease.

  19. The Role of Growth Factors in Intestinal Regeneration and Repair in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Kathryn J.; Choi, Pamela M.; Warner, Brad W.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating intestinal disease resulting in major neonatal morbidity and mortality. The pathology is poorly understood, and means of preventing and treating NEC are limited. Several endogenous growth factors have been identified as having important roles in intestinal growth as well as aiding intestinal repair from injury or inflammation. In this review, we will discuss several growth factors as mediators of intestinal regeneration and repair as well as potential therapeutic agents for NEC. PMID:23611614

  20. Destructive and regenerative changes in the albino rat kidney during mercuric chloride necrotizing nephrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V.P.

    1985-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a morphological analysis of destructive and regenerative changes observed during a study of serial semithin sections of the kidneys of albino rats with mercuric chloride necrotizing nephrosis. The results of this investigation indicate that injury to the epithelium of the urinary tubules by mercuric chloride is heterogenous in depth, and this has a substantial influence on the viability of the animals and on the subsequent process of repair of the damage.

  1. [Necrotizing sialometaplasia: apropos of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    De Saint Aubain Somerhausen, N; Larsimont, D; Tant, L; Verhest, A

    1996-06-01

    Necrotizing Sialometaplasia is an inflammatory, self-healing, reactive process of probable vascular origin, that most commonly involves the minor salivary glands of the palate but can bee seen in all salivary glands. As its clinical and pathological features may suggest malignancy, knowledge of histologic criteria indicating the benign nature of the lesion and the integration of clinical and pathologic elements are required to obviate this mistake. We review the literature reporting to one case.

  2. Mechanisms for virus-induced liver disease: tumor necrosis factor-mediated pathology independent of natural killer and T cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J S; Salazar-Mather, T P; Opal, S M; Biron, C A

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of endogenous NK cells and cytokines to virus-induced liver pathology was evaluated during murine cytomegalovirus infections of mice. In immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, the virus induced a self-limited liver disease characterized by hepatitis, with focal inflammation, and large grossly visible subcapsular necrotic foci. The inflammatory foci were most numerous and contained the greatest number of cells 3 days after infection; they colocalized with areas of viral antigen expression. The largest number of necrotic foci was found 2 days after infection. Overall hepatic damage, assessed as increased expression of liver enzymes in serum, accompanied the development of inflammatory and necrotic foci. Experiments with neutralizing antibodies demonstrated that although virus-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can have antiviral effects, it also mediated significant liver pathology. TNF was required for development of hepatic necrotic foci and increased levels of liver enzymes in serum but not for increased numbers of inflammatory foci. The necrotic foci and liver enzyme indications of pathology occurred independently of NK and T cells, because mice rendered NK-cell deficient by treatment with antibodies, T- and B-cell-deficient Rag-/- mice, and NK- and T-cell-deficient E26 mice all manifested both parameters of disease. Development of necrotic foci and maximally increased levels of liver enzymes in serum also were TNF dependent in NK-cell-deficient mice. Moreover, in the immunodeficient E26 mice, virus-induced liver disease was progressive, with eventual death of the host, and neutralization of TNF significantly increased longevity. These results establish conditions separating hepatitis from significant liver damage and demonstrate a cytokine-mediated component to viral pathogenesis. PMID:9371583

  3. RNA released from necrotic keratinocytes upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujie; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Ning; Xiang, Leihong

    2011-12-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression has been detected in melanocytes around active vitiligo patches as well as in surgically transplanted melanocytes. However, it is unclear whether and how skin injury induces the inappropriate expression of ICAM-1 and other proinflammatory genes in melanocytes. We previously reported that human melanocytes expressed TLR3. We hypothesized that the TLR3 expressed in melanocytes may recognize skin injury by binding to the endogenous ligands secreted by the damaged keratinocytes. Here we showed that RNA released from necrotic keratinocytes induced the upregulation of ICAM-1 protein and mRNA, as shown by FACS and real-time RT-PCR. Use of NF-κB inhibitor prevents upregulation of ICAM-1 in melanocytes indicating a direct role of NF-κB in necrotic keratinocyte-mediated upregulation of ICAM-1. Using a shRNA-expressing lentivirus, we demonstrated that in human melanocytes, TLR3 seems to be necessary for the upregulation of ICAM-1. Using oligonucleotide microarray, we demonstrated a dramatic increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine transcripts (CXCL10, CXCL11, TNFSF10, CCL5, CCL4, CCL2, IFNB1, CCL20, IL-8, and CCL11). These observations suggested that RNA released from necrotic keratinocytes might act as an endogenous TLR3 ligand for the stimulation of ICAM-1 and other proinflammatory gene expression in human melanocytes, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo following skin physical trauma.

