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Sample records for negative chemical ionization

  1. Negative chemical ionization studied of human and food chain contamination with xenobiotic chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, R C; Whitaker, M J; Smith, L M; Stalling, D L; Kuehl, D W

    1980-01-01

    Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a mixture of isobutane, methylene chloride, and oxygen as the reagent gas has been used to explore contamination of environmental substrates with xenobiotic chemicals. The substrates in question, fish tissue, human seminal plasma, and human adipose tissue, were cleaned up by one of the following three cleanup procedures: (1) continuous liquid-liquid extraction steam distillation; (2) gel-permeation chromatography; and (3) adsorption on activated carbon followed by elution with toluene. The third procedure was used only for the examination of planar polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental samples. Using these techniques, we have found evidence for contamination of fish samples with polychloronaphthalenes, polychlorostyrenes, polychlorobiphenyls, polychlorodibenzofurans, and polychlorodibenzodioxins among other chemicals. The polychlorodibenzodioxins appeared only in the spectra of extracts of fish obtained from the Tittabawassee River at Midland Michigan. The polychlorodibenzofuran ions appeared in NCI mass spectra of fish that were significantly contaminated (above 2 ppm) with polychlorobiphenyls. Toxic substances occurring in human seminal plasma included pentachlorophenol, hexachlorobenzene, DDT metabolites, and polychlorobiphenyls. We have investigated toxic substances in human seminal plasma because of the apparent decrease in sperm density in U.S. males over the last 30 years. Results of screening human adipose tissue for contamination with xenobiotic chemicals have been largely coincident with result of the EPA human monitoring program. Polychlorobiphenyls, DDT metabolites, nonachlor, and chlordane have appeared in most samples examined. Detection limits for all of these chemicals were of the order of 1 ppb. PMID:7428739

  2. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION SENSITIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NICI MS) has the potential to be a very useful technique in identifying various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and sediment samples. Some PAHs give much stronger signals under NICI MS conditions than others. On ...

  3. Analysis of pesticide residues by fast gas chromatography in combination with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Húsková, Renáta; Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana; Svorc, Lubomír

    2009-08-28

    A combination of fast GC with narrow-bore column and bench top quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) detector in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode (with methane as reagent gas) is set up and utilized for the ultratrace analysis of 25 selected pesticides. The observed pesticides, belonging to the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), were from different chemical classes. A comparative study with electron impact (EI) ionization was also carried out (both techniques in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode). The programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector in solvent vent mode and narrow-bore column (15mx0.15mm I.D.x0.15microm film of 5% diphenyl 95% dimethylsiloxane stationary phase) were used for effective and fast separation. Heptachlor (HPT) as internal standard (I.S.) was applied for the comparison of results obtained from absolute and normalized peak areas. Non-fatty food matrices were investigated. Fruit (apple - matrix-matched standards; orange, strawberry, plum - real samples) and vegetable (lettuce - real sample) extracts were prepared by a quick and effective QuEChERS sample preparation technique. Very good results were obtained for the characterization of fast GC-NCI-MS method analysing EDCs pesticides. Analyte response was linear from 0.01 to 150microgkg(-1) with the R(2) values in the range from 0.9936 to 1.0000 (calculated from absolute peak areas) and from 0.9956 to 1.0000 (calculated from peak areas normalized to HPT). Instrument limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were found at pgmL(-1) level and for the majority of analytes were up to three orders of magnitude lower for NCI compared to EI mode. In both ionization modes, repeatability of measurements expressed as relative standard deviation (RSDs) was less than 10% which is in very good agreement with the criterion of European Union.

  4. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  5. Serum total testosterone: immunoassay compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Herold, D A

    1996-05-01

    We have developed an electron capture negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure to quantify serum testosterone in the clinically relevant range 0.69-69.3 nmol/L and used this procedure to assess Ciba Corning Diagnostics ACS:180 testosterone immunoassay. The GC-MS method involves liquid-liquid extraction of serum samples and synthesis of a pentafluorobenzyloxime/silyl ether derivative of testosterone with excellent chromatographic and electron capturing properties. The ACS testosterone assay is the first fully automated nonradioactive testosterone immunoassay approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients' specimens (101, 57 males, 44 females) were analyzed by both techniques. A plot of the GC-MS (x) vs ACS (y) testosterone concentrations for men was linear (y = 1.07x + 0.19 nmol/L), showing excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between the two assays. Agreement of the two assays for female specimens was poor (y = 0.72x + 1.2 nmol/L), with a poor correlation (r2 = 0.31).

  6. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T.

  7. Detection of stanozolol in hair by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Höld, K M; Wilkins, D G; Crouch, D J; Rollins, D E; Maes, R A

    1996-10-01

    Stanozolol is an anabolic androgenic steroid occasionally abused by athletes. A sensitive, specific, and reproducible method for the quantitative determination of stanozolol in hair has been developed. After the addition of stanozolol-d3 as the internal standard, hair samples (10-25 mg) were digested with 2 mL of 1N NaOH at 65 degrees C for at least 2 h. Digest solutions were then extracted using solid-phase extraction. The eluents were evaporated, a mixture of N-methyl-N-trimethylsilylhepta-fluorobutryamide (MSHFBA) and trimethylsilylimidazole (TSIM) (1000:20, v/v) was added, and the mixture heated at 80 degrees C for 5 minutes. After cooling to room temperature, N-methyl-bisheptafluorobutyramide (MBHFBA) was added and the mixture heated at 80 degrees C for 30 min. The derivatized extracts were analyzed on a Finnigan MATTM 4500 mass spectrometer in the negative chemical ionization mode. Chromatographic separation was achieved with helium carrier gas on a HP-1 capillary column (15 m x 0.2-mm i.d.; 33-microns film thickness). The assay was capable of reliably quantitating 50 pg/mg of stanozolol and was linear to 2500 pg/mg. Intra-assay precision was 13.2% at 50 pg/mg and 6.6% at 2500 pg/mg. Interassay precision was 13.7% at 50 pg/mg and 6.1% at 2500 pg/mg. This method has been applied to the analysis of stanozolol incorporated into rat hair. Male Long-Evans rats were given stanozolol 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days. The mean concentrations of stanozolol in the rat hair collected on day 14 were 362.4 +/- 332.4 pg/mg in pigmented hair and 90.0 +/- 46.9 pg/mg in nonpigmented hair. These data demonstrate that stanozolol is incorporated preferentially into pigmented hair.

  8. Simultaneous analysis of 17 organochlorine pesticides in natural medicines by GC/MS with negative chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takaomi; Kajimura, Keiji; Takagi, Sokichi; Satsuki, Yuka; Nakamura, Akihiko; Okihashi, Masahiro; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Obana, Hirotaka; Kitagawa, Mikiya

    2007-07-01

    Many methods for the determination of pesticide residues in food have been reported. Although natural medicines should be confirmed to be as safe as food, few methods for the determination of pesticide residues in natural medicines have been reported. In this study, 17 organochlorine pesticides were detected in natural medicines using GC/MS with negative chemical ionization (NCI). GC/MS with NCI can detect halogenated pesticides selectively and thus is suitable for the detection of organochlorine pesticides. This study indicates that GC/MS with NCI is useful for analyzing organochlorine pesticides in natural medicines.

  9. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt.

  10. [Determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xia, Guanghui; Shen, Weijian; Yu, Keyao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Bian, Xiaohong; Xu, Jiyang

    2014-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The honey and royal jelly samples were treated with different preparation methods as the result of the different components. The honey sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up with primary second amine, and the royal jelly sample was extracted with acetonitrile-water (1:1, v/v), and cleaned up with a C18 solid-phase extraction column. Finally, the extracts of the honey and royal jelly were analyzed by GC-NCI/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode separately. External standard calibration method was used for quantification. The linearities of calibration curves of the four insecticides were good with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 in the range of 50-500 microg/L. The limits of the detection (LODs) of the four insecticides were in the range of 0.12- 5.0 microg/kg, and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.40-16.5 microg/kg. The recoveries of the four insecticides spiked in honey and royal jelly at three spiked levels (10, 15 and 20 microg/kg) were in the range of 78.2 -110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all below 14%. The sensitivity and selectivity of this method were good with no interfering peaks. The proposed method is simple quick and effective to analyze the four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly.

  11. Quantitative analysis of THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH in human hair by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, D; Haughey, H; Cone, E; Huestis, M; Foltz, R; Rollins, D

    1995-10-01

    A sensitive and specific method was developed for the quantitative analysis of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11 -hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in human hair. Deuterated internal standards were added to hair samples, and samples were digested overnight in 1 N NaOH at 37 degrees C. Digest solutions were extracted with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure, which was previously developed in our laboratory for the analysis of plasma and whole blood. Derivatized extracts were analyzed on a Finnigan 4500" mass spectrometer in negative ion chemical ionization mode using methane as the reagent gas, hydrogen as the carrier gas, and a Restek Rtx 200-15M-0.25-microm capillary column. The assay was linear up to 50 ng/mg hair (r, 0.99) for all three compounds and was capable of detecting 10 pg THC and THCCOOH and 100 pg 11-OH-THC on column. The intra-assay precision ranged from 2.1 to 11.2% for the three analytes; the interassay precision ranged from 4.4 to 13.0%. The method was used to detect and quantitate the presence of THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH in human hair obtained from eight regular users of cannabis. THC, but not 11-OH-THC or THCCOOH, was detectable in the hair shaft above the assay limit of quantitation. Four laboratory wash procedures were also evaluated for their effect on the measured concentration of THC in hair. in seven of eight subjects, a methylene chloride wash procedure substantially reduced the measured THC concentration by up to 50%. The gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay is currently being used to support pharmacokinetic studies of drug disposition into the hair of humans and animals.

  12. Structural determination of zinc dithiophosphates in lubricating oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron impact and electron-capture negative ion chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Becchi, M; Perret, F; Carraze, B; Beziau, J F; Michel, J P

    2001-01-05

    Pentafluorobenzyl ester derivatives were used to identify zinc dialkyldithiophosphates and diaryldithiophosphates antiwear engine oil additives by GC-electron impact ionization (EI) MS and GC-electron-capture negative ion chemical ionization (ECNCI) MS analysis. GC-EI-MS of the dialkyldithiophosphate-pentafluorobenzyl derivatives afforded characteristic fragment ions corresponding to the cleavage of one and two alkyl radicals. In most cases, information was only obtained on one alkyl chain. Additional and complete information was obtained with retention time indices using synthetic derivatives and with GC-ECNCI-MS analysis. ECNCI afforded characteristic dithiophosphate anions which allowed the determination of the total number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radicals. The diastereoisomer mixtures of 2-hydroxy-sec.-alkyl radicals were completely separated on GC analysis.

  13. Determination of triclosan metabolites by using in-source fragmentation from high-performance liquid chromatography/negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-lin; Liu, Jie; Cai, Zongwei

    2010-07-15

    Triclosan is a widely used broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that acts by specifically inhibiting enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. An in vitro metabolic study of triclosan was performed by using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat liver S9 and microsome, while the in vivo metabolism was investigated on SD rats. Twelve metabolites were identified by using in-source fragmentation from high-performance liquid chromatography/negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-ITMS) analysis. Compared to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) that gave little fragmentation for triclosan and its metabolites, the in-source fragmentation under APCI provided intensive fragmentations for the structural identifications. The in vitro metabolic rate of triclosan was quantitatively determined by using HPLC/ESI-ITMS with the monitoring of the selected triclosan molecular ion. The metabolism results indicated that glucuronidation and sulfonation were the major pathways of phase II metabolism and the hydroxylated products were the major phase I metabolites. Moreover, glucose, mercapturic acid and cysteine conjugates of triclosan were also observed in the urine samples of rats orally administrated with triclosan.

  14. Comparison of negative-ion proton-transfer with iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of isocyanic acid in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, Robert; Taha, Youssef M.; Moussa, Samar G.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2014-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a trace gas pollutant of potential importance to human health whose measurement has recently become possible through the development of negative-ion proton-transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS) with acetate reagent ion. In this manuscript, an alternative ionization and detection scheme, in which HNCO is quantified by iodide CIMS (iCIMS) as a cluster ion at m/z 170, is described. The sensitivity was inversely proportional to water vapor concentration but could be made independent of humidity changes in the sampled air by humidifying the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region of the CIMS. The performance of the two ionization schemes was compared and contrasted using ambient air measurements of HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary, AB, Canada, by NI-PT-CIMS with acetate reagent ion from Dec 16 to 20, 2013, and by the same CIMS operated in iCIMS mode from Feb 3 to 7, 2014. The iCIMS exhibited a greater signal-to-noise ratio than the NI-PT-CIMS, not because of its sensitivity, which was lower (˜0.083 normalized counts per second (NCPS) per parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv) compared to ˜9.7 NCPS pptv-1), but because of a much lower and more stable background (3 ± 4 compared to a range of ˜2 × 103 to ˜6 × 103 NCPS). For the Feb 2014 data set, the HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary air ranged from <12 to 94 pptv (median 34 pptv), were marginally higher at night than during day, and correlated with nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) mixing ratios and submicron particle volume. The ratios of HNCO to NOx observed are within the range of emission ratios reported for gasoline-powered motor vehicles.

  15. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-30

    Under low voltage El conditions sample sensitivity may drop by I or 2 orders of magnitude. In the negative ion mode, polyaromatic hydrocar- bons either...preparation involved placing a drop of solution con- taining the sample in a suitable solvent on the surface of the emitter using a 10 ut syringe...tween Ions and Molecules", P. Ausloos, Ed., Plenum Press, N. Y. (1974). 31. Eyring, C. F.; Mackeown, S. S.; and Millikan , R. A., Phys. Rev., (1928

  16. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Renata; Hall, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin). The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations <100 pg μL−1 (<100 pg m−3 in air). No one method could be used to analyze the range of pre-emergent herbicides, OPs, and OCs investigated. In general GC-NCI/SIM provided the lowest method detection limits (MDLs commonly 2.5–10 pg μL−1) along with best confirmation (<25% RSD of ion ratio), while GC-NCI/SRM is recommended for use where added selectivity or confirmation is required (such as parathion-ethyl, tokuthion, carbofenothion). GC-EI/SRM at concentration <100 pg μL−1 was not suitable for most pesticides. GC-EI/SIM was more prone to interference issues than NCI methods, but gave good sensitivity (MDLs 1–10 pg μL−1) for pesticides with poor NCI response (OPs: sulfotep, phorate, aspon, ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT). PMID:19609395

  17. Quantification of neurosteroids in rat plasma and brain following swim stress and allopregnanolone administration using negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vallée, M; Rivera, J D; Koob, G F; Purdy, R H; Fitzgerald, R L

    2000-12-01

    A simplified method for the quantitative analysis of neurosteroids in rat plasma and brain is described. The method uses negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and involves the synthesis of pentafluorobenzyloxime/trimethylsilyl ether derivatives with excellent chromatographic and electron-capturing properties. Deuterium-labeled analogs of the steroids of interest were synthesized and used as internal standards. The steroids (allopregnanolone, epiallopregnanolone, pregnenolone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone) were isolated from the plasma or brain matrix by a rapid and straightforward solid-phase extraction procedure. The mass spectrometer was operated in a selective ion monitoring mode, allowing for picograms of neurosteroids to be quantified from biological extracts. The method was linear (typical R(2) = 0.999) over the concentration range (100 to 8000 pg from 0.3 ml plasma and 250 to 8000 pg from 100 mg brain tissue) with good precision and accuracy. In experimental protocols, the procedure was suitable for measuring concentrations of endogenous neurosteroids in rat plasma and brain. Significant elevations (P < 0.001) were observed in the frontal cortex for allopregnanolone and pregnenolone following a swim stress and for allopregnanolone and epiallopregnanolone following allopregnanolone injection (8 mg/kg, sc). The present method allows accurate determination of neurosteroids and will be helpful in elucidating the role of neurosteroids in health and disease.

  18. Determination of midazolam and 1-hydroxymidazolam from plasma by gas chromatography coupled to methane negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry after sublingual administration of midazolam.

    PubMed

    Kaartama, Ruut; Jarho, Pekka; Savolainen, Jouko; Kokki, Hannu; Lehtonen, Marko

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method for the determination of midazolam and its biologically active metabolite, 1-hydroxymidazolam, in rabbit plasma has been developed and validated. Sample preparation includes mixed-mode solid-phase extraction and derivatization with silylating reagents. Midazolam-d4 was used as an internal standard for the determination of parent drug and its active metabolite. The instrumentation consisted of a capillary column gas chromatography and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer with a negative chemical ionization. The method was found to be valid in terms of selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, and recovery over the concentration range of 2-200 ng/ml and 1-100 ng/ml for midazolam and 1-hydroxymidazolam, respectively. For both analytes, the lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. Midazolam was stable in stock solutions stored three months at -20°C and in human plasma stored for three months at -80°C. In addition, no degradation of midazolam was found after three freeze-thaw cycles, in short-term stability at room temperature for 24h, or in post-preparative stability in the autosampler. The validity of the method was further tested by performing a pharmacokinetic study of sublingual administration of midazolam in rabbits. The method will be used in studies related to a formulation development of novel midazolam formulations for use in paediatric anaesthesia.

  19. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification of haloacetic acids in tap water for simple and sensitive analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Can; Fujii, Yukiko; Yan, Junxia; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant for control of waterborne diseases in drinking water treatment. It can react with natural organic matter in water and form haloacetic acids (HAAs). For analysis of HAA levels, derivatization with diazomethane is commonly recommended as the standard methodology in Japan. However, diazomethane is a carcinogenic alkylating agent. Therefore, in this study, a safe, simple, and sensitive quantification method was developed to monitor HAAs in drinking water. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification was used for pretreatment. The pentafluorobenzyl-ester derivative was detected by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry analysis with very high sensitivity for HAAs analysis. The method has low detection limits (8-94 ng L(-1)) and good recovery rates (89-99%) for HAAs. The method was applied to 30 tap water samples from 15 cities in the Kansai region of Japan. The levels of HAAs detected were in the range 0.54-7.83 μg L(-1). Dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and bromochloroacetic acid were the major HAAs detected in most of the tap water, and accounted for 29%, 20% and 19% of the total HAAs, respectively. This method could be used for routine monitoring of HAAs in drinking water without exposure of workers to occupational hazards.

  20. Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol in Saliva of Rats Exposed to Chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Wu, Hong; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2005-05-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) insecticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos) are widely used in a variety of applications, and the potential exists for significant occupational and environmental exposures. They have been associated with more occupational poisoning cases than any other class of insecticides. One of the best approaches for accurately assessing human dosimetry and determining risk from both occupational and environmental exposure is biomonitoring. Biological matrices such as blood and urine have been routinely used for biomonitoring; however, other matrices such as saliva represent a simple and readily obtainable fluid. As a result, saliva has been suggested as an alternative biological matrix for the evaluation of a broad range of biomarkers such as environmental contaminants, drugs of abuse, hormones, chemotherapeutics, heavy metals, and pesticides. Chlorpyrifos (CPF), and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), have been quantified in urine and blood as a biomarker for exposure to OP insecticides. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical approach for detecting and quantitating the levels of TCP in saliva obtained from rats exposed to CPF and to evaluate the potential of saliva as a non-invasive biomonitoring matrix. Adult male rats were administered CPF, and blood and saliva were humanely collected for analysis of TCP and CPF. TCP was detected and quantitated in saliva using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring. Initial results indicate that saliva may be potentially utilized as a non-invasive biomonitoring matrix to determine exposure to organophosphate insecticides.

  1. Optimization of quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometric conditions for the analysis of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Comparative approach with negative chemical ionization and electron impact mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Larrazábal, David; Angeles Martínez, Ma; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damiá; Fabrellas, Begoña

    2004-10-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometry (QISTMS) operating in the non-resonant mode is presented as an innovative approach for the analysis of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Although reductions in complexity and time needed for optimization are achieved in comparison with the resonant option, precise adjustment of the mass spectrometric conditions is required. Differences in isolation and fragmentation patterns of target species with degree of bromination were observed. The reliability of the method was confirmed by using standard solutions through the evaluation of certain quality parameters such as accuracy (92-108%), injection repeatability and reproducibility (coefficient of variation below 10% and 15%, respectively). Detection limits ranged from 62 to 621 fg, providing sensitivity similar to that of negative chemical ionisation (NCIMS) and greater than that of electron ionization mass spectrometry. The applicability of QISTMS method to real samples and matrix effects were evaluated through the analysis of some PBDE congeners in a sewage sludge sample from a Spanish waste-water treatment plant. Comparable results were obtained using QISTMS and NCIMS. According to these observations, QISTMS performed in the non-resonant mode may constitute a low-cost, rapid and reliable alternative to high-resolution devices for the analysis of selected PBDEs in environmental samples.

  2. Quantification of low levels of organochlorine pesticides using small volumes (negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Rodríguez, Laura B; Rodríguez-Estrella, Ricardo; Ellington, James Jackson; Evans, John J

    2007-07-01

    A solid phase extraction and gas chromatography with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in scan mode (GC-NCI-MS) method was developed to identify and quantify for the first time low levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in plasma samples of less than 100 microl from wild birds. The method detection limits ranged from 0.012 to 0.102 pg/microl and the method reporting limit from 0.036 to 0.307 pg/microl for alpha, gamma, beta and delta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, endosulfan I, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan-II, endrin-aldehyde and endosulfan-sulfate. Pesticide levels in small serum samples from individual Falco sparverius, Sturnella neglecta, Mimus polyglottos and Columbina passerina were quantified. Concentrations ranged from not detected (n/d) to 204.9 pg/microl for some OC pesticides. All levels in the food web in and around cultivated areas showed the presence of pesticides notwithstanding the small areas for agriculture existing in the desert of Baja California peninsula.

  3. Gas phase enantiomeric distinction of (R)- and (S)-aromatic hydroxy esters by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a chiral reagent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancel, Valérie; Sellier, Nicole; Lesage, Denis; Fournier, Françoise; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-01

    Negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) using a chiral reagent gas such as (2S,3S) butanediol (GSS) allows the differentiation of chiral [alpha] hydroxy esters (MR or MS). The distinction is significantly enhanced by using CID on the deprotonated hetero dimer [M + (GSS-H)]-. The contribution of a non covalent [M + (GSS-H)]- competitive form is very minor. In fact, a covalent form appears favored. To produce a covalent adduct ion, an enantioselectivity of the alkoxide attack on the electrophilic ester site to form a tetravalent adduct is suggested by the product ion abundances. This observed steric control is consistent with the one observed in solution (Cram-Felkin addition/reduction orientation). The dissociations under collision conditions of the product deprotonated diastereomeric compounds show a stereospecific effect in the elimination of alcohol from the tetravalent adduct ions rather than a regeneration of the deprotonated diol reagent as expected from non-covalent heterodimer. This study shows an orientation with a chiral compound that allows, from an analytical point of view, the distinction of enantiomers and the attribution of chirality in the gas phase under NICI conditions.

  4. Development of an SPE method for the determination of zaleplon and zopiclone in hemolyzed blood using fast GC with negative-ion chemical ionization MS.

    PubMed

    Karlonas, Nerijus; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2014-03-01

    An SPE procedure for the determination of zaleplon and zopiclone in low-volume human hemolyzed blood using fast GC with negative-ion chemical ionization MS has been developed and validated. Both analytes were well retained on Oasis MCX and HLB columns, and sufficient extraction efficiency was achieved at pH 9.0. For further study a hydrophilic-lipophilic sorbent Oasis HLB was selected due to the polarity of sorbent surface and its large surface area in order to achieve efficient extraction of both analytes in a single step. Special attention has been paid to choosing washing and eluting solvents, resulting in a particularly/extremely clean and moisture-free extract. The mean extraction efficiency was higher than 90.1% for zaleplon and 82.9% for zopiclone. The precision for zaleplon and zopiclone was between 3.04-10.58% and 4.08-9.52%, respectively. Whereas the accuracy was in the range from -5.73 to 6.00%, and from -7.00 to 6.32% for zaleplon and zopiclone, respectively. The results show that the developed method is accurate, selective, precise, and very fast with excellent recovery and low LOD and LOQ.

  5. Mechanism of branching in negative ionization fronts.

    PubMed

    Arrayás, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A; Trueba, José L

    2005-10-14

    When a strong electric field is applied to nonconducting matter, narrow channels of plasma called streamers may form. Branchlike patterns of streamers have been observed in anode directed discharges. We explain a mechanism for branching as the result of a balance between the destabilizing effect of impact ionization and the stabilizing effect of electron diffusion on ionization fronts. The dispersion relation for transversal perturbation of a planar negative front is obtained analytically when the ratio D between the electron diffusion coefficient and the intensity of the externally imposed electric field is small. We estimate the spacing lambda between streamers and deduce a scaling law lambda approximately D(1/3).

  6. Flow reactor and triple quadrupole mass spectrometer investigations of negative ion reactions involving nitric acid - Implications for atmospheric HNO3 detection by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Arnold, F.

    1991-07-01

    The ion-molecule reactions on which Active Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ACIMS) measurements of atmospheric nitric acid are based are presently subjected to product-ion distribution and rate coefficient measurements. The results obtained indicate that while previous stratospheric nitric acid measurements were not impared by collisional dissociation processes, these processes may have played a major role during previous tropospheric measurements: leading to an undereestimation of nitric acid concentrations. A novel ACIMS ion source has been developed in order to avoid these problems.

  7. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  8. New Automated and High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Urinary Ketones by Multifiber Exchange-Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled to Fast Gas Chromatography/Negative Chemical-Electron Ionization/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Traldi, Pietro; Degli Esposti, Filippo; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Franchi, Elena; Calamante, Massimo; Kikic, Ireneo; Alessi, Paolo; Bonacchi, Alice; Salvadori, Edoardo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The present research is focused on automation, miniaturization, and system interaction with high throughput for multiple and specific Direct Immersion-Solid Phase Microextraction/Fast Gas Chromatography analysis of the urinary ketones. The specific Mass Spectrometry instrumentation, capable of supporting such the automated changeover from Negative Chemical to Electron Ionization mode, as well as the automation of the preparation procedure by new device called MultiFiber Exchange, through change of the fibers, allowed a friendly use of mass spectrometry apparatus with a number of advantages including reduced analyst time and greater reproducibility (2.01–5.32%). The detection limits for the seven ketones were less than 0.004 mg/L. For an innovative powerful meaning in high-throughput routine, the generality of the structurally informative Mass Spectrometry fragmentation patterns together with the chromatographic separation and software automation are also investigated. PMID:20628512

  9. Improved gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in hair using mechanical pulverization and bead-assisted liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cheong, Jae Chul; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2011-03-20

    A gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric (GC-NCI-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in human hair. After decontamination, hair samples were weighed (25mg), mechanically pulverized with a bead mill, and incubated in 0.7 mL of 1.0M sodium hydroxide at 95 °C for 30 min. Bead-assisted liquid-liquid extraction was performed with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v), a method developed in our laboratory. The extract was evaporated to dryness, derivatized with pentafluoropropanol and pentafluoropropionic anhydride, and analyzed by GC-MS/MS in the negative ion chemical ionization mode using methane as the reagent gas. The linear ranges were 0.05-10.0 pg/mg for THC-COOH with the coefficient of determination (r(2) = 0.9976). The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 1.7 and 13.8%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracies were -4.8 to 10.0% and -3.9 to 3.8%, respectively. The limit of detection and quantification were 0.015 and 0.05 pg/mg, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 79.4-87.1%. The results indicate that the proposed method is simple, rapid, accurate, and precise for determination of THC-COOH in hair. The method identified THC-COOH in hair specimens from suspected marijuana abusers.

  10. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  11. Determination of 2-, 3-, 4-methylpentanoic and cyclohexanecarboxylic acids in wine: development of a selective method based on solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry and its application to different wines and alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Moreno, Elisa; Lopez, Ricardo; Ferreira, Vicente

    2015-02-13

    A method to analyse 2-methylpentanoic, 3-methylpentanoic and 4-methylpentanoic acids as well as cyclohexanecarboxylic acid has been developed and applied to wine and other alcoholic beverages. Selective isolation with solid phase extraction, derivatization with 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl bromide at room temperature for 30 minutes, and further analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode provides detection limits between 0.4 and 2.4 ng/L. Good linearity up to 3.6 μg/L, satisfactory reproducibility (RSD<10%) and signal recovery of around 100% represent a robust method of analysis. Concentration data of these analytes in wine and other alcoholic beverages are reported for the first time. The levels found ranged from the method detection limits to 2630 ng/L, 2040 ng/L and 3810 ng/L for 2-, 3- and 4-methylpentanoic acids, respectively, and to 1780 ng/L for cyclohexanecarboxylic acid. There are significant differences depending on the type of wine or beverage. Distilled beverages, beer and aged wines have higher contents in methylpentanoic and cyclohexanecarboxylic acids.

  12. Oxidative Ionization Under Certain Negative-Ion Mass Spectrometric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pavlov, Julius; Errabelli, Ramu; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2017-02-01

    1,4-Hydroquinone and several other phenolic compounds generate (M - 2) -• radical-anions, rather than deprotonated molecules, under certain negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. In fact, spectra generated under helium-plasma ionization (HePI) conditions from 1,4-hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone (by electron capture) were practically indistinguishable. Because this process involves a net loss of H• and H+, it can be termed oxidative ionization. The superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•), known to be present in many atmospheric-pressure plasma ion sources operated in the negative mode, plays a critical role in the oxidative ionization process. The presence of a small peak at m/z 142 in the spectrum of 1,4-hydroquinone, but not in that of 1,4-benzoquinone, indicated that the initial step in the oxidative ionization process is the formation of an O2 -• adduct. On the other hand, under bona fide electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, 1,4-hydroquinone generates predominantly an (M - 1) - ion. It is known that at sufficiently high capillary voltages, corona discharges begin to occur even in an ESI source. At lower ESI capillary voltages, deprotonation predominates; as the capillary voltage is raised, the abundance of O2 -• present in the plasma increases, and the source in turn increasingly behaves as a composite ESI/APCI source. While maintaining post-ionization ion activation to a minimum (to prevent fragmentation), and monitoring the relative intensities of the m/z 109 (due to deprotonation) and 108 (oxidative ionization) peaks recorded from 1,4-hydroquinone, a semiquantitative estimation of the APCI contribution to the overall ion-generation process can be obtained.

  13. Oxidative Ionization Under Certain Negative-Ion Mass Spectrometric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Isra; Pavlov, Julius; Errabelli, Ramu; Attygalle, Athula B

    2017-02-01

    1,4-Hydroquinone and several other phenolic compounds generate (M - 2) (-•) radical-anions, rather than deprotonated molecules, under certain negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. In fact, spectra generated under helium-plasma ionization (HePI) conditions from 1,4-hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone (by electron capture) were practically indistinguishable. Because this process involves a net loss of H(•) and H(+), it can be termed oxidative ionization. The superoxide radical-anion (O2(-•)), known to be present in many atmospheric-pressure plasma ion sources operated in the negative mode, plays a critical role in the oxidative ionization process. The presence of a small peak at m/z 142 in the spectrum of 1,4-hydroquinone, but not in that of 1,4-benzoquinone, indicated that the initial step in the oxidative ionization process is the formation of an O2(-•) adduct. On the other hand, under bona fide electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, 1,4-hydroquinone generates predominantly an (M - 1) (-) ion. It is known that at sufficiently high capillary voltages, corona discharges begin to occur even in an ESI source. At lower ESI capillary voltages, deprotonation predominates; as the capillary voltage is raised, the abundance of O2(-•) present in the plasma increases, and the source in turn increasingly behaves as a composite ESI/APCI source. While maintaining post-ionization ion activation to a minimum (to prevent fragmentation), and monitoring the relative intensities of the m/z 109 (due to deprotonation) and 108 (oxidative ionization) peaks recorded from 1,4-hydroquinone, a semiquantitative estimation of the APCI contribution to the overall ion-generation process can be obtained. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Unresolved issues in the analysis of F2-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, isofurans, neurofurans, and F2-dihomo-isoprostanes in body fluids and tissue using gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yen, H-C; Wei, H-J; Lin, C-L

    2015-01-01

    F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) generated from arachidonic acid (AA) have been recognized as the most reliable marker of nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation in vivo. F2-IsoPs are initially produced in esterified form on phospholipids, and then released into body fluids in free form. The same mechanism can lead to generation of F4-neuroprostanes (F4-NPs) and F2-dihomo-IsoPs from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and adrenic acid, respectively. In addition, isofurans (IsoFs) and neurofurans (NFs) may be preferentially produced from AA and DHA, respectively, under high oxygen tension. The detection of F2-IsoPs using gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (GC/NICI-MS) has been widely employed, which is important for human body fluids containing low quantity of free-form F2-IsoPs. F4-NPs have also been detected using GC/NICI-MS, but multiple peaks need to be quantified. In this paper, we summarize the basic workflow of the GC/NICI-MS method for analyzing F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs, and various formats of assays conducted by different groups. We then discuss the feasibility of simultaneous analysis of IsoFs, NFs, and F2-dihomo-IsoPs with F2-IsoPs or F4-NPs. Representative GC chromatograms for analyzing these markers in human body fluids and rat brain tissue are demonstrated. Furthermore, we discuss several factors that may affect the performance of the analysis, such as those related to the sample processing steps, interference from specimens, types of GC liners used, and the addition of electron multiplier voltage in the method setting for the MS detector. Finally, we question the appropriateness of measuring total (free plus esterified) levels of these markers in body fluids.

  15. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Tao; Guan, Lili

    2013-04-01

    A simple and economical method for the determination of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100,153,154,183, and 209) in water was developed. This method involves the use of ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with GC-MS in negative chemical ionization mode. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, salt concentration, extraction time, and ultrasonic time, were investigated. A volume of 1.0 mL of acetone (dispersive solvent) containing 10 μL tetrachloroethylene (extraction solvent) was injected into 5.0 mL of water samples and then emulsified by ultrasound for 2.0 min to produce the cloudy solution. Under the optimal condition, the enrichment factors for the eight PBDEs were varied from 845- to 1050-folds. Good linearity was observed in the range of 1.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-28, 47, 99, and 100; 5.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-153, 154, and 183; and 5.0-500 ng L(-1) for BDE-209. The RSD values were in the range of 2.5-8.4% (n = 5) and the LODs ranged from 0.40 to 2.15 ng L(-1) (S/N = 3). The developed method was applied for the determination of eight BPDEs in the river and lake water samples, and the mean recoveries at spiking levels of 5.0 and 50.0 ng L(-1) were in the range of 70.6-105.1%.

  16. An innovative ultrasound assisted extraction micro-scale cell combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization to determine persistent organic pollutants in air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Montiel, E; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; Arias-Loaiza, G E; Gómez-Arroyo, S L; Amador-Muñoz, O

    2016-12-16

    New clean technologies are needed to determine concentration of organic pollutants without generating more pollution. A method to extract Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) from airborne particulate matter was developed using a novel technology recently patented called ultrasound assisted extraction micro-scale cell (UAE-MSC). This technology extracts, filters, collects the sample, and evaporates the solvent, on-line. No sample transfer is needed. The cell minimizes sample manipulation, solvent consumption, waste generation, time, and energy; fulfilling most of the analytical green chemistry protocol. The methodology was optimized applying a centred 2(3) factorial experimental design. Optimum conditions were used to validate and determine concentration of 16 organochlorine pesticides (OCls) and 6 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The best conditions achieved were 2 extractions with 5mL (each) of dichloromethane over 5min (each) at 60°C and 80% ultrasound potency. POPs were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization (GC/MS-NCI). Analytical method validation was carried out on airborne particles spiked with POPs at seven concentration levels between 0.5 and 26.9pgm(-3). This procedure was done by triplicate (N=21). Recovery, ranged between 65.5±2.3% and 107.5±3.0% for OCls and between 79.1±6.5% and 105.2±3.8% for PBDEs. Linearity (r(2)) was ≥0.94 for all compounds. Method detection limits, ranged from 0.5 to 2.7pgm(-3), while limits of quantification (LOQ), ranged from 1.7 to 9.0pgm(-3). A Bias from -18.6% to 9% for PBDEs was observed in the Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2787. SRM 2787 did not contain OCls. OCls recoveries were equivalent by UAE-MSC and Soxhlet methods UAE-MSC optimized extraction conditions reduced 30 times less solvent and decreased the extraction time from several hours to ten minutes, respect to Soxhlet. UAE-MSC was applied to 15 samples of particles less than 2.5μm (PM2.5) from three

  17. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Negative Hydrogen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. Neutral--neutral, ion-neutral, Coulomb collisions and charge-neutralizing collisions are implemented in U3DSMC using the no time counter method, electron-molecule collisions are treated by the constant timestep method. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  18. Simultaneous determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Moody, D E; Andrenyak, D M; Smith, E K; Foltz, R L; Huestis, M A; Newton, J F

    2001-10-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) in human plasma can be simultaneously detected using solid-phase extraction with gas chromatography and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. THC-d3 and THCA-d3 are added as internal standards; protein is precipitated with acetonitrile and the resulting supernatants diluted with 0.1 M sodium acetate (pH 7.0) prior to application to the solid-phase extraction columns. THC and THCA were eluted separately and then pooled, dried under air, and derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol. The derivatized THC-d0 gives abundant molecular anions (m/z 410), and the derivatized THCA-d0 gives abundant fragment ions (m/z 422) formed by loss of (CF3)2CHOH from its molecular anion. The recoveries of THC and THCA were 74% and 17%, respectively. The lower and upper limits of quantitation were 0.5 and 100 ng/mL for THC and 2.5 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL for THCA. The within-run accuracy and precision for THC (measured at 0.5, 1, 10 and 75 ng/mL) ranged from 98 to 106% (% target) and 4.1 to 9.5 (%CV), respectively. For THCA, the within-run accuracy and precision (measured at 2.5, 5, 10, and 75 ng/mL) ranged from 89 to 101% and 4.3 to 7.5%, respectively. The between-run accuracy and precision for THC ranged from 92 to 110% and 0.4 to 12.4%, respectively. The between-run accuracy and precision for THCA ranged from 97 to 103% and 6.5 to 12.3%, respectively. In processed samples stored in reconstituted form at -20 degrees C, THC and THCA were stable for at least three days. THC and THCA stored in plasma were stable following three freeze/thaw cycles. THC and THCA in whole blood at room temperature for 6 h, or in plasma stored at room temperature for 24 h, did not show significant change. Storage in polypropylene containers for 7 days at -20 degrees C and the presence of 1% sodium fluoride or the cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716, at 1 microg/mL did not

  19. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  20. Analysis of the residues of 20 organochlorine pesticides in Herba epimedii, a Chinese herbal medicine, by solid-phase extraction with gas chromatography/negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Deng, Ming; Yu, Boyang; Tan, Li

    2010-01-01

    A multiresidue analytical method has been developed to simultaneously determine the residues of 20 organochlorine pesticides in Herba epimedii, a traditional Chinese medicine. The 20 pesticides are included in the list of regulated substances by the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department in Hong Kong. The method consists of solid-phase extraction for cleanup of samples and GC coupled on-line with negative chemical ion-MS to analyze the target pesticides. The chromatographic separation of the compounds was carried out on a DB-1701 column by using an optimal temperature program, and the quantitative analysis was conducted by selected ion monitoring. The LOD and LOQ values fell in the range of 0.0555-5.8821 and 0.1241-17.9333 ng/g, respectively. The average recoveries were between 75.4 and 90.7% (n=5) for the 20 organochlorine pesticides. The developed method proved to be reliable and accurate, and permits rapid determination of the 20 organochlorine pesticides in one run.

  1. Gasification and Ionization of Chemically Complex Liquids for FRC Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Michael; Hill, Carrie

    2014-10-01

    Ion thrusters provide reliable and efficient spacecraft propulsion but are limited to noble gas propellants to limit chemical attack of components. However, thrusters based on Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas are becoming a reality. High beta compact-toroids are generated within an FRC thruster and then expelled to provide thrust. The closed field lines restrict the plasma from attacking thruster components. More convenient propellants such as water are therefore possible. The FRC thruster would generate a series of compact-toroids (plasmoids) to develop continuous spacecraft thrust. Each plasmoid ejection would empty the discharge region. The feed system would then refill the discharge region with partially ionized gas for the next discharge. The ionization part of this feed system is the subject of this paper. The question is how to produce a uniform, chemically complex, ionized gas within the discharge region that optimizes compact-toroid formation? We will be measuring chemical state, ionization state, and uniformity as the propellant enters the discharge region.

  2. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Reacting Plasma Flow in a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Averkin, Sergey; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. The rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom in U3DSMC are implemented using the Larsen-Borgnakke model. Chemical reactions are implemented in U3DSMC using the Quantum-Kinetic model. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  3. Effect of sample compositions on chemical analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriemer, David; Dai, Yuqin; Li, Liang

    1996-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is an effective ionization technique for mass spectrometry. It take advantages of some unique properties of certain organic chemicals to provide entrapment, isolation, vaporization, and ionization of the analyte of interest. While the main application of the MALDI technique is currently in the area of biological molecule analysis, it is possible to use this technique for monitoring polymer chemistry such as degradation processes. This is potentially important for studying and developing environmentally degradable polymers. Direct analysis of the analyte in real-world samples is possible with MALDI. However, there is a significant effect of the overall composition of a sample on the detectability and performance of MALDI. Two examples are given to illustrate the positive and negative effects of buffers, salts, and additives on the MALDI sample preparation.

  4. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  5. Characterization of Nonpolar Lipids and Selected Steroids by Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Chemical Ionization, Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization, and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Daiya, Shivani; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H2O) with the ClMn(H2O)+ ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H2O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H2O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids. PMID:21528012

  6. The effect of negative air ionization on the growth of four generations of laboratory rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsull, S. M.; Bellamy, D.; Head, E. L.

    1984-06-01

    Initial work indicated an inhibition of pre-weaning growth in the first generation of rats born and raised at high negative ion levels. This effect, however, was not carried through to the successive generations. Negative ionization had little apparent effect on post-weaning growth throughout the four generations studied.

  7. Ionization pattern obtained in electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interfaces for authorized antidepressants in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Iulia; Ionicǎ, Mihai; Vlǎdescu, Marian; Truţǎ, Elena; Sultan, Carmen; Viscol, Oana; Horhotǎ, Luminiţa; Radu, Simona

    2016-12-01

    Antidepressants were found in 1950. In the 1990s there was a new generation of antidepressants. They act on the level of certain neurotransmitters extrasinpatic by its growth. After their mode of action antidepressants may be: SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors); (Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors); SARIs (Serotonin Antagonist Reuptake Inhibitors); NRIs (Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors); NDRIs (Norepinephrine-Dopamine Reuptake Inhibitors) NDRAs (Norepinephrine-Dopamine Releasing Agents); TCAs (Tricyclic Antidepressants); TeCAs (Tetracyclic Antidepressants); MAOIs (Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors); agonist receptor 5-HT1A (5- hydroxytryptamine); antagonist receptor 5-HT2; SSREs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Enhancers) and Sigma agonist receptor. To determine the presence of antidepressants in biological products, it has been used a system HPLC-MS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) Varian 12001. The system is equipped with APCI (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization) or ESI (ElectroSpray Ionization) interface. To find antidepressants in unknown samples is necessary to recognize them after mass spectrum. Because the mass spectrum it is dependent on obtaining private parameters work of HPLC-MS system, and control interfaces, the mass spectra library was filled with the mass spectra of all approved antidepressants in Romania. The paper shows the mass spectra obtained in the HPLCMS system.

  8. Chemical characterization of synthetic cannabinoids by electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kill, Jade B; Oliveira, Izabela F; Tose, Lilian V; Costa, Helber B; Kuster, Ricardo M; Machado, Leandro F; Correia, Radigya M; Rodrigues, Rayza R T; Vasconcellos, Géssica A; Vaz, Boniek G; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-09-01

    The synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) represent the most recent advent of the new psychotropic substances (NPS) and has become popularly known to mitigate the effects of the Δ(9)-THC. The SCs are dissolved in organic solvents and sprayed in a dry herbal blend. However, little information is reported on active ingredients of SCs as well as the excipients or diluents added to the herbal blend. In this work, the direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry technique (ESI-FT-ICR MS) was applied to explore the chemical composition of nine samples of herbal extract blends, where a total of 11 SCs (UR-144, JWH-073, XLR-11, JWH-250, JWH-122, AM-2201, AKB48, JWH-210, JWH-081, MAM-2201 and 5F-AKB48) were identified in the positive ionization mode, ESI(+), and other 44 chemical species (saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, sugars, flavonoids, etc.) were detected in the negative ionization mode, ESI(-). Additionally, CID experiments were performed, and fragmentation pathways were proposed to identify the connectivity of SCs. Thus, the direct infusion ESI-FT-ICR MS technique is a powerful tool in forensic chemistry that enables the rapid and unequivocal way for the determination of molecular formula, the degree of unsaturation (DBE-double bond equivalent) and exact mass (<1ppm) of a total of 55 chemical species without the prior separation step.

  9. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization study of the positive and negative ion chemistry of the hydrofluorocarbons 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and of perfluoro-n-hexane (FC-72) in air plasma at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Ester; Paradisi, Cristina; Scorrano, Gianfranco

    2004-07-01

    A report is given on the ionization/dissociation behavior of the title compounds within air plasmas produced by electrical corona discharges at atmospheric pressure: both positive and negative ions were investigated at different temperatures using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). CHF(2)CH(3) (HFC-152a) undergoes efficient ionic oxidation to C(2)H(5)O(+), in which the oxygen comes from water present in the plasma. In contrast, CF(3)CH(2)F (HFC-134a) does not produce any characteristic positive ion under APCI conditions, its presence within the plasma being revealed only as a neutral ligand in ion-molecule complexes with ions of the background (H(3)O(+) and NO(+)). Analogously, the perfluorocarbon FC-72 (n-C(6)F(14)) does not produce significant positive ions at 30 degrees C: at high temperature, however, it undergoes dissociative ionization to form many product ions including C(3)F(6)(+), C(2)F(4)(+), C(n)F(2n+1)(+) and a few families of oxygen containing cations (C(n)F(2n+1)OH(2)(+), C(n)F(2n)OH(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(2)H(2)(+), C(n)F(2n-2)O(2)H(+)) which are suggested to derive from C(n)F(2n+1)(+) in a cascade of steps initiated by condensation with water followed by steps of HF elimination and H(2)O addition. Negative ions formed from the fluoroethanes CHF(2)CH(3) and CF(3)CH(2)F (M) include complexes with ions of the background, O(2)(-)(M), O(3)(-)(M) and some higher complexes involving also water, and complexes of the fluoride ion, F(-)(H(2)O), F(-)(M) and higher complexes with both M and H(2)O also together. The interesting product O(2)(-)(HF) is also formed from 1,1-difluoroethane. In contrast to the HFCs, perfluoro-n-hexane gives stable molecular anions, M(-), which at low source temperature or in humidified air are also detected as hydrates, M(-)(H(2)O). In addition, in humidified air F(-)(H(2)O)(n) complexes are also formed. The reactions leading to all major positive and negative product ions are discussed

  10. Application of Ni-63 photo and corona discharge ionization for the analysis of chemical warfare agents and toxic wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stach, J.; Adler, J.; Brodacki, M.; Doring, H.-R.

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade, advances in instrumental design and refinements in the understanding of ion molecule reactions at atmospheric pressure enabled the application of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) as a simple inexpensive and sensitive analytical method for the detection of organic trace compounds. Positive and negative gas-phase ions for ion mobility spectrometry have been produced by a variety of methods, including photo-ionization, laser multi photon ionization, surface ionization, corona discharge ionization. The most common ion source used in ion mobility spectrometry is a radioactive Ni-63 foil which is favored due to simplicity, stability, convenience, and high selectivity. If reactant ions like (H2O(n)H)(+) or (H2O(n)O2)(-) dominate in the reaction region, nearly all kinds of compounds with a given proton or electron affinity; are ionized. However, the radioactivity of the Ni-63 foil is one disadvantage of this ion source that stimulates the development and application of other ionization techniques. In this paper, we report analyses of old chemical warfare agents and toxic wastes using Bruker RAID ion mobility spectrometers. Due to the modular construction of the measuring cell, the spectrometers can be equipped with different ion sources. The combined use of Ni-63, photo- and corona discharge ionization allows the identification of different classes of chemical compounds and yields in most cases comparable results.

  11. Biomolecular analysis and cancer diagnostics by negative mode probe electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Saha, Subhrakanti; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Shida, Yasuo; Takeda, Sen; Nonami, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-21

    We have examined several combinations of solvents and probes with the aim of optimizing the ionization conditions for biomolecules e.g., proteins, peptides and lipids by negative mode probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PESI-MS). With the data presented in this study, negative-mode PESI-MS can be considered as a potential tool for biomolecular analysis and cancer diagnostics because of its simplicity in instrumental configuration. A sharper sampling probe was found to be better for obtaining high quality mass spectra because it can generate stable electrospray without the occurrence of gas breakdown. Although the best conditions may depend on each sample, aqueous organic solvent solutions, especially isopropanol-H(2)O (1/1) with a pH of ≥7, are shown to be preferable for negative-mode PESI-MS, which was successfully applied to colon cancer diagnosis.

  12. [Determination of homocysteine by tandem mass spectrometry with chemical ionization].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, I I; Platova, A I; Safarova, T P; Iakovleva, O B

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an intermediate of methionine metabolism. High plasma Hcy concentrations are an independent risk factor for stroke, peripheral vascular disease, deep venous thrombosis, coronary disease, and cognitive deficiency. Apparently, it is a great importance to measure Hcy levels in human blood. A new method for the quantification of Hcy by means of reversed-phase LC/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed. The MRM ion transition, m/z 136.0 ® 90.0 was used for Hcy quantification. The limit of detection was 0.4 mM, quantification was performed from 1 mM to 40 mM with coefficient of determination of R2=0,997. The method was applied successfully to Hcy determination in human blood.