  4. The effect of cold stress on the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, C; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2015-01-01

    Cold stress is a physical environmental stressor with significant effect on the poultry industry. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of cold stress as a predisposing factor for necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. The experimental challenge model included an oral inoculation with 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens. Birds were either challenged or not as described above, and either exposed or not to repeated cold stress (15°C for 12 h/day for 4 days). From each bird, intestinal gross lesions were scored and intestinal digesta pH and viscosity were measured. C. perfringens was counted in the caecum. The statistical analysis and evaluation of the experimental data revealed that the cold stress in challenged birds significantly increased the incidence and the severity of necrotic enteritis lesions (Ρ ≤ 0.05), while causing no lesions in unchallenged birds. Moreover, the cold stress caused a significant increase (Ρ ≤ 0.05) in the pH and C. perfringens counts in the caeca. The study provides evidence that cold stress increased the susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in a subclinical experimental model and thus should be regarded as a physical environmental stressor that could significantly affect the welfare, health and intestinal ecosystem of broiler chicks. PMID:26642742

  5. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide-induced necrotic cell death in cardiomyocytes is independent of matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad A M; Kandasamy, Arulmozhi D; Fan, Xiaohu; Schulz, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is well known to proteolyse both extracellular and intracellular proteins. Reactive oxygen species activate MMP-2 at both transcriptional and post-translational levels, thus MMP-2 activation is considered an early event in oxidative stress injury. Although hydrogen peroxide is widely used to trigger oxidative stress-induced cell death, the type of cell death (apoptosis vs. necrosis) in cardiomyocytes is still controversial depending on the concentration used and the exposure time. We carefully investigated the mode of cell death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes induced by different concentrations (50-500 μM) of hydrogen peroxide at various time intervals after exposure and determined whether MMP-2 is implicated in hydrogen peroxide-induced cardiomyocyte death. Treating cardiomyocytes with hydrogen peroxide led to elevated MMP-2 level/activity with maximal effects seen at 200 μM. Hydrogen peroxide caused necrotic cell death by disrupting the plasmalemma as evidenced by the release of lactate dehydrogenase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner as well as the necrotic cleavage of PARP-1. The absence of both caspase-3 cleavage/activation and apoptotic cleavage of PARP-1 illustrated the weak contribution of apoptosis. Pre-treatment with selective MMP inhibitors did not protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced necrosis. In conclusion hydrogen peroxide increases MMP-2 level/activity in cardiomyocytes and induces necrotic cell death, however, the later effect is MMP-2 independent.

  7. Clinical Parameters and Challenges of Managing Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis in a Sub-Saharan Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Adeola A; Gbolahan, Olalere O; Aladelusi, Timothy O; Akinmoladun, Victor I; Arotiba, Juwon T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection. In our environment, patients presenting with this infection are usually financially incapacitated and, therefore, their management can be challenging. This paper aimed to document the pattern and challenges encountered in the management of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Materials and Methods: Information such as biodata, site of infection, systemic conditions, widest span of defect, management provided, hospital stay, and outcome of management was prospectively collected on all patients with CNF who presented at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between January 2007 and December 2013. The patients were managed according to a devised protocol of antibiotic therapy, serial debridement and honey dressings. Results: Twenty-four cases of CNF were seen. There were 9 males and 15 females while 70.9% of the patients belonged to the low socioeconomic class. The mean span of wound defect was 12.2 (±8.844) cm. The mean hospital stay was 27.8 (±23.1) days, and scar formation was the most common complication encountered. Conclusion: Our study represents the largest series of CNF from a Nigerian health facility presently. The management of necrotizing fascitis in the maxillofacial region poses a significant challenge to both the surgeon and the patient. However, the mortality rate of CNF in our center appears comparatively low. PMID:26425068

  8. Progress and problems in vaccination against necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mot, Dorien; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis in broilers is caused by Clostridium perfringens type A strains that produce the NetB toxin. Necrotic enteritis is one of the gastrointestinal diseases in poultry that has gained worldwide importance during the last decade due to efforts to improve broiler performance. Prevention strategies include avoiding predisposing factors, such as coccidiosis, and in-feed supplementation with a variety of feed additives. However, vaccination with modified toxin or other secreted immunogenic proteins seems a logical preventive tool for protection against a toxin-producing bacterium. Formalin-inactivated crude supernatant has been used initially for vaccination. Several studies have been carried out recently to identify the most important immunogenic and protective proteins that can be used for vaccination. These include the NetB toxin, as well as a number of other proteins. There is evidence that immunization with single proteins is not protective against severe challenge and that combinations of different antigens are needed. Most published studies have used multiple dosage vaccination regimens that are not relevant for practical use in the broiler industry. Single vaccination regimens for 1-day-old chicks appear to be non-protective. This review describes the history of vaccination strategies against necrotic enteritis in broilers and gives an update on future vaccination strategies that are applicable in the field. These may include breeder hen vaccination, in ovo vaccination and live attenuated vectors to be used in feed or in drinking water.