  13. Constraining Anthropogenic and Biogenic Emissions Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kathleen M.

    Numerous gas-phase anthropogenic and biogenic compounds are emitted into the atmosphere. These gases undergo oxidation to form other gas-phase species and particulate matter. Whether directly or indirectly, primary pollutants, secondary gas-phase products, and particulate matter all pose health and environmental risks. In this work, ambient measurements conducted using chemical ionization mass spectrometry are used as a tool for investigating regional air quality. Ambient measurements of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) were conducted in Mexico City. A method of inferring the rate of ozone production, PO3, is developed based on observations of HO2NO 2, NO, and NO2. Comparison of this observationally based PO3 to a highly constrained photochemical box model indicates that regulations aimed at reducing ozone levels in Mexico City by reducing NOx concentrations may be effective at higher NO x levels than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Measurements of SO2 and particulate sulfate were conducted over the Los Angeles basin in 2008 and are compared to measurements made in 2002. A large decrease in SO2 concentration and a change in spatial distribution are observed. Nevertheless, only a modest reduction in sulfate concentration is observed at ground sites within the basin. Possible explanations for these trends are investigated. Two techniques, single and triple quadrupole chemical ionization mass spectrometry, were used to quantify ambient concentrations of biogenic oxidation products, hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. The use of these techniques demonstrates the advantage of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for separation of mass analogues, provided the collision-induced daughter ions are sufficiently distinct. Enhancement ratios of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde in Californian biomass burning plumes are presented as are concentrations of these compounds at a rural ground site downwind of Sacramento.

  14. The influence of negative ionization of the air on motor activity in Syrian hamsters ( Masocricetus auratus Waterhouse) in light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkiewicz, Zofia; Dabrowska, Barbara; Schiffer, Zofia

    1989-12-01

    The motor activity of Syrian hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus Waterhouse) under the influence of negative ionization of the atmosphere applied for 10, 20 or 30 min per day was investigated. An ionizer with output of 14000 light negative ions per 1 cm3 of air was used. Studies carried out in the light phase of a 12∶12 h light/dark regime revealed a relation between the reaction of the animal and the time of day at which ionization was applied. Ionization for 20 or 30 min in the light phase decreased motor activity, while 10 min of ionization increased it compared to control animals. Ionization in the dark phase gave a more distinct rise in activity than that applied in the light phase for all three durations of ionization.

  15. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  16. Negative air ionization improves memory and attention in learning-disabled and mentally retarded children.

    PubMed

    Morton, L L; Kershner, J R

    1984-06-01

    The effect of increased concentrations of ambient negative air ions on incidental visual memory for words and purposive auditory memory for dichotic digits was investigated in 20 normal grade 4 children, 8 learning-disabled children, and 8 mildly mentally retarded children. Half in each group were assigned randomly to an unmodified air-placebo condition under double-blind testing procedures. All of the children breathing negatively ionized air were superior in incidental memory. In dichotic listening, the negative ions produced a counter-priming effect in the two learning-impaired groups, offsetting the difficulties that they showed under placebo in switching attention selectively from one ear to the other. The action of negative ions on the neurotransmitter, serotonin, may be the mechanism by which negative ions produce such behavioral effects. In view of the important environmental and remedial implications of these novel findings, interpretations should be made cautiously pending larger-scale replications.

  17. Modeling the Detection of Organic and Inorganic Compounds Using Iodide-Based Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Siddharth; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Lee, Ben H; Thornton, Joel A; Kurtén, Theo

    2016-02-04

    Iodide-based chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been used to detect and measure concentrations of several atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. The significant electronegativity of iodide and the strong acidity of hydroiodic acid makes electron transfer and proton abstraction essentially negligible, and the soft nature of the adduct formation ionization technique reduces the chances of sample fragmentation. In addition, iodide has a large negative mass defect, which, when combined with the high resolving power of a high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS), provides good selectivity. In this work, we use quantum chemical methods to calculate the binding energies, enthalpies and free energies for clusters of an iodide ion with a number of atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. Systematic configurational sampling of the free molecules and clusters was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, followed by subsequent calculations at the PBE/SDD and DLPNO-CCSD(T)/def2-QZVPP//PBE/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP levels. The binding energies, enthalpies, and free energies thus obtained were then compared to the iodide-based University of Washington HR-ToF-CIMS (UW-CIMS) instrument sensitivities for these molecules. We observed a reasonably linear relationship between the cluster binding enthalpies and logarithmic instrument sensitivities already at the PBE/SDD level, which indicates that relatively simple quantum chemical methods can predict the sensitivity of an iodide-based CIMS instrument toward most molecules. However, higher level calculations were needed to treat some outlier molecules, most notably oxalic acid and methylerythritol. Our calculations also corroborated the recent experimental findings that the molecules that the UW-CIMS detects at maximum sensitivity usually have binding enthalpies to iodide which are higher than about 26 kcal/mol, depending slightly on the level of theory.

  18. Ion chemistry of VX surrogates and ion energetics properties of VX: new suggestions for VX chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Midey, Anthony J; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    Room temperature rate constants and product ion branching ratios have been measured for the reactions of numerous positive and negative ions with VX chemical warfare agent surrogates representing the amine (triethylamine) and organophosphonate (diethyl methythiomethylphosphonate (DEMTMP)) portions of VX. The measurements have been supplemented by theoretical calculations of the proton affinity, fluoride affinity, and ionization potential of VX and the simulants. The results show that many proton transfer reactions are rapid and that the proton affinity of VX is near the top of the scale. Many proton transfer agents should detect VX selectively and sensitively in chemical ionization mass spectrometers. Charge transfer with NO(+) should also be sensitive and selective since the ionization potential of VX is small. The surrogate studies confirm these trends. Limits of detection for commercial and research grade CIMS instruments are estimated at 80 pptv and 5 ppqv, respectively.

  19. Rapid differentiation of refined fuels using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    Negative electrospray ionization/MS enabled rapid, specific, and selective screening for unique polar components at parts per million concentrations in commercial hydrocarbon products without extensive sample preparation, separation, chromatography, or quantitation. Commercial fuel types were analyzed with this method, including kerosene, jet fuel, white gas, charcoal lighter fluid, on-road and off-road diesel fuels, and various grades and brands of gasolines. The different types of fuels produced unique and relatively simple spectra. These analyses were then applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill. Although the alkane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane portions began to biodegrade or weather, the polar components in these samples remained relatively unchanged. The type of fuel involved was readily identified by negative electrospray ionization/MS. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 230th ACS National Meeting (Washington, DC 8/28/2005-9/1/2005).

  20. A new concept positive (negative) surface ionization source for RIB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Welton, R.F.; Cui, B.

    1996-12-31

    A versatile, new concept, spherical-geometry, positive (negative) surface-ionization source has been designed. fabricated, and tests completed which can operate in either positive- or negative-ion beam generation modes without mechanical changes to the source. The highly permeable, composite Ir/C has an intrinsic work function of 0 = 5.29 eV and can be used directly for the generation of positive-ion beams of highly electropositive elements. For negative-surface ionization, the work function is lowered by dynamic flow of a highly electropositive adsorbate such as Cs through the ionizer matrix. The results of initial testing indicate that the source is reliable, stable and easy to operate, with efficiencies for Cs{sup +} estimated to exceed 60% and as high as {approximately}50% for F{sup -} generation. The design features, operational principles, and initial performance of the source for generating Cs{sup +} and F{sup -}, when operated with Cs, are discussed in this article.

  1. Negative Temperature Coefficient in Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenson, I. A.; Sergeev, Gleb B.

    1984-05-01

    A systematic analysis of reactions whose rate decreases with increase of temperature is presented. The possibility of a negative temperature coefficient in the elementary reactions is examined from the standpoint of the transition state theory and of collision theory. The mechanisms of complex reactions in which the temperature dependence of the rate is anomalous are discussed, and possible reasons for the anomaly are examined. The bibliography contains 175 references.

  2. Upper-Room Ultraviolet Light and Negative Air Ionization to Prevent Tuberculosis Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Escombe, A. Roderick; Moore, David A. J; Gilman, Robert H; Navincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Mitchell, Bailey; Noakes, Catherine; Martínez, Carlos; Sheen, Patricia; Ramirez, Rocio; Quino, Willi; Gonzalez, Armando; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A

    2009-01-01

    Background Institutional tuberculosis (TB) transmission is an important public health problem highlighted by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant TB. Effective TB infection control measures are urgently needed. We evaluated the efficacy of upper-room ultraviolet (UV) lights and negative air ionization for preventing airborne TB transmission using a guinea pig air-sampling model to measure the TB infectiousness of ward air. Methods and Findings For 535 consecutive days, exhaust air from an HIV-TB ward in Lima, Perú, was passed through three guinea pig air-sampling enclosures each housing approximately 150 guinea pigs, using a 2-d cycle. On UV-off days, ward air passed in parallel through a control animal enclosure and a similar enclosure containing negative ionizers. On UV-on days, UV lights and mixing fans were turned on in the ward, and a third animal enclosure alone received ward air. TB infection in guinea pigs was defined by monthly tuberculin skin tests. All guinea pigs underwent autopsy to test for TB disease, defined by characteristic autopsy changes or by the culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from organs. 35% (106/304) of guinea pigs in the control group developed TB infection, and this was reduced to 14% (43/303) by ionizers, and to 9.5% (29/307) by UV lights (both p < 0.0001 compared with the control group). TB disease was confirmed in 8.6% (26/304) of control group animals, and this was reduced to 4.3% (13/303) by ionizers, and to 3.6% (11/307) by UV lights (both p < 0.03 compared with the control group). Time-to-event analysis demonstrated that TB infection was prevented by ionizers (log-rank 27; p < 0.0001) and by UV lights (log-rank 46; p < 0.0001). Time-to-event analysis also demonstrated that TB disease was prevented by ionizers (log-rank 3.7; p = 0.055) and by UV lights (log-rank 5.4; p = 0.02). An alternative analysis using an airborne infection model demonstrated that ionizers prevented 60% of

  3. A Negative-Surface Ionization for Generation of Halogen Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zaim, H.

    2001-04-16

    A simple and efficient negative surface ionization source has been designed, fabricated and initially tested for on-line generation of radioactive ion beams of the halogens (Cl, Br, I, and At) for use in the nuclear-structure and nuclear-astrophysics research programs at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The source utilizes a solid, spherical geometry LaB{sub 6} surface ionizer for forming highly electronegative atoms and molecules. Despite its widely publicized propensity for being easily poisoned, no evidences of this effect were experienced during testing of the source. Nominal efficiencies of 15% for Br{sup {minus}} beam generation were obtained during off-line evaluation of the source with AlBr3 feed material when account is taken of the fractional dissociation of the molecule. Principles of operation, design features, operational parameter data, initial performance results, and beam quality data (emittance) are presented in this article.

  4. Cluster Formation of Sulfuric Acid with Dimethylamine or Diamines and Detection with Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. N.; McMurry, P. H.; Hanson, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to chemically ionize clusters for detection. In this study, we compare measured cluster concentrations formed by reacting sulfuric acid vapor with dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine) using nitrate and acetate ions. We show from flow reactor measurements that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with weak acidities. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe the chemical ionization processes and lifetimes of ions composed of sulfuric acid and base molecules. We then model the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways, including chemical ionization, ion-induced clustering, and ion decomposition, to better identify which cluster types cannot be chemically ionized by nitrate. Our results show that sulfuric acid dimer with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimer with 2 or more base molecules cannot be chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that cluster concentrations measured with acetate CI gives a better representation of both cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  5. Ionization of Samarium by Chemical Releases in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Caton, R.; Miller, D.; Groves, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The release of Samarium vapor into the upper atmosphere was studied using during the Air Force Research Laboratory sponsored Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) rocket launches in May 2009. The Naval Research Laboratory supported these experiments with 3-D photochemical modeling of the artificial plasma cloud including (1) reactions with atomic oxygen, (2) photo excitation, (3) photoionization, (4) dissociative recombination, and (5) ion and neutral diffusion. NRL provided the experimental diagnostic instrument on the rocket which was a dual frequency radio beacon on the rocket to measure changes in total electron content. The AFRL provided ground based diagnostics of incoherent scatter radar and optical spectroscopy and imagery. The NRL Chemical Release Model (CRM) has over 600 excited states of atomic Samarium neutrals, atomic ions, along with Samarium Oxide Ions and electrons. Diffusive transport of neutrals in cylindrical geometry and ions along magnetic field lines is computed along with the reactive flow to predict the concentrations of Sm, Sm-Ion, Sm0, and SmO Ion. Comparison of the CRM with observations demonstrates that Sm release into the upper atmosphere initially produces enhanced electron densities and SmO-Ions. The diatomic ions recombine with electrons to yield neutral Sm and O. Only the photo ionization of Sm yields a stable atomic ion that does not substantially recombine. The MOSC releases in sunlight yielded long duration ion clouds that can be replicated with the CRM. The CRM predicts that Sm releases in darkness would not produce long duration plasma clouds because of the lack of photo excitation and photoionization.

  6. Rapid differentiation of refined fuels using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    An application of electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry for identification of various commercially refined fuels using the unique signature of polar components, was investigated. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry using negative electrospray on an Agilent Series 1100 liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer. These analysis were applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill which were taken from the subsurface and different extent of biodegradation or weathering. The technique provided rapid identification of hydrocarbons released into the environment because these polar compounds are unique in different fuels.

  7. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low p K a1 and p K a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (log P ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  8. The Effect of Salts on Electrospray Ionization of Amino Acids in the Negative Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. I.; Johnson, P. V.; Beegle, L. W.; Kanik, I.

    2004-01-01

    The continued search for organics on Mars will require the development of simplified procedures for handling and processing of soil or rock core samples prior to analysis by onboard instrumentation. Extraction of certain organic molecules such as amino acids from rock and soil samples using a liquid solvent (H2O) has been shown to be more efficient (by approximately an order of magnitude) than heat extraction methods. As such, liquid extraction (using H2O) of amino acid molecules from rock cores or regolith material is a prime candidate for the required processing. In this scenario, electrospray ionization (ESI) of the liquid extract would be a natural choice for ionization of the analyte prior to interrogation by one of a variety of potential analytical separation techniques (mass spectroscopy, ion mobility spectroscopy, etc.). Aside from the obvious compatibility of ESI and liquid samples, ESI offers simplicity and a soft ionization capability. In order to demonstrate that liquid extraction and ESI can work as part of an in situ instrument on Mars, we must better understand and quantify the effect salts have on the ESI process. In the current work, we have endeavored to investigate the feasibility and limitations of negative mode ESI of Martian surface samples in the context of sample salt content using ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS).

  9. Isolation and Chemical Characterization of Lipid A from Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jeremy C.; O'Brien, John P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major cell surface molecule of gram-negative bacteria, deposited on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane bilayer. LPS can be subdivided into three domains: the distal O-polysaccharide, a core oligosaccharide, and the lipid A domain consisting of a lipid A molecular species and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid residues (Kdo). The lipid A domain is the only component essential for bacterial cell survival. Following its synthesis, lipid A is chemically modified in response to environmental stresses such as pH or temperature, to promote resistance to antibiotic compounds, and to evade recognition by mediators of the host innate immune response. The following protocol details the small- and large-scale isolation of lipid A from gram-negative bacteria. Isolated material is then chemically characterized by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass-spectrometry (MS). In addition to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS, we also describe tandem MS protocols for analyzing lipid A molecular species using electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to collision induced dissociation (CID) and newly employed ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) methods. Our MS protocols allow for unequivocal determination of chemical structure, paramount to characterization of lipid A molecules that contain unique or novel chemical modifications. We also describe the radioisotopic labeling, and subsequent isolation, of lipid A from bacterial cells for analysis by TLC. Relative to MS-based protocols, TLC provides a more economical and rapid characterization method, but cannot be used to unambiguously assign lipid A chemical structures without the use of standards of known chemical structure. Over the last two decades isolation and characterization of lipid A has led to numerous exciting discoveries that have improved our understanding of the physiology of gram-negative bacteria, mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, the human innate

  10. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-05

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring.

  11. Formation of Metal-Adducted Analyte Ions by Flame-Induced Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Wang, Chin-Hsiung; Shiea, Jentaie

    2016-05-17

    A flame-induced atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) source, consisting of a miniflame, nebulizer, and heated tube, was developed to ionize analytes. The ionization was performed by reacting analytes with a charged species generated in a flame. A stainless steel needle deposited with saturated alkali chloride solution was introduced into the mini oxyacetylene flame to generate alkali ions, which were reacted with analytes (M) generated in a heated nebulizer. The alkali-adducted 18-crown-6 ether ions, including (M + Li)(+), (M + Na)(+), (M + K)(+), (M + Rb)(+), and (M + Cs)(+), were successfully detected on the FAPCI mass spectra when the corresponding alkali chloride solutions were separately introduced to the flame. When an alkali chloride mixture was introduced, all alkali-adducted analyte ions were simultaneously detected. Their intensity order was as follows: (M + Cs)(+) > (M + Rb)(+) > (M + K)(+) > (M + Na)(+) > (M + Li)(+), and this trend agreed with the lattice energies of alkali chlorides. Besides alkali ions, other transition metal ions such as Ni(+), Cu(+), and Ag(+) were generated in a flame for analyte ionization. Other than metal ions, the reactive species generated in the fossil fuel flame could also be used to ionize analytes, which formed protonated analyte ions (M + H)(+) in positive ion mode and deprotonated analyte ions (M - H)(-) in negative ion mode.

  12. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-06

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs.

  13. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  14. Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to deprotonate and thus chemically ionize the clusters. In this study, we compare cluster concentrations measured using either nitrate or acetate. Clusters were formed in a flow reactor from vapors of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine). These comparisons show that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with high base content. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe ion processes which include proton-transfer, ion-molecule clustering, and decomposition of ions. Ion decomposition upon deprotonation by acetate/nitrate was observed. More studies are needed to quantify to what extent ion decomposition affects observed cluster content and concentrations, especially those chemically ionized with acetate since it deprotonates more types of clusters than nitrate.Model calculations of the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways are also presented to better identify the cluster types that are not efficiently deprotonated by nitrate. Comparison of model and measured clusters indicate that sulfuric acid dimers with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimers with two or more base molecules are not efficiently chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that acetate CI provides better information on cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  15. Symmetry Switching of Negative Thermal Expansion by Chemical Control.

    PubMed

    Senn, Mark S; Murray, Claire A; Luo, Xuan; Wang, Lihai; Huang, Fei-Ting; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Bombardi, Alessandro; Ablitt, Chris; Mostofi, Arash A; Bristowe, Nicholas C

    2016-05-04

    The layered perovskite Ca3-xSrxMn2O7 is shown to exhibit a switching from a material exhibiting uniaxial negative to positive thermal expansion as a function of x. The switching is shown to be related to two closely competing phases with different symmetries. The negative thermal expansion (NTE) effect is maximized when the solid solution is tuned closest to this region of phase space but is switched off suddenly on passing though the transition. Our results show for the first time that, by understanding the symmetry of the competing phases alone, one may achieve unprecedented chemical control of this unusual property.

  16. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND X-RAY IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization; here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find that photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N{sub 2}H{sup +}, indicating that it is safe to adopt existing approximations of the X-ray ionization rate in typical T Tauri star-disk systems. The recalculation of the photorates increases the abundances of neutral molecules in the outer disk, highlighting the importance of taking into account the shape of the UV spectrum in protoplanetary disks. A recalculation of the photoreaction rates also affects the gas-phase chemistry due to the adjustment of the H/H{sub 2} and C{sup +}/C ratios. The disk ionization fraction is not significantly affected by the methods adopted to calculate the photochemistry and X-ray ionization. We determine that there is a probable 'dead zone' where accretion is suppressed, present in a layer, Z/R {approx}< 0.1-0.2, in the disk midplane, within R Almost-Equal-To 200 AU.

  17. CHLORIDEDETERMINATION IN HIGH IONIC STRENGTH SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM ACETATE USING NEGATIVE ION ELECTRON SPRAY IONIZATION (HPLC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A precise ion chromatography method has been developed for the determination of chloride in high ionic strength ammonium acetate solutions (10-5 M-5 M) using sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate as eluent. Negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was used for q...

  18. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Molecular ionization is owed much of its development from the early implementation of electron ionization (EI). Although dramatically increasing the library of compounds discovered, an inherent problem with EI was the low abundance of molecular ions detected due to high fragmentation leading to the difficult task of the correct chemical identification after mass spectrometry (MS). These problems stimulated the research into new ionization methods which sought to "soften" the ionization process. In the late 1980s the advancements of ionization techniques was thought to have reached its pinnacle with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Both ionization techniques allowed for "soft" ionization of large molecular weight and/or labile compounds for intact characterization by MS. Albeit pervasive, neither ESI nor MALDI can be viewed as "magic bullet" ionization techniques. Both techniques require sample preparation which often included native sample destruction, and operation of these techniques took place in sealed enclosures and often, reduced pressure conditions. New open-air ionization techniques termed "ambient MS" enable direct analysis of samples of various physical states, sizes and shapes. One particular technique named Direct Analysis In Real Time (DART) has been steadily growing as one of the ambient tools of choice to ionize small molecular weight (< 1000 Da) molecules with a wide range of polarities. Although there is a large list of reported applications using DART as an ionization source, there have not been many studies investigating the fundamental properties of DART desorption and ionization mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis is aimed to provide in depth findings on the physicochemical phenomena during open-air DART desorption and ionization MS and current application developments. A review of recent ambient plasma-based desorption/ionization techniques for analytical MS is presented in

  19. [Development of a membrane inlet-single photon ionization/chemical ionization-mass spectrometer for online analysis of VOCs in water].

    PubMed

    Hua, Lei; Wu, Qing-Hao; Hou, Ke-Yong; Cui, Hua-Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yang

    2011-12-01

    A home-made membrane inlet- single photon ionization/chemical ionization- time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been described. A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with photon energy of 10.6 eV was used as the light source for single photon ionization (SPI). Chemical ionization (CI) was achieved through ion-molecule reactions with O2- reactant ions generated by photoelectron ionization. The two ionization modes could be rapidly switched by adjusting electric field in the ionization region within 2 s. Membrane inlet system used for rapid enrichment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water was constructed by using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane with a thickness of 50 microm. A purge gas was added to accelerate desorption of analytes from the membrane surface. The purge gas could also help to prevent the pump oil back-streaming into the ionization region from the analyzer chamber and improve the signal to noise ratio (S/N). Achieved detection limits were 2 microg x L(-1) for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in SPI mode and 1 microg x L(-1) for chloroform in SPI-CI mode within 10 s analysis time, respectively. The instrument has been successfully applied to the rapid analysis of MTBE in simulated underground water nearby petrol station and VOCs in disinfected drinking water. The results indicate that the instrument has a great application prospect for online analysis of VOCs in water.

  20. Characterization of Nitrogen-Containing Species in Coal and Petroleum-Derived Products by Ammonia Chemical Ionization-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Veloski, Garret A.; Lynn, Ronald J.; Sprecher, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A coal-derived light distillate and a petroleum-derived residuum have been studied by high resolution mass spectrometry using both low-pressure ammonia chemical ionization and low-voltage electron impact ionization. A mass calibration mixture for use with ammonia chemical ionization has been developed. Selective ionization of the basic nitrogen-containing compounds by ammonia chemical ionization and compound type characterization of the resulting quasi-molecular species has been demonstrated. Several homologous series of nitrogen-containing compounds were identified in a basic extract by electron impact ionization and compared with quasimolecular analogs identified by ammonia chemical ionization.

  1. Fragmentation of Allylmethylsulfide by Chemical Ionization: Dependence on Humidity and Inhibiting Role of Water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a previously unknown reaction mechanism involving water in the fragmentation reaction following chemical ionization. This result stems from a study presented here on the humidity-dependent and energy-dependent endoergic fragmentation of allyl methyl sulfide (AMS) upon protonation in a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). The fragmentation pathways were studied with experimental (PTR-MS) and quantum chemical methods (polarizable continuum model (PCM), microhydration, studied at the MP2/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory). We report in detail on the energy profiles, reaction mechanisms, and proton affinities (G4MP2 calculations). In the discovered reaction mechanism, water reduces the fragmentation of protonated species in chemical ionization. It does so by direct interaction with the protonated species via covalent binding (C3H5+) or via association (AMS·H+). This stabilizes intermediate complexes and thus overall increases the activation energy for fragmentation. Water thereby acts as a reusable inhibitor (anticatalyst) in chemical ionization. Moreover, according to the quantum chemical (QC) results, when water is present in abundance it has the opposite effect and enhances fragmentation. The underlying reason is a concentration-dependent change in the reaction principle from active inhibition of fragmentation to solvation, which then enhances fragmentation. This amphoteric behavior of water is found for the fragmentation of C3H5+ to C3H3+, and similarly for the fragmentation of AMS·H+ to C3H5+. The results support humidity-dependent quantification efforts for PTR-MS and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Moreover, the results should allow for a better understanding of ion-chemistry in the presence of water. PMID:23682687

  2. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  4. Precursor ion scan profiles of acylcarnitines by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Apolito, Oceania; Corso, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The fatty acyl esters of L-carnitine (acylcarnitines) are useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of some inborn errors of metabolism analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In this study the acylcarnitines were analyzed by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer (APTDCI-MS/MS). The method is based on the precursor ion scan mode determination of underivatized acylcarnitines desorbed from samples by a hot desolvation gas flow and ionized by a corona pin discharge. During desorption/ionization step the temperature induces the degradation of acylcarnitines; nevertheless, the common fragment to all acylcarnitines [MH-59](+) is useful for analyzing their profile. APTDCI parameters, including angle of collection and incidence, gas flows and temperatures, were optimized for acylcarnitines. The experiments were performed drying 2 microL of an equimolar mixture of acylcarnitine standards on a glass slide. The specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and the precursor ion spectra of 85 m/z of acylcarnitines obtained by the APTDCI method and by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). The method was also employed to analyze acylcarnitines extracted from a pathological dried blood spot and a control. The method enables analysis of biological samples and recognition of some acylcarnitines that are diagnostic markers of inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of the ambient desorption ionization methods offers a new opportunity either for its potential application in clinical chemistry and for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  5. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As+) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH+) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As+ through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As+ signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH+ signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As+.

  7. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Michelle J.; Zoerb, Matthew C.; Campbell, Nicole R.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e., DMS, β-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, α-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt−1) to DMS, isoprene, and α-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a much weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion–molecule reactions likely proceed through a combination of ligand-switching and directmore » charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (< 25 %) was observed for the detection of β-caryophyllene, a bicyclic sesquiterpene. The in-field stability of benzene cluster cations using CI-ToFMS was examined in the marine boundary layer during the High Wind Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS). The use of benzene cluster cation chemistry for the selective detection of DMS was validated against an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer, where measurements from the two instruments were highly correlated (R2 > 0.95, 10 s averages) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  8. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-02

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision.

  9. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometer for the in situ measurement of methyl hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    St Clair, Jason M.; McCabe, David C.; Crounse, John D.; Steiner, Urs; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2010-09-15

    A new approach for measuring gas-phase methyl hydrogen peroxide [(MHP) CH{sub 3}OOH] utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry is presented. Tandem mass spectrometry is used to avoid mass interferences that hindered previous attempts to measure atmospheric CH{sub 3}OOH with CF{sub 3}O{sup -} clustering chemistry. CH{sub 3}OOH has been successfully measured in situ using this technique during both airborne and ground-based campaigns. The accuracy and precision for the MHP measurement are a function of water vapor mixing ratio. Typical precision at 500 pptv MHP and 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is {+-}80 pptv (2 sigma) for a 1 s integration period. The accuracy at 100 ppmv H{sub 2}O is estimated to be better than {+-}40%. Chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry shows considerable promise for the determination of in situ atmospheric trace gas mixing ratios where isobaric compounds or mass interferences impede accurate measurements.

  10. Chemical reactivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Enjalbal; Sauvagnat; Lamaty; Lazaro; Martinez; Mouchet; Roux; Aubagnac

    1999-01-01

    During the control of a multistep organic synthesis on a soluble polymer (PEG) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry, a chemical reactivity was encountered when the matrix was acidic, for the samples where the amino moiety of the anchored compounds was protected as a Schiff base. Such imine hydrolysis was proven to be solely mediated by the acidic matrix during analyses since the expected protected structures were detected when the experiments were duplicated with a non-acidic matrix. Even if MALDI mass spectrometry was found to be more convenient than electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the monitoring of liquid phase organic syntheses, the chemical reactivity imparted by the use of a matrix must be taken into account to avoid erroneous spectra interpretations. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The Level of Ionization and Chemical Composition of QSO BAL Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopko, M., Jr.; Turnshek, D. A.; Espey, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    We present results from our attempts to understand the level of ionization and chemical composition of the Broad Absorption Line (BAL) regions of QSOs. We discuss three aspects of the work: 1) We consider methods used to derive BAL region column densities as a function of outflow velocity from BAL profiles, discussing the problems associated with making assumptions about BAL region cloud sizes, covering factors, and internal kinematics (thermal versus turbulent velocities). 2) We apply these methods to a study of the ionization and chemical composition of QSO BAL regions using Ferland's photoionization code CLOUDY. 3) We present results for several BAL QSOs in our study, taking advantage of the presence of absorption from different ions of the same element to derive photoionization parameters. This allows us to derive more stringent constraints than has been possible in the past.

  12. Chemical Properties of Dipole-Bound Negative Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.

    2005-05-01

    In dipole bound negative ions the extra electron is weakly bound by the dipole potential of the neutral molecule in a diffuse orbital localized near the positive end of the dipole. In consequence, it is reasonable to expect that such species will be highly reactive and possess chemical properties similar to those of Rydberg atoms, which also contain a weakly-bound electron in a diffuse orbital. These properties are being examined using a negative ion Penning trap. Data for electron transfer in collisions with attaching targets such as SF6 show that the rate constants for this process are large, ˜ 10-7 cm^3 s-1, and similar to those for free electron attachment. This suggests that collisions can be described in terms of an essentially-free electron model. This is further reinforced by the observation that rotational energy transfer in collisions with polar molecules can lead to rapid electron detachment, again with large rate constants of ˜ 10 -7 cm^3 s-1. Results for several target species will be presented and discussed in light of a free electron model.

  13. Plasma-chemical simulation of negative corona near the inception voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontiga, Francisco; Duran-Olivencia, Francisco J.; Castellanos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    The spatiotemporal development of Trichel pulses in oxygen between a spherical electrode and a grounded plane has been simulated using a fluid approximation that incorporates the plasma chemistry of the electrical discharge. Elementary plasma processes, such as ionization, electron attachment, electron detachment, recombination between ions and chemical reactions between neutral species, are all included in a chemical model consisting of 55 reactions between 8 different species (electrons, O2+,O2-,O3-,O-, O2, O, O3). Secondary emission at the cathode by the impact of positive ions and photons is also considered. The spatial distribution of species is computed in three dimensions (2D-axysimmetrical) by solving Poisson's equation for the electric field and the continuity equations for the species, with the inclusion of the chemical gain/loss rate due to the particle interaction. The results of the simulation reveal the interplay between the different negative ions during the development of every Trichel pulse, and the rate of production of atomic oxygen and ozone by the corona discharge. This work was supported by the Consejeria de Innovacion, Ciencia y Empresa (Junta de Andalucia) and by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, Spain, within the European Regional Development Fund contracts FQM-4983 and FIS2011-25161.

  14. Dependences of Ratio of the Luminosity to Ionization on Velocity and Chemical Composition of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narziev, M.

    2011-01-01

    On the bases of results simultaneous photographic and radio echo observations, the results complex radar and television observations of meteors and also results of laboratory modeling of processes of a luminescence and ionization, correlation between of luminous intensity Ip to linear electronic density q from of velocities and chemical structure are investigated. It is received that by increasing value of velocities of meteors and decrease of nuclear weight of substance of particles, lg Ip/q decreased more than one order.

  15. Radioimmunoassay and chemical ionization/mass spectrometry compared for plasma cortisol determination

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, C.; Johnson, S.; Hedner, P.; Gustafsson, A.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for determination of cortisol in plasma and urine, based on chemical ionization/mass spectrometry with deuterium-labeled cortisol as the internal standard. The within-run precision (CV) was 2.5-5.7%, the between-run precision 4.6%. Results by this method were compared with those by a radioimmunological method (RIANEN Cortisol, New England Nuclear) for 395 plasma samples. The latter method gave significantly higher (approx. 25%) cortisol values.

  16. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Thornberg, Steven Michael

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  17. Quantitative analysis of berberine in urine samples by chemical ionization mass fragmentography.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, H; Shirai, E; Ishibashi, M; Niizima, K

    1978-05-11

    A highly specific and sensitive method has been developed for the quantitative determination of berberine in human urine. In order to carry out the microdetermination of berberine by chemical ionization mass fragmentography, berberine was reduced with sodium borohydride in methanol to tetrahydroberberine and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Berberine concentrations as low as 1 ng/ml urine can be measured by this method, with [2H3]berberine chloride as an internal standard.

  18. Ionization mechanisms in CRRES chemical releases 1. In situ measurements and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Wolf, P. J.; Shadid, T. M.

    1998-01-01

    The quadrupole ion mass spectrometer (QIMS) measured fluxes of barium and strontium ions during the CRRES G-1 chemical release in full Sun and the G-11b release in darkness. The barium ion fluxes detected in darkness were only a factor of 10 lower than the photoionization fluxes, indicating that the rate of nonsolar-UV ionization was at least a factor of 8 higher than literature values of charge transfer and collisional ionization cross sections would suggest. Model calculations of the QIMS ion fluxes using new, state-specific, calculations of the cross sections for ion-pair formation and charge transfer [Wolf and Hunton, this issue] demonstrate that the large nonphotoionization rates are consistent with significant metastable excitation in the neutral cloud but not with a ground state population. Upper limits to the collisional ionization rates for the conditions of the releases are 4.3×10-3s-1 for ion-pair production and 2.2×10-3s-1 for charge transfer. Collisions of high-energy electrons with the neutrals early in the cloud expansion is suggested as a mechanism for producing the metastable metal atoms. A similar analysis of the strontium data indicates that photoionization, charge transfer, and collisional ion-pair production alone cannot explain the large fluxes of strontium ions detected in the sunlit release. Associative ionization may therefore be an important ionization mechanism for that metal in sunlight. The implications of these results for analysis of space critical ionization velocity experiments are discussed.

  19. Laser-induced acoustic desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Owen, Benjamin C; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M; Madden, Jeremy T; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  20. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  1. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  3. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-05

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources.

  4. Negative Differential Resistance of CaF 2/CdF 2 Triple-Barrier Resonant-Tunneling Diode on Si(111) Grown by Partially Ionized Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Aoki, Yuichi; Saito, Wataru; Tsuganezawa, Mika

    1999-02-01

    Room-temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) of triple-barrier cadmium di-fluoride (CdF2)/calcium di-fluoride (CaF2) heterostructure resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) on a Si(111) substrate has been demonstrated. CdF2/CaF2 multilayered heterostructures were grown on a Si(111) substrate using partially ionized beam epitaxy to obtain atomically flat interfaces. The RTD structures, which consist of triple CaF2 energy barriers and double CdF2 quantum wells, were fabricated by electron beam (EB) lithography and dry etching to avoid thermal and chemical damage to the CdF2 layers. In the current-voltage characteristics of the RTD, NDR was clearly observed even at room temperature and the maximum peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio was about 6.

  5. Clustering, methodology, and mechanistic insights into acetate chemical ionization using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, Patrick; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cluster control and transmission through the Tofwerk atmospheric pressure interface installed on various chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometers using authentic standards. This characterization of the atmospheric pressure interface allows for a detailed investigation of the acetate chemical ionization mechanisms and the impact of controlling these mechanisms on sensitivity, selectivity, and mass spectral ambiguity with the aim of non-targeted analysis. Chemical ionization with acetate reagent ions is controlled by a distribution of reagent ion-neutral clusters that vary with relative humidity and the concentration of the acetic anhydride precursor. Deprotonated carboxylic acids are primarily detected only if sufficient declustering is employed inside the atmospheric pressure interface. The configuration of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) using an acetate chemical ionization source for non-targeted analysis is discussed. Recent approaches and studies characterizing acetate chemical ionization as it applies to the HR-TOF-CIMS are evaluated in light of the work presented herein.

  6. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds in fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) using liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parejo, Irene; Jauregui, Olga; Sánchez-Rabaneda, Ferran; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles

    2004-06-16

    Liquid chromatography (LC) diode array detection (DAD) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used for the rapid and sensitive identification of water-soluble phenolic compounds in fennel waste. The plant material was first extracted and then chromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 to afford seven fractions, each of them being subjected to LC-MS analysis. Identification of the compounds was carried out by interpretation of UV, MS, and MS/MS spectra. Forty-two phenolic substances were identified, 27 of which had not previously been reported in fennel, including hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoid glycosides, and flavonoid aglycons.

  7. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  8. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, JN

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  9. Model study of modern oil-based paint media by triacylglycerol profiling in positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Degano, Ilaria; La Nasa, Jacopo; Ghelardi, Elisa; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-12-01

    Lipid binders have traditionally been determined in paintings by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify the characteristic profiles and ratios of fatty acids . However, the presence of mixtures in contemporary and modern oil paints makes the GC/MS determination of fatty acids insufficient to fully characterize the lipid binding media. In this study we prove that triacylglycerol (TAG) profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, using ESI in positive and negative ionization modes is highly effective. We exploited this analytical approach to study the curing and degradation processes undergone by six plant oils used in the formulation of media in modern paints, using both natural and artificial ageing experiments. We believe that is the first time that a negative ionization mode has been applied for this purpose and that a survey with HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF has been carried out to study the ageing kinetics of plant oils. TAG profiling enabled us to study the evolution over time of the constituents of modern oils, with respect to curing and ageing. The data analyzed in this study demonstrate that our approach is efficient to study the oxidation of TAGs during ageing. The data also improve current knowledge on the properties of vegetable oils, which could lead to the development of new paint materials and conservation treatments for modern and contemporary works of art.

  10. Negative ionization of the secondary ions of silver and gold sputtered from their elemental surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindona, A.; Riccardi, P.; Maletta, S.; Rudi, S. A.; Falcone, G.

    2007-03-01

    Calculations of the ionization probabilities of Ag- and Au- particles, ejected during sputtering of clean Ag(1 0 0) and Au(1 0 0) surfaces, respectively, are reported. An effective one-electron theory is used to describe: the plane metal surface, with a projected band gap, the secondary emitted atom, whose charge state is investigated, and its nearest-neighbor substrate atom, put in motion by the collision cascade generated by the primary ion beam. Suitable rectilinear trajectories are selected to describe the motion of these two atoms outside the solid. A good agreement is found with van Der Heide's experiments (P.A.W. van Der Heide, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 157 (1999) 126).

  11. Differentiation of commercial fuels based on polar components using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    Polar components in fuels may enable differentiation between fuel types or commercial fuel sources. A range of commercial fuels from numerous sources were analyzed by flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry without extensive sample preparation, separation, or chromatography. This technique enabled screening for unique polar components at parts per million levels in commercial hydrocarbon products, including a range of products from a variety of commercial sources and locations. Because these polar compounds are unique in different fuels, their presence may provide source information on hydrocarbons released into the environment. This analysis was then applied to mixtures of various products, as might be found in accidental releases into the environment. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  13. Influence of soil pH on the sorption of ionizable chemicals: modeling advances.

    PubMed

    Franco, Antonio; Fu, Wenjing; Trapp, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The soil-water distribution coefficient of ionizable chemicals (K(d)) depends on the soil acidity, mainly because the pH governs speciation. Using pH-specific K(d) values normalized to organic carbon (K(OC)) from the literature, a method was developed to estimate the K(OC) of monovalent organic acids and bases. The regression considers pH-dependent speciation and species-specific partition coefficients, calculated from the dissociation constant (pK(a)) and the octanol-water partition coefficient of the neutral molecule (log P(n)). Probably because of the lower pH near the organic colloid-water interface, the optimal pH to model dissociation was lower than the bulk soil pH. The knowledge of the soil pH allows calculation of the fractions of neutral and ionic molecules in the system, thus improving the existing regression for acids. The same approach was not successful with bases, for which the impact of pH on the total sorption is contrasting. In fact, the shortcomings of the model assumptions affect the predictive power for acids and for bases differently. We evaluated accuracy and limitations of the regressions for their use in the environmental fate assessment of ionizable chemicals.

  14. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  15. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions.

  16. Surface-activated chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry in the analysis of amphetamines in diluted urine samples.

    PubMed

    Cristoni, Simone; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Gerthoux, Piermario; Gonella, Elisabetta; Mocarelli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    A new ionization method, named surface-activated chemical ionization (SACI), was employed for the analysis of five amphetamines (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDE), amphetamine and methamphetamine) by ion trap mass spectrometry. The results so obtained have been compared with those achieved by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) using the same instrument, clearly showing that SACI is the most sensitive of the three. The limit of detection and linearity range for SACI were compared with those obtained using APCI and ESI, showing that the new SACI approach provides the best results for both criteria. SACI was used to analyze MDA, MDMA MDE, amphetamine and methamphetamine in four urine samples, and the quantitation results are compared with those achieved using ESI.

  17. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  18. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M.; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  19. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rondo, L; Ehrhart, S; Kürten, A; Adamov, A; Bianchi, F; Breitenlechner, M; Duplissy, J; Franchin, A; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Dunne, E M; Flagan, R C; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Keskinen, H; Kim, J; Jokinen, T; Lehtipalo, K; Leiminger, M; Praplan, A; Riccobono, F; Rissanen, M P; Sarnela, N; Schobesberger, S; Simon, M; Sipilä, M; Smith, J N; Tomé, A; Tröstl, J; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Vaattovaara, P; Winkler, P M; Williamson, C; Wimmer, D; Baltensperger, U; Kirkby, J; Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Worsnop, D R; Curtius, J

    2016-03-27

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  20. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  1. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    PubMed

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  2. Stability studies of propoxur herbicide in environmental water samples by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Lee, Hian Kee

    2003-10-03

    Liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry has been investigated for the analysis of polar pesticides in water. The degradation behavior of propoxur, selected as a model pesticide belonging to the N-methylcarbamate group, in various aqueous matrices (Milli-Q water, drinking water, rain water, seawater and river water) was investigated. Two interfaces of atmospheric pressure ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI), were compared during the study. Propoxur and its transformation product (N-methylformamide) were best ionized as positive ions with both APCI and ESI, while another transformation product (2-isopropoxyphenol) yielded stronger signals as negative ions only with APCI. In addition, the effects of various pH, matrix type and irradiation sources (sunlight, darkness, indoor lighting and artificial UV lamp) on the chemical degradation (hydrolysis) were also assessed. From the kinetic studies of degradation, it was found that the half-life of propoxur was reduced from 327 to 161 h in Milli-Q water with variation of irradiation conditions from dark to sunlight exposure. Degradation rates largely increased with increasing pH. The half-life of the target compound dissolved in Milli-Q water under darkness decreased from 407 to 3 h when the pH of Milli-Q water was increased from 5 to 8.5. These suggest that hydrolysis of propoxur is light-intensity and pH-dependent. In order to mimic contaminated natural environmental waters, propoxur was spiked into real water samples at 30 microg/l. The degradation of propoxur in such water samples under various conditions were studied in detail and compared. With the ion trap run in a time-scheduled single ion monitoring mode, typical limits of detection of the instrument were in the range of 1-10 microg/l.

  3. Desorption chemical ionization and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric studies of the glucuronide metabolites of doxylamine.

    PubMed

    Lay, J O; Korfmacher, W A; Miller, D W; Siitonen, P; Holder, C L; Gosnell, A B

    1986-11-01

    Three glucuronide metabolites of doxylamine succinate were collected in a single fraction using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) from the urine of dosed male Fischer 344 rats. The metabolites were then separated using an additional HPLC step into fractions containing predominantly a single glucuronide metabolite. Analysis of the metabolites by methane and ammonia desorption chemical ionization, with and without derivatization, revealed fragment ions suggestive of a hydroxylated doxylamine moiety. Identification of the metabolites as glucuronides of doxylamine, desmethyldoxylamine and didesmethyldoxylamine was accomplished, based on determination of the molecular weight and exact mass of each metabolite using fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization. This assignment was confirmed by the fragmentation observed in FAB mass spectrometric and tandem mass spectrometric experiments. Para-substitution of the glucuronide on the phenyl moiety was observed by 500-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. A fraction containing all three glucuronide metabolites, after a single stage of HPLC separation, was also analysed by FAB mass spectrometry, and the proton- and potassium-containing quasimolecular ions for all three metabolites were observed.

  4. From consumption to harvest: Environmental fate prediction of excreted ionizable trace organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Fabio; Plósz, Benedek Gy; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Excreted trace organic chemicals, e.g., pharmaceuticals and biocides, typically undergo incomplete elimination in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and are released to surface water via treated effluents and to agricultural soils through sludge amendment and/or irrigation with freshwater or reclaimed wastewater. Recent research has shown the tendency for these substances to accumulate in food crops. In this study, we developed and applied a simulation tool to predict the fate of three ionizable trace chemicals (triclosan-TCS, furosemide-FUR, ciprofloxacin-CIP) from human consumption/excretion up to the accumulation in soil and plant, following field amendment with sewage sludge or irrigation with river water (assuming dilution of WWTP effluent). The simulation tool combines the SimpleTreat model modified for fate prediction of ionizable chemicals in a generic WWTP and a recently developed dynamic soil-plant uptake model. The simulation tool was tested using country-specific (e.g., consumption/emission rates, precipitation and temperature) input data. A Monte Carlo-based approach was adopted to account for the uncertainty associated to physico-chemical and biokinetic model parameters. Results obtained in this study suggest significant accumulation of TCS and CIP in sewage sludge (1.4-2.8 mg kgDW(-1)) as compared to FUR (0.02-0.11 mg kgDW(-1)). For the latter substance, more than half of the influent load (60.1%-72.5%) was estimated to be discharged via WWTP effluent. Specific emission rates (g ha(-1) a(-1)) of FUR to soil via either sludge application or irrigation were up to 300 times lower than for TCS and CIP. Nevertheless, high translocation potential to wheat was predicted for FUR, reaching concentrations up to 4.3 μg kgDW(-1) in grain. Irrigation was found to enhance the relative translocation of FUR to plant (45.3%-48.9% of emission to soil), as compared to sludge application (21.9%-27.6%). A comparison with peer-reviewed literature showed

  5. Positive and negative-mode laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) for the detection of indigoids in archaeological purple.

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2013-03-01

    Laser-based ionization techniques have demonstrated to be a valuable analytical tool to study organic pigments by mass spectrometric analyses. Though laser-based ionization techniques have identified several natural and synthetic organic dyes and pigments, they have never been used in the characterization of purple. In this work, positive and negative-mode laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) was used for the first time to detect indigoids in shellfish purple. The method was used to study organic residues collected from archaeological ceramic fragments that were known to contain purple, as determined by a classical high-performance liquid chromatography-based procedure. LDI-MS provides a mass spectral fingerprint of shellfish purple, and it was found to be a rapid and successful tool for the identification of purple. In addition, a comparison between positive and negative mode ionization highlighted the complementarity of the two ionization modes. On the one hand, the negative-ion mode LDI-MS showed a better selectivity and sensitivity to brominated molecules, such as 6,6'-dibromoindigo, 6-monobromoindigo, 6,6'-dibromoindirubin, 6- and 6'-monobromoindirubin, thanks to their electronegativity, and produced simpler mass spectra. On the other hand, negative-ion mode LDI-MS was found to have a lower sensitivity to non-brominated compounds, such as indigo and indirubin, whose presence can be established in any case by collecting the complementary positive-ion LDI mass spectrum.

  6. Cluster chemical ionization for improved confidence level in sample identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2003-01-01

    Upon the supersonic expansion of helium mixed with vapor from an organic solvent (e.g. methanol), various clusters of the solvent with the sample molecules can be formed. As a result of 70 eV electron ionization of these clusters, cluster chemical ionization (cluster CI) mass spectra are obtained. These spectra are characterized by the combination of EI mass spectra of vibrationally cold molecules in the supersonic molecular beam (cold EI) with CI-like appearance of abundant protonated molecules, together with satellite peaks corresponding to protonated or non-protonated clusters of sample compounds with 1-3 solvent molecules. Like CI, cluster CI preferably occurs for polar compounds with high proton affinity. However, in contrast to conventional CI, for non-polar compounds or those with reduced proton affinity the cluster CI mass spectrum converges to that of cold EI. The appearance of a protonated molecule and its solvent cluster peaks, plus the lack of protonation and cluster satellites for prominent EI fragments, enable the unambiguous identification of the molecular ion. In turn, the insertion of the proper molecular ion into the NIST library search of the cold EI mass spectra eliminates those candidates with incorrect molecular mass and thus significantly increases the confidence level in sample identification. Furthermore, molecular mass identification is of prime importance for the analysis of unknown compounds that are absent in the library. Examples are given with emphasis on the cluster CI analysis of carbamate pesticides, high explosives and unknown samples, to demonstrate the usefulness of Supersonic GC/MS (GC/MS with supersonic molecular beam) in the analysis of these thermally labile compounds. Cluster CI is shown to be a practical ionization method, due to its ease-of-use and fast instrumental conversion between EI and cluster CI, which involves the opening of only one valve located at the make-up gas path. The ease-of-use of cluster CI is analogous

  7. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, C.D.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  8. A study to control chemical reactions using Si:2p core ionization: site-specific fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Prümper, Georg; Takemoto, Mai; Takahashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiro; Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Isao H; Harries, James R; Tamenori, Yusuke; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2011-08-18

    In an aim to create a "sharp" molecular knife, we have studied site-specific fragmentation caused by Si:2p core photoionization of bridged trihalosilyltrimethylsilyl molecules in the vapor phase. Highly site-specific bond dissociation has been found to occur around the core-ionized Si site in some of the molecules studied. The site specificity in fragmentation and the 2p binding energy difference between the two Si sites depend in similar ways on the intersite bridge and the electronegativities of the included halogen atoms. The present experimental and computational results show that for efficient "cutting" the following conditions for the two atomic sites to be separated by the knife should be satisfied. First, the sites should be located far from each other and connected by a chain of saturated bonds so that intersite electron migration can be reduced. Second, the chemical environments of the atomic sites should be as different as possible.

  9. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  10. Determination of ibogaine in plasma by gas chromatography--chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ley, F R; Jeffcoat, A R; Thomas, B F

    1996-02-02

    Ibogaine is naturally occurring indole alkaloid that is currently being considered as a treatment medication for drug dependence. Although there have been a variety of investigations regarding the mechanisms of action and pharmacology of ibogaine, relatively little has been reported regarding quantitative methods. Because of the paucity of analytical methodologies, studies involving the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of ibogaine have also been limited. A method is described for the determination of ibogaine levels in plasma by gas chromatography -- methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry. [13C2H3]Ibogaine was synthesized and used as an internal standard to control for recovery during sample preparation. The assay requires one ml of plasma and is shown to be a selective and sensitive means of ibogaine quantitation.

  11. HPLC/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectroscopy of eight regulated sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Combs, M T; Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Taylor, L T

    1999-03-01

    Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, HPLC,APCI-MS, has been applied to a mixture of eight sulfonamides. In full scan mode, extracted ion chromatograms produced minimum detectable quantities (MDQ) of 0.8 ng on column, for six of the eight regulated sulfonamides investigated. Selected ion monitoring yielded a 50 pg MDQ for sulfamerazine, sulfadiazine and sulfamethazine, while, the other compounds presented higher values. Analysis of supercritical fluid extracts of chicken liver containing sulfadimethoxine were found to be easily detected by HPLC/APCI-MS. In extracts of chicken liver spiked with 25 microg/kg(-1) (25 ppb) of sulfadimethoxine this compound could be detected in selected ion mode, while 100 pg/microl(-1) was detectable in either full scan or single ion modes. The analysis method for extracted sulfadimethoxine also demonstrated good linearity and reproducibility in both single ion and scan mode.

  12. Water chemical ionization mass spectrometry of aldehydes, ketones esters, and carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.

    1986-11-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI) of aliphatic and aromatic carbonyl compounds using water as the reagent gas provides intense pseudomolecular ions and class-specific fragmentation patterns that can be used to identify aliphatic aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters. The length of ester acyl and alkyl groups can easily be determined on the basis of loss of alcohols from the protonated parent. Water CI provides for an approximately 200:1 selectivity of carbonyl species over alkanes. No reagent ions are detected above 55 amu, allowing species as small as acetone, propanal, acetic acid, and methyl formate to be identified. When deuterate water was used as the reagent, only the carboxylic acids and ..beta..-diketones showed significant H/D exchange. The use of water CI to identify carbonyl compounds in a wastewater from the supercritical water extraction of lignite coal, in lemon oil, and in whiskey volatiles is discussed.

  13. Network structural analysis using directed graph for chemical reaction analysis in weakly-ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobuto, Kyosuke; Mizui, Yasutaka; Miyagi, Shigeyuki; Sakai, Osamu; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2016-09-01

    We visualize complicated chemical reaction systems in weakly-ionized plasmas by analysing network structure for chemical processes, and calculate some indexes by assuming interspecies relationships to be a network to clarify them. With the current social evolution, the mean size of general data which we can use in computers grows huge, and significance of the data analysis increases. The methods of the network analysis which we focus on in this study do not depend on a specific analysis target, but the field where it has been already applied is still limited. In this study, we analyse chemical reaction systems in plasmas for configuring the network structure. We visualize them by expressing a reaction system in a specific plasma by a directed graph and examine the indexes and the relations with the characteristic of the species in the reaction system. For example, in the methane plasma network, the centrality index reveals importance of CH3 in an influential position of species in the reaction. In addition, silane and atmospheric pressure plasmas can be also visualized in reaction networks, suggesting other characteristics in the centrality indexes.

  14. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions.

  15. Typing of blood-group antigens on neutral oligosaccharides by negative-ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Shuang; Tao, Guanjun; Zhang, Yibing; Mulloy, Barbara; Zhan, Xiaobei; Chai, Wengang

    2013-06-18

    Blood-group antigens, such as those containing fucose and bearing the ABO(H)- and Lewis-type determinants expressed on the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids, and also on unconjugated free oligosaccharides in human milk and other secretions, are associated with various biological functions. We have previously shown the utility of negative-ion electrospay ionization tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation (ESI-CID-MS/MS) for typing of Lewis (Le) determinants, for example, Le(a), Le(x), Le(b), and Le(y) on neutral and sialylated oligosaccharide chains. In the present report, we extended the strategy to characterization of blood-group A-, B-, and H-determinants on type 1 and type 2 and also on type 4 globoside chains to provide a high sensitivity method for typing of all the major blood-group antigens, including the A, B, H, Le(a), Le(x), Le(b), and Le(y) determinants, present in oligosaccharides. Using the principles established, we identified two minor unknown oligosaccharide components present in the products of enzymatic synthesis by bacterial fermentation. We also demonstrated that the unique fragmentations derived from the D- and (0,2)A-type cleavages observed in ESI-CID-MS/MS, which are important for assigning blood-group and chain types, only occur under the negative-ion conditions for reducing sugars but not for reduced alditols or under positive-ion conditions.

  16. [Development of a chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical].

    PubMed

    Dou, Jian; Hua, Lei; Hou, Ke-Yong; Jiang, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Wei-Guo; Di, Tian; Li, Hai-Yang

    2014-05-01

    A home-made chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) has been developed for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical. Based on the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization technique, an ionization source with orthogonal dual tube structure was adopted in the instrument, which minimized the interference between the reagent gas ionization and the titration reaction. A 63Ni radioactive source was fixed inside one of the orthogonal tubes to generate reactant ion of NO(-)(3) from HNO3 vapor. Hydroxyl radical was first titrated by excess SO2 to form equivalent concentrations of H2SO4 in the other orthogonal tube, and then reacted with NO(-)(3) ions in the chemical ionization chamber, leading to HSO(-)(4) formation. The concentration of atmospheric hydroxyl radical can be directly calculated by measuring the intensities of the HSOj product ions and the NO(-)(3) reactant ions. The analytical capability of the instrument was demonstrated by measuring hydroxyl radical in laboratory air, and the concentration of the hydroxyl radical in the investigated air was calculated to be 1.6 x 106 molecules*cm ', based on 5 seconds integration. The results have shown that the instrument is competent for in situ continuous measurements of atmospheric trace radical.

  17. Fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p 4P state of the helium negative ion He-.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Li, Chun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2014-12-31

    The fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p (4)P state of the helium negative ion He(-) are calculated in Hylleraas coordinates, including relativistic and QED corrections up to O(α(4)mc(2)), O((μ/M)α(4)mc(2)), O(α(5)mc(2)), and O((μ/M)α(5)mc(2)). Higher order corrections are estimated for the ionization energy. A comparison is made with other calculations and experiments. We find that the present results for the fine structure splittings agree with experiment very well. However, the calculated ionization energy deviates from the experimental result by about 1 standard deviation. The estimated theoretical uncertainty in the ionization energy is much less than the experimental accuracy.

  18. UPTAKE AND ELIMINATION OF IONIZABLE ORGANIC CHEMICALS AT FISH GILLS: PART I. MODEL FORMULATION, PARAMETERIZATION, AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of pH and alkalinity on uptake and elimination of ionizable organic chemicals at the gills of large rainbow trout were studied. Increased pH reduced uptake rates of weakly-acidic chlorinated phenols and increased that of weakly-basic 3,4-dichlorobenzylamine, indicating gr...

  19. Simultaneous Determination of Cyanide and Thiocyanate in Plasma by Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (CI-GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    ORIGINAL PAPER Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS...chemical ioniza- tion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocya- nate in plasma...Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide

  20. Calibrated In Situ Measurement of UT/LS Water Vapor Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A.; Gao, R.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable disagreement among in situ water vapor measurements by different instruments at the low part per million (ppm) mixing ratios found in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). These discrepancies contribute to uncertainty in our understanding of the microphysics related to cirrus cloud particle nucleation and growth and affect our ability to determine the effect of climate changes on the radiatively important feedback from UT/LS water vapor. To address the discrepancies observed in measured UT/LS water vapor, a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for the fast, precise, and accurate measurement of water vapor at low mixing ratios. The instrument utilizes a radioactive α particle source to ionize a flow of sample air drawn into the instrument. A cascade of ion-molecule reactions results in the production of protonated water ions proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio that are then detected by the mass spectrometer. The multi-step nature of the ionization mechanism results in a non-linear sensitivity to water vapor, necessitating calibration across the full range of values to be measured. To accomplish this calibration, we have developed a novel calibration scheme using catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to produce well-defined water vapor mixing ratios that can be introduced into the instrument inlet during flight. The CIMS instrument was deployed for the first time aboard the NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) mission in March and April 2011. The sensitivity of the instrument to water vapor was calibrated every ~45 minutes in flight from < 1 to 150 ppm. Analysis of in-flight data demonstrates a typical sensitivity of 2000 Hz/ppm at 4.5 ppm with a signal to noise ratio (2 σ) > 50 for a 1 second measurement. The instrument and its calibration system performed successfully in

  1. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G.

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  2. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for species identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Traglia, Germán; Famiglietti, Angela; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Vay, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify 396 Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli clinical isolates was evaluated in comparison with conventional phenotypic tests and/or molecular methods. MALDI-TOF MS identified to species level 256 isolates and to genus or complex level 112 isolates. It identified 29 genera including uncommon species.

  3. Study of the mass spectrometric behaviors of anthocyanins in negative ionization mode and its applications for characterization of anthocyanins and non-anthocyanin polyphenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study of the mass spectroscopic behaviors of anthocyanins in the negative ionization mode was reported and it can be used for differentiation anthocyanins from other non-anthocyanin polyphenols. For the study, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (...

  4. Bio-oil Analysis Using Negative Electrospray Ionization: Comparative Study of High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers and Phenolic versus Sugaric Components

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Erica A.; Park, Soojin; Klein, Adam T.; Lee, Young Jin

    2012-05-16

    We have previously demonstrated that a petroleomic analysis could be performed for bio-oils and revealed the complex nature of bio-oils for the nonvolatile phenolic compounds (Smith, E.; Lee, Y. J. Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 5190−5198). As a subsequent study, we have adapted electrospray ionization in negative-ion mode to characterize a wide variety of bio-oil compounds. A comparative study of three common high-resolution mass spectrometers was performed to validate the methodology and to investigate the differences in mass discrimination and resolution. The mass spectrum is dominated by low mass compounds with m/z of 100–250, with some compounds being analyzable by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). We could characterize over 800 chemical compositions, with only about 40 of them being previously known in GC–MS. This unveiled a much more complex nature of bio-oils than typically shown by GC–MS. The pyrolysis products of cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly polyhydroxy cyclic hydrocarbons (or what we call “sugaric” compounds), such as levoglucosan, could be effectively characterized with this approach. Phenolic compounds from lignin pyrolysis could be clearly distinguished in a contour map of double bond equivalent (DBE) versus the number of carbons from these sugaric compounds.

  5. Deep high spectral resolution spectroscopy and chemical composition of ionized nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Toribio San Cipriano, L.

    2014-01-01

    High spectral resolution spectroscopy has proved to be very useful for the advancement of chemical abundances studies in photoionized nebulae, such as H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe). Classical analyses make use of the intensity of bright collisionally excited lines (CELs), which have a strong dependence on the electron temperature and density. By using high resolution spectrophotometric data, our group has led the determination of chemical abundances of some heavy element ions, mainly O++, O+, and C++ from faint recombination lines (RLs), allowing us to deblend them from other nearby emission lines or sky features. The importance of these lines is that their emissivity depends weakly on the temperature and density structure of the gas. The unresolved issue in this field is that recombination lines of heavy element ions give abundances that are about 2-3 times higher than those derived from CELs - in H II regions - for the same ion, and can even be a factor of 70 times higher in some PNe. This uncertainty puts into doubt the validity of face values of metallicity that we use as representative not only for ionized nebulae in the Local Universe, but also for star-forming dwarf and spiral galaxies at different redshifts. Additionally, high-resolution data can allow us to detect and deblend faint lines of neutron capture element ions in PNe. This information would introduce further restrictions to evolution models of AGBs and would help to quantify the chemical enrichment in s-elements produced by low and intermediate mass stars. The availability of an échelle spectrograph at the E-ELT will be of paramount interest to: (a) extend the studies of heavy-element recombination lines to low metallicity objects, (b) to extend abundance determinations of s-elements to planetary nebulae in the extragalactic domain and to bright Galactic and extragalactic H II regions.

  6. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  7. Charge enhancement of single-stranded DNA in negative electrospray ionization using the supercharging reagent meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1% m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1% m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  8. Charge Enhancement of Single-Stranded DNA in Negative Electrospray Ionization Using the Supercharging Reagent Meta-nitrobenzyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1 % m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1 % m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  9. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  10. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-06

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring.

  11. Calibration of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer for the measurement of gaseous sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Rondo, Linda; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Curtius, Joachim

    2012-06-21

    The accurate measurement of the gaseous sulfuric acid concentration is crucial within many fields of atmospheric science. Instruments utilizing chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) measuring H(2)SO(4), therefore, require a careful calibration. We have set up a calibration source that can provide a stable and adjustable concentration of H(2)SO(4). The calibration system initiates the production of sulfuric acid through the oxidation of SO(2) by OH. The hydroxyl radical is produced by UV photolysis of water vapor. A numerical model calculates the H(2)SO(4) concentration provided at the outlet of the calibration source. From comparison of this concentration and the signals measured by CIMS, a calibration factor is derived. This factor is evaluated to be 1.1 × 10(10) cm(-3), which is in good agreement with values found in the literature for other CIMS instruments measuring H(2)SO(4). The calibration system is described in detail and the results are discussed. Because the setup is external to the CIMS instrument, it offers the possibility for future CIMS intercomparison measurements by providing defined and stable concentrations of sulfuric acid.

  12. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications.

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives induced by soft X-radiation in ion mobility spectrometry: mass spectrometric investigation of the ionization reactions of drift gasses, dopants and alkyl nitrates.

    PubMed

    Riebe, Daniel; Erler, Alexander; Ritschel, Thomas; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Beil, Andreas; Blaschke, Michael; Ludwig, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A promising replacement for the radioactive sources commonly encountered in ion mobility spectrometers is a miniaturized, energy-efficient photoionization source that produce the reactant ions via soft X-radiation (2.8 keV). In order to successfully apply the photoionization source, it is imperative to know the spectrum of reactant ions and the subsequent ionization reactions leading to the detection of analytes. To that end, an ionization chamber based on the photoionization source that reproduces the ionization processes in the ion mobility spectrometer and facilitates efficient transfer of the product ions into a mass spectrometer was developed. Photoionization of pure gasses and gas mixtures containing air, N2 , CO2 and N2 O and the dopant CH2 Cl2 is discussed. The main product ions of photoionization are identified and compared with the spectrum of reactant ions formed by radioactive and corona discharge sources on the basis of literature data. The results suggest that photoionization by soft X-radiation in the negative mode is more selective than the other sources. In air, adduct ions of O2(-) with H2 O and CO2 were exclusively detected. Traces of CO2 impact the formation of adduct ions of O2(-) and Cl(-) (upon addition of dopant) and are capable of suppressing them almost completely at high CO2 concentrations. Additionally, the ionization products of four alkyl nitrates (ethylene glycol dinitrate, nitroglycerin, erythritol tetranitrate and pentaerythritol tetranitrate) formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization induced by X-ray photoionization in different gasses (air, N2 and N2 O) and dopants (CH2 Cl2 , C2 H5 Br and CH3 I) are investigated. The experimental studies are complemented by density functional theory calculations of the most important adduct ions of the alkyl nitrates (M) used for their spectrometric identification. In addition to the adduct ions [M + NO3 ](-) and [M + Cl](-) , adduct ions such as [M + N2 O2 ](-) , [M

  14. Investigations of Acetate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (NIPT-CIMS): Underlying Chemistry, Calibrations, and Operational Considerations for the Detection of Carboxylic Acids and Other Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The growing use of high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (HR-TOF-CIMS) as applied to gas and particle measurements requires a thorough understanding of the underlying chemistry to ensure accurate molecular identification. These systems are deployed using a number of reagent ion chemistries in both the positive and negative mode. Moreover, high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometers make it possible to detect and (potentially) quantify species without the use of authentic standards. Acetate CIMS (or negative-ion proton-transfer CIMS) detects species by abstracting a proton from carboxylic acids, nitrated phenols, and other species with acidic protons. Clustering reactions are also known to occur, complicating analysis. proper interpretation of the mass spectra requires understanding these mechanisms and controlling for unwanted ionization processes. We investigate the ability to control for clustering reactions using authentic standards under various clustering regimes while maintaining ion transmission efficiency in simple and complex matrices. The feasibility of using isotopically labeled acetate to unambiguously identify clusters is also investigated. Bulk metrics for describing the spectra (oxygen:carbon, oxidation state, average carbon number, etc) are also investigated to understand their susceptibility to experimental configuration.

  15. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    PubMed

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range.

  16. Atmospheric Amines and Ammonia Measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Madronich, Sasha; Sierra-Hernandez, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, James N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Lee, S.-H

    2014-11-19

    We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a Southeastern U.S. forest in Alabama and a moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1-C6) at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast U.S. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1-C6, from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv) were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

  17. Cyclic acyloxonium ions as diagnostic aids in the characterization of chloropropanol esters under electron impact (EI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) conditions.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Anja K K; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2013-06-26

    During mass spectrometric analysis of various lipids and lipid derivatives such as the chlorinated counterparts of triacylglycerols, the detailed structure of the characteristic and common ions formed under electron impact (EI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) conditions by the loss of a single fatty acid remains ambiguous. These ions are designated in the literature as "diacylglyceride ions" and are frequently depicted with a molecular formula without showing any structural features and sometimes represented as cyclic acyloxonium ions. Characterization of these ions is of considerable importance due to their utility in structural identification of lipid derivatives. This study provides complementary evidence on the cyclic nature of "diacylglyceride ions" through the use of the simplest 3-monochloropropanediol diester as a model and the use of isotope labeling technique. Tandem MS/MS studies have indicated that the ion at m/z 135.6 generated from 1,2-bis(acetoyl)-3-chloropropane through the loss of an acetyl group was identical to the ion at m/z 135.6 generated from 4-chloromethyl-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane, the latter being generated from a cyclic precursor through the loss of a methyl radical, keeping the dioxolane ring structure intact, thus confirming the cyclic nature of these ions. The corresponding cyclic oxonium ions generated from longer chain chloropropanol diesters, such as the ion at m/z 331.2 originating from 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) diesters containing palmitic acid(s), could serve as chemical markers for the presence chloropropanol esters.

  18. Chemical Characterization of Crude Petroleum Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Coupled with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, Peter A.; Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

    2012-02-07

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was used for the first time for the analysis of liquid petroleum crude oil samples. The analysis was performed in both positive and negative ionization modes using three solvents one of which (acetonitrile/toluene mixture) is commonly used in petroleomics studies while two other polar solvents (acetonitrile/water and methanol/water mixtures) are generally not compatible with petroleum characterization using mass spectrometry. The results demonstrate that nano-DESI analysis efficiently ionizes petroleum constituents soluble in a particular solvent. When acetonitrile/toluene is used as a solvent, nano-DESI generates electrospray-like spectra. In contrast, strikingly different spectra were obtained using acetonitrile/water and methanol/water. Comparison with the literature data indicates that these solvents selectively extract water-soluble constituents of the crude oil. Water-soluble compounds are predominantly observed as sodium adducts in nano-DESI spectra indicating that addition of sodium to the solvent may be a viable approach for efficient ionization of water-soluble crude oil constituents. Nano-DESI enables rapid screening of different classes of compounds in crude oil samples using solvents that are rarely used for petroleum characterization.

  19. Negative Electron Affinity Effect on the Surface of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Polycrystalline Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Strong negative electron affinity effects have been observed on the surface of as-grown chemical vapor deposited diamond using Secondary Electron Emission. The test samples were randomly oriented and the surface was terminated with hydrogen. The effect appears as an intensive peak in the low energy part of the spectrum of the electron energy distribution and may be described in the model of effective negative electron affinity.

  20. Selective linkage detection of O-sialoglycan isomers by negative electrospray ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casal, Enriqueta; Lebrón-Aguilar, Rosa; Moreno, Francisco Javier; Corzo, Nieves; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo

    2010-04-15

    Sialylated O-linked oligosaccharides are involved in many biological processes, such as cell-cell interactions, cell-substance adhesion, and virus-host interactions. These activities depend on their structure, which is frequently determined by tandem mass spectrometry. However, these spectra are frequently analyzer-dependent, which makes it difficult to develop widely applicable analytical methods. In order to deepen the origin of this behavior, two couples of isomers of sialylated O-linked oligosaccharides, NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc-ol/Gal beta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-6)GalNAc-ol and NeuGc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc-ol/Gal beta1-3(NeuGc alpha2-6)GalNAc-ol, were analyzed by liquid chromatography/negative electrospray ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI(-)-MS(n)) using both an ion trap and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results clearly showed that while ions obtained in the triple quadrupole instrument fitted very well with the standard fragmentation routes, in the ion trap several intense ions could not be explained by these rules, specially a fragment at m/z 597. Furthermore, this ion was observed in the mass spectrum of those isomers that sialic acid binds to GalNAc by an alpha2-6 linkage. From the MS(3) spectrum of this ion an unexpected structure was deduced, and it led to propose alternative fragmentation pathways. Molecular mechanics calculations suggested that the found atypical route could be promoted by a hydrogen bond located only in alpha2-6-linked oligosaccharides. It has also been demonstrated that this process follows a slow kinetic, explaining why it cannot be observed using an ion beam-type mass analyzer. In conclusion, ion traps seem to be more appropriate than triple quadrupoles to develop a reliable analytical method to distinguish between isomeric O-linked glycans.

  1. Soft Ionization of Saturated Hydrocarbons, Alcohols and Nonpolar Compounds by Negative-Ion Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Robert B.; Dane, A. John

    2013-03-01

    Large polarizable n-alkanes (approximately C18 and larger), alcohols, and other nonpolar compounds can be detected as negative ions when sample solutions are injected directly into the sampling orifice of the atmospheric pressure interface of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source operating in negative-ion mode. The mass spectra are dominated by peaks corresponding to [M + O2]‾•. No fragmentation is observed, making this a very soft ionization technique for samples that are otherwise difficult to analyze by DART. Detection limits for cholesterol were determined to be in the low nanogram range.

  2. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    PubMed

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment.

  3. Identification and Characterization of the Major Chemical Constituents in Fructus Akebiae by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yun; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Dan-dan; Chen, Fei; Kong, Xiu-hua; Liao, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Fructus Akebiae (FA), the dry fruit of Akebia quinata (THUNB.) DECNE., possesses potent antidepressant properties. Owing to the structural complexity, high polarity and thermal lability in plants, it is difficult and time-consuming to analyze the major chemical constituents by traditional strategies that involve extraction, isolation, purification and identification by chemical manipulations and spectroscopic methods. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS-MS) method was established for quickly identifying the chemical constituents in the extract of Fructus Akebiae. The main saponin components in the extract of Fructus Akebiae were detected with the HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS-MS in negative-ion mode. These components were further analyzed by MS(2) spectra, and compared with the corresponding reference substances and literature data. Nineteen saponins in the extract of Fructus Akebiae were well separated in one run. The new method is accurate and rapid. It can be used to identify the main chemical constituents in the extract of Fructus Akebiae and can be suitable for the quality control of Fructus Akebiae.

  4. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Measurements of Gas-Phase Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Yoshida, K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D. J.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Hubler, G.; Fortin, T. J.; Sueper, D. J.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) can be a highly selective technique with fast time response for measuring many atmospheric trace gases (e.g., hydroxyl radical (OH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), nitric acid (HNO3)). CIMS is highly versatile and has been used under a wide variety of conditions with many different ion-molecule detection schemes, even for detecting the same molecule. Because of its high proton affinity (853.6 kJ/mol), ammonia (NH3) is another ideal candidate for detection by CIMS. NH3, the dominant gas-phase base in the atmosphere, is a precursor of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfates, compounds that are important constituents of airborne fine particulate matter that affect air quality. The characterization of three NH3 CIMS instruments: an atmospheric pressure ionization instrument and a low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument, both utilizing protonated ethanol cluster ion chemistry, and a different low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument using protonated acetone dimer ion chemistry, is presented here. Instrument performance is assessed using ambient data from both ground-based and airborne field programs to examine detection sensitivity, background signal, and time response. Laboratory characterization of different inlet materials is also presented. All three instruments used PFA Teflon sampling inlets. Instrumental backgrounds were determined by scrubbing NH3 from ambient air using silicon phosphates that release phosphoric acid when exposed to ambient levels of humidity. Standard addition calibrations were performed using NH3 permeation devices whose output was determined via 185nm optical absorption. Regardless of CIMS technique or ion chemistry used, the observed detection sensitivities were all adequate for detecting changes in NH3 at the 10 pptv level on a 1s timescale. The time responses, defined by a 1/e2 decay in the calibration signal, ranged from 5s to 45s for the different sampling inlet configurations and are rapid enough

  5. Gaseous and particulate composition of fresh and aged emissions of diesel, RME and CNG buses using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psichoudaki, Magda; Le Breton, Michael; Hallquist, Mattias; Watne, Ågot; Hallquist, Asa

    2016-04-01

    . A Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) was employed to monitor the concentration of different organic species present in the fresh and aged emissions. This instrument is capable of identifying the molecular formulas of species in the gas phase. The FIGAERO inlet, also enabled the characterisation of the particle phase, as particles were simultaneously collected on a filter, from which they could then be thermally desorbed and detected. Acetate (negative) ionization was utilised to allow high sensitivity measurements of organic acids, aldehydes, ketones, diols and halogenated species. The H2O, O3 and NOx concentrations inside the PAM flow reactor were monitored, and an organic tracer for OH exposure was also continuously measured. The concentrations of dominant species in both fresh and aged gaseous and particulate bus emissions from the different fuel types will be presented as well as their emission factors, calculated from concurrent CO2 measurements.

  6. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Edward R; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Coupling an electrospray source and a solids probe/chemical ionization source to a selected ion flow tube apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Pedder, Randall E.; Taormina, Christopher R.

    2015-08-15

    A new ion source region has been constructed and attached to a variable temperature selected ion flow tube. The source features the capabilities of electron impact, chemical ionization, a solids probe, and electrospray ionization. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated through a series of reactions from ions created in each of the new source regions. The chemical ionization source is able to create H{sub 3}O{sup +}, but not as efficiently as similar sources with larger apertures. The ability of this source to support a solids probe, however, greatly expands our capabilities. A variety of rhenium cations and dications are created from the solids probe in sufficient abundance to study in the flow tube. The reaction of Re{sup +} with O{sub 2} proceeds with a rate constant that agrees with the literature measurements, while the reaction of Re{sub 2}{sup 2+} is found to charge transfer with O{sub 2} at about 60% of the collision rate; we have also performed calculations that support the charge transfer pathway. The electrospray source is used to create Ba{sup +}, which is reacted with N{sub 2}O to create BaO{sup +}, and we find a rate constant that agrees with the literature.

  8. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Edward R.; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques.

  9. Differential Lipid Profiles of Normal Human Brain Matter and Gliomas by Positive and Negative Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization – Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pirro, Valentina; Hattab, Eyas M.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization—mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging was used to analyze unmodified human brain tissue sections from 39 subjects sequentially in the positive and negative ionization modes. Acquisition of both MS polarities allowed more complete analysis of the human brain tumor lipidome as some phospholipids ionize preferentially in the positive and others in the negative ion mode. Normal brain parenchyma, comprised of grey matter and white matter, was differentiated from glioma using positive and negative ion mode DESI-MS lipid profiles with the aid of principal component analysis along with linear discriminant analysis. Principal component–linear discriminant analyses of the positive mode lipid profiles was able to distinguish grey matter, white matter, and glioma with an average sensitivity of 93.2% and specificity of 96.6%, while the negative mode lipid profiles had an average sensitivity of 94.1% and specificity of 97.4%. The positive and negative mode lipid profiles provided complementary information. Principal component–linear discriminant analysis of the combined positive and negative mode lipid profiles, via data fusion, resulted in approximately the same average sensitivity (94.7%) and specificity (97.6%) of the positive and negative modes when used individually. However, they complemented each other by improving the sensitivity and specificity of all classes (grey matter, white matter, and glioma) beyond 90% when used in combination. Further principal component analysis using the fused data resulted in the subgrouping of glioma into two groups associated with grey and white matter, respectively, a separation not apparent in the principal component analysis scores plots of the separate positive and negative mode data. The interrelationship of tumor cell percentage and the lipid profiles is discussed, and how such a measure could be used to measure residual tumor at surgical margins. PMID:27658243

  10. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol - a laboratory and field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Brüggemann, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-02-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES) upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards - pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94) demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene) cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a different oxidant

  11. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol - a laboratory and field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Brüggemann, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-08-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m-3 for pinonic acid) by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards - pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94) demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene) cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  12. Ion mobility spectrometric analysis of vaporous chemical warfare agents by the instrument with corona discharge ionization ammonia dopant ambient temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takafumi; Kishi, Shintaro; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Tachikawa, Masumi; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Nakagawa, Takao; Kitagawa, Nobuyoshi; Tokita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-03-20

    The ion mobility behavior of nineteen chemical warfare agents (7 nerve gases, 5 blister agents, 2 lachrymators, 2 blood agents, 3 choking agents) and related compounds including simulants (8 agents) and organic solvents (39) was comparably investigated by the ion mobility spectrometry instrument utilizing weak electric field linear drift tube with corona discharge ionization, ammonia doping, purified inner air drift flow circulation operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Three alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates, tabun, and four organophosphorus simulants gave the intense characteristic positive monomer-derived ion peaks and small dimer-derived ion peaks, and the later ion peaks were increased with the vapor concentrations. VX, RVX and tabun gave both characteristic positive monomer-derived ions and degradation product ions. Nitrogen mustards gave the intense characteristic positive ion peaks, and in addition distinctive negative ion peak appeared from HN3. Mustard gas, lewisite 1, o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile and 2-mercaptoethanol gave the characteristic negative ion peaks. Methylphosphonyl difluoride, 2-chloroacetophenone and 1,4-thioxane gave the characteristic ion peaks both in the positive and negative ion mode. 2-Chloroethylethylsulfide and allylisothiocyanate gave weak ion peaks. The marker ion peaks derived from two blood agents and three choking agents were very close to the reactant ion peak in negative ion mode and the respective reduced ion mobility was fluctuated. The reduced ion mobility of the CWA monomer-derived peaks were positively correlated with molecular masses among structurally similar agents such as G-type nerve gases and organophosphorus simulants; V-type nerve gases and nitrogen mustards. The slope values of the calibration plots of the peak heights of the characteristic marker ions versus the vapor concentrations are related to the detection sensitivity, and within chemical warfare agents examined the slope values for sarin, soman

  13. Which molecular features affect the intrinsic hepatic clearance rate of ionizable organic chemicals in fish?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a p...

  14. Absolute method for the assay of oleuropein in olive oils by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Nino, Antonio; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Muzzalupo, Enzo; Perri, Enzo; Sindona, Giovanni; Tagarelli, Antonio

    2005-09-15

    Oleuropein (OLP, 1), the active ingredient present (i) in food integrators extracted from olive leaves, (ii) in table olives, and (iii) in extra virgin olive oils is a nutraceutical whose health benefits have been widely documented. A new analytical method for its assay, which is based on the utilization of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry and on the use of a synthetic labeled analogue, the 4-trideuteriocarboxyoleuropein (2), as an internal standard, is presented. The results obtained with extra virgin olive oils from different cultivars and different Italian regions are discussed.

  15. Ion Yields in the Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics (CPCD) model of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization has been restricted to relative rather than absolute yield comparisons because the rate constant for one step in the model was not accurately known. Recent measurements are used to constrain this constant, leading to good agreement with experimental yield versus fluence data for 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Parameters for alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid are also estimated, including contributions from a possible triplet state. The results are compared with the polar fluid model, the CPCD is found to give better agreement with the data.

  16. The ionized gas at the centre of IC 10: a possible localized chemical pollution by Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; López-Martín, L.; Esteban, C.

    2011-03-01

    We present results from integral field spectroscopy with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrograph at the 3.5-m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory of the intense star-forming region [HL90] 111 at the centre of the starburst galaxy IC 10. We have obtained maps with a spatial sampling of 1 × 1 arcsec2= 3.9× 3.9 pc2 of different emission lines and analysed the extinction, physical conditions, nature of the ionization and chemical abundances of the ionized gas, as well determined locally the age of the most recent star formation event. By defining several apertures, we study the main integrated properties of some regions within [HL90] 111. Two contiguous spaxels show an unambiguous detection of the broad He IIλ4686 emission line, this feature seems to be produced by a single late-type WN star. We also report a probable N and He enrichment in the precise spaxels where the Wolf-Rayet (WR) features are detected. The enrichment pattern is roughly consistent with that expected for the pollution of the ejecta of a single or a very small number of WR stars. Furthermore, this chemical pollution is very localized (˜2 arcsec ˜7.8 pc) and it should be difficult to detect in star-forming galaxies beyond the Local Volume. We also discuss the use of the most common empirical calibrations to estimate the oxygen abundances of the ionized gas in nearby galaxies from 2D spectroscopic data. The ionization degree of the gas plays an important role when applying these empirical methods, as they tend to give lower oxygen abundances with increasing ionization degree. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astrónomico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Plank Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Visiting Astronomer at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  17. Synergistic effect of ionizing radiation on chemical disinfectant treatments for reduction of natural microflora on seafood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Jo, Cheorun; Ha, Sang-Do

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on seafood products such as mussel and squid compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of chlorine and ionizing radiation on the natural microflora of mussel and squid. Total aerobic bacteria initially ranged from 102 to 104 Log CFU/g. More than 100 ppm of chlorine and irradiation at 1 kGy were sufficient to reduce the total aerobic bacteria on mussel and squid to a level lower than detection limit (10 CFU/g). Synergistic effects against natural microflora were observed for all combined treatment. These results suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combine chlorine-ionizing radiation treatment against natural microflora on mussel and squid.

  18. Analysis of low molecular weight acids by negative mode matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rohit; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales

    2007-01-01

    Free 9-aminoacridine base is demonstrated to be a suitable matrix for negative mode matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOFMS) analysis of a wide range of low molecular weight organic acids including aliphatic (from acetic to palmitic acid), aromatic acids, phytohormones (e.g. jasmonic and salicylic acids), and amino acids. Low limits of quantitation in the femtomolar range (jasmonic - 250 fmol; caffeic - 160 fmol and salicylic - 12.5 fmol) and linear detector response over two concentration orders in the pico- and femtomolar range are extremely encouraging for the direct study of such acids in complex biological matrices.

  19. Experts workshop on the ecotoxicological risk assessment of ionizable organic chemicals: Towards a science-based framework for chemical assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing need to develop analytical methods and tools that can be applied to assess the environmental risks associated with charged, polar, and ionisable organic chemicals, such as those used as active pharmaceutical ingredients, biocides, and surface active chemicals. ...

  20. The computation of hypersonic ionized flows in chemical and thermal nonequlibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, Robert W.; Candler, Graham V.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method to compute a two-dimensional hypersonic flowfield that is ionized and in thermochemical nonequilibrium has been developed. Such a flowfield is described by coupled time-dependent partial differential equations for the conservation of species mass, mass-average momentum, vibrational energy of each diatomic species, electron energy, and total mass-averaged energy. The steady-state solution to these fully coupled equations is obtained using an implicit Gauss-Seidel line relaxation technique. The computed electron densities in the flowfield compare well with experimental results.

  1. Chemical ionization of neutral peptides produced by matrix-assisted laser desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Myatt, Christopher P.; Derrick, Peter J.

    1998-03-01

    The cationization in the gas phase of neutral peptides formed under the conditions of matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) has been demonstrated. The beam of neutral peptides formed by MALD using one laser was intercepted several hundred micrometers above the sample surface by a beam of cations produced using a second laser. The intensity of cationized neutral gramicidin S formed in this way was comparable to the ion signal produced by conventional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The threshold fluences for MALD of neutral peptides have been shown to be lower than those for formation of ions from the same samples by MALDI.

  2. Sensitive determination of RDX, nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water by solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure electro-spray [correction of chemical] ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cassada, D A; Monson, S J; Snow, D D; Spalding, R F

    1999-06-04

    Recent improvements in the LC-MS interface have increased the sensitivity and selectivity of this instrument in the analysis of polar and thermally-labile aqueous constituents. Determination of RDX, nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions was enhanced using LC-MS with solid-phase extraction, 15N3-RDX internal standard, and electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode. ESI produced a five-fold increase in detector response over atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for the nitramine compounds, while the more energetic APCI produced more than twenty times the ESI response for nitroaromatics. Method detection limits in ESI for nitramines varied from 0.03 microgram l-1 for MNX to 0.05 microgram l-1 for RDX.

  3. Combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry of sphingolipids. I. Glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and cerebrosides of the spleen in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Oshima, M; Ariga, T; Murata, T

    1977-08-01

    Trimethylsilylated glucosyl sphingosine, ceramides and glucocerebrosides were analysed by combined gas chromatography (GC)-chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometry. Isobutane, methane and ammonia were used as reactant gasses for chemical ionization. Essentially the same fragment ions were detected in the spectra with the different reactant gases. Purified glucocerebrosides isolated from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher's disease were clearly separated into their 8 molecular species by gas chromatography. Three other minor components were detected by spectrometry, and these 11 molecular species of glucocerbrosides from the spleen of the patient with Gaucher's disease have been analysed. The ceramides obtained by periodate oxidation and then alkaline reduction of the glucocerebrosides were also separated into 11 molecular species by GC-CI mass spectrometry. Molecular weight could be determined using the major fragment ion of m/e (M+-90) in the spectra of ceramides and cerebrosides. The chemical ionization method is useful for structural analysis and determination of the molecular species of sphingoglycolipids.

  4. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information.

  5. Determination of carbon number distributions of complex phthalates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Di Sanzo, Frank P; Lim, Peniel J; Han, Wenning W

    2015-01-01

    An assay method for phthalate esters with a complex mixture of isomer of varying carbon numbers, such as di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) and di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) positive chemical ionization (PCI) with 5% ammonia in methane is described. GC-MS-PCI-NH3, unlike GC-MS electron ionization (EI) (GC-MS-EI) that produces generally m/z 149 ion as the main base peak and low intensity M(+) peaks, produces higher intensity (M + 1) ions that allow the determination of total (R + R') carbon number distributions based on the various R and R' alkyl groups of the di-esters moiety. The technique allows distinguishing among the various commercial DINP and DIDP plasticizers. The carbon number distributions are determined in the acceptable range of <0.1 mole percent to >85 mole percent (m/m). Several examples of analysis made on commercial DINP and DIDP are presented. The use of only 5% instead of 100% ammonia simplifies use of GC-MS-PCI-NH3 but still produces sufficient M + 1 ion intensities that are appropriate for the assay. In addition, use of low concentrations of ammonia mitigates potential safety aspects related to use of ammonia and provides less corrosion for the instrument hardware.

  6. Trace determination of 13 haloacetamides in drinking water using liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Krasner, Stuart W; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-04-27

    The haloacetamides (HAcAms) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water which are currently receiving increased scientific attention due to their elevated toxicity relative to regulated disinfection by-products. A simultaneous determination method of 13 HAcAms, combining solid-phase extraction (SPE) enrichment, liquid chromatographic (LC) separation, and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (tqMS) detection with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using selective reaction monitoring in positive mode, was developed to measure HAcAms, including chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated analogs. Ammonium chloride and Oasis HLB were selected as the dechlorinating reagent and polymeric SPE sorbent of HAcAm samples. The used tqMS apparatus showed higher sensitivity for the studied HAcAms in the APCI mode than electrospray ionization. 13 HAcAms were separated by LC in 9.0 min, and the detection limits ranged from 7.6 to 19.7 ng/L. The SPE-LC/tqMS method was successfully applied to quantify 13 HAcAms in drinking water samples for the first time, and first indentified tribromoacetamide and chloroiodoacetamide as DBPs in drinking water.

  7. Detection of non-prescription heroin markers in urine with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bogusz, M J; Maier, R D; Erkens, M; Kohls, U

    2001-09-01

    The planned introduction of a prescription heroin program in Germany created a need for differentiation between non-prescription and prescribed diamorphine use. The following substances were chosen as markers of non-prescription heroin: acetylcodeine (AC); its metabolites codeine (C) and codeine 6-glucuronide (C6G); papaverine (P); and noscapine (N). Typical heroin markers diamorphine (DAM) and its metabolites monoacetylmorphine (MAM) and morphine (M) were also determined. The drugs were extracted from urine samples with solid-phase extraction (C18) using standard 200-mg columns and 96-well microplates (100 mg). The extracts were examined with liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (positive ionization) in two isocratic systems. Selected ion monitoring procedures were applied for protonated molecular masses and characteristic fragments of drugs involved. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.5-1 ng/mL urine. The occurrence of selected heroin markers was investigated in 25 urine samples collected from heroin abusers (road traffic offenders and overdosed patients). C6G was found in all samples, C in 24 samples, N in 22 samples, MAM in 16 samples, P in 14 samples, DAM in 12 samples, and AC in 4 samples. The appearance of these compounds in urine reflects their pharmacokinetic properties and the composition of non-prescription heroin.

  8. [Chromosomal aberrations upon isolated and combined exposures to chemical substances and ionizing irradiation].

    PubMed

    Barantseva, M Iu; Mukhamedieva, L N; Fedorenko, B S; Vorozhtsova, S V

    2009-01-01

    The partial summation of biological effects evaluated by the anaphasic chromosomal aberration test in the bone marrow karyocytes of mice was determined when the animals were concurrently exposed to chemical substances (acetone, acetaldehyde, ammonia, and ethanol) at low concentrations and gamma-irradiation in a total dose of 30 Gy. Qualitative analysis of chromosomal aberrations in the karyocytes of the bone marrow (ponses, fragments) has indicated that upon combined exposure of the animals to the chemical substances and gamma-irradiation, the chemical factor is dominant since upon combined radiochemical exposure, the number of chromosomal aberration increases mainly at the expense of fragments (91.2%), as does upon isolated exposure to chemical substances (96.4%).

  9. Surface-activated chemical ionization combined with electrospray ionization and mass spectrometry for the analysis of cannabinoids in biological samples. Part I: analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxytetrahydro-cannabinol.

    PubMed

    Conti, Matteo; Tazzari, Valeria; Bertona, Maria; Brambilla, Maura; Brambilla, Paolo

    2011-06-15

    Recently, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) has been widely used for the identification of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in biological samples. However, the sensitivity and selectivity of this technique are commonly inadequate for the analysis of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolites at very low levels, such as those sometimes required in forensic and clinical-legal applications. We coupled electrospray ionization and surface-activated chemical ionization (ESI-SACI) to various types of mass analyzers (ion trap, triple quadrupole and orbitrap) (ESI-SACI-MS) to improve the detection of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), the most common marker of THC abuse. The benefits of this approach in terms of sensitivity and selectivity compared with a common ESI-MS approach are clearly demonstrated.

  10. Molecular characterization of cancer reveals interactions between ionizing radiation and chemicals on rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Doi, Kazutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Although various mechanisms have been inferred for combinatorial actions of multiple carcinogens, these mechanisms have not been well demonstrated in experimental carcinogenesis models. We evaluated mammary carcinogenesis initiated by combined exposure to various doses of radiation and chemical carcinogens. Female rats at 7 weeks of age were γ-irradiated (0.2-2 Gy) and/or exposed to 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) (20 or 40 mg/kg, single intraperitoneal injection) or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (40 mg/kg/day by gavage for 10 days) and were observed until 50 weeks of age. The incidence of mammary carcinoma increased steadily as a function of radiation dose in the absence of chemicals; mathematical analysis supported an additive increase when radiation was combined with a chemical carcinogen, irrespective of the chemical species and its dose. Hras mutations were characteristic of carcinomas that developed after chemical carcinogen treatments and were overrepresented in carcinomas induced by the combination of radiation and MNU (but not PhIP), indicating an interaction of radiation and MNU at the level of initiation. The expression profiles of seven classifier genes, previously shown to distinguish two classes of rat mammary carcinomas, categorized almost all examined carcinomas that developed after individual or combined treatments with radiation (1 Gy) and chemicals as belonging to a single class; more comprehensive screening using microarrays and a separate test sample set failed to identify differences in gene expression profiles among these carcinomas. These results suggest that a complex, multilevel interaction underlies the combinatorial action of radiation and chemical carcinogens in the experimental model.

  11. Observations of formic and acetic acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry in the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadaway, V.; McNeill, A.; Heikes, B.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Silwal, I.

    2013-12-01

    Formic (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc) are part of the atmospheric processing of carbon and their measurement is relevant to defining oxygenated volatile organic carbon (OVOC) emissions, to examining photochemical processing of volatile organic carbon (VOC) and OVOCs, and to the photochemical processing of organic aerosol. Further, they can serve as photochemical tracers of convective transport, cloud chemical processes, and precipitation scavenging. The addition of HFo and HAc measurements to the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) is relevant to the DC3 science objectives and complements the suite of chemicals already observed during DC3. The peroxide chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PCIMS) was flown aboard the NCAR Gulfstream-V platform in DC3 and while its primary function was to observe hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide it recorded signals attributed to iodide cluster ions of HFo and HAc at mass-charge ratios of 173 and 187, respectively. Post-mission laboratory experiments were performed to determine the CIMS instrument's sensitivity to these acids under the varying water vapor and sample flow conditions encountered during DC3 flights. The results of field measurements, laboratory experiments and the HFo and HAc recovery process are reported and HFo and HAc measurement quality assessed. The resultant HFo and HAc data are presented and interpreted with respect to atmospheric chemistry within measurement constraints. The DC3 observations were made in May and June 2012 and extended from the surface to 13 km over the central United States.

  12. Block microstructural characterization of copolymers formed from fluorinated and non-fluorinated alkyl polyisocyanates using desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guodong; Cooks, R. Graham; Jha, Salil K.; Oupicky, David; Green, Mark M.

    1997-11-01

    Homopolymers and copolymers of 1-isocyanato-4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,9-tridecafluorononane (monomer F) and n-hexylisocyanate (monomer H) were examined by desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DCI-MS) to obtain information on the monomer distribution in the copolymers. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to characterize ions generated by DCI in the mass spectrometer ion source; ammonia and isobutane were selected as chemical ionization (CI) reagent gases. The major peaks in the ammonia DCI mass spectrum of poly(4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,9-tridecafluorononyl)isocyanate (poly (F)) are protonated and ammoniated trimers. This result suggests that on pyrolytic degradation poly (F) forms cyclic trimers as do alkyl isocyanate polymers. The isobutane DCI mass spectra display the characteristic alkene elimination sequence characteristic of poly(n-hexyl)isocyanate and poly(2,6-dimethylheptyl)isocyanate but with additional extensive fragmentation. The major fragment ion is the protonated monomer. The monomer distributions in copolymers comprised of monomer F and monomer H were deduced from the abundances of various protonated and ammoniated trimers in the ammonia DCI mass spectra using Markovian statistics. Both soluble and insoluble copolymer samples were isolated and found to have non-random monomer distributions. The soluble fraction is dominated by monomer H blocks while the insoluble fraction also contains a majority of monomer H blocks but relatively more monomer F blocks. This forms an example in the polyisocyanates, which hitherto exhibited only random copolymerization, of a non-living method of polymerization yielding a block microstructure for a mixture of two monomers with virtually identical polymerizable functions. Mass spectrometry offers information on chain microstructure which would be unavailable by other means.

  13. Determination of enantiomeric composition by negative-ion electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using deprotonated N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids as chiral selectors.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Bobby N; Zu, Chengli; Koscho, Michael E

    2005-10-01

    The ability to use mixtures of deprotonated N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids as chiral selectors for the determination of enantiomeric composition by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry is demonstrated. For each experiment, two N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids were chosen such that each would have opposite selectivity for the enantiomers of the analyte. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, monitored in the negative ion mode, of solutions containing the two N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids, sodium hydroxide, and the analyte, in a one-to-one mixture of methanol and water, afford peaks in the mass spectrum that correspond to the deprotonated 1:1 analyte-selector complexes. The ratio of the intensities of the complexes in the mass spectrum can be related to the enantiomeric composition of the analyte. Additionally, the sense and extent of chiral recognition is consistent with chromatographic observations, using chiral stationary phases derived from N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids. Each analysis of enantiomeric composition requires less than 10 s to complete, indicating that this method has great potential for the development of fast-/high-throughput chiral analyses.

  14. Linkage analysis of chromophore-labeled disaccharides and linear oligosaccharides by negative ion fast atom bombardment ionization and collisional-induced dissociation with B/E scanning.

    PubMed

    Li, D T; Her, G R

    1993-06-01

    Negative ion fast atom bombardment ionization in combination with collisional-induced dissociation mass spectrometry differentiates the linkage position(s) of chromophore-labeled di- and oligosaccharides. The formation of glycosylamines rather than the more popular reductive amination has been used to label the reducing end of sugars with ultraviolet or fluorescence tags. Two types of fragment ions were detected, one with the charge carried on the chromophore end and the other with the charge carried on the nonreducing terminus. These ions are essential to the determination of interglycosidic linkage and they are produced from the ring cleavage of the reducing end monosaccharide. Additionally, the anomeric configuration of the 1-4-linked residue could be assigned according to the relative abundance of the fragment ions.