  9. LIM kinase-2 induces programmed necrotic neuronal death via dysfunction of DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Ryu, H J; Kim, M J; Kang, T-C

    2014-07-01

    Although the aberrant activation of cell cycle proteins has a critical role in neuronal death, effectors or mediators of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)-mediated death signal are still unknown. Here, we describe a previously unsuspected role of LIM kinase 2 (LIMK2) in programmed necrotic neuronal death. Downregulation of p27(Kip1) expression by Rho kinase (ROCK) activation induced cyclin D1/CDK4 expression levels in neurons vulnerable to status epilepticus (SE). Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex subsequently increased LIMK2 expression independent of caspase-3 and receptor interacting protein kinase 1 activity. In turn, upregulated LIMK2 impaired dynamic-related protein-1 (DRP1)-mediated mitochondrial fission without alterations in cofilin phosphorylation/expression and finally resulted in necrotic neuronal death. Inhibition of LIMK2 expression and rescue of DRP1 function attenuated this programmed necrotic neuronal death induced by SE. Therefore, we suggest that the ROCK-p27(Kip1)-cyclin D1/CDK4-LIMK2-DRP1-mediated programmed necrosis may be new therapeutic targets for neuronal death.

  10. Necrotizing acute pancreatitis current status - emerging new strategies in surgical management.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Sampanis, Dimitrios; Lappas, Christos; Kokoropoulos, Panayiotis; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2012-04-01

    Despite that pancreatic necrosis complicates only 15 % of cases of acute pancreatitis (AP), it is associated with high morbidity and considerable mortality. In an attempt to improve prognosis, many surgical strategies have been described during the last few decades. Currently, necrosectomy remains the cornerstone in the surgical treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis and in selected cases of sterile necrotizing pancreatitis. Following necrosectomy, continuous closed lavage is recommended by many authors, while closed abdominal packing /drainage and repeated planned necrosectomies- commonly using the zipper technique-are also acceptable alternative strategies. Open abdomen (laparostomy) is rarely indicated in carefully selected cases (typically in abdominal compartment syndrome associated with necrotizing AP). During the last decade, minimally invasive techniques (including percutaneous drainage, retroperitoneal endoscopic approach, transgastric endoscopic approach etc) have been extensively studied by some groups not only in the management of pancreatic abscesses and / or pseudocysts, but also as primary methods of treatment of necrotizing AP. Results have been impressive, but experience currently is limited to only a few centers around the world. PMID:22420515

  11. Immune-Mediated Necrotizing Myopathy, Associated With Antibodies to Signal Recognition Particle, Together With Lupus Nephritis: Case Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, John; Harty, Len; Mayer, Nick; Critcher, Val; Ryan, John

    2015-01-01

    A male patient with limb weakness, myalgia and edema was subsequently found to have an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) on biopsy. Targeted myopathic antibody analysis revealed antibodies to signal recognition particle (SRP). Anti-SRP-associated necrotizing myopathy was diagnosed. This case was complicated by the concurrent development of class III lupus nephritis. We discuss an interesting case progression and development as well as the management of these difficult to treat conditions. PMID:25883715

  12. Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    Zika is a virus that is spread mostly by mosquitoes. A pregnant mother can pass it to ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, ...

  13. Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Zika Virus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Areas with Zika Countries and territories with active Zika virus transmission... Mosquito Control Prevent mosquito bites, integrated mosquito ...

  14. Chikungunya Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... traveling to countries with chikungunya virus, use insect repellent, wear long sleeves and pants, and stay in ... Chikungunya Prevention is key! Prevent Infection. Use mosquito repellent. Chikungunya Virus Distribution Chikungunya in the U.S. What's ...