  15. Electron dynamics upon ionization: Control of the timescale through chemical substitution and effect of nuclear motion

    SciTech Connect

    Vacher, Morgane; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.; Mendive-Tapia, David

    2015-03-07

    Photoionization can generate a non-stationary electronic state, which leads to coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in molecules. In this article, we choose benzene cation as a prototype because vertical ionization of the neutral species leads to a Jahn-Teller degeneracy between ground and first excited states of the cation. Starting with equal populations of ground and first excited states, there is no electron dynamics in this case. However, if we add methyl substituents that break symmetry but do not radically alter the electronic structure, we see charge migration: oscillations in the spin density that we can correlate with particular localized electronic structures, with a period depending on the gap between the states initially populated. We have also investigated the effect of nuclear motion on electron dynamics using a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) implementation of the Ehrenfest method, most previous theoretical studies of electron dynamics having been carried out with fixed nuclei. In toluene cation for instance, simulations where the nuclei are allowed to move show significant differences in the electron dynamics after 3 fs, compared to simulations with fixed nuclei.

  16. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined.

  17. Chemically Etched Open Tubular and Monolithic Emitters for Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Luo, Quanzhou; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a new procedure for fabricating fused silica emitters for electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in which the end of a bare fused silica capillary is immersed into aqueous hydrofluoric acid, and water is pumped through the capillary to prevent etching of the interior. Surface tension causes the etchant to climb the capillary exterior, and the etch rate in the resulting meniscus decreases as a function of distance from the bulk solution. Etching continues until the silica touching the hydrofluoric acid reservoir is completely removed, essentially stopping the etch process. The resulting emitters have no internal taper, making them much less prone to clogging compared to e.g. pulled emitters. The high aspect ratios and extremely thin walls at the orifice facilitate very low flow rate operation; stable ESI-MS signals were obtained for model analytes from 5-μm-diameter emitters at a flow rate of 5 nL/min with a high degree of inter-emitter reproducibility. In extensive evaluation, the etched emitters were found to enable approximately four times as many LC-MS analyses of proteomic samples before failing compared with conventional pulled emitters. The fabrication procedure was also employed to taper the ends of polymer monolith-containing silica capillaries for use as ESI emitters. In contrast to previous work, the monolithic material protrudes beyond the fused silica capillaries, improving the monolith-assisted electrospray process.

  18. Experts Workshop on the Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment of Ionizable Organic Chemicals: Bioaccumulation/ADME

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioaccumulation potential of neutral organic chemicals (e.g., PCBs, DDT, brominated flame retardants) has received a great deal of attention from scientists in the field of environment toxicology and chemistry over the past four decades. Regulations based on our understanding...

  19. Validity of Saha's equation of thermal ionization for negatively charged spherical particles in complex plasmas in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2011-04-15

    The authors have discussed the validity of Saha's equation for the charging of negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma in thermal equilibrium, even when the tunneling of the electrons, through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle is considered. It is seen that the validity requires the probability of tunneling of an electron through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle to be independent of the direction (inside to outside and vice versa) or in other words the Born's approximation should be valid.

  20. Application of pentafluorophenyl hydrazine derivatives to the analysis of nabumetone and testosterone in human plasma by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sheen, J F; Her, G R

    2004-12-01

    Two carbonyl compounds, nabumetone and testosterone, were derivatized with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH) and analyzed by atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. The PFPH derivatives underwent dissociative electron capture in negative-ion APCI (ECAPCI) and gave intense [M-20](-) ions in the mass spectra. In positive-ion APCI, the PFPH derivatives underwent efficient protonation and gave intense [M + H](+) ions in the mass spectra. In CID, the major product ions of the [M-20](-) ions in ECAPCI corresponded to the partial moiety of PFPH. In contrast, the major product ions of [M + H](+) corresponded to the partial moiety of the analyte. By using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection, low pg of nabumetone (1 pg) and testosterone (7 pg) could be detected in both ECAPCI and positive-ion APCI. In comparison with the detection limits (SRM) of the underivatized analytes, use of the PFPH derivatives resulted in 2500-fold and 35-fold sensitivity enhancements for nabumetone and testosterone, respectively. The PFPH derivatives were applied to the analysis of nabumetone and testosterone in human plasma by both ECAPCI and positive-ion APCI and were found to enable detection of 0.1 ng mL(-1) nabumetone in spiked plasma. For testosterone, endogenous testosterone in female plasma was detected in both ECAPCI and positive-ion APCI.

  1. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  2. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  3. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-06

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  4. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  5. Quantitation of ceramides in nude mouse skin by normal-phase liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yi-Bo; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Liu, Der-Zen; Lin, Shan-Yang; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2010-06-01

    A sensitive and accurate normal-phase liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) method for determining the standard ceramide [NS] (Cer[NS]) was developed and validated so as to improve the traditional thin-layer chromatography (TLC) technique and LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS method to profile and quantify ceramides in nude mouse skin. Normal-phase LC-APCI-MS was optimized to separate the nine classes of ceramides presented in the stratum corneum (SC) of nude mouse skin. A normal-phase silica column eluted with the gradient system from heptane:acetone/butanol (90:10, v/v) of 75:25 to 100% acetone/butanol (90:10, v/v) (with each solvent containing 0.1% [v/v] triethylamine and 0.1% [v/v] formic acid) at a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min was found to be optimal for analyzing standard Cer[NS]. The analysis of Cer[NS] was validated and employed as the standard for constructing a calibration curve to quantitate all classes of ceramides. This method was applied to profile the classes and contents of ceramides in the SC of nude mouse skin and proved to be workable. It was concluded that this improved method can be used to directly detect and quantify all classes of ceramides in the SC of nude mouse skin and that it is more convenient and labor-saving than the traditional TLC method.

  6. Ballpoint pen inks: characterization by positive and negative ion-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the forensic examination of writing inks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lay-Keow; Lafontaine, Pierre; Brazeau, Luc

    2002-11-01

    A method based on profiling of dye components by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) is described for the characterization of ballpoint pen inks. The method involves benzyl alcohol (30 microL) extraction of ink from paper. The extracts of ink lines 1 and 5 mm in length are used for direct ESI/MS analysis in positive and negative modes, respectively. The instrumental analysis takes 3 min. Basic and acid dyes in the inks are detected in the positive and negative modes, respectively, with each dye yielding one or two characteristic ion peaks. The mass spectrum, which is mainly a compositional signature of the dyes in the ink, was not affected by the type of paper from which the ink was extracted, or by natural ageing of the ink on document in the absence of light. However, exposure to fluorescent illumination caused dealkylation of polyalkylated basic dyes and resulted in changes in the homologous distribution of the dyes. In this study, a total of 44 blue inks, 23 black inks, and 10 red inks have been analyzed, and the mass spectra were used to establish a searchable library. ESI/MS analysis provides a simple and fast way to compare ink specimens and in combination with on-line library search permits rapid screening of inks for forensic document investigations.

  7. Quantitative real-time monitoring of chemical reactions by autosampling flow injection analysis coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenqian; Bartmess, John E; McNally, Mary Ellen; Hoffman, Ron M; Cook, Kelsey D; Song, Liguo

    2012-09-04

    Although qualitative and/or semiquantitative real-time monitoring of chemical reactions have been reported with a few mass spectrometric approaches, to our knowledge, no quantitative mass spectrometric approach has been reported so far to have a calibration valid up to molar concentrations as required by process control. This is mostly due to the absence of a practical solution that could well address the sample overloading issue. In this study, a novel autosampling flow injection analysis coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (FIA/APCI-MS) system, consisting of a 1 μL automatic internal sample injector, a postinjection splitter with 1:10 splitting ratio, and a detached APCI source connected to the mass spectrometer using a 4.5 in. long, 0.042 in. inner diameter (ID) stainless-steel capillary, was thus introduced. Using this system together with an optional FIA solvent modifier, e.g., 0.05% (v/v) isopropylamine, a linear quantitative calibration up to molar concentration has been achieved with 3.4-7.2% relative standard deviations (RSDs) for 4 replicates. As a result, quantitative real-time monitoring of a model reaction was successfully performed at the 1.63 M level. It is expected that this novel autosampling FIA/APCI-MS system can be used in quantitative real-time monitoring of a wide range of reactions under diverse reaction conditions.

  8. Negative Chemically Amplified Resist (nCAR) for DRAM Mask Fabrications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschinkl, Martin; Buergel, Christian; Griesinger, Uwe A.; Jeansannetas, Barbara; Vix, Armelle B. E.

    2002-12-01

    In this contribution we will demonstrate how the use of negative tone CAR can significantly improve the CD control of mask layers in which CD is measured on opaque features. A thorough investigation of the individual contributions of sequential process steps in mask making revealed that the final CD uniformity can by improved by 20% when a negative tone resist is used. In case of 50 keV electron beam (EB) mask writing systems, that employ variable shaped beam (VSB) writing, the writing time can be reduced by 40-50 % when a chemically amplified resist (CAR) is applied. Therefore we have evaluated and characterized a commercially available negative-tone CAR. The resist showed good pattern performance down to 150 nm for isolated and semi-isolated opaque lines thus having the ability to form assist bar features. Vertical profiles have been obtained. Line edge roughness (LER) is more pronounced for this material when compared to standard EB resist ZEP 7000. But analysis of CD uniformity (3σ) of 500 nm opaque lines in local area with negative CAR and with positive tone ZEP 7000 showed 4,8 nm and 6,2 nm, respectively. Thus substantiating that the negative CAR is advantageous in terms of opaque line CD control. Regarding soft bake (SB) and post exposure bake (PEB) latitude, the CAR is stable with respect to soft bake temperature variation (3,7 nm/°C). Much more severe is the steep PEB latitude with respect to dose of 0,7-1,3 (μC/cm2)/°C. This requires the use of high precision baking tools for the PEB step. Since all mask blanks have been coated in-house, we have investigated a variety of pre-treatment steps. The influence of each step was characterized by contact angle measurement. We found out that the best results have been achieved when the sequence H2SO4/H2O2-cleaning-UV/ozone-clean-dehydration bake is applied to virgin blanks as delivered by the blank supplier.

  9. Effect of negative chemical pressure on the prototypical itinerant magnet MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhital, C.; Khan, M. A.; Saghayezhian, M.; Phelan, W. A.; Young, D. P.; Jin, R. Y.; DiTusa, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic and charge transport properties of the itinerant magnetic metal MnSi with the substitution of Al and Ga on the Si site is investigated. We observe an increase in unit cell volume indicating that both Al and Ga substitutions create negative chemical pressure. There are substantial increases in the Curie temperature and the ordered moment demonstrating that the substitutions give the magnetism a stronger itinerant character. The substitutions also increase the range of temperature and field where the skyrmion phase is stable due to a change in the character of the magnetism. In contrast to the behavior of pure MnSi and expectations for the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect, we find a significant temperature dependence to the magnitude and sign of anomalous Hall conductivity constant in Al or Ga substituted samples. This temperature dependence likely reflects changes in the spin-orbit coupling strength with temperature, which may have significant consequences on the helical and skyrmion states. Overall, we observe a continuous evolution of magnetic and charge transport properties through positive to negative pressure.

  10. Multiple sublethal chemicals negatively affect tadpoles of the green frog, Rana clamitans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, Michelle D.; Bridges, Christine M.; Fairchild, James F.; Little, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Many habitats may be exposed to multiple chemical contaminants, particularly in agricultural areas where fertilizer and pesticide use are common; however, the singular and interactive effects of contaminants are not well understood. The objective of our study was to examine how realistic, sublethal environmental levels of ammonium nitrate fertilizer (0, 10, 20 mg/L and ammonium chloride control) and the common insecticide carbaryl (0 or 2.5 mg/L) individually and interactively affect the development, size, and survival of green frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles. We reared tadpoles for 95 d in outdoor 1,000-L polyethylene ponds. We found that the combination of carbaryl and nitrate had a negative effect on development and mass of tadpoles compared to the positive effect that either contaminant had alone. Presence of carbaryl was generally associated with short-term increases in algal resources, including ponds exposed to both carbaryl and nitrate. However, with exposure to nitrate and carbaryl, tadpole mass and development were not positively affected as with one chemical stressor alone. The combination of these sublethal contaminants may reduce the ability of amphibians to benefit from food-rich environments or have metabolic costs. Our study demonstrates the importance of considering multiple stressors when evaluating population-level responses.

  11. Chemically driven negative linear compressibility in sodium amidoborane, Na(NH2BH3).

    PubMed

    Magos-Palasyuk, Ewelina; Fijalkowski, Karol J; Palasyuk, Taras

    2016-06-30

    Over the past few years we have been witnessing a surge of scientific interest to materials exhibiting a rare mechanical effect such as negative linear compressibility (NLC). Here we report on strong NLC found in an ionic molecular crystal of sodium amidoborane (NaAB) - easily-accessible, optically transparent material. In situ Raman measurements revealed abnormal elongation of B-N and N-H bonds of NaAB at pressure about 3 GPa. Ab initio calculations indicate the observed spectroscopic changes are due to an isostructural phase transition accompanied by a stepwise expansion of the crystal along c axis. Analysis of calculated charge density distribution and geometry of molecular species (NH2BH3) univocally points to a chemically driven mechanism of NLC - pressure-induced formation of hydrogen bonds. The new H-bond acts as a "pivot screw" coupling N-H covalent bonds of neighbor molecular species - a system resembling a two-lever "jack device" on a molecular scale. A mechanism based on formation of new bonds stands in apparent contrast to mechanisms so far reported in majority of NLC materials where no significant alteration of chemical bonding was observed. The finding therefore suggests a qualitatively new direction in exploration the field towards rational design of incompressible materials.

  12. Chemically driven negative linear compressibility in sodium amidoborane, Na(NH2BH3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magos-Palasyuk, Ewelina; Fijalkowski, Karol J.; Palasyuk, Taras

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few years we have been witnessing a surge of scientific interest to materials exhibiting a rare mechanical effect such as negative linear compressibility (NLC). Here we report on strong NLC found in an ionic molecular crystal of sodium amidoborane (NaAB) – easily-accessible, optically transparent material. In situ Raman measurements revealed abnormal elongation of B-N and N-H bonds of NaAB at pressure about 3 GPa. Ab initio calculations indicate the observed spectroscopic changes are due to an isostructural phase transition accompanied by a stepwise expansion of the crystal along c axis. Analysis of calculated charge density distribution and geometry of molecular species (NH2BH3) univocally points to a chemically driven mechanism of NLC – pressure-induced formation of hydrogen bonds. The new H-bond acts as a “pivot screw” coupling N-H covalent bonds of neighbor molecular species – a system resembling a two-lever “jack device” on a molecular scale. A mechanism based on formation of new bonds stands in apparent contrast to mechanisms so far reported in majority of NLC materials where no significant alteration of chemical bonding was observed. The finding therefore suggests a qualitatively new direction in exploration the field towards rational design of incompressible materials.

  13. Chemically driven negative linear compressibility in sodium amidoborane, Na(NH2BH3)

    PubMed Central

    Magos-Palasyuk, Ewelina; Fijalkowski, Karol J.; Palasyuk, Taras

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years we have been witnessing a surge of scientific interest to materials exhibiting a rare mechanical effect such as negative linear compressibility (NLC). Here we report on strong NLC found in an ionic molecular crystal of sodium amidoborane (NaAB) – easily-accessible, optically transparent material. In situ Raman measurements revealed abnormal elongation of B-N and N-H bonds of NaAB at pressure about 3 GPa. Ab initio calculations indicate the observed spectroscopic changes are due to an isostructural phase transition accompanied by a stepwise expansion of the crystal along c axis. Analysis of calculated charge density distribution and geometry of molecular species (NH2BH3) univocally points to a chemically driven mechanism of NLC – pressure-induced formation of hydrogen bonds. The new H-bond acts as a “pivot screw” coupling N-H covalent bonds of neighbor molecular species – a system resembling a two-lever “jack device” on a molecular scale. A mechanism based on formation of new bonds stands in apparent contrast to mechanisms so far reported in majority of NLC materials where no significant alteration of chemical bonding was observed. The finding therefore suggests a qualitatively new direction in exploration the field towards rational design of incompressible materials. PMID:27357442

  14. Simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detector characteristics based on the concept of negative feedback in irradiated silicon detectors with carrier impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Zabrodskii, A.; Luukka, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this study the main characteristics of silicon Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD), the dependencies of the collected charge versus bias voltage and fluence, are calculated to fit experimental data. The calculations are based on two previously developed Ioffe Institute models of radiation degradation in Si detectors: 1) a model of two effective energy levels of radiation-induced defects, and 2) a mechanism of internal negative feedback responsible for the gain degradation in irradiated Si detectors originating from the avalanche multiplication at the detector junction. The combination of these models describes well the properties of irradiated p-i-n detectors in a wide range of fluences. For simulating the LGAD characteristics the models are adapted to its n+-pbi-p-p+ structure, where the built-in boron-doped layer pbi produces high electric field sufficient for carrier impact ionization. It is shown that the developed models give adequate quantitative description of the experimental results for the LGADs up to the fluence of 2×1015 n/cm2 including the detector pulse response; however, additional boron removal from the pbi layer is required to have the best correlation with the experimental data. Similar to the physical model developed for silicon strip detectors operated at high voltage, the results are interpreted in terms of the internal negative feedback mechanism. It is shown that in irradiated LGADs this feedback leads to the transfer of a significant fraction of the potential drop from the built-in layer toward the p+ contact. It initiates two negative effects, which both cause the gain degradation with irradiation: the lowering of the electric field in the n+-pbi region that reduces the multiplication probability, and the increase of the collection time and trapping-related charge losses.

  15. Analytical model of chemical phase and formation of DSB in chromosomes by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2013-03-01

    Mathematical analytical model of the processes running in individual radical clusters during the chemical phase (under the presence of radiomodifiers) proposed by us earlier has been further developed and improved. It has been applied to the data presented by Blok and Loman characterizing the oxygen effect in SSB and DSB formation (in water solution and at low-LET radiation) also in the region of very small oxygen concentrations, which cannot be studied with the help of experiments done with living cells. In this new analysis the values of all reaction rates and diffusion parameters known from literature have been made use of. The great increase of SSB and DSB at zero oxygen concentration may follow from the fact that at small oxygen concentrations the oxygen absorbs other radicals while at higher concentrations the formation of oxygen radicals prevails. It explains the double oxygen effect found already earlier by Ewing. The model may be easily extended to include also the effects of other radiomodifiers present in medium during irradiation.

  16. Influence of ionizing radiation on physical properties of native and chemically modified starches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, F.; Costa, L. C.; Aymes-Chodur, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic and anionic starches (chemically modified) and native starch (non-modified) were exposed to electron-beam irradiation at doses of 25, 75 and 150 kGy. The increasing solubility in water, due to chain scission and creation of polar groups as already mentioned in the literature, has been confirmed using several physical methodologies. Impedance Spectroscopy (IS) on water solutions was carried out in order to calculate the relaxation parameters of the Cole-Cole model and α and β parameters of the Jones-Dole equation, which show the influence of radiation dose on increasing polarity, decreasing of molecular mass and increasing of electrostatic attraction between chains. Infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) confirm the formation of polar groups that retain water. The aim of this work was to confirm that the control of chain scission and functionalization of starches with irradiation could then be used in a future work to create nanoparticles by complex coacervation in an aqueous base.

  17. Application of laser induced electron impact ionization to the deposition chemistry in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process with SiH4-NH3 gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Eustergerling, Brett; Hèden, Martin; Shi, Yujun

    2007-11-01

    The application of a laser-induced electron impact (LIEI) ionization source in studying the gas-phase chemistry of the SiH(4)/NH(3) hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) system has been investigated. The LIEI source is achieved by directing an unfocused laser beam containing both 118 nm (10.5 eV) vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and 355 nm UV radiations to the repeller plate in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Comparison of the LIEI source with the conventional 118 nm VUV single-photon ionization (SPI) method has demonstrated that the intensities of the chemical species with ionization potentials (IP) above 10.5 eV, e.g., H(2), N(2) and He, have been significantly enhanced with the incorporation of the LIEI source. It is found that the SPI source due to the 118 nm VUV light coexists in the LIEI source. This allows simultaneous observations of parent ions with enhanced intensity from VUV SPI and their "fingerprint" fragmentation ions from LIEI. It is, therefore, an effective tool to diagnose the gas-phase chemical species involved with both NH(3) and SiH(4) in the HWCVD reactor. In using the LIEI source to SiH(4), NH(3) and their mixtures, it has been shown that the NH(3) decomposition is suppressed with the addition of SiH(4) molecules. Examination of the NH(3) decomposition percentage and the time to reach the N(2) and H(2) steady-state intensities for various NH(3)/SiH(4) mixtures suggests that the extent of the suppression is enhanced with more SiH(4) content in the mixture. With increasing filament temperatures, the negative effect of SiH(4) becomes less important.

  18. In pursuit of negative Fukui functions: examples where the highest occupied molecular orbital fails to dominate the chemical reactivity.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Eleonora; Cárdenas, Carlos; Rabi, Sandra; Rabi, Nataly; Lee, Sungmin; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Toro-Labbe, Alejandro; Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    In our quest to explore molecules with chemically significant regions where the Fukui function is negative, we explored reactions where the frontier orbital that indicates the sites for electrophilic attack is not the highest occupied molecular orbital. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) controls the location of the regions where the Fukui function is negative, supporting the postulate that negative values of the Fukui function are associated with orbital relaxation effects and nodal surfaces of the frontier orbitals. Significant negative values for the condensed Fukui function, however, were not observed.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-03-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate.

  20. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to a portable mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Li, Anyin; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K; Taylor, Stephen; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI) is implemented on a portable mass spectrometer and applied to the direct detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl substituted benzenes. The presence of these compounds in the environment poses a significant threat to the health of both humans and wildlife because of their carcinogenic, toxic, and mutagenic properties. As such, instant detection outside of the laboratory is of particular importance to allow in-situ measurement at the source. Using a rapid, high throughput, miniature, handheld mass spectrometer, several alkyl substituted benzenes and PAHs (i.e., 1,2,3,5-tetramethylbenzene, pentamethylbenzene, hexamethylbenzene, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, acenaphthene, indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene, 9-ethylfluorene, and 1-benzyl-3-methyl-naphthalene) were identified and characterized using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) from ambient surfaces, in the open air. This method can provide almost instantaneous information while minimizing sample preparation, which is advantageous in terms of both cost and simplicity of analysis. This MS-based technique is applicable to a wide range of environmental organic molecules.

  1. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Keiji G; Ford, Michael J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  2. Fast analysis of high-energy compounds and agricultural chemicals in water with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Christopher C; MacMillan, Denise K; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-01-01

    Novel sampling and detection methods using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) are examined in the detection of explosives (RDX, TNT, HMX, and TNB) and agricultural chemicals (atrazine, alachlor and acetochlor) from aqueous matrices and authentic contaminated groundwater samples. DESI allows analysis of solid and liquid compounds directly from surfaces of interest with little or no sample preparation. Significant savings in analysis time and sample preparation are realized. The methods investigated here include (i) immediate analysis of filter paper wetted with contaminated water samples without further sample preparation, (ii) rapid liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), and (iii) analyte extraction from contaminated groundwater samples on-site using solid-phase extraction (SPE) membranes, followed by direct DESI analysis of the membrane. The wetted filter paper experiment demonstrates the maximum sample throughput for DESI analysis of aqueous matrices but has inadequate sensitivity for some of these analytes. Both the LLE and the SPE methods have adequate sensitivity. The resulting SPE membranes and/or small volume solvent extracts produced in these experiments are readily transported to off-site facilities for direct analysis by DESI. This realizes a significant reduction in the costs of sample shipping compared with those for typical liter-sized samples of groundwater. Total analysis times for these preliminary DESI analyses are comparable with or shorter than those for GC/MS and limits of detection approach environmental action levels for these compounds while maintaining a modest relative standard deviation. Tandem mass spectrometric data is used to provide additional specificity as needed.

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Selected Emerging Brominated Flame Retardants in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Surong; Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Bing; Du, Zhenxia

    2017-01-01

    Emerging brominated flame retardants (eBFRs) other than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and their derivatives in foods have been in focus in recent years due to their increasing production volumes, indefinite information on toxicities and the lack of data on occurrence in environments, foods as well as humans. In this study, gas chromatography was coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APGC-MS/MS) for the analysis of six eBFRs in pork, chicken, egg, milk and fish. A short section of unpacked capillary column coupled to the end of the analytical column was applied to improve the chromatographic behaviors of high boiling point compounds. The method was comprehensively validated with method limit of quantification (mLOQ) lower than 8 pg/g wet weight (w.w.). Samples from Chinese Total Diet study were quantified following the validated APGC-MS/MS method. 2,3,4,5-pentabromo-6-ethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were most frequently detected in samples. The highest concentration was found in fish with 351.9 pg/g w.w. of PBT. This is the first report on the presence of PBT in food samples with non-ignorable concentrations and detection rate. PMID:28281659

  4. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of low vapor pressure chemical particulates collected from a surface.

    PubMed

    Ewing, K J; Gibson, D; Sanghera, J; Miklos, F

    2015-01-01

    The collection of a low vapor pressure chemical simulant triethyl phosphate sorbed onto silica gel (TEP/SG) from a surface with subsequent analysis of the TEP/SG particulates using desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is described. Collection of TEP/SG particulates on a surface was accomplished using a sticky screen sampler composed of a stainless steel screen coated with partially polymerized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). DESI-MS analysis of TEP/SG particulates containing different percentages of TEP sorbed onto silica gel enabled the generation of response curves for the TEP ions m/z 155 and m/z 127. Using the response curves the calculation of the mass of TEP in a 25 wt% sample of TEP/SG was calculated, results show that the calculated mass of TEP was 14% different from the actual mass of TEP in the sample using the m/z 127 TEP ion response curve. Detection limits for the TEP vapor and TEP/SG particulates were calculated to be 4 μg and 6 particles, respectively.

  5. Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Raj K; Oda, Robert P; Youso, Stephanie L; Petrikovics, Ilona; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2012-11-01

    An analytical method utilizing chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma. Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and simultaneous extraction of the product into ethyl acetate facilitated by a phase-transfer catalyst, tetrabutylammonium sulfate. The limits of detection for cyanide and thiocyanate were 1 μM and 50 nM, respectively. The linear dynamic range was from 10 μM to 20 mM for cyanide and from 500 nM to 200 μM for thiocyanate with correlation coefficients higher than 0.999 for both cyanide and thiocyanate. The precision, as measured by %RSD, was below 9 %, and the accuracy was within 15 % of the nominal concentration for all quality control standards analyzed. The gross recoveries of cyanide and thiocyanate from plasma were over 90 %. Using this method, the toxicokinetic behavior of cyanide and thiocyanate in swine plasma was assessed following cyanide exposure.

  6. Formic and Acetic Acid Observations over Colorado by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Organic Acids' Role in Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Heikes, B.; Silwal, I.; McNeill, A.

    2015-12-01

    Formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc) have both natural and anthropogenic sources and a role in the atmospheric processing of carbon. These organic acids also have an increasing importance in setting the acidity of rain and snow as precipitation nitrate and sulfate concentrations have decreased. Primary emissions for both organic acids include biomass burning, agriculture, and motor vehicle emissions. Secondary production is also a substantial source for both acids especially from biogenic precursors, secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), and photochemical production from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs). Chemical transport models underestimate organic acid concentrations and recent research has sought to develop additional production mechanisms. Here we report HFo and HAc measurements during two campaigns over Colorado using the peroxide chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PCIMS). Iodide clusters of both HFo and HAc were recorded at mass-to-charge ratios of 173 and 187, respectively. The PCIMS was flown aboard the NCAR Gulfstream-V platform during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and aboard the NCAR C-130 during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE). The DC3 observations were made in May and June 2012 extending from the surface to 13 km over the central and eastern United States. FRAPPE observations were made in July and August 2014 from the surface to 7 km over Colorado. DC3 measurements reported here are focused over the Colorado Front Range and complement the FRAPPE observations. DC3 HFo altitude profiles are characterized by a decrease up to 6 km followed by an increase either back to boundary layer mixing ratio values or higher (a "C" shape). Organic acid measurements from both campaigns are interpreted with an emphasis on emission sources (both natural and anthropogenic) over Colorado and in situ photochemical production especially ozone precursors.

  7. Analysis of gaseous toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agent simulants by atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Justes, Dina R; Nanita, Sergio C; Noll, Robert J; Mulligan, Christopher C; Sanders, Nathaniel L; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-04-01

    The suitability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry as sensing instrumentation for the real-time monitoring of low levels of toxic compounds is assessed, especially with respect to public safety applications. Gaseous samples of nine toxic industrial compounds, NH3, H2S, Cl2, CS2, SO2, C2H4O, HBr, C6H6 and AsH3, and two chemical warfare agent simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and methyl salicylate (MeS), were studied. API-MS proves highly suited to this application, with speedy analysis times (<30 seconds), high sensitivity, high selectivity towards analytes, good precision, dynamic range and accuracy. Tandem MS methods were implemented in selected cases for improved selectivity, sensitivity, and limits of detection. Limits of detection in the parts-per-billion and parts-per-trillion range were achieved for this set of analytes. In all cases detection limits were well below the compounds' permissible exposure limits (PELs), even in the presence of added complex mixtures of alkanes. Linear responses, up to several orders of magnitude, were obtained over the concentration ranges studied (sub-ppb to ppm), with relative standard deviations less than 3%, regardless of the presence of alkane interferents. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented to show the performance trade-off between sensitivity, probability of correct detection, and false positive rate. A dynamic sample preparation system for the production of gas phase analyte concentrations ranging from 100 pptr to 100 ppm and capable of admixing gaseous matrix compounds and control of relative humidity and temperature is also described.

  8. Development of a gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system for on-site detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takahiro; Kakegawa, Ken; Aida, Mari; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Seto, Yasuo; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-06-02

    A gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system was developed to realize a mobile on-site analytical device for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In this system, the plasma source was directly connected to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. The plasma can be generated with ambient air, which is drawn into the discharge region by negative pressure in the mass spectrometer. High-power density pulsed plasma of 100 kW could be generated by using a microhollow cathode and a laboratory-built high-intensity pulsed power supply (pulse width: 10-20 μs; repetition frequency: 50 Hz). CWAs were desorbed and protonated in the enclosed space adjacent to the plasma source. Protonated sample molecules were introduced to the mass spectrometer by airflow through the discharge region. To evaluate the analytical performance of this device, helium and air plasma were directly irradiated to CWAs in the gas-cylinder-free plasma desorption/ionization system and the protonated molecules were analyzed by using an ion-trap mass spectrometer. A blister agent (nitrogen mustard 3) and nerve gases [cyclohexylsarin (GF), tabun (GA), and O-ethyl S-2-N,N-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX)] in solution in n-hexane were applied to the Teflon rod and used as test samples, after solvent evaporation. As a result, protonated molecules of CWAs were successfully observed as the characteristic ion peaks at m/z 204, 181, 163, and 268, respectively. In air plasma, the limits of detection were estimated to be 22, 20, 4.8, and 1.0 pmol, respectively, which were lower than those obtained with helium plasma. To achieve quantitative analysis, calibration curves were made by using CWA stimulant dipinacolyl methylphosphonate as an internal standard; straight correlation lines (R(2) = 0.9998) of the peak intensity ratios (target per internal standard) were obtained. Remarkably, GA and GF gave protonated dimer ions, and the ratios of the protonated dimer ions to the protonated

  9. Chemical ionization by [NO]+ and subsequent collision-induced dissociation for the selective on-line detection of monoterpenes and linalool.

    PubMed

    Rimetz-Planchon, Juliette; Dhooghe, Frederik; Schoon, Niels; Vanhaecke, Frank; Amelynck, Crist

    2011-03-15

    Existing on-line Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) techniques for quantification of atmospheric trace gases, such as Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs), suffer from difficulty in discriminating between isomeric (and more generally isobaric) compounds. Selective detection of these compounds, however, is important because they can affect atmospheric chemistry in different ways, depending on their chemical structure. In this work, Flowing Afterglow Tandem Mass Spectrometry (FATMS) was used to investigate the feasibility of the selective detection of a series of monoterpenes, an oxygenated monoterpene (linalool) and a sesquiterpene (β-caryophyllene). Ions at m/z 137 from [H(3)O](+) chemical ionization of α-pinene, linalool and β-caryophyllene have been subjected to Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) with Ar in the collision cell of a tandem mass spectrometer at center-of-mass energies ranging between 0 and 8 eV. Similar fragmentation patterns were obtained, demonstrating that this method is not suited for the selective detection of these compounds. However, CID of the ions at m/z 136 produced via [NO](+) chemical ionization of a series of monoterpenes has revealed promising results. Some tracer-product ions for individual compounds or groups of compounds were found, which can be considered as a step forward towards selective on-line monitoring of BVOCs with CIMS techniques.

  10. Chemical shrink materials and process for negative tone development (NTD) resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Sagan, John; Padmanaban, Munirathna; Pawlowski, Georg; Nagahara, Tatsuro

    2014-03-01

    Negative tone shrink materials (NSM) suitable for resolution enhancement of negative tone development (NTD) 193nm immersion resists have been developed. While this technology is being applied to integrated circuits (IC) manufacturing, reduction of shrink differences between isolated and dense (ID) CDs also called as shrink ID bias is the challenge to meet wide-spread applications. In this paper, we present the effects of resist thermal flow, proximity effects of DUV exposure, flood exposure of after developed image (ADI) on the NSM shrink. High mixing bake (MB) temperature (example 170°C) during the shrink process resulted in increased resist thermal flow leading to worse shrink ID bias of 3.5 nm. As different pitch pattern has different proximity effect and matching with illumination condition, uneven dose is expected on them. These differences in dose required to obtain same through pitch (1:X, X-1, 1.5, 2, 3, 5) CD was assigned as the cause for shrink ID bias as the de-protection chemistry is related to dose which affects the shrink amount. This was further confirmed by flood exposure of after developed image (ADI) which reduced shrink ID bias from 3.5 nm to 1.8 nm. We concluded that the flood exposure makes the ADIs of the resist chemically uniform thereby minimizing shrink ID bias. Based on these studies, a mechanism for shrink ID bias is proposed. A modified NSM with 1.2 nm shrink ID bias has been developed without the need for the flood exposure.

  11. Desulfurization of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides via the sulfur-by-oxygen replacement induced by the hydroxyl radical during negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lianming; White, David E; Ye, Connie; Vogt, Frederick G; Terfloth, Gerald J; Matsuhashi, Hayao

    2012-07-01

    While the occurrence of desulfurization of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in solution is well established, this study represents the first attempt to investigate the basis of the unexpected desulfurization via the net sulfur-by-oxygen (S-O) replacement during negative electrospray ionization (ESI). The current work, facilitated by quantitative mass deconvolution, demonstrates that considerable desulfurization can take place even under common negative ESI operating conditions. The extent of desulfurization is dependent on the molar phosphorothioate oligonucleotide-to-hydroxyl radical ratio, which is consistent with the corona discharge-induced origin of the hydroxyl radical leading to the S-O replacement. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that an increase of the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) flow rate and the on-column concentration of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide, as well as a decrease of the electrospray voltage reduce the degree of desulfurization. Comparative LC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) sequencing of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide and its corresponding desulfurization product revealed evidence that the S-O replacement occurs at multiple phosphorothioate internucleotide linkage sites. In practice, the most convenient and effective strategy for minimizing this P = O artifact is to increase the LC flow rate and the on-column concentration of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. Another approach to mitigate possible detrimental effects of the undesired desulfurization is to operate the ESI source at a very low electrospray voltage to diminish the corona discharge; however this will significantly compromise sensitivity when analyzing the low-level P = O impurities in phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

  12. Liquid chromatography/negative electrospray ionization ion trap MS(2) mass spectrometry application for the determination of microcystins occurrence in Southern Portugal water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M A; Reis, M P; Mateus, M C

    2013-11-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are toxins produced by cyanobacteria which are common organisms in the phytoplankton of eutrophic lakes, rivers and freshwater reservoirs. In the present work, a novel method of liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/Ion trap-MS/MS), operated in the negative ionization mode, was developed for the analysis of these cyanotoxins. The method was applied to determine the amounts of total microcystins-LR, -YR and -RR in two water reservoirs in Southern Portugal, namely Alqueva and Beliche. A total of 30 water samples were analysed along 2011. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used for sample cleaning-up and analyte enrichment. The extracted toxins were separated on a C18 column with a gradient of acetonitrile/water with 0.1% formic acid. Detection of microcystins was carried out using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in the negative polarity mode, as this method gave a higher selectivity. The MC-RR, YR and LR quantification limits were 17.9, 31.7 and 15.8 ng/L, respectively; quite below the limits recommended by WHO guidelines for drinking water (1 μg/L). Total MC highest concentrations were found in the warm months of June, July and September in Alqueva sampling sites, with concentrations of MC LR and RR ranging 17-344 and 25-212 ng/L, respectively, showing comparable results for MC-RR and LR and slightly lower concentration of MC-YR. Detected values for Beliche reservoir were below quantification limits.

  13. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons' law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  14. Negative thermal expansion in functional materials: controllable thermal expansion by chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Lei; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-06-07

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) is an intriguing physical property of solids, which is a consequence of a complex interplay among the lattice, phonons, and electrons. Interestingly, a large number of NTE materials have been found in various types of functional materials. In the last two decades good progress has been achieved to discover new phenomena and mechanisms of NTE. In the present review article, NTE is reviewed in functional materials of ferroelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, superconductors, temperature-induced electron configuration change and so on. Zero thermal expansion (ZTE) of functional materials is emphasized due to the importance for practical applications. The NTE functional materials present a general physical picture to reveal a strong coupling role between physical properties and NTE. There is a general nature of NTE for both ferroelectrics and magnetics, in which NTE is determined by either ferroelectric order or magnetic one. In NTE functional materials, a multi-way to control thermal expansion can be established through the coupling roles of ferroelectricity-NTE, magnetism-NTE, change of electron configuration-NTE, open-framework-NTE, and so on. Chemical modification has been proved to be an effective method to control thermal expansion. Finally, challenges and questions are discussed for the development of NTE materials. There remains a challenge to discover a "perfect" NTE material for each specific application for chemists. The future studies on NTE functional materials will definitely promote the development of NTE materials.

  15. Adhesion-dependent negative friction coefficient on chemically modified graphite at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhao; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Li, Qunyang; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2012-12-01

    From the early tribological studies of Leonardo da Vinci to Amontons’ law, friction has been shown to increase with increasing normal load. This trend continues to hold at the nanoscale, where friction can vary nonlinearly with normal load. Here we present nanoscale friction force microscopy (FFM) experiments for a nanoscale probe tip sliding on a chemically modified graphite surface in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Our results demonstrate that, when adhesion between the AFM tip and surface is enhanced relative to the exfoliation energy of graphite, friction can increase as the load decreases under tip retraction. This leads to the emergence of an effectively negative coefficient of friction in the low-load regime. We show that the magnitude of this coefficient depends on the ratio of tip-sample adhesion to the exfoliation energy of graphite. Through both atomistic- and continuum-based simulations, we attribute this unusual phenomenon to a reversible partial delamination of the topmost atomic layers, which then mimic few- to single-layer graphene. Lifting of these layers with the AFM tip leads to greater deformability of the surface with decreasing applied load. This discovery suggests that the lamellar nature of graphite yields nanoscale tribological properties outside the predictive capacity of existing continuum mechanical models.

  16. Characterization and quantification of triacylglycerols in peanut oil by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Dong, Xu-Yan; Lv, Xin; Jiang, Mu-Lan; Li, Guang-Ming; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of natural triacylglycerols (TAGs) in various edible oils is prodigious due to the hundreds of set is of TAG compositions, which makes the identification of TAGs quite difficult. In this investigation, the off-line 2D system coupling of nonaqueous RP and silver-ion HPLC with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS detection has been applied to the identification and quantification of TAGs in peanut oil. The method was successful in the separation of a high number of TAG solutes, and the TAG structures were evaluated by analyzing their atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectra information. HPLC and MS conditions have been optimized and the fragmentation mechanisms of isomers have been validated. In addition, an internal standard approach has been developed for TAG quantification. Then this system was applied in peanut oil samples and there was a total of 48 TAGs including regioisomers that have been determined and quantified.

  17. Multiresidue analysis of pesticides in traditional Chinese medicines using gas chromatography - negative chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a residue analysis method for the simultaneous determination of 107 pesticides in the traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), Angelica sinensis, Angelica dahurica, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Pogostemon cablin, and Lonicera japonica Thunb, was developed using gas chromatography couple...

  18. A novel method for analyzing solanesyl esters in tobacco leaves using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2010-09-10

    A direct and simple method for analyzing solanesyl esters found in tobacco leaves was developed. Sample preparation was performed by accelerated solvent extractor 200 (ASE200) using n-hexane followed by evaporating solution in vacuo and dissolving residue with acetone. The separation of analytes was conducted through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with an SIL-C18/5C column and the non-aqueous reversed phase chromatography (NARP) technique using acetone and acetonitrile as the mobile phase with a linear gradient. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometer (APCI/MS) in positive mode was used to detect solanesyl esters in the following conditions: capillary voltage 4000 V, corona current 10 microA, drying gas flow 5 mL/min, fragmentor voltage 200 V, nebulizer pressure 60 psi, and vaporizer temperature 500 degrees C. Each solanesyl ester was identified by the comparison of analyte with synthesized solanesyl esters. Quantification was conducted by selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode in order to detect the specific product ion (613.6 m/z) fragmented from solanesyl ester. The calibration curve was made in the range of 0.1-40 microg/mL with a regression coefficient over 0.999 on almost all solanesyl esters. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 microg/mL and from 0.03 to 0.15 microg/mL, respectively, on the SIM mode of MS for quantification. Recovery (%) ranged from about 80 to 120%. The direct quantification using the developed method succeeded in showing a different amount and composition of solanesyl esters among various tobacco leaves.

  19. On-line derivatization gas chromatography with furan chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for screening of amphetamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Ghule, Anil; Liu, Jen-Yu; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2006-12-22

    A simple alternative method with minimal sample pretreatment is investigated for screening of amphetamines in small volume (using only 20 microL) of urine sample. The method is sensitive and selective. The method uses gas chromatography (GC) direct sample introduction (DSI) for on-line derivatization (acylation) of amphetamines to improve sensitivity. Furan as chemical ionization (CI) reagent in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is used to improve selectivity. Low background with sharp protonated molecular ion peaks of analytes is the evidence of improvement in sensitivity and selectivity. Blank urine samples spiked with known amounts of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine is analyzed. Selected ion monitoring of the characteristic product ions (m/z 119+136+150+163) using furan CI-MS/MS in positive ion mode is used for quantification. Limits of detection (LOD) between 0.4 and 1.0 ng mL(-1) and limits of quantitation (LOQ) between 1.0 and 2.0 ng mL(-1) are established. Linear response over the range of 1-1000 ng mL(-1) (r(2)>0.997) is observed for all analytes, except for methamphetamine (2.0-1000 ng mL(-1)). Good accuracy between 86 and 113% and precision ranging from 4 to 18% is obtained. The method is also tested on real samples of urine from suspected drug abusers. This method could be used for screening and determination of amphetamines in urine samples, however needs additional work for full validation.

  20. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  1. Comparative study of fourteen alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves using HPLC-diode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/MS method.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jialin; Gong, Tianxing; Ma, Bin; Zhang, Lin; Kano, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare alkaloid profile of Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves. Ten oxindole alkaloids and four glycosidic indole alkaloids were identified using HPLC-diode array detection (DAD) or LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-MS method, and a HPLC-UV method for simultaneous quantification of major alkaloids was validated. The hooks are characterized by high levels of four oxindole alkaloids rhynchophylline (R), isorhynchophylline (IR), corynoxeine (C) and isocorynoxeine (IC), while the leaves contained high level of two glycosidic indole alkaloids vincoside lactam (VL) and strictosidine (S). The presented methods have proven its usefulness in chemical characterization of U. rhynchophylla hooks and leaves.

  2. Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci from bovine intramammary infection by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tomazi, Tiago; Gonçalves, Juliano Leonel; Barreiro, Juliana Regina; de Campos Braga, Patrícia Aparecida; Prada e Silva, Luis Felipe; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; dos Santos, Marcos Veiga

    2014-05-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are among the main pathogens causing bovine intramammary infection (IMI) in many countries. However, one of the limitations related to the specific diagnosis of CoNS is the lack of an accurate, rapid, and convenient method that can differentiate the bacterial species comprising this group. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to accurately identify CoNS species in dairy cow IMI. In addition, the study aimed to determine the frequency of CoNS species causing bovine IMI. A total of 108 bacterial isolates were diagnosed as CoNS by microbiological cultures from two milk samples collected from 21 dairy herds; the first sample was collected at the cow level (i.e., 1,242 composite samples from all quarters), while the second sample was collected at the mammary quarter level (i.e., 1,140 mammary samples collected from 285 cows). After CoNS isolation was confirmed by microbiological culture for both samples, all CoNS isolates (n=108) were genotypically differentiated by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a partial groEL gene sequence and subjected to the MALDI-TOF MS identification procedure. MALDI-TOF MS correctly identified 103 (95.4%) of the CoNS isolates identified by PCR-RFLP at the species level. Eleven CoNS species isolated from bovine IMI were identified by PCR-RFLP, and the most prevalent species was Staphylococcus chromogenes (n=80; 74.1%). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS may be a reliable alternative method for differentiating CoNS species causing bovine IMI.

  3. Determination of the enantiomer fraction of PBB 149 by gas chromatography/electron capture negative ionization tandem mass spectrometry in the selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    von der Recke, Roland; Mariussen, Espen; Berger, Urs; Götsch, Arntraut; Herzke, Dorte; Vetter, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Enantioselective determination of the atropisomers of 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexabromobiphenyl (PBB 149) in a purified sample from a bird egg was attempted in this work. By application of the classic method for PBB determination, i.e. gas chromatography coupled to electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS) using the bromide ions, the enantiomers interfered with another brominated compound. Subsequent measurements clarified that this interference did not occur in the mass chromatogram of the molecular ion of PBB 149. Therefore, a GC/ECNI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method was developed, based on the fragmentation of [M]-. A suitable precursor-product ion transition was found for m/z 627.5 --> 80 +/- 1.5, representing the most abundant ion trace of the molecular ion and the bromide ions. Optimization of the ion source temperature, the methane gas pressure, and the collision voltages resulted in a robust method that could solve the problem. Subsequent injections of a technical PBB product (Firemaster BP-6) resulted in the anticipated racemic proportion (enantiomer fraction (EF) = 0.50 +/- 0.02 (n = 8)). By contrast, the EF in the purified extract of a bird egg was found to be 0.42 +/- 0.02 (n = 10), indicative of a significant enantioenrichment of the second eluting atropisomer. Additional measurements were performed on a non-chiral column. These measurements allowed for the detection of 16 hexabromobiphenyls (hexa-BBs) in Firemaster BP-6. These comparisons verified that PBB 149 enantiomers did not interfere with an isomer that could falsify the enantiomer fraction in the sample. The novel method using GC/ECNI-MS/MS in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode was eight times more sensitive than application of conventional GC/ECNI-MS selected ion monitoring (SIM) analysis of the molecular ion.

  4. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    PubMed

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region.

  5. Non-proximate detection of small and large molecules by desorption electrospray ionization and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry: instrumentation and applications in forensics, chemistry, and biology.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Mulligan, Christopher C; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-09-15

    Ambient surfaces are examined by mass spectrometry at distances of up to 3 m from the instrument without any prior sample preparation. Non-proximate versions of the desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization experiments are shown to allow rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of trace amounts of active ingredients in pharmaceutical drug formulations, illicit drugs (methamphetamine, cocaine, and diacetylmorphine), organic salts, peptides, chemical warfare agent simulants, and other small organic compounds. Utilizing an ion transport tube to transport analyte ions to the mass spectrometer, nonproximate DESI allows one to collect high-quality, largely interference-free spectra with signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of more than 100. High selectivity is achieved by tandem mass spectrometry and by reactive DESI, a variant experiment in which reagents added into the solvent spray allow bond-forming reactions with the analyte. Ion/molecule reactions were found to selectively suppress the response of mixture components other than the analyte of interest in nonproximate-DESI. Flexible ion transport tubing is also investigated, allowing performance similar to stainless steel tubing in the transport of ions from the sample to the mass spectrometer. Transfer tube temperature effects are examined. A multiple sprayer DESI source capable of analyzing a larger sample area was evaluated to decrease the sampling time and increase sample throughput. Low nanogram detection limits were obtained for the compounds studied from a wide variety of surfaces, even those present in complex matrixes.

  6. Detection of chemical warfare agent degradation products in foods using liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubachka, Kevin M; Richardson, Douglas D; Heitkemper, Douglas T; Caruso, Joseph A

    2008-08-22

    The following work presents the exploration of three chromatographic separations in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the analysis of chemical warfare agent degradation products (CWADPs). The robust ionization of ICP is virtually matrix independent thus enabling the examination of sample matrices generally considered too complicated for analysis by electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS with little to no sample preparation. The analysis was focused on detecting CWADPs in food matrices, as they present possible vehicles for terrorist contamination. Due to the specific detection of (31)P by ICP-MS, resolution of analytes of interest from other P-containing interferences (H(3)PO(4)) was a crucial part of each separation. Up to 10 CWADPs were separated in the presence of H(3)PO(4) with detection limits in the low part per billion levels using the methods described. Additionally, one method was tailored to be compatible with both ICP-MS and ESI-MS making structural verification possible.

  7. Exploring atmospheric photooxidation with a new Gas Chromatograph Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (GC-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Allen, H. M.; Teng, A.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric photooxidation is a fundamental process that effectively removes pollutants and greenhouse gases from the air we breathe. One way to explore these processes is to directly measure the stable intermediate oxidation products. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) has proven to be a powerful tool to sensitively detect with high time resolution photooxidation products in the atmosphere such as hydroperoxides, acids, nitrates, and other oxygenated volatile organic compounds. Despite the potential to elucidate atmospheric photooxidation in detail, field observations of such compounds are sparse. Here we present the development of a new Gas Chromatograph Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (GC-ToF-CIMS) for field deployment. Using low pressure gas chromatography and CF3O- ionization chemistry, the selective operation of a GC is combined with the sensitive, specific, and fast detection of a high-resolution ToF-CIMS. The combination of chromatographic separation and exact mass identification allows detecting isomer resolved photooxidation products. Direct measurements in the atmosphere of such isomer distributions are particularly interesting due to the broad range of their individual atmospheric lifetimes and impacts.

  8. Double bond localization in minor homoallylic fatty acid methyl esters using acetonitrile chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Anthony L; Diau, Guan-Yeu; Abril, Reuben; Brenna, J Thomas

    2002-08-15

    Double bond position in natural fatty acids is critical to biochemical properties, however, common instrument-based methods cannot locate double bonds in fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), the predominant analysis form of fatty acids. A recently described mass spectrometry (MS) method for locating double bonds in FAME is reported here for the analysis of minor (<1%) components of real FAME mixtures derived from three natural sources; golden algae (Schizochytrium sp.), primate brain white matter, and transgenic mouse liver. Acetonitrile chemical ionization tandem MS was used to determine double bond positions in 39 FAME, most at concentrations well below 1% of all fatty acid methyl esters. FAME identified in golden algae are 14:1n-6, 14:3n-3, 16:1n-7, 16:2n-6, 16:3n-6, 16:3n-3, 16:4n-3, 18:2n-7, 18:3n-7, 18:3n-8, 18:4n-3, 18:4n-5, 20:3n-7, 20:4n-3, 20:4n-5, 20:4n-7, 20:5n-3, and 22:4n-9. Additional FAME identified in primate brain white matter are 20:1n-7, 20:1n-9, 20:2n-7, 20:2n-9, 22:1n-7, 22:1n-9, 22:1n-13, 22:2n-6, 22:2n-7, 22:2n-9, 22:3n-6, 22:3n-7, 22:3n-9, 22:4n-6, 24:1n-7, 24:1n-9, and 24:4n-6. Additional FAME identified in mouse liver are 26:5n-6, 26:6n-3, 28:5n-6, and 28:6n-3. The primate brain 22:3n-7 and algae 18:4n-5 are novel fatty acids. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the technique for analysis of real samples. Tables are presented to aid in interpretation of acetonitrile CIMS/MS spectra.

  9. Cyclic organic peroxides identification and trace analysis by Raman microscopy and open-air chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena-Quevedo, Alvaro Javier

    The persistent use of cyclic organic peroxides in explosive devices has increased the interest in study these compounds. Development of methodologies for the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) has become an urgent priority. However, differences in physical properties between cyclic organic peroxides make difficult the development of a general method for peroxide analysis and detection. Following this urgency, the first general technique for the analysis of any peroxide, regarding its structural differences is reported. Characterization and detection of TATP and HMTD was performed using an Open-Air Chemical Ionization High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. The first spectrometric analysis for tetramethylene diperoxide dicarbamide (TMDD) and other nitrogen based peroxides using Raman Microscopy and Mass Spectrometry is reported. Analysis of cyclic peroxides by GC-MS was also conducted to compare results with OACI-HRTOF data. In the OACI mass spectrum, HMTD showed a clear signal at m/z 209 MH + and a small adduct peak at m/z 226 [M+NH4]+ that allowed its detection in commercial standard solutions and lab made standards. TMDD presented a molecular peak of m/z 237 MH+ and an adduct peak of m/z 254 [M+NH4]+. TATP showed a single peak at m/z 240 [M+NH4]+, while the peak of m/z 223 or 222 was completely absent. This evidence suggests that triperoxides are stabilized by the ammonium ion. TATP samples with deuterium enrichment were analyzed to compare results that could differentiate from HMTD. Raman microscopy was used as a complementary characterization method and was an essential tool for cyclic peroxides identification, particularly for those which could not be extensively purified. All samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to confirm the Mass Spectrometry results. Peroxide O-O vibrations were observed around 750-970 cm-1. D18-TATP studies had identified ketone triperoxide nu(O-O) vibration around

  10. A review of quantitative structure-property relationships for the fate of ionizable organic chemicals in water matrices and identification of knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Tom M; Ragas, Ad M J

    2017-03-22

    Many organic chemicals are ionizable by nature. After use and release into the environment, various fate processes determine their concentrations, and hence exposure to aquatic organisms. In the absence of suitable data, such fate processes can be estimated using Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPRs). In this review we compiled available QSPRs from the open literature and assessed their applicability towards ionizable organic chemicals. Using quantitative and qualitative criteria we selected the 'best' QSPRs for sorption, (a)biotic degradation, and bioconcentration. The results indicate that many suitable QSPRs exist, but some critical knowledge gaps remain. Specifically, future focus should be directed towards the development of QSPR models for biodegradation in wastewater and sediment systems, direct photolysis and reaction with singlet oxygen, as well as additional reactive intermediates. Adequate QSPRs for bioconcentration in fish exist, but more accurate assessments can be achieved using pharmacologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models. No adequate QSPRs exist for bioconcentration in non-fish species. Due to the high variability of chemical and biological species as well as environmental conditions in QSPR datasets, accurate predictions for specific systems and inter-dataset conversions are problematic, for which standardization is needed. For all QSPR endpoints, additional data requirements involve supplementing the current chemical space covered and accurately characterizing the test systems used.

  11. Methanol chemical ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry of O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate (VX) and its degradation products.

    PubMed

    Rohrbaugh, D K

    2000-10-06

    Mass spectrometric analysis of O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate (VX) degradation products by electron ionization produces extensive fragmentation with little or no molecular ion information making product identification difficult. Milder chemical ionization (CI) is commonly used to provide molecular mass and structure confirmation. In this study, methanol was used as a CI reagent in combination with an ion trap detector for detection and identification of over 30 compounds present in a thermally degraded sample of VX. The use of methanol provides superior results for this class of compounds with less fragmentation than commonly observed with gas reagents and offers logistical advantages for on-site analysis by being easier to transport and safer to use than gas cylinders.

  12. Quantitative analysis of cortisol and 6β-hydroxycortisol in urine by fully automated SPE and ultra-performance LC coupled with electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (ESCi)-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Lang, Lotte M; Dalsgaard, Petur W; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-performance LC TOF MS method for quantitative analysis of cortisol and 6β-hydroxycortisol in urine was developed. The method was used for determination of the ratio between 6β-hydroxycortisol and cortisol in urine received from autopsy cases and living persons as a measure of cytochrome P450 3A enzyme activity. Urine samples (0.25 mL) were extracted with an in-house developed fully automated 96-well SPE system. The compounds were quantified using a Waters ACQUITY UPLC system coupled to a Waters SYNAPT G2. The MS sensitivity was optimized by using negative ionization in sensitivity mode (resolution >10 000 full-width at half-maximum), and further optimized by using the enhanced duty cycle around the 410 m/z. ESCi (simultaneous electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization) mode was used to compensate for the matrix effects of postmortem urine. Finally, the SYNAPT G2 was tested as a quantitative instrument. The developed method has a measurement range from 2.5-300 ng/mL for cortisol to 10-1200 ng/mL for 6β-hydroxycortisol. Mean overall process efficiencies were 29.4 and 23.0% for cortisol and 6β-hydroxycortisol, respectively. In 20 forensic reference cases, the range of the 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio was 0.29-14.2 with a median of 3.04.

  13. MoS2/Ag nanohybrid: A novel matrix with synergistic effect for small molecule drugs analysis by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaju; Deng, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaohui; Sun, Liang; Li, Hui; Cheng, Quan; Xi, Kai; Xu, Danke

    2016-09-21

    This paper reports a facile synthesis of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets/silver nanoparticles (MoS2/Ag) hybrid and its use as an effective matrix in negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The nanohybrid exerts a strong synergistic effect, leading to high performance detection of small molecule analytes including amino acids, peptides, fatty acids and drugs. The enhancement of laser desorption/ionization (LDI) efficiency is largely attributed to the high surface roughness and large surface area for analyte adsorption, better dispersibility, increased thermal conductivity and enhanced UV energy absorption as compared to pure MoS2. Moreover, both Ag nanoparticles and the edge of the MoS2 layers function as deprotonation sites for proton capture, facilitating the charging process in negative ion mode and promoting formation of negative ions. As a result, the MoS2/Ag nanohybrid proves to be a highly attractive matrix in MALDI-TOF MS, with desired features such as high desorption/ionization efficiency, low fragmentation interference, high salt tolerance, and no sweet-spots for mass signal. These characteristic properties allowed for simultaneous analysis of eight different drugs and quantification of acetylsalicylic acid in the spiked human serum. This work demonstrates for the first time the fabrication and application of a novel MoS2/Ag hybrid, and provides a new platform for use in the rapid and high throughput analysis of small molecules by mass spectrometry.

  14. Development of Bottom-Up Chemical Approaches to 3-D Negative Index Meta-Materials: Two Photon Lithographic Approach-Chiral Chemical Synthesis Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    Approaches to 3-D Negative Index Meta-Materials Two Photon Lithographic Approach- Chiral Chemical Synthesis Approach 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-09-1...materials with large optical activity. A series of chiral polymers, based on thiophene, fluorene, and fluorene-quinoxaline motif with chiral side...chains were synthesized, post-processed and characterized in both solution and film phases. A new concept of chirality enhancement via coupling with

  15. Early time evolution of negative ion clouds and electron density depletions produced during electron attachment chemical release experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the early time evolution of electron depletions and negative ion clouds produced during electron attachment chemical releases in the ionosphere. The simulation model considers the evolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and a three-species plasma that contains electrons, positive ions, and also heavy negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attachment reaction. The early time evolution (less than the negative ion cyclotron period) of the system shows that a negative charge surplus initially develops outside of the depletion boundary as the heavy negative ions move across the boundary. The electrons are initially restricted from moving into the depletion due to the magnetic field. An inhomogenous electric field develops across the boundary layer due to this charge separation. A highly sheared electron flow velocity develops in the depletion boundary due to E x B and Delta-N x B drifts that result from electron density gradients and this inhomogenous electric field. Structure eventually develops in the depletion boundary layer due to low-frequency electrostatic waves that have growth times shorter than the negative ion cyclotron period. It is proposed that these waves are most likely produced by the electron-ion hybrid instability that results from sufficiently large shears in the electron flow velocity.

  16. Visualization of cancer-related chemical components in mouse pancreas tissue by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yoichi; Satoh, Shuya; Naito, Junpei; Kyogaku, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is an informative approach for the comprehensive analysis of multiple components inside biological specimens. We used novel tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method to visualize cancer-related chemical components in the mouse pancreas tissue section at a sampling pitch of 100 µm. Positive ion mode measurements from m/z 100 to 1500 resulted in the visualization of multiple components that are tentatively assigned as polyamines, lipids and proteins. Their signal intensities inside the cancerous and the non-cancerous regions were found to be significantly different by the two-sample t-test.

  17. Use of a hand-portable gas chromatograph-toroidal ion trap mass spectrometer for self-chemical ionization identification of degradation products related to O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate (VX).

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip A; Lepage, Carmela R Jackson; Savage, Paul B; Bowerbank, Christopher R; Lee, Edgar D; Lukacs, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    The chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate (VX) and many related degradation products produce poorly diagnostic electron ionization (EI) mass spectra by transmission quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thus, chemical ionization (CI) is often used for these analytes. In this work, pseudomolecular ([M+H](+)) ion formation from self-chemical ionization (self-CI) was examined for four VX degradation products containing the diisopropylamine functional group. A person-portable toroidal ion trap mass spectrometer with a gas chromatographic inlet was used with EI, and both fixed-duration and feedback-controlled ionization time. With feedback-controlled ionization, ion cooling (reaction) times and ion formation target values were varied. Evidence for protonation of analytes was observed under all conditions, except for the largest analyte, bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide which yielded [M+H](+) ions only with increased fixed ionization or ion cooling times. Analysis of triethylamine-d(15) provided evidence that [M+H](+) production was likely due to self-CI. Analysis of a degraded VX sample where lengthened ion storage and feedback-controlled ionization time were used resulted in detection of [M+H](+) ions for VX and several relevant degradation products. Dimer ions were also observed for two phosphonate compounds detected in this sample.

  18. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Grimaudo, V.; Mezger, K.; Moreno-García, P.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2016-03-01

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APGC/MS/MS) an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) for the determination of dioxins.

    PubMed

    van Bavel, Bert; Geng, Dawei; Cherta, Laura; Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Portolés, Tania; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; Dunstan, Jody; Jones, Rhys; Kotz, Alexander; Winterhalter, Helmut; Malisch, Rainer; Traag, Wim; Hagberg, Jessika; Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid; Beltran, Joaquim; Hernández, Félix

    2015-09-01

    The use of a new atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography (APGC) coupled with a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system, as an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), for the determination of PCDDs/PCDFs is described. The potential of using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a tandem quadrupole analyzer has been validated for the identification and quantification of dioxins and furans in different complex matrices. The main advantage of using the APCI source is the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure, which results in very limited fragmentation. APCI mass spectra are dominated by the molecular ion cluster, in contrast with the high energy ionization process under electron ionization (EI). The use of the molecular ion as the precursor ion in MS/MS enhances selectivity and, consequently, sensitivity by increasing the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). For standard solutions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, injections of 10 fg in the splitless mode on 30- or 60-m-length, 0.25 mm inner diameter (id), and 25 μm film thickness low-polarity capillary columns (DB5MS type), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of >10:1 were routinely obtained. Linearity was achieved in the region (correlation coefficient of r(2) > 0.998) for calibration curves ranging from 100 fg/μL to 1000 pg/μL. The results from a wide variety of complex samples, including certified and standard reference materials and samples from several QA/QC studies, which were previously analyzed by EI HRGC/HRMS, were compared with the results from the APGC/MS/MS system. Results between instruments showed good agreement both in individual congeners and toxic equivalence factors (TEQs). The data show that the use of APGC in combination with MS/MS for the analysis of dioxins has the same potential, in terms of sensitivity and selectivity, as the traditional HRMS instrumentation used for this analysis. However, the APCI/MS/MS system, as a benchtop system, is

  20. Rapid Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Hydrolysis Products by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    microextraction (SPME) sampling and DESI-MS analysis or liquid chromatographic electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS) analysis. The...sample pre- treatment, resulting in a significant increase in sample throughput over conventional solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling and DESI...methods based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry GC-MS analysis [35-43] and direct

  1. Zero-Net-Charge Air Ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument monitors air supplied by air ionizer and regulates ionizer to ensure net charge neutral. High-impedance electrometer and nulling control amplifier regulate output of air ionizer. Primarily intended to furnish ionized air having no net charge, instrument adaptable to generating air with positive or negative net charge is so desired. Useful where integrated circuit chips are manufactured, inspected, tested or assembled.

  2. Comparison of electron and chemical ionization modes for the quantification of thiols and oxidative compounds in white wines by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thibon, Cécile; Pons, Alexandre; Mouakka, Nadia; Redon, Pascaline; Méreau, Raphaël; Darriet, Philippe

    2015-10-09

    A rapid, sensitive method for assaying volatile impact compounds in white wine was developed using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) technology, with a triple quadrupole analyzer operating in chemical ionization and electron impact mode. This GC-MS/MS method made it possible to assay volatile thiols (3SH: 3-sulfanylhexanol, formerly 3MH; 3SHA: 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, formerly 3MHA; 4MSP: 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one, formerly 4MMP; BM: benzenemethanethiol; E2SA: ethyl 2-sulfanylacetate; and 2FM: 2-furanmethanethiol) and odoriferous oxidation markers (Sotolon: 4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5)H-furanone, methional, and phenylacetaldehyde) simultaneously in dry white wines, comparing electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) modes. More molecular ions were produced by CI than protonated molecules, despite the greater fragmentation caused by EI. So, even using the best reactant gas giving the highest signal for thiols, EI was the best ionization mode, with the lowest detection limits. For all compounds of interest, the limits of quantification (LOQ) obtained were well below their detection thresholds (ranging from 0.5 to 8.5ng/L for volatile thiols and 65-260ng/L for oxidation markers). Recovery rates ranged from 86% to 111%, reproducibility (in terms of relative standard deviation; RSD) was below 18% in all cases, with correlation coefficients above 0.991 for all analytes. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of compounds of interest in Sauvignon Blanc wines from a single estate and ten different vintages.

  3. Acanthocephalan fish parasites (Rhadinorhynchidae Lühe, 1912) as potential biomarkers: Molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinertz, S.; Eckhardt, K.-U.; Theisen, S.; Palm, H. W.; Leinweber, P.

    2016-07-01

    The present study represents the first molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry applied on fish parasites. A total of 71 fishes from Balinese fish markets, 36 Auxis rochei (Risso, 1810) and 35 A. thazard (Lacepède, 1800), were studied for their acanthocephalan parasites. This is the first record of Rhadinorhynchus zhukovi in Balinese waters, Indonesia, and we describe for the first time A. rochei and A. thazard as R. zhukovi hosts. Using this method, small scale variations within the chemical compounds of acanthocephalans could be detected. Using this methodology it will be possible to generate additional, pollutant specific information from aquatic habitats in future with the potential of a new bioindicator application for parasite/host origin and/or environmental pollution.

  4. Release of 1-O-alkylglyceryl 3-phosphorylcholine, O-deacetyl platelet-activating factor, from leukocytes: chemical ionization mass spectrometry of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, J; Tencé, M; Varenne, P; Das, B C; Lunel, J; Benveniste, J

    1980-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the simultaneous release of platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) and of its deacetylated derivative (lyso-PAF-acether) from hog leukocytes. On the basis of spectroscopy and chemical reactions, the structure of O-deacetyl-PAF is shown to be 1-O-alkylglyceryl 3-phosphorylcholine, an alkyl ether analog of lyso-phosphatidylcholine. Acetylation of lyso-PAF yields a compound with biological activity and chromatographical behavior indistinguishable from those of native PAF. Lyso-PAF may be considered to be either the precursor or the enzymatic degradation product of PAF. The usefulness of chemical ionization mass spectrometry for structural determination of phospholipids is also demonstrated. PMID:6938950

  5. Thermal dissociation atmospheric chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry with a miniature source for selective trace detection of dimethoate in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhang, Xinglei; Han, Jing; Guo, Xiali; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen; Luo, Liping

    2013-01-21

    A miniature thermal dissociation atmospheric chemical ionization (TDCI) source, coupled with LTQ-MS, has been developed for rapid trace detection of pesticide residues such as dimethoate in highly viscous fruit juice samples. Instead of toxic organic solvents and the high electric field used in the conventional ionizations, an ionic liquid, a "green solvent", was employed to directly generate reagent ions in the TDCI process, followed by the proton or charge transfer with the analytes prior to the LTQ instrument for mass analysis. Trace amounts of dimethoate in fresh orange juices have been quantitatively detected, without any sample pretreatment or aid of high-pressure gas. A low limit of detection (LOD = 8.76 × 10(-11) g mL(-1)), acceptable relative standard deviation (RSD = 3.1-10.0%), and reasonable recoveries (91.2-102.8%) were achieved with this method for direct detection of dimethoate in highly viscous orange juice samples. The average analysis time for each single sample was less than 30 seconds. These experimental results showed that the miniature TDCI developed here is a powerful tool for the fast trace detection of pesticide residues in complex viscous fruit juices, with the advantage of high sensitivity, high speed, and high-throughput, ease of operation, and so on. Because of no chemical contamination and high voltage damage to the analytes and the environment, the technique has promising applications for online quality monitoring in the area of food safety.

  6. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 μg/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 μg/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene.

  7. Trace determination of caffeine in surface water samples by liquid chromatography--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS).

    PubMed

    Gardinali, Piero R; Zhao, Xu

    2002-12-01

    A new method based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) coupled to reverse phase liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) has been applied to determine trace amounts of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in surface water samples from a near coastal ecosystem such as Biscayne Bay, Florida. The rational behind the development of such method will be to evaluate the use of unmetabolized caffeine as a potential dissolved phase tracer of human waste contamination. The method allows for the determination of caffeine at levels as low as 4.0 ng/l (ppt) in both salt and freshwater by extracting and concentrating a 1-1 water sample to a final volume of 500 microl and using HPLC separation coupled to an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) system operated in selected ion monitoring (SIM) for the protonated molecular ions (M + H(+)). Samples from different portions of Biscayne Bay and the Miami River, one of its major tributaries, were analyzed and caffeine was detected in those areas previously identified for consistently exceeding the water quality criteria for fecal coliform bacteria contamination. The caffeine concentration in the samples with positive detection was generally low at levels equal or lower than 41 ng/l. However, there is a marked difference between samples collected in open bay areas and those collected from the Miami River.

  8. Identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds in chemical ionization GC-MS using a mass-to-structure (MTS) Search Engine with integral isotope pattern ranking.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenta; Draper, William M

    2013-02-21

    The mass-to-structure or MTS Search Engine is an Access 2010 database containing theoretical molecular mass information for 19,438 compounds assembled from common sources such as the Merck Index, pesticide and pharmaceutical compilations, and chemical catalogues. This database, which contains no experimental mass spectral data, was developed as an aid to identification of compounds in atmospheric pressure ionization (API)-LC-MS. This paper describes a powerful upgrade to this database, a fully integrated utility for filtering or ranking candidates based on isotope ratios and patterns. The new MTS Search Engine is applied here to the identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds including pesticides, nitrosoamines and other pollutants. Methane and isobutane chemical ionization (CI) GC-MS spectra were obtained from unit mass resolution mass spectrometers to determine MH(+) masses and isotope ratios. Isotopes were measured accurately with errors of <4% and <6%, respectively, for A + 1 and A + 2 peaks. Deconvolution of interfering isotope clusters (e.g., M(+) and [M - H](+)) was required for accurate determination of the A + 1 isotope in halogenated compounds. Integrating the isotope data greatly improved the speed and accuracy of the database identifications. The database accurately identified unknowns from isobutane CI spectra in 100% of cases where as many as 40 candidates satisfied the mass tolerance. The paper describes the development and basic operation of the new MTS Search Engine and details performance testing with over 50 model compounds.

  9. Monitoring of the principal carbonyl compounds involved in malolactic fermentation of wine by solid-phase microextraction and positive ion chemical ionization GC/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Riccardo; Vedova, Antonio Dalla; Panighel, Annarita; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Ongarato, Stefano

    2005-12-01

    A new method has been developed to determine acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl) and 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin) in wine by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and positive ion chemical ionization GC/MS analysis of O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine (PFBOA) derivatives. For SPME, a 65-microm PEG/DVB fibre was used; chemical ionization was performed with methane as reagent gas. The best analysis-time/sensitivity compromise was to perform the PFBOA reaction at 50 degrees C for 20 min, followed by 5-min SPME at the same temperature. Quantitative analysis was performed in SCAN mode using o-chlorobenzaldehyde as internal standard (IS), on the signal of the [M + H](+) ion at m/z 240 for acetaldehyde, 266 for acetoin (corresponding to the [M + H - 18](+) ion), 282 for diacetyl (protonated mono-derivatized compound), and 336 for IS. The accuracy and repeatability of the method were suitable for the study aims, and linearity was good in the range of concentration studied, with correlation coefficients of calibration curves 0.997, 0.998 and 0.988 for acetaldehyde, diacetyl and acetoin respectively. Due to the higher polarity of acetoin with respect to other two compounds, lower sensitivity in the detection of this compound was observed. By following the variation of the three carbonyl compounds, malolactic fermentations (MLF) were monitored in Merlot wines and this was carried out in the laboratory by two different bacteria strains.

  10. Constraining the sensitivity of iodide adduct chemical ionization mass spectrometry to multifunctional organic molecules using the collision limit and thermodynamic stability of iodide ion adducts

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Iyer, Siddarth; Mohr, Claudia; ...

    2016-04-06

    The sensitivity of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ions formed per number density of analytes) is fundamentally limited by the collision frequency between reagent ions and analytes, known as the collision limit, the ion–molecule reaction time, and the transmission efficiency of product ions to the detector. We use the response of a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) to N2O5, known to react with iodide at the collision limit, to constrain the combined effects of ion–molecule reaction time, which is strongly influenced by mixing and ion losses in the ion–molecule reaction drift tube. A mass spectrometric voltage scanning procedure elucidatesmore » the relative binding energies of the ion adducts, which influence the transmission efficiency of molecular ions through the electric fields within the vacuum chamber. Together, this information provides a critical constraint on the sensitivity of a ToF-CIMS towards a wide suite of routinely detected multifunctional organic molecules for which no calibration standards exist. We describe the scanning procedure and collision limit determination, and we show results from the application of these constraints to the measurement of organic aerosol composition at two different field locations.« less

  11. Negative thermal ion mass spectrometry of osmium, rhenium, and iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creaser, R. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obtaining, in a conventional surface ionization mass spectrometer, intense ion beams of negatively charged oxides of Os, Re, and Ir by thermal ionization. It is shown that the principal ion species of these ions are OsO3(-), ReO4(-), and IrO2(-), respectively. For Re-187/Os-187 studies, this technique offers the advantage of isotopic analyses without prior chemical separation of Re from Os.

  12. Use of a Hand-Portable Gas Chromatograph-Toroidal Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Self-Chemical Ionization Identification of Degradation Products Related to O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) Methyl Phosphonothiolate (VX)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    M+H]+ in a triple quadrupole instrument [19], and methanol CI using an ion trap instrument [6] led to observation of a m/z 128 product ion. 4...products produce poorly diagnostic electron ionization (EI) mass spectra by transmission quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thus, chemical ionization (CI) is...is used with a quadrupole mass filter detector [1]. When EI is used in this man- ner, unimolecular decomposition is the norm, producing neutral and

  13. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  14. Ion suppression and enhancement effects of co-eluting analytes in multi-analyte approaches: systematic investigation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization or electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Meyer, Markus R; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-11-15

    In multi-analyte procedures, sufficient separation is important to avoid interferences, particularly when using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) because of possible ion suppression or enhancement. However, even using ultra-high-performance LC, baseline separation is not always possible. For development and validation of an LC/MS/MS approach for quantification of 140 antidepressants, benzodiazepines, neuroleptics, beta-blockers, oral antidiabetics, and analytes measured in the context of brain death diagnosis in plasma, the extent of ion suppression or enhancement of co-eluting analytes within and between the drug classes was investigated using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). Within the drug classes, five analytes showed ion enhancement of over 25% and six analytes ion suppression of over 25% using APCI and 16 analytes ion suppression of over 25% using ESI. Between the drug classes, two analytes showed ion suppression of over 25% using APCI. Using ESI, one analyte showed ion enhancement of over 25% and five analytes ion suppression of over 25%. These effects may influence the drug quantification using calibrators made in presence of overlapping and thus interfering analytes. Ion suppression/enhancement effects induced by co-eluting drugs of different classes present in the patient sample may also lead to false measurements using class-specific calibrators made in absence of overlapping and thus interfering analytes. In conclusion, ion suppression and enhancement tests are essential during method development and validation in LC/MS/MS multi-analyte procedures, with special regards to co-eluting analytes.

  15. Mass spectrometry in the characterization of ambers. I. Studies of amber samples of different origin and ages by laser desorption ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tonidandel, Loris; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Roghi, Guido; Traldi, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Amber is a fossil resin constituted of organic polymers derived through complex maturation processes of the original plant resin. A classification of eight samples of amber of different geological age (Miocene to Triassic) and geographical origin is here proposed using direct mass spectrometric techniques, i.e. laser desorption ionization (LDI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), in order to obtain a fingerprint related to the amber origin. Differences and similarities were detected among the spectra with the four methods, showing quite complex spectra, full of ionic species in the mass range investigated (up to m/z 2000). The evaluation required statistical analysis involving multivariate techniques. Cluster analysis or principal component analysis (PCA) generally did not show a clear clustering with respect to the age of samples, except for the APPI method, which allowed a satisfying clustering. Using the total ion current (TIC) obtained by the different analytical approaches on equal quantities of the different amber samples and plotted against the age, the only significant correlation appeared to be that involving APPI. To validate the method, four amber samples from Cretaceous of Spain were analyzed. Also in this case a significant correlation with age was found only with APPI data. PCA obtained with TIC values from all the MS methods showed a fair grouping of samples, according to their age. Three main clusters could be detected, belonging to younger, intermediate and older fossil resins, respectively. This MS analysis on crude amber, either solid or extract, followed by appropriate multivariate statistical evaluation, can provide useful information on amber age. The best results are those obtained by APPI, indicating that the quantity of amber soluble components that can be photoionized decreases with increasing age, in agreement with the formation of highly stable, insoluble polymers.

  16. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51).

  17. Specificity enhancement by electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry--a valuable tool for differentiation and identification of 'V'-type chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Weissberg, Avi; Tzanani, Nitzan; Dagan, Shai

    2013-12-01

    The use of chemical warfare agents has become an issue of emerging concern. One of the challenges in analytical monitoring of the extremely toxic 'V'-type chemical weapons [O-alkyl S-(2-dialkylamino)ethyl alkylphosphonothiolates] is to distinguish and identify compounds of similar structure. MS analysis of these compounds reveals mostly fragment/product ions representing the amine-containing residue. Hence, isomers or derivatives with the same amine residue exhibit similar mass spectral patterns in both classical EI/MS and electrospray ionization-MS, leading to unavoidable ambiguity in the identification of the phosphonate moiety. A set of five 'V'-type agents, including O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX), O-isobutyl S-(2-diethylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothiolate (RVX) and O-ethyl S-(2-diethylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VM) were studied by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/MS, utilizing a QTRAP mass detector. MS/MS enhanced product ion scans and multistage MS(3) experiments were carried out. Based on the results, possible fragmentation pathways were proposed, and a method for the differentiation and identification of structural isomers and derivatives of 'V'-type chemical warfare agents was obtained. MS/MS enhanced product ion scans at various collision energies provided information-rich spectra, although many of the product ions obtained were at low abundance. Employing MS(3) experiments enhanced the selectivity for those low abundance product ions and provided spectra indicative of the different phosphonate groups. Study of the fragmentation pathways, revealing some less expected structures, was carried out and allowed the formulation of mechanistic rules and the determination of sets of ions typical of specific groups, for example, methylphosphonothiolates versus ethylphosphonothiolates. The new group-specific ions elucidated in this work are also useful for screening unknown 'V'-type agents and related

  18. A new technique for the direct detection of HO2 radicals using bromide chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Br-CIMS): initial characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Javier; Tanner, David J.; Chen, Dexian; Huey, L. Gregory; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-08-01

    Hydroperoxy radicals (HO2) play an important part in tropospheric photochemistry, yet photochemical models do not capture ambient HO2 mixing ratios consistently. This is likely due to a combination of uncharacterized chemical pathways and measurement limitations. The indirect nature of current HO2 measurements introduces challenges in accurately measuring HO2; therefore a direct technique would help constrain HOx chemistry in the atmosphere. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and propose a direct HO2 detection scheme using bromide as a reagent ion. Ambient observations were made with a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) in Atlanta over the month of June 2015 to demonstrate the capability of this direct measurement technique. Observations displayed expected diurnal profiles, reaching daytime median values of ˜ 5 ppt between 2 and 3 p.m. local time. The HO2 diurnal profile was found to be influenced by morning-time vehicular NOx emissions and shows a slow decrease into the evening, likely from non-photolytic production, among other factors. Measurement sensitivities of approximately 5.1 ± 1.0 cps ppt-1 for a bromide ion (79Br-) count rate of 106 cps were observed. The relatively low instrument background allowed for a 3σ lower detection limit of 0.7 ppt for a 1 min integration time. Mass spectra of ambient measurements showed the 79BrHO2- peak was the major component of the signal at nominal mass-to-charge 112, suggesting high selectivity for HO2 at this mass-to-charge. More importantly, this demonstrates that these measurements can be achieved using instruments with only unit mass resolution capability.

  19. Chemically amplified negative resist optimized for high-resolution x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Jiro; Kawai, Yoshio; Deguchi, Kimiyoshi; Oda, Masatoshi; Matsuda, Tadahito

    1999-06-01

    We have developed a three-component negative resist for x- ray lithography which is composed of monodispersed polyhydroxystyrene as a base polymer, hexamethoxymethylmelamine as a cross-linker, and alicyclic- bromides containing ketonic groups as an acid generator. To enlarge the contrast of the dissolution rate between the exposed and unexposed films, polyhydroxystyrene was partially protected by t-butoxycarbonyl groups and organic bases were added to the resist component. Among the bromic compounds we evaluated as acid generators, the alicyclic- bromides containing ketonic groups produced hydrobromic acids most efficiently. The resolution of the new resist remains nice down to 80-nm line-and-space patterns at a proximity gap of 20 micrometers , and 70-nm patterns at a gap of 10 micrometers with a resist sensitivity of 150 mJ/cm2.

  20. Perceiving the chemical language of Gram-negative bacteria: listening by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Fonseca, Juliano; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria use N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as their command language to coordinate population behavior during invasion and colonization of higher organisms. Although many different bacterial bioreporters are available for AHLs monitoring, in which a phenotypic response, e.g. bioluminescence, violacin production, and β-galactosidase activity, is exploited, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most versatile detector for rapid analysis of AHLs in complex microbial samples, with or without prior separation steps. In this paper we critically review recent advances in the application of high-resolution MS to analysis of the quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules used by Gram-negative bacteria, with much emphasis on AHLs. A critical review of the use of bioreporters in the study of AHLs is followed by a short methodological survey of the capabilities of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), including Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and quadrupole time-of-flight (qTOF) MS. Use of infusion electrospray ultrahigh-resolution FTICR MS (12 Tesla) enables accurate mass measurements for determination of the elemental formulas of AHLs in Acidovorax sp. N35 and Burkholderia ubonensis AB030584. Results obtained by coupling liquid chromatography with a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap-FTICR mass spectrometer (LC-LTQ-FTICRMS, 7-T) for characterization of acylated homoserine lactones in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are presented. UPLC-ESI-qTOF MS has also proved to be suitable for identification of 3O-C(10)HSL in Pseudomonas putida IsoF cell culture supernatant. Aspects of sample preparation and the avoidance of analytical pitfalls are also emphasized.

  1. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-04

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected.

  2. Matrix assisted ionization: new aromatic and nonaromatic matrix compounds producing multiply charged lipid, peptide, and protein ions in the positive and negative mode observed directly from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Green, Daniel R; Manly, Cory D; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH(2) functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  3. Calculation of aqueous solubility of crystalline un-ionized organic chemicals and drugs based on structural similarity and physicochemical descriptors.

    PubMed

    Raevsky, Oleg A; Grigor'ev, Veniamin Yu; Polianczyk, Daniel E; Raevskaja, Olga E; Dearden, John C

    2014-02-24

    Solubilities of crystalline organic compounds calculated according to AMP (arithmetic mean property) and LoReP (local one-parameter regression) models based on structural and physicochemical similarities are presented. We used data on water solubility of 2615 compounds in un-ionized form measured at 25±5 °C. The calculation results were compared with the equation based on the experimental data for lipophilicity and melting point. According to statistical criteria, the model based on structural and physicochemical similarities showed a better fit with the experimental data. An additional advantage of this model is that it uses only theoretical descriptors, and this provides means for calculating water solubility for both existing and not yet synthesized compounds.

  4. Comparison Of Quantum Mechanical And Classical Trajectory Calculations Of Cross Sections For Ion-Atom Impact Ionization of Negative - And Positive -Ions For Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-05-15

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I{sup -} and Cs{sup +} ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential.

  5. Characterizing and compensating for matrix effects using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of neutral pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2008-03-15

    Matrix effects are a great challenge for the quantitative analysis of environmental samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Signal suppression or enhancement can compromise the accuracy of analytical results. While matrix effects have been relatively well studied for applications of LC-MS/MS instrumentation with electrospray ionization, there have been relatively few studies to evaluate matrix effects when using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as the ion source. In this study, we determined the effects of sample matrix on the analysis of six neutral pharmaceuticals (i.e., caffeine, cotinine, carbamazepine and its major metabolite, carbamazepine-10,11-dihydrodiol, trimethoprim, and fluoxetine) in samples of municipal wastewater using LC-APCI-MS/MS and evaluated whether isotope-labeled internal standards can be used to compensate for matrix effects. The matrix effects were measured using postextraction spikes and postcolumn direct infusion, respectively. The results showed that the matrix in the extracts prepared from municipal wastewater enhanced the signals for four of the six analytes when using an APCI source. Without correction for signal enhancement, apparent recoveries of the analytes from wastewater samples were overestimated to levels as high as 178% of the spiked amount. Isotope-labeled compounds corrected for these overestimates that occurred as a result of interferences from the sample matrix.

  6. [Isolation and purification of solanesol from potato leaves by high-speed counter-current chromatography and identification by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangyong; Liang, Yong; Xie, Ya; Huang, Zhaofeng; Zhong, Hanzuo

    2007-07-01

    Preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was used for the isolation and purification of solanesol from potato leaves. Experimental conditions of the extraction of solanesol from potato leaves have been optimized. An ultrafine extraction method was applied in this study. The efficiency using an ultrafine extraction was found to be improved in the investigation, the yields of solanesol by different extraction methods were 0.083% by ultrafine extraction and 0.050% by ultrasonic extraction. Using n-hexane-methanol (10:7, v/v) as the two-phase solvent system, preparative HSCCC was successfully performed with the yield of 5 mg solanesol at 98.7% of purity from 60 mg of crude extract in the one-step separation. The mobile phase was the lower phase and operated at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min, while the apparatus rotated at 800 r/min. The solanesol was identified by the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). The ionization and cleavage mechanisms of solanesol in APCI-MS and APCI-MS/MS are discussed.

  7. Chemical resistance of the gram-negative bacteria to different sanitizers in a water purification system

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Priscila G; Martins, Alzira MS; Penna, Thereza CV

    2006-01-01

    Background Purified water for pharmaceutical purposes must be free of microbial contamination and pyrogens. Even with the additional sanitary and disinfecting treatments applied to the system (sequential operational stages), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas picketti, Flavobacterium aureum, Acinetobacter lowffi and Pseudomonas diminuta were isolated and identified from a thirteen-stage purification system. To evaluate the efficacy of the chemical agents used in the disinfecting process along with those used to adjust chemical characteristics of the system, over the identified bacteria, the kinetic parameter of killing time (D-value) necessary to inactivate 90% of the initial bioburden (decimal reduction time) was experimentally determined. Methods Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas picketti, Flavobacterium aureum, Acinetobacter lowffi and Pseudomonas diminuta were called in house (wild) bacteria. Pseudomonas diminuta ATCC 11568, Pseudomonas alcaligenes INCQS , Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 3178, Pseudomonas picketti ATCC 5031, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 937 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 were used as 'standard' bacteria to evaluate resistance at 25°C against either 0.5% citric acid, 0.5% hydrochloric acid, 70% ethanol, 0.5% sodium bisulfite, 0.4% sodium hydroxide, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, or a mixture of 2.2% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 0.45% peracetic acid. Results The efficacy of the sanitizers varied with concentration and contact time to reduce decimal logarithmic (log10) population (n cycles). To kill 90% of the initial population (or one log10 cycle), the necessary time (D-value) was for P. aeruginosa into: (i) 0.5% citric acid, D = 3.8 min; (ii) 0.5% hydrochloric acid, D = 6.9 min; (iii) 70% ethanol, D = 9.7 min; (iv) 0.5% sodium bisulfite, D = 5.3 min; (v) 0.4% sodium hydroxide, D = 14.2 min; (vi) 0.5% sodium hypochlorite

  8. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-07

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  9. Structural transformation with "negative volume expansion": chemical bonding and physical behavior of TiGePt.

    PubMed

    Ackerbauer, S-V; Senyshyn, A; Borrmann, H; Burkhardt, U; Ormeci, A; Rosner, H; Schnelle, W; Gamża, M; Gumeniuk, R; Ramlau, R; Bischoff, E; Schuster, J C; Weitzer, F; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tjeng, L H; Grin, Yu

    2012-05-14

    The synthesis and a joint experimental and theoretical study of the crystal structure and physical properties of the new ternary intermetallic compound TiGePt are presented. Upon heating, TiGePt exhibits an unusual structural phase transition with a huge volume contraction of about 10 %. The transformation is characterized by a strong change in the physical properties, in particular, by an insulator-metal transition. At temperatures below 885 °C TiGePt crystallizes in the cubic MgAgAs (half-Heusler) type (LT phase, space group F43m, a = 5.9349(2) Å). At elevated temperatures, the crystal structure of TiGePt transforms into the TiNiSi structure type (HT phase, space group Pnma, a = 6.38134(9) Å, b = 3.89081(5) Å, c = 7.5034(1) Å). The reversible, temperature-dependent structural transition was investigated by in-situ neutron powder diffraction and dilatometry measurements. The insulator-metal transition, indicated by resistivity measurements, is in accord with band structure calculations yielding a gap of about 0.9 eV for the LT phase and a metallic HT phase. Detailed analysis of the chemical bonding in both modifications revealed an essential change of the Ti-Pt and Ti-Ge interactions as the origin of the dramatic changes in the physical properties.

  10. Determination of metformin in mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Peter, Raimund M

    2010-11-02

    A simple, rapid and robust high-throughput assay for the quantitative analysis of metformin in plasma from different species using laser diode thermal desorption interfaced with atmospheric chemical pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MSMS) was developed for use in a pharmaceutical discovery environment. In order to minimize sample preparation a generic protein precipitation method was used to extract metformin from the plasma. Laser diode thermal desorption is a relatively new sample introduction method, the optimization of the instrumental parameters are presented. The method was successfully applied to spiked mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples and was subsequently used to determine the oral pharmacokinetics of metformin after dosing to male rats in order to support drug discovery projects. The deviations for intra-assay accuracy and precision across the four species were less than 30% at all calibration and quality control levels.

  11. Evaluation of the α-phenylvinyl cation as a chemical ionization reagent for the differentiation of isomeric substituted phenols in an ITMS.

    PubMed

    Begala, Michela

    2015-04-01

    Ion-molecule reactions between the α-phenylvinyl cation and isomeric naturally occurring phenols were investigated using a quadruple ion trap mass spectrometer. The α-phenylvinyl cation m/z 103, generated by chemical ionization from phenylacetylene, reacts with neutral aromatic compounds to form the characteristic species: [M + 103](+) adduct ions and the trans-vinylating product ions [M + 25](+) , which correspond to [M + 103](+) adduct after the loss of benzene. Isomeric differentiation of several ring-substituted phenols was achieved by using collision-induced dissociation of the [M + 103](+) adduct ions. This method also showed to be effective in the differentiation of 4-ethylguaiacol from one of its structural isomers that displays identical EI and EI/MS/MS spectra. The effects of gas-phase alkylation with phenylvinyl cation on the dissociation behavior were examined using mass spectrometry(n) and labeled derivatives. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Characterizing a switching reagent ion chemical ionization high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer: Standard additions, External calibrations, and Inlet response during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D.

    2013-12-01

    A high-resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with switching reagent ion source and low pressure, gas-phase inlet was deployed during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Brent, Alabama. Acetate chemistry was employed for the detection of small acids and iodine chemistry for the detection of peroxy acids. Switching between the two ion sources was found to be possible on less than ten minute time scales with minimal artifacts observed. Online calibrations for formic acid on both the acetate and iodine sources were performed every hour using both standard addition techniques as well as external standard calibrations; offline formic acid calibrations were also conducted. Inlet responses were investigated though a number of experiments finding that the inlet has minimal hysteresis and rapid response times.

  13. Exact masses and chemical formulas of individual Suwannee River fulvic acids from ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Alexandra C; Marshall, Alan G; Cooper, William T

    2003-03-15

    Molecular formulas have been assigned for 4626 individual Suwannee River fulvic acids based on accurate mass measurements from ions generated by electrospray ionization and observed by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Formula assignments were possible because of the mass accuracy of FTICR MS at high field (9.4 T) and the regular mass spacing patterns found in fulvic acid mixtures. Sorting the 4626 individually observed ions according to Kendrick mass defect and nominal mass series (z* score) revealed that all could be assigned to 1 of 266 distinct homologous series that differ in oxygen content and double bond equivalence. Tandem mass spectrometry based on infrared multiphoton dissociation identified labile fragments of fulvic acid molecules, whose chemical formulas led to plausible structures consistent with degraded lignin as a source of Suwannee River fulvic acids.

  14. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going.

  15. Photochemistry of the indoor air pollutant acetone on Degussa P25 TiO2 studied by chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Catherine M; Buchbinder, Avram M; Weitz, Eric; Geiger, Franz M

    2007-12-20

    We have used chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the adsorption and photochemistry of several oxygenated organic species adsorbed to Degussa P25 TiO2, an inexpensive catalyst that can be used to mineralize volatile organic compounds. The molecules examined in this work include the common indoor air pollutant acetone and several of its homologs and possible oxidation and condensation products that may be formed during the adsorption and/or photocatalytic degradation of acetone on titanium dioxide catalysts. We report nonreactive uptake coefficients for acetone, formic acid, acetic acid, mesityl oxide, and diacetone alcohol, and results from photochemical studies that quantify, on a per-molecule basis, the room-temperature photocatalytic conversion of the species under investigation to CO2 and related oxidation products. The data presented here imply that catalytic surfaces that enhance formate and acetate production from acetone precursors will facilitate the photocatalytic remediation of acetone in indoor environments, even at room temperature.

  16. Technical note: Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Heinritzi, M.; Herzog, S.; Leiminger, M.; Bianchi, F.; Praplan, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Kürten, A.

    2015-12-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation and therefore the demand for highly sensitive gas phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas phase-sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, Extremely Low Volatile Organic Compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH, DMA) using the NO3-(HNO3)1-2(DMA) cluster ion signals. This observation was made at the CLOUD aerosol chamber, which was also used for calibration measurements. Good linearity between 0 and ~120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide observations by chemical ionization mass spectrometry on the GV during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D. W.; Silwal, I.; Treadaway, V.; McNeill, A.; Heikes, B.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gas phase measurements of hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide were made on 22 research flights on the NCAR Gulfstream-V using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy (CIMS) during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) in May and June 2012. A multi-reagent ion CIMS method, using O2- and CO4- reagent ions, and standard additions of hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide was developed to identify and quantify hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methylhydroperoxide (CH3OOH) in ambient air. The DC3 field program characterized a number of active convective systems in three different regions, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Alabama with observations extending from the surface to 13 km. A few flights were also flown to characterize the photochemical aging of lofted chemicals and lightning generated oxides of nitrogen. Peroxide observations will be used to examine transport efficiency and removal in isolated convective storms and larger scale multiple convective systems. Differences in peroxide storm input and transport process will be compared across the three regions. Peroxide observations coupled with other in situ chemical species observations and meteorological parameters will be used to assess the contribution of convective transport to the photochemical budget of hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide in the upper troposphere over the United States.

  18. A positive chemical ionization GC/MS method for the determination of airborne ethylene glycol and propylene glycols in non-occupational environments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiping; Feng, Yong-Lai; Aikawa, Bio

    2004-11-01

    An analytical method for ethylene glycol and propylene glycols has been developed for measuring airborne levels of these chemicals in non-occupational environments such as residences and office buildings. The analytes were collected on charcoal tubes, solvent extracted, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a positive chemical ionization technique. The method had a method detection limit of 0.07 microg m(-3) for ethylene glycol and 0.03 microg m(-3) for 1,2- and 1,3-propylene glycols, respectively, based on a 1.44 m3 sampling volume. Indoor air samples of several residential homes and other indoor environments have been analyzed. The median concentrations of ethylene glycol and 1,2-propylene glycol in nine residential indoor air samples were 53 microg m(-3) and 13 microg m(-3) respectively with maximum values of 223 microg m(-3) and 25 microg m(-3) detected for ethylene glycol and 1,2-propylene glycol respectively. The concentrations of these two chemicals in one office and two laboratories were at low microg m(-3) levels. The maximum concentration of 1,3-propylene glycol detected in indoor air was 0.1 microg m(-3).

  19. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected.

  20. Laboratory and Ambient Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds in the Gas Phase Using Nitrate Ion Chemical Ionization Coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Lambe, A. T.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Kimmel, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is a widely used technique for molecular level characterization of inorganic and organic gas phase species. Here we present laboratory and ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry, which recently has proven capable of selectively detecting oxidized organic molecules in the gas-phase via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. Such low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOC, ELVOC) have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest site in Centreville, AL (June 1 - July 15, 2013), where emissions were dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), occasionally mixing with anthropogenic emissions. During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected oxidation products of both isoprene (typically C5 LVOC) and terpenes (typically C10 ELVOC). The isoprene-related LVOC showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, while two groups of terpene ELVOC were identified, one peaking at night and one peaking during the day. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analyses are applied to the dataset to further interpret these observations. The effect of anthropogenic pollution on the biogenic-dominated environment was also investigated during periods of elevated nitrous and sulfur dioxide levels. To further aid in interpretation of the SOAS dataset, oxidized organic molecules were produced via OH and O3 initiated oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors in targeted laboratory studies and detected using the HR-ToF-CIMS. Spectra were obtained in these studies over a range of simulated atmospheric conditions.

  1. Determination of patterns of biologically relevant aldehydes in exhaled breath condensate of healthy subjects by liquid chromatography/atmospheric chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Roberta; Manini, Paola; Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio; Niessen, Wilfried M. A.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of several classes of aldehydes in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was developed using liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS/MS). EBC is a biological matrix obtained by a relatively new, simple and noninvasive technique and provides an indirect assessment of pulmonary status. The measurement of aldehydes in EBC represents a biomarker of the effect of oxidative stress caused by smoke, disease, or strong oxidants like ozone. Malondialdehyde (MDA), acrolein, α,β-unsaturated hydroxylated aldehydes [namely 4-hydroxyhexenal (4-HHE) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)], and saturated aldehydes (n-hexanal, n-heptanal and n-nonanal) were measured in EBC after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the analytes was obtained in positiveion mode for MDA, and in negativeion mode for acrolein, 4-HHE, 4-HNE, and saturated aldehydes. DNPH derivatives were separated on a C18 column using variable proportions of 20 mM aqueous acetic acid and methanol. Linearity was established over 4–5 orders of magnitude and limits of detection were in the 0.3–1.0 nM range. Intra-day and inter-day precision were in the 1.3–9.9% range for all the compounds. MDA, acrolein and n-alkanals were detectable in all EBC samples, whereas the highly reactive 4-HHE and 4-HNE were found in only a few samples. Statistically significant higher concentrations of MDA, acrolein and n-hexanal were found in EBC from smokers. PMID:12661015

  2. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; ...