  15. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of three papaya viruses.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yang, Yong; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2014-10-21

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV), and Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) produce similar symptoms in papaya. Each threatens commercial production of papaya on Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay was developed to detect simultaneously these three viruses by screening combinations of mixed primer pairs and optimizing the multiplex RT-PCR reaction conditions. A mixture of three specific primer pairs was used to amplify three distinct fragments of 613 bp from the P3 gene of PRSV, 355 bp from the CP gene of PLDMV, and 205 bp from the CP gene of PapMV, demonstrating the assay's specificity. The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR was evaluated by showing plasmids containing each of the viral target genes with 1.44 × 103, 1.79 × 103, and 1.91 × 102 copies for the three viruses could be detected successfully. The multiplex RT-PCR was applied successfully for detection of three viruses from 341 field samples collected from 18 counties of Hainan Island, China. Rates of single infections were 186/341 (54.5%), 93/341 (27.3%), and 3/341 (0.9%), for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively; 59/341 (17.3%) of the samples were co-infected with PRSV and PLDMV, which is the first time being reported in Hainan Island. This multiplex RT-PCR assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for detecting multiple viruses in papaya and can be used for routine molecular diagnosis and epidemiological studies in papaya.

  16. Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis in the context of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): Is histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis in SLE associated with skin lesions?

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Kang, M S; Yoon, B Y; Kim, D Y; Cho, S K; Bae, S C; Her, M Y

    2011-07-01

    Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL), or Kikuchi's disease, is a benign and self-limiting lymphadenopathy that typically affects young Asian females. It presents with lymphadenopathy, usually cervical, accompanied by fever, chills and leukopenia. Although the association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and HNL is rare, the number of reports of HNL in SLE patients is increasing. We present nine cases of HNL in patients with SLE. Among the seven patients with diverse skin manifestations, three had skin manifestations that were histologically compatible with SLE. A review of previous reports in the literature showed that cutaneous involvement was commonly found in HNL in association with SLE. In the patients who had simultaneous onset of both diseases, lupus flare-ups were commonly observed. We suggest that HNL in SLE patients is associated with cutaneous manifestations. This report contributes to our understanding of the relationship between these diseases. PMID:21562017

  17. Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Veesler, David; Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined virus maturation of selected non-enveloped and enveloped ssRNA viruses; retroviruses; bacteriophages and herpes virus. Processes associated with maturation in the RNA viruses range from subtle (noda and picornaviruses) to dramatic (tetraviruses and togaviruses). The elaborate assembly and maturation pathway of HIV is discussed in contrast to the less sophisticated but highly efficient processes associated with togaviruses. Bacteriophage assembly and maturation are discussed in general terms with specific examples chosen for emphasis. Finally the herpes viruses are compared with bacteriophages. The data support divergent evolution of noda, picorna and tetraviruses from a common ancestor and divergent evolution of alpha and flaviviruses from a common ancestor. Likewise, bacteriophages and herpes viruses almost certainly share a common ancestor in their evolution. Comparing all the viruses, we conclude that maturation is a convergent process that is required to solve conflicting requirements in biological dynamics and function. PMID:22404678

  18. In situ detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcripts in human lung granulomas reveals differential gene expression in necrotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Fenhalls, Gael; Stevens, Liesel; Moses, Lorraine; Bezuidenhout, Juanita; Betts, Joanna C; Helden Pv, Paul van; Lukey, Pauline T; Duncan, Ken

    2002-11-01

    We have used RNA-RNA in situ hybridization to detect the expression of several Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes in tuberculous granulomas in lung tissue sections from tuberculosis patients. The M. tuberculosis genes chosen fall into two classes. Four genes (icl, narX, and Rv2557 and Rv2558) have been implicated in the persistence of the bacterium in the host, and two genes (iniB and kasA) are upregulated in response to isoniazid exposure. Both necrotic and nonnecrotic granulomas were identified in all of the patients. Necrotic granulomas were divided into three zones: an outer lymphocyte cuff containing lymphocytes and macrophages, a transition zone consisting of necrotic material interspersed with macrophages, and a central acellular necrotic region. Transcripts of all of the genes studied were found in nonnecrotic granulomas and in the lymphocyte cuff of necrotic granulomas. Mycobacterial gene expression was associated with CD68-positive myeloid cells. Rv2557 and/or its homologue Rv2558, kasA, and iniB were expressed within the transition zone of necrotic granulomas, whereas icl and narX transcripts were absent from this area. There was no evidence of transcription of any of the genes examined in the central necrotic region, although mycobacterial DNA was present. The differential expression of genes within granulomas demonstrates that M. tuberculosis exists in a variety of metabolic states and may be indicative of the response to different microenvironments. These observations confirm that genes identified in models of persistence or in response to drug treatment in vitro are expressed in the human host. PMID:12379712

  19. Molecular characterization of a new tobacco rattle virus (TRV) RNA2 and identification of different TRV RNA1/RNA2 pairings in various potato-growing areas in Germany.

    PubMed

    Koenig, R; Hilbrich, I; Lindner, K

    2016-03-01

    The almost complete nucleotide sequences lacking only the short primer-derived 5' and 3' ends were determined for two closely related isolates of a new tobacco rattle virus (TRV) RNA2, i.e., ByKT (Bav)-2 and ByKT (LS)-2. These isolates originated from corky-ringspot-affected potato-growing areas in southern Germany (Bavaria) and northern central Germany (Lower Saxony), respectively, where they were associated with distinct supporting TRV RNA1s. In potatoes in other parts of Germany, TRV RNA2s closely related to TRV TpO1 RNA2 were identified. They, too, were associated with distinct TRV RNA1s in different parts of the country.

  20. Molecular characterization of a new tobacco rattle virus (TRV) RNA2 and identification of different TRV RNA1/RNA2 pairings in various potato-growing areas in Germany.

    PubMed

    Koenig, R; Hilbrich, I; Lindner, K

    2016-03-01

    The almost complete nucleotide sequences lacking only the short primer-derived 5' and 3' ends were determined for two closely related isolates of a new tobacco rattle virus (TRV) RNA2, i.e., ByKT (Bav)-2 and ByKT (LS)-2. These isolates originated from corky-ringspot-affected potato-growing areas in southern Germany (Bavaria) and northern central Germany (Lower Saxony), respectively, where they were associated with distinct supporting TRV RNA1s. In potatoes in other parts of Germany, TRV RNA2s closely related to TRV TpO1 RNA2 were identified. They, too, were associated with distinct TRV RNA1s in different parts of the country. PMID:26659943

  1. The relative safety of MRI contrast agent in acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, J; Schmidt, J; Warshaw, A L; Gebhard, M M; Herfarth, C; Klar, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the safety of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (GD-DTPA) by measuring its effect on pancreatic capillary perfusion and acinar injury in acute pancreatitis. BACKGROUND: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is proposed as a gold standard for early evaluation of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, iodinated contrast media used for CECT have been shown in these circumstances to reduce pancreatic capillary flow and increase necrosis and mortality. Recent reports suggest that post-GD MRI provides images comparable to CECT in the assessment of severe acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in 14 Wistar rats by intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (10 mM/L) and intravenous caerulein (5 microg/kg/h) over 6 hours. Intravital microscopic quantitation of pancreatic capillary blood flow was performed using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled erythrocytes after induction of pancreatitis and 30 and 60 minutes after an intravenous bolus of either Ringer's solution or GD-DTPA (0.2 mL/kg). RESULTS: The two study groups were comparable with regard to mean arterial pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases, hematocrit, amylase, lipase, and trypsinogen activation peptide production throughout the experiment. GD-DTPA did not reduce capillary flow (1.93 +/- 0.05 nL/capillary/min) compared to animals infused with Ringer's solution (1.90 +/- 0.06 nL/capillary/min). CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous injection of GD-DTPA does not further impair pancreatic microcirculation or increase acinar injury in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of this advantage over CT contrast medium, further development of MRI as a staging tool in acute pancreatitis seems desirable. PMID:9445117

  2. CD46 transgenic mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Sekiya, Yukie; Nakamura, Masahiko; Murayama, Somay Yamagata; Yoshida, Haruno; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Imanishi, Ken'ichi; Tsuchimoto, Kanji; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2009-11-01

    We developed a human CD46-expressing transgenic (Tg) mouse model of subcutaneous (s.c.) infection into both hind footpads with clinically isolated 11 group A streptococcus (GAS) serotype M1 strains. When the severity levels of foot lesions at 72 h and the mortality rates by 336 h were compared after s.c. infection with 1x10(7) CFU of each GAS strain, the GAS472 strain, isolated from the blood of a patient suffering from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), induced the highest severity levels and mortality rates. GAS472 led to a 100% mortality rate in CD46 Tg mice after only 168 h postinfection through the supervention of severe necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the feet. In contrast, GAS472 led to a 10% mortality rate in non-Tg mice through the supervention of partial necrotizing cutaneous lesions of the feet. The footpad skin sections of CD46 Tg mice showed hemorrhaging and necrotic striated muscle layers in the dermis, along with the exfoliation of epidermis with intracellular edema until 48 h after s.c. infection with GAS472. Thereafter, the bacteria proliferated, reaching a 90-fold or 7-fold increase in the livers of CD46 Tg mice or non-Tg mice, respectively, for 24 h between 48 and 72 h after s.c. infection with GAS472. As a result, the infected CD46 Tg mice appeared to suffer severe liver injuries. These findings suggest that human CD46 enhanced the progression of NF in the feet and the exponential growth of bacteria in deep tissues, leading to death.