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore » groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm−3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  3. Method to reduce chemical background interference in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry using exclusive reactions with the chemical reagent dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P; Covey, Thomas R

    2007-06-01

    The interference of chemical background ions (chemical noise) has been a problem since the inception of mass spectrometry. We present here a novel method to reduce the chemical noise in LC-MS based on exclusive gas-phase reactions with a reactive collision gas in a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Combined with the zero neutral loss (ZNL) scan of a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, the reactive chemical noise ions can be removed because of shifts of mass-to-charge ratios from the original background ions. The test on various classes of compounds with different functional groups indicates a generic application of this technique in LC-MS. The preliminary results show that a reduction of the level of LC-MS base-peak chromatographic baseline by a factor up to 40 and an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor up to 5-10 are achieved on both commercial and custom-modified triple-quadrupole LC-MS systems. Application is foreseen in both quantitative and qualitative trace analysis. It is expected that this chemical noise reduction technique can be optimized on a dedicated mass spectrometric instrumentation which incorporates both a chemical reaction cell for noise reduction and a collision stage for fragmentation.

  4. Photochemical Dimerization of Dibenzylideneacetone: A Convenient Exercise in [2+2] Cycloaddition Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, G. Nageswara; Janardhana, Chelli; Ramanathan, V.; Rajesh, T.; Kumar, P. Harish

    2006-01-01

    Chemical reactions induced by light have been utilized for synthesizing highly strained, thermodynamically unstable compounds, which are inaccessible through non-photochemical methods. Photochemical cycloaddition reactions, especially those leading to the formation of four-membered rings, constitute a convenient route to compounds that are…

  5. Analysis of aldehydes in beer by gas-diffusion microextraction: characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Luís Moreira; Magalhães, Paulo Jorge; Valente, Inês Maria; Pacheco, João Grosso; Dostálek, Pavel; Sýkora, David; Rodrigues, José António; Barros, Aquiles Araújo

    2010-06-11

    In this work, a recently developed extraction technique for sample preparation aiming the analysis of volatile and semi-volatile compounds named gas-diffusion microextraction (GDME) is applied in the chromatographic analysis of aldehydes in beer. Aldehydes-namely acetaldehyde (AA), methylpropanal (MA) and furfural (FA)-were simultaneously extracted and derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), then the derivatives were separated and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric detection (HPLC-UV). The identity of the eluted compounds was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass-spectrometry detection in the negative ion mode (HPLC-APCI-MS). The developed methodology showed good repeatability (ca. 5%) and linearity as well as good limits of detection (AA-12.3, FA-1.5 and MA 5.4microgL(-1)) and quantification (AA-41, FA-4.9 and MA 18microgL(-1)); it also appears to be competitive in terms of speed and cost of analysis.

  6. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  7. Intraspecific chemical diversity among neighbouring plants correlates positively with plant size and herbivore load but negatively with herbivore damage.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Segura, Carlos; Poelman, Erik H; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Gols, Rieta

    2017-01-01

    Intraspecific plant diversity can modify the properties of associated arthropod communities and plant fitness. However, it is not well understood which plant traits determine these ecological effects. We explored the effect of intraspecific chemical diversity among neighbouring plants on the associated invertebrate community and plant traits. In a common garden experiment, intraspecific diversity among neighbouring plants was manipulated using three plant populations of wild cabbage that differ in foliar glucosinolates. Plants were larger, harboured more herbivores, but were less damaged when plant diversity was increased. Glucosinolate concentration differentially correlated with generalist and specialist herbivore abundance. Glucosinolate composition correlated with plant damage, while in polycultures, variation in glucosinolate concentrations among neighbouring plants correlated positively with herbivore diversity and negatively with plant damage levels. The results suggest that intraspecific variation in secondary chemistry among neighbouring plants is important in determining the structure of the associated insect community and positively affects plant performance.

  8. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Hydroxyl Radical (OH) Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Saewung

    2016-05-01

    The University of California, Irvine, science team (Dr. Saewung Kim, Dr. Roger Seco, Dr. Alex Guenther, and Dr. Jim Smith) deployed a chemical ionization mass spectrometer system for hydroxyl radical (OH) and sulfuric acid quantifications. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/15 field campaign. Hydroxyl radical determines tropospheric oxidation capacity and had been expected to be very low in the pristine rain forest region such as the Brazilian Amazon because of the presence of significant levels of highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds and very low levels of NO, which is an OH recycling agent. However, several recent in situ OH observations provided by a laser-induced fluorescence system reported unaccountably high OH concentrations. To address this discrepancy, a series of laboratory and theoretical studies has postulated chemical reaction mechanisms of isoprene that may regenerate OH in photo-oxidation processes. Along with these efforts, potential artifacts on the laser induced fluorescence system from isoprene and its oxidation products also have been explored. Therefore, the first chemical ionization mass spectrometer observations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, are expected to provide a critical experimental constraint to address uncertainty in constraining oxidation capacity over pristine rain forest environments. In addition, we deployed a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer to characterize atmospheric volatile organic compound levels, especially isoprene and its oxidation products, which are critical input parameters for box modeling to simulate OH with different isoprene photo-oxidation schemes. As there has been no report on noticeable new particle formation events, our first in situ sulfuric acid observations in the Amazon rain forest were expected to constrain the

  9. Analysis of the enantiomers of VX using normal-phase chiral liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, J R

    2004-01-01

    The chemical warfare nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) is a mixture of two enantiomers resulting from the chiral center at the phosphorus atom. Significant differences exist in the reported toxicity and acetylcholinesterase inhibition rates of the two enantiomers. This makes the ability to distinguish between them desirable for either toxicological studies or the development of antidotal therapies. Using a Chiralcel OD-H column with normal-phase liquid chromatography, the enantiomers were baseline resolved in less than 7 min. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was utilized as the interface between a liquid chromatograph and mass spectrometer. The mass spectra of the two enantiomers were virtually identical. The protonated molecule was readily observed at m/z 268. VX was incubated with human plasma for 13 min, followed by hexane extraction. The areas of the first and second eluting VX enantiomers decreased by approximately 40% and 6%, respectively, when compared with VX-spiked plasma samples that were not allowed an incubation phase. Currently, research by others has been directed towards the identification, isolation, and possible modification of enzymes capable of hydrolyzing VX. The method presented here provides an analytical tool capable of monitoring the stereospecificity of enzymes that react with VX.

  10. Direct probe atmospheric pressure photoionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry for fast screening of flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Gómez, A; Brandsma, S H; de Boer, J; Leonards, P E G

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we develop fast screening methods for flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste based on direct probe (DP) atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a high-resolution (HR) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. DP-APPI is reported for the first time in this study, and DP-APCI that has been scarcely exploited is optimized for comparison. DP-APPI was more selective than DP-APCI and also more sensitive for the most hydrophobic compounds. No sample treatment was necessary, and only a minimal amount of sample (few milligrams) was used for analysis that was performed within a few minutes. Both methods were applied to the analysis of plastic products, electronic waste, and car interiors. Polybrominated diphenylethers, new brominated flame retardants, and organophosphorus flame retardants were present in most of the samples. The combination of DP with HR mass spectra and data processing based on mass accuracy and isotopic patterns allowed the unambiguous identification of chemicals at low levels of about 0.025 % (w/w). Under untargeted screening, resorcinol bis(biphenylphosphate) and bisphenol A bis(bisphenylphosphate) were identified in many of the consumer products of which literature data are still very limited.

  11. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  12. Determination of red blood cell fatty acid profiles: Rapid and high-confident analysis by chemical ionization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schober, Yvonne; Wahl, Hans Günther; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (FA) profiles have been acknowledged as biomarkers in various human diseases. Nevertheless, common FA analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) requires long analysis time. Hence, there is a need for feasible methods for high throughput analysis in clinical studies. FA was extracted from red blood cells (RBC) and derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A method using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with ammonia-induced chemical ionization (CI) was developed for the analysis of FA profiles in human RBC. We compared this method with classical single GC-MS using electron impact ionization (EI). The FA profiles of 703 RBC samples were determined by GC-MS/MS. In contrast to EI ammonia-induced CI resulted in adequate amounts of molecular ions for further fragmentation of FAME. Specific fragments for confident quantification and fragmentation were determined for 45 FA. The GC-MS/MS method has a total run time of 9min compared to typical analysis times of up to 60min in conventional GC-MS. Intra and inter assay variations were <10% for all FA analyzed. Analysis of RBC FA composition revealed an age-dependent increase of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, and a decline of the omega-6 linoleic acid with a corresponding rise of the omega-3 index. The combination of ammonia-induced CI and tandem mass spectrometry after GC separation allows for high-throughput, robust and confident analysis of FA profiles in the clinical laboratory.

  13. Comprehensive chemical characterization of Rapé tobacco products: Nicotine, un-ionized nicotine, tobacco-specific N'-nitrosamines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and flavor constituents.

    PubMed

    Stanfill, Stephen B; Oliveira da Silva, André Luiz; Lisko, Joseph G; Lawler, Tameka S; Kuklenyik, Peter; Tyx, Robert E; Peuchen, Elizabeth H; Richter, Patricia; Watson, Clifford H

    2015-08-01

    Rapé, a diverse group of smokeless tobacco products indigenous to South America, is generally used as a nasal snuff and contains substantial amount of plant material with or without tobacco. Previously uncharacterized, rapé contains addictive and harmful chemicals that may have public health implications for users. Here we report % moisture, pH, and the levels of total nicotine, un-ionized nicotine, flavor-related compounds, tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for manufactured and hand-made rapé. Most rapé products were mildly acidic (pH 5.17-6.23) with total nicotine ranging from 6.32 to 47.6 milligram per gram of sample (mg/g). Calculated un-ionized nicotine ranged from 0.03 to 18.5 mg/g with the highest values associated with hand-made rapés (pH 9.75-10.2), which contain alkaline ashes. In tobacco-containing rapés, minor alkaloid levels and Fourier transform infrared spectra were used to confirm the presence of Nicotiana rustica, a high nicotine tobacco species. There was a wide concentration range of TSNAs and PAHs among the rapés analyzed. Several TSNAs and PAHs identified in the products are known or probable carcinogens according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Milligram quantities of some non-tobacco constituents, such as camphor, coumarin, and eugenol, warrant additional evaluation.

  14. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds.

  15. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry-Based Measurements of HO2 and RO2 During TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Christopher A.; Eisele, Fred L.

    2004-01-01

    The Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) mission extends NASA's Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) series of campaigns. TRACE-P was an aircraft-based campaign that was part of a larger ground-based and aircraft-based program (APARE) under the auspices of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) program. TRACE-P was designed to (1) determine the chemical composition of Asian outflow over the western Pacific, and to (2) determine the chemical evolution of the Asian outflow. These objectives were addressed through a variety of observations and numerical modeling exercises. In particular, the goals included sampling strategies that would improve understanding of the budgets of odd hydrogen species (OH and HO2), budgets of NOx (NO, NO2, and their reservoirs), and impacts of oxidants produced in the outflow on air quality in the United States. The NASA DC-8 and P-3B aircraft were deployed in the March and April, 2001 out of primary bases of operation in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Base in Japan. These two aircraft have complementary capabilities which allow high altitude and long range impacts, as well as low altitude, local impacts to be assessed. In order to quantify the composition and evolution of Asian outflow, it is important to quantify as many species as possible including photochemically active species (e.g. NO2, CH2O, O3, acetone, etc.), sources species (VOCs, CO, NOx, SO2, aerosols), reactive intermediates including free radicals (OH, HO2, RO2, and their reservoirs), and end products (nitric acid, sulfuric acid, secondary aerosols, etc.). The more complete the measurement suite, the more tightly constrained the numerical modeling can be (within the uncertainties of the measurements). The numerical models range in sophistication from simple steady state box models (as employed in this study) to multi-dimensional chemical transport models. Data were collected on approximately 20 flights of the DC-8 and 21 flights of the P-3B

  16. Preparative mass-spectrometry profiling of bioactive metabolites in Saudi-Arabian propolis fractionated by high-speed countercurrent chromatography and off-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry injection.

    PubMed

    Jerz, Gerold; Elnakady, Yasser A; Braun, André; Jäckel, Kristin; Sasse, Florenz; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A; Omar, Mohamed O M; Winterhalter, Peter

    2014-06-20

    Propolis is a glue material collected by honeybees which is used to seal cracks in beehives and to protect the bee population from infections. Propolis resins have a long history in medicinal use as a natural remedy. The multiple biological properties are related to variations in their chemical compositions. Geographical settings and availability of plant sources are important factors for the occurrence of specific natural products in propolis. A propolis ethylacetate extract (800mg) from Saudi Arabia (Al-Baha region) was separated by preparative scale high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) using a non-aqueous solvent system n-hexane-ACN (1:1, v/v). For multiple metabolite detection, the resulting HSCCC-fractions were sequentially injected off-line into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) device, and a reconstituted mass spectrometry profile of the preparative run was visualized by selected ion traces. Best ion-intensities for detected compounds were obtained in the negative APCI mode and monitored occurring co-elution effects. HSCCC and successive purification steps resulted in the isolation and characterization of various bioactive natural products such as (12E)- and (12Z)-communic acid, sandaracopimaric acid, (+)-ferruginol, (+)-totarol, and 3β-acetoxy-19(29)-taraxasten-20a-ol using EI-, APCI-MS and 1D/2D-NMR. Cycloartenol-derivatives and triterpene acetates were isolated in mixtures and elucidated by EI-MS and 1D-NMR. Free fatty acids, and two labdane fatty acid esters were identified by APCI-MS/MS. In total 19 metabolites have been identified. The novel combination of HSCCC fractionation, and APCI-MS-target-guided molecular mass profiling improve efficiency of lead-structure identification.

  17. Direct correlation of the crystal structure of proteins with the maximum positive and negative charge states of gaseous protein ions produced by electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Halan; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2005-09-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometric studies in native folded forms of several proteins in aqueous solution have been performed in the positive and negative ion modes. The mass spectra of the proteins show peaks corresponding to multiple charge states of the gaseous protein ions. The results have been analyzed using the known crystal structures of these proteins. Crystal structure analysis shows that among the surface exposed residues some are involved in hydrogen-bonding or salt-bridge interactions while some are free. The maximum positive charge state of the gaseous protein ions was directly related to the number of free surface exposed basic groups whereas the maximum negative charge state was related to the number of free surface exposed acidic groups of the proteins. The surface exposed basic groups, which are involved in hydrogen bonding, have lower propensity to contribute to the positive charge of the protein. Similarly, the surface exposed acidic groups involved in salt bridges have lower propensity to contribute to the negative charge of the protein. Analysis of the crystal structure to determine the maximum charge state of protein in the electrospray mass spectrum was also used to interpret the reported mass spectra of several proteins. The results show that both the positive and the negative ion mass spectra of the proteins could be interpreted by simple consideration of the crystal structure of the folded proteins. Moreover, unfolding of the protein was shown to increase the positive charge-state because of the availability of larger number of free basic groups at the surface of the unfolded protein.

  18. Characterization of Organic Nitrate Formation in Limonene Secondary Organic Aerosol using High-Resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, Cameron; Hammes, Julia; Peng, Jianfei; Hallquist, Mattias; Pathak, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that organic nitrates (RONO2) are prevalent in the boundary layer, and can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Monoterpenes, including limonene, have been shown to be precursors for the formation of these organic nitrates. Limonene has two double bonds, either of which may be oxidized by NO3 or O3. This leads to the generation of products that can subsequently condense or partition into the particle phase, producing secondary organic aerosol. In order to further elucidate the particle and gas phase product distribution of organic nitrates forming from the reactions of limonene and the nitrate radical (NO3), a series of experiments were performed in the Gothenburg Flow Reactor for Oxidation Studies at Low Temperatures (G-FROST), described by previous work. N2O5 was used as the source for NO3 and NO2, and a characterized diffusion source was used to introduce limonene into the flow reactor. All experiments were conducted in the absence of light, and the concentration of limonene was increased step-wise throughout each experiment to modify the ratio of N2O5to limonene. The experiments were conducted such that both limonene- and N2O5-limited regimes were present. Gas and particle phase products were measured using an iodide High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) coupled to a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO, and particle size and SOA mass concentrations were derived using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CIMS measurement techniques have previously been employed for the measurement of organic nitrate products of such compounds using multiple reagent ions. The use of this instrumentation allowed for the identification of chemical formulas for gas and particle phase species. The findings from the experiments will be presented in terms of the relative gas-particle partitioning of major products and the effects of N2O5/limonene ratios on product distributions. Additionally, a

  19. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer π-π interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed

  20. Microprobe sampling--photo ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for in situ chemical analysis of pyrolysis and combustion gases: examination of the thermo-chemical processes within a burning cigarette.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Liu, Chuan; McAdam, Kevin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2012-02-10

    A microprobe sampling device (μ-probe) has been developed for in situ on-line photo ionization mass spectrometric analysis of volatile chemical species formed within objects consisting of organic matter during thermal processing. With this approach the chemical signature occurring during heating, pyrolysis, combustion, roasting and charring of organic material within burning objects such as burning fuel particles (e.g., biomass or coal pieces), lit cigarettes or thermally processed food products (e.g., roasting of coffee beans) can be investigated. Due to its dynamic changes between combustion and pyrolysis phases the cigarette smoking process is particularly interesting and has been chosen as first application. For this investigation the tip of the μ-probe is inserted directly into the tobacco rod and volatile organic compounds from inside the burning cigarette are extracted and real-time analyzed as the glowing front (or coal) approaches and passes the μ-probe sampling position. The combination of micro-sampling with photo ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOFMS) allows on-line intrapuff-resolved analysis of species formation inside a burning cigarette. Monitoring volatile smoke compounds during cigarette puffing and smoldering cycles in this way provides unparalleled insights into formation mechanisms and their time-dependent change. Using this technique the changes from pyrolysis conditions to combustion conditions inside the coal of a cigarette could be observed directly. A comparative analysis of species formation within a burning Kentucky 2R4F reference cigarette with μ-probe analysis reveals different patterns and behaviors for nicotine, and a range of semi-volatile aromatic and aliphatic species.

  1. Analysis of Thermal and Chemical Effets on Negative Valve Overlap Period Energy Recovery for Low-Temperature Gasoline Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Dr Isaac; Peterson, Dr. Brian; Szybist, James P; Northrop, Dr. William

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for efficient auto-ignition controlled low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engines has been achieving the combustion phasing needed to reach stable performance over a wide operating regime. The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy has been explored as a way to improve combustion stability through a combination of charge heating and altered reactivity via a recompression stroke with a pilot fuel injection. The study objective was to analyze the thermal and chemical effects on NVO-period energy recovery. The analysis leveraged experimental gas sampling results obtained from a single-cylinder LTGC engine along with cylinder pressure measurements and custom data reduction methods used to estimate period thermodynamic properties. The engine was fueled by either iso-octane or ethanol, and operated under sweeps of NVO-period oxygen concentration, injection timing, and fueling rate. Gas sampling at the end of the NVO period was performed via a custom dump-valve apparatus, with detailed sample speciation by in-house gas chromatography. The balance of NVO-period input and output energy flows was calculated in terms of fuel energy, work, heat loss, and change in sensible energy. Experiment results were complemented by detailed chemistry single-zone reactor simulations performed at relevant mixing and thermodynamic conditions, with results used to evaluate ignition behavior and expected energy recovery yields. For the intermediate bulk-gas temperatures present during the NVO period (900-1100 K), weak negative temperature coefficient behavior with iso-octane fueling significantly lengthened ignition delays relative to similar ethanol fueled conditions. Faster ethanol ignition chemistry led to lower recovered fuel intermediate yields relative to similar iso-octane fueled conditions due to more complete fuel oxidation. From the energy analysis it was found that increased NVO-period global equivalence ratio, either from lower NVOperiod oxygen

  2. Secondary ion counting for surface-sensitive chemical analysis of organic compounds using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy with cluster ion impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Narumi, K.

    2011-03-15

    We report suitable secondary ion (SI) counting for surface-sensitive chemical analysis of organic compounds using time-of-flight (TOF) SI mass spectroscopy, based on considerably higher emission yields of SIs induced by cluster ion impact ionization. A SI counting system for a TOF SI mass spectrometer was developed using a fast digital storage oscilloscope, which allows us to perform various types of analysis as all the signal pulses constituting TOF SI mass spectra can be recorded digitally in the system. Effects of the SI counting strategy on SI mass spectra were investigated for C{sub 8} and C{sub 60} cluster ion impacts on an organically contaminated silicon wafer and on polytetrafluoroethylene targets by comparing TOF SI mass spectra obtained from the same recorded signals with different SI counting procedures. Our results show that the use of a counting system, which can cope with high SI yields, is necessary for quantitative analysis of SI mass spectra obtained under high SI yield per impact conditions, including the case of cluster ion impacts on organic compounds.

  3. Characterization of major and minor alk(en)ylresorcinols from mango (Mangifera indica L.) peels by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Knödler, Matthias; Berardini, Nicolai; Kammerer, Dietmar R; Carle, Reinhold; Schieber, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    5-Alkyl- and 5-alkenylresorcinols, as well as their hydroxylated derivatives, were extracted from mango (Mangifera indica L.) peels, purified on polyamide and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/APcI-MS) for the first time. Among the 15 compounds analyzed, 3 major and 12 minor C(15)-, C(17)-, and C(19)-substituted resorcinols and related analogues, showing varying degrees of unsaturation, were characterized by their specific fragmentation patterns in collision-induced dissociation experiments. This marks the first report on the occurrence of mono-, di-, and triunsaturated C(15)-homologues, saturated and triunsaturated C(17)-homologues, and mono- and diunsaturated C(19)-homologues in mango peels. Additionally, several hydroxylated C(15)- and C(17)-homologues, also not yet described in mango, and a C(14)-monoene, unique because of its even-numbered side chain, were tentatively identified on the basis of their fragmentation patterns. The results obtained in the present study indicate that HPLC-DAD-APcI-MS(n), combined with the newly developed solid-phase extraction, is a powerful tool for the analysis of alk(en)ylresorcinols and could therefore be used for their determination in various matrices.

  4. A method for simultaneous analysis of phytosterols and phytosterol esters in tobacco leaves using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detector.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2014-05-02

    While numerous analytical methods for phytosterols have been reported, the similar polarity and large molecules of phytosterol esters have made the methods lengthy and complicated. For this reason, an analytical method that could completely separate phytosterol esters including the higher fatty acids such as palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid in addition to phytosterols without preliminary separation was developed. The separation was accomplished by non-aqueous reversed phase chromatography technique using only acetone and acetonitrile. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry detector configured at selected ion monitoring mode was hyphenated with the separation system to detect phytosterols and phytosterol esters. Twenty-four types of these were consequently separated and then identified with their authentic components. The calibration curve was drawn in the range of about 5 to 25,000 ng/mL with a regression coefficient over 0.999. The limit of detection and limit of quantification, respectively, ranged from 0.9 to 3.0 ng/mL and from 3.0 to 11.0 ng/mL. Recovery rates ranged from 80 to 120%. The quantification results were subjected to statistical analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis, and were used to determine the differences in the amounts of phytosterols and phytosterol esters across tobacco leaves. The newly developed method succeeded in clarifying the whole composition of phytosterols and phytosterol esters in tobacco leaves and in explaining compositional differences across the variety of tobacco leaves.

  5. Continuous water infusion enhances atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of methyl chloroformate derivatives in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, Christian J; Dettmer, Katja; Lang, Sven A; Mycielska, Maria E; Oefner, Peter J

    2014-09-16

    The effects of continuous water infusion on efficiency and repeatability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of both methyl chloroformate (MCF) and methoxime-trimethylsilyl (MO-TMS) derivatives of metabolites were evaluated using gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Water infusion at a flow-rate of 0.4 mL/h yielded not only an average 16.6-fold increase in intensity of the quasimolecular ion for 20 MCF-derivatized metabolite standards through suppression of in-source fragmentation but also the most repeatable peak area integrals. The impact of water infusion was the greatest for dicarboxylic acids and the least for (hetero-) aromatic compounds. Water infusion also improved the ability to detect reliably fold changes as small as 1.33-fold for the same 20 MCF-derivatized metabolite standards spiked into a human serum extract. On the other hand, MO-TMS derivatives were not significantly affected by water infusion, neither in their fragmentation patterns nor with regard to the detection of differentially regulated compounds. As a proof of principle, we applied MCF derivatization and GC-APCI-TOFMS to the detection of changes in abundance of metabolites in pancreatic cancer cells upon treatment with 17-DMAG. Water infusion increased not only the number of metabolites identified via their quasimolecular ion but also the reproducibility of peak areas, thereby almost doubling the number of significantly regulated metabolites (false discovery rate < 0.05) to a total of 23.

  6. Effect of ionizing radiation on the chemical composition, crystalline content and structure, and flow properties of polytetrafluoroethylene. [0. 5 to 0. 8 MeV electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.K.; Corelli, J.C.

    1981-10-01

    This article describes a study of ionizing radiation-induced changes in the chemical composition, crystalline content and structure, and flow properties in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Irradiations conducted in the presence of oxygen cause acid fluoride end groups to be formed, which on exposure to water vapor hydrolyze to form carboxylic acid end groups. Analyses by infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicate that when irradiated in a vacuum PTFE exhibits defect absorption bands which have been attributed to branch and crosslink formation. The crystalline content of PTFE which increases after exposure to radiation was monitored by IR spectroscopy, density, x-ray diffraction on unoriented samples, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the measurement probes. The melt viscosity of PTFE exposed to various radiation doses in air decreases dramatically after irradiation. Between 2.5 and 5 Mrd an increase in viscosity is attributed to the formation of branches and crosslinks. The effects of preirradiation crystallinity and postirradiation heat treatment were studied. A model is presented to explain the mechanism of the observed radiation effects.

  7. Quantitation of fluoride ion released sarin in red blood cell samples by gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry using isotope dilution and large-volume injection.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, E M; McGuire, J M; Evans, R A; Edwards, J L; Hulet, S W; Benton, B J; Forster, J S; Burnett, D C; Muse, W T; Matson, K; Crouse, C L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2004-01-01

    A new method for measuring fluoride ion released isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (sarin, GB) in the red blood cell fraction was developed that utilizes an autoinjector, a large-volume injector port (LVI), positive ion ammonia chemical ionization detection in the SIM mode, and a deuterated stable isotope internal standard. This method was applied to red blood cell (RBC) and plasma ethyl acetate extracts from spiked human and animal whole blood samples and from whole blood of minipigs, guinea pigs, and rats exposed by whole-body sarin inhalation. Evidence of nerve agent exposure was detected in plasma and red blood cells at low levels of exposure. The linear method range of quantitation was 10-1000 pg on-column with a detection limit of approximately 2-pg on-column. In the course of method development, several conditions were optimized for the LVI, including type of injector insert, injection volume, initial temperature, pressure, and flow rate. RBC fractions had advantages over the plasma with respect to assessing nerve agent exposure using the fluoride ion method especially in samples with low serum butyrylcholinesterase activity.

  8. Analysis of vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific analytical method to study vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables. Accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. Quantification was done by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot. The repeatability was 5.2% and the internal reproducibility was 6.2%. Recovery was in the range 90-120%. No significant difference was observed between the results obtained by the present method and by a method using the same principle as the CEN-standard i.e. liquid-liquid extraction and post-column zinc reduction with fluorescence detection. Limit of quantification was estimated to 0.05 μg/100g fresh weight.

  9. Dispersive micro-solid phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of N-nitrosamines in swimming pool water samples.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ssu-Chieh; Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Chen, Hsin-Chang; Wang, Yu-Chen; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    A simple sample pretreatment technique, dispersive micro-solid phase extraction, was applied for the extraction of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other four N-nitrosamines (NAs) from samples of swimming pool water. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were systematically investigated. The best extraction conditions involved immersing 75 mg of carbon molecular sieve, Carboxen™ 1003 (as an adsorbent), in a 50-mL water sample (pH 7.0) containing 5% sodium chloride in a sample tube. After 20 min of extraction by vigorous shaking, the adsorbent was collected on a filter and the NAs desorbed by treatment with 150 μL of dichloromethane. A 10-μL aliquot was then directly determined by large-volume injection gas chromatography with chemical ionization mass spectrometry using the selected ion storage mode. The limits of quantitation were <0.9 ng/L. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations, were <8% for both intra- and inter-day analyses. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 62% and 109%. A preliminary analysis of swimming pool water samples revealed that NDMA was present in the highest concentration, in the range from n.d. to 100 ng/L.

  10. A validated positive chemical ionization GC/MS method for the identification and quantification of amphetamine, opiates, cocaine, and metabolites in human postmortem brain.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Ross H; Barnes, Allan J; Lehrmann, Elin; Freed, William J; Kleinman, Joel E; Hyde, Thomas M; Herman, Mary M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-02-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the simultaneous detection and quantification of amphetamine, opiates, and cocaine and metabolites in human postmortem brain was developed and validated. Analytes of interest included amphetamine, morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine ethyl ester, cocaethylene, and anhydroecgonine methyl ester. The method employed ultrasonic homogenization of brain tissue in pH 4.0 sodium acetate buffer and solid phase extraction. Extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide. Separation and quantification were accomplished on a bench-top positive chemical ionization capillary gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer with selected ion monitoring. Eight deuterated analogs were used as internal standards. Limits of quantification were 50 ng/g of brain. Calibration curves were linear to 1000 ng/g for anhydroecgonine methyl ester and 6-acetylmorphine, and to 2000 ng/g for all other analytes. Accuracy across the linear range of the assay ranged from 90.2 to 112.2%, and precision, as percent relative standard deviation, was less than 16.6%. Quantification of drug concentrations in brain is a useful research tool in neurobiology and in forensic and postmortem toxicology, identifying the type, relative magnitude, and recency of abused drug exposure. This method will be employed to quantify drug concentrations in human postmortem brain in support of basic and clinical research on the physiologic, biochemical, and behavioral effects of drugs in humans.

  11. Chemical separation and mass spectrometry of Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Akane; Yamashita, Katsuyuki; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2009-12-01

    A sequential chemical separation technique for Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Cu in terrestrial and extraterrestrial silicate rocks was developed for precise and accurate determination of elemental concentration by the isotope dilution method (ID). The technique uses a combination of cation-anion exchange chromatography and Eichrom nickel specific resin. The method was tested using a variety of matrixes including bulk meteorite (Allende), terrestrial peridotite (JP-1), and basalt (JB-1b). Concentrations of each element was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) using W filaments and a Si-B-Al type activator for Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn and a Re filament and silicic acid-H3PO4 activator for Cu. The method can be used to precisely determine the concentrations of these elements in very small silicate samples, including meteorites, geochemical reference samples, and mineral standards for microprobe analysis. Furthermore, the Cr mass spectrometry procedure developed in this study can be extended to determine the isotopic ratios of 53Cr/52Cr and 54Cr/52Cr with precision of approximately 0.05epsilon and approximately 0.10epsilon (1epsilon = 0.01%), respectively, enabling cosmochemical applications such as high precision Mn-Cr chronology and investigation of nucleosynthetic isotopic anomalies in meteorites.

  12. Simultaneous airborne nitric acid and formic acid measurements using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer around the UK: Analysis of primary and secondary production pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Xiao, Ping; Shallcross, Beth M. A.; Batt, Rory; Cooke, Michael C.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Bauguitte, S. J.-B.; Percival, Carl J.

    2014-02-01

    The first simultaneous measurements of formic and nitric acid mixing ratios around the United Kingdom were measured on the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer using I- reagent ions at 0.8 Hz. Analysis of the whole dataset shows that formic acid and nitric acid are positively correlated as illustrated by other studies (e.g. Veres et al., 2011). However, initial evidence indicates a prominent direct source of formic acid and also a significant source when O3 levels are high, suggesting the importance of the ozonolysis of 1-alkenes. A trajectory model was able to reproduce the formic acid concentrations by both the inclusion of a primary vehicle source and production via ozonolysis of propene equivalent 1-alkene levels. Inspection of data archives implies these levels of 1-alkene are possible after 11 am, but formic acid and nitric acid plumes early in the flight are too high for the model to replicate. These data show the relationship between nitric acid and formic acid cannot solely be attributed to related photochemical production. The simultaneous measurement of HCOOH and HNO3 has been implemented to estimate OH levels along the flight track assuming a relationship between formic and nitric acid in photochemical plumes and a constant source of 1-alkene.

  13. Triacylglycerols profiling in plant oils important in food industry, dietetics and cosmetics using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal

    2008-07-11

    Optimized non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method using acetonitrile-2-propanol gradient elution and the column coupling in the total length of 45 cm has been applied for the high resolution separation of plant oils important in food industry, dietetics and cosmetics. Positive-ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry is used for the unambiguous identification and also the reliable quantitation with the response factors approach. Based on the precise determination of individual triacyglycerol concentrations, the calculation of average parameters important in the nutrition is performed, i.e. average carbon number, average double bond number, relative concentrations of essential, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results are reported in the form of both chromatographic fingerprints and tables containing relative concentrations for all triacylglycerols and fatty acids in individual samples. In total, 264 triacylglycerols consisting of 28 fatty acids with the alkyl chain length from 6 to 26 carbon atoms and 0 to 4 double bonds have been identified in 26 industrial important plant oils.

  14. A highly specific and sensitive quantification analysis of the sterols in silkworm larvae by high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Fumihiko; Hikiba, Juri; Ogihara, Mari H; Nakaoka, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2011-12-15

    The biochemical quantification of sterols in insects has been difficult because only small amounts of tissues can be obtained from insect bodies and because sterol metabolites are structurally related. We have developed a highly specific and sensitive quantitative method for determining of the concentrations of seven sterols-7-dehydrocholesterol, desmosterol, cholesterol, ergosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol-using a high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-MS/MS). The sterols were extracted from silkworm larval tissues using the Bligh and Dyer method and were analyzed using HPLC/APCI-MS/MS with selected reaction monitoring, using cholesterol-3,4-(13)C(2) as an internal standard. The detection limits of the method were between 12.1 and 259 fmol. The major sterol in most silkworm larval tissues was cholesterol, whereas only small quantities of the dietary sterols were detected. Thus, a simple, sensitive, and specific method was successfully developed for the quantification of the sterol concentrations in each tissue of an individual silkworm larva. This method will be a useful tool for investigating to molecular basis of sterol physiology in insects, facilitating the quantification of femtomole quantities of sterols in biological samples.

  15. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant.

  16. Identification and quantification of antitumor thioproline and methylthioproline in Korean traditional foods by a liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hyo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-11-01

    A liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-APCI-MS/MS) has been developed for the sensitive determination of antitumor thioproline and methylthioproline from fermented foods. Thioproline and methylthioproline were derivatized in one step with ethyl chloroformate at room temperature. These compounds were identified and quantified in various traditional Korean fermented foods by LC-APCI-MS/MS. The concentration range of thioproline of each food was found for doenjang (0.011-0.032mg/kg), gochujang (0.010-0.038mg/kg), and ganjang (0.010-0.038mg/kg). Those of methylthioproline of each food was found for doenjang (0.098-0.632mg/kg), gochujang (0.015-0.112mg/kg), and ganjang (0.023-1.468mg/kg). A prolonged aging time leads to an increase in both the thioproline and methylthioproline contents, suggesting that the storage time plays a key role in the formation of thioproline and methylthioproline in Korean traditional foods. The results here suggest that thioproline and methylthioproline are related to the biological activities of traditional Korean fermented foods.

  17. Trace analysis of selected hormones and sterols in river sediments by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matić, Ivana; Grujić, Svetlana; Jauković, Zorica; Laušević, Mila

    2014-10-17

    In this paper, development and optimization of new LC-MS method for determination of twenty selected hormones, human/animal and plant sterols in river sediments were described. Sediment samples were prepared using ultrasonic extraction and clean up with silica gel/anhydrous sodium sulphate cartridge. Extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The optimized extraction parameters were extraction solvent (methanol), weight of the sediment (2 g) and time of ultrasonic extraction (3× 10 min). Successful chromatographic separation of hormones (estriol and estrone, 17α- and 17β-estradiol) and four human/animal sterols (epicoprostanol, coprostanol, α-cholestanol and β-cholestanol) that have identical fragmentation reactions was achieved. The developed and optimized method provided high recoveries (73-118%), low limits of detection (0.8-18 ng g(-1)) and quantification (2.5-60 ng g(-1)) with the RSDs generally lower than 20%. Applicability of the developed method was confirmed by analysis of six river sediment samples. A widespread occurrence of human/animal and plant sterols was found. The only detected hormone was mestranol in just one sediment sample.

  18. Rapid and sensitive analysis of azadirachtin and related triterpenoids from Neem (Azadirachta indica) by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, O; Jarvis, A P; van der Esch, S A; Giagnacovo, G; Oldham, N J

    2000-07-21

    Based on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry, a HPLC-MS method was developed to permit the rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of azadirachtin and related tetranortriterpenoids from seeds and tissue cultures of Neem (Azadirachta indica). APCI+ standard scanning mass spectra of the major Neem triterpenoids were recorded and utilized to select suitable ions for selected ion monitoring (SIM). Transitions for selective reaction monitoring (SRM) were based on MS-MS experiments. Using SIM, major Neem triterpenoids were detected in callus culture material and seed kernels of A. indica. The limit of detection for azadirachtin in extract samples (approximately 1 ng ml(-1) or 10 pg in SIM mode) was determined to be (with respect to injected absolute amounts) approximately 1000-times lower than values quoted in the literature for existing HPLC methods (approximately 200 ng ml(-1) or 10 ng). In addition to high sensitivity, the HPLC-MS method is able to tolerate minimal sample preparation and purification, dramatically reducing total analysis time.

  19. Interaction of the indoor air pollutant acetone with Degussa P25 TiO2 studied by chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Catherine M; Weitz, Eric; Geiger, Franz M

    2006-11-07

    Preventing a build-up of indoor pollutant concentrations has emerged as a major goal in environmental chemistry. Here, we have applied chemical ionization mass spectrometry to study the interaction of acetone, a common indoor air pollutant, with Degussa P25 TiO2, an inexpensive catalyst that is widely used for the degradation of volatile organic compounds into CO2 and water. To better understand the adsorption of acetone onto Degussa P25, the necessary first step for its degradation, the experiments were carried out at room temperature in the absence of UV light. This allowed for the deconvolution of the nonreactive and reactive thermal binding processes on Degussa P25 at acetone partial pressures (10(-7)-10(-4) Torr) commonly found in indoor environments. On average, 30% of the adsorbed acetone is bound irreversibly, resulting in a surface coverage of irreversibly bound acetone of approximately 1 x 10(12) molecules/cm2 at 3-4 x 10(-5) Torr. Equilibrium and dynamic experiments yield a sticking coefficient of approximately 1 x 10(-4) that is independent of the acetone partial pressures examined here. Equilibrium binding constants and free energies of adsorption are reported.

  20. Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Mario; Heinritzi, Martin; Herzog, Stephan; Leiminger, Markus; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Kürten, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation, but their concentrations are usually low with typical mixing ratios in the pptv range or even smaller. Therefore, the demand for highly sensitive gas-phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas-phase sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine (DMA, (CH3)2NH) using the NO3-•(HNO3)1 - 2• (DMA) cluster ion signal. Calibration measurements were made at the CLOUD chamber during two different measurement campaigns. Good linearity between 0 and ˜ 120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  1. Selective determination of tobacco-specific nitrosamines in mainstream cigarette smoke by GC coupled to positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole MS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Da; Lu, Yifeng; Lin, Huaqing; Zhou, Wanhong; Gu, Wenbo

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method for the selective determination of four kinds of tobacco-specific nitrosamines, N-nitrosonornicotine, N-nitrosoanatabine, N-nitrosoanabasine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, in mainstream cigarette smoke was developed by GC coupled to positive chemical ionization triple-quadrupole MS. After mainstream cigarette smoke was collected on a cambridge filter pad, the particulate matter was extracted with 0.1 M HCL aqueous solution, cleaned by positive cation-exchange solid extraction, and finally injected into GC-MS/MS using isotopically labeled analogues as internal standards. Excellent linearity was obtained over the concentration range of 0.5-200.0 ng mL(-1) for all tobacco-specific nitrosamines with values for correlation coefficient between 0.9996-0.9999. Limits of detection of each tobacco specific nitrosamine varied from 0.023-0.028 ng cig(-1), and lower limits of quantification varied from 0.077-0.093 ng cig(-1). The recovery of each tobacco specific nitrosamine was from 90.0-109.0%. The relative standard deviations of the intra-day and inter-day precisions were 3.1-5.8 and 3.9-6.6, respectively. This method was applied to reference and domestic cigarettes. The result showed that the method was consistent with traditional methods and can be used as an effective approach for the routine analysis of tobacco-specific nitrosamines.

  2. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa.

  3. Comparison of Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer to BD Phoenix automated microbiology system for identification of gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Saffert, Ryan T; Cunningham, Scott A; Ihde, Sherry M; Jobe, Kristine E Monson; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Patel, Robin

    2011-03-01

    We compared the BD Phoenix automated microbiology system to the Bruker Biotyper (version 2.0) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system for identification of gram-negative bacilli, using biochemical testing and/or genetic sequencing to resolve discordant results. The BD Phoenix correctly identified 363 (83%) and 330 (75%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively. The Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 408 (93%) and 360 (82%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively. The 440 isolates were grouped into common (308) and infrequent (132) isolates in the clinical laboratory. For the 308 common isolates, the BD Phoenix and Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 294 (95%) and 296 (96%) of the isolates to the genus level, respectively. For species identification, the BD Phoenix and Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 93% of the common isolates (285 and 286, respectively). In contrast, for the 132 infrequent isolates, the Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 112 (85%) and 74 (56%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively, compared to the BD Phoenix, which identified only 69 (52%) and 45 (34%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively. Statistically, the Bruker Biotyper overall outperformed the BD Phoenix for identification of gram-negative bacilli to the genus (P < 0.0001) and species (P = 0.0005) level in this sample set. When isolates were categorized as common or infrequent isolates, there was statistically no difference between the instruments for identification of common gram-negative bacilli (P > 0.05). However, the Bruker Biotyper outperformed the BD Phoenix for identification of infrequently isolated gram-negative bacilli (P < 0.0001).

  4. N2O5 measurement in Hong Kong by a chemical ionization mass spectrometry: Presence of high N2O5 and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Tham Yee; Tao, Wang; Zhe, Wang; Xinfeng, Wang; Chao, Yan; Qiaozhi, Zha; Zheng, Xu; Likun, Xue

    2014-05-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) plays key roles in a number of nocturnal chemical processes within the troposphere, including the sink of nitrogen oxides (NOx). However, accurate measurement of this atmospheric trace compound remains as a challenging task, especially in polluted environment like China. We initially deploy a thermal dissociation chemical ionization mass spectrometry (TD-CIMS) for N2O5 field measurement in Hong Kong from 2010-2012. Unusual high N2O5 signal measured as NO3- (62 amu) were frequently observed. Various interference tests and correction were conducted to verify the data, but we caution the use of 62 amu for measuring ambient N2O5 in a high NOx environment like Hong Kong. Therefore, we optimized the CIMS to measure N2O5 as ion cluster of I(N2O5)- at 235 amu with some minor improvements and demonstrated to has the ability for simultaneous in situ measurements of N2O5 at an urban site. Then, the CIMS was deployed to another field study at a mountain-top site (Tai Mo Shan). A comparison of N2O5 measurement with a cavity ring-down spectrometry was performed and found to be in good correlation with the CIMS. High concentration of N2O5 was observed between the boundary layer and there are some occasions where N2O5 exceeds several ppb, which is among the highest values ever reported. These results provide deeper understanding on the chemistry of NOx in a polluted environment. Furthermore, our first observation of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) and its co-existence with N2O5 also implies an active heterogeneous reactivity between N2O5 and chloride particles in an Asian environment. Thus, N2O5 is an important nocturnal intermediate and has the potential in jump-starting the atmospheric photochemistry in this region

  5. [Determination of short chain chlorinated paraffins in polyvinyl chloride plastics by gas chromatography-negative chemical ion/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xing, Yuanna; Lin, Zhihui; Feng, Anhong; Wang, Xin; Gong, Yemeng; Chen, Zeyong

    2015-02-01

    A novel method was established to determine short chain chlorinated paraffins (SC-CPs) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics by gas chromatography-negative chemical ion/mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). Ultrasonic extraction was used to extract SCCPs from PVC plastics. The optimal extraction time was 1.5 h, and concentrated sulfuric acid was adopted to purify the extracted solution. Finally, SCCPs in a sample were detected by GC-NCI/MS at 160 C and with methane reagent gas at 1. 5 mL/min. This method was not influenced by medium chain chlorinated paraffins (MCCPs) in the sample, and accurate quantitation was made for SCCPs. Twelve batches of samples were analyzed and SCCPs were detected in each batch with the contents from 0. 3 x 10(2)mg/kg to 3. 5 x 10(4)mg/kg. With respect to European limitation of SC-CPs (1%), four batches of samples did not comply with the European regulation, and they accounted for 33. 3%. Obviously, high SCCPs risk was presented in PVC plastics.

  6. Development of a High-Resolution H3O+ Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Gas-phase Hydrocarbons and its Application During the 2015 SONGNEX Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Stark, H.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (ToF-CIMS) using H3O+ reagent ion chemistry (PTR-MS) are a relatively new technique in detection of gas-phase hydrocarbons, and recent improvements in instrument sensitivity, mass resolution, and ease of field deployment have expanded their use in atmospheric chemistry. The comparatively low-energy H3O+ ionization technique is ideal for measuring complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, and, compared to conventional quadrupole PTRMS, the newest generation of ToF-CIMS measure many more species simultaneously and with a sensitivity that is as high as a quadrupole PTR-MS. We describe here the development of a commercially available ToF CIMS into an H3O+CIMS suitable for deployment on aircraft, and its application during an aircraft campaign studying emissions from oil and natural gas extraction industry. We provide an overview of instrument development and specifications, including design, characterization, and field operation. We then discuss data processing and interpretation. First, we investigate determination of intensities of poorly resolved peaks. The mass resolution of the present instrument (m/Δm ~4500) enables separate analysis of many isobaric peaks, but peaks are also frequently not fully resolved. Using results from laboratory tests, we quantify how the accuracy can be limited by the overlap in neighboring peaks, and compare to theoretical predictions from literature. We then briefly describe our method for quality assurance of reported compounds, and correction for background and humidity effects. Finally, we present preliminary results from the first field deployment of this instrument during the Spring 2015 SONGNEX aircraft campaign. This campaign sampled emissions from oil and natural gas extraction regions and associated infrastructure in the Western and Central United States. We will highlight results that illustrate (1) new scientific capability from improved mass resolution, which

  7. Electronic dynamics by ultrafast pump photoelectron detachment probed by ionization: a dynamical simulation of negative-neutral-positive in LiH(-).

    PubMed

    Mignolet, B; Levine, R D; Remacle, F

    2014-08-21

    The control of electronic dynamics in the neutral electronic states of LiH before the onset of significant nuclei motion is investigated using a negative-neutral-positive (NeNePo) ultrafast IR pump-attoescond pulse train (APT) probe scheme. Starting from the ground state of the anion (LiH(-)), multiphoton ultrafast electron detachment and subsequent excitation of the neutral by a few femtosecond intense IR pulse produces a non-equilibrium electronic density in neutral LiH. The coherent electronic wave packet is then probed by angularly resolved photoionization to the cation by an APT generated from a replica of the pump IR pulse at several time delays. Realistic parameters for the pump and the APT are used. Several NeNePo schemes are simulated using different IR carrier frequencies, showing that the delay between the successive attosecond pulses in the train can be used as a filter to probe the different pairs of states present in the coherent electronic wave packet produced by the pump pulse. The dynamical simulations include the pump and the probe pulses to all orders by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a coupled equation scheme for the manifolds of the anion, neutral, and cation subspaces. We show that an incomplete molecular orientation of the molecule in the laboratory frame does not prevent probing the electronic density localization by angularly resolved photoelectron maps.

  8. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  9. Toward Comprehensive Physical/Chemical Understanding of the Circumstellar Environments - Simultaneous Probing of Each of the Ionized/Atomic/Molecular Gas and Dust Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya

    also suggest that the central star of about 1.5 M_sun initial mass is terminating its PN evolution onto the white dwarf cooling track. The most notable aspect of the HerPlaNS analysis is simultaneous probing of each of the ionized/atomic/molecular gas and dust components in the target PN, which can properly determine relative abundances of these components as a function of position in the shell, allowing us to investigate the mass loss history. With this NASA ADAP proposal, we request funding to continue the simultaneous probing of all the PN components for the rest of 10 HerPlaNS target PNs and 13 other PNs in the Herschel Science Archive for which a full complement of the analysis can be performed (plus the remaining 29 PNs in the archive for which partial analysis is possible, for the sake of completeness). Our goals are to perform (1) broadband thermal dust emission fitting to establish the dust mass distribution in the target PNs and (2) farIR line diagnostics to establish the mass distribution of each of the ionized, atomic, and molecular gas components in the target PNs, so that we can create empirically-sound gasto-dust mass ratio maps which permit us to investigate the possibility of time variations in the gas-to-dust mass ratio over the course of mass loss history. We will also perform photoionization modeling using (py)CLOUDY and MOCASSIN to establish 3-D physical/chemical stratification within the nebulae as a manifestation of mass-loss modulations over the course of mass loss history. Our analysis is also assisted by optical data obtained through slit-scan mapping at the Gemini-North and South as well as the Subaru Telescope that are presently on-going (plus, spectral mapping with the Hubble Space Telescope and IFU observations at VLT, pending approval). Together with the farIR data, we can iteratively bootstrap line diagnostics so that we can determine the (Te, ne) profiles completely self-consistently without any prior assumptions.