  3. [Role of computerized tomography in percutaneous drainage of acute infected necrotic-hemorrhagic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Violino, P; Ghirardo, D; Fioranti, L; Borrelli, M; Scarrone, A; Pancione, L; Ambrogi, C; Ferro, C

    1996-09-01

    In the last few years, Computed Tomography (CT) has emerged as the most sensitive and reliable imaging technique to diagnose acute pancreatitis (AP). Besides assessing the extent of damage to the pancreas and to periglandular tissue. CT can recognize the major early and late complications of the disease promptly and with extreme accuracy. We investigated the diagnostic capabilities of CT in controlling AP development and tried to assess the role of interventional radiology as a therapeutic support after or instead of surgery in treating the necrotic forms of pancreatitis complicated by sepsis. From 1989 to 1995, acute pancreatitis mostly due to biliary tract disease and alcoholism was diagnosed in 228 patients. Necrotic processes were identified in 105 of them since disease onset; septic complications developed in 57 patients. Surgery was performed in 42 patients, but the result was poor in 11 of them (30%) and CT showed the persistence of some infectious pancreatic exudate which had been drained insufficiently. Since sepsis persisted in these patients, the exudate was aspirated percutaneously after positioning appropriate drainage means guided by abdominal CT. Sepsis resolved completely in 10 patients, while one required subsequent surgery. Percutaneous drainage catheters were positioned in 15 patients as the treatment of choice, under CT and US guidance. Sepsis resolved in 7 cases only (45%), while 3 of the extant patients died and 5 needed surgery. The results of our experience demonstrate the effectiveness of percutaneous drainage under CT guidance. However, this technique should be used after and as a support to surgery, the latter remaining the treatment of choice for infectious necrotic AP. Thus, in our experience, the use of percutaneous aspiration instead of surgery proved to be a less effective tool in curing this condition and its use should therefore be limited to high-risk surgical patients.

  4. Efficacy of early treatment with toltrazuril in prevention of coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Alnassan, Alaa Aldin; Shehata, Awad Ali; Kotsch, Marianne; Schrödl, Wieland; Krüger, Monika; Daugschies, Arwid; Bangoura, Berit

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, efficacy of the toltrazuril treatment for prevention of coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis was tested. Ninety-six 14-day-old commercial broiler chickens were caged and divided into eight groups (n=12), designated groups 1 to 8. Chickens of groups 1 to 6 were inoculated orally at 18 days of age with 25,000 oocysts of Eimeria tenella and 75,000 oocysts of Eimeria brunetti. At 22 days of age, chickens of groups 1 to 6 were infected with 10(9) colony-forming unit Clostridium perfringens. Chickens of group 1 were treated with 75 parts/10(6) toltrazuril in drinking water for 8 h on two consecutive days up to 12 h before Eimeria infection, while chickens of groups 2 to 5 were treated with the same dose of toltrazuril at 12 h, 36 h, 60 h and 84 h after Eimeria infection, respectively. The non-treated group 6 served as a positive control. Chickens in group 7 were treated with toltrazuril at 17 and 18 days of age, and those of group 8 remained uninfected and non-treated as a negative control. The feed conversion ratio was higher in the positive control compared with other groups. The mortality rates were 16.8% and 41.7% in the late toltrazuril-treated (at 84 h) and infected non-treated chickens, respectively. Lesions scores of necrotic enteritis or coccidiosis in infected, non-treated chickens were significantly more severe compared with negative controls (P<0.01) and late toltrazuril-treated (at 84 h) chickens (P<0.05). In conclusion, application of toltrazuril before Eimeria challenge protected chickens from coccidiosis and indirectly from successive necrotic enteritis caused by C. perfringens infection.

  5. Excimer laser debridement of necrotic erosions of skin without collateral damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynne, James J.; Felsenstein, Jerome M.; Trzcinski, Robert; Zupanski-Nielsen, Donna; Connors, Daniel P.

    2011-07-01

    Pulsed ArF excimer laser radiation at 6.4 eV, at fluence exceeding the ablation threshold, will debride burn eschar and other dry necrotic erosions of the skin. Debridement will cease when sufficiently moist viable tissue is exposed, due to absorption by aqueous chloride ions (Cl-) through the non-thermal process of electron photodetachment, thereby inhibiting collateral damage to the viable tissue. ArF excimer laser radiation debrides/ablates ~1 micron of tissue with each pulse. While this provides great precision in controlling the depth of debridement, the process is relatively time-consuming. In contrast, XeCl excimer laser radiation debrides ~8 microns of tissue with each pulse. However the 4.0 eV photon energy of the XeCl excimer laser is insufficient to photodetach an electron from a Cl- ion, so blood or saline will not inhibit debridement. Consequently, a practical laser debridement system should incorporate both lasers, used in sequence. First, the XeCl excimer laser would be used for accelerated debridement. When the necrotic tissue is thinned to a predetermined thickness, the ArF excimer laser would be used for very precise and well-controlled debridement, removing ultra-thin layers of material with each pulse. Clearly, the use of the ArF laser is very desirable when debriding very close to the interface between necrotic tissue and viable tissue, where the overall speed of debridement need not be so rapid and collateral damage to viable tissue is undesirable. Such tissue will be sterile and ready for further treatment, such as a wound dressing and/or a skin graft.

  6. Complement activation by necrotic cells in normal plasma environment compares to that by late apoptotic cells and involves predominantly IgM.

    PubMed

    Ciurana, Caroline L F; Zwart, Bas; van Mierlo, Gerard; Hack, C Erik

    2004-09-01

    Necrotic cells are generally considered to stimulate inflammation, whereas apoptotic cells should not. However, apoptotic cells have pro-inflammatory properties since they can activate complement. To what extent this activation compares to that by necrotic cells is not known. We compared complement activation by necrotic cells and apoptotic cells in plasma. Jurkat cells were made apoptotic or necrotic by incubation with etoposide or by heat shock, respectively. Cells incubated in recalcified plasma were tested for C3 and C4 fixation and fluid phase generation of complement activation products. Fixation of C3 and C4 to necrotic cells occurred mainly via the classical pathway, independent from the method of necrosis induction and the cell type. Depletion of IgM from plasma almost completely abrogated complement fixation by necrotic cells, which was restored by supplementation with purified IgM. Complement activation by late apoptotic cells was comparable to that by necrotic cells regarding the extent and dependence on IgM. Moreover, incubation of plasma with necrotic or late apoptotic cells led to the generation of comparable amounts of complement activation products. These results indicate that late apoptotic and necrotic cells employ similar complement activation mechanisms in the plasma environment.

  7. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  8. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  9. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    acute, fatal infections in ducklings with a rapid decline within 1-2 hr and clinical and pathologic signs virtually indistinguishable from DHAV. DAstV-1 has only been recognized in the United Kingdom and recently in China, while DAstV-2 has been reported in ducks in the United States. FAdV, the causative agent of inclusion body hepatitis, is a Group I avian adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. The affected birds have a swollen, friable, and discolored liver, sometimes with necrotic or hemorrhagic foci. Histologic lesions include multifocal necrosis of hepatocytes and acute hepatitis with intranuclear inclusion bodies in the nuclei of the hepatocytes. THV is a picornavirus that is likely the causative agent of turkey viral hepatitis. Currently there are more questions than answers about THV, and the pathogenesis and clinical impacts remain largely unknown. Future research in viral hepatic diseases of poultry is warranted to develop specific diagnostic assays, identify suitable cell culture systems for virus propagation, and develop effective vaccines.

  10. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    acute, fatal infections in ducklings with a rapid decline within 1-2 hr and clinical and pathologic signs virtually indistinguishable from DHAV. DAstV-1 has only been recognized in the United Kingdom and recently in China, while DAstV-2 has been reported in ducks in the United States. FAdV, the causative agent of inclusion body hepatitis, is a Group I avian adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. The affected birds have a swollen, friable, and discolored liver, sometimes with necrotic or hemorrhagic foci. Histologic lesions include multifocal necrosis of hepatocytes and acute hepatitis with intranuclear inclusion bodies in the nuclei of the hepatocytes. THV is a picornavirus that is likely the causative agent of turkey viral hepatitis. Currently there are more questions than answers about THV, and the pathogenesis and clinical impacts remain largely unknown. Future research in viral hepatic diseases of poultry is warranted to develop specific diagnostic assays, identify suitable cell culture systems for virus propagation, and develop effective vaccines. PMID:27610716

  11. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  12. Management of descending necrotizing mediastinitis complicated with empyema by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Chen; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Dai, Zen-Kong

    2016-05-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is an uncommon disease that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Herein, we report a 17-month-old girl of DNM with an initial normal chest radiograph followed by rapid clinical deterioration during a period of 4 days, from deep neck infection to mediastinitis and then complicated empyema. She was managed successfully with intravenous antibiotics and surgical debridement by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and cervical drainage. Early recognition and meticulous intensive care of patients with DNM are important to minimize morbidity and mortality. VATS is an effective and minimally invasive therapeutic strategy in children with DNM. PMID:26716737