  10. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  11. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  12. Development of An Ion-Drift Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Technique for Measurements of Aerosol Precursor Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Ma, Y.; Chen, M.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a new technique, i.e., ion-drift time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-ToF-CIMS) for measurements of aerosol precursor gases, including ammonia, amines, organic acids and oxygenated VOCs at pptv level with a response time less than 1 s. The ID-ToF-CIMS was modified from an Aerodyne high resolution ToF-CIMS with a custom-designed ion-drift tube, which can control the ion flight velocity and hence the ion-molecular reaction time. In addition, the tunable electric field generated by the drift tube can break up water clusters to select the major reagent ions. The advantages of the ID-ToF-CIMS over the traditional quadrupole-based ID-CIMS were the high mass-resolving power of the ToF mass analyzer and the capability of simultaneous measurement of the full mass range (typically up to 300 m/z) of product ions. Using hydronium ion based reagent ions, we demonstrated that the ID-ToF-CIMS can unambiguously measure ammonia (NH3) at 18.03 m/z, methyl amine (CH3NH2) at 32.05 m/z, formic acid (HCOOH) at 47.01 m/z and acetone (CH3COCH3) at 59.05 m/z. Calibrations were performed with both compressed commercial standard gases and permeation tubes and the results showed that the instrument detection limit can reach pptv level for 1 s average time or less. The ID-ToF-CIMS was also field tested in a mobile laboratory on the campus of Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology (NUIST). The preliminary results will be discussed.

  13. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH(+), MOH(+), and MO(2)H(+), respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH(+) sharply decreased, that of MOH(+) increased once and then decreased, and that of MO(2)H(+) sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO(2)H(+) at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH(+) and 100 times higher than that of MOH(+) in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO(2)H(+) signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m(3), which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m(3), which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m(3) vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative analysis on chemical constituents from Curculigo orchioides using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yongjing; Dong, Xin; Jia, Xiaoxuan; Li, Mei; Yuan, Tingting; Xu, Hongtao; Qin, Luping; Han, Ting; Zhang, Qiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    A rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS) method was developed for qualitative and quantitative determination of constituents in the rhizome of Curculigo orchioides. Qualitative analysis was performed on a Waters ACQUITY UHPLC @ HSS T3 column (1.8 μm 100 × 2.1mm) using gradient elution with mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile. Quantitative analysis was performed on an Agilent ZORBAX Eclipse plus C18 column (1.7 μm 100 × 2.1mm) using gradient elution with mobile phase of 0.1% acetic acid and acetonitrile for at least 20 min. Quadrupole TOF/MS in either full scan mode or extracted ion mode was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the constituents. According to the mass spectrometric fragmentation mechanism and UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS data, chemical structures of 45 constituents in the rhizome of Curculigo orchioides, including 19 phenols and phenolic glycosides, 16 lignans and lignan glycosides, 8 triterpenoid saponins, one flavone and one sesquiterpene, were identified tentatively on-line without the time-consuming process of isolation. In addition, 8 phenolic glycosides including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), 2-hydroxy-5-(2-hydroxyethyl) phenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (HPG), anacardoside (ACD), orcinol glucoside (OGD), orcinol-1-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (OAG), 2,6-dimethoxybenzoic acid (DBA), curculigoside (CUR) and curculigine A (CCL) were quantitated in 11 collected samples and 10 commercial samples from different providers. The results show that UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS is a viable method for analysis and quality evaluation of the constituents from the rhizome of Curculigo orchioides.

  15. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for sensitive determination of bioactive amines in donkey milk.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Giovanna Loredana; Saitta, Marcello; Giorgia Potortì, Angela; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Dugo, Giacomo

    2010-08-06

    In the present study we report on the optimization and validation of a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS) method for the determination of 8 bioactive amines (histamine, tyramine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine) in donkey milk samples. The method involves donkey milk pre-treatment to remove proteins and pre-column dansylation of the amines. HPLC in reversed phase mode has been used for bioactive amines separation and the operating condition of the APCI-MS system proved to be powerful and very efficient for peak assignment. The separation was accomplished in a short time with an excellent resolution for all the amine peaks. Quantification was carried out by monitoring the characteristic [M+H](+) ion of each amine derivative. The method sensitivity, linearity and repeatability were assayed with satisfactory results. The detection limits of the analysed amines ranged from 0.5 microg L(-1) to 15 microg L(-1); the highest LOD was for spermine. Also remarkably good recovery values were obtained; at the lowest spiking level (1 microg L(-1)) the percent mean recoveries ranged from 77.7 to 109.7. Furthermore, as the investigations relate to a complex matrix as donkey milk, suitable studies on matrix effect were performed. Finally, the developed and validated method was applied to analyse 13 donkey milk samples. Among the identified bioactive amines, putrescine, spermine and spermidine proved to be the main amines in donkey milk. Their concentration levels in the present study were lower than the values determined in mature human, cow and sow milk.

  16. Determination of eight nitrosamines in water at the ng L(-1) levels by liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ripollés, Cristina; Pitarch, Elena; Sancho, Juan V; López, Francisco J; Hernández, Félix

    2011-09-19

    In this work, we have developed a sensitive method for detection and quantification of eight N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMor), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopirrolidine (NPyr), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPip), N-nitroso-n-dipropylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA) in drinking water. The method is based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive mode with a triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ). The simultaneous acquisition of two MS/MS transitions in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) for each compound, together with the evaluation of their relative intensity, allowed the simultaneous quantification and reliable identification in water at ppt levels. Empirical formula of the product ions selected was confirmed by UHPLC-(Q)TOF MS accurate mass measurements from reference standards. Prior to LC-MS/MS QqQ analysis, a preconcentration step by off-line SPE using coconut charcoal EPA 521 cartridges (by passing 500 mL of water sample) was necessary to improve the sensitivity and to meet regulation requirements. For accurate quantification, two isotope labelled nitrosamines (NDMA-d(6) and NDPA-d(14)) were added as surrogate internal standards to the samples. The optimized method was validated at two concentration levels (10 and 100 ng L(-1)) in drinking water samples, obtaining satisfactory recoveries (between 90 and 120%) and precision (RSD<20%). Limits of detection were found to be in the range of 1-8 ng L(-1). The described methodology has been applied to different types of water samples: chlorinated from drinking water and wastewater treatment plants (DWTP and WWTP, respectively), wastewaters subjected to ozonation and tap waters.

  17. Analysis of trimethoprim, lincomycin, sulfadoxin and tylosin in swine manure using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Massé, Daniel; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A new extraction method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the determination of four veterinary antibiotics. The analytes belong to different groups of antibiotics such as chemotherapeutics, sulfonamides, lincosamides and macrolides. Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfadoxin (SFX), lincomycin (LCM) and tylosin (TYL) were extracted from lyophilized manure using a sonication extraction. McIlvaine buffer and methanol (MeOH) were used as extraction buffers, followed by cation-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) for clean-up. Analysis was performed by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical-ionization (LDTD-APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The LDTD is a high throughput sample introduction method that reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample, compared to minutes when using traditional liquid chromatography (LC). Various SPE parameters were optimized after sample extraction: the stationary phase, the extraction solvent composition, the quantity of sample extracted and sample pH. LDTD parameters were also optimized: solvent deposition, carrier gas, laser power and corona discharge. The method limit of detection (MLD) ranged from 2.5 to 8.3 µg kg(-1) while the method limit of quantification (MLQ) ranged from 8.3 to 28µgkg(-1). Calibration curves in the manure matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥ 0.996) for all analytes and the interday and intraday coefficients of variation were below 14%. Recoveries of analytes from manure ranged from 53% to 69%. The method was successfully applied to real manure samples.

  18. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum.

    PubMed

    Geng, Dawei; Jogsten, Ingrid Ericson; Dunstan, Jody; Hagberg, Jessika; Wang, Thanh; Ruzzin, Jerome; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van Bavel, Bert

    2016-07-01

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r(2))>0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4pg/μL) and CS 3 (4pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS.

  19. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Mol, J G J; Sancho, J V; López, Francisco J; Hernández, F

    2014-08-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS(E)). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20mg kg(-1). For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01mg kg(-1) level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01mg kg(-1) for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01mg kg(-1) level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20mg kg(-1) level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second ion was the main reason for the inability to identify detected pesticides, followed by deviations in mass accuracy and ion ratios.

  20. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  1. Aqueous-phase photooxidation of levoglucosan - a mechanistic study using Aerosol Time of Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-04-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is a widely employed tracer for biomass burning (BB). Recent studies have shown that LG can react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the aqueous phase, despite many mass balance receptor models assuming it to be inert during atmospheric transport. In the current study, aqueous-phase photooxidation of LG by OH radicals was performed in the laboratory. The reaction kinetics and products were monitored by Aerosol Time of Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS). Approximately 50 reaction products were detected by the Aerosol-ToF-CIMS during the photooxidation experiments, representing one of the most detailed product studies yet performed. By following the evolution of mass defects of product peaks, unique trends of adding oxygen (+O) and removing hydrogen (-2H) were observed among the products detected, providing useful information to determine potential reaction mechanisms and sequences. As well, bond scission reactions take place, leading to reaction intermediates with lower carbon numbers. We introduce a data analysis framework where the average oxidation state (OSc) is plotted against a novel molecular property: double bond equivalence to carbon ratio (DBE / #C). The trajectory of LG photooxidation on this plot suggests formation of poly-carbonyl intermediates and their subsequent conversion to carboxylic acids as a general reaction trend. We also determined the rate constant of LG with OH radicals at room temperature to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 109 M-1 s-1. By coupling an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) to the system, we observed a rapid decay of the mass fraction of organic signals at mass-to-charge ratio 60 (f60), corresponding closely to the LG decay monitored by the Aerosol-ToF-CIMS. The trajectory of LG photooxidation on a f44-f60 correlation plot matched closely to literature field measurement data. This implies that aqueous-phase photooxidation might be partially contributing to aging of BB particles in the ambient

  2. Aqueous-phase photooxidation of levoglucosan - a mechanistic study using aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-09-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is a widely employed tracer for biomass burning (BB). Recent studies have shown that LG can react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the aqueous phase despite many mass balance receptor models assuming it to be inert during atmospheric transport. In the current study, aqueous-phase photooxidation of LG by OH radicals was performed in the laboratory. The reaction kinetics and products were monitored by aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol ToF-CIMS). Approximately 50 reaction products were detected by the Aerosol ToF-CIMS during the photooxidation experiments, representing one of the most detailed product studies yet performed. By following the evolution of mass defects of product peaks, unique trends of adding oxygen (+O) and removing hydrogen (-2H) were observed among the products detected, providing useful information for determining potential reaction mechanisms and sequences. Additionally, bond-scission reactions take place, leading to reaction intermediates with lower carbon numbers. We introduce a data analysis framework where the average oxidation state (OSc) is plotted against a novel molecular property: double-bond-equivalence-to-carbon ratio (DBE/#C). The trajectory of LG photooxidation on this plot suggests formation of polycarbonyl intermediates and their subsequent conversion to carboxylic acids as a general reaction trend. We also determined the rate constant of LG with OH radicals at room temperature to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 109 M-1 s-1. By coupling an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to the system, we observed a rapid decay of the mass fraction of organic signals at mass-to-charge ratio 60 (f60), corresponding closely to the LG decay monitored by the Aerosol ToF-CIMS. The trajectory of LG photooxidation on a f44-f60 correlation plot matched closely to literature field measurement data. This implies that aqueous-phase photooxidation might be partially contributing to aging of BB particles in the

  3. Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds during SOAS 2013 using nitrate ion chemical ionization coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Cnagaratna, M.; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J. P.; Mauldin, R.; Ehn, M.; Sipila, M.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry. This technique allows to selectively detect oxidized gas-phase species, e.g., oxidized organic molecules and sulfuric acid via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. The capability of making such measurements is important because both sulfuric acid and organic gas molecules have a recognized key role in new particle formation (NPF) processes and likely have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest supersite in Centreville, AL, from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The main goal of the SOAS campaign was to investigate the composition and sources of SOA in the Southeast US, where emissions are mainly represented by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emissions and in less extent by anthropogenic emissions (AVOC). During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected a range of organic ions that based on previous literature could be identified as oxidation products of both isoprene and terpenes. The isoprene products were 5 to 10 times more abundant than the terpene products. The isoprene-related molecules showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, typically after 1500 local time, while the terpene products were higher at night (between 2000 and 0600 local time). These results are consistent with the diurnal trends of primary BVOC emissions from other co-located instruments. The ambient data are also compared to laboratory measurements where oxidized organic vapors are produced using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor by the OH oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors (isoprene, a-pinene) over multiple days of equivalent atmospheric exposure.

  4. Profiling of triacylglycerols in plant oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmosphere pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a novel mixed-mode column.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Wei, Fang; Lv, Xin; Wu, Lin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, a rapid and high-throughput method for profiling of TAGs in plant oils by liquid chromatography using a single column coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry was reported. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column could provide hydrophobic interactions as well as π-π interactions. Compared with two traditionally columns used in TAG separation - the C18 column and silver-ion column, this column exhibited much higher selectivity for the separation of TAGs with great efficiency and rapid speed. By comparison with a novel mix-mode column (Ag-HiSep OTS column), which can also provide both hydrophobic interactions as well as π-π interactions for the separation of TAGs, phenyl-hexyl column exhibited excellent stability. LC method using phenyl-hexyl column coupled with APCI-MS was successfully applied for the profiling of TAGs in soybean oils, peanut oils, corn oils, and sesame oils. 29 TAGs in peanut oils, 22 TAGs in soybean oils, 19 TAGs in corn oils, and 19 TAGs in sesame oils were determined and quantified. The LC-MS data was analyzed by barcodes and principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting barcodes constitute a simple tool to display differences between different plant oils. Results of PCA also enabled a clear identification of different plant oils. This method provided an efficient and convenient chromatographic technology for the fast characterization and quantification of complex TAGs in plant oils at high selectivity. It has great potential as a routine analytical method for analysis of edible oil quality and authenticity control.

  5. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; ...

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  6. Enantioselective determination of cetirizine in human plasma by normal-phase liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Woo; Jang, Hae Jong; Moore, Victor S; Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Ah; Youm, Jeong-Rok; Han, Sang Beom

    2010-12-15

    A highly sensitive and enantioselective method has been developed and validated for the determination of levocetirizine [(R)-cetirizine] in human plasma by normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface in the positive ion mode. Enantioselective separation was achieved on a CHIRALPAK AD-H column using an isocratic mobile phase consisting of a mixture of n-hexane, ethyl alcohol, diethylamine, and acetic acid (60:40:0.1:0.1, v/v/v/v). Levocetirizine-D(8) was used as an internal standard (IS). Levocetirizine and the IS were detected by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM). Mass transitions of analyte and IS were m/z 389.2→201.1 and 397.2→201.1, respectively. Under optimized analytical conditions, a baseline separation of two enantiomers and IS was obtained in less than 11 min. Samples were prepared by a simple two-step extraction by protein precipitation using acetonitrile followed by liquid-liquid extraction with a n-hexane-dichloromethane mixture (50:50, v/v). The standard curve for levocetirizine was linear (r(2)>0.995) in the concentration range 0.5-300 ng/mL. Recovery was between 97.0 and 102.2% at low, medium, and high concentration. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.5 ng/mL. Other method validation parameters, such as precision, accuracy, and stability, were very satisfactory. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the study of enantioselective oral pharmacokinetics of levocetirizine in healthy Korean volunteers.

  7. Simultaneous determination of eight underivatized amphetamines in hair by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stanaszek, Roman; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, optimize, and validate an analytical procedure to determine a group of eight amphetamines, amphetamine (AMP), ephedrine (EP), methcathinone (MTC), paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA), methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA), in hair. The target substances were extracted with 1-chlorobutane after alkaline (1M NaOH) digestion and analyzed underivatized with high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS). APCI-MS parameters such as fragmentor and capillary voltage, corona current, drying gas temperature and flow rate, vaporizer temperature, and nebulizer gas pressure were optimized with the application of flow injection analysis. Quantitation was performed using selected ion monitoring of protonated molecular ions of the studied drugs, and their deuterated analogues were used as internal standards. The limits of detection were 0.05 ng/mg for MA, MDA, MDMA, and MDEA; 0.10 ng/mg for EP and AMP; and 0.20 ng/mg for MTC and PMA. A linear response was observed for all drugs from 0 to 20 ng/mg. The method was applied to the determination of amphetamines in 93 authentic hair samples obtained from detoxification and methadone treatment patients, revealing the following concentrations: 0.17-17.28 ng/mg (EP), 0.52-2.08 ng/mg (MTC), 0.15-62.52 ng/mg (AMP), 0.10-16.52 ng/mg (MA), 0.10-0.88 ng/mg (MDMA), and 0.10-0.16 ng/mg (MDEA). MDA and PMA were never detected.

  8. Identification of organic nitrates in the NO3 radical initiated oxidation of alpha-pinene by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perraud, Véronique; Bruns, Emily A; Ezell, Michael J; Johnson, Stanley N; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2010-08-01

    The gas-phase reactions of nitrate radicals (NO3) with biogenic organic compounds are a major sink for these organics during night-time. These reactions form secondary organic aerosols, including organic nitrates that can undergo long-range transport, releasing NOx downwind. We report here studies of the reaction of NO3 with alpha-pinene at 1 atm in dry synthetic air (relative humidity approximately 3%) and at 298 K using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) to identify gaseous and particulate products. The emphasis is on the identification of individual organic nitrates in the particle phase that were obtained by passing the product mixture through a denuder to remove gas-phase reactants and products prior to entering the source region of the mass spectrometer. Filter extracts were also analyzed by GC-MS and by APCI time-of-flight mass spectrometry (APCI-ToF-MS) with methanol as the proton source. In addition to pinonaldehyde and pinonic acid, five organic nitrates were identified in the particles as well as in the gas phase: 3-oxopinane-2-nitrate, 2-hydroxypinane-3-nitrate, pinonaldehyde-PAN, norpinonaldehyde-PAN, and (3-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-3-nitrooxycyclobutyl)acetaldehyde. Furthermore, there was an additional first-generation organic nitrate product tentatively identified as a carbonyl hydroxynitrate with a molecular mass of 229. These studies suggest that a variety of organic nitrates would partition between the gas phase and particles in the atmosphere, and serve as a reservoir for NOx.

  9. Identification and quantification of seven volatile n-nitrosamines in cosmetics using gas chromatography/chemical ionization-mass spectrometry coupled with head space-solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Na Rae; Kim, Yong Pyo; Ji, Won Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Ahn, Yun Gyong

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for the identification and quantification of seven volatile n-nitrosamines (n-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], n-nitrosoethylmethylamine [NMEA], n-nitrosodiethylamine [NDEA], n-nitrosodipropylamine [NDPA], n-nitrosodibutylamine [NDBA], n-nitrosopiperidine [NPIP], and n-nitrosopyrrolidine [NPYR]) in water insoluble cream type cosmetics. It was found that the head space-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was suitable for extraction, clean up, and pre-concentration of n-nitrosamines in the cream type samples so its optimal conditions were investigated. Identification and quantification of n-nitrosamines using single quadrupole gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in chemical ionization (CI) mode were carried out with accurate mass measurements. Their accurate masses of protonated molecular ions were obtained within 10 mDa of the theoretical masses when sufficiently high signal was acquired from the unique calibration method using mass and isotope accuracy. For the method validation of quantification, spiking experiments were carried out to determine the linearity, recovery, and method detection limit (MDL) using three deuterated internal standards. The average recovery was 79% within 20% relative standard deviation (RSD) at the concentration of 50 ng/g. MDLs ranged from 0.46 ng/g to 36.54 ng/g, which was satisfactory for the directive limit of 50 ng/g proposed by the European Commission (EC). As a result, it was concluded that the method could be provided for the accurate mass screening, confirmation, and quantification of n-nitrosamines when applied to cosmetic inspection.

  10. Determination of 21-hydroxydeflazacort in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Application to bioequivalence study.

    PubMed

    Ifa, D R; Moraes, M E; Moraes, M O; Santagada, V; Caliendo, G; de Nucci, G

    2000-03-01

    A liquid chromatographic atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric method is described for the determination of 21-hydroxydeflazacort in human plasma using dexamethasone 21-acetate as an internal standard. The procedure requires a single diethyl ether extraction. After evaporation of the solvent under a nitrogen flow, the analytes are reconstituted in the mobile phase, chromatographed on a C18 reversed-phase column and analyzed by mass spectrometry via a heated nebulizer interface where they are detected by multiple reaction monitoring. The method has a chromatographic run time of less than 5 min and a linear calibration curve with a range of 1-400 ng ml(-1) (r>0.999). The between-run precision, based on the relative standard deviation for replicate quality controls, was < or =5.5% (10 ng ml(-1)), 1.0% (50 ng ml(-1)) and 2.7% (200 ng ml(-1)). The between-run accuracy was +/-7.1, 3.8 and 4.8% for the above concentrations, respectively. This method was employed in a bioequivalence study of two DFZ tablet formulations (Denacen from Marjan Industria e Comercio, Brazil, as a test formulation, and Calcort from Merrell Lepetit, Brazil, as a reference formulation) in 24 healthy volunteers of both sexes who received a single 30 mg dose of each formulation. The study was conducted using an open, randomized, two-period crossover design with a 7-day washout interval. The 90% confidence interval (CI) of the individual geometric mean ratio for Denacen/Calcort was 89.8-109.5% for area under the curve AUC(0-24 h) and 80.7-98.5% for Cmax. Since both the 90% CI for AUC(0-24 h) and Cmax were included in the 80-125% interval proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration, Denacen was considered bioequivalent to Calcort according to both the rate and extent of absorption.

  11. pH-dependent random coil (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts of the ionizable amino acids: a guide for protein pK a measurements.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Gerald; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-11-01

    The pK a values and charge states of ionizable residues in polypeptides and proteins are frequently determined via NMR-monitored pH titrations. To aid the interpretation of the resulting titration data, we have measured the pH-dependent chemical shifts of nearly all the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei in the seven common ionizable amino acids (X = Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, Lys, and Arg) within the context of a blocked tripeptide, acetyl-Gly-X-Gly-amide. Alanine amide and N-acetyl alanine were used as models of the N- and C-termini, respectively. Together, this study provides an essentially complete set of pH-dependent intra-residue and nearest-neighbor reference chemical shifts to help guide protein pK a measurements. These data should also facilitate pH-dependent corrections in algorithms used to predict the chemical shifts of random coil polypeptides. In parallel, deuterium isotope shifts for the side chain (15)N nuclei of His, Lys, and Arg in their positively-charged and neutral states were also measured. Along with previously published results for Asp, Glu, Cys, and Tyr, these deuterium isotope shifts can provide complementary experimental evidence for defining the ionization states of protein residues.

  12. Chemical Protection Against Ionizing Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    measuring the rates of reaction of various thiols with model carbon-centered radicals. In solutions containing methanol and cysteamine , pulse radiolytic...epinephrine but causes much less reduction of cysteamine or cysteine radio- protection [457]. Finally, the state of intracellular oxygen tension in intestinal...rates which are close to the diffusion controlled limit (see II.C.l.b.i). Even at these high rates of reaction, calculations show [349] that cysteamine

  13. An integrated strategy for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins and related peptides in natural blooms by liquid chromatography-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cintia; Caixach, Josep

    2015-08-14

    An integrated high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) strategy has been developed for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins (MCs) and related peptides in water blooms. The natural samples (water and algae) were filtered for independent analysis of aqueous and sestonic fractions. These fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-Orbitrap-HCD-MS. MALDI, ESI and the study of fragmentation sequences have been provided crucial structural information. The potential of combined positive and negative ionization modes, full scan and fragmentation acquisition modes (TOF/TOF and HCD) by HRMS and high resolution and accurate mass was investigated in order to allow unequivocal determination of MCs. Besides, a reliable quantitation has been possible by HRMS. This composition helped to decrease the probability of false positives and negatives, as alternative to commonly used LC-ESI-MS/MS methods. The analysis was non-target, therefore covered the possibility to analyze all MC analogs concurrently without any pre-selection of target MC. Furthermore, archived data was subjected to retrospective "post-targeted" analysis and a screening of other potential toxins and related peptides as anabaenopeptins in the samples was done. Finally, the MS protocol and identification tools suggested were applied to the analysis of characteristic water blooms from Spanish reservoirs.

  14. Detection of formaldehyde emissions from an industrial zone in the Yangtze River Delta region of China using a proton transfer reaction ion-drift chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Diao, Yiwei; Zhang, Bingjie; Wang, Weiwei; Ren, Xinrong; Yang, Dongsen; Wang, Ming; Shi, Xiaowen; Zheng, Jun

    2016-12-01

    A proton transfer reaction ion-drift chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PTR-ID-CIMS) equipped with a hydronium (H3+O) ion source was developed and deployed near an industrial zone in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region of China in spring 2015 to investigate industry-related emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Air pollutants including formaldehyde (HCHO), aromatics, and other trace gases (O3 and CO) were simultaneously measured. Humidity effects on the sensitivity of the PTR-ID-CIMS for HCHO detection were investigated and quantified. The performances of the PTR-ID-CIMS were also validated by intercomparing with offline HCHO measurement technique using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH) cartridges and the results showed fairly good agreement (slope = 0.81, R2 = 0.80). The PTR-ID-CIMS detection limit of HCHO (10 s, three-duty-cycle averages) was determined to be 0.9-2.4 (RH = 1-81.5 %) parts per billion by volume (ppbv) based on 3 times the standard deviations of the background signals. During the field study, observed HCHO concentrations ranged between 1.8 and 12.8 ppbv with a campaign average of 4.1 ± 1.6 ppbv, which was comparable with previous HCHO observations in other similar locations of China. However, HCHO diurnal profiles showed few features of secondary formation. In addition, time series of both HCHO and aromatic VOCs indicated strong influence from local emissions. Using a multiple linear regression fit model, on average the observed HCHO can be attributed to secondary formation (13.8 %), background level (27.0 %), and industry-related emissions, i.e., combustion sources (43.2 %) and chemical productions (16.0 %). Moreover, within the plumes the industry-related emissions can account for up to 69.2 % of the observed HCHO. This work has provided direct evidence of strong primary emissions of HCHO from industry-related activities. These primary HCHO sources can potentially have a strong impact on local and regional air pollution formation

  15. Implementation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in Routine Clinical Laboratories Improves Identification of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci and Reveals the Pathogenic Role of Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Argemi, Xavier; Riegel, Philippe; Lavigne, Thierry; Lefebvre, Nicolas; Grandpré, Nicolas; Hansmann, Yves; Jaulhac, Benoit; Prévost, Gilles; Schramm, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for staphylococcal identification is now considered routine in laboratories compared with the conventional phenotypical methods previously used. We verified its microbiological relevance for identifying the main species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) by randomly selecting 50 isolates. From 1 January 2007 to 31 August 2008, 12,479 staphylococci were isolated with phenotypic methods, of which 4,594 were identified as Staphylococcus aureus and 7,885 were coagulase negative staphylococci. Using MALDI-TOF MS from 1 January 2011 to 31 August 2012, 14,913 staphylococci were identified, with 5,066 as S. aureus and 9,847 as CoNS. MALDI-TOF MS allowed the identification of approximately 85% of the CoNS strains, whereas only 14% of the CoNS strains were identified to the species level with phenotypic methods because they were often considered contaminants. Furthermore, the use of MALDI-TOF MS revealed the occurrence of recently characterized Staphylococcus species, such as S. pettenkoferi, S. condimenti, and S. piscifermentans. Microbiological relevance analysis further revealed that some species displayed a high rate of microbiological significance, i.e., 40% of the S. lugdunensis strains included in the analysis were associated with infection risk. This retrospective microbiological study confirms the role of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical settings for the identification of staphylococci with clinical consequences. The species distribution reveals the occurrence of the recently identified species S. pettenkoferi and putative virulent species, including S. lugdunensis.

  16. Simultaneous determination of phentermine and topiramate in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization and its application in pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yang; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Mingzhen; He, Xiaomeng; Li, Huqun; Haseeb, Satter; Chen, Hui; Li, Weiyong

    2015-03-25

    A new method for simultaneous determination of phentermine and topiramate by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) operated in positive and negative ionization switching modes was developed and validated. Protein precipitation with acetonitrile was selected for sample preparation. Analyses were performed on a liquid chromatography system employing a Kromasil 60-5CN column (2.1 mm × 100 mm, 5 μm) and an isocratic elution with mixed solution of acetonitrile-20mM ammonium formate containing 0.3% formic acid (40:60, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.35 mL/min. Doxazosin mesylate and pioglitazone were used as the internal standard (IS) respectively for quantification. The determination was carried out on an API 4000 triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the following transitions monitored simultaneously: positive m/z 150.0/91.0 for phentermine, m/z 452.1/344.3 for doxazosin, and negative m/z 338.3/77.9 for topiramate, m/z 355.0/41.9 for pioglitazone. The method was validated to be linear over the concentration range of 1-800 ng mL(-1) for phentermine, 1-1000 ng mL(-1) for topiramate. Within- and between-day accuracy and precision of the validated method at three different concentration levels were within the acceptable limits of <15% at all concentrations. Blood samples were collected into heparinized tubes before and after administration. The simple and robust LC/MS/MS method was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of phentermine and topiramate in a pharmacokinetic study in healthy male Chinese volunteers.

  17. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O2 -•] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2 -• adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) to generate the superoxide radical-anion ( m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [ m/z (M - H)-], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions.

  18. Non-polar lipids characterization of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization/mass spectrometry detection and non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Chiara; Beccaria, Marco; Salivo, Simona; Tranchida, Peter; Tripodo, Giusy; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Laura; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-08

    A chemical characterization of major lipid components, namely, triacylglycerols, fatty acids and the unsaponifiable fraction, in a Quinoa seed lipids sample is reported. To tackle such a task, non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was employed. The latter was interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the analysis of triacylglycerols. The main triacylglycerols (>10%) were represented by OLP, OOL and OLL (P = palmitoyl, O = oleoyl, L = linoleoyl); the latter was present in the oil sample at the highest percentage (18.1%). Furthermore, fatty acid methyl esters were evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. 89% of the total fatty acids was represented by unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters with the greatest percentage represented by linoleic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 48 and 28%, respectively. An extensive characterization of the unsaponifiable fraction of Quinoa seed lipids was performed for the first time, by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with dual mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection. Overall, 66 compounds of the unsaponifiable fraction were tentatively identified, many constituents of which (particularly sterols) were confirmed by using gas chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  19. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  20. Systematic investigation of ion suppression and enhancement effects of fourteen stable-isotope-labeled internal standards by their native analogues using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization and the relevance for multi-analyte liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric procedures.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-04-15

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, multi-analyte procedures are very useful to quantify drugs and poisons of different classes in one run. For liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) multi-analyte procedures, often only a limited number of stable-isotope-labeled internal standards (SIL-ISs) are available. If an SIL-IS is used for quantification of other analytes, it must be excluded that the co-eluting native analyte influences its ionization. Therefore, the effect of ion suppression and enhancement of fourteen SIL-ISs caused by their native analogues has been studied. It could be shown that the native analyte concentration influenced the extent of ion suppression and enhancement effects leading to more suppression with increasing analyte concentration especially when electrospray ionization (ESI) was used. Using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), methanolic solution showed mainly enhancement effects, whereas no ion suppression and enhancement effect, with one exception, occurred when plasma extracts were used under these conditions. Such differences were not observed using ESI. With ESI, eleven SIL-ISs showed relevant suppression effects, but only one analyte showed suppression effects when APCI was used. The presented study showed that ion suppression and enhancement tests using matrix-based samples of different sources are essential for the selection of ISs, particularly if used for several analytes to avoid incorrect quantification. In conclusion, only SIL-ISs should be selected for which no suppression and enhancement effects can be observed. If not enough ISs are free of ionization interferences, a different ionization technique should be considered.

  1. APPLICATION OF NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TRICHLOROPYRIDINOL IN SALIVA OF RATS EXPOSED TO CHLORPYRIFOS. (R828608)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. SW-846 Test Method 8276: Toxaphene and Toxaphene Congeners By Gas Chromatography/Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (GC-NICI/MS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    determine the concentrations of various toxaphene congeners and technical toxaphene (with other toxaphene congeners and compounds from Method 8081) in extracts from solidliquid matrices, using fused-silica, open-tubular capillary columns with (NICI/MS).

  3. Physico-Chemical-Managed Killing of Penicillin-Resistant Static and Growing Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Vegetative Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Jr., Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Farris, III, Alex F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for the use of compounds from the Hofmeister series coupled with specific pH and temperature to provide rapid physico-chemical-managed killing of penicillin-resistant static and growing Gram-positive and Gram-negative vegetative bacteria. The systems and methods represent the more general physico-chemical enhancement of susceptibility for a wide range of pathological macromolecular targets to clinical management by establishing the reactivity of those targets to topically applied drugs or anti-toxins.

  4. Detection of atmospheric gaseous amines and amides by a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer with protonated ethanol reagent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yi; Wang, Xin-Ke; Liu, Yi-Jun; Chen, Hang-Fei; Zheng, Jun; Nie, Wei; Ding, Ai-Jun; Geng, Fu-Hai; Wang, Dong-Fang; Chen, Jian-Min; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Amines and amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds but high time resolution, highly sensitive, and simultaneous ambient measurements of these species are rather sparse. Here, we present the development of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) method, utilizing protonated ethanol as reagent ions to simultaneously detect atmospheric gaseous amines (C1 to C6) and amides (C1 to C6). This method possesses sensitivities of 5.6-19.4 Hz pptv-1 for amines and 3.8-38.0 Hz pptv-1 for amides under total reagent ion signals of ˜ 0.32 MHz. Meanwhile, the detection limits were 0.10-0.50 pptv for amines and 0.29-1.95 pptv for amides at 3σ of the background signal for a 1 min integration time. Controlled characterization in the laboratory indicates that relative humidity has significant influences on the detection of amines and amides, whereas the presence of organics has no obvious effects. Ambient measurements of amines and amides utilizing this method were conducted from 25 July to 25 August 2015 in urban Shanghai, China. While the concentrations of amines ranged from a few parts per trillion by volume to hundreds of parts per trillion by volume, concentrations of amides varied from tens of parts per trillion by volume to a few parts per billion by volume. Among the C1- to C6-amines, the C2-amines were the dominant species with concentrations up to 130 pptv. For amides, the C3-amides (up to 8.7 ppb) were the most abundant species. The diurnal and backward trajectory analysis profiles of amides suggest that in addition to the secondary formation of amides in the atmosphere, industrial emissions could be important sources of amides in urban Shanghai. During the campaign, photo-oxidation of amines and amides might be a main loss pathway for them in daytime, and wet deposition was also an important sink.

  5. Measurements of HNO3 and N2O5 using Ion drift - Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry during the MCMA - 2006 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Fortner, E. C.; Molina, L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gäggeler, K.; Dommen, J.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Tie, X.

    2008-03-01

    An ion drift - chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-CIMS) was deployed in Mexico City between 5 and 31 March to measure HNO3 and N2O5 during the 2006 Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign. The observation site, T0, was located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo at the center of the Mexico City Basin with major emissions of pollutants from both domestic and industrial sources. Diurnally, HNO3 was less than 200 parts per trillion (ppt) during the night and in the early morning, increased steadily from around 09:00 a.m. central standard time (CST), reached a peak value of 0.5 to 3 parts per billion (ppb) in the early afternoon, and declined sharply to less than half of the peak value near 05:00 p.m. CST. An inter-comparison between the ID-CIMS and an ion chromatograph/mass spectrometer (ICMS) showed a good correlation in the HNO3 measurements (R2=0.75). The HNO3 mixing ratio was found to anti-correlate with aerosol nitrate, suggesting that the gaseous HNO3 concentration was controlled by the gas-particle partitioning process. During most times of the MCMA 2006 field campaign, N2O5 was found to be under the detection limit (about 20 ppt for a 10 s integration time) of the ID-CIMS, because of high NO mixing ratio (>100 ppb) during the night. With one exception on 26 March 2006, about 40 ppt N2O5 was observed during the late afternoon and early evening hours under a cloudy condition, before NO built up at the surface site. The results revealed that during the 2006 MCMA field campaign HNO3 was primarily produced by the reaction of OH with NO2 and regulated by gas/particle partitioning, and HNO3 production from N2O5 hydrolysis during the nighttime was small because of high NO and low O3 concentrations near the surface.

  6. Measurements of HNO3 and N2O5 using ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Fortner, E. C.; Volkamer, R. M.; Molina, L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gaeggeler, K.; Dommen, J.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Tie, X.

    2008-11-01

    An ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) was deployed in Mexico City between 7 and 31 March to measure gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA)-2006 field campaign. The observation site was located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo in the northern part of Mexico City urban area with major emissions of pollutants from residential, vehicular and industrial sources. Diurnally, HNO3 was less than 200 parts per trillion (ppt) during the night and early morning. The concentration of HNO3 increased steadily from around 09:00 a.m. central standard time (CST), reached a peak value of 0.5 to 3 parts per billion (ppb) in the early afternoon, and then declined sharply to less than half of the peak value near 05:00 p.m. CST. An inter-comparison between the ID-CIMS and an ion chromatograph/mass spectrometer (ICMS) showed a good agreement between the two HNO3 measurements (R2=0.75). The HNO3 mixing ratio was found to anti-correlate with submicron-sized aerosol nitrate, suggesting that the gas-particle partitioning process was a major factor in determining the gaseous HNO3 concentration. Losses by irreversible reactions with mineral dust and via dry deposition also could be important at this site. Most of the times during the MCMA 2006 field campaign, N2O5 was found to be below the detection limit (about 30 ppt for a 10 s integration time) of the ID-CIMS, because of high NO mixing ratio at the surface (>100 ppb) during the night. An exception occurred on 26 March 2006, when about 40 ppt N2O5 was observed during the late afternoon and early evening hours under cloudy conditions before the build-up of NO at the surface site. The results revealed that during the MCMA-2006 field campaign HNO3 was primarily produced from the reaction of OH with NO2 and regulated by gas/particle transfer and dry deposition. The production of HNO3 from N2O5 hydrolysis during the nighttime was small because of

  7. Online profiling of triacylglycerols in plant oils by two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Ji, Shu-Xian; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Feng, Yu-Qi; Chen, Hong

    2013-10-18

    The complexity of natural triacylglycerols (TAGs) in various edible oils is high because of the hundreds of TAG compositions, which makes the profiling of TAGs quite difficult. In this investigation, a rapid and high-throughput method for online profiling of TAGs in plant oils by two-dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography using a single column coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry was reported. A novel mixed-mode 2D chromatographic column packed with silver-ion-modified octyl and sulfonic co-bonded silica was employed in this online 2D separation system. This novel 2D column combined the features of C8 column and silver-ion. In comparison with the traditional C18 column and silver-ion column, which are the two main columns used for the separation of complex TAGs in natural oil samples, this novel 2D column, could provide hydrophobic interactions as well as π-complexation interactions. It exhibited much higher selectivity for the separation of TAGs, and the separation was rapid. This online 2D separation system was successful in the separation of a large number of TAG solutes, and the TAG structures were evaluated by analyzing their APCI mass spectra information. This system was applied for the profiling of TAGs in peanut oils, corn oils, and soybean oils. 30 TAGs in peanut oils, 18 TAGs in corn oils, and 21 TAGs in soybean oils were determined and quantified. The highest relative content of TAGs was LLL, which was found in corn oil with the relative content up to 45.43 (%, w/w), and the lowest relative content of TAGs was LLS and OSS, which was found in soybean oil and corn oil respectively, with the relative content only 0.01 (%, w/w). In addition, the TAG data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Results of PCA enabled a clear identification of different plant oils. This method provided an efficient and convenient chromatographic technology for the fast characterization and quantification of complex TAGs

  8. Laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry applied for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanshoeft, Christian; Heudi, Olivier; Leuthold, Luc Alexis; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Elbast, Walid; Picard, Franck; Kretz, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive and ultra-fast method utilizing the laser diode thermal desorption ion source using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of BKM120, an investigational anticancer drug in human plasma. Samples originating from protein precipitation (PP) followed by salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) were spotted onto the LazWell™ plate prior to their thermal desorption and detection by tandem mass spectrometry in positive mode. The validated method described in this paper presents a high absolute extraction recovery (>90 %) for BKM120 and its internal standard (ISTD) [D8]BKM120, with precision and accuracy meeting the acceptance criteria. Standard curves were linear over the range of 5.00 to 2000 ng mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination (R (2)) >0.995. The method specificity was demonstrated in six different batches of human plasma. Intra- and inter-run precision as well as accuracy within ±20 % at the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and ±15 % (other levels) were achieved during a three-run validation for quality control (QC) samples. The post-preparative stability on the LazWell™ plate at room temperature was 72 h and a 200-fold dilution of spiked samples was demonstrated. The method was applied successfully to three clinical studies (n = 847) and cross-checked with the validated LC-ESI-MS/MS reference method. The sample analysis run time was 10 s as compared to 4.5 min for the current validated LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The resultant data were in agreement with the results obtained using the validated reference LC-ESI-MS/MS assay and the same pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated for both analytical assays. This work demonstrates that LDTD-APCI-MS/MS is a reliable method for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 which can be used to speed-up and support its bioanalysis in the frame of the clinical trials.

  9. Screening and quantification of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables making use of gas chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Cervera, M I; Portolés, T; López, F J; Beltrán, J; Hernández, F

    2014-11-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source has been used to enhance the potential of gas chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for screening and quantification purposes in pesticide residue analysis. A screening method developed in our laboratory for around 130 pesticides has been applied to fruit and vegetable samples, including strawberries, oranges, apples, carrots, lettuces, courgettes, red peppers, and tomatoes. Samples were analyzed together with quality control samples (at 0.05 mg/kg) for each matrix and for matrix-matched calibration standards. The screening strategy consisted in first rapid searching and detection, and then a refined identification step using the QTOF capabilities (MS(E) and accurate mass). Identification was based on the presence of one characteristic m/z ion (Q) obtained with the low collision energy function and at least one fragment ion (q) obtained with the high collision energy function, both with mass errors of less than 5 ppm, and an ion intensity ratio (q/Q) within the tolerances permitted. Following this strategy, 15 of 130 pesticides were identified in the samples. Afterwards, the quantitation capabilities were tested by performing a quantitative validation for those pesticides detected in the samples. To this aim, five matrices were selected (orange, apple, tomato, lettuce, and carrot) and spiked at two concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg), and quantification was done using matrix-matched calibration standards (relative responses versus triphenyl phosphate used as an internal standard). Acceptable average recoveries and relative standard deviations were obtained for many but not all pesticide-matrix combinations. These figures allowed us to perform a retrospective quantification of positives found in the screening without the need for additional analysis. Taking advantage of the accurate-mass full-spectrum data provided by QTOF MS, we searched for a higher number of compounds

  10. High-Precision Tungsten Isotopic Analysis by Multicollection Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Based on Simultaneous Measurement of W and (18)O/(16)O Isotope Ratios for Accurate Fractionation Correction.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne; Touboul, Mathieu; Walker, Richard J

    2016-02-02

    Determination of the (182)W/(184)W ratio to a precision of ± 5 ppm (2σ) is desirable for constraining the timing of core formation and other early planetary differentiation processes. However, WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry normally results in a residual correlation between the instrumental-mass-fractionation-corrected (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W ratios that is attributed to mass-dependent variability of O isotopes over the course of an analysis and between different analyses. A second-order correction using the (183)W/(184)W ratio relies on the assumption that this ratio is constant in nature. This may prove invalid, as has already been realized for other isotope systems. The present study utilizes simultaneous monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O and W isotope ratios to correct oxide interferences on a per-integration basis and thus avoid the need for a double normalization of W isotopes. After normalization of W isotope ratios to a pair of W isotopes, following the exponential law, no residual W-O isotope correlation is observed. However, there is a nonideal mass bias residual correlation between (182)W/(i)W and (183)W/(i)W with time. Without double normalization of W isotopes and on the basis of three or four duplicate analyses, the external reproducibility per session of (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W normalized to (186)W/(183)W is 5-6 ppm (2σ, 1-3 μg loads). The combined uncertainty per session is less than 4 ppm for (183)W/(184)W and less than 6 ppm for (182)W/(184)W (2σm) for loads between 3000 and 50 ng.

  11. Sensitivity improvement in hydrophilic interaction chromatography negative mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol as a post-column modifier for non-targeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Koch, Wendelin; Forcisi, Sara; Lehmann, Rainer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2014-09-26

    The application of ammonia acetate buffered liquid chromatography (LC) eluents is known to concomitantly lead to ion suppression when electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection is used. In negative ESI mode, post column infusion of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol (2-MEE) was shown in the literature to help to compensate this adverse effect occurring in reversed phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (RP-LC-MS) analyses. Here a setup of direct infusion and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) post-column infusion experiments was established in order to investigate systematically the beneficial effects of 2-MEE. We demonstrate that, 2-MEE can help to improve ESI-MS sensitivity in HILIC too and reveal analyte structure specific behaviors. Our study indicates that 2-MEE especially improves ESI response for small and polar molecules. The ESI response of stable isotope labeled amino acids spiked into biological matrices increases up to 50-fold (i.e. D5-l-glutamic acid) when post column infusion of 2-MEE is applied. A non-targeted analysis of a pooled urine sample via HILIC-ESI-QTOF-MS supports this hypothesis. In direct infusion, the combined application of an ammonia acetate buffered solution together with 2-MEE results in an improved ESI response compared to a non-buffered solution. We observed up to 60-fold increased ESI response of l-lysine. We propose this effect is putatively caused by the formation of smaller ESI droplets and stripping of positive charge from ESI droplets due to evaporation of acetic acid anions. In summary, post-column infusion of 2-MEE especially enhances ESI response of small and polar molecules. Therefore it can be regarded as a valuable add-on in targeted or non-targeted metabolomic HILIC-MS studies since this method sets a focus on this molecule category.

  12. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a Reliable Tool to Identify Species of Catalase-negative Gram-positive Cocci not Belonging to the Streptococcus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Velázquez, Viviana Rojas; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) by using 190 Catalase-negative Gram-Positive Cocci (GPC) clinical isolates. Methods: All isolates were identified by conventional phenotypic tests following the proposed scheme by Ruoff and Christensen and MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker Daltonics, BD, Bremen, Germany). Two different extraction methods (direct transfer formic acid method on spot and ethanol formic acid extraction method) and different cut-offs for genus/specie level identification were used. The score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer (≥ 2.000 for species-level, 1.700 to 1.999 for genus level and <1.700 no reliable identification) and lower cut-off scores (≥1.500 for genus level, ≥ 1.700 for species-level and score <1.500 no reliable identification) were considered for identification. A minimum difference of 10% between the top and next closest score was required for a different genus or species. MALDI-TOF MS identification was considered correct when the result obtained from MS database agreed with the phenotypic identification result. When both methods gave discordant results, the 16S rDNA or sodA genes sequencing was considered as the gold standard identification method. The results obtained by MS concordant with genes sequencing, although discordant with conventional phenotyping, were considered correct. MS results discordant with 16S or sodA identification were considered incorrect. Results: Using the score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer, 97.37% and 81.05% were correctly identified to genus and species level, respectively. On the other hand, using lower cut-off scores for identification, 97.89% and 94.21% isolates were correctly identified to genus and species level respectively by MALDI-TOF MS and no significant differences between the results obtained with two extraction methods were obtained. Conclusion: The results obtained suggest that MALDI

  13. Visualizing the Positive-Negative Interface of Molecular Electrostatic Potentials as an Educational Tool for Assigning Chemical Polarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonborn, Konrad; Host, Gunnar; Palmerius, Karljohan

    2010-01-01

    To help in interpreting the polarity of a molecule, charge separation can be visualized by mapping the electrostatic potential at the van der Waals surface using a color gradient or by indicating positive and negative regions of the electrostatic potential using different colored isosurfaces. Although these visualizations capture the molecular…

  14. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  15. Distributions for negative-feedback-regulated stochastic gene expression: dimension reduction and numerical solution of the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, Eduardo S; Santillán, Moisés

    2010-05-21

    In this work we introduce a novel approach to study biochemical noise. It comprises a simplification of the master equation of complex reaction schemes (via an adiabatic approximation) and the numerical solution of the reduced master equation. The accuracy of this procedure is tested by comparing its results with analytic solutions (when available) and with Gillespie stochastic simulations. We further employ our approach to study the stochastic expression of a simple gene network, which is subject to negative feedback regulation at the transcriptional level. Special attention is paid to the influence of negative feedback on the amplitude of intrinsic noise, as well as on the relaxation rate of the system probability distribution function to the steady solution. Our results suggest the existence of an optimal feedback strength that maximizes this relaxation rate.

  16. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and

  17. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: probing chemical composition of D2O ice beneath a H2O ice layer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Gudipati, Murthy S

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D2O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D2O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H2O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H2O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D2O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D2O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H2O molecules in the shockwave. We call this "shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation" technique as "two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers." This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes--ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be potentially

  18. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  19. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  20. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  1. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  2. New design of high performance ionizing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronggang; Sun, Yurong

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a new design of DC-pulse ionizing bar to solve the problem of imbalance offset voltage for the AC ionizing bar, which is easily affected by the environment, as well as indicate the final tests. The new design mainly includes five parts: power supply circuit, main control unit, logic circuit, high frequency transformer unit, and feedback unit. The ionizing bar can automatically adjust the discharge voltage, pulse frequency and pulse width to balance the positive and negative ions. The final test results indicate that the DC ionizing bar owns good effect in electrostatic elimination.