  13. Probiotics and Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Finding the Missing Pieces of the Probiotic Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Luedtke, Sherry A.; Yang, Jacob T.; Wild, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the leading causes of death in the neonatal intensive care unit. Morbidity and mortality rates significantly increase with decreases in gestational age and birth weight. Strong evidence suggests probiotic prophylaxis may significantly decrease the incidence of NEC and should therefore be incorporated into the standard of care for preterm infants. However, debate still remains because of limitations of completed studies. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the controversies regarding probiotic use in preterm infants and to shed light on the practical considerations for implementation of probiotic supplementation. PMID:23412969

  14. Necrotizing myopathy as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naert, E; De Bleecker, J L; Lumen, N; Rottey, S

    2015-02-01

    We report a 49-year-old patient with necrotizing myopathy and a right renal mass. After laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, a remission of myopathy was seen. Pathologic evaluation of the nephrectomy specimen revealed a clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Relapse of myopathy 6 months postoperatively coincided with the diagnosis of the appearance of liver metastatic disease. After initiation of treatment with an mTOR-inhibitor, myopathy became less active requiring smaller amounts of corticosteroids with a complete remission of myopathy after 3 months of systemic treatment for metastatic renal cell cancer.

  15. Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Systemic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhoomika K.; Shah, Jigna S.

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common serious gastrointestinal disorder affecting very preterm or very low birth weight infants. The risk is inversely proportional to gestational age and weight at birth. Fetal growth restriction and compromise may be additional specific risk factors. Despite extensive research and animal studies etiopathogenesis, preventive strategies and management options remain controversial. The present paper reviews the literature for recent advances and newer insights for changing epidemiological trends, pathogenesis, role of inflammatory cytokines, and various preventive and management strategies. PMID:22997587

  16. Evidence based feeding strategies before and after the development of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Hackam, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While the pathogenesis of NEC remains incompletely understood, it is well established that the risk of disease is increased by the administration of infant formula and decreased by the administration of breast milk. This review will focus on the mechanisms by which breast milk may serve to protect against NEC, and will review the evidence regarding various feeding strategies that may be utilized before and after an episode of NEC. PMID:24898361

  17. Clinical and pathological findings of a Yorkshire terrier affected with necrotizing encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sawashima, Y; Sawashima, K; Taura, Y; Shimada, A; Umemura, T

    1996-07-01

    A three-year-old, male Yorkshire terrier was presented with blindness, circling, hind limb weakness, and convulsive seizure for the past 3 months. Characteristic clinical findings were chronic, progressive neurological signs involving cerebrum and brain stem, an elevation of brain-type isoenzyme of serum creatine kinase, appearance of high voltage slow activity in electroencephalogram, and multifocal lesions in the cerebral hemispheres on magnetic resonance imaging. Necrotizing encephalitis of Yorkshire terrier was diagnosed after postmortem pathological examination. This is the first case report of the disease in Japan.

  18. Necrotizing encephalitis in a Yorkshire Terrier: clinical, imaging, and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Lotti, D; Capucchio, M T; Gaidolfi, E; Merlo, M

    1999-01-01

    A 5-year-old, male Yorkshire Terrier had chronic and progressive neurologic signs compatible with lesions in the right brain stem and right forebrain. In magnetic resonance images of the brain there were multifocal lesions at different stages of evolution, consistent with an inflammatory disease. The lesions were located in the white matter of the cerebrum, in the diencephalon and mesencephalon. These lesions were hypointense in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted images with no mass effect and minimal enhancement with gadolinium. Necrotizing encephalitis was confirmed post mortem.

  19. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with membranous nephropathy in a patient exposed to levamisole-adulterated cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Camillo; Emili, Stefano; Lin, Mercury; Alpers, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic agent widely used as an adulterant of illicit cocaine recently implicated as a cause of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated microscopic polyangiitis in cocaine abusers. An isolated case of membranous nephropathy (MN) associated with levamisole exposure has also been reported. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with both microscopic polyangiitis manifest as a pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and concurrent MN in the setting of chronic cocaine abuse and presumed levamisole exposure, raising the hypothesis that levamisole was the causative agent in the development of this rare dual glomerulopathy. PMID:26985374

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis following endoscopic harvesting of the greater saphenous vein for coronary artery bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Liliav, Benjamin; Yakoub, Danny; Kasabian, Armen

    2011-01-01

    The greater saphenous vein (GSV) remains the most commonly harvested conduit for revascularization in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Published literature shows that minimally invasive vein harvesting techniques have a significantly lower incidence of wound infection rates than conventional open vein harvesting techniques have. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis, an infection with a mortality rate of 30% to 50%, after endoscopic harvesting of the greater saphenous vein to be used as a conduit in a CABG procedure. Though minimally invasive vein harvesting techniques have advantages of smaller incisions and a decreased overall rate of wound infection, clinicians should be aware of this potentially lethal infection that may occur. PMID:21902951