  3. Using Chemical Probes to Assess the Feasibility of Targeting SecA for Developing Antimicrobial Agents against Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinshan; Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Cui, Jianmei; Damera, Krishna; Dai, Chaofeng; Chaudhary, Arpana S; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Cao, Nannan; Jiang, Chun; Vaara, Martti; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C

    2016-11-21

    With the widespread emergence of drug resistance, there is an urgent need to search for new antimicrobials, especially those against Gram-negative bacteria. Along this line, the identification of viable targets is a critical first step. The protein translocase SecA is commonly believed to be an excellent target for the development of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In recent years, we developed three structural classes of SecA inhibitors that have proven to be very effective against Gram-positive bacteria. However, we have not achieved the same level of success against Gram-negative bacteria, despite the potent inhibition of SecA in enzyme assays by the same inhibitors. In this study, we use representative inhibitors as chemical probes to gain an understanding as to why these inhibitors were not effective against Gram-negative bacteria. The results validate our initial postulation that the major difference in effectiveness against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is in the additional permeability barrier posed by the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. We also found that the expression of efflux pumps, which are responsible for multidrug resistance (MDR), have no effect on the effectiveness of these SecA inhibitors. Identification of an inhibitor-resistant mutant and complementation tests of the plasmids containing secA in a secAts mutant showed that a single secA-azi-9 mutation increased the resistance, providing genetic evidence that SecA is indeed the target of these inhibitors in bacteria. Such results strongly suggest SecA as an excellent target for developing effective antimicrobials against Gram-negative bacteria with the intrinsic ability to overcome MDR. A key future research direction should be the optimization of membrane permeability.

  4. Average local ionization energy generalized to correlated wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2014-08-28

    The average local ionization energy function introduced by Politzer and co-workers [Can. J. Chem. 68, 1440 (1990)] as a descriptor of chemical reactivity has a limited utility because it is defined only for one-determinantal self-consistent-field methods such as the Hartree–Fock theory and the Kohn–Sham density-functional scheme. We reinterpret the negative of the average local ionization energy as the average total energy of an electron at a given point and, by rewriting this quantity in terms of reduced density matrices, arrive at its natural generalization to correlated wavefunctions. The generalized average local electron energy turns out to be the diagonal part of the coordinate representation of the generalized Fock operator divided by the electron density; it reduces to the original definition in terms of canonical orbitals and their eigenvalues for one-determinantal wavefunctions. The discussion is illustrated with calculations on selected atoms and molecules at various levels of theory.

  5. Negative resistance phenomenon in dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system for photovoltaic manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H. C.; Aman-ur-Rehman, Won, I. H.; Park, W. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    The validity of effective frequency concept is investigated for dual-frequency (DF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharges by using particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulations. This concept helps in analyzing DF CCP discharges in a fashion similar to single-frequency (SF) CCP discharges with effective parameters. Unlike the driving frequency of SF CCP discharges, the effective frequency in DF CCP is dependent on the ratio of the two driving currents (or voltages) and this characteristic makes it possible to control the ion flux and the ion bombardment energy independently. This separate control principally allows to increase the ion flux and plasma density for high deposition rates, while keeping the ion mean energy constant at low values to prevent the bombardment of highly energetic ions at the substrate surface to avoid unwanted damage in the solar cell manufacturing. The abrupt transition of the effective frequency leads to the phenomenon of negative resistance which is one of the several physical phenomena associated uniquely with DF CCP discharges. Using effective frequency concept, the plasma characteristics have been investigated in the negative resistance regime for solar cell manufacturing.

  6. Initial results of positron ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. L.; Hulett, L. D., Jr.; Mcluckey, S. A.; Glish, G. L.; Eckenrode, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of monoenergetic positrons for the ionization of organic molecules in the gas phase is described. The ionic products are analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected to produce a mass spectrum. The ionization mechanisms which can be studied in this way include positron impact at energies above the ionization limit of the target molecules, positronium formation in the Ore gap energy range, and positron attachment at energies less than 1eV. The technique of positron ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) may have analytical utility in that chemical selectivity is observed for one or more of these processes.

  7. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg.

  8. Targeted delivery of chemically modified anti-miR-221 to hepatocellular carcinoma with negatively charged liposomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wendian; Peng, Fangqi; Zhou, Taotao; Huang, Yifei; Zhang, Li; Ye, Peng; Lu, Miao; Yang, Guang; Gai, Yongkang; Yang, Tan; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Gene therapy was established as a new strategy for treating HCC. To explore the potential delivery system to support the gene therapy of HCC, negatively charged liposomal delivery system was used to deliver miR-221 antisense oligonucleotide (anti-miR-221) to the transferrin (Tf) receptor over expressed HepG2 cells. The liposome exhibited a mean particle size of 122.5 nm, zeta potential of -15.74 mV, anti-miR-221 encapsulation efficiency of 70%, and excellent colloidal stability at 4°C. Anti-miR-221-encapsulated Tf-targeted liposome demonstrated a 15-fold higher delivery efficiency compared to nontargeted liposome in HepG2 cells in vitro. Anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome effectively delivered anti-miR-221 to HepG2 cells, upregulated miR-221 target genes PTEN, P27(kip1), and TIMP3, and exhibited greater silencing efficiency over nontargeted anti-miR-221 liposome. After intravenous injection into HepG2 tumor-bearing xenografted mice with Cy3-labeled anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome, Cy3-anti-miR-221 was successfully delivered to the tumor site and increased the expressions of PTEN, P27(kip1), and TIMP3. Our results demonstrate that the Tf-targeted negatively charged liposome could be a potential therapeutic modality in the gene therapy of human HCC.

  9. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulicault, Jean E.; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Li+ > Ga3+ > Co2+ > Cr3+ > Cu2+ > [Mn2+, Mg2+] > [Na+, K+]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion.

  10. Identification of oxidized organic atmospheric species during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) using a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (IMS-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Surratt, J. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the field deployment of a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). IMS-TOF is a 2-dimensional analysis method, which separates gas-phase ions by mobility prior to determination of mass-to-charge ratio by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility is a unique physical property that is determined by the collisional cross section of an ion. Because mobility depends on size and shape, the IMS measurement is able to resolve isomers and isobaric compounds. Additionally, trends in IMS-TOF data space can be used to identify relationships between ions, such as common functionality or polymeric series. During SOAS we interfaced the IMS-TOF to a nitrate ion (NO3-) chemical ionization source that enables the selective ionization of highly oxidized gas phase species (those having a high O:C ratio) through clustering with the reagent ion. Highly oxidized products of terpenes and isoprene are important secondary organic aerosol precursors (SOA) that play an uncertain but important role in particle-phase chemistry. We present several case studies of atmospheric events during SOAS that exhibited elevated concentrations of sulfuric acid and/or organics. These events exhibited a rise in particle number and provide an opportunity to examine the role that organic species may have in local atmospheric new particle formation events. We also present the results from the field deployment and subsequent laboratory studies utilizing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor as the inlet for the CI-IMS-TOF. The reactor draws in ambient air and exposes it to high concentrations of the OH radical, created by photolysis O3 in the presence of water. The highly oxidized products are then sampled directly by the CI-IMS-TOF. We performed several experiments including placing pine and deciduous plants directly in front of the reactor opening and observed large increases in the number and

  11. Flow cytometric evaluation of physico-chemical impact on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fröhling, Antje; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Since heat sensitivity of fruits and vegetables limits the application of thermal inactivation processes, new emerging inactivation technologies have to be established to fulfill the requirements of food safety without affecting the produce quality. The efficiency of inactivation treatments has to be ensured and monitored. Monitoring of inactivation effects is commonly performed using traditional cultivation methods which have the disadvantage of the time span needed to obtain results. The aim of this study was to compare the inactivation effects of peracetic acid (PAA), ozonated water (O3), and cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using flow cytometric methods. E. coli cells were completely depolarized after treatment (15 s) with 0.25% PAA at 10°C, and after treatment (10 s) with 3.8 mg l−1 O3 at 12°C. The membrane potential of CAPP treated cells remained almost constant at an operating power of 20 W over a time period of 3 min, and subsequently decreased within 30 s of further treatment. Complete membrane permeabilization was observed after 10 s O3 treatment, but treatment with PAA and CAPP did not completely permeabilize the cells within 2 and 4 min, respectively. Similar results were obtained for esterase activity. O3 inactivates cellular esterase but esterase activity was detected after 4 min CAPP treatment and 2 min PAA treatment. L. innocua cells and P. carotovorum cells were also permeabilized instantaneously by O3 treatment at concentrations of 3.8 ± 1 mg l−1. However, higher membrane permeabilization of L. innocua and P. carotovorum than of E. coli was observed at CAPP treatment of 20 W. The degree of bacterial damage due to the inactivation processes is highly dependent on treatment parameters as well as on treated bacteria. Important information regarding the inactivation mechanisms can be obtained by flow cytometric measurements and this enables the definition of critical process parameters. PMID

  12. Numerical solution of the chemical master equation uniqueness and stability of the stationary distribution for chemical networks, and mRNA bursting in a gene network with negative feedback regulation.

    PubMed

    Zeron, E S; Santillán, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a couple of algorithms to compute the stationary probability distribution for the chemical master equation (CME) of arbitrary chemical networks. We further find the conditions guaranteeing the algorithms' convergence and the unity and stability of the stationary distribution. Next, we employ these algorithms to study the mRNA and protein probability distributions in a gene regulatory network subject to negative feedback regulation. In particular, we analyze the influence of the promoter activation/deactivation speed on the shape of such distributions. We find that a reduction of the promoter activation/deactivation speed modifies the shape of those distributions in a way consistent with the phenomenon known as mRNA (or transcription) bursting.

  13. Determination of organophosphate flame retardants and plasticizers in lipid-rich matrices using dispersive solid-phase extraction as a sample cleanup step and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shaogang; Letcher, Robert J

    2015-07-23

    A fast, robust and highly sensitive analysis method for determination of trace levels of organophosphate ester (OPE) flame retardants and plasticizers in lipid-rich samples was presently developed, and based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled to a positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (UHPLC-MS/MS-APCI(+)). The target OPEs in the sample were extracted from the biota samples, such as egg and liver, by ultrasonic extraction, and cleaned up further by dispersive solid phase extraction (d-ESP). As a result, background contamination was largely reduced. Different dispersive ESP sorbents were tested and primary secondary amine (PSA) bonded silica sorbents showed the best recoveries for these target OPEs. The recoveries obtained were in the range 54-113% (RSD<17%), with method limits of quantification (MLOQs) ranging between 0.06 and 0.29ng/g in egg, and 0.05 and 0.50ng/g w.w. in liver sample. The matrix effects (MEs) associated with using APCI(+) and ESI(+) sources were investigated. APCI(+) showed much less ion suppression than ESI(+) for the determination of these OPEs. For egg and liver samples, the APCI(+) ME values ranged from 40% to 94%, while ESI(+) ME values ranged from 0% to 36%. Although APCI(+) was used for the determination of OPEs, the ionization mechanism might mainly be a thermospray ionization process. This UHPLC-MS/MS-APCI(+) method showed good response linearity for calibration (R2>0.99). The proposed method was applied to real environmental bird egg and fish samples, where several OPE were quantifiable and different OPE patterns was observed between samples.

  14. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices.

  15. Determination of azolic fungicides in wine by solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nozal, Maria J; Bernal, J L; Jiménez, J J; Martín, Maria T; Bernal, J

    2005-05-27

    A method for simultaneous analysis of eight azolic fungicides: cyproconazole, diniconazole, tetraconazole, thiabendazole, flusilazole, triadimenol, triadimefon, carbendazim and the degradation product 2-aminobenzimidazole in wine samples is described. The compounds are isolated from the samples and concentrated by solid-phase extraction on polymeric cartridges. The determination is carried out by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection in positive ionization and selected ion monitoring modes. The influence of parameters such as the mobile phase composition, column temperature, corona current and fragmentor voltage is studied and the proposed method is validated. Recoveries of the nine compounds added to wine samples range from 83 to 109%, with relative standard deviations below 10%. The quantitation limits are between 9 and 31 microg/L. Real wine samples are analyzed by the proposed method, also.

  16. Development and validation of a sensitive gas chromatography-ammonia chemical ionization mass spectrometry method for the determination of tabun enantiomers in hemolysed blood and plasma of different species.

    PubMed

    Tenberken, Oliver; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Reiter, Georg

    2010-05-15

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fast, sensitive and easily applicable GC-MS assay for the chiral quantification of the highly toxic organophosphorus compound tabun (O-ethyl-N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate, GA) in hemolysed swine blood for further use in toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic studies. These requirements were fulfilled best by a GC-MS assay with positive chemical ionization with ammonia (GC-PCI-MS). Separation was carried out on a beta-cyclodextrin capillary column (Supelco BetaDex 225) after reversed phase (C18) solid-phase extraction. The limit of detection was 1 pg/ml for each enantiomer (approximately 500 fg on column) and the limit of quantification 5 pg/ml. The GC-PCI-MS method was applied for the quantification of tabun enantiomers in spiked swine blood after hemolysis and in spiked plasma of different species including humans.

  17. Method development for the analysis of N-nitrosodimethylamine and other N-nitrosamines in drinking water at low nanogram/liter concentrations using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography with chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Munch, Jean W; Bassett, Margarita V

    2006-01-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a probable human carcinogen of concern that has been identified as a drinking water contaminant. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 521 has been developed for the analysis of NDMA and 6 additional N-nitrosamines in drinking water at low ng/L concentrations. The method uses solid-phase extraction with coconut charcoal as the sorbent and dichloromethane as the eluent to concentrate 0.50 L water samples to 1 mL. The extracts are analyzed by gas chromatography-chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry using large-volume injection. Method performance was evaluated in 2 laboratories. Typical analyte recoveries of 87-104% were demonstrated for fortified reagent water samples, and recoveries of 77-106% were demonstrated for fortified drinking water samples. All relative standard deviations on replicate analyses were < 11%.

  18. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects.

  19. A gas chromatographic-positive ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometric method for the determination of I-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM), norLAAM, and dinorLAAM in plasma, urine, and tissue.

    PubMed

    Moody, D E; Crouch, D J; Sakashita, C O; Alburges, M E; Minear, K; Schulthies, J E; Foltz, R L

    1995-10-01

    l-alpha-Acetylmethadol (LAAM) is approved as a substitute for methadone for the treatment of opiate addiction. Analytical methods are needed to quantitate LAAM and its two psychoactive metabolites, norLAAM and dinorLAAM, to support pharmacokinetic and other studies. We developed a gas chromatographic-positive ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometric method for these analyses. The method uses 0.5 mL urine or 1.0 mL plasma or tissue homogenate, deuterated (d3) isotopomers as internal standards, methanolic denaturation of protein (for plasma and tissue), and extraction of the buffered sample with n-butyl chloride. For tissue homogenates, an acidic back extraction is included. norLAAM and dinorLAAM were derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride. Chromatographic separation of LAAM and derivatized norLAAM and dinorLAAM is achieved with a 5% phenyl methylsilicone capillary column. Positive ion chemical ionization detection using methane-ammonia as the reagent gas produces abundant protonated ions (MH+) for LAAM (m/z 354) and LAAM-d3 (m/z 357) and ammonia adduct ions (MNH4+) for the derivatized norLAAM (m/z 453), norLAAM-d3 (m/z 45 6), dinorLAAM (m/z 439), and dinorLAAM-d3 (m/z 442). The linear range of the calibration curves were matrix dependent: 5-300 ng/mL for plasma, 10-1000 ng/mL for urine, and 10-600 ng/g for tissue homogenates. The low calibrator was the validated limit of quantitation for that matrix. The method is precise and accurate with percent coefficients of variation and percent of targets within 13%. The method was applied to the analysis of human urine and plasma samples; rat plasma, liver, and brain samples; and human liver microsomes following incubation with LAAM.

  20. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  1. Effects of ionizing irradiation and hydrostatic pressure on Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation, chemical composition, and sensory acceptability of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Schilling, M W; Yoon, Y; Tokarskyy, O; Pham, A J; Williams, R C; Marshall, D L

    2009-04-01

    A randomized complete block design with three replications was utilized to determine the effects of ionizing irradiation and hydrostatic pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, volatile composition, and consumer acceptability (n=155) of frozen ground beef patties. E-beam and X-ray irradiation (2kGy) inactivated E. coli O157:H7 below the limit of detection, while hydrostatic pressure treatment (300mPa for 5min at 4°C) did not inactivate this pathogen. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile compounds from treated ground beef patties. Irradiation and hydrostatic pressure altered the volatile composition (P<0.05) of the ground beef patties in respect to radiolytic products. However, results were inconclusive on whether these differences were great enough to use this method to differentiate between irradiated and non-irradiated samples in a commercial setting. Irradiation did not affect (P>0.05) consumer acceptability of ground beef patties when compared to untreated samples, but hydrostatic pressure caused decreased acceptability (P<0.05) when compared to other treatments.

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE: Again `why layered, square-planar, mixed-valent cuprates alone?' - further pursuit of the `chemical' negative-U route to the HTSC mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John A.

    2000-10-01

    This paper is a consolidated presentation of why the author believes the most promising way forward as regards the mechanism for high-temperature superconductivity remains with the `chemical negative-U' interpretation, first sketched out in 1987. Many other mechanisms have been proposed over the years but none address head on the problem as to why the phenomenon is so tightly confined to the current small subset of mixed-valent cuprates. Tc in Hg-1223 under pressure is more than 450% greater than from any other class of superconductor. By concentrating on the materials side, and how this controls evolution in real space and k-space properties, a more tailored outlook can be gained. This includes understanding how cuprates find themselves in a unique position with regard to chemical bonding, to the delocalization of charge and to the decay of magnetism. It entails appreciation of the fine-tuning of metallization which is achieved by the choice of counter-ions, and the part which the latter play in stabilizing cuprate valencies and crystal structures. By emphasizing the fundamental role of the periodic table in this physics I wish to see the `chemical' side to what is involved given greater consideration. It is clear whether in dealing with the HTSC materials by transport measurements or nmr or optical properties or ARPES or neutron scattering that they are `marginal metals'. A formal Fermi liquid approach has to be pushed to the limit - and beyond. It is a pity that more high-level cluster calculations, drawing on quantum chemistry, have not been employed to attack the problem. Nowhere is that effort more greatly missed than in the need to corroborate formally the shell-closure negative-U understanding of HTSC adhered to throughout the course of the present work. I have made double-loading shell-closure fluctuations, with their termination of pdσ/σ* bonding/antibonding interaction, and the concomitant collapse in the elevated position of the crucial dx2-y2 state

  3. Implementation and performance evaluation of a database of chemical formulas for the screening of pharmaco/toxicologically relevant compounds in biological samples using electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Polettini, Aldo; Gottardo, Rossella; Pascali, Jennifer Paola; Tagliaro, Franco

    2008-04-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI)-time-of-flight (TOF) MS enables searching a wide number of pharmaco/toxicologically relevant compounds (PTRC) in biosamples. However, the number of identifiable PTRC depends on extension of reference database of chemical formulas/compound names. Previous approaches proposed in-house or commercial databases with limitations either in PTRC number or content (e.g., few metabolites, presence of non-PTRC). In the frame of development of a ESI-TOF PTRC screening procedure, a subset of PubChem Compound as reference database is proposed. Features of this database (approximately 50,500 compounds) are illustrated, and its performance evaluated through analysis by capillary electrophoresis (CE)-ESI-TOF of hair/blood/urine collected from subjects under treatment with known drugs or by comparison with reference standards. The database is rich in parent compounds of pharmaceutical and illicit drugs, pesticides, and poisons and contains many metabolites (including about 6000 phase I metabolites and 180 glucuronides) and related substances (e.g., impurities, esters). The average number of hits with identical chemical formula is 1.82 +/- 2.27 (median = 1, range 1-39). Minor deficiencies, redundancies, and errors have been detected that do not limit the potential of the database in identifying unknown PTRC. The database allows a much broader search for PTRC than other commercial/in-house databases of chemical formulas/compound names previously proposed. However, the probability that a search retrieves different PTRC having identical chemical formula is higher than with smaller databases, and additional information (anamnestic/circumstantial data, concomitant presence of parent drug and metabolite, selective sample preparation, liquid chromatographic retention, and CE migration behavior) must be used in order to focus the search more tightly.

  4. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  5. Novel physico-chemical diagnostic tools for high throughput identification of bovine mastitis associated gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The routine diagnosis of Streptococcus spp. and other mastitis associated gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci is still based upon biochemical tests and serological methods, which frequently provide ambiguous identification results. We therefore aimed to establish an accurate identification system for differential diagnosis of mastitis associated Streptococcus spp. and related species using biophysical techniques such as Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and MALDI – TOF/MS. Results Based on a panel of 210 isolates from cases of bovine mastitis, an unsupervised FTIR spectral reference library was established and an artificial neural network (ANN) - assisted identification system was developed. All bacterial isolates were previously identified by species-specific PCR and/or 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. An overall identification rate of 100% at species level for 173 strains unknown to the ANN and the library was achieved by combining ANN and the spectral database, thus demonstrating the suitability of our FTIR identification system for routine diagnosis. In addition, we investigated the potential of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the identification of mastitis associated Streptococcus spp. and related bacteria. Using the Microflex LT System, MALDI Biotyper software™ (V3.3) we achieved an accuracy rate of 95.2%. A blind study, including 21 clinical samples from dairy cows, revealed a 100% correct species identification rate for FTIR and 90.5% for MALDI-TOF MS, indicating that these techniques are valuable tools for diagnosis. Conclusions This study clearly demonstrates that FTIR spectroscopy as well as MALDI-TOF MS can significantly improve and facilitate the identification and differentiation of mastitis associated Streptococcus spp. and related species. Although the FTIR identification system turned out being slightly superior to MALDI-TOF MS in terms of identification

  6. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  7. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  8. Vibronic spectra of jet-cooled 2-aminopurine·H2O clusters studied by UV resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Lobsiger, Simon; Trachsel, Maria; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2011-06-16

    For understanding the major- and minor-groove hydration patterns of DNAs and RNAs, it is important to understand the local solvation of individual nucleobases at the molecular level. We have investigated the 2-aminopurine·H(2)O monohydrate by two-color resonant two-photon ionization and UV/UV hole-burning spectroscopies, which reveal two isomers, denoted A and B. The electronic spectral shift δν of the S(1) ← S(0) transition relative to bare 9H-2-aminopurine (9H-2AP) is small for isomer A (-70 cm(-1)), while that of isomer B is much larger (δν = -889 cm(-1)). B3LYP geometry optimizations with the TZVP basis set predict four cluster isomers, of which three are doubly H-bonded, with H(2)O acting as an acceptor to a N-H or -NH2 group and as a donor to either of the pyrimidine N sites. The "sugar-edge" isomer A is calculated to be the most stable form with binding energy D(e) = 56.4 kJ/mol. Isomers B and C are H-bonded between the -NH2 group and pyrimidine moieties and are 2.5 and 6.9 kJ/mol less stable, respectively. Time-dependent (TD) B3LYP/TZVP calculations predict the adiabatic energies of the lowest (1)ππ* states of A and B in excellent agreement with the observed 0(0)(0) bands; also, the relative intensities of the A and B origin bands agree well with the calculated S(0) state relative energies. This allows unequivocal identification of the isomers. The R2PI spectra of 9H-2AP and of isomer A exhibit intense low-frequency out-of-plane overtone and combination bands, which is interpreted as a coupling of the optically excited (1)ππ* state to the lower-lying (1)nπ* dark state. In contrast, these overtone and combination bands are much weaker for isomer B, implying that the (1)ππ* state of B is planar and decoupled from the (1)nπ* state. These observations agree with the calculations, which predict the (1)nπ* above the (1)ππ* state for isomer B but below the (1)ππ* for both 9H-2AP and isomer A.

  9. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 μm. At a flow-rate of 10 L·min-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 ° C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from α-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009

  10. Superior performance of asymmetric supercapacitor based on reduced graphene oxide-manganese carbonate as positive and sono-chemically reduced graphene oxide as negative electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Milan; Kumar, J. Sharath; Khanra, Partha; Samanta, Pranab; Koo, Hyeyoung; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Kuila, Tapas

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy to synthesize hierarchical rod like MnCO3 on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets by a facile and cost-effective hydrothermal method is demonstrated. The chelating action of citric acid facilitates the formation a complex intermediate of Mn2+ and citrate ions, which finally results a 3D MnCO3/RGO (MRGO) composite with high electrical conductivity (∼1056 S m-1), good surface area (59 m2 g-1) and high pore volume (0.3 cm3 g-1). The specific capacitance (SC) of the MRGO composite is ∼1120 F g-1 at a current density of 2 A g-1 in three electrode system. An asymmetric device has been designed with MRGO as positive and sono-chemically reduced RGO (SRGO) as negative electrode material. The asymmetric device (MRGO//SRGO) shows the SC of ∼318 F g-1 (at 2 A g-1) and energy density of ∼113 W h kg-1 (at 1600 W kg-1). The true energy density (1.7 W h kg-1) has been calculated considering the total weight of the device. The MRGO//SRGO device can power a wall clock for ∼13 min after full charging. The Nyquist plot of the asymmetric cell has been simulated with Z-View software to measure the solution resistance, charge-transfer resistance and Warburg elements.

  11. A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer utilizing hydronium ions (H3O+ ToF-CIMS) for measurements of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bin; Koss, Abigail; Warneke, Carsten; Gilman, Jessica B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Stark, Harald; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2016-07-01

    Proton transfer reactions between hydronium ions (H3O+) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) provide a fast and highly sensitive technique for VOC measurements, leading to extensive use of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in atmospheric research. Based on the same ionization approach, we describe the development of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) utilizing H3O+ as the reagent ion. The new H3O+ ToF-CIMS has sensitivities of 100-1000 cps ppb-1 (ion counts per second per part-per-billion mixing ratio of VOC) and detection limits of 20-600 ppt at 3σ for a 1 s integration time for simultaneous measurements of many VOC species of atmospheric relevance. The ToF analyzer with mass resolution (m/Δm) of up to 6000 allows the separation of isobaric masses, as shown in previous studies using similar ToF-MS. While radio frequency (RF)-only quadrupole ion guides provide better overall ion transmission than ion lens system, low-mass cutoff of RF-only quadrupole causes H3O+ ions to be transmitted less efficiently than heavier masses, which leads to unusual humidity dependence of reagent ions and difficulty obtaining a humidity-independent parameter for normalization. The humidity dependence of the instrument was characterized for various VOC species and the behaviors for different species can be explained by compound-specific properties that affect the ion chemistry (e.g., proton affinity and dipole moment). The new H3O+ ToF-CIMS was successfully deployed on the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for the SONGNEX campaign in spring of 2015. The measured mixing ratios of several aromatics from the H3O+ ToF-CIMS agreed within ±10 % with independent gas chromatography measurements from whole air samples. Initial results from the SONGNEX measurements demonstrate that the H3O+ ToF-CIMS data set will be valuable for the identification and characterization of emissions from various sources, investigation of secondary

  12. Lymphoblastoid lines and skin fibroblasts from patients with tuberous sclerosis are abnormally sensitive to ionizing radiation and to a radiomimetic chemical

    SciTech Connect

    Scudiero, D.A.; Moshell, A.N.; Scarpinato, R.G.; Meyer, S.A.; Clatterbuck, B.E.; Tarone, R.E.; Robbins, J.H.

    1982-03-01

    Lymphoblastoid lines, derived by transforming peripheral blood lymphocytes with Epstein-Barr virus, and skin fibroblast lines were established from two patients with tuberous sclerosis. The number of viable lymphoblastoid cells was determined by their ability to exclude the vital dye trypan blue after their irradiation with x-rays or 254 nm ultraviolet light. The growth of fibroblasts was determined by their ability to form colonies after treatment with the radiomimetic, DNA-damaging chemical N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The tuberous sclerosis lymphoblastoid lines were hypersensitive to x-rays but had normal sensitivity to the ultraviolet radiation. The tuberous sclerosis fibroblast lines were hypersensitive to the N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The hypersensitivity of tuberous sclerosis cells to x-rays and to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine is believed to reflect defective repair of DNA damaged by these agents and may provide the basis for in vitro, including prenatal, diagnostic tests for tuberous sclerosis.

  13. Studies of nanosecond pulse surface ionization wave discharges over solid and liquid dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Vitaly; Leonov, Sergey; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ionization wave discharges generated by high-voltage nanosecond pulses, propagating over a planar quartz surface and over liquid surfaces (distilled water and 1-butanol) have been studied in a rectangular cross section test cell. The discharge was initiated using a custom-made, alternating polarity, high-voltage nanosecond pulse plasma generator, operated at a pulse repetition rate of 100-500 Hz, with a pulse peak voltage and current of 10-15 kV and 7-20 A, respectively, a pulse FWHM of ˜100 ns, and a coupled pulse energy of 2-9 mJ/pulse. Wave speed was measured using a capacitive probe. ICCD camera images demonstrated that the ionization wave propagated predominantly over the quartz wall or over the liquid surface adjacent to the grounded waveguide placed along the bottom wall of the test cell. Under all experimental conditions tested, the surface plasma ‘sheet’ was diffuse and fairly uniform, both for positive and negative polarities. The parameters of ionization wave discharge propagating over distilled water and 1-butanol surfaces were close to those of the discharge over a quartz wall. No perturbation of the liquid surface by the discharge was detected. In most cases, the positive polarity surface ionization wave propagated at a higher speed and over a longer distance compared to the negative polarity wave. For all three sets of experiments (surface ionization wave discharge over quartz, water and 1-butanol), wave speed and travel distance decreased with pressure. Diffuse, highly reproducible surface ionization wave discharge was also observed over the liquid butanol-saturated butanol vapor interface, as well as over the distilled water-saturated water vapor interface, without buffer gas flow. No significant difference was detected between surface ionization discharges sustained using single-polarity (positive or negative), or alternating polarity high-voltage pulses. Plasma emission images yielded preliminary evidence of charge removal from the

  14. Method development for the determination of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma without derivatization by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Kakehi, Masaaki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Kamiguchi, Hidenori; Jinno, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface to determine 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a major metabolite of cholesterol formed by cytochrome P450 family 46A1, in human plasma without any derivatization step. Phosphate buffered saline including 1% Tween 80 was used as the surrogate matrix for preparation of calibration curves and quality control samples. The saponification process to convert esterified 24S-hydroxycholesterol to free sterols was optimized, followed by liquid-liquid extraction using hexane. Chromatographic separation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol from other isobaric endogenous oxysterols was successfully achieved with gradient mobile phase comprised of 0.1% propionic acid and acetonitrile using L-column2 ODS (2 μm, 2.1 mm id × 150 mm). This assay was capable of determining 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma (200 μL) ranging from 1 to 100 ng/mL with acceptable intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The potential risk of in vitro formation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol by oxidation from endogenous cholesterol in human plasma was found to be negligible. The stability of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in relevant solvents and human plasma was confirmed. This method was successfully applied to quantify the plasma concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in male and female volunteers.

  15. A validated method for the determination of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insook; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-06-01

    A liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the simultaneous determination of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma was developed and validated. Analytes and deuterated internal standards were extracted from human plasma using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric detection with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 and 2.5 ng/ml, respectively, for all analytes. Linearity ranged from 2.5 to 500 ng/ml of human plasma using a weighting factor of 1/x; correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were > 0.99. Intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy were < 15.0%. Recoveries were 108.2-110.8% nicotine, 95.8-108.7% cotinine, 90.5-99.5% trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and 99.5-109.5% norcotinine. The method was also partially validated in bovine serum, owing to the difficulty of obtaining nicotine-free human plasma for the preparation of calibrators and quality control (QC) samples. This method proved to be robust and accurate for the quantification of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma collected in clinical studies of acute nicotine effects on brain activity and on the development of neonates of maternal smokers.

  16. Matrix isolation studies of the interactions of BF3 with water and substituted diethyl ethers. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric determination of the proton affinity of (CF3CH2)2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, David W.; Zehe, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    BF3 was co-condensed with H2O, D2O, (C2H5)2O, (CF3CH2)2O, and (C2F5)2O in excess argon at 15 K. Infrared spectra of BF3/water isolated in solid argon provided a more complete analysis of the BF3--H2O complex than previously published. Infrared spectra of the matrices showed a definite Lewis acid-base interaction between BF3 and diethyl ether; a weak but definite interaction with bis (2,2,2-trifluorodiethyl) ether, and no observable interaction with perfluorodiethyl ether. Thus, the ether data indicate a clear trend between strength of interaction with BF3 and the degree of F substitution. To support and explain the emerging relationship between interaction strength and the basicity of the oxygen-containing molecule, the proton affinity of (CF3CH2)2O was measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The implications of the results for lubricant/metal oxide surface interactions are discussed.

  17. Real-time gas and particle-phase organic acids measurement at a forest site using chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Day, D. A.; Jayne, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurement of organic acids in gas and aerosol particles conducted in a ponderosa pine forest during July and August 2011 as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS; http://tinyurl.com/BEACHON-RoMBAS). The measurement technique is based on chemical ionization, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and utilizes a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor [MOVI-CI-HR-ToFMS; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2010] to collect sub-micron aerosol particles while simultaneously measuring the gas-phase composition. The collected particles are subsequently analyzed by temperature-programmed thermal desorption. The reagent ion chosen for this campaign is the acetate anion (CH3C(O)O-, m/z 59), which reacts selectively via proton transfer with compounds that are stronger gas-phase acids than acetic acid [Veres et al., IJMS, 2008]. Preliminary results show substantial particle-phase concentrations of biogenic oxidation products such as hydroxy-glutaric acid, pinic acid, pinonic acid, and hydroxy-pinonic acid along with numerous lower and higher molecular weight organic acids. Correlations of the organic acid concentrations with meteorological, gas and aerosol parameters measured by other instrumentation are investigated in order to understand the formation, transformation, and partitioning of gas and particle-phase organic acids in a forested environment dominated by terpenes.

  18. Identification of organic hydroperoxides and hydroperoxy acids in secondary organic aerosol formed during the ozonolysis of different monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes by on-line analysis using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reinnig, Marc-Christopher; Warnke, Jörg; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2009-06-01

    On-line ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) enables the real-time characterization of reaction products of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The analysis was conducted by directly introducing the aerosol particles into the ion source. Positive-ion chemical ionization at atmospheric pressure (APCI(+)) ITMS was used for the characterization of constituents of biogenic SOA produced in reaction-chamber experiments. APCI in the positive-ion mode usually enables the detection of [M+H](+) ions of the individual SOA components. In this paper the identification of organic peroxides from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by on-line APCI-ITMS is presented. Organic peroxides containing a hydroperoxy group, generated by gas-phase ozonolysis of monoterpenes (alpha-pinene and beta-pinene) and sesquiterpenes (alpha-cedrene and alpha-copaene), could be detected via on-line APCI(+)-MS/MS experiments. A characteristic neutral loss of 34 Da (hydrogen peroxide, H(2)O(2)) in the on-line MS/MS spectra is a clear indication for the existence of an organic peroxide, containing a hydroperoxy functional group.

  19. Quantitative analysis of selegiline and three metabolites (N-desmethylselegiline, methamphetamine, and amphetamine) in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Slawson, Matthew H; Taccogno, James L; Foltz, Rodger L; Moody, David E

    2002-10-01

    This report describes a sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection of subnanogram concentrations of selegiline and its three principle metabolites, N-desmethylselegiline, methamphetamine, and amphetamine, in human plasma. The assay has a dynamic range of 0.1-20 ng/mL for selegiline and N-desmethylselegiline (norselegiline) and 0.2-20 ng/mL for methamphetamine and amphetamine. The inter- and intra-assay precision and accuracy varied by less than 11% for all analytes at 0.3, 2.5, and 15 ng/mL and less than 16% at the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 ng/mL for selegiline and norselegiline; and 0.2 ng/mL for methamphetamine and amphetamine). Selegiline and its metabolites showed no significant loss in quantitative accuracy after three freeze/thaw cycles or after up to 6 h at room temperature prior to extraction. Extracted plasma samples retained quantitative accuracy after storage for at least 7 days at -20 degrees C or up to 70 h at room temperature. Methanolic stock solutions were stable for at least 6 h when kept at room temperature or at least 90 days when kept at -20 degrees C.

  20. Laboratory and Field Characterizations of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) Collector Module for a Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Vogel, A.; Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Kroll, J. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) collector module is an add-on for Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) instruments. The FIGAERO enables simultaneous real-time chemical analysis of trace gases and particles in ambient air. The collector module described here is modelled after the University of Washington (UW) design of Lopez-Hilfikeret al., 2014. The collector module mounts directly to the front of the CI-TOFMS ion molecule reactor, replacing the standard gas phase inlet. Automated operation follows a two-step sequence alternating between gas and particle sampling. Gas and particle flows are sampled through separate inlet lines. Software provides automated control of the ARI FIGAERO and determines which inlet line is sampled into ion molecule reaction region. While in the gas phase measuring position particles are separately collected on a filter. After sufficient particle collection, heated clean nitrogen is passed over the filter to desorb the particles on the filter. The thermally desorbed material is then measured with the CI-TOFMS. Though conceptually similar, the ARI FIGAERO is mechanically different enough from the UW design that it requires its own performance assessment. Presented here is the characterization of the ARI FIGAERO collector module. The FIGAERO performance is assessed by using laboratory, chamber, and field data collected using iodide as the reagent ion to examine detection sensitivity, quantification limits, and time response. Lopez-Hilfiker et al., "A novel method for online analysis of gas and particle composition: description and evaluation of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO)", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 983-1001 (2014)

  1. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  2. Treatment of Amaranthus cruentus with chemical and biological inducers of resistance has contrasting effects on fitness and protection against compatible Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casarrubias-Castillo, Kena; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma A; Délano-Frier, John P

    2014-07-01

    Amaranthus cruentus (Ac) plants were treated with the synthetic systemic acquired resistance (SAR) inducer benzothiadiazole (BTH), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and the incompatible pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss), under greenhouse conditions. The treatments induced a set of marker genes in the absence of pathogen infection: BTH and Pss similarly induced genes coding for pathogenesis-related and antioxidant proteins, whereas MeJA induced the arginase, LOX2 and amarandin 1 genes. BTH and Pss were effective when tested against the Gram negative pathogen Ps pv. tabaci (Pst), which was found to have a compatible interaction with grain amaranth. The resistance response appeared to be salicylic acid-independent. However, resistance against Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), a Gram positive tomato pathogen also found to infect Ac, was only conferred by Pss, while BTH increased susceptibility. Conversely, MeJA was ineffective against both pathogens. Induced resistance against Pst correlated with the rapid and sustained stimulation of the above genes, including the AhPAL2 gene, which were expressed both locally and distally. The lack of protection against Cmm provided by BTH, coincided with a generalized down-regulation of defense gene expression and chitinase activity. On the other hand, Pss-treated Ac plants showed augmented expression levels of an anti-microbial peptide gene and, surprisingly, of AhACCO, an ethylene biosynthetic gene associated with susceptibility to Cmm in tomato, its main host. Pss treatment had no effect on productivity, but compromised growth, whereas MeJA reduced yield and harvest index. Conversely, BTH treatments led to smaller plants, but produced significantly increased yields. These results suggest essential differences in the mechanisms employed by biological and chemical agents to induce SAR in Ac against bacterial pathogens having different infection strategies. This may determine the outcome of a particular

  3. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  4. Negative muon chemistry: the quantum muon effect and the finite nuclear mass effect.

    PubMed

    Posada, Edwin; Moncada, Félix; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-10-09

    The any-particle molecular orbital method at the full configuration interaction level has been employed to study atoms in which one electron has been replaced by a negative muon. In this approach electrons and muons are described as quantum waves. A scheme has been proposed to discriminate nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on chemical properties of muonic and regular atoms. This study reveals that the differences in the ionization potentials of isoelectronic muonic atoms and regular atoms are of the order of millielectronvolts. For the valence ionizations of muonic helium and muonic lithium the nuclear mass effects are more important. On the other hand, for 1s ionizations of muonic atoms heavier than beryllium, the quantum muon effects are more important. In addition, this study presents an assessment of the nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on the barrier of Heμ + H2 reaction.

  5. Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry protein profiling identifies ubiquitin and ferritin light chain as prognostic biomarkers in node-negative breast cancer tumors.

    PubMed

    Ricolleau, Gabriel; Charbonnel, Catherine; Lodé, Laurence; Loussouarn, Delphine; Joalland, Marie-Pierre; Bogumil, Ralf; Jourdain, Sabine; Minvielle, Stéphane; Campone, Mario; Déporte-Fety, Régine; Campion, Loïc; Jézéquel, Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Novel prognostic biomarkers are imperatively needed to help direct treatment decisions by typing subgroups of node-negative breast cancer patients. The current study has used a proteomic approach of SELDI-TOF-MS screening to identify differentially cytosolic expressed proteins with a prognostic impact in 30 node-negative breast cancer patients with no relapse versus 30 patients with metastatic relapse. The data analysis took into account 73 peaks, among which 2 proved, by means of univariate Cox regression, to have a good cumulative prognostic-informative power. Repeated random sampling (n = 500) was performed to ensure the reliability of the peaks. Optimized thresholds were then computed to use both peaks as risk factors and, adding them to the St. Gallen ones, improve the prognostic classification of node-negative breast cancer patients. Identification of ubiquitin and ferritin light chain (FLC), corresponding to the two peaks of interest, was obtained using ProteinChip LDI-Qq-TOF-MS. Differential expression of the two proteins was further confirmed by Western blotting analyses and immunohistochemistry. SELDI-TOF-MS protein profiling clearly showed that a high level of cytosolic ubiquitin and/or a low level of FLC were associated with a good prognosis in breast cancer.

  6. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  7. Atmospheric-pressure laser ionization: a novel ionization method for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Constapel, M; Schellenträger, M; Schmitz, O J; Gäb, S; Brockmann, K J; Giese, R; Benter, Th

    2005-01-01

    We report on the development of a new laser-ionization (LI) source operating at atmospheric pressure (AP) for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) applications. APLI is introduced as a powerful addition to existing AP ionization techniques, in particular atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), electrospray ionization (ESI), and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Replacing the one-step VUV approach in APPI with step-wise two-photon ionization strongly enhances the selectivity of the ionization process. Furthermore, the photon flux during an ionization event is drastically increased over that of APPI, leading to very low detection limits. In addition, the APLI mechanism generally operates primarily directly on the analyte. This allows for very efficient ionization even of non-polar compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The APLI source was characterized with a MicroMass Q-Tof Ultima II analyzer. Both the effluent of an HPLC column containing a number of PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, anthracene, fluorene) and samples from direct syringe injection were analyzed with respect to selectivity and sensitivity of the overall system. The liquid phase was vaporized by a conventional APCI inlet (AP probe) with the corona needle removed. Ionization was performed through selective resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization schemes using a high-repetition-rate fixed-frequency excimer laser operating at 248 nm. Detection limits well within the low-fmol regime are readily obtained for various aromatic hydrocarbons that exhibit long-lived electronic states at the energy level of the first photon. Only molecular ions are generated at the low laser fluxes employed ( approximately 1 MW/cm(2)). The design and performance of the laser-ionization source are presented along with results of the analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Rimmer, P. B.; Diver, D. A.

    2013-10-10

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (≥10{sup –7}) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10{sup –6}-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H{sub 2}, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  9. Low-density ionization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    As part of a continuing study of the physics of matter under extreme conditions, I give some results on matter at extremely low density. In particular I compare a quantum mechanical calculation of the pressure for atomic hydrogen with the corresponding pressure given by Thomas-Fermi theory. (This calculation differs from the ``confined atom`` approximation in a physically significant way.) Since Thomas-Fermi theory in some sense, represents the case of infinite nuclear charge, these cases should represent extremes. Comparison is also made with Saha theory, which considers ionization from a chemical point of view, but is weak on excited-state effects. In this theory, the pressure undergoes rapid variation as electron ionization levels are passed. This effect is in contrast to the smooth behavior of the Thomas-Fermi fixed temperature, complete ionization occurs in the low density limit, I study the case where the temperature goes appropriately to zero with the density. Although considerable modification is required, Saha theory is closer to the actual results for this case than is Thomas-Fermi theory.

  10. Simultaneous determination of histamine and prostaglandin D2 using an LC-ESI-MS/MS method with positive/negative ion-switching ionization modes: application to the study of anti-allergic flavonoids on the degranulation of KU812 cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Junko; Taga, Shiori; Shimizu, Kae; Shimizu, Maki; Morita, Izumi; Takeuchi, Atsuko

    2011-09-01

    A new method for simultaneous determination of histamine and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry operated in positive and negative ionization switching modes was developed and validated without a previous derivatization step. This method was used to measure histamine and PGD(2) release following degranulation of KU812 human basophilic cells, using pyrazol and d(4)-PGD(2) as internal standards. Analyses were performed on a liquid chromatography system employing a Cosmosil 5C(18) PAQ column and an isocratic elution with mixed solution of methanol-water (7:3, v/v) with 0.0015% trifluoroacetic acid at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. A triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in selected reaction monitoring mode simultaneously monitored using the following transitions: positive m/z 112/95 for histamine and negative m/z 351/271 for PGD(2). The retention times of histamine and pyrazol were 4.2 and 5.0 min, respectively. PGD(2) and d(4)-PGD(2) had retention times of 8.5 min. The limits of detection were 0.3 and 0.5 ng/mL for histamine and PGD(2), respectively. The relative standard deviations of the retention time and peak area for histamine were between 1.6% and 7.7%, and were 1.2% and 7.8% for PGD(2). This method was used to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of 26 flavonoids and sodium cromoglicate which are first-line anti-allergic drugs. Of these compounds, baicalein and morin were the most potent inhibitors.

  11. Using a novel sol-gel stir bar sorptive extraction method for the analysis of steroid hormones in water by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vo Duy, S; Fayad, P B; Barbeau, B; Prévost, M; Sauvé, S

    2012-11-15

    A new coating material was used for a stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique. This allowed for a simple procedure for fast determinations of eight steroid hormones (estriol, estradiol, ethynylestradiol, estrone, progesterone, medroxyprogesterone, levonorgestrel, northindrone) in water. Sample pre-treatment was performed using an in-house SBSE method based on a polydimethylsiloxane/phenyltrimethylsiloxane/β-cyclodextrin sol-gel material. The analytes were desorbed by liquid extraction prior to their analysis by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). Several parameters, including ionic strength, volume and time of extraction as well as volume and time of desorption, were investigated to maximize extraction efficiency by SBSE in aqueous solutions. The in-house stir bar showed good reproducibility and could be used for at least 50 extractions without affecting analytical performance. The recoveries of the spiked steroid hormones ranged from 55% to 96% in all water matrices studied (HPLC grade water, tap water and raw wastewater). Only one compound showed poor recovery values (<2% for estriol) in all matrices. The method detection limits (MDLs) in real matrices were within the range of 0.1-0.3 μg L(-1) except for estriol at 48 μg L(-1). The extraction performance of the in-house SBSE for the eight selected hormones was also compared with that of a commercially-available stir bar coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This novel stir bar coating could prove to be useful method for the detection and quantification of trace levels of steroid hormones.

  12. An improved high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in freeze-dried and hot-air-dried Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsai Hua; Chen, Chia Ju; Chen, Bing Huei

    2011-10-30

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz, a traditional Chinese herb possessing antioxidant and anti-cancer activities, has been reported to contain functional components like carotenoids and chlorophylls. However, the variety and amount of chlorophylls remain uncertain. The objectives of this study were to develop a high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS) method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in hot-air-dried and freeze-dried R. nasutus. An Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column and a gradient mobile phase composed of methanol/N,N-dimethylformamide (97:3, v/v), acetonitrile and acetone were employed to separate internal standard zinc-phthalocyanine plus 12 cholorophylls and their derivatives within 21 min, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', hydroxychlorophyll a, 15-OH-lactone chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll b', hydroxychlorophyll b, pheophytin a, pheophytin a', hydroxypheophytin a, hydroxypheophytin a' and pheophytin b in hot-air-dried R. nasutus with flow rate at 1 mL/min and detection at 660 nm. But, in freeze-dried R. nasutus, only 4 chlorophylls and their derivatives, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', chlorophyll b and pheophytin a were detected. Zinc-phthalocyanine was found to be an appropriate internal standard to quantify all the chlorophyll compounds. After quantification by HPLC-DAD, both chlorophyll a and pheophytin a were the most abundant in hot-air-dried R. nasutus, while in freeze-dried R. nasutus, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b dominated.

  13. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision.

  14. An approach based on ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry allowing the quantification of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Birgit; Menzel, Nicole; Lander, Vera; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-15

    A method for the analysis of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters in complex mixtures was established. The approach was based on a previously not described combination of three elements: (i) the formation of [M-FA+H](+) fragment ions via APCI (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization), (ii) a highly efficient UHPLC-based separation on a 1.7 μ C8 column, previously established for phytostanyl fatty acid esters, allowing the distinction of individual fatty acid esters sharing the same sterol/stanol nucleus and of isotope peaks of phytosteryl fatty acid esters and corresponding phytostanyl fatty acid esters based on these [M-FA+H](+) fragment ions, and (iii) the adjustment of the APCI conditions allowing the differential APCI-MS-SIM (single ion monitoring) detection of phytostanyl esters of linoleic and linolenic acid based on their distinct formation of a [M+H](+) ion. The usefulness of the methodology was demonstrated by the analysis of a commercially available enriched margarine. Two runs per sample allowed the quantification of 35 target analytes; the total amounts of esters were between 124.7 and 125.3g/kg, being in good agreement with the labelled 125 g/kg. Validation data were elaborated for 35 individual fatty acid esters of sitosterol, campesterol, brassicasterol, stigmasterol, sitostanol and campestanol. Recovery rates ranged from 95 to 106%; the coefficients of variation were consistently <5%, except for stigmasteryl-18:1. The approach describes for the first time a quantification of both individual phytosteryl and phytostanyl fatty acid esters and thus closes an analytical gap related to this class of health-relevant food constituents.

  15. Thai Negation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Samsul

    A study analyzed the structure of negative sentences in the Thai language, based on data gathered from two native speakers. It is shown that the Thai negative marker generally occurs between the noun phrase (subject) and the verb phrase in simple active sentences and in passive sentences. Negation of noun phrases is also allowed in Thai, with a…

  16. The thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization