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Sample records for negative predictive values

  1. Precision and negative predictive value of links between ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed.

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of translational science is to shorten the time from discovery to clinical use. Clinical trial registries were established to increase transparency in completed and ongoing clinical trials, and they support linking trials with resulting publications. We set out to investigate precision and negative predictive value (NPV) of links between ClinicalTrials.gov (CT.gov) and PubMed. CT.gov has been established to increase transparency in clinical trials and the link to PubMed is crucial for supporting a number of important functions, including ascertaining publication bias. We drew a random sample of trials downloaded from CT.gov and performed manual review of retrieved publications. We characterize two types of links between trials and publications (NCT-link originating from MEDLINE and PMID-link originating from CT.gov).The link precision is different based on type (NCT-link: 100%; PMID-link: 63% to 96%). In trials with no linked publication, we were able to find publications 44% of the time (NPV=56%) by searching PubMed. This low NPV shows that there are potentially numerous publications that should have been formally linked with the trials. Our results indicate that existing trial registry and publisher policies may not be fully enforced. We suggest some automated methods for improving link quality.

  2. Prognostic and predictive value of Ki-67 in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peifeng; Fei, Xiaochun; Zong, Yu; Chen, Xiaosong; Huang, Ou; He, Jian-Rong; Chen, Weiguo; Li, Yafen; Shen, Kunwei; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate the prognostic role of Ki-67 in further classification of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), and to test whether high expression level of Ki67 can predict benefit from carboplatin. From January 2004 to December 2012, 363 patients operated for TNBC were identified through the institutional clinical database. After a median follow-up time of 34 months (5.2–120.0 months), 62 patients (17.1%) had relapses and 33 patients (9.1%) died of breast cancer. In univariate analysis, high Ki-67 index as well as larger tumor size and lymph node involvement was associated with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, high Ki-67 is an independent risk factor for DFS (Risk Ratio, RR: 2.835, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI: 1.586–5.068, P < 0.001) and OS (RR: 3.180, 95% CI: 1.488–6.793, P = 0.003). When analyzing the 3-year DFS by Ki-67 distribution, Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot analysis showed a beneficial effect of carboplatin in patients with high Ki-67 index. In conclusion, TNBC is probably a heterogeneous disease with different characteristics and prognosis, and may be further subdivided according to the Ki-67 expression levels. Patients in the high Ki- 67 group seem to benefit more from treatment with carboplatin, but this needs to be further verified. PMID:27145269

  3. Symptom Screening Among HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Is Acceptable and Has High Negative Predictive Value for Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Patil, Sandesh; Bhosale, Ramesh; Sambarey, Pradeep; Ghorpade, Shivahari; Nayak, Uma; Garda, Laila; Sastry, Jayagowri; Bharadwaj, Renu; Bollinger, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated tuberculosis (TB) screening among 799 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected pregnant women in India. Eleven (1.4%) had active TB. The negative predictive value of screening using cough, fever, night sweats, or weight loss was 99.3%. Tuberculin skin test and targeted chest radiography provided no substantial benefit. TB symptom screening, as recommended by the World Health Organization, is effective for ruling out TB in HIV-infected pregnant women. PMID:21940417

  4. Negative Predictive Value of Pigmented Lesion Evaluation by Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis in a Community Practice Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rigel, Darrell S.; Kollmann, Emily; Swenson, Nicole; Tucker, Natalie; Nestor, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine if the high negative predictive value of a multispectral digital skin lesion analysis that has been previously found in an academic-based trial would be similar in a community-based setting with its expected different distribution of pigmented lesions. Design: Data were collected from patients undergoing routine skin examinations over a one-year period at a community-based practice in Florida. All lesions that were selected for biopsy to rule out melanoma were also imaged with multispectral digital skin lesion analysis prior to biopsy. Histopathological diagnoses and multispectral digital skin lesion analysis results were reviewed and compared with findings from a prior primarily academic center-based multispectral digital skin lesion analysis trial. Setting/participants: Community-based clinical setting in Florida. Measurements: Negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity. Results: One hundred thirty-seven consecutive lesions were selected for biopsy and also analyzed via multispectral digital skin lesion analysis. All 21 cases with multispectral digital skin lesion analysis “Low Disorganization” readings were all histologically benign (100% negative predictive value, 95% lower confidence boundary = 96.9%). The negative predictive value and the sensitivity were not significantly different than what was found in the prior academic-based multispectral digital skin lesion analysis trial. Multispectral digital skin lesion analysis also correctly identified all high-risk lesions, which were subsequently confirmed via histology to be one invasive melanoma and 15 moderately dysplastic nevi (100% sensitivity). Specificity with multispectral digital skin lesion analysis was significantly higher than reported in the academic-based multispectral digital skin lesion analysis trial (18% vs. 10%, p=0.02). Conclusion: Because of the high negative predictive value achieved by multispectral digital skin lesion analysis, lesions with readings

  5. Negativity bias and basic values.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Shalom H

    2014-06-01

    Basic values explain more variance in political attitudes and preferences than other personality and sociodemographic variables. The values most relevant to the political domain are those likely to reflect the degree of negativity bias. Value conflicts that represent negativity bias clarify differences between what worries conservatives and liberals and suggest that relations between ideology and negativity bias are linear. PMID:24970450

  6. Negative predictive value of preoperative computed tomography in determining pathologic local invasion, nodal disease, and abdominal metastases in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kagedan, D.J.; Frankul, F.; El-Sedfy, A.; McGregor, C.; Elmi, M.; Zagorski, B.; Dixon, M.E.; Mahar, A.L.; Vasilevska-Ristovska, J.; Helyer, L.; Rowsell, C.; Swallow, C.J.; Law, C.H.; Coburn, N.G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Before undergoing curative-intent resection of gastric adenocarcinoma (ga), most patients undergo abdominal computed tomography (ct) imaging to determine contraindications to resection (local invasion, distant metastases). However, the ability to detect contraindications is variable, and the literature is limited to single-institution studies. We sought to assess, on a population level, the clinical relevance of preoperative ct in evaluating the resectability of ga tumours in patients undergoing surgery. Methods In a provincial cancer registry, 2414 patients with ga diagnosed during 2005–2008 at 116 institutions were identified, and a primary chart review of radiology, operative, and pathology reports was performed for all patients. Preoperative abdominal ct reports were compared with intraoperative findings and final pathology reports (reference standard) to determine the negative predictive value (npv) of ct in assessing local invasion, nodal involvement, and intra-abdominal metastases. Results Among patients undergoing gastrectomy, the npv of ct imaging in detecting local invasion was 86.9% (n = 536). For nodal metastasis, the npv of ct was 43.3% (n = 450). Among patients undergoing surgical exploration, the npv of ct for intra-abdominal metastases was 52.3% (n = 407). Conclusions Preoperative abdominal ct imaging reported as negative is most accurate in determining local invasion and least accurate in nodal assessment. The poor npv of ct should be taken into account when selecting patients for staging laparoscopy. PMID:27536178

  7. Comparison of Hemodynamic Effects and Negative Predictive Value of Normal Adenosine Gated Myocardial Perfusion Scan With or Without Caffeine Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    uz Zaman, Maseeh; Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Areeba; Zaman, Unaiza; Tahseen, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    For vasodilator stress, myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with at least 12-h caffeine abstinence is recommended, as it attenuates cardiovascular hyperemic response of adenosine and dipyridamole. However, many published conflicting results have shown no significant effect upon perfusion abnormalities in MPI performed without caffeine abstinence. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes and negative predictive value (NPV) of normal MPIs with adenosine stress performed with or without caffeine abstinence. This was a prospective study that accrued 50 patients from May 2013 till September 2013 and followed till November 2014. These patients had a normal adenosine-gated MPI (GMPI) with technetium-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) after 12-h caffeine abstinence (no-caffeine). Next day, all patients had a repeat adenosine stress within 60 min after ingestion of a cup of coffee (about 80 mg of caffeine) followed by no MPI in 30 patients due to concern about radiation dose (prior-caffeine adenosine—no MPI; group A). Twenty patients opted for a repeat MPI (prior-caffeine adenosine—MPI; group B). Adenosine-induced hemodynamic response and NPV of the normal MPI with no-caffeine and prior-caffeine protocols were compared. The mean age of the study cohort was 57 ± 9 years with a male-to-female ratio of 76:24% and mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.915 ± 4.121 kg/m2. Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and positive family history were 76%, 20%, 22%, and 17%, respectively. Comparison of group A with group B revealed no significant difference in demographic parameters, hemodynamic or electrocardiography (ECG) parameters, or left ventricular (LV) function parameters during adenosine intervention with prior-caffeine and no-caffeine protocols. During the follow-up, no fatal myocardial infarction (MI) was reported but 6 nonfatal MIs were reported based upon the history of short hospitalization for chest pain but without biochemical or

  8. Comparison of Hemodynamic Effects and Negative Predictive Value of Normal Adenosine Gated Myocardial Perfusion Scan With or Without Caffeine Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    uz Zaman, Maseeh; Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Areeba; Zaman, Unaiza; Tahseen, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    For vasodilator stress, myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with at least 12-h caffeine abstinence is recommended, as it attenuates cardiovascular hyperemic response of adenosine and dipyridamole. However, many published conflicting results have shown no significant effect upon perfusion abnormalities in MPI performed without caffeine abstinence. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes and negative predictive value (NPV) of normal MPIs with adenosine stress performed with or without caffeine abstinence. This was a prospective study that accrued 50 patients from May 2013 till September 2013 and followed till November 2014. These patients had a normal adenosine-gated MPI (GMPI) with technetium-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) after 12-h caffeine abstinence (no-caffeine). Next day, all patients had a repeat adenosine stress within 60 min after ingestion of a cup of coffee (about 80 mg of caffeine) followed by no MPI in 30 patients due to concern about radiation dose (prior-caffeine adenosine—no MPI; group A). Twenty patients opted for a repeat MPI (prior-caffeine adenosine—MPI; group B). Adenosine-induced hemodynamic response and NPV of the normal MPI with no-caffeine and prior-caffeine protocols were compared. The mean age of the study cohort was 57 ± 9 years with a male-to-female ratio of 76:24% and mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.915 ± 4.121 kg/m2. Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and positive family history were 76%, 20%, 22%, and 17%, respectively. Comparison of group A with group B revealed no significant difference in demographic parameters, hemodynamic or electrocardiography (ECG) parameters, or left ventricular (LV) function parameters during adenosine intervention with prior-caffeine and no-caffeine protocols. During the follow-up, no fatal myocardial infarction (MI) was reported but 6 nonfatal MIs were reported based upon the history of short hospitalization for chest pain but without biochemical or

  9. Comparison of Hemodynamic Effects and Negative Predictive Value of Normal Adenosine Gated Myocardial Perfusion Scan With or Without Caffeine Abstinence.

    PubMed

    Uz Zaman, Maseeh; Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Areeba; Zaman, Unaiza; Tahseen, Rabia

    2016-09-01

    For vasodilator stress, myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with at least 12-h caffeine abstinence is recommended, as it attenuates cardiovascular hyperemic response of adenosine and dipyridamole. However, many published conflicting results have shown no significant effect upon perfusion abnormalities in MPI performed without caffeine abstinence. The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes and negative predictive value (NPV) of normal MPIs with adenosine stress performed with or without caffeine abstinence. This was a prospective study that accrued 50 patients from May 2013 till September 2013 and followed till November 2014. These patients had a normal adenosine-gated MPI (GMPI) with technetium-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile ((99m)Tc-MIBI) after 12-h caffeine abstinence (no-caffeine). Next day, all patients had a repeat adenosine stress within 60 min after ingestion of a cup of coffee (about 80 mg of caffeine) followed by no MPI in 30 patients due to concern about radiation dose (prior-caffeine adenosine-no MPI; group A). Twenty patients opted for a repeat MPI (prior-caffeine adenosine-MPI; group B). Adenosine-induced hemodynamic response and NPV of the normal MPI with no-caffeine and prior-caffeine protocols were compared. The mean age of the study cohort was 57 ± 9 years with a male-to-female ratio of 76:24% and mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.915 ± 4.121 kg/m(2). Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and positive family history were 76%, 20%, 22%, and 17%, respectively. Comparison of group A with group B revealed no significant difference in demographic parameters, hemodynamic or electrocardiography (ECG) parameters, or left ventricular (LV) function parameters during adenosine intervention with prior-caffeine and no-caffeine protocols. During the follow-up, no fatal myocardial infarction (MI) was reported but 6 nonfatal MIs were reported based upon the history of short hospitalization for chest pain but without biochemical or

  10. Predictive Factors and Value of ypN+ after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Clinically Lymph Node-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, Ippei; Araki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kokoro; Shibayama, Tomoko; Takahashi, Shunji; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji; Ohno, Shinji; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Hozumi, Yasuo; Sata, Naohiro; Ito, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Background Pathological complete response (pCR) with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has been regarded as a surrogate endpoint for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with breast cancer. No consensus regarding the definition of pCR has been established; there are several definitions according to a variety of classifications. Eradication of cancer cells in both breast and lymph nodes has been better associated with improved prognosis than in the breast alone. Even in patients diagnosed as having clinically node-negative cancer before NAC, postoperative pathological examination often shows axillary lymph node metastases. Patients and Methods Of the 771 patients with breast cancer who underwent NAC in the Cancer Institute Hospital between January 2000 and May 2009, 146 patients preoperatively diagnosed as having node-negative breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. We have made the definition of clinically lymph node-negative (N0) as follows: first, ultrasonography before NAC did not show any lymphadenopathy. Second, a cytological procedure confirmed negative study for each patient when ultrasonography suggested lymphadenopathy. Results The median observation period was 79.7 months, and the median age of the subjects was 51 years. Pathological examination at the time of the surgery showed lymph node metastases (ypN+) in 46 patients (31.5%). Histological therapeutic effects revealed ypT0/is in 9 patients (6.2%) and ypTinv in 137 (93.8%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that younger age (49>), large tumor size, NG3, and ypN+ were significant poor prognostic factors for DFS (p = 0.020, p = 0.008, P = 0.022 and p = 0.010, respectively). Moreover, ypN+ was the only significant poor prognostic factor for OS (p = 0.022). The predictive factors of ypN+ in clinically lymph node–negative breast cancer were ypTinv (p = 0.036) and the luminal type (HR+ and HER2-) (p = 0.029). Conclusion The prognosis of clinically lymph node negative breast

  11. Positive predictive values of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision diagnoses of Gram-negative septicemia/sepsis and urosepsis for presence of Gram-negative bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Søgaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care databases are a valuable resource for infectious disease epidemiology if diagnoses are accurately coded. We examined the ability of diagnostic coding to accurately identify Gram-negative bacteremia. Methods We randomly selected 100 patients among 1,703 patients recorded in the Danish National Patient Register with a diagnosis of either “septicemia/sepsis due to other Gram-negative organisms” (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision [ICD-10] code A41.5) or “urosepsis” (ICD-10 code A41.9B) who had been admitted at Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2012. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of these diagnoses for presence of Gram-negative bacteremia, using microbiological results from blood cultures as standard reference. Complementary clinical information was obtained from the medical records. Results Of the 100 patients registered with Gram-negative septicemia/sepsis or urosepsis, 72 had blood culture confirmed Gram-negative bacteremia, four patients had monomicrobial Gram-positive bacteremia, 21 patients had a negative blood culture, and three had no blood culture taken. The overall PPV of a blood culture confirmed Gram-negative bacteremia diagnosis was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62%–81%); for ICD-10 code A41.5 it was 86% (95% CI: 74%–94%) and for ICD-10 code A41.9B it was 55% (95% CI: 39%–70%). The highest PPV was achieved for diagnoses registered in the most recent calendar period (2009–2012) and for secondary discharge diagnoses. Conclusion Our findings indicated good agreement between ICD-10 code A41.5 “septicemia/sepsis due to other Gram-negative organisms” and Gram-negative bacteremia, whereas ICD-10 code A41.9B “urosepsis” was not suited for identification of Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:25709502

  12. Analysis of Sensitivity, Specificity, and Positive and Negative Predictive Values of Smear and Colposcopy in Diagnosis of Premalignant and Malignant Cervical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Mert Ulaş; Kale, Ahmet; Kuyumcuoğlu, Umur; Bozkurt, Murat; Ağaçayak, Elif; Özekinci, Server; Gul, Talip

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to examine the positive and negative predictive value in the diagnosis of premalignant and malignant lesions of cervical colposcopy, the sensitivity and specificity of smear, and to evaluate the correlation with histopathology of abnormal cytology and colposcopy. Material/Methods The criteria for inclusion of patients with unhealthy cervix in the study were: Erosion, Chronic cervicitis, and Healed lacerations, Hypertrophied cervix, bleeding on touch, suspicious growth/ulcer/polyp on the cervix, and abnormal discharges from the cervix. Women with frank carcinoma cervix, pregnant females, patients with bleeding per vaginum at the time of examination, and those who had used vaginal medications, vaginal contraceptives or douches in the last 48 h of examination were excluded from the study. Demographic analysis was performed for 450 patients who were admitted to the clinic. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of patients to identify cervical pathologies of smear and colposcopy were histopathologically calculated. The statistical software package SPSS 15.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) and Spearman‘s and Chi-Square tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Sensitivity, specificity, PPD and NDP of smear were 0.57%, 0.76%, 0.26%, 0.92% respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPD and NDP of colposcopy were 0.92%, 0.67%, 0.52%, 0.96% respectively. A statistically significant correlation was found between abnormal cytology and histopathology, and abnormal colposcopy finding and histopathology. Conclusions Women with clinical diagnosis of unhealthy cervix should be evaluated by cytology to detect any premalignant or malignant lesions. It was concluded that Pap smear, colposcopy and histopathology should be collectively evaluated to evaluate cervical findings in low socio-economic regions. PMID:26655816

  13. The importance of negative predictive value (NPV) of vulnerable elderly survey (VES 13) as a pre-screening test in older patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Castagneto, B; Di Pietrantonj, C; Stevani, I; Anfossi, A; Arzese, M; Giorcelli, L; Giaretto, L

    2013-12-01

    The importance of prognostic value of the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is well known in geriatric oncology, but there is no consensus on the use of alternative abbreviated screening methods for the evaluation of older patient disabilities. The participants in this study underwent vulnerable elderly survey 13 (VES 13) at first entry in Oncology Department and were later assessed by a geriatrician according to CGA. A score >3 for VES 13 identified patients as vulnerable. Aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity, sensibility, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of VES 13 versus cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS), activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and short portable mental status questionnaire (SPMSQ). Hundred and seventeen patients (mean age 78.8 years) entered the study. The NPV of VES was 74.6% for CIRS, 90.1% for IADL, 93.0% for ADL, and 100% for SPMSQ. As for PPV, the VES 13 showed no accuracy. We can conclude that VES 13 demonstrated sufficient accuracy as a screening test in identifying elderly "fit" patients in order to spare the more time-consuming CGA.

  14. Predictive value of angiogenesis-related gene profiling in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer treated with bevacizumab and weekly paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Mendiola, Marta; Martínez-Marin, Virginia; Herranz, Jesús; Heredia, Victoria; Yébenes, Laura; Zamora, Pilar; Castelo, Beatriz; Pinto, Álvaro; Miguel, María; Díaz, Esther; Gámez, Angelo; Fresno, Juan Ángel; de Molina, Ana Ramírez; Hardisson, David; Espinosa, Enrique; Redondo, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus weekly paclitaxel improves progression-free survival (PFS) in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (mBC), but its use has been questioned due to the absence of a predictive biomarker, lack of benefit in overall survival (OS) and increased toxicity. We examined the baseline tumor angiogenic-related gene expression of 60 patients with mBC with the aim of finding a signature that predicts benefit from this drug. Multivariate analysis by Lasso-penalized Cox regression generated two predictive models: one, named G-model, including 11 genes, and the other one, named GC-model, including 13 genes plus 5 clinical covariates. Both models identified patients with improved PFS (HR (Hazard Ratio) 2.57 and 4.04, respectively) and OS (HR 3.29 and 3.43, respectively). The G-model distinguished low and high risk patients in the first 6 months, whereas the GC-model maintained significance over time. PMID:26992213

  15. Positive and negative predictive values of HLA-DR and CD34 in the diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of acute myeloid leukemia with recurrent chromosomal translocations.

    PubMed

    Promsuwicha, Orathai; Auewarakul, Chirayu U

    2009-12-01

    The predictive value of HLA-DR and CD34 in the diagnosis of four distinct genetic entities of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is presently not established. We evaluated the positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively), sensitivity, specificity, and correlation coefficients of HLA-DR and CD34 in AML patients with t(15;17), t(8;21), inv(16), and abn(11q23). In AML with t(15;17) (n = 64), HLA-DR was expressed in 4.68% and CD34 was expressed in 15.62% and none of the cases expressed both HLA-DR and CD34. In AML with t(8;21) (n = 99), HLA-DR, CD34 or both antigens were expressed in the majority of cases (90.90%, 80.80%, and 79.79%, respectively). AML patients with inv(16) (n = 18) and abn(11q23) (n = 31) also highly expressed HLA-DR and CD34. Eight cases of t(8;21) and 1 case of abn(11q23) did not express either antigen. The highest correlation between CD34 and HLA-DR expression values was observed in cases with t(8;21) (r = 0.72) with the lowest correlation in inv(16) (r = 0.035). The PPV and NPV of HLA-DR-negativity plus CD34-negativity to predict t(15;17) was 85% and 100%, respectively, with 100% sensitivity and 92.74% specificity. The PPV and NPV of other myeloid markers such as CD117, MPO and CD11c to diagnose t(15;17) were much lower than those of HLA-DR and CD34. It was concluded that the absence of double negativity of HLA-DR and CD34 strongly predicts against t(15;17). Rare HLA-DR-positive/CD34-negative cases exist in patients with t(15;17) and 8% of t(8;21) cases expressed neither antigen. Further studies should determine whether HLA-DR-positive t(15;17) and HLA-DR-negative/CD34-negative t(8;21) represent a special entity associated with significant prognostic relevance.

  16. The Predictive Value of Foreshocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, G. A.; Avlonitis, M.; Di Fiore, B.; Minadakis, G.

    2012-04-01

    Foreshock activity was considered as a potential precursor of mainshocks since the 1960's. This is because foreshocks come directly from the source where mainshock is under preparation. However, the precise predictive value of foreshocks remained unrevealed due to the lack of precise earthquake catalogue data. We use recent examples of foreshocks from Japan, Italy, Greece and California and show that significant changes of seismicity in space-time-size domains during precisely located foreshock sequences provide seismicity patterns bearing high probability gain before the mainshock. The power-law increase of the event rate and the move of foreshocks towards mainshock epicenter indicate an accumulated or cascade stress redistribution process and a nucleation process, respectively. On the other hand, the statistically significant drop of b-value during foreshock sequences, from physical point of view provides clues for a softening material process in the seismogenic volume. We show analytically that the microstructural parameter α of the Olami-Feder-Christensen model controls the macroscopically observed b-value. This is further supported by our simulation results. The seismicity changes in the time, space and size domains during foreshocks provide information about the time and space of mainshock preparation as well as about the lower threshold of the mainshock magnitude, M. However, they do not provide an approximation of M. The recent examples used yield evidence that the foreshock area is likely a function of M. We propose that in selected target areas the close seismicity monitoring may provide evidence for foreshock activity beforehand, which may open possibilities for the predictability of mainshocks.

  17. Visual mismatch negativity: a predictive coding view

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kremláček, Jan; Czigler, István

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist's point of view in a predictive coding framework: (1) experimental protocols and procedures to control “refractoriness” effects; (2) methods to control attention; (3) vMMN and veridical perception. PMID:25278859

  18. HCV RNA decline in the first 24 hours exhibits high negative predictive value of sustained virologic response in HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, N; Bolcic, F; Rolón, MJ; Martinez, A; Reynoso, R; Pérez, H; Salomón, H; Cahn, P; Quarleri, J

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment with Peg-interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) for HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 has suboptimal rates of response. Viral kinetics has emerged as one of the best prognostic factors of treatment outcome. Methods Twenty HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients in treatment with PEG-IFN/RBV, had blood drawn at baseline, 24h, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 weeks. HCV-RNA levels were evaluated at each time point. ROC curves were used to evaluate the log10 HCV-RNA decay at 24h that exhibits the best predictive value of achieving response. Genomic characterization of HCV NS5A at both interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) and protein-kinase binding (PKRBD) domains were performed in order to evaluate its heterogeneity and association with 24h HCV-RNA decay and SVR. Results Non-responder patients exhibited a mean of 0.7log10 (SD 0.74log10) HCV-RNA decay at 24h, whereas responder-patients presented 1.6log10 (SD 0.28log10), p=0.04. A reduction in HCV viral load from baseline to 24h of <1.4 had a negative predictive value for achieving SVR of 100% and a positive predictive value of 50%. HCV genotype 1 isolates from patients with a decrease of HCV-RNA at 24h >1.4log10, exhibited 3.1(SD 1.5) amino acids substitutions in ISDR and 4.8(SD 2.3) in PKRBD regions and 1.6(SD 0.7) and 2.4(SD1.3), respectively, in those patients presenting lower reduction in HCV-RNA. Conclusions HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients with a decrease in HCV-VL at 24h >1.4 log10 are more likely to achieve SVR when treated with PEG-IFN/RBV than those with lower levels of HCV-RNA decay. Along with other host-related and viral-related prognostic factors in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, this very early time point of evaluation could be of relevance in the management of HCV-specific treatment. PMID:21376083

  19. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans.

  20. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans. PMID:25071182

  1. It's difficult, but important, to make negative predictions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard V; Amberg, Alexander; Brigo, Alessandro; Coquin, Laurence; Giddings, Amanda; Glowienke, Susanne; Greene, Nigel; Jolly, Robert; Kemper, Ray; O'Leary-Steele, Catherine; Parenty, Alexis; Spirkl, Hans-Peter; Stalford, Susanne A; Weiner, Sandy K; Wichard, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    At the confluence of predictive and regulatory toxicologies, negative predictions may be the thin green line that prevents populations from being exposed to harm. Here, two novel approaches to making confident and robust negative in silico predictions for mutagenicity (as defined by the Ames test) have been evaluated. Analyses of 12 data sets containing >13,000 compounds, showed that negative predictivity is high (∼90%) for the best approach and features that either reduce the accuracy or certainty of negative predictions are identified as misclassified or unclassified respectively. However, negative predictivity remains high (and in excess of the prevalence of non-mutagens) even in the presence of these features, indicating that they are not flags for mutagenicity. PMID:26785392

  2. Prognostic value of Ki67 and p53 in patients with estrogen receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer: Validation of the cut-off value of the Ki67 labeling index as a predictive factor

    PubMed Central

    OHARA, MASAHIRO; MATSUURA, KAZUO; AKIMOTO, ETSUSHI; NOMA, MIDORI; DOI, MIHOKO; NISHIZAKA, TAKASHI; KAGAWA, NAOKI; ITAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of the Ki67 labeling index and p53 status as prognostic and predictive indicators of operable estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Among 697 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2013, 308 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer were assessed. The results of the multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that a high Ki67 labeling index was significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) (p=0.004) and was marginally associated with a worse overall survival (p=0.074). A positive p53 status was not associated with worse outcomes. To validate the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for identifying patients who may benefit from additional chemotherapy, prognostic factors were investigated in breast cancer patients treated postoperatively with endocrine therapy alone. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that a Ki67 labeling index cut-off of 20.0% was optimal for predicting recurrence among patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year RFIs for patients with Ki67 <20 and ≥20% were 97.2 and 86.6%, respectively (p=0.0244). A high Ki67 labeling index (≥20%) was significantly associated with large tumors (p<0.01), lymph node metastasis (p=0.0236) and positive p53 status (p<0.001). The univariate analysis demonstrated that Ki67 labeling index ≥20%, lymph node metastasis and progesterone receptor negativity were significant worse prognostic factors for RFI (p=0.0333, 0.0116 and 0.0573, respectively). The Ki67 labeling index was found to be a useful prognostic factor in patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer and the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for making a decision regarding adjuvant treatment were validated. PMID:27073684

  3. Predictability of extreme values in geophysical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterk, Alef; Holland, Mark; Rabassa, Pau; Broer, Henk; Vitolo, Renato

    2014-05-01

    Classical extreme value theory studies the occurrence of unlikely large events. Extreme value theory was originally developed for time series of near-independent random variables, but in the last decade the theory has been extended to the setting of chaotic, deterministic dynamical systems. In the latter context one studies the distribution of large values in a time series generated by evaluating a scalar observable along evolutions of the system. We have studied the finite-time predictability of extreme values, such as convection, energy, and wind speeds, in three geophysical models. To that end we computed finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) which measure the exponential growth rate of nearby trajectories over a finite time. In general, FTLEs strongly depend on the initial condition. We study whether initial conditions leading to extremes typically have a larger or smaller FTLE. Our study clearly suggests that general statements about the predictability of extreme values are not possible: the predictability of extreme values depends on (1) the observable, (2) the attractor of the system, and (3) the prediction lead time.

  4. Personality Moderates the Interaction between Positive and Negative Daily Events Predicting Negative Affect and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Longua, Julie; DeHart, Tracy; Tennen, Howard; Armeli, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    A 30-day diary study examined personality moderators (neuroticism and extraversion) of the interaction between positive and negative daily events predicting daily negative affect and night-time stress. Multilevel analyses revealed positive daily events buffered the effect of negative daily events on negative affect for individuals low in neuroticism and individuals high in extraversion, but not for individuals high in neuroticism or individuals low in extraversion. Positive daily events also buffered the effect of negative daily events on that night’s stress, but only for participants low in neuroticism. As such, this research linked today’s events to tonight’s stressfulness. This study advances our understanding of how neuroticism and extraversion influence within-person associations between positive and negative events predicting negative affect and stress. PMID:20161239

  5. Values and uncertainties in climate prediction, revisited.

    PubMed

    Parker, Wendy

    2014-06-01

    Philosophers continue to debate both the actual and the ideal roles of values in science. Recently, Eric Winsberg has offered a novel, model-based challenge to those who argue that the internal workings of science can and should be kept free from the influence of social values. He contends that model-based assignments of probability to hypotheses about future climate change are unavoidably influenced by social values. I raise two objections to Winsberg's argument, neither of which can wholly undermine its conclusion but each of which suggests that his argument exaggerates the influence of social values on estimates of uncertainty in climate prediction. I then show how a more traditional challenge to the value-free ideal seems tailor-made for the climate context. PMID:25051868

  6. The preference of probability over negative values in action selection.

    PubMed

    Neyedli, Heather F; Welsh, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been found that when participants are presented with a pair of motor prospects, they can select the prospect with the largest maximum expected gain (MEG). Many of those decisions, however, were trivial because of large differences in MEG between the prospects. The purpose of the present study was to explore participants' preferences when making non-trivial decisions between two motor prospects. Participants were presented with pairs of prospects that: 1) differed in MEG with either only the values or only the probabilities differing between the prospects; and 2) had similar MEG with one prospect having a larger probability of hitting the target and a higher penalty value and the other prospect a smaller probability of hitting the target but a lower penalty value. In different experiments, participants either had 400 ms or 2000 ms to decide between the prospects. It was found that participants chose the configuration with the larger MEG more often when the probability varied between prospects than when the value varied. In pairs with similar MEGs, participants preferred a larger probability of hitting the target over a smaller penalty value. These results indicate that participants prefer probability information over negative value information in a motor selection task.

  7. The preference of probability over negative values in action selection.

    PubMed

    Neyedli, Heather F; Welsh, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been found that when participants are presented with a pair of motor prospects, they can select the prospect with the largest maximum expected gain (MEG). Many of those decisions, however, were trivial because of large differences in MEG between the prospects. The purpose of the present study was to explore participants' preferences when making non-trivial decisions between two motor prospects. Participants were presented with pairs of prospects that: 1) differed in MEG with either only the values or only the probabilities differing between the prospects; and 2) had similar MEG with one prospect having a larger probability of hitting the target and a higher penalty value and the other prospect a smaller probability of hitting the target but a lower penalty value. In different experiments, participants either had 400 ms or 2000 ms to decide between the prospects. It was found that participants chose the configuration with the larger MEG more often when the probability varied between prospects than when the value varied. In pairs with similar MEGs, participants preferred a larger probability of hitting the target over a smaller penalty value. These results indicate that participants prefer probability information over negative value information in a motor selection task. PMID:25004846

  8. Prospect theory does not describe the feedback-related negativity value function.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Thomas D; Roser, Matthew; Goslin, Jeremy

    2012-12-01

    Humans handle uncertainty poorly. Prospect theory accounts for this with a value function in which possible losses are overweighted compared to possible gains, and the marginal utility of rewards decreases with size. fMRI studies have explored the neural basis of this value function. A separate body of research claims that prediction errors are calculated by midbrain dopamine neurons. We investigated whether the prospect theoretic effects shown in behavioral and fMRI studies were present in midbrain prediction error coding by using the feedback-related negativity, an ERP component believed to reflect midbrain prediction errors. Participants' stated satisfaction with outcomes followed prospect theory but their feedback-related negativity did not, instead showing no effect of marginal utility and greater sensitivity to potential gains than losses.

  9. Let it be: Accepting negative emotional experiences predicts decreased negative affect and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Troy, Allison S.; Boland, Matthew; Mauss, Iris B.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies examined whether a tendency to accept negative emotional experiences buffers individuals from experiencing elevated negative affect during negative emotional situations (Study 1) and from developing depressive symptoms in the face of life stress (Study 2). Both studies examined female samples. This research expands on existing acceptance research in four ways. First, it examined whether acceptance has beneficial correlates when it matters most: in emotionally taxing (versus more neutral) contexts. Second, in Study 2 a prospective design was used in which acceptance was measured before stress was encountered and before outcomes were measured. Third, depressive symptoms (rather than general functioning or trauma symptoms) were examined as a particularly relevant outcome in the context of stress. Fourth, to enhance generalizability, a community sample (versus undergraduates or a purely clinical sample) was recruited. Results indicated that acceptance was correlated with decreased negative affect during a negative emotion induction but not an affectively neutral condition (Study 1). In Study 2, acceptance interacted with life stress such that acceptance predicted lower levels of depressive symptoms after higher, but not lower, life stress. These results suggest that accepting negative experiences may protect individuals from experiencing negative affect and from developing depressive symptoms. PMID:20566191

  10. The contact caveat: negative contact predicts increased prejudice more than positive contact predicts reduced prejudice.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Fiona Kate; Paolini, Stefania; Pedersen, Anne; Hornsey, Matthew J; Radke, Helena R M; Harwood, Jake; Rubin, Mark; Sibley, Chris G

    2012-12-01

    Contact researchers have largely overlooked the potential for negative intergroup contact to increase prejudice. In Study 1, we tested the interaction between contact quantity and valence on prejudice toward Black Australians (n = 1,476), Muslim Australians (n = 173), and asylum seekers (n = 293). In all cases, the association between contact quantity and prejudice was moderated by its valence, with negative contact emerging as a stronger and more consistent predictor than positive contact. In Study 2, White Americans (n = 441) indicated how much positive and negative contact they had with Black Americans on separate measures. Although both quantity of positive and negative contact predicted racism and avoidance, negative contact was the stronger predictor. Furthermore, negative (but not positive) contact independently predicted suspicion about Barack Obama's birthplace. These results extend the contact hypothesis by issuing an important caveat: Negative contact may be more strongly associated with increased racism and discrimination than positive contact is with its reduction.

  11. Emotion and hypervigilance: negative affect predicts increased P1 responses to non-negative pictorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schomberg, Jessica; Schöne, Benjamin; Gruber, Thomas; Quirin, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that negative affect influences attentional processes. Here, we investigate whether pre-experimental negative affect predicts a hypervigilant neural response as indicated by increased event-related potential amplitudes in response to neutral and positive visual stimuli. In our study, seventeen male participants filled out the German version of the positive and negative affect schedule (Watson et al. in J Pers Soc Psychol 54:1063-1070, 1988; Krohne et al. in Diagnostica 42:139-156, 1996) and subsequently watched positive (erotica, extreme sports, beautiful women) and neutral (daily activities) photographs while electroencephalogram was recorded. In line with our hypothesis, low state negative affect but not (reduced) positive affect predicted an increase in the first positive event-related potential amplitude P1 as a typical marker of increased selective attention. As this effect occurred in response to non-threatening picture conditions, negative affect may foster an individual's general hypervigilance, a state that has formerly been associated with psychopathology only. PMID:26749180

  12. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The predictive and prognostic value of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in non-small-cell lung carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and lymphoma is discussed. The degree of FDG uptake is of prognostic value at initial presentation, after induction treatment prior to resection and in the case of relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In locally advanced and advanced stages of NSCLC, FDG-PET has been shown to be predictive for clinical outcome at an early stage of treatment. In colorectal carcinoma, limited studies are available on the prognostic value of FDG-PET, however, the technique appears to have great potential in monitoring the success of local ablative therapies soon after intervention and in the prediction and evaluation of response to radiotherapy, systemic therapy, and combinations thereof. The prognostic value of end-of treatment FDG-PET for FDG-avid lymphomas has been established, and the next step is to define how to use this information to optimize patient outcome. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, FDG-PET has a high negative predictive value, however, histological confirmation of positive findings should be sought where possible. For non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the opposite applies. The newly published standardized guidelines for interpretation formulates specific criteria for visual interpretation and for defining PET positivity in the liver, spleen, lung, bone marrow and small residual lesions. The introduction of these guidelines should reduce variability among studies. Interim PET offers a reliable method for early prediction of long-term remission, however it should only be performed in prospective randomized controlled trials. Many of the diagnostic and management questions considered in this review are relevant to other tumour types. Further research in this field is of great importance, since it may lead to a change in the therapeutic concept of cancer. The preliminary findings call for systematic inclusion of FDG

  13. Impaired Neural Response to Negative Prediction Errors in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Konova, Anna B.; Proudfit, Greg H.; Dunning, Jonathan P.; Malaker, Pias; Moeller, Scott J.; Maloney, Tom; Alia-Klein, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Learning can be guided by unexpected success or failure, signaled via dopaminergic positive reward prediction error (+RPE) and negative reward-prediction error (−RPE) signals, respectively. Despite conflicting empirical evidence, RPE signaling is thought to be impaired in drug addiction. To resolve this outstanding question, we studied as a measure of RPE the feedback negativity (FN) that is sensitive to both reward and the violation of expectation. We examined FN in 25 healthy controls; 25 individuals with cocaine-use disorder (CUD) who tested positive for cocaine on the study day (CUD+), indicating cocaine use within the past 72 h; and in 25 individuals with CUD who tested negative for cocaine (CUD−). EEG was acquired while the participants performed a gambling task predicting whether they would win or lose money on each trial given three known win probabilities (25, 50, or 75%). FN was scored for the period in each trial when the actual outcome (win or loss) was revealed. A significant interaction between prediction, outcome, and group revealed that controls showed increased FN to unpredicted compared with predicted wins (i.e., intact +RPE) and decreased FN to unpredicted compared with predicted losses (i.e., intact −RPE). However, neither CUD subgroup showed FN modulation to loss (i.e., impaired −RPE), and unlike CUD+ individuals, CUD− individuals also did not show FN modulation to win (i.e., impaired +RPE). Thus, using FN, the current study directly documents −RPE deficits in CUD individuals. The mechanisms underlying −RPE signaling impairments in addiction may contribute to the disadvantageous nature of excessive drug use, which can persist despite repeated unfavorable life experiences (e.g., frequent incarcerations). PMID:25653348

  14. Impaired neural response to negative prediction errors in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Parvaz, Muhammad A; Konova, Anna B; Proudfit, Greg H; Dunning, Jonathan P; Malaker, Pias; Moeller, Scott J; Maloney, Tom; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2015-02-01

    Learning can be guided by unexpected success or failure, signaled via dopaminergic positive reward prediction error (+RPE) and negative reward-prediction error (-RPE) signals, respectively. Despite conflicting empirical evidence, RPE signaling is thought to be impaired in drug addiction. To resolve this outstanding question, we studied as a measure of RPE the feedback negativity (FN) that is sensitive to both reward and the violation of expectation. We examined FN in 25 healthy controls; 25 individuals with cocaine-use disorder (CUD) who tested positive for cocaine on the study day (CUD+), indicating cocaine use within the past 72 h; and in 25 individuals with CUD who tested negative for cocaine (CUD-). EEG was acquired while the participants performed a gambling task predicting whether they would win or lose money on each trial given three known win probabilities (25, 50, or 75%). FN was scored for the period in each trial when the actual outcome (win or loss) was revealed. A significant interaction between prediction, outcome, and group revealed that controls showed increased FN to unpredicted compared with predicted wins (i.e., intact +RPE) and decreased FN to unpredicted compared with predicted losses (i.e., intact -RPE). However, neither CUD subgroup showed FN modulation to loss (i.e., impaired -RPE), and unlike CUD+ individuals, CUD- individuals also did not show FN modulation to win (i.e., impaired +RPE). Thus, using FN, the current study directly documents -RPE deficits in CUD individuals. The mechanisms underlying -RPE signaling impairments in addiction may contribute to the disadvantageous nature of excessive drug use, which can persist despite repeated unfavorable life experiences (e.g., frequent incarcerations). PMID:25653348

  15. The feedback-related negativity signals salience prediction errors, not reward prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Talmi, Deborah; Atkinson, Ryan; El-Deredy, Wael

    2013-05-01

    Modulations of the feedback-related negativity (FRN) event-related potential (ERP) have been suggested as a potential biomarker in psychopathology. A dominant theory about this signal contends that it reflects the operation of the neural system underlying reinforcement learning in humans. The theory suggests that this frontocentral negative deflection in the ERP 230-270 ms after the delivery of a probabilistic reward expresses a prediction error signal derived from midbrain dopaminergic projections to the anterior cingulate cortex. We tested this theory by investigating whether FRN will also be observed for an inherently aversive outcome: physical pain. In another session, the outcome was monetary reward instead of pain. As predicted, unexpected reward omissions (a negative reward prediction error) yielded a more negative deflection relative to unexpected reward delivery. Surprisingly, unexpected pain omission (a positive reward prediction error) also yielded a negative deflection relative to unexpected pain delivery. Our data challenge the theory by showing that the FRN expresses aversive prediction errors with the same sign as reward prediction errors. Both FRNs were spatiotemporally and functionally equivalent. We suggest that FRN expresses salience prediction errors rather than reward prediction errors. PMID:23658166

  16. The feedback-related negativity signals salience prediction errors, not reward prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Talmi, Deborah; Atkinson, Ryan; El-Deredy, Wael

    2013-05-01

    Modulations of the feedback-related negativity (FRN) event-related potential (ERP) have been suggested as a potential biomarker in psychopathology. A dominant theory about this signal contends that it reflects the operation of the neural system underlying reinforcement learning in humans. The theory suggests that this frontocentral negative deflection in the ERP 230-270 ms after the delivery of a probabilistic reward expresses a prediction error signal derived from midbrain dopaminergic projections to the anterior cingulate cortex. We tested this theory by investigating whether FRN will also be observed for an inherently aversive outcome: physical pain. In another session, the outcome was monetary reward instead of pain. As predicted, unexpected reward omissions (a negative reward prediction error) yielded a more negative deflection relative to unexpected reward delivery. Surprisingly, unexpected pain omission (a positive reward prediction error) also yielded a negative deflection relative to unexpected pain delivery. Our data challenge the theory by showing that the FRN expresses aversive prediction errors with the same sign as reward prediction errors. Both FRNs were spatiotemporally and functionally equivalent. We suggest that FRN expresses salience prediction errors rather than reward prediction errors.

  17. Chasing probabilities - Signaling negative and positive prediction errors across domains.

    PubMed

    Meder, David; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Hulme, Oliver; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-07-01

    Adaptive actions build on internal probabilistic models of possible outcomes that are tuned according to the errors of their predictions when experiencing an actual outcome. Prediction errors (PEs) inform choice behavior across a diversity of outcome domains and dimensions, yet neuroimaging studies have so far only investigated such signals in singular experimental contexts. It is thus unclear whether the neuroanatomical distribution of PE encoding reported previously pertains to computational features that are invariant with respect to outcome valence, sensory domain, or some combination of the two. We acquired functional MRI data while volunteers performed four probabilistic reversal learning tasks which differed in terms of outcome valence (reward-seeking versus punishment-avoidance) and domain (abstract symbols versus facial expressions) of outcomes. We found that ventral striatum and frontopolar cortex coded increasingly positive PEs, whereas dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) traced increasingly negative PEs, irrespectively of the outcome dimension. Individual reversal behavior was unaffected by context manipulations and was predicted by activity in dACC and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). The stronger the response to negative PEs in these areas, the lower was the tendency to reverse choice behavior in response to negative events, suggesting that these regions enforce a rule-based strategy across outcome dimensions. Outcome valence influenced PE-related activity in left amygdala, IFG, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, where activity selectively scaled with increasingly positive PEs in the reward-seeking but not punishment-avoidance context, irrespective of sensory domain. Left amygdala displayed an additional influence of sensory domain. In the context of avoiding punishment, amygdala activity increased with increasingly negative PEs, but only for facial stimuli, indicating an integration of outcome valence and sensory domain during probabilistic

  18. Borderline personality disorder features predict negative outcomes 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Bagge, Courtney; Nickell, Angela; Stepp, Stephanie; Durrett, Christine; Jackson, Kristina; Trull, Timothy J

    2004-05-01

    In a sample of 351 young adults, the authors assessed whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) features prospectively predicted negative outcomes (poorer academic achievement and social maladjustment) over the subsequent 2 years, over and above gender and both Axis I and Axis II psychopathology. Borderline traits were significantly related to these outcomes, with impulsivity and affective instability the most highly associated. The present findings suggest that the impulsivity and affective instability associated with BPD leads to impairment in relating well with others, in meeting social role obligations, and in academic or occupational achievement. Therefore, these may be especially important features to target in interventions for BPD.

  19. Negative Correlation Learning for Customer Churn Prediction: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis. PMID:25879060

  20. Negative correlation learning for customer churn prediction: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Fayyoumi, Ayham; Faris, Hossam; Alsakran, Jamal; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis. PMID:25879060

  1. Negative correlation learning for customer churn prediction: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Fayyoumi, Ayham; Faris, Hossam; Alsakran, Jamal; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis.

  2. The value of PET/CT to assess clinically negative necks.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Enver; Naiboğlu, Barış; Meacham, Ryan; Ryoo, Cherie; Agrawal, Amit; Schuller, David E

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of [(18)F]-2-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in evaluating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to the cervical lymph nodes, with specific attention to the efficacy in regard to clinically negative necks. This was a retrospective review of 243 patients with HNSCC between years 2005 and 2007 treated at a comprehensive cancer care institution who underwent pre-operative PET/CT and neck dissection with either an N0 (112 patients) or N+ (131 patients) clinical nodal status. PET/CT findings were correlated with histopathological results of surgical specimens. A majority of the primary sites were oral cavity and oropharynx (70%), followed by larynx, unknown primary and hypopharynx. In the group of 112 patients who underwent 144 neck dissections with N0 nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive (NPV) and accuracy were 57, 82, 59, 80 and 74%, respectively. In the group of 131 patients who underwent 169 neck dissections with N+ nodal status, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 93, 70, 96, 58 and 91%, respectively. PET/CT has a much reduced rate of efficacy for the clinically negative neck compared to the clinically positive neck. PET/CT in its current stage does not appear to offer an advantage in staging the clinically N0 neck due to high rates of false positives and negatives.

  3. The devil is in the specificity: the negative effect of prediction specificity on prediction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Song-Oh; Suk, Kwanho; Goo, Jin Kyung; Lee, Jiheon; Lee, Seon Min

    2013-07-01

    In the research reported here, we proposed and demonstrated the prediction-specificity effect, which states that people's prediction of the general outcome of an event (e.g., the winner of a soccer match) is less accurate when the prediction question is framed in a more specific manner (e.g., guessing the score) rather than in a less specific manner (e.g., guessing the winner). We demonstrated this effect by examining people's predictions on actual sports games both in field and laboratory studies. In Study 1, the analysis of 19 billion bets from a commercial sports-betting business provided evidence for the effect of prediction specificity. This effect was replicated in three controlled laboratory studies, in which participants predicted the outcomes of a series of soccer matches. Furthermore, the negative effect of prediction specificity was mediated by participants' underweighting of important holistic information during decision making.

  4. Negative-Margin Criterion for Impact-Response Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Denton

    2006-01-01

    Some space missions require a nuclear-power source to generate electrical power to meet mission objectives. At present, the nuclear-power source is an assembly of modular heat sources called the general purpose heat source (GPHS) modules. Each module comprises graphite shells designed to protect iridium-alloy clads which serve as the primary containment shells for the radioactive, heat-producing material. In the course of launching the space vehicle to perform its mission the nuclear heat source may be exposed to severe accident environments. One particular environment is a primary impact event where individual GPHS modules impact hard surfaces at speeds in the range of 50 meters per second or more. Tests have shown that some clads may be breached in particularly severe impacts and release a small fraction of their contents. This paper presents an empirical model for predicting essential ingredients for assessing the risk associated with primary impact events. The ingredients include: clad failure probability, release fraction of clad contents, characterization of the released material in terms of particle-size distribution and a means to estimate uncertainty in the prediction process. The empirical model focuses on the deformation of the clads and their capability to withstand deformation without breaching, measured by ductility. The basic criterion used to estimate all ingredients is called ``negative margin''. The procedure for estimating risk factors entails calculation of clad distortion by, e.g. hydrocode simulation, and high-strain-rate ductility of the iridium alloy. Negative margin is a linear combination of distortion and ductility. Regression equations derived from test data are used to calculate the clad failure probability and the fractional activity release as functions of negative margin. The mass-based particle-size distribution is calculated as a function of release fraction. Cumulative uncertainty in this computing process is evaluated using

  5. Designing of discrete mechatronic vibrating systems with negative value parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchacz, Andrzej; Gałęziowski, Damian

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, the known problem of vibration control, authors expanded for designing of mechatronic discrete systems that contains single or multiply piezoelectric elements connected to external electric networks. Main focus has been given for investigations in relation to damping performance and parameters study, in case of potential practical application. By different configurations of considered mechatronic discrete branched structures with two degrees of freedom, key negative parameters have been identified and investigated in case of vibration control effectiveness. Results have been presented in graphical form of amplitudes and dynamical flexibility functions.

  6. Predictive values for procalcitonin in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Abdel Hakeem Abdel; Kamel, Bothina Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis followed by appropriate treatment decreases mortality and morbidity in infants. The aim of this study is to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Methods: We present a cross sectional study where 35 neonates with early onset sepsis (admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Units at El-Minia Children University Hospital from August 2012 to August 2013) were included in the study. Another 35 healthy neonates with no clinical or biological data of infection were included as a control group. Subjects were subjected to a thorough history taking and routine laboratory investigations. Serum PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Mean levels of PCT and CRP in neonates with sepsis were significantly higher than in the control group (p=0.0001). There was a moderate, but significant, positive correlation between PCT and C-reactive protein (p=0.001, r=0.55) and an insignificant correlation between procalcitonin and total leukocytic count among the neonates with sepsis (p=0.2, r=0.2). In addition, procalcitonin had high sensitivity, specificity, a high positive predictive value, and a high negative predictive value (80%, 85.7%, 84.8%, and 81.1% respectively). Procalcitonin showed higher sensitivity when compared to CRP. Conclusion: Procalcitonin is a sensitive, independent, and useful biomarker in comparison to CRP in early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. PMID:26396733

  7. Childhood negative emotionality predicts biobehavioral dysregulation fifteen years later.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Melissa J; Luecken, Linda J; Modecki, Kathryn L; Sandler, Irwin N; Wolchik, Sharlene A

    2016-09-01

    The temperamental trait of negative emotionality (NE) plays an important role in maladaptation among adults experiencing significant life stress. However, the prospective relation between childhood NE and subsequent interrelated behavioral, emotional, and biological dysregulation in later life has not yet been established among children who experience early adversity. Using a longitudinal sample of youth who experienced parental divorce during childhood (N = 160; 53% male; 83% White), we tested the hypothesis that childhood NE would predict physiological, emotional, and behavioral dysregulation 15 years later. NE was assessed by maternal report when youth were between 9 and 12 years old. Fifteen years later, young adults (mean age = 25.55 years) participated in a psychosocial stress task to assess cortisol reactivity and reported on internalizing symptoms and problematic alcohol use. Structural equation modeling revealed that higher childhood NE predicted significantly greater alcohol use, internalizing symptoms, and total cortisol output during a stress task 15 years later. Importantly, these findings held after adjusting for childhood internalizing symptoms. In addition, problematic alcohol use was associated with greater cortisol reactivity and internalizing symptoms. Findings suggest that childhood NE is a critical risk marker for interrelated forms of dysregulation in young adulthood among at-risk youth. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100364

  8. Evaluating the Predictive Value of Growth Prediction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Gaertner, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates four growth prediction models--projection, student growth percentile, trajectory, and transition table--commonly used to forecast (and give schools credit for) middle school students' future proficiency. Analyses focused on vertically scaled summative mathematics assessments, and two performance standards conditions (high…

  9. Human attitudes towards herpetofauna: The influence of folklore and negative values on the conservation of amphibians and reptiles in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human values and folklore of wildlife strongly influence the effectiveness of conservation efforts. These values and folklore may also vary with certain demographic characteristics such as gender, age, or education. Reptiles and amphibians are among the least appreciated of vertebrates and are victims of many negative values and wrong ideas resulting from the direct interpretation of folklore. We try to demonstrate how these values and folklore can affect the way people relate to them and also the possible conservation impacts on these animals. Methods A questionnaire survey distributed to 514 people in the district of Évora, Portugal, was used to obtain data regarding the hypothesis that the existence of wrong ideas and negative values contributes to the phenomenon of human-associated persecution of these animals. A structural equation model was specified in order to confirm the hypothesis about the possible relationships between the presence of perceptions and negative values about amphibians and reptiles and persecution and anti-conservation attitudes. Sociodemographic variables were also added. Results The results of the model suggest that the presence of folklore and negative values clearly predicts persecution and anti-conservation attitudes towards amphibians and reptiles. Also, the existence of folklore varies sociodemographically, but negative values concerning these animals are widespread in the population. Conclusions With the use of structural equation models, this work is a contribution to the study of how certain ideas and values can directly influence human attitudes towards herpetofauna and how they can be a serious conservation issue. PMID:22316318

  10. Negative emotion-driven impulsivity predicts substance dependence problems.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Bechara, Antoine; Recknor, Emily C; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2007-12-01

    Impulsivity is predominant among users of several drugs of abuse including alcohol, cocaine, and amphetamines, and it is considered a risk factor for later development of alcohol and substance abuse and dependence. However, there is little consensus on how impulsivity should be defined and measured, and there are few studies on the relationship between separate dimensions of impulsivity and substance dependence. We used a multidimensional measure of impulsivity (the UPPS scale) to examine differences between 36 individuals with substance dependence (ISD) and 36 drug-free controls on the dimensions of urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. In addition, we examined which dimensions of impulsivity better predicted addiction-related problems as measured with the addiction severity index. Results revealed that ISD show high scores on dimensions of urgency, lack of perseverance, and lack of premeditation (effect sizes ranging from 1.10 to 1.96), but not on sensation seeking. Among the different impulsivity dimensions, urgency was the best predictor of severity of medical, employment, alcohol, drug, family/social, legal and psychiatric problems in ISD, explaining 13-48% of the total variance of these indices. Furthermore, urgency scores alone correctly classified 83% of the participants in the ISD group. Urgency is characterized by a tendency to act impulsively in response to negative emotional states. Thus, our results could have important implications for novel treatment approaches for substance dependence focused on emotional regulation. PMID:17629632

  11. Predicting Response to Depression Treatment: The Role of Negative Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Wells, Tony T.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2007-01-01

    Repeated experiences with major depressive disorder (MDD) may strengthen associations between negative thinking and dysphoria, rendering negative cognition more accessible and pronounced with each episode. According to cognitive theory, greater negative cognition should lead to a more protracted episode of depression. In this study of 121 adults…

  12. Negative HPV screening test predicts low cervical cancer risk better than negative Pap test

    Cancer.gov

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, investigators at NCI have determined that a negative test for HPV infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer.

  13. Predictive value of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal swab PCR assay for MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Benjamin; Chung, Andrew; Webb, Brandon; Seville, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with poor outcomes and frequently merits empirical antibiotic consideration despite its relatively low incidence. Nasal colonization with MRSA is associated with clinical MRSA infection and can be reliably detected using the nasal swab PCR assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the nasal swab MRSA PCR in predicting MRSA pneumonia. A retrospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary care center from January 2009 to July 2011. All patients with confirmed pneumonia who had both a nasal swab MRSA PCR test and a bacterial culture within predefined time intervals were included in the study. These data were used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for clinically confirmed MRSA pneumonia. Four hundred thirty-five patients met inclusion criteria. The majority of cases were classified as either health care-associated (HCAP) (54.7%) or community-acquired (CAP) (34%) pneumonia. MRSA nasal PCR was positive in 62 (14.3%) cases. MRSA pneumonia was confirmed by culture in 25 (5.7%) cases. The MRSA PCR assay demonstrated 88.0% sensitivity and 90.1% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 35.4% and a negative predictive value of 99.2%. In patients with pneumonia, the MRSA PCR nasal swab has a poor positive predictive value but an excellent negative predictive value for MRSA pneumonia in populations with low MRSA pneumonia incidence. In cases of culture-negative pneumonia where initial empirical antibiotics include an MRSA-active agent, a negative MRSA PCR swab can be reasonably used to guide antibiotic de-escalation.

  14. Perceptual Negativity Predicts Greater Reactivity to Negative Events in Daily Life.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Liu, Tianwei

    2013-11-01

    Reinforcement sensitivity theory includes the idea that people differ in their sensitivity to negative events, but relevant process-based assessments have not been developed. The present studies assessed sensitivity to negative events in terms of the extent to which negative word stimuli were perceived to be larger than neutral word stimuli. There was a general tendency to overestimate the size of negative relative to neutral words, but individuals differed substantially in this form of what is termed perceptual negativity. Of more importance, two studies (total N = 151) found systematic relationships between individual differences in perceptual negativity and reactivity to negative events in daily diary protocols. Study 1 found that within-person variations in the occurrence of daily negative events undermined goal-related optimism to a greater extent at higher, relative to lower, levels of perceptual negativity. Study 2 conceptually replicated this interaction in the context of within-person associations between the occurrence of daily negative events and antisocial behavior. These findings are important in advancing reinforcement sensitivity theory, in operationalizing a particular component of it, and in extending it to reactivity processes in daily life.

  15. Perceptual Negativity Predicts Greater Reactivity to Negative Events in Daily Life.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Liu, Tianwei

    2013-11-01

    Reinforcement sensitivity theory includes the idea that people differ in their sensitivity to negative events, but relevant process-based assessments have not been developed. The present studies assessed sensitivity to negative events in terms of the extent to which negative word stimuli were perceived to be larger than neutral word stimuli. There was a general tendency to overestimate the size of negative relative to neutral words, but individuals differed substantially in this form of what is termed perceptual negativity. Of more importance, two studies (total N = 151) found systematic relationships between individual differences in perceptual negativity and reactivity to negative events in daily diary protocols. Study 1 found that within-person variations in the occurrence of daily negative events undermined goal-related optimism to a greater extent at higher, relative to lower, levels of perceptual negativity. Study 2 conceptually replicated this interaction in the context of within-person associations between the occurrence of daily negative events and antisocial behavior. These findings are important in advancing reinforcement sensitivity theory, in operationalizing a particular component of it, and in extending it to reactivity processes in daily life. PMID:24163492

  16. Predictive value of superficial cultures to anticipate tunneled hemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Bouza, Emilio; Rojas, Loreto; Guembe, María; Marín, Mercedes; Anaya, Fernando; Luño, José; López, Juan M; Muñoz, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with tunneled catheters to assess the validity of Gram stain and superficial culture for anticipating catheter exit-site infection and hemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infection. The sensitivity and negative predictive value were high, and we succeeded in identifying a subpopulation at low risk of infection.

  17. Prior probability (the pretest best guess) affects predictive values of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Erb, Hollis N

    2011-06-01

    Authors who publish evaluations of dichotomous (yes/no) diagnostic tests often include the predictive values of their test at a single prior probability (eg, the prevalence of the target disease within the evaluation data set). The objectives of this technical note are to demonstrate why single-probability predictive values are misleading and to show a better way to display positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for a newly evaluated test. Secondly, this technical note will show readers how to calculate predictive values from only sensitivity and specificity for any desired prior probability. As prior probability increases from 0% to 100%, PPV increases from 0% to 100%, but NPV goes in the opposite direction (drops from 100% to 0%). Because prior probabilities vary so greatly across situations, predictive values should be provided in publications for the full range of potential prior probabilities (if provided at all). This is easily done with a 2-curve graph displaying the predictive values (y-axis) against the prior probability (x-axis).

  18. Mechanism of negative thermal expansion in LaC2 from first-principles prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaming; Jia, Yu; Sun, Qiang; Liang, Erjun

    2015-01-01

    Based on density functional theory and quasiharmonic approximation, the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) and negative thermal expansion (NTE) mechanism of tetragonal LaC2 are studied. Numerical results show that there is an obvious NTE parallel to c-axis, and the CTE is approximately αc = - 1.67 ×10-6K-1, which coincides with the experimental data - 1.0 ×10-6K-1. In particular, a tiny NTE phenomenon along a-axis below 10 K has been predicted. The vibrational modes Eu and Eg at Γ (0 , 0 , 0), and other three modes at M (0.5 , 0.5 , 0) and Z (0 , 0 , 0.5), give rise to negative Grüneisen parameters and therefore contribute to the NTE along a- and c-axis. Additionally, the bulk CTE was calculated to be positive, our CTE values and temperature intervals agree well with the presented experiments.

  19. Positive and negative emotional contexts unevenly predict episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Galindo, Joyce Graciela; Cansino, Selene

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the recognition of faces with neutral expressions differs when they are encoded under different emotional contexts (positive, negative or non-emotional). The effects of the emotional valence context on the subsequent memory effect (SME) and the autonomic responses were also examined. Twenty-eight participants performed a betting-game task in which the faces of their virtual opponents were presented in each trial. The probability of winning or losing was manipulated to generate positive or negative contexts, respectively. Additionally, the participants performed the same task without betting as a non-emotional condition. After the encoding phase, an old/new paradigm was performed for the faces of the virtual opponents. The recognition was superior for the faces encoded in the positive contexts than for the faces encoded in the non-emotional contexts. The skin conductance response amplitude was equivalent for both of the emotional contexts. The N170 and P300 components at occipital sites and the frontal slow wave manifested SMEs that were modulated by positive contexts; neither negative nor non-emotional contexts influenced these effects. The behavioral and neurophysiological data demonstrated that positive contexts are stronger predictors of episodic memory than negative or non-emotional contexts. PMID:26003944

  20. It's worse than you thought: the feedback negativity and violations of reward prediction in gambling tasks.

    PubMed

    Hajcak, Greg; Moser, Jason S; Holroyd, Clay B; Simons, Robert F

    2007-11-01

    The reinforcement learning theory suggests that the feedback negativity should be larger when feedback is unexpected. Two recent studies found, however, that the feedback negativity was unaffected by outcome probability. To further examine this issue, participants in the present studies made reward predictions on each trial of a gambling task where objective reward probability was indicated by a cue. In Study 1, participants made reward predictions following the cue, but prior to their gambling choice; in Study 2, predictions were made following their gambling choice. Predicted and unpredicted outcomes were associated with equivalent feedback negativities in Study 1. In Study 2, however, the feedback negativity was larger for unpredicted outcomes. These data suggest that the magnitude of the feedback negativity is sensitive to violations of reward prediction, but that this effect may depend on the close coupling of prediction and outcome.

  1. When bad moods may not be so bad: Valuing negative affect is associated with weakened affect-health links.

    PubMed

    Luong, Gloria; Wrzus, Cornelia; Wagner, Gert G; Riediger, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Bad moods are considered "bad" not only because they may be aversive experiences in and of themselves, but also because they are associated with poorer psychosocial functioning and health. We propose that people differ in their negative affect valuation (NAV; the extent to which negative affective states are valued as pleasant, useful/helpful, appropriate, and meaningful experiences) and that affect-health links are moderated by NAV. These predictions were tested in a life span sample of 365 participants ranging from 14-88 years of age using reports of momentary negative affect and physical well-being (via experience sampling) and assessments of NAV and psychosocial and physical functioning (via computer-assisted personal interviews and behavioral measures of hand grip strength). Our study demonstrated that the more individuals valued negative affect, the less pronounced (and sometimes even nonexistent) were the associations between everyday experiences of negative affect and a variety of indicators of poorer psychosocial functioning (i.e., emotional health problems, social integration) and physical health (i.e., number of health conditions, health complaints, hand grip strength, momentary physical well-being). Exploratory analyses revealed that valuing positive affect was not associated with the analogous moderating effects as NAV. These findings suggest that it may be particularly important to consider NAV in models of affect-health links.

  2. A weighted generalized score statistic for comparison of predictive values of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Andrzej S

    2013-03-15

    Positive and negative predictive values are important measures of a medical diagnostic test performance. We consider testing equality of two positive or two negative predictive values within a paired design in which all patients receive two diagnostic tests. The existing statistical tests for testing equality of predictive values are either Wald tests based on the multinomial distribution or the empirical Wald and generalized score tests within the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework. As presented in the literature, these test statistics have considerably complex formulas without clear intuitive insight. We propose their re-formulations that are mathematically equivalent but algebraically simple and intuitive. As is clearly seen with a new re-formulation we presented, the generalized score statistic does not always reduce to the commonly used score statistic in the independent samples case. To alleviate this, we introduce a weighted generalized score (WGS) test statistic that incorporates empirical covariance matrix with newly proposed weights. This statistic is simple to compute, always reduces to the score statistic in the independent samples situation, and preserves type I error better than the other statistics as demonstrated by simulations. Thus, we believe that the proposed WGS statistic is the preferred statistic for testing equality of two predictive values and for corresponding sample size computations. The new formulas of the Wald statistics may be useful for easy computation of confidence intervals for difference of predictive values. The introduced concepts have potential to lead to development of the WGS test statistic in a general GEE setting.

  3. Trustworthiness and Negative Affect Predict Economic Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christopher M; Koenigs, Michael; Yamada, Torricia H; Teo, Shu Hao; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Tranel, Daniel; Denburg, Natalie L

    2011-09-01

    The Ultimatum Game (UG) is a widely used and well-studied laboratory model of economic decision-making. Here, we studied 129 healthy adults and compared demographic (i.e., age, gender, education), cognitive (i.e., intelligence, attention/working memory, speed, language, visuospatial, memory, executive functions), and personality (i.e., "Big Five", positive affect, negative affect) variables between those with a "rational" versus an "irrational" response pattern on the UG. Our data indicated that participants with "rational" UG performance (accepting any offer, no matter the fairness) endorsed higher levels of trust, or the belief in the sincerity and good intentions of others, while participants with "irrational" UG performance (rejecting unfair offers) endorsed higher levels of negative affect, such as anger and contempt. These personality variables were the only ones that differentiated the two response patterns-demographic and cognitive factors did not differ between rational and irrational players. The results indicate that the examination of personality and affect is crucial to our understanding of the individual differences that underlie decision-making.

  4. Trustworthiness and Negative Affect Predict Economic Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Christopher M.; Koenigs, Michael; Yamada, Torricia H.; Teo, Shu Hao; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Tranel, Daniel; Denburg, Natalie L.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultimatum Game (UG) is a widely used and well-studied laboratory model of economic decision-making. Here, we studied 129 healthy adults and compared demographic (i.e., age, gender, education), cognitive (i.e., intelligence, attention/working memory, speed, language, visuospatial, memory, executive functions), and personality (i.e., “Big Five”, positive affect, negative affect) variables between those with a “rational” versus an “irrational” response pattern on the UG. Our data indicated that participants with “rational” UG performance (accepting any offer, no matter the fairness) endorsed higher levels of trust, or the belief in the sincerity and good intentions of others, while participants with “irrational” UG performance (rejecting unfair offers) endorsed higher levels of negative affect, such as anger and contempt. These personality variables were the only ones that differentiated the two response patterns—demographic and cognitive factors did not differ between rational and irrational players. The results indicate that the examination of personality and affect is crucial to our understanding of the individual differences that underlie decision-making. PMID:23493494

  5. Value Preferences Predicting Narcissistic Personality Traits in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gungor, Ibrahim Halil; Eksi, Halil; Aricak, Osman Tolga

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at showing how the value preferences of young adults could predict the narcissistic characteristics of young adults according to structural equation modeling. 133 female (59.6%) and 90 male (40.4%), total 223 young adults participated the study (average age: 25.66, ranging from 20 to 38). Ratio group sampling method was used while…

  6. Observed Measures of Negative Parenting Predict Brain Development during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Sarah; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Dennison, Meg; Schwartz, Orli; Simmons, Julian G.; Sheeber, Lisa; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2016-01-01

    Limited attention has been directed toward the influence of non-abusive parenting behaviour on brain structure in adolescents. It has been suggested that environmental influences during this period are likely to impact the way that the brain develops over time. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between aggressive and positive parenting behaviors on brain development from early to late adolescence, and in turn, psychological and academic functioning during late adolescence, using a multi-wave longitudinal design. Three hundred and sixty seven magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained over three time points from 166 adolescents (11–20 years). At the first time point, observed measures of maternal aggressive and positive behaviors were obtained. At the final time point, measures of psychological and academic functioning were obtained. Results indicated that a higher frequency of maternal aggressive behavior was associated with alterations in the development of right superior frontal and lateral parietal cortical thickness, and of nucleus accumbens volume, in males. Development of the superior frontal cortex in males mediated the relationship between maternal aggressive behaviour and measures of late adolescent functioning. We suggest that our results support an association between negative parenting and adolescent functioning, which may be mediated by immature or delayed brain maturation. PMID:26824348

  7. Observed Measures of Negative Parenting Predict Brain Development during Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Sarah; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Dennison, Meg; Schwartz, Orli; Simmons, Julian G; Sheeber, Lisa; Allen, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Limited attention has been directed toward the influence of non-abusive parenting behaviour on brain structure in adolescents. It has been suggested that environmental influences during this period are likely to impact the way that the brain develops over time. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between aggressive and positive parenting behaviors on brain development from early to late adolescence, and in turn, psychological and academic functioning during late adolescence, using a multi-wave longitudinal design. Three hundred and sixty seven magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained over three time points from 166 adolescents (11-20 years). At the first time point, observed measures of maternal aggressive and positive behaviors were obtained. At the final time point, measures of psychological and academic functioning were obtained. Results indicated that a higher frequency of maternal aggressive behavior was associated with alterations in the development of right superior frontal and lateral parietal cortical thickness, and of nucleus accumbens volume, in males. Development of the superior frontal cortex in males mediated the relationship between maternal aggressive behaviour and measures of late adolescent functioning. We suggest that our results support an association between negative parenting and adolescent functioning, which may be mediated by immature or delayed brain maturation. PMID:26824348

  8. Do Negative 124I Pretherapy Positron Emission Tomography Scans in Patients with Elevated Serum Thyroglobulin Levels Predict Negative 131I Posttherapy Scans?

    PubMed Central

    Khorjekar, Gauri R.; Garcia, Carlos; O'Neil, Jeffrey; Moreau, Shari; Atkins, Francis B.; Mete, Mihriye; Orquiza, Michael H.; Burman, Kenneth; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    planar scan, and a prior post-131I therapy scan that was positive, a negative 124I PET scan will have a low predictive value for a negative post-131I therapy scan and should not be used to exclude the option of blind 131I therapy. PMID:24820222

  9. Prediction of mortality rates in the presence of missing values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chon Sern; Pooi, Ah Hin

    2015-12-01

    A time series model based on multivariate power-normal distribution has been applied in the past literature on the United States (US) mortality data from the years 1933 to 2000 to forecast the future age-specific mortality rates of the years 2001 to 2010. In this paper, we show that the method based on multivariate power-normal distribution can still be used for an incomplete US mortality dataset that contains some missing values. The prediction intervals based on this incomplete training data are found to still have good ability of covering the observed future mortality rates although the interval lengths may become wider for long-range prediction.

  10. Initial value predictability of intrinsic oceanic modes and implications for decadal prediction over North America

    SciTech Connect

    Branstator, Grant

    2014-12-09

    The overall aim of our project was to quantify and characterize predictability of the climate as it pertains to decadal time scale predictions. By predictability we mean the degree to which a climate forecast can be distinguished from the climate that exists at initial forecast time, taking into consideration the growth of uncertainty that occurs as a result of the climate system being chaotic. In our project we were especially interested in predictability that arises from initializing forecasts from some specific state though we also contrast this predictability with predictability arising from forecasting the reaction of the system to external forcing – for example changes in greenhouse gas concentration. Also, we put special emphasis on the predictability of prominent intrinsic patterns of the system because they often dominate system behavior. Highlights from this work include: • Development of novel methods for estimating the predictability of climate forecast models. • Quantification of the initial value predictability limits of ocean heat content and the overturning circulation in the Atlantic as they are represented in various state of the art climate models. These limits varied substantially from model to model but on average were about a decade with North Atlantic heat content tending to be more predictable than North Pacific heat content. • Comparison of predictability resulting from knowledge of the current state of the climate system with predictability resulting from estimates of how the climate system will react to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations. It turned out that knowledge of the initial state produces a larger impact on forecasts for the first 5 to 10 years of projections. • Estimation of the predictability of dominant patterns of ocean variability including well-known patterns of variability in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. For the most part these patterns were predictable for 5 to 10 years. • Determination of

  11. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: The Value of Publishing Negative Scientific Study Data.

    PubMed

    Boorman, Gary A; Foster, John R; Laast, Victoria A; Francke, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Historically it has been easier to publish positive scientific results than negative data not supporting the research hypothesis. This appears to be increasing, with fewer negative studies appearing in the literature across many disciplines. Failure to recognize the value of negative results has important implications for the toxicology community. Implications include perpetuating scientific fields based upon selective or occasionally erroneous, positive results. One example is decreased vaccination rates and increased measles infections that can lead to childhood mortality following one erroneous positive study linking vaccination to adverse effects despite multiple negative studies. Publication of negative data that challenges existing paradigms enhances progress by stopping further investment in scientifically barren topics, decreases the use of animals, and focuses research in more fruitful areas. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) publishes both positive and negative rodent data. Retrospective analysis of the NTP database has provided insights on the carcinogenic process and in the gradual acceptance of using fewer animals in safety studies. This article proposes that careful publication of both positive and negative data can enhance product safety assessment, add robustness to safety determinations in the regulatory decision-making process, and should be actively encouraged by those determining journal editorial policy. PMID:26269614

  12. Regulatory Forum Opinion Piece*: The Value of Publishing Negative Scientific Study Data.

    PubMed

    Boorman, Gary A; Foster, John R; Laast, Victoria A; Francke, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Historically it has been easier to publish positive scientific results than negative data not supporting the research hypothesis. This appears to be increasing, with fewer negative studies appearing in the literature across many disciplines. Failure to recognize the value of negative results has important implications for the toxicology community. Implications include perpetuating scientific fields based upon selective or occasionally erroneous, positive results. One example is decreased vaccination rates and increased measles infections that can lead to childhood mortality following one erroneous positive study linking vaccination to adverse effects despite multiple negative studies. Publication of negative data that challenges existing paradigms enhances progress by stopping further investment in scientifically barren topics, decreases the use of animals, and focuses research in more fruitful areas. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) publishes both positive and negative rodent data. Retrospective analysis of the NTP database has provided insights on the carcinogenic process and in the gradual acceptance of using fewer animals in safety studies. This article proposes that careful publication of both positive and negative data can enhance product safety assessment, add robustness to safety determinations in the regulatory decision-making process, and should be actively encouraged by those determining journal editorial policy.

  13. Inducing negative affect increases the reward value of appetizing foods in dieters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Dylan D; Boswell, Rebecca G; Kelley, William M; Heatherton, Todd F

    2012-07-01

    Experiencing negative affect frequently precedes lapses in self-control for dieters, smokers, and drug addicts. Laboratory research has similarly shown that inducing negative emotional distress increases the consumption of food or drugs. One hypothesis for this finding is that emotional distress sensitizes the brain's reward system to appetitive stimuli. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that inducing negative affect in chronic dieters increases activity in brain regions representing the reward value of appetitive stimuli when viewing appetizing food cues. Thirty female chronic dieters were randomly assigned to receive either a negative (n = 15) or neutral mood induction (n = 15) immediately followed by exposure to images of appetizing foods and natural scenes during fMRI. Compared with chronic dieters in a neutral mood, those receiving a negative mood induction showed increased activity in the OFC to appetizing food images. In addition, activity to food images in the OFC and ventral striatum was correlated with individual differences in the degree to which the negative mood induction decreased participants' self-esteem. These findings suggest that distress sensitizes the brain's reward system to appetitive cues, thereby offering a mechanism for the oft-observed relationship between negative affect and disinhibited eating.

  14. Inducing Negative Affect Increases the Reward Value of Appetizing Foods in Dieters

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dylan D.; Boswell, Rebecca G.; Kelley, William M.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2013-01-01

    Experiencing negative affect frequently precedes lapses in self-control for dieters, smokers, and drug addicts. Laboratory research has similarly shown that inducing negative emotional distress increases the consumption of food or drugs. One hypothesis for this finding is that emotional distress sensitizes the brain’s reward system to appetitive stimuli. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that inducing negative affect in chronic dieters increases activity in brain regions representing the reward value of appetitive stimuli when viewing appetizing food cues. Thirty female chronic dieters were randomly assigned to receive either a negative (n = 15) or neutral mood induction (n = 15) immediately followed by exposure to images of appetizing foods and natural scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Compared to chronic dieters in a neutral mood, those receiving a negative mood induction showed increased activity in the orbitofrontal cortex to appetizing food images. In addition, activity to food images in the orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum was correlated with individual differences in the degree to which the negative mood induction decreased participants’ self-esteem. These findings suggest that distress sensitizes the brain’s reward system to appetitive cues thereby offering a mechanism for the oft-observed relationship between negative affect and disinhibited eating. PMID:22524295

  15. Prediction of metabolisable energy value of broiler diets and water excretion from dietary chemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Carré, B; Lessire, M; Juin, H

    2013-08-01

    Thirty various pelleted diets were given to broilers (8/diet) for in vivo measurements of dietary metabolisable energy (ME) value and digestibilities of proteins, lipids, starch and sugars from day 27 to day 31, with ad libitum feeding and total collection of excreta. Water excretion was also measured. Amino acid formulation of diets was done on the basis of ratios to crude proteins. Mean in vivo apparent ME values corrected to zero nitrogen retention (AMEn) were always lower than the AMEn values calculated for adult cockerels using predicting equations from literature based on the chemical analyses of diets. The difference between mean in vivo AMEn values and these calculated AMEn values increased linearly with increasing amount of wheat in diets (P = 0.0001). Mean digestibilities of proteins, lipids and starch were negatively related to wheat introduction (P = 0.0001). The correlations between mean in vivo AMEn values and diet analytical parameters were the highest with fibre-related parameters, such as water-insoluble cell-walls (WICW) (r = -0.91) or Real Applied Viscosity (RAV) (r = -0.77). Thirteen multiple regression equations relating mean in vivo AMEn values to dietary analytical data were calculated, with R² values ranging from 0.859 to 0.966 (P = 0.0001). The highest R² values were obtained when the RAV parameter was included in independent variables. The direct regression equations obtained with available components (proteins, lipids, starch, sucrose and oligosaccharides) and the indirect regression equations obtained with WICW and ash parameters showed similar R² values. Direct or indirect theoretical equations predicting AMEn values were established using the overall mean in vivo digestibility values. The principle of indirect equations was based on the assumption that WICW and ashes act as diluters. Addition of RAV or wheat content in variables improved the accuracy of theoretical equations. Efficiencies of theoretical equations for predicting AMEn

  16. Trait Reappraisal Predicts Affective Reactivity to Daily Positive and Negative Events

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Gul; Selcuk, Emre; Ong, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    Past research on emotion regulation has provided evidence that cognitive reappraisal predicts reactivity to affective stimuli and challenge tests in laboratory settings. However, little is known about how trait reappraisal might contribute to affective reactivity to everyday positive and negative events. Using a large, life-span sample of adults (N = 1755), the present study addressed this important gap in the literature. Respondents completed a measure of trait reappraisal and reported on their daily experiences of positive and negative events and positive and negative affect for eight consecutive days. Results showed that trait reappraisal predicted lower increases in negative affect in response to daily negative events and lower increases in positive affect in response to daily positive events. These findings advance our understanding of the role of reappraisal in emotion regulation by showing how individual differences in the use of this strategy relate to emotional reactions to both positive and negative events outside the laboratory. PMID:27445954

  17. The Role of Age, Family Support, and Negative Cognitions in the Prediction of Depressive Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrander, Rick; Weinfurt, Kevin P.; Nay, W. Robert

    1998-01-01

    Study examines developmental changes in the relationship between negative cognitions and stressful family characteristics in the prediction of depression in young people. Hierarchical regression analysis demonstrates significant 3-way interaction between age, negative cognitions, and family unsupportiveness. Discusses results as they relate to…

  18. Predictive value of middle cerebral artery to uterine artery pulsatility index ratio in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Prashanth; Kantharaja, Indumathi; Hebbar, Shripad; Rai, Lavanya; Guruvare, Shyamala; Mundkur, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. (i) To determine the predictive value of cerebrouterine (CU) ratio (middle cerebral artery to uterine artery pulsatility index, MCA/UT PI) in assessing perinatal outcome among hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. (ii) To compare between CU ratio and CP ratio (MCA/Umbilical artery PI) as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcome. Methods. A prospective observational study was done in a tertiary medical college hospital, from September 2012 to August 2013. One hundred singleton pregnancies complicated by hypertension peculiar to pregnancy were enrolled. Both CU and CP ratios were estimated. The perinatal outcomes were studied. Results. Both cerebrouterine and cerebroplacental ratios had a better negative predictive value in predicting adverse perinatal outcome. However, both CU and CP ratios when applied together were able to predict adverse outcomes better than individual ratios. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and the negative predictive values for an adverse neonatal outcome with CU ratio were 61.3%, 70.3%, 56%, and 78.9%, respectively, compared to 42%, 57.5%, 62%, and 76% as with CP ratio. Conclusion. Cerebrouterine ratio and cerebroplacental ratio were complementary to each other in predicting the adverse perinatal outcomes. Individually, both ratios were reassuring for favorable perinatal outcome with high negative predictive value.

  19. Suboptimal Choice in Pigeons: Stimulus Value Predicts Choice over Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron P; Bailey, Alexandria R; Chow, Jonathan J; Beckmann, Joshua S; Zentall, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Pigeons have shown suboptimal gambling-like behavior when preferring a stimulus that infrequently signals reliable reinforcement over alternatives that provide greater reinforcement overall. As a mechanism for this behavior, recent research proposed that the stimulus value of alternatives with more reliable signals for reinforcement will be preferred relatively independently of their frequencies. The present study tested this hypothesis using a simplified design of a Discriminative alternative that, 50% of the time, led to either a signal for 100% reinforcement or a blackout period indicative of 0% reinforcement against a Nondiscriminative alternative that always led to a signal that predicted 50% reinforcement. Pigeons showed a strong preference for the Discriminative alternative that remained despite reducing the frequency of the signal for reinforcement in subsequent phases to 25% and then 12.5%. In Experiment 2, using the original design of Experiment 1, the stimulus following choice of the Nondiscriminative alternative was increased to 75% and then to 100%. Results showed that preference for the Discriminative alternative decreased only when the signals for reinforcement for the two alternatives predicted the same probability of reinforcement. The ability of several models to predict this behavior are discussed, but the terminal link stimulus value offers the most parsimonious account of this suboptimal behavior. PMID:27441394

  20. Suboptimal Choice in Pigeons: Stimulus Value Predicts Choice over Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexandria R.; Chow, Jonathan J.; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Zentall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Pigeons have shown suboptimal gambling-like behavior when preferring a stimulus that infrequently signals reliable reinforcement over alternatives that provide greater reinforcement overall. As a mechanism for this behavior, recent research proposed that the stimulus value of alternatives with more reliable signals for reinforcement will be preferred relatively independently of their frequencies. The present study tested this hypothesis using a simplified design of a Discriminative alternative that, 50% of the time, led to either a signal for 100% reinforcement or a blackout period indicative of 0% reinforcement against a Nondiscriminative alternative that always led to a signal that predicted 50% reinforcement. Pigeons showed a strong preference for the Discriminative alternative that remained despite reducing the frequency of the signal for reinforcement in subsequent phases to 25% and then 12.5%. In Experiment 2, using the original design of Experiment 1, the stimulus following choice of the Nondiscriminative alternative was increased to 75% and then to 100%. Results showed that preference for the Discriminative alternative decreased only when the signals for reinforcement for the two alternatives predicted the same probability of reinforcement. The ability of several models to predict this behavior are discussed, but the terminal link stimulus value offers the most parsimonious account of this suboptimal behavior. PMID:27441394

  1. Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype predicts greater aggression through impulsive reactivity to negative affect.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan; Derefinko, Karen J; Estus, Steven; Peters, Jessica R; Lynam, Donald R; Jiang, Yang

    2015-04-15

    Low functioning MAOA genotypes have been reliably linked to increased reactive aggression, yet the psychological mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. The low functioning MAOA genotype's established link to diminished inhibition and greater reactivity to conditions of negative affect suggest that negative urgency, the tendency to act impulsively in the context of negative affect, may fill this mediating role. Such MAOA carriers may have higher negative urgency, which may in turn predict greater aggressive responses to provocation. To test these hypotheses, 277 female and male participants were genotyped for an MAOA SNP yet to be linked to aggression (rs1465108), and then reported their negative urgency and past aggressive behavior. We replicated the effect of the low functioning MAOA genotype on heightened aggression, which was mediated by greater negative urgency. These results suggest that disrupted serotonergic systems predispose individuals towards aggressive behavior by increasing impulsive reactivity to negative affect. PMID:25637908

  2. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) Genotype Predicts Greater Aggression Through Impulsive Reactivity to Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Chester, David S.; DeWall, C. Nathan; Derefinko, Karen J.; Estus, Steven; Peters, Jessica R.; Lynam, Donald R.; Jiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Low functioning MAOA genotypes have been reliably linked to increased reactive aggression, yet the psychological mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. The low functioning MAOA genotype’s established link to diminished inhibition and greater reactivity to conditions of negative affect suggest that negative urgency, the tendency to act impulsively in the context of negative affect, may fill this mediating role. Such MAOA carriers may have higher negative urgency, which may in turn predict greater aggressive responses to provocation. To test these hypotheses, 277 female and male participants were genotyped for an MAOA SNP yet to be linked to aggression (rs1465108), and then reported their negative urgency and past aggressive behavior. We replicated the effect of the low functioning MAOA genotype on heightened aggression, which was mediated by greater negative urgency. These results suggest that disrupted serotonergic systems predispose individuals towards aggressive behavior by increasing impulsive reactivity to negative affect. PMID:25637908

  3. [NIRS for Predicting Nutritive Value of Elymus sibiricus].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Bai, Shi-qie; Yan, Jia-jun; Hu, Chao; Li, Da-xu; You, Ming-hong; Zhang, Yu; Dao, Zhi-xue; Zhang, Chang-bing; Gan, You-min

    2015-08-01

    Siberian wildrye (Elymus sibiricus L.) is one of the predominant pasture species in Qinghai-Tibet plateau of China. It supplies a large number of fodders to domestic animals in spring and winter, and provides a large proportion of the summer and autumn grazing in these alpine regions. Crude protein (CP), acid detergent fiber (ADF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) are the most important aspects of nutritive value of forages. A successful application of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with partial least square regression (PLSR) for the determination of four parameters (CP, ADF, NDF and IVDMD) of Siberian wildrye was developed. The standard errors of calibration (SEC, %DM) and Rcal(2) values (in parentheses) were 0.3299(0.9945), 0.7799(0.9499), 1.3430(0.9133), and 1.3762(0.9822) for CP, ADF, NDF and IVDMD equations, respectively. The standard errors of prediction (SEP, %DM) and Rval(2) values (in parentheses) were 0.3621(0.9938), 0.7878(0.9449), 1.3852(0.8907), and 1.4303(0.9790) for CP, ADF, NDF and IVDMD, respectively. A good correlation (r>0.9438) was found between results from NIRS and the traditional chemical method, and residual predictive deviation (RPD) ranged from 3.02 to 12.63. It was concluded that NIR spectroscopic technique associated with chemometrics is sufficiently sensitive to allow the accurate prediction of the concentrations of compo nents (CP, ADF and NDF) and IVDMD of Siberian wildrye. PMID:26672275

  4. The interplay of personality and negative comments about appearance in predicting body image.

    PubMed

    Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; von Soest, Tilmann; Roald, Helge E; Skolleborg, Knut Chr

    2006-09-01

    This study investigates how personality traits in combination with frequency of and emotional reaction to negative comments about appearance while growing up are related to appearance evaluation and orientation among adult women. Nine hundred and seven participants from a representative sample of Norwegian women aged 22-55, answered questions measuring body image, personality (Big Five), and history of experiencing negative comments about appearance. Results indicated that only emotional reaction to negative comments about appearance significantly predicted both appearance evaluation and orientation, while frequency of negative comments did not. Being extrovert predicted more positive appearance evaluation and being more appearance oriented than being introvert. Scoring high on neuroticism was related to negative appearance evaluation and high appearance orientation. The findings demonstrate the importance of differentiating between the frequency and the emotional impact of teasing as well as including personality traits when studying body image. PMID:18089229

  5. Mediofrontal event-related potentials in response to positive, negative and unsigned prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Thomas D; Goslin, Jeremy

    2014-08-01

    Reinforcement learning models make use of reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between an expected and obtained reward. There is evidence that the brain computes RPEs, but an outstanding question is whether positive RPEs ("better than expected") and negative RPEs ("worse than expected") are represented in a single integrated system. An electrophysiological component, feedback related negativity, has been claimed to encode an RPE but its relative sensitivity to the utility of positive and negative RPEs remains unclear. This study explored the question by varying the utility of positive and negative RPEs in a design that controlled for other closely related properties of feedback and could distinguish utility from salience. It revealed a mediofrontal sensitivity to utility, for positive RPEs at 275-310ms and for negative RPEs at 310-390ms. These effects were preceded and succeeded by a response consistent with an unsigned prediction error, or "salience" coding.

  6. Predicting Negative Emotions Based on Mobile Phone Usage Patterns: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Ching; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt recognition and intervention of negative emotions is crucial for patients with depression. Mobile phones and mobile apps are suitable technologies that can be used to recognize negative emotions and intervene if necessary. Objective Mobile phone usage patterns can be associated with concurrent emotional states. The objective of this study is to adapt machine-learning methods to analyze such patterns for the prediction of negative emotion. Methods We developed an Android-based app to capture emotional states and mobile phone usage patterns, which included call logs (and use of apps). Visual analog scales (VASs) were used to report negative emotions in dimensions of depression, anxiety, and stress. In the system-training phase, participants were requested to tag their emotions for 14 consecutive days. Five feature-selection methods were used to determine individual usage patterns and four machine-learning methods were tested. Finally, rank product scoring was used to select the best combination to construct the prediction model. In the system evaluation phase, participants were then requested to verify the predicted negative emotions for at least 5 days. Results Out of 40 enrolled healthy participants, we analyzed data from 28 participants, including 30% (9/28) women with a mean (SD) age of 29.2 (5.1) years with sufficient emotion tags. The combination of time slots of 2 hours, greedy forward selection, and Naïve Bayes method was chosen for the prediction model. We further validated the personalized models in 18 participants who performed at least 5 days of model evaluation. Overall, the predictive accuracy for negative emotions was 86.17%. Conclusion We developed a system capable of predicting negative emotions based on mobile phone usage patterns. This system has potential for ecological momentary intervention (EMI) for depressive disorders by automatically recognizing negative emotions and providing people with preventive treatments before it

  7. Expectation Value Theorem for Thermo Vacuum States of Optical Chaotic Field and Negative-Binomial Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhi-Long; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2016-07-01

    For the density operator (mixed state) describing chaotic light and negative-binomial field there exist the corresponding thermal vacuum state (pure state) in the real-fictitious space. Using the method of integration within ordered product of operators we find the expectation value theorem in these two thermo vacuum states respectively. The thermal average theorem of translation operator is also deduced. Application of the new thermo vacuum state in calculating photon number disturibution and fluctuation and thermal average is presented.

  8. Negative emotions predict elevated interleukin-6 in the United States but not in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuri; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Coe, Christopher L; Curhan, Katherine B; Levine, Cynthia S; Markus, Hazel Rose; Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Kawakami, Norito; Karasawa, Mayumi; Love, Gayle D; Ryff, Carol D

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies conducted in Western cultures have shown that negative emotions predict higher levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, specifically interleukin-6 (IL-6). This link between negative emotions and IL-6 may be specific to Western cultures where negative emotions are perceived to be problematic and thus may not extend to Eastern cultures where negative emotions are seen as acceptable and normal. Using samples of 1044 American and 382 Japanese middle-aged and older adults, we investigated whether the relationship between negative emotions and IL-6 varies by cultural context. Negative emotions predicted higher IL-6 among American adults, whereas no association was evident among Japanese adults. Furthermore, the interaction between culture and negative emotions remained even after controlling for demographic variables, psychological factors (positive emotions, neuroticism, extraversion), health behaviors (smoking status, alcohol consumption), and health status (chronic conditions, BMI). These findings highlight the role of cultural context in shaping how negative emotions affect inflammatory physiology and underscore the importance of cultural ideas and practices relevant to negative emotions for understanding of the interplay between psychology, physiology, and health.

  9. Negative Emotions Predict Elevated Interleukin-6 in the United States but not in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yuri; Boylan, Jennifer Morozink; Coe, Christopher L.; Curhan, Katherine B.; Levine, Cynthia S.; Markus, Hazel Rose; Park, Jiyoung; Kitayama, Shinobu; Kawakami, Norito; Karasawa, Mayumi; Love, Gayle D.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies conducted in Western cultures have shown that negative emotions predict higher levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, specifically interleukin-6 (IL-6). This link between negative emotions and IL-6 may be specific to Western cultures where negative emotions are perceived to be problematic and thus may not extend to Eastern cultures where negative emotions are seen as acceptable and normal. Using samples of 1044 American and 382 Japanese middle-aged and older adults, we investigated whether the relationship between negative emotions and IL-6 varies by cultural context. Negative emotions predicted higher IL-6 among American adults, whereas no association was evident among Japanese adults. Furthermore, the interaction between culture and negative emotions remained even after controlling for demographic variables, psychological factors (positive emotions, neuroticism, extraversion), health behaviors (smoking status, alcohol consumption), and health status (chronic conditions, BMI). These findings highlight the role of cultural context in shaping how negative emotions affect inflammatory physiology and underscore the importance of cultural ideas and practices relevant to negative emotions for understanding of the interplay between psychology, physiology, and health. PMID:23911591

  10. EndoPredict predicts for the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The EndoPredict (EP) signature is a prognostic 11-gene expression signature specifically developed in ER+/HER2- node-negative/positive breast cancer. It is associated with relapse-free survival in patients treated with adjuvant hormone therapy, suggesting that EP low-risk patients could be treated with adjuvant hormone therapy alone whereas high-risk patients would deserve addition of adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus, it is important to determine whether EP high-risk patients are or are not more sensitive to chemotherapy than low-risk patients. Here, we have assessed the EP predictive value for pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in ER+/HER2- breast cancer. We gathered gene expression and histoclinical data of 553 pre-treatment ER+/HER2- breast carcinomas treated with anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We searched for correlation between the pathological complete response (pCR) and the EP score-based classification. The overall pCR rate was 12%. Fifty-one percent of samples were classified as low-risk according to the EP score and 49% as high-risk. EP classification was associated with a pCR rate of 7% in the low-risk group and 17% in the high-risk group (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the EP score remained significantly associated with pCR. Many genes upregulated in the high-risk tumours were involved in cell proliferation, whereas many genes upregulated in the low-risk tumours were involved in ER-signalling and stroma. Despite higher chemosensitivity, the high-risk group was associated with worse disease-free survival. In conclusion, EP high-risk ER+/HER2- breast cancers are more likely to respond to anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

  11. External validation of a prediction model for pathologic N2 among patients with a negative mediastinum by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Backhus, Leah M.; Varghese, Thomas K.; Manning, James P.; Cheng, Aaron M.; Mulligan, Michael S.; Wood, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background A prediction model for pathologic N2 (pN2) among lung cancer patients with a negative mediastinum by positron emission tomography (PET) was recently internally validated. Our study sought to determine the external validity of that model. Methods A cohort study [2005-2013] was performed of lung cancer patients with a negative mediastinum by PET. Previously published model coefficients were used to estimate the probability of pN2 based on tumor location and size, nodal enlargement by computed tomography (CT), maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor, N1 disease by PET, and pretreatment histology. Results Among 239 patients, 18 had pN2 [7.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-12%]. Model discrimination was excellent (c-statistic 0.80, 95% CI: 0.75-0.85) and the model fit the data well (P=0.191). The accuracy of the model was as follows: sensitivity 100%, 95% CI: 81-100%; specificity 49%, 95% CI: 42-56%; positive predictive value (PPV) 14%, 95% CI: 8-21%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 100%, 95% CI: 97-100%. CI inspection revealed a significantly higher c-statistic in this external validation cohort compared to the internal validation cohort. The model’s apparently poor specificity for patient selection is in fact significantly better than usual care (i.e., aggressive but allowable guideline concordant staging) and minimum guideline mandated selection criteria for invasive staging. Conclusions A prediction model for pN2 is externally valid. The high NPV of this model may allow pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons to more comfortably minimize the number of invasive procedures performed among patients with a negative mediastinum by PET. PMID:25973222

  12. [Predictive value of Hodgkin's lymphoma tumor burden in present].

    PubMed

    Kulyova, S A; Karitsky, A P

    2014-01-01

    Today approximately 70% of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma can be cured with the combined-modality therapy. Tumor burden, the importance of which was demonstrated 15 years ago for the first time, is a powerful prognostic factor. Data of literature of representations on predictive value of Hodgkin's lymphoma tumor burden are shown in the article. The difficult immunological relations between tumor cells and reactive ones lead to development of the main symptoms. Nevertheless, the collective sign of tumor burden shows the greatest influence on survival and on probability of resistance, which relative risk can be predicted on this variable and treatment program. Patients with bulky disease need escalated therapy with high-dose chemotherapy. Integration into predictive models of the variable will change an expected contribution of clinical and laboratory parameters in the regression analyses constructed on patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Today the role of diagnostic functional methods, in particular a positron emission tomography, for metabolic active measurement is conducted which allows excluding a reactive component.

  13. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the “CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database” which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  14. Neurophysiology of Reward-Guided Behavior: Correlates Related to Predictions, Value, Motivation, Errors, Attention, and Action.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Roesch, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Many brain areas are activated by the possibility and receipt of reward. Are all of these brain areas reporting the same information about reward? Or are these signals related to other functions that accompany reward-guided learning and decision-making? Through carefully controlled behavioral studies, it has been shown that reward-related activity can represent reward expectations related to future outcomes, errors in those expectations, motivation, and signals related to goal- and habit-driven behaviors. These dissociations have been accomplished by manipulating the predictability of positively and negatively valued events. Here, we review single neuron recordings in behaving animals that have addressed this issue. We describe data showing that several brain areas, including orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and basolateral amygdala signal reward prediction. In addition, anterior cingulate, basolateral amygdala, and dopamine neurons also signal errors in reward prediction, but in different ways. For these areas, we will describe how unexpected manipulations of positive and negative value can dissociate signed from unsigned reward prediction errors. All of these signals feed into striatum to modify signals that motivate behavior in ventral striatum and guide responding via associative encoding in dorsolateral striatum. PMID:26276036

  15. Neurophysiology of Reward-Guided Behavior: Correlates Related to Predictions, Value, Motivation, Errors, Attention, and Action.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Roesch, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Many brain areas are activated by the possibility and receipt of reward. Are all of these brain areas reporting the same information about reward? Or are these signals related to other functions that accompany reward-guided learning and decision-making? Through carefully controlled behavioral studies, it has been shown that reward-related activity can represent reward expectations related to future outcomes, errors in those expectations, motivation, and signals related to goal- and habit-driven behaviors. These dissociations have been accomplished by manipulating the predictability of positively and negatively valued events. Here, we review single neuron recordings in behaving animals that have addressed this issue. We describe data showing that several brain areas, including orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and basolateral amygdala signal reward prediction. In addition, anterior cingulate, basolateral amygdala, and dopamine neurons also signal errors in reward prediction, but in different ways. For these areas, we will describe how unexpected manipulations of positive and negative value can dissociate signed from unsigned reward prediction errors. All of these signals feed into striatum to modify signals that motivate behavior in ventral striatum and guide responding via associative encoding in dorsolateral striatum.

  16. Negative Example Selection for Protein Function Prediction: The NoGO Database

    PubMed Central

    Youngs, Noah; Penfold-Brown, Duncan; Bonneau, Richard; Shasha, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Negative examples – genes that are known not to carry out a given protein function – are rarely recorded in genome and proteome annotation databases, such as the Gene Ontology database. Negative examples are required, however, for several of the most powerful machine learning methods for integrative protein function prediction. Most protein function prediction efforts have relied on a variety of heuristics for the choice of negative examples. Determining the accuracy of methods for negative example prediction is itself a non-trivial task, given that the Open World Assumption as applied to gene annotations rules out many traditional validation metrics. We present a rigorous comparison of these heuristics, utilizing a temporal holdout, and a novel evaluation strategy for negative examples. We add to this comparison several algorithms adapted from Positive-Unlabeled learning scenarios in text-classification, which are the current state of the art methods for generating negative examples in low-density annotation contexts. Lastly, we present two novel algorithms of our own construction, one based on empirical conditional probability, and the other using topic modeling applied to genes and annotations. We demonstrate that our algorithms achieve significantly fewer incorrect negative example predictions than the current state of the art, using multiple benchmarks covering multiple organisms. Our methods may be applied to generate negative examples for any type of method that deals with protein function, and to this end we provide a database of negative examples in several well-studied organisms, for general use (The NoGO database, available at: bonneaulab.bio.nyu.edu/nogo.html). PMID:24922051

  17. Negative example selection for protein function prediction: the NoGO database.

    PubMed

    Youngs, Noah; Penfold-Brown, Duncan; Bonneau, Richard; Shasha, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    Negative examples - genes that are known not to carry out a given protein function - are rarely recorded in genome and proteome annotation databases, such as the Gene Ontology database. Negative examples are required, however, for several of the most powerful machine learning methods for integrative protein function prediction. Most protein function prediction efforts have relied on a variety of heuristics for the choice of negative examples. Determining the accuracy of methods for negative example prediction is itself a non-trivial task, given that the Open World Assumption as applied to gene annotations rules out many traditional validation metrics. We present a rigorous comparison of these heuristics, utilizing a temporal holdout, and a novel evaluation strategy for negative examples. We add to this comparison several algorithms adapted from Positive-Unlabeled learning scenarios in text-classification, which are the current state of the art methods for generating negative examples in low-density annotation contexts. Lastly, we present two novel algorithms of our own construction, one based on empirical conditional probability, and the other using topic modeling applied to genes and annotations. We demonstrate that our algorithms achieve significantly fewer incorrect negative example predictions than the current state of the art, using multiple benchmarks covering multiple organisms. Our methods may be applied to generate negative examples for any type of method that deals with protein function, and to this end we provide a database of negative examples in several well-studied organisms, for general use (The NoGO database, available at: bonneaulab.bio.nyu.edu/nogo.html).

  18. Brief optogenetic inhibition of dopamine neurons mimics endogenous negative reward prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun Yun; Esber, Guillem R; Marrero-Garcia, Yasmin; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bonci, Antonello; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Correlative studies have strongly linked phasic changes in dopamine activity with reward prediction error signaling. But causal evidence that these brief changes in firing actually serve as error signals to drive associative learning is more tenuous. Although there is direct evidence that brief increases can substitute for positive prediction errors, there is no comparable evidence that similarly brief pauses can substitute for negative prediction errors. In the absence of such evidence, the effect of increases in firing could reflect novelty or salience, variables also correlated with dopamine activity. Here we provide evidence in support of the proposed linkage, showing in a modified Pavlovian over-expectation task that brief pauses in the firing of dopamine neurons in rat ventral tegmental area at the time of reward are sufficient to mimic the effects of endogenous negative prediction errors. These results support the proposal that brief changes in the firing of dopamine neurons serve as full-fledged bidirectional prediction error signals. PMID:26642092

  19. Brief optogenetic inhibition of dopamine neurons mimics endogenous negative reward prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun Yun; Esber, Guillem R; Marrero-Garcia, Yasmin; Yau, Hau-Jie; Bonci, Antonello; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Correlative studies have strongly linked phasic changes in dopamine activity with reward prediction error signaling. But causal evidence that these brief changes in firing actually serve as error signals to drive associative learning is more tenuous. Although there is direct evidence that brief increases can substitute for positive prediction errors, there is no comparable evidence that similarly brief pauses can substitute for negative prediction errors. In the absence of such evidence, the effect of increases in firing could reflect novelty or salience, variables also correlated with dopamine activity. Here we provide evidence in support of the proposed linkage, showing in a modified Pavlovian over-expectation task that brief pauses in the firing of dopamine neurons in rat ventral tegmental area at the time of reward are sufficient to mimic the effects of endogenous negative prediction errors. These results support the proposal that brief changes in the firing of dopamine neurons serve as full-fledged bidirectional prediction error signals.

  20. Predictive value of ceruloplasmin for metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

    PubMed

    González-Jiménez, Emilio; Schmidt-Riovalle, Jacqueline; Sinausía, Laura; Carmen Valenza, Maríe; Perona, Javier S

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is precisely defined and the cardiovascular risk associated with the clustering of its components has been demonstrated in adults. However, data on children and adolescents are still scarce, in part, because of difficulties in transposing the definition from adults. The identification of risk factors for the development of MetS at an early age is essential for prevention purposes with low-grade inflammation acting as a determinant for the association among the MetS components. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of the MetS with systemic markers of inflammation and ceruloplasmin in a population of adolescents. The present is a cross-sectional study whose sample population consisted of 976 adolescents, 13.2 ± 1.2 years of age. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by ELISA. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was determined by a solid-phase chemiluminiscent immunometric assay. Ceruloplasmin was measured by immunoturbidimetry. MetS adolescents exhibited higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, CRP, and ceruloplasmin compared to non-MetS individuals. TNF-α, IL-6, and CRP showed strong correlations with the MetS components and insulin resistance but not relevant predictive values according to ROC curves (AUC values 0.544- 0.555). In contrast, ceruloplasmin only showed significant correlations in non-Mets individuals, but exhibited a very high predictive value (AUC=0.941, P < 0.001). The determination of serum ceruloplasmin in adolescents might be a useful tool to identify patients with the highest risk of future cardiovascular disease.

  1. Predictive value of ceruloplasmin for metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

    PubMed

    González-Jiménez, Emilio; Schmidt-Riovalle, Jacqueline; Sinausía, Laura; Carmen Valenza, Maríe; Perona, Javier S

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is precisely defined and the cardiovascular risk associated with the clustering of its components has been demonstrated in adults. However, data on children and adolescents are still scarce, in part, because of difficulties in transposing the definition from adults. The identification of risk factors for the development of MetS at an early age is essential for prevention purposes with low-grade inflammation acting as a determinant for the association among the MetS components. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of the MetS with systemic markers of inflammation and ceruloplasmin in a population of adolescents. The present is a cross-sectional study whose sample population consisted of 976 adolescents, 13.2 ± 1.2 years of age. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by ELISA. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was determined by a solid-phase chemiluminiscent immunometric assay. Ceruloplasmin was measured by immunoturbidimetry. MetS adolescents exhibited higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, CRP, and ceruloplasmin compared to non-MetS individuals. TNF-α, IL-6, and CRP showed strong correlations with the MetS components and insulin resistance but not relevant predictive values according to ROC curves (AUC values 0.544- 0.555). In contrast, ceruloplasmin only showed significant correlations in non-Mets individuals, but exhibited a very high predictive value (AUC=0.941, P < 0.001). The determination of serum ceruloplasmin in adolescents might be a useful tool to identify patients with the highest risk of future cardiovascular disease. PMID:27083758

  2. Examining the role of negative urgency in a predictive model of bulimic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Kevin R; Weinstock, Jeremiah; Vander Wal, Jillon S; Weaver, Terri L

    2014-08-01

    The etiological dual pathway model of bulimia nervosa suggests that dietary restraint and negative affect are significant predictors of this disorder. Negative urgency, or the tendency to act rashly in response to negative emotionality, is also associated with bulimia nervosa; however, no study has examined the role of negative urgency within the context of the dual pathway model. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between bulimic symptomatology and negative urgency in the context of dietary restraint and depressive affect. Participants (N=166) were college women recruited from a private mid-western university through an online participant registry. A self-report battery assessed depressive affect, dietary restraint, negative urgency, and bulimic symptoms. Participants' height and weight were measured in-person to determine body mass index. A significant main effect of negative urgency was found after controlling for depressive affect and dietary restraint. The interaction between depressive affect and negative urgency to predict bulimic symptoms approached significance; however, no statistically significant interaction between dietary restraint and negative urgency was observed. These results provide support for the inclusion of negative urgency as a significant factor in etiological frameworks of bulimia nervosa.

  3. Doing Gender for Different Reasons: Why Gender Conformity Positively and Negatively Predicts Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Jessica J.; Sanchez, Diana T.

    2010-01-01

    Past research has shown that valuing gender conformity is associated with both positive and negative consequences for self-esteem and positive affect. The current research (women, n= 226; men, n= 175) explored these conflicting findings by separating out investing in societal gender ideals from personally valuing one's gender identity ("private…

  4. Identification of prognostic genes for recurrent risk prediction in triple negative breast cancer patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee H; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chen, Pei-Chun; Hsiao, Chuhsing K; Chuang, Eric Y; Chang, Li-Yun; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chang, King-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Discrepancies in the prognosis of triple negative breast cancer exist between Caucasian and Asian populations. Yet, the gene signature of triple negative breast cancer specifically for Asians has not become available. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to construct a prediction model for recurrence of triple negative breast cancer in Taiwanese patients. Whole genome expression profiling of breast cancers from 185 patients in Taiwan from 1995 to 2008 was performed, and the results were compared to the previously published literature to detect differences between Asian and Western patients. Pathway analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were applied to construct a prediction model for the recurrence of triple negative breast cancer. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that triple negative breast cancers from different races were in separate sub-clusters but grouped in a bigger cluster. Two pathways, cAMP-mediated signaling and ephrin receptor signaling, were significantly associated with the recurrence of triple negative breast cancer. After using stepwise model selection from the combination of the initial filtered genes, we developed a prediction model based on the genes SLC22A23, PRKAG3, DPEP3, MORC2, GRB7, and FAM43A. The model had 91.7% accuracy, 81.8% sensitivity, and 94.6% specificity under leave-one-out support vector regression. In this study, we identified pathways related to triple negative breast cancer and developed a model to predict its recurrence. These results could be used for assisting with clinical prognosis and warrant further investigation into the possibility of targeted therapy of triple negative breast cancer in Taiwanese patients.

  5. [Predictive value of nocturnal pulse oximetry in sleep apnea screening].

    PubMed

    Nuber, R; Vavrina, J; Karrer, W

    2000-01-01

    The monitoring of overnight oxygen saturation is widely used for sleep apnoea screening. The point of this screening has been questioned as a wide range of sensitivity has been reported in the literature. In a prospective study 70 subjects presenting with a possible sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome had overnight oximetry followed by polysomnography 2 to 4 months later. Compared to polysomnography, the sensitivity of oximetry for sleep apnoea-hypopnoea was 85.2%, the specificity 77.8% and the predictive value positive 96.3%. When short, non-significant, repetitive desaturations have been declared pathologic, sensitivity increased to 91.8%. In the hands of an expert user, oximetry represents an excellent instrument for detecting patients with sleep apnoea-hypopnoea. Patients with pathological nocturnal oximetry are candidates for nCPAP treatment and therefore should undergo a sleep laboratory investigation.

  6. Predictive value of cytokines for developing complications after polytrauma

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Anne-Britt E; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate posttraumatic cytokine alterations and their value for predicting complications and mortality in polytraumatized patients. METHODS: Studies on the use of specific cytokines to predict the development of complications and mortality were identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Of included studies, relevant data were extracted and study quality was scored. RESULTS: Forty-two studies published between 1988 and 2015 were identified, including 28 cohort studies and 14 “nested” case-control studies. Most studies investigated the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). IL-6 seems related to muliorgan dysfunction syndrome, multiorgan failure (MOF) and mortality; IL-8 appears altered in acute respiratory distress syndrome, MOF and mortality; IL-10 alterations seem to precede sepsis and MOF; and TNF-α seems related to MOF. CONCLUSION: Cytokine secretion patterns appear to be different for patients developing complications when compared to patients with uneventful posttraumatic course. More research is needed to strengthen the evidence for clinical relevance of these cytokines.

  7. Predictive value of cytokines for developing complications after polytrauma

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Anne-Britt E; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate posttraumatic cytokine alterations and their value for predicting complications and mortality in polytraumatized patients. METHODS: Studies on the use of specific cytokines to predict the development of complications and mortality were identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Of included studies, relevant data were extracted and study quality was scored. RESULTS: Forty-two studies published between 1988 and 2015 were identified, including 28 cohort studies and 14 “nested” case-control studies. Most studies investigated the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). IL-6 seems related to muliorgan dysfunction syndrome, multiorgan failure (MOF) and mortality; IL-8 appears altered in acute respiratory distress syndrome, MOF and mortality; IL-10 alterations seem to precede sepsis and MOF; and TNF-α seems related to MOF. CONCLUSION: Cytokine secretion patterns appear to be different for patients developing complications when compared to patients with uneventful posttraumatic course. More research is needed to strengthen the evidence for clinical relevance of these cytokines. PMID:27652210

  8. Additional value of F-18 FDG PET/CT for initial staging in breast cancer with clinically negative axillary nodes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do-Young; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Son, Hye Joo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of the preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the initial workup of breast cancer with clinically negative axillary nodes. Whether the status of the clinical axillary nodal involvement can be considered a parameter for making a decision to omit the preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the situation reported herein was also determined. A total of 178 patients who had newly diagnosed breast cancer and for whom the conventional diagnostic modalities showed no sign of axillary node metastasis were retrospectively enrolled in this study. All the patients underwent preoperative ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT. The images and histologic results that were obtained were analyzed. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT detected primary lesions in 156 of the 178 patients, with an overall sensitivity of 87.6 %, and false negative results were obtained for 22 patients (12.4 %). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of axillary nodes were 20.8, 86.9, 37.0, 74.8, and 69.1 %, respectively. Extra-axillary node metastasis was identified in two patients (1.1 %) who had internal mammary nodes. There was no distant metastasis, but coexisting primary tumor was detected in five patients (2.8 %). In total, the therapeutic plan was changed based on ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in seven (3.9 %) of the 178 patients, but considering only the cases confined to breast cancer, the change occurred in only two patients (1.1 %). ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT almost did not affect the initial staging and treatment plan in breast cancer with clinically negative axillary node. If the axillary node is clinically negative in the preoperative workup of breast cancer, then ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT can be omitted.

  9. Incremental validity of positive and negative valence in predicting personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Simms, Leonard J; Yufik, Tom; Gros, Daniel F

    2010-04-01

    The Big Seven model of personality includes five dimensions similar to the Big Five model as well as two evaluative dimensions—Positive Valence (PV) and Negative Valence (NV)—which reflect extremely positive and negative person descriptors, respectively. Recent theory and research have suggested that PV and NV predict significant variance in personality disorder (PD) above that predicted by the Big Five, but firm conclusions have not been possible because previous studies have been limited to only single measures of PV, NV, and the Big Five traits. In the present study, we replicated and extended previous findings using three markers of all key constructs—including PV, NV, and the Big Five—in a diverse sample of 338 undergraduates. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that PV incrementally predicted Narcissistic and Histrionic PDs above the Big Five and that NV nonspecifically incremented the prediction of most PDs. Implications for dimensional models of personality pathology are discussed.

  10. The value of "negative" appraisals for resilience. Is positive (re)appraisal always good and negative always bad?

    PubMed

    Freund, Alexandra M; Staudinger, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the PASTOR model by Kalisch et al. we point to the potential negative long-term effects of positive (re)appraisals of events for resilience. This perspective posits that emotional reactions to events provide important guidelines as to which events, environments, or social relations should be sought out and which ones should be avoided in the future.

  11. Negative Affective Spillover from Daily Events Predicts Early Response to Cognitive Therapy for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lawrence H.; Gunthert, Kathleen C.; Butler, Andrew C.; Parrish, Brendt P.; Wenze, Susan J.; Beck, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive role of depressed outpatients' (N = 62) affective reactivity to daily stressors in their rates of improvement in cognitive therapy (CT). For 1 week before treatment, patients completed nightly electronic diaries that assessed daily stressors and negative affect (NA). The authors used multilevel modeling to…

  12. Fear among the extremes: how political ideology predicts negative emotions and outgroup derogation.

    PubMed

    van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Krouwel, André P M; Boiten, Max; Eendebak, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    The "rigidity of the right" hypothesis predicts that particularly the political right experiences fear and derogates outgroups. We propose that above and beyond that, the political extremes (at both sides of the spectrum) are more likely to display these responses than political moderates. Results of a large-scale sample reveal the predicted quadratic term on socio-economic fear. Moreover, although the political right is more likely to derogate the specific category of immigrants, we find a quadratic effect on derogation of a broad range of societal categories. Both extremes also experience stronger negative emotions about politics than politically moderate respondents. Finally, the quadratic effects on derogation of societal groups and negative political emotions were mediated by socio-economic fear, particularly among left- and right-wing extremists. It is concluded that negative emotions and outgroup derogation flourish among the extremes. PMID:25652084

  13. Positive and negative family emotional climate differentially predict youth anxiety and depression via distinct affective pathways.

    PubMed

    Luebbe, Aaron M; Bell, Debora J

    2014-08-01

    A socioaffective specificity model was tested in which positive and negative affect differentially mediated relations of family emotional climate to youth internalizing symptoms. Participants were 134 7(th)-9(th) grade adolescents (65 girls; 86 % Caucasian) and mothers who completed measures of emotion-related family processes, experienced affect, anxiety, and depression. Results suggested that a family environment characterized by maternal psychological control and family negative emotion expressiveness predicted greater anxiety and depression, and was mediated by experienced negative affect. Conversely, a family emotional environment characterized by low maternal warmth and low positive emotion expressiveness predicted only depression, and was mediated through lowered experienced positive affect. This study synthesizes a theoretical model of typical family emotion socialization with an extant affect-based model of shared and unique aspects of anxiety and depression symptom expression.

  14. Fear among the extremes: how political ideology predicts negative emotions and outgroup derogation.

    PubMed

    van Prooijen, Jan-Willem; Krouwel, André P M; Boiten, Max; Eendebak, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    The "rigidity of the right" hypothesis predicts that particularly the political right experiences fear and derogates outgroups. We propose that above and beyond that, the political extremes (at both sides of the spectrum) are more likely to display these responses than political moderates. Results of a large-scale sample reveal the predicted quadratic term on socio-economic fear. Moreover, although the political right is more likely to derogate the specific category of immigrants, we find a quadratic effect on derogation of a broad range of societal categories. Both extremes also experience stronger negative emotions about politics than politically moderate respondents. Finally, the quadratic effects on derogation of societal groups and negative political emotions were mediated by socio-economic fear, particularly among left- and right-wing extremists. It is concluded that negative emotions and outgroup derogation flourish among the extremes.

  15. Why do oceanic negative cloud-to-ground lightning exhibit larger peak current values?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronis, T.; Koshak, W.; McCaul, E.

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the temporal (monthly) and spatial climatology (2004-2010) of the first return stroke of the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash peak current (Ip) across various land/water boundaries over the contiguous United States. Four regions are examined: the Gulf of Mexico (region 1), the Florida peninsula (region 2), Lake Michigan (region 3), and part of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic (region 4). The crosss across the coastlines of regions 1, 2, and 4 show a gradual oceanward increase in the mean negative polarity CG peak current values (-Ip). This transition along the respective land/ocean boundaries is not sharp but gradual. In direct contrast with ocean, there is no consistent behavior in -Ip values as we move from land out across the fresh water of Lake Michigan (region 3). Meanwhile, the positive CG flash peak current (+Ip) values do not exhibit a consistent variation across any coastal boundary. For region 1, the -Ip values increase as we move toward the coast (southwards) especially during the wet season (June-October). This finding is in direct contrast with studies that documented winter as the season of maximum -Ip values. The zonal and seasonal variations of -Ip values across region 4 are not quite as pronounced, but the oceanic -Ip values are still larger than over the adjoining landmass. We explore in turn which up to date hypotheses pertinent to the oceanic -Ip enhancement are supported or refuted by our findings. It is concluded that the oceanic -Ip enhancement is not an artifact related to CG detection or Ip retrieval methods, nor is it likely related to the cloud top heights or CG activity. The study cannot refute the role of electrical conductivity and its contribution to CG leader attachment processes. However, given the observed "blurred transition" of the Ip values across the coastlines this paper suggests that likely the main physical mechanism is acting on the thundercloud potential. The recently suggested role of sodium chloride (Na

  16. Depressive symptoms in early marriage: predictions from relationship confidence and negative marital interaction.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Sarah W; Olmos-Gallo, P Antonio; Stanley, Scott M; Prado, Lydia M; Kline, Galena H; St Peters, Michelle; Markman, Howard J

    2007-06-01

    The authors proposed a model of depressive symptoms in early marriage in which relationship confidence, defined as perceived couple-level efficacy to manage conflicts and maintain a healthy relationship, mediates the effect of negative marital interactions on depressive symptoms. The model was tested in a sample of 139 couples assessed prior to marriage and 1 year later. As predicted, relationship confidence demonstrated simple negative associations with negative marital interaction and depressive symptoms for all participants. Longitudinal path analyses supported the mediational model for women only. In women but not men, negative marital interaction indirectly had an impact on depressive symptoms through the mediator of relationship confidence. Findings suggest that relationship confidence may be important to understanding links between marital distress and depressive symptoms, especially in women.

  17. Predicting first onset of depression in young girls: Interaction of diurnal cortisol and negative life events.

    PubMed

    LeMoult, Joelle; Ordaz, Sarah J; Kircanski, Katharina; Singh, Manpreet K; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between biological vulnerability and environmental adversity are central to the pathophysiology of depression. Given evidence that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences biological responses to environmental events, in the current longitudinal study the authors examined HPA-axis functioning, negative life events, and their interaction as predictors of the first onset of depression. At baseline, girls ages 9 to 14 years provided saliva samples to assess levels of diurnal cortisol production, quantified by total cortisol production (area under the curve with respect to ground; AUCg) and the cortisol awakening response (CAR). The authors then followed these participants until they reached age 18 in order to assess their subsequent experience of negative life events and the onset of a depressive episode. They found that the influence of negative life events on the subsequent onset of depression depended on HPA-axis functioning at baseline. Specifically, negative life events predicted the onset of depression in girls with higher levels of AUCg, but not in girls with lower levels of AUCg. In contrast, CAR did not predict the onset of depression either alone or in interaction with negative life events. These findings suggest that elevated total cortisol production in daily life potentiates susceptibility to environmental adversity and signals the need for early intervention. PMID:26595472

  18. Predicting First Onset of Depression in Young Girls: Interaction of Diurnal Cortisol and Negative Life Events

    PubMed Central

    LeMoult, Joelle; Ordaz, Sarah J.; Kircanski, Katharina; Singh, Manpreet K.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between biological vulnerability and environmental adversity are central to the pathophysiology of depression. Given evidence that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences biological responses to environmental events, in the current longitudinal study we examined HPA-axis functioning, negative life events, and their interaction as predictors of the first onset of depression. At baseline, girls ages 9 to 14 years provided saliva samples to assess levels of diurnal cortisol production, quantified by total cortisol production (area under the curve with respect to ground; AUCg) and the cortisol awakening response (CAR). We then followed these participants until they reached age 18 in order to assess their subsequent experience of negative life events and the onset of a depressive episode. We found that the influence of negative life events on the subsequent onset of depression depended on HPA-axis functioning at baseline. Specifically, negative life events predicted the onset of depression in girls with higher levels AUCg, but not in girls with lower levels of AUCg. In contrast, CAR did not predict the onset of depression either alone or in interaction with negative life events. These findings suggest that elevated total cortisol production in daily life potentiates susceptibility to environmental adversity and signals the need for early intervention. PMID:26595472

  19. Cultural Values Predicting Acculturation Orientations: Operationalizing a Quantitative Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes that acculturation orientations are related to two sets of cultural values: utilitarianism (Ut) and traditionalism (Tr). While utilitarian values enhance assimilation, traditional values support language and identity maintenance. It is proposed that the propensity to either end of this value opposition can be measured by an…

  20. Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: diagnostic and predictive value of clinical testing, lumbar drainage, and CSF dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Cynthia V; Dengl, Markus; Nestler, Ulf; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Eichner, Gerrit; Preuß, Matthias; Meixensberger, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to analyze the diagnostic and predictive values of clinical tests, CSF dynamics, and intracranial pulsatility tests, compared with external lumbar drainage (ELD), for shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). METHODS Sixty-eight consecutive patients with suspected iNPH were prospectively evaluated. Preoperative assessment included clinical tests, overnight intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, lumbar infusion test (LIFT), and ELD for 24-72 hours. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to identify predictive parameters concerning the outcome after shunt therapy. RESULTS Positive response to ELD correctly predicted improvement after CSF diversion in 87.9% of the patients. A Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) value below 21 was associated with nonresponse after shunt insertion (specificity 93%, sensitivity 67%). Resistance to outflow of CSF (ROut) > 12 mm Hg/ml/min was false negative in 21% of patients. Intracranial pulsatility parameters yielded different results in various parameters (correlation coefficient between pulse amplitude and ICP, slow wave amplitude, and mean ICP) but did not correlate to outcome. In multiple linear regression analysis, a calculation of presurgical MMSE versus the value after ELD, ROut, and ICP amplitude quotient during LIFT was significantly associated with outcome (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Despite a multitude of invasive tests, presurgical clinical testing and response to ELD yielded the best prediction for improvement of symptoms following surgery. The complication rate of invasive testing was 5.4%. Multiple and simple linear regression analyses indicated that outcome can only be predicted by a combination of parameters, in accordance with a multifactorial pathogenesis of iNPH. PMID:26824377

  1. The effect of deviance predictability on mismatch negativity in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Magdalena; Kärgel, Christian; Scherbaum, Norbert; Müller, Bernhard W

    2016-03-23

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an electrophysiological index of prediction error processing and recently has been considered an endophenotype marker in schizophrenia. While the prediction error is a core concept in the MMN generation, predictability of deviance occurrence has rarely been assessed in MMN research and in schizophrenia patients. We investigated the MMN to 12% temporally predictable or unpredictable duration decrement deviant stimuli in two runs in 29 healthy controls and 31 schizophrenia patients. We analyzed MMN amplitudes and latencies and its associations with clinical symptoms at electrode Fz. With a stimulus onset asynchronicity of 500 ms in the regular predictable condition, a deviant occurred every 4s while it varied randomly in the unpredictable condition. In the random condition we found diminished MMN amplitudes in patients which normalized in the regular deviance condition, resulting in an analysis of variance main effect of predictability and a predictability x group interaction. Deviance predictability did not affect the MMN of control subjects and we found no relevant results with regard to MMN latencies. Our results indicate that MMN amplitudes in patients normalize to the level of the control subjects in the case of a temporally fixed regular deviant. In schizophrenia patients the detection of deviance is basically intact. However, the temporal uncertainty of deviance occurrence may be of substantial relevance to the highly replicated MMN deficit in schizophrenia patients.

  2. Early Negative Affect Predicts Anxiety, not Autism, in Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Malone, Patrick S.; Hatton, Deborah D.

    2012-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and non-clinical pediatric samples. In light of the high comorbidity between autism and anxiety within FXS, the present study investigates the relationship between longitudinal trajectories of negative affect (between 8 and 71 months) and severity of anxiety and autistic outcomes in young males with FXS (n= 25). Multilevel models indicated associations between elevated anxiety and higher fear and sadness, lower soothability, and steeper longitudinal increases in approach. Autistic outcomes were unrelated to negative affect. These findings suggest early negative affect differentially predicts anxiety, not autistic symptoms, within FXS. Future research is warranted to determine the specificity of the relationship between negative affect and anxiety, as well as to explore potential moderators. Characterizing the relationship between early negative affect and anxiety within FXS may inform etiology and treatment considerations specific to children with FXS, as well as lend insight into precursors of anxiety disorders in other clinical groups and community samples. PMID:23011214

  3. Emotion, working memory task demands and individual differences predict behavior, cognitive effort and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Justin; Davidson, Nicole A; Dahl, Chelsea F; Blass, Sara; Yung, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether positive and negative affect motivates verbal and spatial working memory processes, respectively, which have implications for the expenditure of mental effort. We argue that when emotion promotes cognitive tendencies that are goal incompatible with task demands, greater cognitive effort is required to perform well. We sought to investigate whether this increase in cognitive effort impairs behavioural control over a broad domain of self-control tasks. Moreover, we predicted that individuals with higher behavioural inhibition system (BIS) sensitivities would report more negative affect within the goal incompatible conditions because such individuals report higher negative affect during cognitive challenge. Positive or negative affective states were induced followed by completing a verbal or spatial 2-back working memory task. All participants then completed one of three self-control tasks. Overall, we observed that conditions of emotion and working memory incompatibility (positive/spatial and negative/verbal) performed worse on the self-control tasks, and within the incompatible conditions individuals with higher BIS sensitivities reported more negative affect at the end of the study. The combination of findings suggests that emotion and working memory compatibility reduces cognitive effort and impairs behavioural control.

  4. Early negative affect predicts anxiety, not autism, in preschool boys with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L; Malone, Patrick S; Hatton, Deborah D; Roberts, Jane E

    2013-02-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and non-clinical pediatric samples. In light of the high comorbidity between autism and anxiety within FXS, the present study investigates the relationship between longitudinal trajectories of negative affect (between 8 and 71 months) and severity of anxiety and autistic outcomes in young males with FXS (n = 25). Multilevel models indicated associations between elevated anxiety and higher fear and sadness, lower soothability, and steeper longitudinal increases in approach. Autistic outcomes were unrelated to negative affect. These findings suggest early negative affect differentially predicts anxiety, not autistic symptoms, within FXS. Future research is warranted to determine the specificity of the relationship between negative affect and anxiety, as well as to explore potential moderators. Characterizing the relationship between early negative affect and anxiety within FXS may inform etiology and treatment considerations specific to children with FXS, as well as lend insight into precursors of anxiety disorders in other clinical groups and community samples.

  5. A Values-Affirmation Intervention Does Not Benefit Negatively Stereotyped Immigrant Students in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Elisabeth M.; Jellesma, Francine C.; Koomen, Helma M. Y.; de Jong, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research showed that a values-affirmation intervention can help reduce the achievement gap between African American and European American students in the US. In the present study, it was examined if these results would generalize to ethnic minority students in a country outside the US, namely the Netherlands, where there is also an achievement gap between native and ethnic minority students. This type of intervention was tested in two separate studies, the first among first-year pre-vocational students (n = 361, 84% ethnic minority), and the second among sixth grade students (n = 290, 96% ethnic minority). Most minority participants had a Turkish-Dutch or Moroccan-Dutch immigrant background. In the second study, a third condition was added to the original paradigm, in which students elaborated on either their affirmation- or a control exercise with the help of a teaching assistant. We also examined whether values affirmation affected the level of problem behavior of negatively stereotyped ethnic minority youth. Contrary to what was expected, multilevel analyses revealed that the intervention had no effect on the school achievement or the problem behavior of the ethnic minority students. Possible explanations for these findings, mainly related to contextual and cultural differences between the Netherlands and the US, are discussed. PMID:27242604

  6. BacPP: a web-based tool for Gram-negative bacterial promoter prediction.

    PubMed

    de Avila E Silva, S; Notari, D L; Neis, F A; Ribeiro, H G; Echeverrigaray, S

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Promoter Prediction (BacPP) is a tool used to predict given sequences as promoters of Gram-negative bacteria according to the σ factor that recognizes it. The first version of BacPP was implemented in Python language in a desktop version without a friendly interface. For this reason, a web version of BacPP is now available with the purpose of improving its usability and availability. The present paper describes the implementation of the web version of this tool, focusing on its software architecture and user functionalities. The software is available at www.bacpp.bioinfoucs.com/home. PMID:27173187

  7. Misestimating betting behavior: the role of negative asymmetries in emotional self prediction.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Eduardo B; Claro, Danny P; Islam, Gazi

    2014-12-01

    This paper addresses the role of negative asymmetries in emotional self-prediction by looking at the extent to which individuals misestimate their own betting behavior in sequential gambles. In a series of three experimental studies, we demonstrate that losses lead to higher than planned bets whereas bets are on average carried over after gains. Such asymmetric deviations from the plan emerge (1) when monetary and non-monetary incentives are used, and (2) when participants face fair and unfair gambles. The asymmetry is based on people's inability to predict how much the negative emotions generated by a bad experience (e.g. the loss) will influence them to put more effort (e.g. bet more) than planned in an attempt to re-establish a homeostatic state in the prospect of a good experience (e.g. winning). PMID:23907282

  8. Misestimating betting behavior: the role of negative asymmetries in emotional self prediction.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Eduardo B; Claro, Danny P; Islam, Gazi

    2014-12-01

    This paper addresses the role of negative asymmetries in emotional self-prediction by looking at the extent to which individuals misestimate their own betting behavior in sequential gambles. In a series of three experimental studies, we demonstrate that losses lead to higher than planned bets whereas bets are on average carried over after gains. Such asymmetric deviations from the plan emerge (1) when monetary and non-monetary incentives are used, and (2) when participants face fair and unfair gambles. The asymmetry is based on people's inability to predict how much the negative emotions generated by a bad experience (e.g. the loss) will influence them to put more effort (e.g. bet more) than planned in an attempt to re-establish a homeostatic state in the prospect of a good experience (e.g. winning).

  9. Predictive value of clinical and laboratory findings in the diagnosis of the enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Kuvandik, Ceren; Karaoglan, Ilkay; Namiduru, Mustafa; Baydar, Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    Although the definitive diagnosis of enteric fever requires the isolation of Salmonella enterica serotype typhi or paratyphi, the diagnosis is usually made according to clinical and laboratory findings. There is usually a diagnostic dilemma. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum required parameters that could be valuable in the diagnosis of enteric fever. A retrospective study was performed to compare the clinical and laboratory findings in 60 patients who proved to have enteric fever by cultures and 58 patients with non-enteric fever. Features independently predictive of enteric fever were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive and negative predictive values were estimated. Significant clinical features of enteric fever were hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, relative bradycardia, rose spots, leucopenia, trombocytopenia, eosinopenia and elevated AST level. Five of these features were found to be predictive for the diagnosis of enteric fever; splenomegaly, relative bradycardia, rose spots and trombocytopenia and elevated AST level. In conclusion, clinical and laboratory findings can help the clinician to diagnose enteric fever in the absence of microbiological confirmation. PMID:19382666

  10. Financial strain and stressful events predict newlyweds' negative communication independent of relationship satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Hannah C; Karney, Benjamin R; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2013-02-01

    Social-learning perspectives explicitly recognize the role of partners' personal histories and contexts as possible causes of couple communication behavior, but these assumptions are rarely tested directly, and operationalizations of context in behavioral research on couples rarely extend beyond the interacting dyad. To broaden our understanding of why couples differ in communication, the current study examined whether observed behaviors in marital interactions covary with individual experiences and contextual factors. Behaviors coded from in-home conversations of 414 ethnically diverse newlywed couples were examined simultaneously in relation to childhood and family-of-origin experiences, financial strain and stressful life events, depressive symptoms, and relationship satisfaction. A latent factor representing financial strain and stressful life events was the strongest correlate of negative communication, with higher levels of stress predicting more negativity. Relationship satisfaction was the strongest correlate of observed positivity, with higher levels of satisfaction predicting more positivity. Childhood and family experiences were unrelated to behaviors, whereas results for depressive symptoms were complex and counterintuitive. Because the negative behaviors highlighted in social-learning models of relationship functioning, and often targeted in educational interventions, covary reliably with the stresses and financial strains that couples experience, contextual factors merit greater emphasis in models designed to explain and prevent marital deterioration.

  11. Striatal D1 and D2 signaling differentially predict learning from positive and negative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sylvia M L; Frank, Michael J; Larcher, Kevin; Fellows, Lesley K; Clark, Crystal A; Leyton, Marco; Dagher, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which we learn from positive and negative outcomes of decisions is modulated by the neurotransmitter dopamine. Dopamine neurons burst fire in response to unexpected rewards and pause following negative outcomes. This dual signaling mechanism is hypothesized to drive both approach and avoidance behavior. Here we test a prediction deriving from a computational reinforcement learning model, in which approach is mediated via activation of the direct cortico-striatal pathway due to striatal D1 receptor stimulation, while avoidance occurs via disinhibition of indirect pathway striatal neurons secondary to a reduction of D2 receptor stimulation. Using positron emission tomography with two separate radioligands, we demonstrate that individual differences in human approach and avoidance learning are predicted by variability in striatal D1 and D2 receptor binding, respectively. Moreover, transient dopamine precursor depletion improved learning from negative outcomes. These findings support a bidirectional modulatory role for striatal dopamine in reward and avoidance learning via segregated D1 and D2 cortico-striatal pathways.

  12. Prediction of positive and negative elastic dilatancy in 2D and 3D liquid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognon, P.; Molino, F.; Gay, C.

    2010-05-01

    Liquid foams have been observed to behave like immersed granular materials in at least one respect: deformation tends to raise their liquid contents, a phenomenon called dilatancy. While experimental observations evidenced the effect of a continuous deformation rate (dynamic dilatancy), we present a geometrical interpretation of both main contributions to elastic dilatancy (during elastic deformation) in foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams), which contain pseudo Plateau borders along the plates, and in 3D foams. The positive contribution is related to the increase in total Plateau border length while the negative contribution reflects the increase in total surface area of the foam. In 2D, we show that the negative dilatancy predicted by Weaire and Hutzler (Philos. Mag., 83 (2003) 2747) at very low liquid fractions is specific to ideal 2D foams (with no glass plates). In 3D, we predict that dilatancy should be positive at low liquid fractions (below 1%) and negative at moderate liquid fractions (above 4%).

  13. Auditory Mismatch Negativity and Repetition Suppression Deficits in Schizophrenia Explained by Irregular Computation of Prediction Error

    PubMed Central

    Rentzsch, Johannes; Shen, Christina; Jockers-Scherübl, Maria C.; Gallinat, Jürgen; Neuhaus, Andres H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The predictive coding model is rapidly gaining attention in schizophrenia research. It posits the neuronal computation of residual variance (‘prediction error’) between sensory information and top-down expectation through multiple hierarchical levels. Event-related potentials (ERP) reflect cortical processing stages that are increasingly interpreted in the light of the predictive coding hypothesis. Both mismatch negativity (MMN) and repetition suppression (RS) measures are considered a prediction error correlates based on error detection and error minimization, respectively. Methods Twenty-five schizophrenia patients and 25 healthy controls completed auditory tasks designed to elicit MMN and RS responses that were investigated using repeated measures models and strong spatio-temporal a priori hypothesis based on previous research. Separate correlations were performed for controls and schizophrenia patients, using age and clinical variables as covariates. Results MMN and RS deficits were largely replicated in our sample of schizophrenia patients. Moreover, MMN and RS measures were strongly correlated in healthy controls, while no correlation was found in schizophrenia patients. Single-trial analyses indicated significantly lower signal-to-noise ratio during prediction error computation in schizophrenia. Conclusions This study provides evidence that auditory ERP components relevant for schizophrenia research can be reconciled in the light of the predictive coding framework. The lack of any correlation between the investigated measures in schizophrenia patients suggests a disruption of predictive coding mechanisms in general. More specifically, these results suggest that schizophrenia is associated with an irregular computation of residual variance between sensory input and top-down models, i.e. prediction error. PMID:25955846

  14. Phospho-T356RB1 predicts survival in HPV-negative squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Handorf, Elizabeth; Nikonova, Anna; Dubyk, Cara; Peri, Suraj; Lango, Miriam; Ridge, John A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.; Burtness, Barbara; Golemis, Erica A.; Mehra, Ranee

    2015-01-01

    Locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) that is not associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) has a poor prognosis in contrast to HPV-positive disease. To better understand the importance of RB1 activity in HPV-negative SCCHN, we investigated the prognostic value of inhibitory CDK4/6 phosphorylation of RB1 on threonine 356 (T356) in archival HPV-negative tumor specimens from patients who underwent surgical resection and adjuvant radiation. We benchmarked pT356RB1 to total RB1, Ki67, pT202/Y204ERK1/2, and TP53, as quantified by automatic quantitative analysis (AQUA), and correlated protein expression with tumor stage and grade. High expression of pT356RB1 but not total RB1 predicted reduced overall survival (OS; P = 0.0295), indicating the potential relevance of post-translational phosphorylation. Paired analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data for regulators of this RB1 phosphorylation identified loss or truncating mutation of negative regulator CDKN2A (p16) and elevated expression of the CDK4/6 activator CCND1 (cyclin D) as also predicting poor survival. Given that CDK4/6 inhibitors have been most effective in the context of functional RB1 and low expression or deletion of p16 in other tumor types, these data suggest such agents may merit evaluation in HPV-negative SCCHN, specifically in cases associated with high pT356RB1. PMID:26265441

  15. Choosing negative examples for the prediction of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hur, Asa; Noble, William Stafford

    2006-01-01

    The protein-protein interaction networks of even well-studied model organisms are sketchy at best, highlighting the continued need for computational methods to help direct experimentalists in the search for novel interactions. This need has prompted the development of a number of methods for predicting protein-protein interactions based on various sources of data and methodologies. The common method for choosing negative examples for training a predictor of protein-protein interactions is based on annotations of cellular localization, and the observation that pairs of proteins that have different localization patterns are unlikely to interact. While this method leads to high quality sets of non-interacting proteins, we find that this choice can lead to biased estimates of prediction accuracy, because the constraints placed on the distribution of the negative examples makes the task easier. The effects of this bias are demonstrated in the context of both sequence-based and non-sequence based features used for predicting protein-protein interactions. PMID:16723005

  16. Cumulative activation during positive and negative events and state anxiety predicts subsequent inertia of amygdala reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Swann; Miendlarzewska, Ewa A; Eryilmaz, Hamdi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    Inertia, together with intensity and valence, is an important component of emotion. We tested whether positive and negative events generate lingering changes in subsequent brain responses to unrelated threat stimuli and investigated the impact of individual anxiety. We acquired fMRI data while participants watched positive or negative movie-clips and subsequently performed an unrelated task with fearful and neutral faces. We quantified changes in amygdala reactivity to fearful faces as a function of the valence of preceding movies and cumulative neural activity evoked during them. We demonstrate that amygdala responses to emotional movies spill over to subsequent processing of threat information in a valence-specific manner: negative movies enhance later amygdala activation whereas positive movies attenuate it. Critically, the magnitude of such changes is predicted by a measure of cumulative amygdala responses to the preceding positive or negative movies. These effects appear independent of overt attention, are regionally limited to amygdala, with no changes in functional connectivity. Finally, individuals with higher state anxiety displayed stronger modulation of amygdala reactivity by positive movies. These results suggest that intensity and valence of emotional events as well as anxiety levels promote local changes in amygdala sensitivity to threat, highlighting the importance of past experience in shaping future affective reactivity.

  17. The Predictive and Instructional Value of Interim Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pon, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This mixed design study investigated the predictive and instructional uses of two different types of interim mathematics assessments given in two different districts. One district administered the same summative type of assessment three times a year, while the other district administered a different interim assessment after six-week intervals of…

  18. Histomorphological Factors Predicting the Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Yang; Hyun, Chang Lim; Jin, Min-Sun; Park, In Ae; Chung, Yul Ri; Shim, Bobae; Lee, Kyu Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is no standard targeted therapy for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Therefore, its management heavily depends on adjuvant chemotherapy. Using core needle biopsy, this study evaluated the histological factors of TNBC predicting the response to chemotherapy. Methods One hundred forty-three TNBC patients who received single-regimen neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with the combination of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and docetaxel were enrolled. The core needle biopsy specimens acquired before NAC were used to analyze the clinicopathologic variables and overall performance of the predictive model for therapeutic response. Results Independent predictors of pathologic complete response after NAC were found to be higher number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (p=0.007), absence of clear cytoplasm (p=0.008), low necrosis (p=0.018), and high histologic grade (p=0.039). In the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, the area under curve for the combination of these four variables was 0.777. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that a predictive model using the above four variables can predict therapeutic response to single-regimen NAC with the combination of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and docetaxel in TNBC. Therefore, adding these morphologic variables to clinical and genomic signatures might enhance the ability to predict the therapeutic response to NAC in TNBC. PMID:27721875

  19. A culture-brain link: Negative age stereotypes predict Alzheimer's disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B; Slade, Martin D; Troncoso, Juan; Resnick, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    Although negative age stereotypes have been found to predict adverse outcomes among older individuals, it was unknown whether the influence of stereotypes extends to brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. To consider this possibility, we drew on dementia-free participants, in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, whose age stereotypes were assessed decades before yearly magnetic resonance images and brain autopsies were performed. Those holding more-negative age stereotypes earlier in life had significantly steeper hippocampal-volume loss and significantly greater accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques, adjusting for relevant covariates. These findings suggest a new pathway to identifying mechanisms and potential interventions related to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Mothers' depressive symptoms predict both increased and reduced negative reactivity: aversion sensitivity and the regulation of emotion.

    PubMed

    Dix, Theodore; Moed, Anat; Anderson, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether, as mothers' depressive symptoms increase, their expressions of negative emotion to children increasingly reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to minimize ongoing stress or discomfort. In multiple interactions over 2 years, negative affect expressed by 319 mothers and their children was observed across variations in mothers' depressive symptoms, the aversiveness of children's immediate behavior, and observed differences in children's general negative reactivity. As expected, depressive symptoms predicted reduced maternal negative reactivity when child behavior was low in aversiveness, particularly with children who were high in negative reactivity. Depressive symptoms predicted high negative reactivity and steep increases in negative reactivity as the aversiveness of child behavior increased, particularly when high and continued aversiveness from the child was expected (i.e., children were high in negative reactivity). The findings are consistent with the proposal that deficits in parenting competence as depressive symptoms increase reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to avoid conflict and suppress children's aversive behavior.

  1. Episodic memories predict adaptive value-based decision-making.

    PubMed

    Murty, Vishnu P; FeldmanHall, Oriel; Hunter, Lindsay E; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Davachi, Lila

    2016-05-01

    Prior research illustrates that memory can guide value-based decision-making. For example, previous work has implicated both working memory and procedural memory (i.e., reinforcement learning) in guiding choice. However, other types of memories, such as episodic memory, may also influence decision-making. Here we test the role for episodic memory-specifically item versus associative memory-in supporting value-based choice. Participants completed a task where they first learned the value associated with trial unique lotteries. After a short delay, they completed a decision-making task where they could choose to reengage with previously encountered lotteries, or new never before seen lotteries. Finally, participants completed a surprise memory test for the lotteries and their associated values. Results indicate that participants chose to reengage more often with lotteries that resulted in high versus low rewards. Critically, participants not only formed detailed, associative memories for the reward values coupled with individual lotteries, but also exhibited adaptive decision-making only when they had intact associative memory. We further found that the relationship between adaptive choice and associative memory generalized to more complex, ecologically valid choice behavior, such as social decision-making. However, individuals more strongly encode experiences of social violations-such as being treated unfairly, suggesting a bias for how individuals form associative memories within social contexts. Together, these findings provide an important integration of episodic memory and decision-making literatures to better understand key mechanisms supporting adaptive behavior. PMID:26999046

  2. Predicting Proenvironmental Behavior Cross-Nationally: Values, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and Value-Belief-Norm Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oreg, Shaul; Katz-Gerro, Tally

    2006-01-01

    This article builds on Ajzen's theory of planned behavior and on Stern et al.'s value-belief-norm theory to propose and test a model that predicts proenvironmental behavior. In addition to relationships between beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors, we incorporate Inglehart's postmaterialist and Schwartz's harmony value dimensions as contextual…

  3. Predictive value of fine needle aspiration biopsy of axillary lymph nodes in preoperative breast cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    Akıncı, Muzaffer; Bulut, Serap Pamak; Erözgen, Fazilet; Gürbüzel, Mihriban; Gülşen, Gökçe; Kocakuşak, Ahmet; Gülen, Mehmet; Kaplan, Rafet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diagnosis of axillary nodal involvement is significant in the management of breast cancer as well as in predicting prognosis. In this prospective study, we evaluated the efficiency of US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in preoperative axillary staging of early breast cancer. Material and Methods Between January 2011 and July 2013, 46 women were prospectively enrolled in the study. Ultrasound guided-FNABs for axillary assessment were performed preoperatively. Cytology results were compared with histopathology reports to determine its sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value and accuracy. Results Nineteen cases that had malignant cytology on FNAB also had axillary involvement in axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) without any false-positive results. The sensitivity and specificity of US-guided FNAB were 63.3% and 100%, respectively. US-guided FNAB was accurate in predicting the status of the axilla in 76.1% of patients. Conclusion Although this technique is favorable due to its minimally invasive nature, it is not as effective as sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in terms of detecting axillary metastasis preoperatively. The low sensitivity and low accuracy rates decrease the usefulness of the technique. Therefore, it seems that US-guided FNAB alone could not replace SLNB. Nevertheless, combining some other molecular studies may be useful in increasing the technique’s sensitivity. These issues should be determined by comprehensive clinical trials. PMID:27528822

  4. Police referral to victim support: the predictive and diagnostic value of the RISK (10) screening instrument.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Frans Willem; Wohlfarth, Tamar; Blaauw, Eric

    2004-01-01

    One of the basic rights of crime victims granted under victim-orientated legislation introduced during the last 20 years in more than 100 countries worldwide is the right to be referred to victim support by the police. The under-utilization of psychological services by crime victims who are objectively in need of external support is substantial. Current legal procedures tend to perpetuate this unwanted condition. Programs aimed at the early detection and prevention of persistent postvictimization distress are more in line with the ideals of therapeutic jurisprudence. The RISK (10) screening instrument, which was specifically developed to be administered by police officers, may provide a basis for early detection. RISK (10) consists of a selection of 10 Risk factors with prior empirical evidence and theoretical significance. The focus of the present study was to examine the predictive and diagnostic power of RISK (10) components to detect persistent future psychological distress, among other things, in terms of Adjustment Disorder. Analyses were based on a sample of 93 crime victims who participated in the police and (3 months) follow-up parts of the study. Findings provided initial validation for the predictive accuracy of most RISK (10) components, and confirm the diagnostic value (in terms of specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive power) of risk factors, such as engaging in character attributions, upward comparison processes, fatalistic appraisals of the episode, and the initial reporting of expected deficiencies in social support. The clinical utility of RISK (10) for early detection in police stations is confirmed.

  5. The Role of Negative Affectivity and Negative Reactivity to Emotions in Predicting Outcomes in the Unified Protocol for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sauer-Zavala, Shannon; Boswell, James F.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Bentley, Kate H.; Ametaj, Amantia; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to understand the contributions of both the trait tendency to experience negative emotions and how one relates to such experience in predicting symptom change during participation in the Unified Protocol (UP), a transdiagnostic treatment for emotional disorders. Data were derived from a randomized controlled trial comparing the UP to a wait-list control / delayed-treatment condition. First, effect sizes of pre- to post-treatment change for frequency of negative emotions and several variables measuring reactivity to emotional experience (emotional awareness and acceptance, fear of emotions, and anxiety sensitivity) were examined. Second, the relative contributions of change in negative emotions and emotional reactivity in predicting symptom (clinician-rated anxiety, depression, and severity of principal diagnosis) reductions were investigated. Results suggested that decreases in the frequency of negative emotions and reactivity to emotions following participation in the UP were both large in magnitude. Further, two emotional reactivity variables (fear of emotions and anxiety sensitivity) remained significantly related to symptom outcomes when controlling for negative emotions, and accounted for significant incremental variance in their prediction. These findings lend support to the notion that psychological health depends less on the frequency of negative emotions and more on how one relates to these emotions when they occur. PMID:22738907

  6. Predicting p Ka values from EEM atomic charges.

    PubMed

    Vařeková, Radka Svobodová; Geidl, Stanislav; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Skřehota, Ondřej; Bouchal, Tomáš; Sehnal, David; Abagyan, Ruben; Koča, Jaroslav

    2013-04-10

    : The acid dissociation constant p Ka is a very important molecular property, and there is a strong interest in the development of reliable and fast methods for p Ka prediction. We have evaluated the p Ka prediction capabilities of QSPR models based on empirical atomic charges calculated by the Electronegativity Equalization Method (EEM). Specifically, we collected 18 EEM parameter sets created for 8 different quantum mechanical (QM) charge calculation schemes. Afterwards, we prepared a training set of 74 substituted phenols. Additionally, for each molecule we generated its dissociated form by removing the phenolic hydrogen. For all the molecules in the training set, we then calculated EEM charges using the 18 parameter sets, and the QM charges using the 8 above mentioned charge calculation schemes. For each type of QM and EEM charges, we created one QSPR model employing charges from the non-dissociated molecules (three descriptor QSPR models), and one QSPR model based on charges from both dissociated and non-dissociated molecules (QSPR models with five descriptors). Afterwards, we calculated the quality criteria and evaluated all the QSPR models obtained. We found that QSPR models employing the EEM charges proved as a good approach for the prediction of p Ka (63% of these models had R2 > 0.9, while the best had R2 = 0.924). As expected, QM QSPR models provided more accurate p Ka predictions than the EEM QSPR models but the differences were not significant. Furthermore, a big advantage of the EEM QSPR models is that their descriptors (i.e., EEM atomic charges) can be calculated markedly faster than the QM charge descriptors. Moreover, we found that the EEM QSPR models are not so strongly influenced by the selection of the charge calculation approach as the QM QSPR models. The robustness of the EEM QSPR models was subsequently confirmed by cross-validation. The applicability of EEM QSPR models for other chemical classes was illustrated by a case study focused on

  7. Encoding of both positive and negative reward prediction errors by neurons of the primate lateral prefrontal cortex and caudate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Asaad, Wael F; Eskandar, Emad N

    2011-12-01

    Learning can be motivated by unanticipated success or unexpected failure. The former encourages us to repeat an action or activity, whereas the latter leads us to find an alternative strategy. Understanding the neural representation of these unexpected events is therefore critical to elucidate learning-related circuits. We examined the activity of neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and caudate nucleus of monkeys as they performed a trial-and-error learning task. Unexpected outcomes were widely represented in both structures, and neurons driven by unexpectedly negative outcomes were as frequent as those activated by unexpectedly positive outcomes. Moreover, both positive and negative reward prediction errors (RPEs) were represented primarily by increases in firing rate, unlike the manner in which dopamine neurons have been observed to reflect these values. Interestingly, positive RPEs tended to appear with shorter latency than negative RPEs, perhaps reflecting the mechanism of their generation. Last, in the PFC but not the caudate, trial-by-trial variations in outcome-related activity were linked to the animals' subsequent behavioral decisions. More broadly, the robustness of RPE signaling by these neurons suggests that actor-critic models of reinforcement learning in which the PFC and particularly the caudate are considered primarily to be "actors" rather than "critics," should be reconsidered to include a prominent evaluative role for these structures. PMID:22159094

  8. Predicting response and survival in chemotherapy-treated triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prat, A; Lluch, A; Albanell, J; Barry, W T; Fan, C; Chacón, J I; Parker, J S; Calvo, L; Plazaola, A; Arcusa, A; Seguí-Palmer, M A; Burgues, O; Ribelles, N; Rodriguez-Lescure, A; Guerrero, A; Ruiz-Borrego, M; Munarriz, B; López, J A; Adamo, B; Cheang, M C U; Li, Y; Hu, Z; Gulley, M L; Vidal, M J; Pitcher, B N; Liu, M C; Citron, M L; Ellis, M J; Mardis, E; Vickery, T; Hudis, C A; Winer, E P; Carey, L A; Caballero, R; Carrasco, E; Martín, M; Perou, C M; Alba, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this study, we evaluated the ability of gene expression profiles to predict chemotherapy response and survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Methods: Gene expression and clinical–pathological data were evaluated in five independent cohorts, including three randomised clinical trials for a total of 1055 patients with TNBC, basal-like disease (BLBC) or both. Previously defined intrinsic molecular subtype and a proliferation signature were determined and tested. Each signature was tested using multivariable logistic regression models (for pCR (pathological complete response)) and Cox models (for survival). Within TNBC, interactions between each signature and the basal-like subtype (vs other subtypes) for predicting either pCR or survival were investigated. Results: Within TNBC, all intrinsic subtypes were identified but BLBC predominated (55–81%). Significant associations between genomic signatures and response and survival after chemotherapy were only identified within BLBC and not within TNBC as a whole. In particular, high expression of a previously identified proliferation signature, or low expression of the luminal A signature, was found independently associated with pCR and improved survival following chemotherapy across different cohorts. Significant interaction tests were only obtained between each signature and the BLBC subtype for prediction of chemotherapy response or survival. Conclusions: The proliferation signature predicts response and improved survival after chemotherapy, but only within BLBC. This highlights the clinical implications of TNBC heterogeneity, and suggests that future clinical trials focused on this phenotypic subtype should consider stratifying patients as having BLBC or not. PMID:25101563

  9. Quantification, Prediction, and the Online Impact of Sentence Truth-Value: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Do negative quantifiers like “few” reduce people’s ability to rapidly evaluate incoming language with respect to world knowledge? Previous research has addressed this question by examining whether online measures of quantifier comprehension match the “final” interpretation reflected in verification judgments. However, these studies confounded quantifier valence with its impact on the unfolding expectations for upcoming words, yielding mixed results. In the current event-related potentials study, participants read negative and positive quantifier sentences matched on cloze probability and on truth-value (e.g., “Most/Few gardeners plant their flowers during the spring/winter for best results”). Regardless of whether participants explicitly verified the sentences or not, true-positive quantifier sentences elicited reduced N400s compared with false-positive quantifier sentences, reflecting the facilitated semantic retrieval of words that render a sentence true. No such facilitation was seen in negative quantifier sentences. However, mixed-effects model analyses (with cloze value and truth-value as continuous predictors) revealed that decreasing cloze values were associated with an interaction pattern between truth-value and quantifier, whereas increasing cloze values were associated with more similar truth-value effects regardless of quantifier. Quantifier sentences are thus understood neither always in 2 sequential stages, nor always in a partial-incremental fashion, nor always in a maximally incremental fashion. Instead, and in accordance with prediction-based views of sentence comprehension, quantifier sentence comprehension depends on incorporation of quantifier meaning into an online, knowledge-based prediction for upcoming words. Fully incremental quantifier interpretation occurs when quantifiers are incorporated into sufficiently strong online predictions for upcoming words. PMID:26375784

  10. Quantification, prediction, and the online impact of sentence truth-value: Evidence from event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Nieuwland, Mante S

    2016-02-01

    Do negative quantifiers like "few" reduce people's ability to rapidly evaluate incoming language with respect to world knowledge? Previous research has addressed this question by examining whether online measures of quantifier comprehension match the "final" interpretation reflected in verification judgments. However, these studies confounded quantifier valence with its impact on the unfolding expectations for upcoming words, yielding mixed results. In the current event-related potentials study, participants read negative and positive quantifier sentences matched on cloze probability and on truth-value (e.g., "Most/Few gardeners plant their flowers during the spring/winter for best results"). Regardless of whether participants explicitly verified the sentences or not, true-positive quantifier sentences elicited reduced N400s compared with false-positive quantifier sentences, reflecting the facilitated semantic retrieval of words that render a sentence true. No such facilitation was seen in negative quantifier sentences. However, mixed-effects model analyses (with cloze value and truth-value as continuous predictors) revealed that decreasing cloze values were associated with an interaction pattern between truth-value and quantifier, whereas increasing cloze values were associated with more similar truth-value effects regardless of quantifier. Quantifier sentences are thus understood neither always in 2 sequential stages, nor always in a partial-incremental fashion, nor always in a maximally incremental fashion. Instead, and in accordance with prediction-based views of sentence comprehension, quantifier sentence comprehension depends on incorporation of quantifier meaning into an online, knowledge-based prediction for upcoming words. Fully incremental quantifier interpretation occurs when quantifiers are incorporated into sufficiently strong online predictions for upcoming words.

  11. Spontaneous eye blink rate predicts learning from negative, but not positive, outcomes.

    PubMed

    Slagter, Heleen A; Georgopoulou, Katerina; Frank, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A large body of research shows that striatal dopamine critically affects the extent to which we learn from the positive and negative outcomes of our decisions. In this study, we examined the relationship between reinforcement learning and spontaneous eye blink rate (sEBR), a cheap, non-invasive, and easy to obtain marker of striatal dopaminergic activity. Based on previous findings from pharmacological and patient studies, our main prediction was that in healthy individuals, low blink rates (and concomitant lower striatal dopamine levels) would be associated with better learning from negative choices, while high blink rates (and concomitant higher striatal dopamine levels) would be associated with learning from positive choices. Behavioral analyses showed that in healthy individuals, lower blink rates were indeed associated with greater learning from negative outcomes, indicating that lower dopamine levels per se may enhance avoidance learning. Yet, higher EBR was not associated with better learning from positive outcomes. These observations support the notion that sEBR reflects tonic dopamine levels, and suggest that sEBR may specifically relate to dopamine D2 receptor function, given the importance of the dopaminergic D2 pathway in avoidance learning. More generally, these findings highlight the usefulness of sEBR as a non-invasive and cheap method for assessing the relationship between striatal dopaminergic function and behavior.

  12. Prediction of 3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (HPO) log K1 values for Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Lin; Barlow, Dave J; Kong, Xiao-Le; Ma, Yong-Min; Hider, Robert C

    2012-09-21

    As a means to aid in the design of 3-hydroxypyridin-4-ones (HPOs) intended for use as therapeutic Fe(3+) chelating agents, a novel methodology has been developed using quantum mechanical (QM) calculations for predicting the iron binding affinities of the compounds (more specifically, their log K(1) values). The reported/measured HPO log K(1) values were verified through their correlation with the corresponding sum of the compounds' ligating group pK(a) values. Using a training set of eleven HPOs with known log K(1) values, reliable predictions are shown to be obtained with QM calculations using the B3LYP/6-31+G(d)/CPCM model chemistry (with Bondi radii, and water as solvent). With this methodology, the observed log K(1) values for the training set compounds are closely matched by the predicted values, with the correlation between the observed and predicted values giving r(2) = 0.9. Predictions subsequently made by this method for a test set of 42 HPOs of known log K(1) values gave predicted values accurate to within ±0.32 log units. In order to further investigate the predictive power of the method, four novel HPOs were synthesised and their log K(1) values were determined experimentally. Comparison of these predicted log K(1) values against the measured values gave absolute deviations of 0.22 (13.87 vs. 14.09), 0.02 (14.31 vs. 14.29), 0.12 (14.62 vs. 14.50), and 0.13 (15.04 vs. 15.17). The prediction methodology reported here is the first to be provided for predicting the absolute log K(1) values of iron-chelating agents in the absence of pK(a) values.

  13. Positive predictive value of cholescintigraphy in common bile duct obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Austin, A.R.; Benedetto, A.R.; Growcock, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Technetium-99m DISIDA imaging was employed in 400 patients to differentiate obstruction of the common bile duct from medical and other surgical causes of hyperbilirubinemia. Sequential anterior images demonstrated variable degrees of liver uptake, yet there was no evidence of intrabiliary or extrabiliary radioactivity for at least 4 hr after injection in 25 patients. Twenty-three patients were surgically documented to have complete obstruction of the common bile duct. One patient had hepatitis, and another had sickle cell crisis without bile duct obstruction. The remaining patients had either partial or no obstruction of the common bile duct. We conclude that the presence of liver uptake without evident biliary excretion by 4 hr on cholescintigraphy is highly sensitive and predictive of total obstruction of the common bile duct.

  14. Effect of serum uric acid on the positive predictive value of dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aribas, Alpay; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Alibasic, Hayrudin; Yildirim, Oguzhan; Sertdemir, Ahmet Lutfi; Karanfil, Mustafa; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2016-03-01

    There is controversial data regarding the relationship between uric acid (UA) and coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events. Despite the deleterious effects of hyperuricemia on endothelial function, the effect of UA on myocardial ischemia has not been previously studied. We aimed to investigate the relationship between UA and myocardial ischemia that was identified using dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). In this retrospective study, the laboratory and DSE reports of 548 patients were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of ischemia and further subdivided into three groups according to the extent of ischemia (none, ischemia in 1-3 segments, ischemia in >3 segments). Serum UA levels were compared. Determinants of ischemia were assessed using a regression model. UA was increased in patients with ischemia and was correlated with the number of ischemic segments (p < 0.001). A cutoff value of UA > 5 mg/dl had 63.9 % sensitivity, 62.0 % specificity, 42.5 % positive predictive value (PPV), and 79.6 % negative predictive value for ischemia. When the positive DSE exams were further sorted according to the UA cutoff, the PPV of DSE increased from 80.2 to 94.0 %. Uric acid (odds ratio 1.51; 95 % CI 1.14-1.99), diabetes mellitus, HDL and glomerular filtration rate were found to be independent determinants of myocardial ischemia in DSE. Increased UA is associated with both the presence and extent of DSE-identified myocardial ischemia. A UA cutoff may be a good method to improve the PPV of DSE.

  15. Interpreting incremental value of markers added to risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Pencina, Michael J; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Pencina, Karol M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Greenland, Philip

    2012-09-15

    The discrimination of a risk prediction model measures that model's ability to distinguish between subjects with and without events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) is a popular measure of discrimination. However, the AUC has recently been criticized for its insensitivity in model comparisons in which the baseline model has performed well. Thus, 2 other measures have been proposed to capture improvement in discrimination for nested models: the integrated discrimination improvement and the continuous net reclassification improvement. In the present study, the authors use mathematical relations and numerical simulations to quantify the improvement in discrimination offered by candidate markers of different strengths as measured by their effect sizes. They demonstrate that the increase in the AUC depends on the strength of the baseline model, which is true to a lesser degree for the integrated discrimination improvement. On the other hand, the continuous net reclassification improvement depends only on the effect size of the candidate variable and its correlation with other predictors. These measures are illustrated using the Framingham model for incident atrial fibrillation. The authors conclude that the increase in the AUC, integrated discrimination improvement, and net reclassification improvement offer complementary information and thus recommend reporting all 3 alongside measures characterizing the performance of the final model.

  16. Harsh Parenting and Fearfulness in Toddlerhood Interact to Predict Amplitudes of Preschool Error-Related Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Temperamentally fearful children are at increased risk for the development of anxiety problems relative to less-fearful children. This risk is even greater when early environments include high levels of harsh parenting behaviors. However, the mechanisms by which harsh parenting may impact fearful children’s risk for anxiety problems are largely unknown. Recent neuroscience work has suggested that punishment is associated with exaggerated error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related potential linked to performance monitoring, even after the threat of punishment is removed. In the current study, we examined the possibility that harsh parenting interacts with fearfulness, impacting anxiety risk via neural processes of performance monitoring. We found that greater fearfulness and harsher parenting at 2 years of age predicted greater fearfulness and greater ERN amplitudes at age 4. Supporting the role of cognitive processes in this association, greater fearfulness and harsher parenting also predicted less efficient neural processing during preschool. This study provides initial evidence that performance monitoring may be a candidate process by which early parenting interacts with fearfulness to predict risk for anxiety problems. PMID:24721466

  17. Harsh parenting and fearfulness in toddlerhood interact to predict amplitudes of preschool error-related negativity.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Rebecca J; Buss, Kristin A

    2014-07-01

    Temperamentally fearful children are at increased risk for the development of anxiety problems relative to less-fearful children. This risk is even greater when early environments include high levels of harsh parenting behaviors. However, the mechanisms by which harsh parenting may impact fearful children's risk for anxiety problems are largely unknown. Recent neuroscience work has suggested that punishment is associated with exaggerated error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related potential linked to performance monitoring, even after the threat of punishment is removed. In the current study, we examined the possibility that harsh parenting interacts with fearfulness, impacting anxiety risk via neural processes of performance monitoring. We found that greater fearfulness and harsher parenting at 2 years of age predicted greater fearfulness and greater ERN amplitudes at age 4. Supporting the role of cognitive processes in this association, greater fearfulness and harsher parenting also predicted less efficient neural processing during preschool. This study provides initial evidence that performance monitoring may be a candidate process by which early parenting interacts with fearfulness to predict risk for anxiety problems.

  18. The Role of Values in Predicting Fairness Judgments and Support of Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Randall S.

    1994-01-01

    Compares three models positing differing roles for values in predicting fairness judgments and support of affirmative action: Tetlock's (1986) value pluralism models, Lind's (1992) fairness heuristic hypothesis, and Jackman's (1978) model involving no role for values. Results support the fairness heuristic hypothesis, indicating that values play a…

  19. Getting off on the right foot: subjective value versus economic value in predicting longitudinal job outcomes from job offer negotiations.

    PubMed

    Curhan, Jared R; Elfenbein, Hillary Anger; Kilduff, Gavin J

    2009-03-01

    Although negotiation experiences can affect a negotiator's ensuing attitudes and behavior, little is known about their long-term consequences. Using a longitudinal survey design, the authors tested the degree to which economic and subjective value achieved in job offer negotiations predicts employees' subsequent job attitudes and intentions concerning turnover. Results indicate that subjective value predicts greater compensation satisfaction and job satisfaction and lower turnover intention measured 1 year later. Surprisingly, the economic outcomes that negotiators achieved had no apparent effects on these factors. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed. PMID:19271806

  20. Using negative feedback to guide behavior: impairments on the first 4 cards of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test predict negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sally J; Strauss, Gregory P; Allen, Daniel N

    2013-12-01

    Research has demonstrated that individuals with schizophrenia fail to appropriately use negative feedback to guide learning. These learning deficits are thought to arise from abnormalities in midbrain dopamine activity. Primary and enduring negative symptoms are also associated with abnormal dopamine activity and are expected to produce more severe deficits in learning when they present in individuals with schizophrenia. The current study examines this matter by comparing individuals with deficit syndrome schizophrenia, which is characterized by primary and enduring negative symptoms, to individuals with nondeficit syndrome schizophrenia and to normal controls in their use of positive feedback and negative feedback to guide learning on the first four cards of the WCST. Participants included 67 individuals with schizophrenia (15 deficit; 52 nondeficit syndrome) and 51 healthy controls. Accuracy data from the first 4 cards of the WCST and measures of global test performance were examined. Individuals with schizophrenia were significantly less accurate than controls in their performance on early (pre-shift) WCST trials, and this impairment was significantly greater in patients with deficit than nondeficit schizophrenia. Additionally, accuracy across the first 4 WCST cards significantly predicted the number of categories completed and percentage of perseverative errors across the entire test. These findings suggest that negative symptoms of schizophrenia are associated with difficulty using negative feedback to adaptively guide behavior, and are consistent with the notion that abnormal DA signaling contributes to the higher-order executive functioning impairments seen in schizophrenia with severe negative symptoms.

  1. Inter-individual differences in the experience of negative emotion predict variations in functional brain architecture.

    PubMed

    Petrican, Raluca; Saverino, Cristina; Shayna Rosenbaum, R; Grady, Cheryl

    2015-12-01

    Current evidence suggests that two spatially distinct neuroanatomical networks, the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the default mode network (DMN), support externally and internally oriented cognition, respectively, and are functionally regulated by a third, frontoparietal control network (FPC). Interactions among these networks contribute to normal variations in cognitive functioning and to the aberrant affective profiles present in certain clinical conditions, such as major depression. Nevertheless, their links to non-clinical variations in affective functioning are still poorly understood. To address this issue, we used fMRI to measure the intrinsic functional interactions among these networks in a sample of predominantly younger women (N=162) from the Human Connectome Project. Consistent with the previously documented dichotomous motivational orientations (i.e., withdrawal versus approach) associated with sadness versus anger, we hypothesized that greater sadness would predict greater DMN (rather than DAN) functional dominance, whereas greater anger would predict the opposite. Overall, there was evidence of greater DAN (rather than DMN) functional dominance, but this pattern was modulated by current experience of specific negative emotions, as well as subclinical depressive and anxiety symptoms. Thus, greater levels of currently experienced sadness and subclinical depression independently predicted weaker DAN functional dominance (i.e., weaker DAN-FPC functional connectivity), likely reflecting reduced goal-directed attention towards the external perceptual environment. Complementarily, greater levels of currently experienced anger and subclinical anxiety predicted greater DAN functional dominance (i.e., greater DAN-FPC functional connectivity and, for anxiety only, also weaker DMN-FPC coupling). Our findings suggest that distinct affective states and subclinical mood symptoms have dissociable neural signatures, reflective of the symbiotic relationship

  2. School Leadership in Turbulent Times and the Value of Negative Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Given the turbulence of the contemporary education environment this paper argues it is necessary to adopt more flexible approaches to leadership than has traditionally been the case and involving new ways of learning and behaviours. In this regard, the paper investigates the paradoxical concept of "negative capability" and its potential…

  3. Leadership Values, Trust and Negative Capability: Managing the Uncertainties of Future English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The complex leadership attribute of "negative capability" in managing uncertainty and engendering trust may be amongst the qualities enabling institutions to cope with multiple recent government policy challenges affecting English higher education, including significant increases in student fees. Research findings are reported on changes in…

  4. Using Subject Test Scores Efficiently to Predict Teacher Value-Added

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefgren, Lars; Sims, David

    2012-01-01

    This article develops a simple model of teacher value-added to show how efficient use of information across subjects can improve the predictive ability of value-added models. Using matched student-teacher data from North Carolina, we show that the optimal use of math and reading scores improves the fit of prediction models of overall future…

  5. Virtual World Currency Value Fluctuation Prediction System Based on User Sentiment Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Bin; Lee, Sang Hyeok; Kang, Shin Jin; Choi, Myung Jin; Lee, Jung; Kim, Chang Hun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for predicting the value of virtual currencies used in virtual gaming environments that support multiple users, such as massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). Predicting virtual currency values in a virtual gaming environment has rarely been explored; it is difficult to apply real-world methods for predicting fluctuating currency values or shares to the virtual gaming world on account of differences in domains between the two worlds. To address this issue, we herein predict virtual currency value fluctuations by collecting user opinion data from a virtual community and analyzing user sentiments or emotions from the opinion data. The proposed method is straightforward and applicable to predicting virtual currencies as well as to gaming environments, including MMORPGs. We test the proposed method using large-scale MMORPGs and demonstrate that virtual currencies can be effectively and efficiently predicted with it.

  6. Virtual World Currency Value Fluctuation Prediction System Based on User Sentiment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Bin; Lee, Sang Hyeok; Kang, Shin Jin; Choi, Myung Jin; Lee, Jung; Kim, Chang Hun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for predicting the value of virtual currencies used in virtual gaming environments that support multiple users, such as massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). Predicting virtual currency values in a virtual gaming environment has rarely been explored; it is difficult to apply real-world methods for predicting fluctuating currency values or shares to the virtual gaming world on account of differences in domains between the two worlds. To address this issue, we herein predict virtual currency value fluctuations by collecting user opinion data from a virtual community and analyzing user sentiments or emotions from the opinion data. The proposed method is straightforward and applicable to predicting virtual currencies as well as to gaming environments, including MMORPGs. We test the proposed method using large-scale MMORPGs and demonstrate that virtual currencies can be effectively and efficiently predicted with it. PMID:26241496

  7. Predictive value of procalcitonin decrease in patients with severe sepsis: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This prospective study investigated the predictive value of procalcitonin (PCT) for survival in 242 adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock treated in intensive care. Methods PCT was analyzed from blood samples of all patients at baseline, and 155 patients 72 hours later. Results The median PCT serum concentration on day 0 was 5.0 ng/ml (interquartile range (IQR) 1.0 and 20.1 ng/ml) and 1.3 ng/ml (IQR 0.5 and 5.8 ng/ml) 72 hours later. Hospital mortality was 25.6% (62/242). Median PCT concentrations in patients with community-acquired infections were higher than with nosocomial infections (P = 0.001). Blood cultures were positive in 28.5% of patients (n = 69), and severe sepsis with positive blood cultures was associated with higher PCT levels than with negative cultures (P = < 0.001). Patients with septic shock had higher PCT concentrations than patients without (P = 0.02). PCT concentrations did not differ between hospital survivors and nonsurvivors (P = 0.64 and P = 0.99, respectively), but mortality was lower in patients whose PCT concentration decreased > 50% (by 72 hours) compared to those with a < 50% decrease (12.2% vs. 29.8%, P = 0.007). Conclusions PCT concentrations were higher in more severe forms of severe sepsis, but a substantial concentration decrease was more important for survival than absolute values. PMID:21078153

  8. The effects of negative emotion on encoding-related neural activity predicting item and source recognition.

    PubMed

    Yick, Yee Ying; Buratto, Luciano Grüdtner; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    We report here a study that obtained reliable effects of emotional modulation of a well-known index of memory encoding--the electrophysiological "Dm" effect--using a recognition memory paradigm followed by a source memory task. In this study, participants performed an old-new recognition test of emotionally negative and neutral pictures encoded 1 day before the test, and a source memory task involving the retrieval of the temporal context in which pictures had been encoded. Our results showed that Dm activity was enhanced for all emotional items on a late positivity starting at ~400 ms post-stimulus onset, although Dm activity for high arousal items was also enhanced at an earlier stage (200-400 ms). Our results also showed that emotion enhanced Dm activity for items that were both recognised with or without correct source information. Further, when only high arousal items were considered, larger Dm amplitudes were observed if source memory was accurate. Three main conclusions are drawn from these findings. First, negative emotion can enhance encoding processes predicting the subsequent recognition of central item information. Second, if emotion reaches high levels of arousal, the encoding of contextual details can also be enhanced over and above the effects of emotion on central item encoding. Third, the morphology of our ERPs is consistent with a hybrid model of the role of attention in emotion-enhanced memory (Pottage and Schaefer, 2012).

  9. Can Age at Sexual Maturity act as a Predictive Biomarker for prodromal negative symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Seethalakshmi; Miewald, Jean; Montrose, Debra; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2015-01-01

    Background Puberty and reproductive hormones have been identified as having a potential role in schizophrenia. Earlier reports have suggested associations between later age at puberty and schizophrenia in males. Similarly, associations have been reported between testosterone levels and psychotic symptoms. In this report, we examined the association between age at puberty and prodromal symptoms of psychosis. Methods 58 child or adolescent family members of individuals with schizophrenia were interviewed using the Scale of Prodromal Symptoms and the Tanner Maturational Scale. Age at tanner pubertal stage was determined and regression analyses were used to explore associations between prodromal symptoms and age at puberty. Results Among males, delayed age at puberty was associated with greater severity of prodromal symptoms; the association between negative prodromal symptoms and delayed age was significant (p=0.001). In females, the association was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that delayed age at puberty may be associated with negative prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia in males. Our findings suggest that delayed age at puberty could potentially be a predictive biomarker for psychopathology in males at risk for schizophrenia. PMID:25778616

  10. The effects of negative emotion on encoding-related neural activity predicting item and source recognition.

    PubMed

    Yick, Yee Ying; Buratto, Luciano Grüdtner; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    We report here a study that obtained reliable effects of emotional modulation of a well-known index of memory encoding--the electrophysiological "Dm" effect--using a recognition memory paradigm followed by a source memory task. In this study, participants performed an old-new recognition test of emotionally negative and neutral pictures encoded 1 day before the test, and a source memory task involving the retrieval of the temporal context in which pictures had been encoded. Our results showed that Dm activity was enhanced for all emotional items on a late positivity starting at ~400 ms post-stimulus onset, although Dm activity for high arousal items was also enhanced at an earlier stage (200-400 ms). Our results also showed that emotion enhanced Dm activity for items that were both recognised with or without correct source information. Further, when only high arousal items were considered, larger Dm amplitudes were observed if source memory was accurate. Three main conclusions are drawn from these findings. First, negative emotion can enhance encoding processes predicting the subsequent recognition of central item information. Second, if emotion reaches high levels of arousal, the encoding of contextual details can also be enhanced over and above the effects of emotion on central item encoding. Third, the morphology of our ERPs is consistent with a hybrid model of the role of attention in emotion-enhanced memory (Pottage and Schaefer, 2012). PMID:25936685

  11. Predictive Models of Alcohol Use Based on Attitudes and Individual Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Castillo Rodríguez, José A. García; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Soler, M. Carmen Quiles; Del Castillo-López, Álvaro García; Pertusa, Mónica Gázquez; Campos, Juan Carlos Marzo; Inglés, Cándido J.

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people' attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The…

  12. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Confirms the Prediction that (CO)5 and (CO)6 Each Has a Singlet Ground State

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Xiaoguang; Hrovat, David; Borden, Weston; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-03-20

    Cyclobutane-1,2,3,4-tetraone has been both predicted and found to have a triplet ground state, in which a b2g MO and an a2u MO is each singly occupied. In contrast, (CO)5 and (CO)6 have each been predicted to have a singlet ground state. This prediction has been tested by generating the (CO)5 - and (CO)6 - anions in the gas-phase by electrospray vaporization of solutions of, respectively, the croconate (CO)52- and rhodizonate (CO)62- dianions. The negative ion photoelectron (NIPE) spectra of the (CO)5•- radical anion give electron affinity (EA) = 3.830 eV and a singlet ground state for (CO)5, with the triplet higher in energy by 0.850 eV (19.6 kcal/mol). The NIPE spectra of the (CO)6•- radical anion give EA = 3.785 eV and a singlet ground state for (CO)6, with the triplet higher in energy by 0.915 eV (21.1 kcal/mol). (RO)CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//(U)B3LYP/6-311+G(2df) calculations give EA values that are only ca. 1 kcal/mol lower than those measured and EST values that are only 2 - 3 kcal/mol higher than those obtained from the NIPE spectra. Thus, the calculations support the interpretations of the NIPE spectra and the finding, based on the spectra, that (CO)5 and (CO)6 both have a singlet ground state.

  13. Predictability influences whether outcomes are processed in terms of original or relative values.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianmin; Cao, Zhipeng; Huang, Jiajin; Hitchman, Glenn; Zhang, Qinglin

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have provided insights into the representations of original and relative values and the influence of predictability on decision making. However, whether the predictability of outcomes can influence the processing manner of outcomes (i.e. whether the outcomes are processed in terms of original or relative values) is still unknown. To investigate this issue, we had participants perform a monetary decision task which resulted in two outcomes with the same relative values but different original values in either a predictable or unpredictable condition, while recording event-related potentials (ERP). ERP results showed that the outcome processing in the unpredictable condition elicited more positive deflections in the time window of 300-500ms (P300) than did those in the predictable condition. More importantly, the outcome with high original value elicited a greater P300 component than did that with low original value in the unpredictable condition even though these two outcomes had the same relative values, while in the predictable condition no significant difference was observed between ERPs elicited by the two outcomes even though their original values were different. These results suggest that the outcomes might be processed in terms of relative values in the predictable condition but original values in the unpredictable condition. PMID:24905428

  14. The Positive Predictive Value of Lyme Elisa for the Diagnosis of Lyme Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Susan C; Pollock, Nira R; Branda, John A; Gordon, Caroline D; Gordon, Catherine R; Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2015-11-01

    By using a Lyme enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we demonstrated that high ELISA index values are strongly predictive of Lyme disease. In children with clinical presentations consistent with Lyme disease, ELISA index values ≥3.0 had a positive predictive value of 99.4% (95% confidence interval: 98.1-99.8%) for Lyme disease, making a supplemental Western immunoblot potentially unnecessary.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma oxytocin concentrations are positively correlated and negatively predict anxiety in children.

    PubMed

    Carson, D S; Berquist, S W; Trujillo, T H; Garner, J P; Hannah, S L; Hyde, S A; Sumiyoshi, R D; Jackson, L P; Moss, J K; Strehlow, M C; Cheshier, S H; Partap, S; Hardan, A Y; Parker, K J

    2015-09-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) exerts anxiolytic and prosocial effects in the central nervous system of rodents. A number of recent studies have attempted to translate these findings by investigating the relationships between peripheral (e.g., blood, urinary and salivary) OXT concentrations and behavioral functioning in humans. Although peripheral samples are easy to obtain in humans, whether peripheral OXT measures are functionally related to central OXT activity remains unclear. To investigate a possible relationship, we quantified OXT concentrations in concomitantly collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples from child and adult patients undergoing clinically indicated lumbar punctures or other CSF-related procedures. Anxiety scores were obtained in a subset of child participants whose parents completed psychometric assessments. Findings from this study indicate that plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively predict CSF OXT concentrations (r=0.56, P=0.0064, N=27). Moreover, both plasma (r=-0.92, P=0.0262, N=10) and CSF (r=-0.91, P=0.0335, N=10) OXT concentrations significantly and negatively predicted trait anxiety scores, consistent with the preclinical literature. Importantly, plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively (r=0.96, P=0.0115, N=10) predicted CSF OXT concentrations in the subset of child participants who provided behavioral data. This study provides the first empirical support for the use of blood measures of OXT as a surrogate for central OXT activity, validated in the context of behavioral functioning. These preliminary findings also suggest that impaired OXT signaling may be a biomarker of anxiety in humans, and a potential target for therapeutic development in individuals with anxiety disorders.

  16. Methylome sequencing in triple-negative breast cancer reveals distinct methylation clusters with prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Stirzaker, Clare; Zotenko, Elena; Song, Jenny Z; Qu, Wenjia; Nair, Shalima S; Locke, Warwick J; Stone, Andrew; Armstong, Nicola J; Robinson, Mark D; Dobrovic, Alexander; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Peters, Kate M; French, Juliet D; Stein, Sandra; Korbie, Darren J; Trau, Matt; Forbes, John F; Scott, Rodney J; Brown, Melissa A; Francis, Glenn D; Clark, Susan J

    2015-02-02

    Epigenetic alterations in the cancer methylome are common in breast cancer and provide novel options for tumour stratification. Here, we perform whole-genome methylation capture sequencing on small amounts of DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and matched normal samples. We identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) enriched with promoters associated with transcription factor binding sites and DNA hypersensitive sites. Importantly, we stratify TNBCs into three distinct methylation clusters associated with better or worse prognosis and identify 17 DMRs that show a strong association with overall survival, including DMRs located in the Wilms tumour 1 (WT1) gene, bi-directional-promoter and antisense WT1-AS. Our data reveal that coordinated hypermethylation can occur in oestrogen receptor-negative disease, and that characterizing the epigenetic framework provides a potential signature to stratify TNBCs. Together, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of profiling the cancer methylome with limited archival tissue to identify regulatory regions associated with cancer.

  17. Negative Social Relationships Predict Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among War-Affected Children Via Posttraumatic Cognitions.

    PubMed

    Palosaari, Esa; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Peltonen, Kirsi; Diab, Marwan; Qouta, Samir R

    2016-07-01

    Post traumatic cognitions (PTCs) are important determinants of post traumatic stress symptoms (PTS symptoms). We tested whether risk factors of PTS symptoms (trauma, demographics, social and family-related factors) predict PTCs and whether PTCs mediate the association between risk factors and PTS symptoms among war-affected children. The participants were 240 Palestinian children 10-12 years old, half boys and half girls, and their parents. Children reported about psychological maltreatment, sibling and peer relations, war trauma, PTCs, PTS symptoms, and depression. Parents reported about their socioeconomic status and their own PTS symptoms. The associations between the variables were estimated in structural equation models. In models which included all the variables, PTCs were predicted by and mediated the effects of psychological maltreatment, war trauma, sibling conflict, and peer unpopularity on PTS symptoms. Other predictors had statistically non-significant effects. Psychological maltreatment had the largest indirect effect (b* = 0.29, p = 0.002) and the indirect effects of war trauma (b* = 0.10, p = 0.045), sibling conflict (b* = 0.10, p = 0.045), and peer unpopularity (b* = 0.10, p = 0.094) were lower and about the same size. Age-salient social relationships are potentially important in the development of both PTCs and PTS symptoms among preadolescents. Furthermore, PTCs mediate the effects of the risk factors of PTS symptoms. The causality of the associations among the variables is not established but it could be studied in the future with interventions which improve the negative aspects of traumatized children's important social relationships. PMID:26362037

  18. Evaluation of random forest regression for prediction of breeding value from genomewide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rupam Kumar; Rao, A R; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Nepolean, T; Mohapatra, T

    2015-06-01

    Genomic prediction is meant for estimating the breeding value using molecular marker data which has turned out to be a powerful tool for efficient utilization of germplasm resources and rapid improvement of cultivars. Model-based techniques have been widely used for prediction of breeding values of genotypes from genomewide association studies. However, application of the random forest (RF), a model-free ensemble learning method, is not widely used for prediction. In this study, the optimum values of tuning parameters of RF have been identified and applied to predict the breeding value of genotypes based on genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), where the number of SNPs (P variables) is much higher than the number of genotypes (n observations) (P » n). Further, a comparison was made with the model-based genomic prediction methods, namely, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), ridge regression (RR) and elastic net (EN) under P » n. It was found that the correlations between the predicted and observed trait response were 0.591, 0.539, 0.431 and 0.587 for RF, LASSO, RR and EN, respectively, which implies superiority of the RF over the model-based techniques in genomic prediction. Hence, we suggest that the RF methodology can be used as an alternative to the model-based techniques for the prediction of breeding value at genome level with higher accuracy.

  19. Evaluation of random forest regression for prediction of breeding value from genomewide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rupam Kumar; Rao, A R; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Nepolean, T; Mohapatra, T

    2015-06-01

    Genomic prediction is meant for estimating the breeding value using molecular marker data which has turned out to be a powerful tool for efficient utilization of germplasm resources and rapid improvement of cultivars. Model-based techniques have been widely used for prediction of breeding values of genotypes from genomewide association studies. However, application of the random forest (RF), a model-free ensemble learning method, is not widely used for prediction. In this study, the optimum values of tuning parameters of RF have been identified and applied to predict the breeding value of genotypes based on genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), where the number of SNPs (P variables) is much higher than the number of genotypes (n observations) (P » n). Further, a comparison was made with the model-based genomic prediction methods, namely, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), ridge regression (RR) and elastic net (EN) under P » n. It was found that the correlations between the predicted and observed trait response were 0.591, 0.539, 0.431 and 0.587 for RF, LASSO, RR and EN, respectively, which implies superiority of the RF over the model-based techniques in genomic prediction. Hence, we suggest that the RF methodology can be used as an alternative to the model-based techniques for the prediction of breeding value at genome level with higher accuracy. PMID:26174666

  20. Value attainment: an explanation for the negative effects of work-family conflict on job and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Perrewé, P L; Hochwarter, W A; Kiewitz, C

    1999-10-01

    Perceptions of work interfering with family life and family issues interfering with work are examined as 2 distinct constructs representing work-family conflict. Experienced work-family conflict is argued to reduce one's value attainment which, in turn, lowers both job and life satisfaction. This study examines value attainment as a mediating variable in the work-family conflict and satisfaction relationship. Responses from 270 hotel managers indicate that value attainment either partially or fully mediates the relationship between work interference with family and family interference with work and both job and life satisfaction. Value attainment is argued to be a meaningful explanatory variable for the negative relationship between work-family conflict and job-life satisfaction.

  1. Predicting the heating value of MSW with a feed forward neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Changqing; Jin Baosheng; Li Daji

    2003-07-01

    The influence of the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW) is very important on the combustion efficiency of MSW incinerators. The heating value of MSW is determined by the elementary chemical composition of its various components. Commonly, calorimetric measurement and empirical methods are available for this determination. In this analysis, the relationship between the physical composition and the low heating value (LHV) was studied. A feed forward neural network (FFNN) can be very helpful in predicting the heating value of MSW from its physical composition. The results of this analysis show that the prediction of LHV of MSW with FFNN is much better than conventional models.

  2. Gate-tunable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaojia; Liu, Erfu; Liu, Huimei; Pan, Yiming; Zhang, Longqiang; Zeng, Junwen; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Miao; Xu, Kang; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Zhenlin; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Xing, Dingyu; Wang, Baigeng; Wan, Xiangang; Miao, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The progress in exploiting new electronic materials has been a major driving force in solid-state physics. As a new state of matter, a Weyl semimetal (WSM), in particular a type-II WSM, hosts Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles and may harbour novel electrical transport properties. Nevertheless, such a type-II WSM material has not been experimentally observed. In this work, by performing systematic magneto-transport studies on thin films of a predicted material candidate WTe2, we observe notable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, which can be attributed to the chiral anomaly in WSM. This phenomenon also exhibits strong planar orientation dependence with the absence along the tungsten chains, consistent with the distinctive feature of a type-II WSM. By applying a gate voltage, we demonstrate that the Fermi energy can be in-situ tuned through the Weyl points via the electric field effect. Our results may open opportunities for implementing new electronic applications, such as field-effect chiral devices.

  3. Gate-tunable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaojia; Liu, Erfu; Liu, Huimei; Pan, Yiming; Zhang, Longqiang; Zeng, Junwen; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Miao; Xu, Kang; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Zhenlin; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Xing, Dingyu; Wang, Baigeng; Wan, Xiangang; Miao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The progress in exploiting new electronic materials has been a major driving force in solid-state physics. As a new state of matter, a Weyl semimetal (WSM), in particular a type-II WSM, hosts Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles and may harbour novel electrical transport properties. Nevertheless, such a type-II WSM material has not been experimentally observed. In this work, by performing systematic magneto-transport studies on thin films of a predicted material candidate WTe2, we observe notable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, which can be attributed to the chiral anomaly in WSM. This phenomenon also exhibits strong planar orientation dependence with the absence along the tungsten chains, consistent with the distinctive feature of a type-II WSM. By applying a gate voltage, we demonstrate that the Fermi energy can be in-situ tuned through the Weyl points via the electric field effect. Our results may open opportunities for implementing new electronic applications, such as field-effect chiral devices. PMID:27725682

  4. The Value of Combining Blood Culture and SeptiFast Data for Predicting Complicated Bloodstream Infections Caused by Gram-Positive Bacteria or Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Mercedes; Kestler, Martha; Alcalá, Luis; Rodriguez-Créixems, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Management of complicated bloodstream infections requires more aggressive treatment than uncomplicated bloodstream infections. We assessed the value of follow-up blood culture in bloodstream infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Candida spp. and studied the value of persistence of DNA in blood (using SeptiFast) for predicting complicated bloodstream infections. Patients with bloodstream infections caused by these microorganisms were enrolled prospectively. After the first positive blood culture, samples were obtained every third day to perform blood culture and SeptiFast analyses simultaneously. Patients were followed to detect complicated bloodstream infection. The study sample comprised 119 patients. One-third of the patients developed complicated bloodstream infections. The values of persistently positive tests to predict complicated bloodstream infections were as follows: SeptiFast positive samples (sensitivity, 56%; specificity, 79.5%; positive predictive value, 54%; negative predictive value, 80.5%; accuracy, 72.3%) and positive blood cultures (sensitivity, 30.5%; specificity, 92.8%; positive predictive value, 64%; negative predictive value, 75.5%; accuracy, 73.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that patients with a positive SeptiFast result between days 3 and 7 had an almost 8-fold-higher risk of developing a complicated bloodstream infection. In S. aureus, the combination of both techniques to exclude endovascular complications was significantly better than the use of blood culture alone. We obtained a score with variables selected by the multivariate model. With a cutoff of 7, the negative predictive value for complicated bloodstream infection was 96.6%. Patients with a positive SeptiFast result between days 3 and 7 after a positive blood culture have an almost 8-fold-higher risk of developing complicated bloodstream infections. A score combining clinical data with the SeptiFast result may improve the

  5. Early Attention and Negative Emotionality Predict Later Cognitive and Behavioural Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Katharine R.; Ruff, Holly A.

    2004-01-01

    Negative emotionality and poor attention may combine or interact as risk factors in development. Negative emotionality is considered a challenge for self-regulation, whereas good attention is a potential means of self-regulation. In the current study, composites of 1- and 2-year maternal ratings of negative emotionality and global ratings of…

  6. Absorbed in the task: Personality measures predict engagement during task performance as tracked by error negativity and asymmetrical frontal activity.

    PubMed

    Tops, Mattie; Boksem, Maarten A S

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that interactions between traits and context predict task engagement, as measured by the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN), performance, and relative frontal activity asymmetry (RFA). In Study 1, we found that drive for reward, absorption, and constraint independently predicted self-reported persistence. We hypothesized that, during a prolonged monotonous task, absorption would predict initial ERN amplitudes, constraint would delay declines in ERN amplitudes and deterioration of performance, and drive for reward would predict left RFA when a reward could be obtained. Study 2, employing EEG recordings, confirmed our predictions. The results showed that most traits that have in previous research been related to ERN amplitudes have a relationship with the motivational trait persistence in common. In addition, trait-context combinations that are likely associated with increased engagement predict larger ERN amplitudes and RFA. Together, these results support the hypothesis that engagement may be a common underlying factor predicting ERN amplitude.

  7. The predictive value of kidney biopsy in renal vasculitis: a multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Crespo, Francisco; Villacorta, Javier; Acevedo, Mercedes; Cavero, Teresa; Guerrero, Carmen; García Díaz, Eugenio; Orradre, Juan Luis; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Praga, Manuel; Fernandez-Juarez, Gema

    2016-06-01

    The histopathologic classification of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been demonstrated to have prognostic value in small cohorts of patients with pauci-immune extracapillary glomerulonephritis. We aimed to validate this histologic subgrouping system in a large cohort of patients with renal vasculitis from 3 Spanish centers. The additional value of several histologic parameters for predicting renal outcome was investigated. A total of 151 biopsies of patients with renal vasculitis were reviewed and classified as follows: 41% crescentic, 24% mixed, 21% focal, and 14% sclerotic. The cumulative proportions of renal survival at 5 years were 83.2%, 81.2%, 60.5%, and 50.7% for the focal, mixed, crescentic, and sclerotic categories, respectively (P < .05). In the crescentic category, patients with less than 75% of glomeruli showing crescents had better survival at 1 and 5 years compared with those having greater than or equal to 75% of crescents (77.9% and 70.6% versus 51.3% and 45.6%; P = .02). When adjusted by renal function and other histologic parameters, the percentage of extracapillary proliferation and glomerulosclerosis remained as significant predictors for renal survival (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .001, and hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .002, respectively). In conclusion, patients with pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis experienced different outcomes depending on the percentage of crescents observed, so that extensive extracapillary proliferation was associated with the poorest renal survival. These findings validate the prognostic utility of the histologic classification scheme in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive and negative patients and suggest a subdivision of crescentic category (<75% and ≥75% of crescents) based on the different survival rates observed among these subgroups.

  8. Supersonic intensity and non-negative intensity for prediction of radiated sound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daipei; Peters, Herwig; Marburg, Steffen; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Two numerical methods to identify the surface areas of a vibrating structure that radiate sound are presented. The supersonic intensity identifies only the supersonic wave components of the sound field contributing to far-field radiated sound. The supersonic intensity is calculated using a two-dimensional convolution between a spatial radiation filter and the sound field. To compute the spatial radiation filter, the shortest surface distance between two points on the structure is calculated using the geodesic distance method. The non-negative intensity is based on acoustic radiation modes and identifies the radiated sound power from a vibrating structure. Numerical models of a baffled plate, a cylinder and an engine crankcase are presented. The supersonic intensity is shown to be difficult to implement at low frequencies due to the size of the spatial radiation filter and accuracy of the surface distances. A cut-off coefficient associated with the acoustic wavenumber of the spatial radiation filter is used to reduce the aperture error. A comparison of the two intensity-based techniques both in terms of a sound power ratio and the modal assurance criterion is introduced to identify the optimal values of the cut-off coefficients that result in better convergence between the intensity techniques.

  9. Supersonic intensity and non-negative intensity for prediction of radiated sound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daipei; Peters, Herwig; Marburg, Steffen; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Two numerical methods to identify the surface areas of a vibrating structure that radiate sound are presented. The supersonic intensity identifies only the supersonic wave components of the sound field contributing to far-field radiated sound. The supersonic intensity is calculated using a two-dimensional convolution between a spatial radiation filter and the sound field. To compute the spatial radiation filter, the shortest surface distance between two points on the structure is calculated using the geodesic distance method. The non-negative intensity is based on acoustic radiation modes and identifies the radiated sound power from a vibrating structure. Numerical models of a baffled plate, a cylinder and an engine crankcase are presented. The supersonic intensity is shown to be difficult to implement at low frequencies due to the size of the spatial radiation filter and accuracy of the surface distances. A cut-off coefficient associated with the acoustic wavenumber of the spatial radiation filter is used to reduce the aperture error. A comparison of the two intensity-based techniques both in terms of a sound power ratio and the modal assurance criterion is introduced to identify the optimal values of the cut-off coefficients that result in better convergence between the intensity techniques. PMID:27250172

  10. Retrieval-induced forgetting predicts failure to recall negative autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Storm, Benjamin C; Jobe, Tara A

    2012-01-01

    There is a positivity bias in autobiographical memory such that people are more likely to remember positive events from their past than they are to remember negative ones. Inhibition may promote this positivity bias by deterring negative memories from being retrieved. In our first experiment, we measured individual differences in retrieval-induced forgetting, a phenomenon believed to be the consequence of retrieval inhibition, and correlated that measure with individual differences in the recall of positive and negative autobiographical memories. Participants who exhibited lower levels of retrieval-induced forgetting recalled significantly more negative memories despite recalling fewer positive memories. In our second experiment, participants attempted to recall negative memories from childhood and from the previous month. Participants who exhibited lower levels of retrieval-induced forgetting recalled significantly more negative memories in both conditions. These results suggest that inhibition plays a key role in preventing the retrieval of negative autobiographical memories.

  11. Identifying Risk for Self-Harm: Rumination and Negative Affectivity in the Prospective Prediction of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Katey Anne; Wielgus, Madeline D; Mezulis, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Research suggests nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) may function as a maladaptive strategy to regulate negative emotions, and individuals high in trait negative affectivity (NA) may be particularly at risk. Rumination, a cognitive emotion regulation strategy, may amplify negative affect, increasing the likelihood of NSSI. The current study found that high NA and high rumination interacted to predict both likelihood of engagement in NSSI and frequency of NSSI. This study provides support for the joint contribution of cognitive and temperamental factors impacting the relationship between NA and NSSI and suggests that interventions targeted at maladaptive emotion regulation strategies may help inform individualized treatment.

  12. Negative Relational Schemas Predict the Trajectory of Coercive Dynamics During Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justin D.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2014-01-01

    Coercive family processes are germane to the development of problem behaviors in early childhood, yet the cognitive and affective underpinnings are not well understood. We hypothesized that one antecedent of early coercive interactions is the caregiver’s implicit affective attitudes toward the child, which in this article are termed relational schemas. Relational schemas have previously been linked to coercion and problem behaviors, but there has yet to be an examination of the association between relational schemas and trajectories of coercion during early childhood. We examined 731 indigent caregiver-child dyads (49% female children) from a randomized intervention trial of the Family Check-Up. Predominantly biological mothers participated. A speech sample was used to assess relational schemas at age 2. Coercive interactions were assessed observationally each year between ages 2 and 4. Caregiver and teacher reports of children’s oppositional and aggressive behaviors were collected at age 7.5 and 8.5. Path analysis revealed that negative relational schemas were associated with less steep declines in coercion during this period, which in turn were predictive of ratings of oppositional and aggressive behaviors at age 7.5/8.5 after controlling for baseline levels, positive relational schemas, child gender, ethnicity, and cumulative risk. Intervention condition assignment did not moderate this relationship, suggesting the results represent a naturally occurring process. Given the link between persistent early coercion and later deleterious outcomes, relational schemas that maintain and amplify coercive dynamics represent a potential target for early intervention programs designed to improve parent–child relationships. PMID:25208813

  13. Negative affect predicts social functioning across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Findings from an integrated data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler B; Tso, Ivy F; Chun, Jinsoo; Mueller, Savanna A; Taylor, Stephan F; Ellingrod, Vicki L; McInnis, Melvin G; Deldin, Patricia J

    2016-09-30

    Most people with a serious mental illness experience significant functional impairment despite ongoing pharmacological treatment. Thus, in order to improve outcomes, a better understanding of functional predictors is needed. This study examined negative affect, a construct comprised of negative emotional experience, as a predictor of social functioning across serious mental illnesses. One hundred twenty-seven participants with schizophrenia, 113 with schizoaffective disorder, 22 with psychosis not otherwise specified, 58 with bipolar disorder, and 84 healthy controls (N=404) completed self-report negative affect measures. Elevated levels of negative affect were observed in clinical participants compared with healthy controls. For both clinical and healthy control participants, negative affect measures were significantly correlated with social functioning, and consistently explained significant amounts of variance in functioning. For clinical participants, this relationship persisted even after accounting for cognition and positive/negative symptoms. The findings suggest that negative affect is a strong predictor of outcome across these populations and treatment of serious mental illnesses should target elevated negative affect in addition to cognition and positive/negative symptoms.

  14. Predicting liver metastasis of gastrointestinal tract cancer by diffusion-weighted imaging of apparent diffusion coefficient values

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, De-Xian; Meng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Qing-Jun; Li, Chuan-Ting; Shang, Xi-Dan; Zhu, Yu-Seng; Bai, Tian-Jun; Xu, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine if efficacy of chemotherapy on liver metastasis of gastrointestinal tract cancer can be predicted by apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). METHODS: In total, 86 patients with liver metastasis of gastrointestinal tract cancer (156 metastatic lesions) diagnosed in our hospital were included in this study. The maximum diameters of these tumors were compared with each other before treatment, 2 wk after treatment, and 12 wk after treatment. Selected patients were classified as the effective group and the ineffective group, depending on the maximum diameter of the tumor after 12 wk of treatment; and the ADC values at different treatment times between the two groups were compared. Spearman rank correlation was used to analyze the relationship between ADC value and tumor diameter. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve) was used to analyze the ADC values before treatment to predict the patient’s sensitivity and specificity degree of efficacy to the chemotherapy. RESULTS: There was no difference in age between the two groups and in maximum tumor diameter before treatment and 2 wk after treatment. However, after 12 wk of treatment, maximum tumor diameter in the effective group was significantly lower than that in the ineffective group (P < 0.05). Before treatment, ADC values in the ineffective group were significantly higher than those in the effective group (P < 0.05). There was no difference in ADC values between the effective and ineffective groups after 2 and 12 wk of treatment. However, ADC values were significantly higher after 2 and 12 wk of treatment compared to before treatment in the effective group (P < 0.05). Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that ADC value before treatment and the reduced percentage of the maximum tumor diameter after 12 wk of treatment were negatively correlated, while the increase in the percentage of the ADC value 12 wk after treatment and the decrease in the

  15. The Nature and Predictive Value of Mothers’ Beliefs Regarding Infants’ and Toddlers’ TV/Video Viewing: Applying the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Vaala, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Viewing television and video programming has become a normative behavior among US infants and toddlers. Little is understood about parents’ decision-making about the extent of their young children’s viewing, though numerous organizations are interested in reducing time spent viewing among infants and toddlers. Prior research has examined parents’ belief in the educational value of TV/videos for young children and the predictive value of this belief for understanding infant/toddler viewing rates, though other possible salient beliefs remain largely unexplored. This study employs the integrative model of behavioral prediction (Fishbein & Ajzen, 2010) to examine 30 maternal beliefs about infants’ and toddlers’ TV/video viewing which were elicited from a prior sample of mothers. Results indicate that mothers tend to hold more positive than negative beliefs about the outcomes associated with young children’s TV/video viewing, and that the nature of the aggregate set of beliefs is predictive of their general attitudes and intentions to allow their children to view, as well as children’s estimated viewing rates. Analyses also uncover multiple dimensions within the full set of beliefs, which explain more variance in mothers’ attitudes and intentions and children’s viewing than the uni-dimensional index. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25431537

  16. Prenatal Maternal Anxiety and Depression Predict Negative Behavioral Reactivity in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Snidman, Nancy; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Chris Dunkel; Sandman, Curt A.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of maternal antenatal and postnatal anxiety and depression on infant negative behavioral reactivity were examined in a sample of 22 mother-infant pairs. Maternal anxiety and depression were assessed by standardized measures during the third trimester of pregnancy and postpartum. Infant negative behavioral responses to novelty were…

  17. Relational Aggression, Positive Urgency and Negative Urgency: Predicting Alcohol Use and Consequences among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Elizabeth M.; Napper, Lucy E.; LaBrie, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Research on relational aggression (indirect and social means of inflicting harm) has previously focused on adolescent populations. The current study extends this research by exploring both the frequency of perpetrating and being the target of relational aggression as it relates to alcohol use outcomes in a college population. Further, this study examines whether positive urgency (e.g. acting impulsively in response to positive emotions) and negative urgency (e.g., acting impulsively in response to negative emotions) moderate the relationship between relational aggression and alcohol outcomes. In this study, 245 college students (65.7% female) completed an online survey. Results indicated greater frequency of perpetrating relational aggression, higher levels of positive urgency, or higher levels of negative urgency was associated with more negative consequences. Further, negative urgency moderated the relationship between frequency of perpetrating aggression and consequences such that aggression was more strongly associated with consequences for those high in urgency. Counter to the adolescent literature, the frequency of being the target of aggression was not associated with more alcohol use. These findings suggest that perpetrators of relational aggression may be at particular risk for negative alcohol-related consequences when they act impulsively in response to negative, but not positive, emotions. These students may benefit from interventions exploring alternative ways to cope with negative emotions. PMID:25134025

  18. Predictive Value of Autoantibody Testing for Validating Self-reported Diagnoses of Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Women's Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Mackey, Rachel; Kuller, Lewis; Deane, Kevin D.; Robinson, William; Holers, V. Michael; Chang, Yue-Fang; Moreland, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research using large databases is limited by insufficient case validity. Of 161,808 postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative, 15,691 (10.2%) reported having RA, far higher than the expected 1% population prevalence. Since chart review for confirmation of an RA diagnosis is impractical in large cohort studies, the current study (2009–2011) tested the ability of baseline serum measurements of rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, second-generation assay (anti-CCP2), to identify physician-validated RA among the chart-review study participants with self-reported RA (n = 286). Anti-CCP2 positivity had the highest positive predictive value (PPV) (80.0%), and rheumatoid factor positivity the lowest (44.6%). Together, use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-CCP2 positivity increased PPV to 100% but excluded all seronegative cases (approximately 15% of all RA cases). Case definitions inclusive of seronegative cases had PPVs between 59.6% and 63.6%. False-negative results were minimized in these test definitions, as evidenced by negative predictive values of approximately 90%. Serological measurements, particularly measurement of anti-CCP2, improved the test characteristics of RA case definitions in the Women's Health Initiative. PMID:23492764

  19. Inbreeding in Swiss Braunvieh and its influence on breeding values predicted from a repeatability animal model.

    PubMed

    Casanova, L; Hagger, C; Kuenzi, N; Schneeberger, M

    1992-04-01

    Inbreeding coefficients were computed for 910,444 animals of the Swiss Braunvieh population. Of the animals born in 1984, 71.5% were inbred with 67.9, 3.4, and .2% having inbreeding coefficients between greater than 0 and 5%, greater than 5 to 10%, and greater than 10%, respectively. The average inbreeding coefficient was 1.14% but, for animals with both parents and at least one grandparent known, it was 1.67%. Breeding values for total milk, fat, and protein yields and for fat and protein percentages were predicted using a repeatability animal model including a regression on the inbreeding coefficient. Phenotypic performance was sizeably depressed for milk yield only (-26 kg/% of inbreeding or 2.4% of the phenotypic standard deviation). Adjusting for inbreeding increased the estimated genetic trend slightly. Inbreeding is only partially accounted for when it is ignored in the construction of the inverse of the numerator relationship matrix. This effect was investigated by comparing predicted breeding values from a model including the complete matrix with predicted breeding values from a model including a matrix constructed with inbreeding ignored. Only .8% of all predicted breeding values were affected by more than +/- 5.5 kg. The maximum difference observed was 55.3 kg. The observed average absolute differences between the breeding values of offspring predicted with the two models increased with inbreeding of parents.

  20. The IgG avidity value for the prediction of Toxoplasma gondii infection in the amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Kenji; Nishikawa, Akira; Tairaku, Shinya; Shinozaki, Nanae; Deguchi, Masashi; Morizane, Mayumi; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Morioka, Ichiro; Yamada, Hideto

    2015-09-01

    Primary Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection during pregnancy may lead to congenital toxoplasmosis. Maternal screening using T. gondii IgG avidity measurement and multiplex nested PCR was performed. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine a cut-off value of IgG avidity index (AI) for the prediction of the presence of T. gondii DNA in the amniotic fluid. One hundred thirty-nine women with positive or equivocal tests for IgM underwent both serum IgG avidity measurement and PCR analysis for the amniotic fluid. Nine had positive PCR results, and three of them were diagnosed as having congenital infection. A cut-off value of IgG AI was determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis. IgG AI (mean 13%) in women with positive PCR results was significantly lower than that (39%) in women with negative results. A cut-off value of <25% IgG AI yields the best results with 77.8% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity for the presence of T. gondii DNA in the amniotic fluid. None of women with IgG AI of ≥30% had a positive PCR result or congenital infection. This study firstly demonstrated that a cut-off value of 25-30% IgG AI might be useful for the prediction of the presence of T. gondii DNA in the amniotic fluid and congenital infection.

  1. Triple-Negative Subtype Predicts Poor Overall Survival and High Locoregional Relapse in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Allen, Pamela K.; Yu, Tse K.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Lucci, Anthony; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Gong, Yun; Bondy, Melissa L.; Yang, Wei; Willey, Jie S.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Valero, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Background. Numerous studies have demonstrated that expression of estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 is important for predicting overall survival (OS), distant relapse (DR), and locoregional relapse (LRR) in early and advanced breast cancer patients. However, these findings have not been confirmed for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), which has different biological features than non-IBC. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 316 women who presented to MD Anderson Cancer Center in 1989–2008 with newly diagnosed IBC without distant metastases. Most patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation. Patients were grouped according to receptor status: ER+ (ER+/PR+ and HER-2−; n = 105), ER+HER-2+ (ER+/PR+ and HER-2+; n = 37), HER-2+ (ER−/PR− and HER-2+; n = 83), or triple-negative (TN) (ER−PR−HER-2−; n = 91). Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to assess LRR, DR, and OS rates and their associations with prognostic factors. Results. The median age was 50 years (range, 24–83 years). The median follow-up time and median OS time for all patients were both 33 months. The 5-year actuarial OS rates were 58.7% for the entire cohort, 69.7% for ER+ patients, 73.5% for ER+HER-2+ patients, 54.0% for HER=2+ patients, and 42.7% for TN patients (p < .0001); 5-year LRR rates were 20.3%, 8.0%, 12.6%, 22.6%, and 38.6%, respectively, for the four subgroups (p < .0001); and 5-year DR rates were 45.5%, 28.8%, 50.1%, 52.1%, and 56.7%, respectively (p < .001). OS and LRR rates were worse for TN patients than for any other subgroup (p < .0001–.03). Conclusions. TN disease is associated with worse OS, DR, and LRR outcomes in IBC patients, indicating the need for developing new locoregional and systemic treatment strategies for patients with this aggressive subtype. PMID:22147002

  2. Estimating Time-Varying PCB Exposures Using Person-Specific Predictions to Supplement Measured Values: A Comparison of Observed and Predicted Values in Two Cohorts of Norwegian Women

    PubMed Central

    Nøst, Therese Haugdahl; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank; Rylander, Charlotta; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Sandanger, Torkjel Manning

    2015-01-01

    , Rylander C, Odland JØ, Sandanger TM. 2016. Estimating time-varying PCB exposures using person-specific predictions to supplement measured values: a comparison of observed and predicted values in two cohorts of Norwegian women. Environ Health Perspect 124:299–305; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409191 PMID:26186800

  3. Metacognitive functioning predicts positive and negative symptoms over 12 months in first episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Hamish J; Gumley, Andrew I; Macbeth, Angus; Schwannauer, Matthias; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-07-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia are a major source of impairment and distress but both pharmacological and psychological treatment options provide only modest benefit. Developing more effective psychological treatments for negative symptoms will require a more sophisticated understanding of the psychological processes that are implicated in their development and maintenance. We extended previous work by demonstrating that metacognitive functioning is related to negative symptom expression across the first 12 months of first episode psychosis (FEP). Previous studies in this area have either been cross-sectional or have used much older participants with long-standing symptoms. In this study, forty-five FEP participants were assessed three times over 12 months and provided data on PANSS rated symptoms, premorbid adjustment, metacognitive functioning, and DUP. Step-wise linear regression showed that adding metacognition scores to known predictors of negative symptoms (baseline symptom severity, gender, DUP, and premorbid academic and social adjustment) accounted for 62% of the variance in PANSS negative symptom scores at six months and 38% at 12 months. The same predictors also explained 47% of the variance in positive symptoms at both six and 12 months. However, exploration of the simple correlations between PANSS symptom scores and metacognition suggests a stronger univariate relationship between metacognition and negative symptoms. Overall, the results indicate that problems with mental state processing may be important determinants of negative symptom expression from the very early stages of psychosis. These results provide further evidence that metacognitive functioning is a potentially relevant target for psychological interventions. PMID:24725651

  4. Metacognitive functioning predicts positive and negative symptoms over 12 months in first episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Hamish J; Gumley, Andrew I; Macbeth, Angus; Schwannauer, Matthias; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-07-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia are a major source of impairment and distress but both pharmacological and psychological treatment options provide only modest benefit. Developing more effective psychological treatments for negative symptoms will require a more sophisticated understanding of the psychological processes that are implicated in their development and maintenance. We extended previous work by demonstrating that metacognitive functioning is related to negative symptom expression across the first 12 months of first episode psychosis (FEP). Previous studies in this area have either been cross-sectional or have used much older participants with long-standing symptoms. In this study, forty-five FEP participants were assessed three times over 12 months and provided data on PANSS rated symptoms, premorbid adjustment, metacognitive functioning, and DUP. Step-wise linear regression showed that adding metacognition scores to known predictors of negative symptoms (baseline symptom severity, gender, DUP, and premorbid academic and social adjustment) accounted for 62% of the variance in PANSS negative symptom scores at six months and 38% at 12 months. The same predictors also explained 47% of the variance in positive symptoms at both six and 12 months. However, exploration of the simple correlations between PANSS symptom scores and metacognition suggests a stronger univariate relationship between metacognition and negative symptoms. Overall, the results indicate that problems with mental state processing may be important determinants of negative symptom expression from the very early stages of psychosis. These results provide further evidence that metacognitive functioning is a potentially relevant target for psychological interventions.

  5. Working memory capacity and spontaneous emotion regulation: high capacity predicts self-enhancement in response to negative feedback.

    PubMed

    Schmeichel, Brandon J; Demaree, Heath A

    2010-10-01

    Although previous evidence suggests that working memory capacity (WMC) is important for success at emotion regulation, that evidence may reveal simply that people with higher WMC follow instructions better than those with lower WMC. The present study tested the hypothesis that people with higher WMC more effectively engage in spontaneous emotion regulation following negative feedback, relative to those with lower WMC. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either no feedback or negative feedback about their emotional intelligence. They then completed a disguised measure of self-enhancement and a self-report measure of affect. Experimental condition and WMC interacted such that higher WMC predicted more self-enhancement and less negative affect following negative feedback. This research provides novel insight into the consequences of individual differences in WMC and illustrates that cognitive capacity may facilitate the spontaneous self-regulation of emotion. PMID:21038959

  6. Accuracy of Predicted Genomic Breeding Values in Purebred and Crossbred Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, André M.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Lopes, Marcos S.; Harlizius, Barbara; Groenen, Martien A. M.; de Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Genomic selection has been widely implemented in dairy cattle breeding when the aim is to improve performance of purebred animals. In pigs, however, the final product is a crossbred animal. This may affect the efficiency of methods that are currently implemented for dairy cattle. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of predicted breeding values in crossbred pigs using purebred genomic and phenotypic data. A second objective was to compare the predictive ability of SNPs when training is done in either single or multiple populations for four traits: age at first insemination (AFI); total number of piglets born (TNB); litter birth weight (LBW); and litter variation (LVR). We performed marker-based and pedigree-based predictions. Within-population predictions for the four traits ranged from 0.21 to 0.72. Multi-population prediction yielded accuracies ranging from 0.18 to 0.67. Predictions across purebred populations as well as predicting genetic merit of crossbreds from their purebred parental lines for AFI performed poorly (not significantly different from zero). In contrast, accuracies of across-population predictions and accuracies of purebred to crossbred predictions for LBW and LVR ranged from 0.08 to 0.31 and 0.11 to 0.31, respectively. Accuracy for TNB was zero for across-population prediction, whereas for purebred to crossbred prediction it ranged from 0.08 to 0.22. In general, marker-based outperformed pedigree-based prediction across populations and traits. However, in some cases pedigree-based prediction performed similarly or outperformed marker-based prediction. There was predictive ability when purebred populations were used to predict crossbred genetic merit using an additive model in the populations studied. AFI was the only exception, indicating that predictive ability depends largely on the genetic correlation between PB and CB performance, which was 0.31 for AFI. Multi-population prediction was no better than within

  7. Evaluation of the efficiency of artificial neural networks for genetic value prediction.

    PubMed

    Silva, G N; Tomaz, R S; Sant'Anna, I C; Carneiro, V Q; Cruz, C D; Nascimento, M

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have shown great potential when applied to breeding programs. In this study, we propose the use of artificial neural networks as a viable alternative to conventional prediction methods. We conduct a thorough evaluation of the efficiency of these networks with respect to the prediction of breeding values. Therefore, we considered eight simulated scenarios, and for the purpose of genetic value prediction, seven statistical parameters in addition to the phenotypic mean in a network designed as a multilayer perceptron. After an evaluation of different network configurations, the results demonstrated the superiority of neural networks compared to estimation procedures based on linear models, and indicated high predictive accuracy and network efficiency. PMID:27051007

  8. Predictive models of alcohol use based on attitudes and individual values.

    PubMed

    García del Castillo Rodríguez, José A; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Quiles Soler, M Carmen; García del Castillo-López, Alvaro; Gázquez Pertusa, Mónica; Marzo Campos, Juan Carlos; Inglés, Candido J

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people's attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The questionnaire used obtained information on participants' alcohol use, attitudes and personal values. The results show that the attitudes model correctly classifies 76.3% of cases. Likewise, the model for level of alcohol use correctly classifies 82% of cases. According to our results, we can conclude that there are a series of individual values that influence drinking and attitudes to alcohol use, which therefore provides us with a potentially powerful instrument for developing preventive intervention programs.

  9. Preoperative spirometry before abdominal operations. A critical appraisal of its predictive value.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, V A; Page, C P; Harris, G D

    1989-02-01

    Preoperative spirometry is commonly ordered before abdominal surgery, with the goal of predicting and preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. We assessed the evidence for this practice with a systematic literature search and critical appraisal of published studies. The search identified 135 clinical articles, of which 22 (16%) were actual investigations of the use and predictive value of preoperative spirometry. All 22 studies had important methodological flaws that preclude valid conclusions about the value of screening preoperative spirometry. The available evidence indicates that spirometry's predictive value is unproved. Unanswered questions involve (1) the yield of spirometry, in addition to history and physical examination, in patients with clinically apparent lung disease; (2) spirometry's yield in detecting surgically important occult disease; and (3) its utility, or beneficial effect on patient outcome. Spirometry's full potential for risk assessment in the individual patient has not yet been realized.

  10. Loss of stromal caveolin-1 expression predicts poor clinical outcome in triple negative and basal-like breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Sammons, Sara; Er, Ozlem; Potoczek, Magdalena B; Guiles, Fran; Sotgia, Federica; Brody, Jonathan R; Mitchell, Edith P; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-07-15

    Here, we investigated the possible predictive value of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) as a candidate biomarker for clinical outcome in triple negative (TN) breast cancer patients. A cohort of 85 TN breast cancer patients was available, with the necessary annotation and nearly 12 years of follow-up data. Our primary outcome of interest in this study was overall survival. Interestingly, TN patients with high-levels of stromal Cav-1 had a good clinical outcome, with >50% of the patients remaining alive during the follow-up period. In contrast, the median survival for TN patients with moderate stromal Cav-1 staining was 33.5 months. Similarly, the median survival for TN patients with absent stromal Cav-1 staining was 25.7 months. A comparison of 5-year survival rates yields a similar pattern. TN patients with high stromal Cav-1 had a good 5-year survival rate, with 75.5% of the patients remaining alive. In contrast, TN patients with moderate or absent stromal Cav-1 levels had progressively worse 5-year survival rates, with 40 and 9.4% of the patients remaining alive. In contrast, in a parallel analysis, the levels of tumor epithelial Cav-1 had no prognostic significance. As such, the prognostic value of Cav-1 immunostaining in TN breast cancer patients is compartment-specific, and selective for an absence of Cav-1 staining in the stromal fibroblast compartment. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to assess which factors are most predictive of overall survival in TN breast cancer patients. In this analysis, we included tumor size, histologic grade, whether the patient received surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, CK5/6, EGFR, p53 and Ki67 status, as well as the stromal Cav-1 score. This analysis indicated that stromal loss of Cav-1 expression was the most important prognostic factor for overall survival in TN breast cancer. Virtually identical results were obtained with CK5/6 (+) and/or EGFR (+) TN breast cancer cases, demonstrating that a loss of stromal Cav-1 is

  11. The importance of values in predicting Turkish youth's opinions about the European Union in light of the Copenhagen Political Criteria.

    PubMed

    Kuşdil, M Ersin; Simşek, Sefa

    2008-12-01

    The enlargement process of the European Union may be regarded as one of the most important social projects of human history in that it is trying to unite several nation-states under a "European identity." As a historically and culturally "distant" candidate, Turkey has been asked to meet a set of expectations referred to as the "Copenhagen Criteria," requiring a series of large-scale reforms to the infrastructure and superstructure of the country. Taking advantage of the unique opportunity to relate Turkish people's opinions on the criteria to their values, hypotheses based on Schwartz's model of values were tested. Schwartz's Personal Values Questionnaire and a questionnaire measuring opinions on the criteria and the Union were completed by 368 Turkish university students. Factor analysis of the opinion items yielded five factors: reduction of military influence in civil life, scepticism towards Europe and the European Union, improvement of human rights and liberties, improvement of minority rights, and lack of transparency in public institutions. Regression analyses showed that values and nationalism were powerful predictors of opinions whereas the effect of religiosity was limited only to the prediction of a preference for the reduction of military influence in civil life. Preference for openness to change values were successful in predicting variance in three of the five criteria: The more the participants favoured these values, the more they supported the improvement of human rights and liberties, the improvement of minority rights, and regretted the lack of transparency. Self-transcendence values were also positively related to support for the same three criteria together with a preference for reduction of military influence. As for nationalism, the results showed that this variable was related negatively to reduction of the military influence, improvement of human rights and liberties, improvement of minority rights; and positively to scepticism. PMID

  12. The importance of values in predicting Turkish youth's opinions about the European Union in light of the Copenhagen Political Criteria.

    PubMed

    Kuşdil, M Ersin; Simşek, Sefa

    2008-12-01

    The enlargement process of the European Union may be regarded as one of the most important social projects of human history in that it is trying to unite several nation-states under a "European identity." As a historically and culturally "distant" candidate, Turkey has been asked to meet a set of expectations referred to as the "Copenhagen Criteria," requiring a series of large-scale reforms to the infrastructure and superstructure of the country. Taking advantage of the unique opportunity to relate Turkish people's opinions on the criteria to their values, hypotheses based on Schwartz's model of values were tested. Schwartz's Personal Values Questionnaire and a questionnaire measuring opinions on the criteria and the Union were completed by 368 Turkish university students. Factor analysis of the opinion items yielded five factors: reduction of military influence in civil life, scepticism towards Europe and the European Union, improvement of human rights and liberties, improvement of minority rights, and lack of transparency in public institutions. Regression analyses showed that values and nationalism were powerful predictors of opinions whereas the effect of religiosity was limited only to the prediction of a preference for the reduction of military influence in civil life. Preference for openness to change values were successful in predicting variance in three of the five criteria: The more the participants favoured these values, the more they supported the improvement of human rights and liberties, the improvement of minority rights, and regretted the lack of transparency. Self-transcendence values were also positively related to support for the same three criteria together with a preference for reduction of military influence. As for nationalism, the results showed that this variable was related negatively to reduction of the military influence, improvement of human rights and liberties, improvement of minority rights; and positively to scepticism.

  13. Prediction of textural attributes using color values of banana (Musa sapientum) during ripening.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Pranita; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Kaur, Poonam Preet; Bhardwaj, Rishi; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Wadhawan, Vishakha

    2014-06-01

    Banana is an important sub-tropical fruit in international trade. It undergoes significant textural and color transformations during ripening process, which in turn influence the eating quality of the fruit. In present study, color ('L', 'a' and 'b' value) and textural attributes of bananas (peel, fruit and pulp firmness; pulp toughness; stickiness) were studied simultaneously using Hunter Color Lab and Texture Analyser, respectively, during ripening period of 10 days at ambient atmosphere. There was significant effect of ripening period on all the considered textural characteristics and color properties of bananas except color value 'b'. In general, textural descriptors (peel, fruit and pulp firmness; and pulp toughness) decreased during ripening except stickiness, while color values viz 'a' and 'b' increased with ripening barring 'L' value. Among various textural attributes, peel toughness and pulp firmness showed highest correlation (r) with 'a' value of banana peel. In order to predict textural properties using color values of banana, five types of equations (linear/polynomial/exponential/logarithmic/power) were fitted. Among them, polynomial equation was found to be the best fit (highest coefficient of determination, R(2)) for prediction of texture using color properties for bananas. The pulp firmness, peel toughness and pulp toughness showed R(2) above 0.84 with indicating its potentiality of the fitted equations for prediction of textural profile of bananas non-destructively using 'a' value. PMID:24876653

  14. An Intercomparison of Lidar Ozone and Temperature Measurements From the SOLVE Mission With Predicted Model Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas J.; Hoegy, Walt; Lait, Leslie; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Larry; Heaps, William

    2000-01-01

    Temperature profiles acquired by Goddard Space Flight Center's AROTEL lidar during the SOLVE mission onboard NASA's DC-8 are compared with predicted values from several atmospheric models (DAO, NCEP and UKMO). The variability in the differences between measured and calculated temperature fields was approximately 5 K. Retrieved temperatures within the polar vortex showed large regions that were significantly colder than predicted by the atmospheric models.

  15. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Striatal Reward Responses Relate to Approach-Avoidance Learning and Encoding of Positive-Negative Prediction Errors in Dopaminergic Midbrain Regions.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Kristoffer Carl; Doell, Kimberly C; Schwartz, Sophie

    2015-10-28

    Some individuals are better at learning about rewarding situations, whereas others are inclined to avoid punishments (i.e., enhanced approach or avoidance learning, respectively). In reinforcement learning, action values are increased when outcomes are better than predicted (positive prediction errors [PEs]) and decreased for worse than predicted outcomes (negative PEs). Because actions with high and low values are approached and avoided, respectively, individual differences in the neural encoding of PEs may influence the balance between approach-avoidance learning. Recent correlational approaches also indicate that biases in approach-avoidance learning involve hemispheric asymmetries in dopamine function. However, the computational and neural mechanisms underpinning such learning biases remain unknown. Here we assessed hemispheric reward asymmetry in striatal activity in 34 human participants who performed a task involving rewards and punishments. We show that the relative difference in reward response between hemispheres relates to individual biases in approach-avoidance learning. Moreover, using a computational modeling approach, we demonstrate that better encoding of positive (vs negative) PEs in dopaminergic midbrain regions is associated with better approach (vs avoidance) learning, specifically in participants with larger reward responses in the left (vs right) ventral striatum. Thus, individual dispositions or traits may be determined by neural processes acting to constrain learning about specific aspects of the world.

  16. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Striatal Reward Responses Relate to Approach-Avoidance Learning and Encoding of Positive-Negative Prediction Errors in Dopaminergic Midbrain Regions.

    PubMed

    Aberg, Kristoffer Carl; Doell, Kimberly C; Schwartz, Sophie

    2015-10-28

    Some individuals are better at learning about rewarding situations, whereas others are inclined to avoid punishments (i.e., enhanced approach or avoidance learning, respectively). In reinforcement learning, action values are increased when outcomes are better than predicted (positive prediction errors [PEs]) and decreased for worse than predicted outcomes (negative PEs). Because actions with high and low values are approached and avoided, respectively, individual differences in the neural encoding of PEs may influence the balance between approach-avoidance learning. Recent correlational approaches also indicate that biases in approach-avoidance learning involve hemispheric asymmetries in dopamine function. However, the computational and neural mechanisms underpinning such learning biases remain unknown. Here we assessed hemispheric reward asymmetry in striatal activity in 34 human participants who performed a task involving rewards and punishments. We show that the relative difference in reward response between hemispheres relates to individual biases in approach-avoidance learning. Moreover, using a computational modeling approach, we demonstrate that better encoding of positive (vs negative) PEs in dopaminergic midbrain regions is associated with better approach (vs avoidance) learning, specifically in participants with larger reward responses in the left (vs right) ventral striatum. Thus, individual dispositions or traits may be determined by neural processes acting to constrain learning about specific aspects of the world. PMID:26511241

  17. The dark side of optimism: unrealistic optimism about problems with alcohol predicts subsequent negative event experiences.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Amanda J; Midboe, Amanda M; Klein, William M P

    2009-11-01

    College students were identified who were unrealistically optimistic about the likelihood they would experience severe problems due to alcohol consumption. These individuals were then followed over a 2-year period to determine whether they were more likely to report experiencing a range of alcohol-related negative events. Unlike the majority of studies on unrealistic optimism, this study (a) assessed bias at the individual rather than group level and (b) used a prospective rather than cross-sectional design. Participants completed measures at four times, each separated by 4-6 months. Findings showed that unrealistic optimism at Time 1 was associated with a greater number of negative events at Times 2, 3, and 4. Similarly, unrealistic optimism at Time 2 was associated with more negative events at Times 3 and 4. In all cases, the relationships were significant when controlling for previous negative events, suggesting the effects of unrealistic optimism can mount over time. PMID:19721102

  18. Negative cognitive styles synergistically predict suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders: a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Burke, Taylor A; Kleiman, Evan M; O'Garro-Moore, Jared K; Seligman, Nicole D; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-03-30

    Rates of suicidal ideation and behavior are extremely high in bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs). However, relatively little work has evaluated potentially synergistic relationships between cognitive and emotion-regulatory processes proposed by theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs. The present study evaluated whether negative cognitive style and subtypes of rumination would exacerbate the impact of self-criticism on suicidal ideation in a prospective study of individuals with BSDs. Seventy-two young adults with BSDs (bipolar II, bipolar NOS, or cyclothymia) completed diagnostic interviews and trait measures of self-criticism, negative cognitive style, and brooding and reflective rumination at a baseline assessment. The occurrence of suicidal ideation was assessed as part of diagnostic interviews completed every 4 months for an average of 3 years of follow-up. Negative cognitive style and reflective rumination strengthened the association between self-criticism and the prospective occurrence of suicidal ideation across follow-up. Individuals with high levels of self-criticism in conjunction with negative cognitive style or reflective rumination were most likely to experience the onset of suicidal ideation. Self-criticism may work synergistically with negative cognitive style and rumination to confer risk for suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders. These results support theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs and indicate that evaluating and understanding negative cognitive styles may help to identify individuals who are at risk of suicide.

  19. Predictive Response Value of Pre- and Postchemoradiotherapy Variables in Rectal Cancer: An Analysis of Histological Data

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Silva, Cristina; Rocha, Anabela; Nogueira, Carlos; Matos, Eduarda; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by curative surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) improves pelvic disease control. Survival improvement is achieved only if pathological response occurs. Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG) proved to be a valid system to measure nCRT response. Potential predictive factors for Mandard response are analyzed. Materials and Methods. 167 patients with LARC were treated with nCRT and curative surgery. Tumor biopsies and surgical specimens were reviewed and analyzed regarding mitotic count, necrosis, desmoplastic reaction, and inflammatory infiltration grade. Surgical specimens were classified according to Mandard TRG. The patients were divided as “good responders” (Mandard TRG1-2) and “bad responders” (Mandard TRG3-5). According to results from our previous data, good responders have better prognosis than bad responders. We examined predictive factors for Mandard response and performed statistical analysis. Results. In univariate analysis, distance from anal verge and ten other postoperative variables related with nCRT tumor response had predictive value for Mandard response. In multivariable analysis only mitotic count, necrosis, and differentiation grade in surgical specimen had predictive value. Conclusions. There is a lack of clinical and pathological preoperative variables able to predict Mandard response. Only postoperative pathological parameters related with nCRT response have predictive value. PMID:26885438

  20. Predicting negative life outcomes from early aggressive-disruptive behavior trajectories: gender differences in maladaptation across life domains.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catherine P; Schaeffer, Cindy M; Petras, Hanno; Ialongo, Nicholas

    2010-08-01

    Transactional theories of development suggest that displaying high levels of antisocial behavior early in life and persistently over time causes disruption in multiple life domains, which in turn places individuals at risk for negative life outcomes. We used longitudinal data from 1,137 primarily African American urban youth (49.1% female) to determine whether different trajectories of aggressive and disruptive behavior problems were associated with a range of negative life outcomes in young adulthood. General growth mixture modeling was used to classify the youths' patterns of aggressive-disruptive behavior across elementary school. These trajectories were then used to predict early sexual activity, early pregnancy, school dropout, unemployment, and drug abuse in young adulthood. The trajectories predicted the number but not type of negative life outcomes experienced. Girls with the chronic high aggression-disruption (CHAD) pattern experienced more negative outcomes than girls with consistently moderate levels, who were at greater risk than nonaggressive-nondisruptive girls. Boys with CHAD and boys with an increasing pattern had equal levels of risk for experiencing negative outcomes. The findings are consistent with transactional models of development and have implications for preventive interventions.

  1. Values, attitudes, and frequency of meat consumption. Predicting meat-reduced diet in Australians.

    PubMed

    Hayley, Alexa; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Hardiman, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Reduced consumption of meat, particularly red meat, is associated with numerous health benefits. While past research has examined demographic and cognitive correlates of meat-related diet identity and meat consumption behaviour, the predictive influence of personal values on meat-consumption attitudes and behaviour, as well as gender differences therein, has not been explicitly examined, nor has past research focusing on 'meat' generally addressed 'white meat' and 'fish/seafood' as distinct categories of interest. Two hundred and two Australians (59.9% female, 39.1% male, 1% unknown), aged 18 to 91 years (M = 31.42, SD = 16.18), completed an online questionnaire including the Schwartz Values Survey, and measures of diet identity, attitude towards reduced consumption of each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, as well as self-reported estimates of frequency of consumption of each meat type. Results showed that higher valuing of Universalism predicted more positive attitudes towards reducing, and less frequent consumption of, each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, while higher Power predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption of, these meats. Higher Security predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption, of white meat and fish/seafood, while Conformity produced this latter effect for fish/seafood only. Despite men valuing Power more highly than women, women valuing Universalism more highly than men, and men eating red meat more frequently than women, gender was not a significant moderator of the value-attitude-behaviour mediations described, suggesting that gender's effects on meat consumption may not be robust once entered into a multivariate model of MRD attitudes and behaviour. Results support past findings associating Universalism, Power, and Security values with meat-eating preferences, and extend these findings by articulating how these values relate specifically

  2. Values, attitudes, and frequency of meat consumption. Predicting meat-reduced diet in Australians.

    PubMed

    Hayley, Alexa; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Hardiman, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Reduced consumption of meat, particularly red meat, is associated with numerous health benefits. While past research has examined demographic and cognitive correlates of meat-related diet identity and meat consumption behaviour, the predictive influence of personal values on meat-consumption attitudes and behaviour, as well as gender differences therein, has not been explicitly examined, nor has past research focusing on 'meat' generally addressed 'white meat' and 'fish/seafood' as distinct categories of interest. Two hundred and two Australians (59.9% female, 39.1% male, 1% unknown), aged 18 to 91 years (M = 31.42, SD = 16.18), completed an online questionnaire including the Schwartz Values Survey, and measures of diet identity, attitude towards reduced consumption of each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, as well as self-reported estimates of frequency of consumption of each meat type. Results showed that higher valuing of Universalism predicted more positive attitudes towards reducing, and less frequent consumption of, each of red meat, white meat, and fish/seafood, while higher Power predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption of, these meats. Higher Security predicted less positive attitudes towards reducing, and more frequent consumption, of white meat and fish/seafood, while Conformity produced this latter effect for fish/seafood only. Despite men valuing Power more highly than women, women valuing Universalism more highly than men, and men eating red meat more frequently than women, gender was not a significant moderator of the value-attitude-behaviour mediations described, suggesting that gender's effects on meat consumption may not be robust once entered into a multivariate model of MRD attitudes and behaviour. Results support past findings associating Universalism, Power, and Security values with meat-eating preferences, and extend these findings by articulating how these values relate specifically

  3. Predictive Value of Estimated Tumor Volume Measured by Ultrasonography for Occult Central Lymph Node Metastasis in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Nam; Kang, Kyung Yoon; Hong, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Han-Shin; Lee, Seung Won

    2015-11-01

    The clinical and prognostic value of tumor volume in various solid tumors has been investigated. However, there have been few studies on the clinical impact of tumor volume in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). This study was performed to investigate the predictive value of estimated tumor volume measured by ultrasonography for occult central neck metastasis (OCNM) of PTC. A total of 264 patients with clinically node-negative PTC on ultrasonography and computed tomography who underwent total thyroidectomy in conjunction with at least ipsilateral prophylactic central neck dissection were enrolled in this study. Tumor volume was derived with the formula used to calculate ellipsoids from two orthogonal scans during 2-D ultrasonography at initial aspiration biopsy. We retrospectively evaluated demographic characteristics, pre-operative ultrasonographic features (tumor size, volume and multifocality) and pathologic results. The OCNM rate was 35.6%; estimated tumor volume was used to predict OCNM (p = 0.035). At 0.385 mL, sensitivity and specificity were 51.1% and 66.5%, and the area under the curve for OCNM detection was 0.610. In multivariate analysis, tumor volume, but not size, was an independent predictive factor for OCNM (odds ratio = 1.83, p = 0.029). The other factors were extrathyroidal extension (odds ratio = 2.39, p = 0.004) and male gender (odds ratio = 3.90, p < 0.001). The estimated tumor volume of PTC measured by ultrasonography could be a pre-operative predictor of OCNM.

  4. Correlates of reward-predictive value in learning-related hippocampal neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Okatan, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Temporal difference learning (TD) is a popular algorithm in machine learning. Two learning signals that are derived from this algorithm, the predictive value and the prediction error, have been shown to explain changes in neural activity and behavior during learning across species. Here, the predictive value signal is used to explain the time course of learning-related changes in the activity of hippocampal neurons in monkeys performing an associative learning task. The TD algorithm serves as the centerpiece of a joint probability model for the learning-related neural activity and the behavioral responses recorded during the task. The neural component of the model consists of spiking neurons that compete and learn the reward-predictive value of task-relevant input signals. The predictive-value signaled by these neurons influences the behavioral response generated by a stochastic decision stage, which constitutes the behavioral component of the model. It is shown that the time course of the changes in neural activity and behavioral performance generated by the model exhibits key features of the experimental data. The results suggest that information about correct associations may be expressed in the hippocampus before it is detected in the behavior of a subject. In this way, the hippocampus may be among the earliest brain areas to express learning and drive the behavioral changes associated with learning. Correlates of reward-predictive value may be expressed in the hippocampus through rate remapping within spatial memory representations, they may represent reward-related aspects of a declarative or explicit relational memory representation of task contingencies, or they may correspond to reward-related components of episodic memory representations. These potential functions are discussed in connection with hippocampal cell assembly sequences and their reverse reactivation during the awake state. The results provide further support for the proposal that neural

  5. On the hydrophobicity of peptides: Comparing empirical predictions of peptide log P values.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sarah J; Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Holliday, John D; Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    Peptides are of great therapeutic potential as vaccines and drugs. Knowledge of physicochemical descriptors, including the partition coefficient logP, is useful for the development of predictive Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs). We have investigated the accuracy of available programs for the prediction of logP values for peptides with known experimental values obtained from the literature. Eight prediction programs were tested, of which seven programs were fragment-based methods: XLogP, LogKow, PLogP, ACDLogP, AlogP, Interactive Analysis's LogP and MlogP; and one program used a whole molecule approach: QikProp. The predictive accuracy of the programs was assessed using r(2) values, with ALogP being the most effective (r( 2) = 0.822) and MLogP the least (r(2) = 0.090). We also examined three distinct types of peptide structure: blocked, unblocked, and cyclic. For each study (all peptides, blocked, unblocked and cyclic peptides) the performance of programs rated from best to worse is as follows: all peptides - ALogP, QikProp, PLogP, XLogP, IALogP, LogKow, ACDLogP, and MlogP; blocked peptides - PLogP, XLogP, ACDLogP, IALogP, LogKow, QikProp, ALogP, and MLogP; unblocked peptides - QikProp, IALogP, ALogP, ACDLogP, MLogP, XLogP, LogKow and PLogP; cyclic peptides - LogKow, ALogP, XLogP, MLogP, QikProp, ACDLogP, IALogP. In summary, all programs gave better predictions for blocked peptides, while, in general, logP values for cyclic peptides were under-predicted and those of unblocked peptides were over-predicted. PMID:17597897

  6. [Critical evaluation and predictive value of clinical presentation in out-patients with acute community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Mayaud, C; Fartoukh, M; Prigent, H; Parrot, A; Cadranel, J

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic probability of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends on data related to age and clinical and radiological findings. The critical evaluation of data in the literature leads to the following conclusions: 1) the prevalence of CAP in a given population with acute respiratory disease is 5% in outpatients and 10% in an emergency care unit. This could be as low as 2% in young people and even higher than 40% in hospitalized elderly patients; 2) the collection of clinical data is linked to the way the patient is examined and to the expertise of the clinician. The absolute lack of "vital signs" has a good negative predictive value in CAP; presence of unilateral crackles has a good positive predictive value; 3) there is a wide range of X-ray abnormalities: localized alveolar opacities; interstitial opacities, limited of diffused. The greatest radiological difficulties are encountered in old people with disorders including chronic respiratory or cardiac opacities and as a consequence of the high prevalence of bronchopneumonia episodes at this age; 4) among patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT) infections, the blood levels of leukocytes, CRP and procalcitonine are higher in CAP patients, mainly when their disease has a bacterial origin. Since you have not a threshold value reliably demonstrated in large populations with LRT infections or acute respiratory disease, presence or absence of these parameters could only be taken as a slight hint for a CAP diagnosis. PMID:17084571

  7. Predictive value of early serum beta-human chorionic gonadotrophin for the successful outcome in women undergoing in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neeta; Goyal, Manu; Malhotra, Neena; Tiwari, Abanish; Badiger, Shreenivas

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Pregnancies achieved by in vitro fertilization (IVF) are at increased risk of adverse outcome. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-HCG) and age of the patient for the successful outcome in IVF. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was done in 139 pregnancies after IVF at single IVF center from June 2007 to July 2012. The age of the patient and initial serum values of β-HCG on day 14 of embryo transfer were correlated with ongoing pregnancy (>12 weeks gestation). RESULTS: The β-HCG level on day 14 of more than 347 mIU/ml has a sensitivity of 72.2% and specificity of 73.6% in prediction of pregnancy beyond 12 weeks period of gestation. Positive likelihood ratio (LR) is 2.74 and negative LR is 0.37, (receiver operating characteristic area = 0.79). DISCUSSION: In IVF cycles, there is a lot of stress on the couples while the cycle is going on. There was a positive correlation between the higher values of early serum β-HCG levels and ongoing pregnancy. Hence, it can be used as an independent predictor of a successful outcome of IVF cycle. CONCLUSION: We concluded from our study that early serum β-HCG can be used as a predictor of a successful outcome in IVF. PMID:24672163

  8. Comparing the Effects of Negative and Mixed Emotional Messages on Predicted Occasional Excessive Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Pilar; Caballero, Amparo; Muñoz, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present two types of emotional message, negative (sadness) versus mixed (joy and sadness), with the aim of studying their differential effect on attitude change and the probability estimated by participants of repeating the behavior of occasional excessive drinking in the near future. The results show that for the group of participants with moderate experience in this behavior the negative message, compared to the mixed one, is associated with higher probability of repeating the risk behavior and a less negative attitude toward it. These results suggest that mixed emotional messages (e.g. joy and sadness messages) could be more effective in campaigns for the prevention of this risk behavior. PMID:25977606

  9. Predicted Values of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Healthy Individuals (A Pilot Study)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Majid Malek; Dadashpour, Shahdak

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary exercise testing evaluates the ability of one's cardiovascular and respiratory system in maximal exercise. This was a descriptive cross-sectional pilot study conducted at Masih Daneshvari Hospital in order to determine predicted values of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in individuals with normal physical activity patterns. Materials and Methods Thirty four individuals (14 women, 20 men) between 18-57 years of age were chosen using simple sampling method and evaluated with an incremental progressive cycle-ergometer test to a symptom-limited maximal tolerable work load. Subjects with a history of ischemic heart disease, pulmonary disease or neuromuscular disease were excluded from the study. Smokers were included but we made sure that all subjects had normal FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. This study aimed to compare measured values of VO2, VCO2, VO2/Kg, RER, O2pulse, HRR, HR, Load, Ant, BF, BR, VE, EQCO2, and EQO2 with previously published predicted values. Results We found that our obtained values for VO2 max, HRR max and HR max were different from standard tables but such difference was not observed for other understudy variables. Multiple linear regression analysis was done for height, weight and age (due to the small number of samples, no difference was detected between males and females). VO2 max and load max had reverse correlation with age and direct correlation with weight and height (P < 0.05) but the greatest correlation was observed for height. Conclusion Due to the small number of samples and poor correlations it was not possible to do regression analysis for other variables. In the next study with a larger sample size predicted values for all variables will be calculated. If the future study also indicates a significant difference between the predicted values and the reference values, we will need standard tables made specifically for our own country, Iran. PMID:25191396

  10. Prediction of breeding values for dairy cattle using artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy systems.

    PubMed

    Shahinfar, Saleh; Mehrabani-Yeganeh, Hassan; Lucas, Caro; Kalhor, Ahmad; Kazemian, Majid; Weigel, Kent A

    2012-01-01

    Developing machine learning and soft computing techniques has provided many opportunities for researchers to establish new analytical methods in different areas of science. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of two types of intelligent learning methods, artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy systems, in order to estimate breeding values (EBV) of Iranian dairy cattle. Initially, the breeding values of lactating Holstein cows for milk and fat yield were estimated using conventional best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) with an animal model. Once that was established, a multilayer perceptron was used to build ANN to predict breeding values from the performance data of selection candidates. Subsequently, fuzzy logic was used to form an NFS, a hybrid intelligent system that was implemented via a local linear model tree algorithm. For milk yield the correlations between EBV and EBV predicted by the ANN and NFS were 0.92 and 0.93, respectively. Corresponding correlations for fat yield were 0.93 and 0.93, respectively. Correlations between multitrait predictions of EBVs for milk and fat yield when predicted simultaneously by ANN were 0.93 and 0.93, respectively, whereas corresponding correlations with reference EBV for multitrait NFS were 0.94 and 0.95, respectively, for milk and fat production.

  11. Understanding the Communicative Implications of Initial Impressions: A Longitudinal Test of Predicted Outcome Value Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, Sean M.; Houser, Marian L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test predicted outcome value theory (POV) in the classroom in order to discover the implications of students' POV judgments. Specifically, we explored the relationships among students' initial POV judgments and students' communication. To that end, we conducted a two-phase study in which students completed…

  12. Significance of a Behavioral Economic Index of Reward Value in Predicting Drinking Problem Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jalie A.; Vuchinich, Rudy E.; Black, Bethany C.; Rippens, Paula D.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether a behavioral economic index of the value of rewards available over different time horizons improved prediction of drinking outcomes beyond established biopsychosocial predictors. Preferences for immediate drinking versus more delayed rewards made possible by saving money were determined from expenditures prior to…

  13. Determining the Predictive Value of Selected Measures for First Grade Reading Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Bob Gene

    This study investigated the predictive value of certain tests in relationship to first grade reading success. The Metropolitan Readiness Test, Naming Letters Test, Light Response Test, and Matching Symbol Test were administered to 70 first grade students during the first two weeks of school. The Teacher's Reading Readiness Rating Scale was filled…

  14. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1890...

  15. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1890...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1890...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1890...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1890 - Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Predictive pulmonary-function value calculator. 868.1890 Section 868.1890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1890...

  19. Interests, Work Values, and Occupations: Predicting Work Outcomes with the WorkKeys Fit Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaney, Kyle B.; Allen, Jeff; Casillas, Alex; Hanson, Mary Ann; Robbins, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether a measure of person-environment (P-E) fit predicted worker ratings of work attitudes and supervisor ratings of performance. After combining extant data elements and expert ratings of interest and work value characteristics for each occupation in the O*NET system, the authors generated a "Fit Index"--involving profile…

  20. The Predictive Value of Selection Criteria in an Urban Magnet School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmeier, Jill Hendrickson; Raad, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The predictive value of selection criteria on outcome data from two cohorts of students (Total N = 525) accepted to an urban magnet high school were evaluated. Regression analyses of typical screening variables (suspensions, absences, metropolitan achievement tests, middle school grade point averages [GPAs], Matrix Analogies test scores, and…

  1. Semiparametric Models of Time-dependent Predictive Values of Prognostic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingye; Cai, Tianxi; Stanford, Janet L.; Feng, Ziding

    2009-01-01

    Summary Rigorous statistical evaluation of the predictive values of novel biomarkers is critical prior to applying novel biomarkers into routine standard care. It is important to identify factors that influence the performance of a biomarker in order to determine the optimal conditions for test performance. We propose a covariate-specific time-dependent PPV curve to quantify the predictive accuracy of a prognostic marker measured on a continuous scale and with censored failure time outcome. The covariate effect is accommodated with a semiparametric regression model framework. In particular we adopt a smoothed survival time regression technique (Dabrowska, 1997) to account for the situation where risk for the disease occurrence and progression is likely to change over time. In addition, we provide asymptotic distribution theory and resampling-based procedures for making statistical inference on the covariate specific positive predictive values. We illustrate our approach with numerical studies and a dataset from a prostate cancer study. PMID:19397579

  2. Early Negative Affect Predicts Anxiety, Not Autism, in Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Malone, Patrick S.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Roberts, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and…

  3. Reduction in delta activity predicted improved negative affect in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia

    2015-08-30

    While prior research has demonstrated a paradoxical antidepressant effect of slow-wave disruption (SWD), the specific dimensions of depression affected is still unclear. The current study aimed to extend this research by utilizing a dimensional approach in examining the antidepressant effects of SWD. Of particular interest is the affective dimension, as negative affect in depression is arguably the most salient characteristic of depression. This sample included 16 individuals with depression (10 female) recruited from the community. Participants slept in the lab for three nights (adaptation, baseline night, and SWD) with polysomnography, and completed measures of negative affect and depression severity the following morning. Results show that reduction in delta power was linearly associated with improved negative affect. Comparison of individual change scores revealed that half of the individuals showed improved negative affect, which is comparable to the reported 40-60% antidepressant response rate to sleep deprivation. Results suggest that vulnerability in the sleep homeostatic system may be a contributing individual differences factor in response to slow-wave disruption in depression.

  4. Prediction of Negative Attitude from Congruity, Summation, and Logarithm Formulae for the Evaluation of Complex Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lynn R.

    1970-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to Compare the efficacy of an averaging (congruity) formula vs. an additive formula for the evaluation of complex stimuli when negative adjectives were used to describe the attitude topic. A logarithm formula proposed by Mannis, Gleason, and Dawes was also used. (DB)

  5. Reduction in delta activity predicted improved negative affect in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia

    2015-08-30

    While prior research has demonstrated a paradoxical antidepressant effect of slow-wave disruption (SWD), the specific dimensions of depression affected is still unclear. The current study aimed to extend this research by utilizing a dimensional approach in examining the antidepressant effects of SWD. Of particular interest is the affective dimension, as negative affect in depression is arguably the most salient characteristic of depression. This sample included 16 individuals with depression (10 female) recruited from the community. Participants slept in the lab for three nights (adaptation, baseline night, and SWD) with polysomnography, and completed measures of negative affect and depression severity the following morning. Results show that reduction in delta power was linearly associated with improved negative affect. Comparison of individual change scores revealed that half of the individuals showed improved negative affect, which is comparable to the reported 40-60% antidepressant response rate to sleep deprivation. Results suggest that vulnerability in the sleep homeostatic system may be a contributing individual differences factor in response to slow-wave disruption in depression. PMID:26123231

  6. Genome-wide protein localization prediction strategies for gram negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-wide prediction of protein subcellular localization is an important type of evidence used for inferring protein function. While a variety of computational tools have been developed for this purpose, errors in the gene models and use of protein sorting signals that are not recognized by the more commonly accepted tools can diminish the accuracy of their output. As part of an effort to manually curate the annotations of 19 strains of Shewanella, numerous insights were gained regarding the use of computational tools and proteomics data to predict protein localization. Identification of the suite of secretion systems present in each strain at the start of the process made it possible to tailor-fit the subsequent localization prediction strategies to each strain for improved accuracy. Comparisons of the computational predictions among orthologous proteins revealed inconsistencies in the computational outputs, which could often be resolved by adjusting the gene models or ortholog group memberships. While proteomic data was useful for verifying start site predictions and post-translational proteolytic cleavage, care was needed to distinguish cellular versus sample processing-mediated cleavage events. Searches for lipoprotein signal peptides revealed that neither TatP nor LipoP are designed for identification of lipoprotein substrates of the twin arginine translocation system and that the +2 rule for lipoprotein sorting does not apply to this Genus. Analysis of the relationships between domain occurrence and protein localization prediction enabled identification of numerous location-informative domains which could then be used to refine or increase confidence in location predictions. This collective knowledge was used to develop a general strategy for predicting protein localization that could be adapted to other organisms.

  7. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-02-01

    Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients.This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II-VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan-Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS).Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72-12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458-3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan-Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation.The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut-off values may prove

  8. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients. This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II–VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan–Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS). Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72–12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458–3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan–Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation. The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut

  9. Effects of affective arousal on choice behavior, reward prediction errors, and feedback-related negativities in human reward-based decision making.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ming H; Hsu, Yung-Fong; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Emotional experience has a pervasive impact on choice behavior, yet the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Introducing facial-expression primes into a probabilistic learning task, we investigated how affective arousal regulates reward-related choice based on behavioral, model fitting, and feedback-related negativity (FRN) data. Sixty-six paid subjects were randomly assigned to the Neutral-Neutral (NN), Angry-Neutral (AN), and Happy-Neutral (HN) groups. A total of 960 trials were conducted. Subjects in each group were randomly exposed to half trials of the pre-determined emotional faces and another half of the neutral faces before choosing between two cards drawn from two decks with different assigned reward probabilities. Trial-by-trial data were fit with a standard reinforcement learning model using the Bayesian estimation approach. The temporal dynamics of brain activity were simultaneously recorded and analyzed using event-related potentials. Our analyses revealed that subjects in the NN group gained more reward values than those in the other two groups; they also exhibited comparatively differential estimated model-parameter values for reward prediction errors. Computing the difference wave of FRNs in reward vs. non-reward trials, we found that, compared to the NN group, subjects in the AN and HN groups had larger "General" FRNs (i.e., FRNs in no-reward trials minus FRNs in reward trials) and "Expected" FRNs (i.e., FRNs in expected reward-omission trials minus FRNs in expected reward-delivery trials), indicating an interruption in predicting reward. Further, both AN and HN groups appeared to be more sensitive to negative outcomes than the NN group. Collectively, our study suggests that affective arousal negatively regulates reward-related choice, probably through overweighting with negative feedback.

  10. Effects of affective arousal on choice behavior, reward prediction errors, and feedback-related negativities in human reward-based decision making

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ming H.; Hsu, Yung-Fong; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Emotional experience has a pervasive impact on choice behavior, yet the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Introducing facial-expression primes into a probabilistic learning task, we investigated how affective arousal regulates reward-related choice based on behavioral, model fitting, and feedback-related negativity (FRN) data. Sixty-six paid subjects were randomly assigned to the Neutral-Neutral (NN), Angry-Neutral (AN), and Happy-Neutral (HN) groups. A total of 960 trials were conducted. Subjects in each group were randomly exposed to half trials of the pre-determined emotional faces and another half of the neutral faces before choosing between two cards drawn from two decks with different assigned reward probabilities. Trial-by-trial data were fit with a standard reinforcement learning model using the Bayesian estimation approach. The temporal dynamics of brain activity were simultaneously recorded and analyzed using event-related potentials. Our analyses revealed that subjects in the NN group gained more reward values than those in the other two groups; they also exhibited comparatively differential estimated model-parameter values for reward prediction errors. Computing the difference wave of FRNs in reward vs. non-reward trials, we found that, compared to the NN group, subjects in the AN and HN groups had larger “General” FRNs (i.e., FRNs in no-reward trials minus FRNs in reward trials) and “Expected” FRNs (i.e., FRNs in expected reward-omission trials minus FRNs in expected reward-delivery trials), indicating an interruption in predicting reward. Further, both AN and HN groups appeared to be more sensitive to negative outcomes than the NN group. Collectively, our study suggests that affective arousal negatively regulates reward-related choice, probably through overweighting with negative feedback. PMID:26042057

  11. Amygdala Response to Negative Stimuli Predicts PTSD Symptom Onset following a Terrorist Attack

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Busso, Daniel S.; Duys, Andrea; Green, Jennifer Greif; Alves, Sonia; Way, Marcus; Sheridan, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit heightened amygdala reactivity and atypical activation patterns in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in response to negative emotional information. It is unknown whether these aspects of neural function are risk factors for PTSD or consequences of either trauma exposure or onset of the disorder. We had a unique opportunity to investigate this issue following the terrorist attacks at the 2013 Boston Marathon and the ensuing manhunt and shelter in place order. We examined associations of neural function measured prior to the attack with PTSD symptom onset related to these events. METHODS A sample of 15 adolescents (mean age=16.5 years) who previously participated in a neuroimaging study completed a survey assessing posttraumatic symptoms related to the terrorist attack. We examined blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response to viewing and actively down-regulating emotional responses to negative stimuli in regions previously associated with PTSD, including the amygdala, hippocampus, and mPFC, as prospective predictors of posttraumatic symptom onset. RESULTS Increased BOLD signal to negative emotional stimuli in the left amygdala was strongly associated with posttraumatic symptoms following the attack. Reduced bilateral hippocampal activation during effortful attempts to down-regulate emotional responses to negative stimuli was also associated with greater posttraumatic symptoms. Associations of amygdala reactivity with posttraumatic symptoms were robust to controls for pre-existing depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms and prior exposure to violence. CONCLUSIONS Amygdala reactivity to negative emotional information might represent a neurobiological marker of vulnerability to traumatic stress and, potentially, a risk factor for PTSD. PMID:24995938

  12. Event-related potentials reveal task-dependence and inter-individual differences in negation processing during silent listening and explicit truth-value evaluation.

    PubMed

    Herbert, C; Kissler, J

    2014-09-26

    In sentences such as dogs cannot fly/bark, evaluation of the truth-value of the sentence is assumed to appear after the negation has been integrated into the sentence structure. Moreover negation processing and truth-value processing are considered effortful processes, whereas processing of the semantic relatedness of the words within sentences is thought to occur automatically. In the present study, modulation of event-related brain potentials (N400 and late positive potential, LPP) was investigated during an implicit task (silent listening) and active truth-value evaluation to test these theoretical assumptions and determine if truth-value evaluation will be modulated by the way participants processed the negated information implicitly prior to truth-value verification. Participants first listened to negated sentences and then evaluated these sentences for their truth-value in an active evaluation task. During passive listening, the LPP was generally more pronounced for targets in false negative (FN) than true negative (TN) sentences, indicating enhanced attention allocation to semantically-related but false targets. N400 modulation by truth-value (FN>TN) was observed in 11 out of 24 participants. However, during active evaluation, processing of semantically-unrelated but true targets (TN) elicited larger N400 and LPP amplitudes as well as a pronounced frontal negativity. This pattern was particularly prominent in those 11 individuals, whose N400 modulation during silent listening indicated that they were more sensitive to violations of the truth-value than to semantic priming effects. The results provide evidence for implicit truth-value processing during silent listening of negated sentences and for task dependence related to inter-individual differences in implicit negation processing.

  13. [Evaluation of sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of six qualitative serological methods for the detection of Helicobacter pylori antibodies].

    PubMed

    Doweck, J; Quintana, C; Barrios, A; Monastra, L; Lopetegui, G; Zerbo, O; Schenone, L; Giordano, A; Valero, J; Kogan, Z; Bartellini, M A; Corti, R

    1997-01-01

    Screening tests for IG g antibodies against Helicobacter pylori are usefull for a long follow up of patients who were well eradicated. The aim of this study was to determinate and compared sensibility, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of six qualitative serological tests for IG g antibodies detection in the diagnosis of H. Pylori infections. Between May and October 1996 52 patients (30 males and 22 females; median age 42.4 years, range 21-68) with H. Pylori infection assessed on two antral and two corpus biopsies by means of Giema stain and a rapid urease test were tested for IG g antibodies detection. The serological tests used were: Inmunocomb II (Orgenics) Enzimo Inmuno Assay Inmunoadsorbent qualitative, Flex Pack (Smith Kline Diagnostics, Abbott) inmunocromatographic cualitative, Pylori Stat test (Biowhittaker) Enzimo Inmuno Assay (ELISA) qualitative, Premier (Meridian Diagnostics) Enzimo Inmuno Assay ELISA) qualitative. Pyloristest (Orion Diagnóstica) latex aglutination qualitative, H. Pylori (Bio Tre) Enzimo Inmuno Assay cualitative. 10 healthy subjects with negative gastric biopsies and negative rapid ureasa test were used as control group. The six evaluated serological tests have a comparable sensibility (89-95%) and specificity (77-83%) for the diagnosis of HP infection. The presence of specific HP antibodies in infected patients revealed a strong correlation with the histological demonstration of the microrganisms. We can recommend this qualitative serological tests due to their high sensibility and specificity, simplicity and low cost.

  14. Defining the cutoff value of MGMT gene promoter methylation and its predictive capacity in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Brigliadori, Giovanni; Foca, Flavia; Dall'Agata, Monia; Rengucci, Claudia; Melegari, Elisabetta; Cerasoli, Serenella; Amadori, Dino; Calistri, Daniele; Faedi, Marina

    2016-06-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), median survival is 12-15 months. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation status is acknowledged as a predictive marker for temozolomide (TMZ) treatment. When MGMT promoter values fall into a "methylated" range, a better response to chemotherapy is expected. However, a cutoff that discriminates between "methylated" and "unmethylated" status has yet to be defined. We aimed to identify the best cutoff value and to find out whether variability in methylation profiles influences the predictive capacity of MGMT promoter methylation. Data from 105 GBM patients treated between 2008 and 2013 were analyzed. MGMT promoter methylation status was determined by analyzing 10 CpG islands by pyrosequencing. Patients were treated with radiotherapy followed by TMZ. MGMT promoter methylation status was classified into unmethylated 0-9 %, methylated 10-29 % and methylated 30-100 %. Statistical analysis showed that an assumed methylation cutoff of 9 % led to an overestimation of responders. All patients in the 10-29 % methylation group relapsed before the 18-month evaluation. Patients with a methylation status ≥30 % showed a median overall survival of 25.2 months compared to 15.2 months in all other patients, confirming this value as the best methylation cutoff. Despite wide variability among individual profiles, single CpG island analysis did not reveal any correlation between single CpG island methylation values and relapse or death. Specific CpG island methylation status did not influence the predictive value of MGMT. The predictive role of MGMT promoter methylation was maintained only with a cutoff value ≥30 %. PMID:27029617

  15. Negative prognostic value of CD34 antigen also if expressed on a small population of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Stefanizzi, Caterina; Raponi, Sara; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Minotti, Clara; Latagliata, Roberto; Diverio, Daniela; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2014-11-01

    Potential clinical significance of CD34 expression in acute promyelocitic leukemia (APL) has not been deeply investigated. We hereby analyzed the clinico-biological features and treatment outcome of APL patients in relation to CD34 expression, even when expressed in a small subpopulation: 114 APL patients homogeneously treated with the AIDA schedule were included in the study and prognostic correlation with respect to CD34 expression, both when expressed in association with CD2 and as isolated expression (cutoff ≥2 to <10 % or ≥10 %), were investigated. CD34 was associated to CD2 in 30 patients and was isolated in 19 patients. When compared to the CD34-negative population, CD34/CD2 expression identified a subgroup with characteristic features: M3 variant subtype (26 vs 7 % in the negative group, p = 0.02), bcr3 transcript subtype (73 vs 32 %, p = 0.001), high risk according to the risk of relapse (66 vs 17 %, p = 0.002), high incidence of differentiation syndrome (26 vs 12 %, p = 0.01), lower overall survival (88 vs 95 %), and a significantly higher rate of relapse (22 vs 13.8 %, p = 0.05). We then evaluated the prognostic value of isolated CD34 expression: it was detected in nine patients with a cutoff of expression ≥10 % and in 10 patients with a cutoff ≥2 but <10 %. Isolated CD34 positivity identified a subgroup with a classic morphology (79 %), bcr1 prevalence (53 %), higher rate of relapse (37 vs 13.8 % in the negative group, p = 0.002), higher incidence of differentiation syndrome (55 vs 12 %, p = 0.03), and lower overall survival (60 vs 95 %, p = 0.001). The results of our study confirm that CD34/CD2 expression characterizes a subset of APL with a high WBC count and a variant morphological subtype, associated with an unfavorable clinical course. We also show that the isolated expression of CD34, even at a low cutoff, identifies a group of classic APL with a negative prognosis. Further studies aimed at identifying other

  16. Negative prognostic value of CD34 antigen also if expressed on a small population of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Stefanizzi, Caterina; Raponi, Sara; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Minotti, Clara; Latagliata, Roberto; Diverio, Daniela; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2014-11-01

    Potential clinical significance of CD34 expression in acute promyelocitic leukemia (APL) has not been deeply investigated. We hereby analyzed the clinico-biological features and treatment outcome of APL patients in relation to CD34 expression, even when expressed in a small subpopulation: 114 APL patients homogeneously treated with the AIDA schedule were included in the study and prognostic correlation with respect to CD34 expression, both when expressed in association with CD2 and as isolated expression (cutoff ≥2 to <10 % or ≥10 %), were investigated. CD34 was associated to CD2 in 30 patients and was isolated in 19 patients. When compared to the CD34-negative population, CD34/CD2 expression identified a subgroup with characteristic features: M3 variant subtype (26 vs 7 % in the negative group, p = 0.02), bcr3 transcript subtype (73 vs 32 %, p = 0.001), high risk according to the risk of relapse (66 vs 17 %, p = 0.002), high incidence of differentiation syndrome (26 vs 12 %, p = 0.01), lower overall survival (88 vs 95 %), and a significantly higher rate of relapse (22 vs 13.8 %, p = 0.05). We then evaluated the prognostic value of isolated CD34 expression: it was detected in nine patients with a cutoff of expression ≥10 % and in 10 patients with a cutoff ≥2 but <10 %. Isolated CD34 positivity identified a subgroup with a classic morphology (79 %), bcr1 prevalence (53 %), higher rate of relapse (37 vs 13.8 % in the negative group, p = 0.002), higher incidence of differentiation syndrome (55 vs 12 %, p = 0.03), and lower overall survival (60 vs 95 %, p = 0.001). The results of our study confirm that CD34/CD2 expression characterizes a subset of APL with a high WBC count and a variant morphological subtype, associated with an unfavorable clinical course. We also show that the isolated expression of CD34, even at a low cutoff, identifies a group of classic APL with a negative prognosis. Further studies aimed at identifying other

  17. Poverty, household chaos, and interparental aggression predict children's ability to recognize and modulate negative emotions.

    PubMed

    Raver, C Cybele; Blair, Clancy; Garrett-Peters, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    The following prospective longitudinal study considers the ways that protracted exposure to verbal and physical aggression between parents may take a substantial toll on emotional adjustment for 1,025 children followed from 6 to 58 months of age. Exposure to chronic poverty from infancy to early childhood as well as multiple measures of household chaos were also included as predictors of children's ability to recognize and modulate negative emotions in order to disentangle the role of interparental conflict from the socioeconomic forces that sometimes accompany it. Analyses revealed that exposure to greater levels of interparental conflict, more chaos in the household, and a higher number of years in poverty can be empirically distinguished as key contributors to 58-month-olds' ability to recognize and modulate negative emotion. Implications for models of experiential canalization of emotional processes within the context of adversity are discussed.

  18. Autocorrelation structure at rest predicts value correlates of single neurons during reward-guided choice

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Sean E; Wallis, Joni D; Kennerley, Steven W; Hunt, Laurence T

    2016-01-01

    Correlates of value are routinely observed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during reward-guided decision making. In previous work (Hunt et al., 2015), we argued that PFC correlates of chosen value are a consequence of varying rates of a dynamical evidence accumulation process. Yet within PFC, there is substantial variability in chosen value correlates across individual neurons. Here we show that this variability is explained by neurons having different temporal receptive fields of integration, indexed by examining neuronal spike rate autocorrelation structure whilst at rest. We find that neurons with protracted resting temporal receptive fields exhibit stronger chosen value correlates during choice. Within orbitofrontal cortex, these neurons also sustain coding of chosen value from choice through the delivery of reward, providing a potential neural mechanism for maintaining predictions and updating stored values during learning. These findings reveal that within PFC, variability in temporal specialisation across neurons predicts involvement in specific decision-making computations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18937.001 PMID:27705742

  19. Nonparametric functional data estimation applied to ozone data: prediction and extreme value analysis.

    PubMed

    Quintela-del-Río, Alejandro; Francisco-Fernández, Mario

    2011-02-01

    The study of extreme values and prediction of ozone data is an important topic of research when dealing with environmental problems. Classical extreme value theory is usually used in air-pollution studies. It consists in fitting a parametric generalised extreme value (GEV) distribution to a data set of extreme values, and using the estimated distribution to compute return levels and other quantities of interest. Here, we propose to estimate these values using nonparametric functional data methods. Functional data analysis is a relatively new statistical methodology that generally deals with data consisting of curves or multi-dimensional variables. In this paper, we use this technique, jointly with nonparametric curve estimation, to provide alternatives to the usual parametric statistical tools. The nonparametric estimators are applied to real samples of maximum ozone values obtained from several monitoring stations belonging to the Automatic Urban and Rural Network (AURN) in the UK. The results show that nonparametric estimators work satisfactorily, outperforming the behaviour of classical parametric estimators. Functional data analysis is also used to predict stratospheric ozone concentrations. We show an application, using the data set of mean monthly ozone concentrations in Arosa, Switzerland, and the results are compared with those obtained by classical time series (ARIMA) analysis. PMID:21144549

  20. Modeling Polio Data Using the First Order Non-Negative Integer-Valued Autoregressive, INAR(1), Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazifedan, Turaj; Shitan, Mahendran

    Time series data may consists of counts, such as the number of road accidents, the number of patients in a certain hospital, the number of customers waiting for service at a certain time and etc. When the value of the observations are large it is usual to use Gaussian Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) process to model the time series. However if the observed counts are small, it is not appropriate to use ARMA process to model the observed phenomenon. In such cases we need to model the time series data by using Non-Negative Integer valued Autoregressive (INAR) process. The modeling of counts data is based on the binomial thinning operator. In this paper we illustrate the modeling of counts data using the monthly number of Poliomyelitis data in United States between January 1970 until December 1983. We applied the AR(1), Poisson regression model and INAR(1) model and the suitability of these models were assessed by using the Index of Agreement(I.A.). We found that INAR(1) model is more appropriate in the sense it had a better I.A. and it is natural since the data are counts.

  1. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices of negative affect predict cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Robert A; Twining, Robert C; Jones, Joshua L; Slater, Jennifer M; Grigson, Patricia S; Carelli, Regina M

    2008-03-13

    The motivation to seek cocaine comes in part from a dysregulation of reward processing manifested in dysphoria, or affective withdrawal. Learning is a critical aspect of drug abuse; however, it remains unclear whether drug-associated cues can elicit the emotional withdrawal symptoms that promote cocaine use. Here we report that a cocaine-associated taste cue elicited a conditioned aversive state that was behaviorally and neurophysiologically quantifiable and predicted subsequent cocaine self-administration behavior. Specifically, brief intraoral infusions of a cocaine-predictive flavored saccharin solution elicited aversive orofacial responses that predicted early-session cocaine taking in rats. The expression of aversive taste reactivity also was associated with a shift in the predominant pattern of electrophysiological activity of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons from inhibitory to excitatory. The dynamic nature of this conditioned switch in affect and the neural code reveals a mechanism by which cues may exert control over drug self-administration. PMID:18341996

  2. The application of SEAT values for predicting how compliant seats with backrests influence vibration discomfort.

    PubMed

    Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The extent to which a seat can provide useful attenuation of vehicle vibration depends on three factors: the characteristics of the vehicle motion, the vibration transmissibility of the seat, and the sensitivity of the body to vibration. The 'seat effective amplitude transmissibility' (i.e., SEAT value) reflects how these three factors vary with the frequency and the direction of vibration so as to predict the vibration isolation efficiency of a seat. The SEAT value is mostly used to select seat cushions or seat suspensions based on the transmission of vertical vibration to the principal supporting surface of a seat. This study investigated the accuracy of SEAT values in predicting how seats with backrests influence the discomfort caused by multiple-input vibration. Twelve male subjects participated in a four-part experiment to determine equivalent comfort contours, the relative discomfort, the location of discomfort, and seat transmissibility with three foam seats and a rigid reference seat at 14 frequencies of vibration in the range 1-20 Hz at magnitudes of vibration from 0.2 to 1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s. The 'measured seat dynamic discomfort' (MSDD) was calculated for each foam seat from the ratio of the vibration acceleration required to cause similar discomfort with the foam seat and with the rigid reference seat. Using the frequency weightings in current standards, the SEAT values of each seat were calculated from the ratio of overall ride values with the foam seat to the overall ride values with the rigid reference seat, and compared to the corresponding MSDD at each frequency. The SEAT values provided good predictions of how the foam seats increased vibration discomfort at frequencies around the 4-Hz resonance but reduced vibration discomfort at frequencies greater than about 6.3 Hz, with discrepancies explained by a known limitation of the frequency weightings.

  3. The application of SEAT values for predicting how compliant seats with backrests influence vibration discomfort.

    PubMed

    Basri, Bazil; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The extent to which a seat can provide useful attenuation of vehicle vibration depends on three factors: the characteristics of the vehicle motion, the vibration transmissibility of the seat, and the sensitivity of the body to vibration. The 'seat effective amplitude transmissibility' (i.e., SEAT value) reflects how these three factors vary with the frequency and the direction of vibration so as to predict the vibration isolation efficiency of a seat. The SEAT value is mostly used to select seat cushions or seat suspensions based on the transmission of vertical vibration to the principal supporting surface of a seat. This study investigated the accuracy of SEAT values in predicting how seats with backrests influence the discomfort caused by multiple-input vibration. Twelve male subjects participated in a four-part experiment to determine equivalent comfort contours, the relative discomfort, the location of discomfort, and seat transmissibility with three foam seats and a rigid reference seat at 14 frequencies of vibration in the range 1-20 Hz at magnitudes of vibration from 0.2 to 1.6 ms(-2) r.m.s. The 'measured seat dynamic discomfort' (MSDD) was calculated for each foam seat from the ratio of the vibration acceleration required to cause similar discomfort with the foam seat and with the rigid reference seat. Using the frequency weightings in current standards, the SEAT values of each seat were calculated from the ratio of overall ride values with the foam seat to the overall ride values with the rigid reference seat, and compared to the corresponding MSDD at each frequency. The SEAT values provided good predictions of how the foam seats increased vibration discomfort at frequencies around the 4-Hz resonance but reduced vibration discomfort at frequencies greater than about 6.3 Hz, with discrepancies explained by a known limitation of the frequency weightings. PMID:24793821

  4. Midbrain dopamine neurons compute inferred and cached value prediction errors in a common framework

    PubMed Central

    Sadacca, Brian F; Jones, Joshua L; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons have been proposed to signal reward prediction errors as defined in temporal difference (TD) learning algorithms. While these models have been extremely powerful in interpreting dopamine activity, they typically do not use value derived through inference in computing errors. This is important because much real world behavior – and thus many opportunities for error-driven learning – is based on such predictions. Here, we show that error-signaling rat dopamine neurons respond to the inferred, model-based value of cues that have not been paired with reward and do so in the same framework as they track the putative cached value of cues previously paired with reward. This suggests that dopamine neurons access a wider variety of information than contemplated by standard TD models and that, while their firing conforms to predictions of TD models in some cases, they may not be restricted to signaling errors from TD predictions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13665.001 PMID:26949249

  5. A translational pharmacology approach to understanding the predictive value of abuse potential assessments.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Potter, David M; Mead, Andy N

    2013-09-01

    Within the drug development industry the assessment of abuse potential for novel molecules involves the generation and review of data from multiple sources, ranging from in-vitro binding and functional assays through to in-vivo nonclinical models in mammals, as well as collection of information from studies in humans. This breadth of data aligns with current expectations from regulatory agencies in both the USA and Europe. To date, there have been a limited number of reviews on the predictive value of individual models within this sequence, but there has been no systematic review on how each of these models contributes to our overall understanding of abuse potential risk. To address this, we analyzed data from 100 small molecules to compare the predictive validity for drug scheduling status of a number of models that typically contribute to the abuse potential assessment package. These models range from the assessment of in-vitro binding and functional profiles at receptors or transporters typically associated with abuse through in-vivo models including locomotor activity, drug discrimination, and self-administration in rodents. Data from subjective report assessments in humans following acute dosing of compounds were also included. The predictive value of each model was then evaluated relative to the scheduling status of each drug in the USA. In recognition of the fact that drug scheduling can be influenced by factors other than the pharmacology of the drug, we also evaluated the predictive value of each assay for the outcome of the human subjective effects assessment. This approach provides an objective and statistical assessment of the predictive value of many of the models typically applied within the pharmaceutical industry to evaluate abuse potential risk. In addition, the impact of combining information from multiple models was examined. This analysis adds to our understanding of the predictive value of each model, allows us to critically evaluate the

  6. Prognostic and Predictive Values and Statistical Interactions in the Era of Targeted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Iasonos, Alexia; Zhou, Qin

    2015-11-01

    The current era of targeted treatment has accelerated the interest in studying gene-treatment, gene-gene, and gene-environment interactions using statistical models in the health sciences. Interactions are incorporated into models as product terms of risk factors. The statistical significance of interactions is traditionally examined using a likelihood ratio test (LRT). Epidemiological and clinical studies also evaluate interactions in order to understand the prognostic and predictive values of genetic factors. However, it is not clear how different types and magnitudes of interaction effects are related to prognostic and predictive values. The contribution of interaction to prognostic values can be examined via improvements in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve due to the inclusion of interaction terms in the model (ΔAUC). We develop a resampling based approach to test the significance of this improvement and show that it is equivalent to LRT. Predictive values provide insights into whether carriers of genetic factors benefit from specific treatment or preventive interventions relative to noncarriers, under some definition of treatment benefit. However, there is no unique definition of the term treatment benefit. We show that ΔAUC and relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) measure predictive values under two specific definitions of treatment benefit. We investigate the properties of LRT, ΔAUC, and RERI using simulations. We illustrate these approaches using published melanoma data to understand the benefits of possible intervention on sun exposure in relation to the MC1R gene. The goal is to evaluate possible interventions on sun exposure in relation to MC1R. PMID:26349638

  7. Prognostic and Predictive Values and Statistical Interactions in the Era of Targeted Treatment.

    PubMed

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Iasonos, Alexia; Zhou, Qin

    2015-11-01

    The current era of targeted treatment has accelerated the interest in studying gene-treatment, gene-gene, and gene-environment interactions using statistical models in the health sciences. Interactions are incorporated into models as product terms of risk factors. The statistical significance of interactions is traditionally examined using a likelihood ratio test (LRT). Epidemiological and clinical studies also evaluate interactions in order to understand the prognostic and predictive values of genetic factors. However, it is not clear how different types and magnitudes of interaction effects are related to prognostic and predictive values. The contribution of interaction to prognostic values can be examined via improvements in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve due to the inclusion of interaction terms in the model (ΔAUC). We develop a resampling based approach to test the significance of this improvement and show that it is equivalent to LRT. Predictive values provide insights into whether carriers of genetic factors benefit from specific treatment or preventive interventions relative to noncarriers, under some definition of treatment benefit. However, there is no unique definition of the term treatment benefit. We show that ΔAUC and relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) measure predictive values under two specific definitions of treatment benefit. We investigate the properties of LRT, ΔAUC, and RERI using simulations. We illustrate these approaches using published melanoma data to understand the benefits of possible intervention on sun exposure in relation to the MC1R gene. The goal is to evaluate possible interventions on sun exposure in relation to MC1R.

  8. Percutaneous Nerve Evaluation Test Versus Staged Test Trials for Sacral Neuromodulation: Sensitivity, Specificity, and Predictive Values of Each Technique

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, Magdy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose InterStim device is an U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved minimal invasive therapy for sacral neuromodulation for lower urinary tract dysfunction. Before InterStim implantation, a trial with the appropriate screening tests is required to determine patient therapy eligibility. There are two different techniques for patient screening: percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test and staged test. Few studies have reported success and failure rates for each technique. However, test sensitivity and predictive values of either test have not been studied. The aim of our study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of each test and to establish a decision algorithm for the most appropriate testing method to be used as a screening test. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2009 to February 2012 and included patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction who participated in the stimulation test trial. Patients underwent PNE as the first stimulation test, while those who encountered technical difficulty during PNE or electrode migration underwent staged testing. Results A total of 213 patients, including 172 female and 41 male subjects, underwent PNE. The patients’ diagnoses included refractory overactive bladder (47.9%), nonobstructive urinary retention (29.6%), and frequency urgency syndrome (22.1%). A total of 202 patients were screened with PNE and 10 patients with staged testing. Overall sensitivity of PNE was 87.3%, and it was 90% for staged test. PNE specificity was 98.5% as compared to 92.9% for staged test. Positive and negative predictive values for PNE were 99% and 82.1% and for staged test were 90% and 92.9%, respectively. Conclusions PNE test has high specificity and positive predictive value. We recommend PNE, a simple office-based, less expensive procedure as the first option for screening. PMID:27706006

  9. Predisaster Trait Anxiety and Negative Affect Predict Posttraumatic Stress in Youths after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Carl F.; Pina, Armando A.; Costa, Natalie M.; Watts, Sarah E.; Taylor, Leslie K.; Cannon, Melinda F.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of theory and previous research, it was hypothesized that predisaster child trait anxiety would predict disaster-related posttraumatic stress symptoms and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms, even after controlling for the number of hurricane exposure events. Results support this hypothesis and further indicate that predisaster…

  10. Colon polyp morphology on double-contrast berium enema: its pathologic predictive value

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Ablin, D.S.

    1983-11-01

    The morphologic appearance of 96 polyps seen on double-contrast barium enema was reviewed to assess the predictive value of various signs described to diagnose malignancy. Size, surface contour, basal indentation, and pedunculation were studied. Sessile polyps had an appreciable incidence of malignancy, with size being the best indicator of that risk. Pedunculation was found to be a reliable sign of benignity in predicting the absence of malignant invasion into the adjacent colonic wall. Polyps under 1 cm and having a smooth contour were invariably benign. Conversely, polyps larger than 1 cm with a lobulated contour and basal indentation had a significant incidence of malignancy.

  11. The role of numeracy and approximate number system acuity in predicting value and probability distortion.

    PubMed

    Patalano, Andrea L; Saltiel, Jason R; Machlin, Laura; Barth, Hilary

    2015-12-01

    It is well documented that individuals distort outcome values and probabilities when making choices from descriptions, and there is evidence of systematic individual differences in distortion. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between individual differences in such distortions and two measures of numerical competence, numeracy and approximate number system (ANS) acuity. Participants indicated certainty equivalents for a series of simple monetary gambles, and data were used to estimate individual-level value and probability distortion, using a cumulative prospect theory framework. We found moderately strong negative correlations between numeracy and value and probability distortion, but only weak and non-statistically reliable correlations between ANS acuity and distortions. We conclude that low numeracy contributes to number distortion in decision making, but that approximate number system acuity might not underlie this relationship.

  12. Varicella zoster virus in American Samoa: seroprevalence and predictive value of varicella disease history in elementary and college students.

    PubMed

    Mahamud, A; Leung, J; Masunu-Faleafaga, Y; Teshale, E; Williams, R; Dulski, T; Thieme, M; Garcia, P; Schmid, D S; Bialek, S R

    2014-05-01

    The epidemiology of varicella is believed to differ between temperate and tropical countries. We conducted a varicella seroprevalence study in elementary and college students in the US territory of American Samoa before introduction of a routine varicella vaccination programme. Sera from 515 elementary and 208 college students were tested for the presence of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IgG antibodies. VZV seroprevalence increased with age from 76·0% in the 4-6 years group to 97·7% in those aged ⩾23 years. Reported history of varicella disease for elementary students was significantly associated with VZV seropositivity. The positive and negative predictive values of varicella disease history were 93·4% and 36·4%, respectively, in elementary students and 97·6% and 3·0%, respectively, in college students. VZV seroprevalence in this Pacific island appears to be similar to that in temperate countries and suggests endemic VZV circulation.

  13. [Prediction of SPAD value in oilseed rape leaves using hyperspectral imaging technique].

    PubMed

    Ding, Xi-bin; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Chu; He, Yong

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, prediction models of SPAD value (Soil and Plant Analyzer Development, often used as a parameter to indicate chlorophyll content) in oilseed rape leaves were successfully built using hyperspectral imaging technique. The hy perspectral images of 160 oilseed rape leaf samples in the spectral range of 380-1030 nm were acquired. Average spectrum was extracted from the region of interest (ROI) of each sample. We chose spectral data in the spectral range of 500-900 nm for analysis. Using Monte Carlo partial least squares(MC-PLS) algorithm, 13 samples were identified as outliers and eliminated. Based on the spectral information and measured SPAD values of the rest 147 samples, several estimation models have been built based on different parameters using different algorithms for comparison, including: (1) a SPAD value estimation model based on partial least squares(PLS) in the whole wavelength region of 500-900 nm; (2) a SPAD value estimation model based on successive projections algorithmcombined with PLS(SPA-PLS); (3) 4 kind of simple experience SPAD value estimation models in which red edge position was used as an argument; (4) 4 kind of simple experience SPAD value estimation models in which three vegetation indexes R710/R760, (R750-R705)/(R750-R705) and R860/(R550 x R708), which all have been proved to have a good relevance with chlorophyll content, were used as an argument respectively; (5) a SPAD value estimation model based on PLS using the 3 vegetation indexes mentioned above. The results indicate that the optimal prediction performance is achieved by PLS model in the whole wavelength region of 500-900 nm, which has a correlation coefficient(r(p)) of 0.8339 and a root mean squares error of predicted (RMSEP) of 1.52. The SPA-PLS model can provide avery close prediction result while the calibration computation has been significantly reduced and the calibration speed has been accelerated sharply. For simple experience models based on red edge

  14. [Prediction of SPAD value in oilseed rape leaves using hyperspectral imaging technique].

    PubMed

    Ding, Xi-bin; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Chu; He, Yong

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, prediction models of SPAD value (Soil and Plant Analyzer Development, often used as a parameter to indicate chlorophyll content) in oilseed rape leaves were successfully built using hyperspectral imaging technique. The hy perspectral images of 160 oilseed rape leaf samples in the spectral range of 380-1030 nm were acquired. Average spectrum was extracted from the region of interest (ROI) of each sample. We chose spectral data in the spectral range of 500-900 nm for analysis. Using Monte Carlo partial least squares(MC-PLS) algorithm, 13 samples were identified as outliers and eliminated. Based on the spectral information and measured SPAD values of the rest 147 samples, several estimation models have been built based on different parameters using different algorithms for comparison, including: (1) a SPAD value estimation model based on partial least squares(PLS) in the whole wavelength region of 500-900 nm; (2) a SPAD value estimation model based on successive projections algorithmcombined with PLS(SPA-PLS); (3) 4 kind of simple experience SPAD value estimation models in which red edge position was used as an argument; (4) 4 kind of simple experience SPAD value estimation models in which three vegetation indexes R710/R760, (R750-R705)/(R750-R705) and R860/(R550 x R708), which all have been proved to have a good relevance with chlorophyll content, were used as an argument respectively; (5) a SPAD value estimation model based on PLS using the 3 vegetation indexes mentioned above. The results indicate that the optimal prediction performance is achieved by PLS model in the whole wavelength region of 500-900 nm, which has a correlation coefficient(r(p)) of 0.8339 and a root mean squares error of predicted (RMSEP) of 1.52. The SPA-PLS model can provide avery close prediction result while the calibration computation has been significantly reduced and the calibration speed has been accelerated sharply. For simple experience models based on red edge

  15. Predictive Value of Interim PET/CT in DLBCL Treated with R-CHOP: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Zhao, Jinhua; Qiao, Wenli; Wang, Taisong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP chemotherapy. Methods. We searched for articles published in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Wiley, Scopus, and Ovid database from inception to March 2014. Articles related to interim PET/CT in patients with DLBCL treated with R-CHOP chemotherapy were selected. PFS with or without OS was chosen as the endpoint to evaluate the prognostic significance of interim PET/CT. Results. Six studies with a total of 605 cases were included. The sensitivity of interim PET/CT ranged from 21.2% to 89.7%, and the pooled sensitivity was 52.4%. The specificity of interim PET/CT ranged from 37.4% to 90.7%, and the pooled specificity was 67.8%. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 1.780 and 0.706, respectively. The explained AUC was 0.6978 and the Q* was 0.6519. Conclusions. The sensitivity and specificity of interim PET/CT in predicting the outcome of DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP chemotherapy were not satisfactory (52.4% and 67.8%, resp.). To improve this, some more work should be done to unify the response criteria and some more research to assess the prognostic value of interim PET/CT with semiquantitative analysis. PMID:25710013

  16. Sensation and perception of sucrose and fat stimuli predict the reinforcing value of food.

    PubMed

    Panek-Scarborough, Leah M; Dewey, Amber M; Temple, Jennifer L

    2012-03-20

    Chronic overeating can lead to weight gain and obesity. Sensory system function may play a role in the types of foods people select and the amount of food people eat. Several studies have shown that the orosensory components of eating play a strong role in driving food intake and food selection. In addition, previous work has shown that motivation to get food, or the reinforcing value of food, is a predictor of energy intake. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that higher detection thresholds and lower suprathreshold intensity ratings of sweet and fat stimuli are associated with greater reinforcing value of food. In addition, we sought to determine if the sensory ratings of the stimuli would differ depending on whether they were expectorated or swallowed. The reinforcing value of food was measured by having participants perform operant responses for food on progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. Taste detection thresholds and suprathresholds for solutions containing varied concentrations of sucrose and fat were also measured in two different Experiments. In Experiment 1, we found that sucrose, but not fat, detection predicted the reinforcing value of food with the reinforcing value of food increasing as sucrose detection threshold increased (indicating poorer detection). In Experiment 2, we found that lower suprathreshold ratings of expectorated fat and sucrose predicted greater reinforcing value of food. In addition, higher detection thresholds for fat stimuli (indicating poorer detection) were associated with greater reinforcing value of food. When taken together, these studies suggest that there is a relationship between taste detection and perception and reinforcing value of food and that these relationships vary based on whether the stimulus is swallowed or expectorated.

  17. Threshold Values for Identification of Contamination Predicted by Reduced-Order Models

    DOE PAGES

    Last, George V.; Murray, Christopher J.; Bott, Yi-Ju; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project is developing reduced-order models to evaluate potential impacts on underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) if CO2 or brine leaks from deep CO2 storage reservoirs. Threshold values, below which there would be no predicted impacts, were determined for portions of two aquifer systems. These threshold values were calculated using an interwell approach for determining background groundwater concentrations that is an adaptation of methods described in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Unified Guidance for Statistical Analysis of Groundwater Monitoring Data at RCRA Facilities.

  18. Predicting graded young modulus values of Ti alloys modified by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M H Mohamed

    2004-05-01

    There has been, and is still, concern about the high elastic modulus of Ti alloys compared to bone. Any reduction in the Young's modulus value of the implant is expected to enhance stress redistribution to the adjacent bone tissues, minimize stress shielding and eventually prolong device lifetime. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulation is used to predict the gradual reduction in Young's modulus values between the bulk of Ti alloys and the modified surface layers due to Ca ion implantation. The simulation can be used as a screening step when applying new alloys and/or coatings.

  19. Liver steatosis replaced with non-invasive viral and host parametars can serve as negative predictive model in patients with chronic hepatitis-C.

    PubMed

    Višnjić, Ana; Ostojić, Zvonimir; Hrstić, Irena; Corić, Marijana; Premuzić, Marina

    2014-09-01

    Almost 70% of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients will have concomitant hepatic steatosis (HS) usually determined with invasive method. HS serve as negative predictive factor for lower sustained viral response (SVR) in CHC patients treated with standard of care (SOC) (PEG-IFN and Rib). Retrospective analysis of biochemical, virological and histological data in CHC patients treated with PEG-IFN and Ribavarin. Statistical analysis was carried out by Biometriha Healthcare Research. Level of significance was set to 95% (p < 0.05). 72 patients (43 M; 29 F; median age 41 y) with CHC (60 G1; 12 G3) with no concomitant metabolic syndrome were analyzed. HS ranged from 5 to 30% (median 15%). Overall accuracy of prediction of SVR based on the levels of HS was AUC=0.71 (95% CI=0.58-0.84; p=0.005). When HS was split regarding cut-off value of 5% significant difference was found between responders and non-responders to treatment (chi2 = 10.025; df = 1; p = 0.002). Overall sensitivity was 48% and specificity 91%. Conventional predictive variables (gender, age, fibrosis and genotype) where combined with HS (>5%) and all together achieved Nagelherke R squared of 34.0% in prediction of SVR, with accuracy rate of 75.0%. Further, invasive variables (fibrosis and HS) where replaced with vire mia and body mass index (BMI). All noninvasive variables together achieved Nagelkerke R squared of 26.5% in prediction of SVR with 74% accuracy rate of the logistic regression model. Very low HS (<5%) is negative predictor of SVR and can be replaced with noninvasive variables (gender, age, viremia and BMI) with same accuracy rate of the logistic regres- sion model. PMID:25507366

  20. A Gram-Negative Bacterial Secreted Protein Types Prediction Method Based on PSI-BLAST Profile

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of secreted protein types based solely on sequence data remains to be a challenging problem. In this study, we extract the long-range correlation information and linear correlation information from position-specific score matrix (PSSM). A total of 6800 features are extracted at 17 different gaps; then, 309 features are selected by a filter feature selection method based on the training set. To verify the performance of our method, jackknife and independent dataset tests are performed on the test set and the reported overall accuracies are 93.60% and 100%, respectively. Comparison of our results with the existing method shows that our method provides the favorable performance for secreted protein type prediction. PMID:27563663

  1. Stable excited Au= and Pt= negative ions: A Regge-pole prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2010-03-01

    Electron elastic scattering from Au and Pt atoms is investigated in the energy region E < 4.0 eV in search of the possibility of forming and observing stable excited Au= and Pt= negative ions as Regge resonances. Total elastic cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated. The investigation uses the recent Regge-pole methodology [1] wherein is embedded the vital electron-electron correlations together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the crucial core-polarization interaction, essential for the existence and stability of most negative ions. From the characteristic dramatically sharp resonances in the elastic total and Mulholland partial cross sections we identify excited Au= and Pt= anions and extract their binding energies (BEs). Ramsauer-Townsend minima and shape resonances are also determined. The DCSs also yield the BEs of the Au= and Pt= anions [2]. The TCSs for the excited and ground Au= and Pt= anions are contrasted as well; they provide a clue to the significant catalytic properties of their nanoparticles. [1] D. Sokolovski et al, Phys. Rev. A 76, 012705 (2007); [2] Z. Felfli et al, NIMB, At Press (2010). Supported by U.S. DOE, AFOSR and CAU CFNM, NSF-CREST Program

  2. "A Culture-Brain Link: Negative Age Stereotypes Predict Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers": Correction to Levy et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Reports an error in "A Culture-Brain Link: Negative Age Stereotypes Predict Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers" by Becca R. Levy, Luigi Ferrucci, Alan B. Zonderman, Martin D. Slade, Juan Troncoso and Susan M. Resnick (Psychology and Aging, Advanced Online Publication, Dec 7, 2015, np). In the article, the correct analyses were reported for bootstrapping; however, the sizes of the bootstrapping samples for Studies 1 and 2 were reversed. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-54839-001.) Although negative age stereotypes have been found to predict adverse outcomes among older individuals, it was unknown whether the influence of stereotypes extends to brain changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. To consider this possibility, we drew on dementia-free participants, in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, whose age stereotypes were assessed decades before yearly magnetic resonance images and brain autopsies were performed. Those holding more-negative age stereotypes earlier in life had significantly steeper hippocampal-volume loss and significantly greater accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques, adjusting for relevant covariates. These findings suggest a new pathway to identifying mechanisms and potential interventions related to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Local morphology predicts functional organization of experienced value signals in the human orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Yansong; Sescousse, Guillaume; Amiez, Céline; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-28

    Experienced value representations within the human orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) are thought to be organized through an antero-posterior gradient corresponding to secondary versus primary rewards. Whether this gradient depends upon specific morphological features within this region, which displays considerable intersubject variability, remains unknown. To test the existence of such relationships, we performed a subject-by-subject analysis of fMRI data taking into account the local morphology of each individual. We tested 38 subjects engaged in a simple incentive delay task manipulating both monetary and visual erotic rewards, focusing on reward outcome (experienced value signal). The results showed reliable and dissociable primary (erotic) and secondary (monetary) experienced value signals at specific OFC sulci locations. More specifically, experienced value signal induced by monetary reward outcome was systematically located in the rostral portion of the medial orbital sulcus. Experienced value signal related to erotic reward outcome was located more posteriorly, that is, at the intersection between the caudal portion of the medial orbital sulcus and transverse orbital sulcus. Thus, the localizations of distinct experienced value signals can be predicted from the organization of the human orbitofrontal sulci. This study provides insights into the anatomo-functional parcellation of the anteroposterior OFC gradient observed for secondary versus primary rewards because there is a direct relationship between value signals at the time of reward outcome and unique OFC sulci locations. PMID:25632140

  4. Prognostic and predictive value of immunological parameters for chemoradioimmunotherapy in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakhanova, S; Ryschich, E; Mosl, B; Harig, S; Jäger, D; Schmidt, J; Hartwig, W; Werner, J; Bazhin, A V

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemoradioimmunotherapy of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma from the CapRI trial did not show any benefit of interferon-α in addition to a 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based treatment. The aim of this study was to identify immunological parameters in patients from this trial to be used for predictive and/or prognostic purposes. Methods: The following methods were used: tumour immunohistology, FACS analyses, cytokine measurement, as well as cytotoxicity and ELIspot. Immunological parameters were correlated with patients' survival using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: Irrespective of therapy type, high lymphocyte accumulation in tumours and frequencies of NK cells and effector (eff) CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood of the patients were associated with patients' survival. Amount of CD3+ and effector-memory CD8+ blood lymphocytes, expression of CD152 and interleukin (IL)-2 serum level showed a predictive value for chemoradioimmunotherapy. Tumoural accumulation of CD3+ and CD8+ cells was predictive for outcome of chemotherapy alone. Besides, we identified the frequencies of CD3+ lymphocytes, effCD8+ T cells and NK cells in the peripheral blood of the patients, and IL-10 amount in serum, to be predictive values for 5FU-based chemotherapy. Conclusions: Immunological parameters, identified in this trial as possible markers, may be of interest in personalized medicine towards the improvement of the treatment and prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma patients. PMID:25742476

  5. Predictive Value of an Early Amplitude Integrated Electroencephalogram and Neurologic Examination

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Athina; McDonald, Scott A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Bara, Rebecca; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Goldberg, Ronald; Donovan, Edward F.; Fanaroff, Avroy A.; Das, Abhik; Poole, W. Kenneth; Walsh, Michele; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Welsh, Cherie; Salhab, Walid; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Poindexter, Brenda; Stoll, Barbara J.; Guillet, Ronnie; Finer, Neil N.; Stevenson, David K.; Bauer, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the predictive validity of the amplitude integrated electroencephalogram (aEEG) and stage of encephalopathy among infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) eligible for therapeutic whole-body hypothermia. DESIGN: Neonates were eligible for this prospective study if moderate or severe HIE occurred at <6 hours and an aEEG was obtained at <9 hours of age. The primary outcome was death or moderate/severe disability at 18 months. RESULTS: There were 108 infants (71 with moderate HIE and 37 with severe HIE) enrolled in the study. aEEG findings were categorized as normal, with continuous normal voltage (n = 12) or discontinuous normal voltage (n = 12), or abnormal, with burst suppression (n = 22), continuous low voltage (n = 26), or flat tracing (n = 36). At 18 months, 53 infants (49%) experienced death or disability. Severe HIE and an abnormal aEEG were related to the primary outcome with univariate analysis, whereas severe HIE alone was predictive of outcome with multivariate analysis. Addition of aEEG pattern to HIE stage did not add to the predictive value of the model; the area under the curve changed from 0.72 to 0.75 (P = .19). CONCLUSIONS: The aEEG background pattern did not significantly enhance the value of the stage of encephalopathy at study entry in predicting death and disability among infants with HIE. PMID:21669899

  6. Belief about nicotine selectively modulates value and reward prediction error signals in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaosi; Lohrenz, Terry; Salas, Ramiro; Baldwin, Philip R.; Soltani, Alireza; Kirk, Ulrich; Cinciripini, Paul M.; Montague, P. Read

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how prior beliefs impact biophysically described processes in the presence of neuroactive drugs, which presents a profound challenge to the understanding of the mechanisms and treatments of addiction. We engineered smokers’ prior beliefs about the presence of nicotine in a cigarette smoked before a functional magnetic resonance imaging session where subjects carried out a sequential choice task. Using a model-based approach, we show that smokers’ beliefs about nicotine specifically modulated learning signals (value and reward prediction error) defined by a computational model of mesolimbic dopamine systems. Belief of “no nicotine in cigarette” (compared with “nicotine in cigarette”) strongly diminished neural responses in the striatum to value and reward prediction errors and reduced the impact of both on smokers’ choices. These effects of belief could not be explained by global changes in visual attention and were specific to value and reward prediction errors. Thus, by modulating the expression of computationally explicit signals important for valuation and choice, beliefs can override the physical presence of a potent neuroactive compound like nicotine. These selective effects of belief demonstrate that belief can modulate model-based parameters important for learning. The implications of these findings may be far ranging because belief-dependent effects on learning signals could impact a host of other behaviors in addiction as well as in other mental health problems. PMID:25605923

  7. Belief about nicotine selectively modulates value and reward prediction error signals in smokers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaosi; Lohrenz, Terry; Salas, Ramiro; Baldwin, Philip R; Soltani, Alireza; Kirk, Ulrich; Cinciripini, Paul M; Montague, P Read

    2015-02-24

    Little is known about how prior beliefs impact biophysically described processes in the presence of neuroactive drugs, which presents a profound challenge to the understanding of the mechanisms and treatments of addiction. We engineered smokers' prior beliefs about the presence of nicotine in a cigarette smoked before a functional magnetic resonance imaging session where subjects carried out a sequential choice task. Using a model-based approach, we show that smokers' beliefs about nicotine specifically modulated learning signals (value and reward prediction error) defined by a computational model of mesolimbic dopamine systems. Belief of "no nicotine in cigarette" (compared with "nicotine in cigarette") strongly diminished neural responses in the striatum to value and reward prediction errors and reduced the impact of both on smokers' choices. These effects of belief could not be explained by global changes in visual attention and were specific to value and reward prediction errors. Thus, by modulating the expression of computationally explicit signals important for valuation and choice, beliefs can override the physical presence of a potent neuroactive compound like nicotine. These selective effects of belief demonstrate that belief can modulate model-based parameters important for learning. The implications of these findings may be far ranging because belief-dependent effects on learning signals could impact a host of other behaviors in addiction as well as in other mental health problems.

  8. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males.

  9. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males. PMID:26626441

  10. Negative affect predicts posttraumatic stress symptoms in Brazilian volunteer United Nations peacekeepers in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Souza, Wanderson F; Figueira, Ivan; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Volchan, Eliane; Mendonça-de-Souza, Ana C; Duarte, Antônio F A; Monteiro da Silva, Angela M; Marques-Portella, Carla; Mari, Jair J; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire

    2008-11-01

    Our study evaluated the relationship between positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) traits on the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among peacekeepers. A longitudinal study with 138 army personnel deployed to a peacekeeping mission in Haiti was conducted. An instrument for measuring PA and NA traits was used before deployment. PTSS, indexed by posttraumatic stress disorder Checklist--Military Version (PCL-M) and frequency of stressful situations were measured after return. Regression analysis showed that both NA and number of stressful situations contributed toward increasing PCL-M scores (Adjusted R = 0.25; p < 0.001). We also found that NA traits interact with intensively stressful situations enhancing the occurrence of PTSS (Adjusted R = 0.32; p < 0.001). These findings suggest that NA traits are an important predictor for PTSS among peacekeepers and also worsen the consequences of being exposed to stressful situations. PMID:19008738

  11. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  12. Using Magnetic Resonance for Predicting Femoral Strength: Added Value with respect to Bone Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Olivia; Fierens, Yves; Strantza, Maria; Luypaert, Robert; de Mey, Johan; Cattrysse, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose. To evaluate the added value of MRI with respect to peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for predicting femoral strength. Material and Methods. Bone mineral density (BMD) of eighteen femur specimens was assessed with pQCT, DXA, and MRI (using ultrashort echo times (UTE) and the MicroView software). Subsequently biomechanical testing was performed to assess failure load. Simple and multiple linear regression were used with failure load as the dependent variable. Results. Simple linear regression allowed a prediction of failure load with either pQCT, DXA, or MRI in an r2 range of 0.41–0.48. Multiple linear regression with pQCT, DXA, and MRI yielded the best prediction (r2 = 0.68). Conclusions. The accuracy of MRI, using UTE and MicroView software, to predict femoral strength compares well with that of pQCT or DXA. Furthermore, the inclusion of MRI in a multiple-regression model yields the best prediction. PMID:26413544

  13. The value of "black-box" neural network modeling in subsurface flow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleologos, E.; Skitzi, I.; Katsifarakis, K.

    2012-04-01

    In several hydrologic cases the complexity of the processes involved tied in with the uncertainty in the subsurface geologic environment, geometries, and boundary conditions cannot be addressed by constitutive relationships, either in a deterministic or a stochastic framework. "Black-box" models are used routinely in surface hydrologic predictions, but in subsurface hydrology there is still a tendency to rely on physical descriptions, even in problems where the geometry, the medium, the processes, the boundary conditions are largely unknown. Subsurface flow in karstic environments exemplifies all the above complexities and uncertainties rendering the use of physical models impractical. The current study uses neural networks to exemplify that "black-box" models can provide useful predictions even in the absence of physical process descriptions. Daily discharges of two springs lying in a karstic environment were simulated for a period of two and a half years with the use of a multi-layer perceptron back-propagation neural network. Missing discharge values were supplemented by assuming linear relationships during base flow conditions, thus extending the length of the data record during the network's training phase and improving its performance. The time lag between precipitation and spring discharge differed significantly for the two springs indicating that in karstic environments hydraulic behavior is dominated, even within a few hundred meters, by local conditions. Optimum training results were attained with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm resulting in a network architecture consisting of two input layer neurons, four hidden layer neurons, and one output layer neuron, the spring's discharge. The neural network's predictions captured the behavior for both springs and followed very closely the discontinuities in the discharge time series. Under/over-estimation of observed discharges for the two springs remained below 3%, with the exception of a few local maxima where

  14. Prediction of very large values of magnetoresistance in a graphene nanoribbon device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Youn; Kim, Kwang S

    2008-07-01

    Graphene has emerged as a versatile material with outstanding electronic properties that could prove useful in many device applications. Recently, the demonstration of spin injection into graphene and the observation of long spin relaxation times and lengths have suggested that graphene could play a role in 'spintronic' devices that manipulate electron spin rather than charge. In particular it has been found that zigzag graphene nanoribbons have magnetic (or spin) states at their edges, and that these states can be either antiparallel or parallel. Here we report the results of first-principles simulations that predict that spin-valve devices based on graphene nanoribbons will exhibit magnetoresistance values that are thousands of times higher than previously reported experimental values. These remarkable values can be linked to the unique symmetry of the band structure in the nanoribbons. We also show that it is possible to manipulate the band structure of the nanoribbons to generate highly spin-polarized currents. PMID:18654564

  15. PREDICTION OF SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION FOR N-VALUES IN EARTH-FILL EMBANK MENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Shin-Ichi; Takayama, Yuta; Suzuki, Makoto; Murakami, Akira; Fujisawa, Kazunori

    In this research, the spatial distribution for the strength parameters of decrepit earth-fill dams, and the identification methods of the distribution are discussed. Generally, the strength of the earth-fill is predicted derived from the SPT N-values. While, in this research, the Swedish Weight Sounding tests (SWS tests) are conducted to obtain the spatial distribution of the N-values as the simpler method, and the statistical model of the N-values is determined based on the sounding test results. For this task, the MAIC (Minimizing Aka ike's Information Criterion) method is employed, and the semi-variogram method is also used to identify the spatial correlation characteristics. The spatial distribution of the N-value is identified from the sounding test results with high resolution, since the point estimations are obtained with short intervals. To interpolate the point estimated values, the indicator simulation method, which is one of the geostatistical methods, is employed. In the method, the hard data (primary data) and the soft data (complementary data) can be used simultaneously. Results from the SWS and the surface wave method (SWM), which is one of the geophysical exploration methods, are dealt with as hard and soft data, respectively. With synthesizing two results, the accurate spatial distribution of N-values can be identified.

  16. Can exaggerated stress reactivity and prolonged recovery predict negative health outcomes? The case of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, William R

    2015-04-01

    Researchers and laypersons have long argued that stress is bad for health, particularly when responses are large, prolonged, and frequent. By extension, individuals who have the largest and the most prolonged responses are assumed to have worse outcomes than do less reactive persons. Research in animals has been supportive of the connection between stress and poor health, but evidence in humans has been slow to accumulate. The current issue of Psychosomatic Medicine presents a meta-analysis of 33 studies of delayed recovery from stress and its association with poor cardiovascular disease outcomes and all-cause mortality. The analysis supports the contention that slower recovery to baseline after exercise or psychological stress may predict earlier death due to all causes. This finding raises questions for psychosomatic theories of disease and points the direction for further study of how or whether to incorporate reactivity measures into standard risk profiles.

  17. Qualities of Peer Relations on Social Networking Websites: Predictions from Negative Mother-Teen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Szwedo, David E; Mikami, Amori Yee; Allen, Joseph P

    2011-09-01

    This study examined associations between characteristics of teenagers' relationships with their mothers and their later socializing behavior and peer relationship quality online. At age 13, teenagers and their mothers participated in an interaction in which mothers' and adolescents' behavior undermining autonomy and relatedness was observed, and indicators of teens' depressive symptoms and social anxiety were assessed. At age 20, youth self-reported on their online behaviors, youths' social networking webpages were observationally coded to assess peer relationship quality online, and symptoms of depression and social anxiety were reassessed. Results suggested that problematic mother-teen relationships were predictive of youths' later preference for online communication and greater likelihood of forming a friendship with someone met online, yet poorer quality in online relationships. Findings are discussed within a developmental framework suggesting the importance of considering youths' family interactions during early adolescence as predictors of future online socializing behavior and online interactions with peers. PMID:21860584

  18. Genes associated with histopathologic features of triple negative breast tumors predict molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Visscher, Daniel W; Wang, Chen; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lakis, Sotiris; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fountzilas, George; Kabisch, Maria; Rüdiger, Thomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Cross, Simon S; Southey, Melissa C; Olson, Janet E; Gilbert, Judy; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Jones, J Louise; Zheng, Wei; Mannermaa, Arto; Eccles, Diana M; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2016-05-01

    Distinct subtypes of triple negative (TN) breast cancer have been identified by tumor expression profiling. However, little is known about the relationship between histopathologic features of TN tumors, which reflect aspects of both tumor behavior and tumor microenvironment, and molecular TN subtypes. The histopathologic features of TN tumors were assessed by central review and 593 TN tumors were subjected to whole genome expression profiling using the Illumina Whole Genome DASL array. TN molecular subtypes were defined based on gene expression data associated with histopathologic features of TN tumors. Gene expression analysis yielded signatures for four TN subtypes (basal-like, androgen receptor positive, immune, and stromal) consistent with previous studies. Expression analysis also identified genes significantly associated with the 12 histological features of TN tumors. Development of signatures using these markers of histopathological features resulted in six distinct TN subtype signatures, including an additional basal-like and stromal signature. The additional basal-like subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of cell motility and glucose metabolism genes and reduced expression of immune signaling genes, whereas the additional stromal subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of immunomodulatory pathway genes. Histopathologic features that reflect heterogeneity in tumor architecture, cell structure, and tumor microenvironment are related to TN subtype. Accounting for histopathologic features in the development of gene expression signatures, six major subtypes of TN breast cancer were identified.

  19. β1 Integrin as a Prognostic and Predictive Marker in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hsin-Ling; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Lin, Chih-Hung; Chai, Chee-Yin; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chang, Shu-Jyuan; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Hung, Wen-Chun; Pan, Mei-Ren; Luo, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) displays higher risk of recurrence and distant metastasis. Due to absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), TNBC lacks clinically established targeted therapies. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism underlying the aggressive behaviors of TNBC is required for the design of individualized strategies and the elongation of overall survival duration. Here, we supported a positive correlation between β1 integrin and malignant behaviors such as cell migration, invasion, and drug resistance. We found that silencing of β1 integrin inhibited cell migration, invasion, and increased the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug. In contrast, activation of β1 integrin increased cell migration, invasion, and decreased the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug. Furthermore, we found that silencing of β1 integrin abolished Focal adhesion kinese (FAK) mediated cell survival. Overexpression of FAK could restore cisplatin-induced apoptosis in β1 integrin-depleted cells. Consistent to in vitro data, β1 integrin expression was also positively correlated with FAK (p = 0.031) in clinical tissue. More importantly, β1 integrin expression was significantly correlated with patient outcome. In summary, our study indicated that β1 integrin could regulate TNBC cells migration, invasion, drug sensitivity, and be a potential prognostic biomarker in TNBC patient survival. PMID:27589736

  20. β1 Integrin as a Prognostic and Predictive Marker in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hsin-Ling; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Lin, Chih-Hung; Chai, Chee-Yin; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chang, Shu-Jyuan; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Hung, Wen-Chun; Pan, Mei-Ren; Luo, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) displays higher risk of recurrence and distant metastasis. Due to absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), TNBC lacks clinically established targeted therapies. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism underlying the aggressive behaviors of TNBC is required for the design of individualized strategies and the elongation of overall survival duration. Here, we supported a positive correlation between β1 integrin and malignant behaviors such as cell migration, invasion, and drug resistance. We found that silencing of β1 integrin inhibited cell migration, invasion, and increased the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug. In contrast, activation of β1 integrin increased cell migration, invasion, and decreased the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug. Furthermore, we found that silencing of β1 integrin abolished Focal adhesion kinese (FAK) mediated cell survival. Overexpression of FAK could restore cisplatin-induced apoptosis in β1 integrin-depleted cells. Consistent to in vitro data, β1 integrin expression was also positively correlated with FAK (p = 0.031) in clinical tissue. More importantly, β1 integrin expression was significantly correlated with patient outcome. In summary, our study indicated that β1 integrin could regulate TNBC cells migration, invasion, drug sensitivity, and be a potential prognostic biomarker in TNBC patient survival. PMID:27589736

  1. A Bayesian method and its variational approximation for prediction of genomic breeding values in multiple traits

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic selection is an effective tool for animal and plant breeding, allowing effective individual selection without phenotypic records through the prediction of genomic breeding value (GBV). To date, genomic selection has focused on a single trait. However, actual breeding often targets multiple correlated traits, and, therefore, joint analysis taking into consideration the correlation between traits, which might result in more accurate GBV prediction than analyzing each trait separately, is suitable for multi-trait genomic selection. This would require an extension of the prediction model for single-trait GBV to multi-trait case. As the computational burden of multi-trait analysis is even higher than that of single-trait analysis, an effective computational method for constructing a multi-trait prediction model is also needed. Results We described a Bayesian regression model incorporating variable selection for jointly predicting GBVs of multiple traits and devised both an MCMC iteration and variational approximation for Bayesian estimation of parameters in this multi-trait model. The proposed Bayesian procedures with MCMC iteration and variational approximation were referred to as MCBayes and varBayes, respectively. Using simulated datasets of SNP genotypes and phenotypes for three traits with high and low heritabilities, we compared the accuracy in predicting GBVs between multi-trait and single-trait analyses as well as between MCBayes and varBayes. The results showed that, compared to single-trait analysis, multi-trait analysis enabled much more accurate GBV prediction for low-heritability traits correlated with high-heritability traits, by utilizing the correlation structure between traits, while the prediction accuracy for uncorrelated low-heritability traits was comparable or less with multi-trait analysis in comparison with single-trait analysis depending on the setting for prior probability that a SNP has zero effect. Although the prediction

  2. Prediction of pKa values using the PM6 semiempirical method

    PubMed Central

    Kromann, Jimmy C.; Larsen, Frej; Moustafa, Hadeel

    2016-01-01

    The PM6 semiempirical method and the dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected PM6-D3H+ method are used together with the SMD and COSMO continuum solvation models to predict pKa values of pyridines, alcohols, phenols, benzoic acids, carboxylic acids, and phenols using isodesmic reactions and compared to published ab initio results. The pKa values of pyridines, alcohols, phenols, and benzoic acids considered in this study can generally be predicted with PM6 and ab initio methods to within the same overall accuracy, with average mean absolute differences (MADs) of 0.6–0.7 pH units. For carboxylic acids, the accuracy (0.7–1.0 pH units) is also comparable to ab initio results if a single outlier is removed. For primary, secondary, and tertiary amines the accuracy is, respectively, similar (0.5–0.6), slightly worse (0.5–1.0), and worse (1.0–2.5), provided that di- and tri-ethylamine are used as reference molecules for secondary and tertiary amines. When applied to a drug-like molecule where an empirical pKa predictor exhibits a large (4.9 pH unit) error, we find that the errors for PM6-based predictions are roughly the same in magnitude but opposite in sign. As a result, most of the PM6-based methods predict the correct protonation state at physiological pH, while the empirical predictor does not. The computational cost is around 2–5 min per conformer per core processor, making PM6-based pKa prediction computationally efficient enough to be used for high-throughput screening using on the order of 100 core processors.

  3. Prediction of pKa values using the PM6 semiempirical method.

    PubMed

    Kromann, Jimmy C; Larsen, Frej; Moustafa, Hadeel; Jensen, Jan H

    2016-01-01

    The PM6 semiempirical method and the dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected PM6-D3H+ method are used together with the SMD and COSMO continuum solvation models to predict pKa values of pyridines, alcohols, phenols, benzoic acids, carboxylic acids, and phenols using isodesmic reactions and compared to published ab initio results. The pKa values of pyridines, alcohols, phenols, and benzoic acids considered in this study can generally be predicted with PM6 and ab initio methods to within the same overall accuracy, with average mean absolute differences (MADs) of 0.6-0.7 pH units. For carboxylic acids, the accuracy (0.7-1.0 pH units) is also comparable to ab initio results if a single outlier is removed. For primary, secondary, and tertiary amines the accuracy is, respectively, similar (0.5-0.6), slightly worse (0.5-1.0), and worse (1.0-2.5), provided that di- and tri-ethylamine are used as reference molecules for secondary and tertiary amines. When applied to a drug-like molecule where an empirical pKa predictor exhibits a large (4.9 pH unit) error, we find that the errors for PM6-based predictions are roughly the same in magnitude but opposite in sign. As a result, most of the PM6-based methods predict the correct protonation state at physiological pH, while the empirical predictor does not. The computational cost is around 2-5 min per conformer per core processor, making PM6-based pKa prediction computationally efficient enough to be used for high-throughput screening using on the order of 100 core processors. PMID:27602298

  4. Prediction of pKa values using the PM6 semiempirical method

    PubMed Central

    Kromann, Jimmy C.; Larsen, Frej; Moustafa, Hadeel

    2016-01-01

    The PM6 semiempirical method and the dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected PM6-D3H+ method are used together with the SMD and COSMO continuum solvation models to predict pKa values of pyridines, alcohols, phenols, benzoic acids, carboxylic acids, and phenols using isodesmic reactions and compared to published ab initio results. The pKa values of pyridines, alcohols, phenols, and benzoic acids considered in this study can generally be predicted with PM6 and ab initio methods to within the same overall accuracy, with average mean absolute differences (MADs) of 0.6–0.7 pH units. For carboxylic acids, the accuracy (0.7–1.0 pH units) is also comparable to ab initio results if a single outlier is removed. For primary, secondary, and tertiary amines the accuracy is, respectively, similar (0.5–0.6), slightly worse (0.5–1.0), and worse (1.0–2.5), provided that di- and tri-ethylamine are used as reference molecules for secondary and tertiary amines. When applied to a drug-like molecule where an empirical pKa predictor exhibits a large (4.9 pH unit) error, we find that the errors for PM6-based predictions are roughly the same in magnitude but opposite in sign. As a result, most of the PM6-based methods predict the correct protonation state at physiological pH, while the empirical predictor does not. The computational cost is around 2–5 min per conformer per core processor, making PM6-based pKa prediction computationally efficient enough to be used for high-throughput screening using on the order of 100 core processors. PMID:27602298

  5. Predeliberation activity in prefrontal cortex and striatum and the prediction of subsequent value judgment.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Uri; Rutishauser, Ueli; Kim, Soyoun; Cai, Xinying; Lee, Daeyeol; Koch, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Rational, value-based decision-making mandates selecting the option with highest subjective expected value after appropriate deliberation. We examined activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and striatum of monkeys deciding between smaller, immediate rewards and larger, delayed ones. We previously found neurons that modulated their activity in this task according to the animal's choice, while it deliberated (choice neurons). Here we found neurons whose spiking activities were predictive of the spatial location of the selected target (spatial-bias neurons) or the size of the chosen reward (reward-bias neurons) before the onset of the cue presenting the decision-alternatives, and thus before rational deliberation could begin. Their predictive power increased as the values the animals associated with the two decision alternatives became more similar. The ventral striatum (VS) preferentially contained spatial-bias neurons; the caudate nucleus (CD) preferentially contained choice neurons. In contrast, the DLPFC contained significant numbers of all three neuron types, but choice neurons were not preferentially also bias neurons of either kind there, nor were spatial-bias neurons preferentially also choice neurons, and vice versa. We suggest a simple winner-take-all (WTA) circuit model to account for the dissociation of choice and bias neurons. The model reproduced our results and made additional predictions that were borne out empirically. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that the DLPFC and striatum harbor dissociated neural populations that represent choices and predeliberation biases that are combined after cue onset; the bias neurons have a weaker effect on the ultimate decision than the choice neurons, so their influence is progressively apparent for trials where the values associated with the decision alternatives are increasingly similar.

  6. Predictive Value of Sympathetic Skin Response in Diagnosing Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Hea Eun; Kim, Dae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive value of the sympathetic skin response (SSR) in diagnosing complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) by comparing three diagnostic modalities-SSR, three-phasic bone scans (TPBS), and thermography. Methods Thirteen patients with severe limb pain were recruited. Among them, 6 were diagnosed with CRPS according to the proposed revised CRPS clinical diagnostic criteria described by the International Association for the Study of Pain. SSR was measured in either the hands or feet bilaterally and was considered abnormal when the latency was prolonged. A positive TPBS finding was defined as diffuse increased tracer uptake on the delayed image. Thermographic findings were considered positive if a temperature asymmetry greater than 1.00℃ was detected between the extremities. Results Five of 6 CRPS patients showed prolonged latency on SSR (83% sensitivity). TPBS was positive in the 5 CRPS patients who underwent TPBS (100% sensitivity). Thermography was positive in 4 of 5 CRPS patients who underwent the procedure (80% sensitivity). The remaining 7 non-CRPS patients differed on examination. SSR latencies within normal limit were noted in 4 of 7 non-CRPS patients (57% specificity). Results were negative in 4 of 5 non-CRPS patients who underwent TPBS (80% specificity), and negative in 3 of 5 non-CRPS patients who underwent thermography (60% specificity). Conclusion SSR may be helpful in detecting CRPS. PMID:25750880

  7. Simultaneous modeling of visual saliency and value computation improves predictions of economic choice

    PubMed Central

    Towal, R. Blythe; Mormann, Milica; Koch, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Many decisions we make require visually identifying and evaluating numerous alternatives quickly. These usually vary in reward, or value, and in low-level visual properties, such as saliency. Both saliency and value influence the final decision. In particular, saliency affects fixation locations and durations, which are predictive of choices. However, it is unknown how saliency propagates to the final decision. Moreover, the relative influence of saliency and value is unclear. Here we address these questions with an integrated model that combines a perceptual decision process about where and when to look with an economic decision process about what to choose. The perceptual decision process is modeled as a drift–diffusion model (DDM) process for each alternative. Using psychophysical data from a multiple-alternative, forced-choice task, in which subjects have to pick one food item from a crowded display via eye movements, we test four models where each DDM process is driven by (i) saliency or (ii) value alone or (iii) an additive or (iv) a multiplicative combination of both. We find that models including both saliency and value weighted in a one-third to two-thirds ratio (saliency-to-value) significantly outperform models based on either quantity alone. These eye fixation patterns modulate an economic decision process, also described as a DDM process driven by value. Our combined model quantitatively explains fixation patterns and choices with similar or better accuracy than previous models, suggesting that visual saliency has a smaller, but significant, influence than value and that saliency affects choices indirectly through perceptual decisions that modulate economic decisions. PMID:24019496

  8. Prediction of genetic values of quantitative traits with epistatic effects in plant breeding populations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D; Salah El-Basyoni, I; Stephen Baenziger, P; Crossa, J; Eskridge, K M; Dweikat, I

    2012-01-01

    Though epistasis has long been postulated to have a critical role in genetic regulation of important pathways as well as provide a major source of variation in the process of speciation, the importance of epistasis for genomic selection in the context of plant breeding is still being debated. In this paper, we report the results on the prediction of genetic values with epistatic effects for 280 accessions in the Nebraska Wheat Breeding Program using adaptive mixed least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). The development of adaptive mixed LASSO, originally designed for association mapping, for the context of genomic selection is reported. The results show that adaptive mixed LASSO can be successfully applied to the prediction of genetic values while incorporating both marker main effects and epistatic effects. Especially, the prediction accuracy is substantially improved by the inclusion of two-locus epistatic effects (more than onefold in some cases as measured by cross-validation correlation coefficient), which is observed for multiple traits and planting locations. This points to significant potential in using non-additive genetic effects for genomic selection in crop breeding practices. PMID:22892636

  9. Progress in the prediction of pKa values in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alexov, Emil; Mehler, Ernest L.; Baker, Nathan A.; Baptista, Antonio; Huang, Yong; Milletti, Francesca; Nielsen, Jens E.; Farrell, Damien; Carstensen, Tommy; Olsson, Mats H.; Shen, Jana K.; Warwicker, Jim; Williams, Sarah; Word, J Michael

    2011-12-15

    The pKa-cooperative aims to provide a forum for experimental and theoretical researchers interested in protein pKa values and protein electrostatics in general. The first round of the pKa -cooperative, which challenged computational labs to carry out blind predictions against pKas experimentally determined in the laboratory of Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, was completed and results discussed at the Telluride meeting (July 6-10, 2009). This paper serves as an introduction to the reports submitted by the blind prediction participants that will be published in a special issue of PROTEINS: Structure, Function and Bioinformatics. Here we briefly outline existing approaches for pKa calculations, emphasizing methods that were used by the participants in calculating the blind pKa values in the first round of the cooperative. We then point out some of the difficulties encountered by the participating groups in making their blind predictions, and finally try to provide some insights for future developments aimed at improving the accuracy of pKa calculations.

  10. Gaze fixations predict brain activation during the voluntary regulation of picture-induced negative affect.

    PubMed

    van Reekum, Carien M; Johnstone, Tom; Urry, Heather L; Thurow, Marchell E; Schaefer, Hillary S; Alexander, Andrew L; Davidson, Richard J

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies have identified a distributed network of brain regions thought to support cognitive reappraisal processes underlying emotion regulation in response to affective images, including parieto-temporal regions and lateral/medial regions of prefrontal cortex (PFC). A number of these commonly activated regions are also known to underlie visuospatial attention and oculomotor control, which raises the possibility that people use attentional redeployment rather than, or in addition to, reappraisal as a strategy to regulate emotion. We predicted that a significant portion of the observed variance in brain activation during emotion regulation tasks would be associated with differences in how participants visually scan the images while regulating their emotions. We recorded brain activation using fMRI and quantified patterns of gaze fixation while participants increased or decreased their affective response to a set of affective images. fMRI results replicated previous findings on emotion regulation with regulation differences reflected in regions of PFC and the amygdala. In addition, our gaze fixation data revealed that when regulating, individuals changed their gaze patterns relative to a control condition. Furthermore, this variation in gaze fixation accounted for substantial amounts of variance in brain activation. These data point to the importance of controlling for gaze fixation in studies of emotion regulation that use visual stimuli.

  11. The Value of Online Algorithms to Predict T-Cell Ligands Created by Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    van der Lee, Dyantha I; Pont, Margot J; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Griffioen, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be a curative treatment for hematological malignancies. After HLA-matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation, beneficial anti-tumor immunity as well as detrimental side-effects can develop due to donor-derived T-cells recognizing polymorphic peptides that are presented by HLA on patient cells. Polymorphic peptides on patient cells that are recognized by specific T-cells are called minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA), while the respective peptides in donor cells are allelic variants. MiHA can be identified by reverse strategies in which large sets of peptides are screened for T-cell recognition. In these strategies, selection of peptides by prediction algorithms may be relevant to increase the efficiency of MiHA discovery. We investigated the value of online prediction algorithms for MiHA discovery and determined the in silico characteristics of 68 autosomal HLA class I-restricted MiHA that have been identified as natural ligands by forward strategies in which T-cells from in vivo immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are used to identify the antigen. Our analysis showed that HLA class I binding was accurately predicted for 87% of MiHA of which a relatively large proportion of peptides had strong binding affinity (56%). Weak binding affinity was also predicted for a considerable number of antigens (31%) and the remaining 13% of MiHA were not predicted as HLA class I binding peptides. Besides prediction for HLA class I binding, none of the other online algorithms significantly contributed to MiHA characterization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the majority of MiHA do not differ from their allelic variants in in silico characteristics, suggesting that allelic variants can potentially be processed and presented on the cell surface. In conclusion, our analyses revealed the in silico characteristics of 68 HLA class I-restricted MiHA and explored the value of online algorithms to predict T

  12. The Value of Online Algorithms to Predict T-Cell Ligands Created by Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, Dyantha I.; Pont, Margot J.; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Griffioen, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be a curative treatment for hematological malignancies. After HLA-matched allogeneic stem cell transplantation, beneficial anti-tumor immunity as well as detrimental side-effects can develop due to donor-derived T-cells recognizing polymorphic peptides that are presented by HLA on patient cells. Polymorphic peptides on patient cells that are recognized by specific T-cells are called minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA), while the respective peptides in donor cells are allelic variants. MiHA can be identified by reverse strategies in which large sets of peptides are screened for T-cell recognition. In these strategies, selection of peptides by prediction algorithms may be relevant to increase the efficiency of MiHA discovery. We investigated the value of online prediction algorithms for MiHA discovery and determined the in silico characteristics of 68 autosomal HLA class I-restricted MiHA that have been identified as natural ligands by forward strategies in which T-cells from in vivo immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are used to identify the antigen. Our analysis showed that HLA class I binding was accurately predicted for 87% of MiHA of which a relatively large proportion of peptides had strong binding affinity (56%). Weak binding affinity was also predicted for a considerable number of antigens (31%) and the remaining 13% of MiHA were not predicted as HLA class I binding peptides. Besides prediction for HLA class I binding, none of the other online algorithms significantly contributed to MiHA characterization. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the majority of MiHA do not differ from their allelic variants in in silico characteristics, suggesting that allelic variants can potentially be processed and presented on the cell surface. In conclusion, our analyses revealed the in silico characteristics of 68 HLA class I-restricted MiHA and explored the value of online algorithms to predict T

  13. Signals in human striatum are appropriate for policy update rather than value prediction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-04-01

    Influential reinforcement learning theories propose that prediction error signals in the brain's nigrostriatal system guide learning for trial-and-error decision-making. However, since different decision variables can be learned from quantitatively similar error signals, a critical question is: what is the content of decision representations trained by the error signals? We used fMRI to monitor neural activity in a two-armed bandit counterfactual decision task that provided human subjects with information about forgone and obtained monetary outcomes so as to dissociate teaching signals that update expected values for each action, versus signals that train relative preferences between actions (a policy). The reward probabilities of both choices varied independently from each other. This specific design allowed us to test whether subjects' choice behavior was guided by policy-based methods, which directly map states to advantageous actions, or value-based methods such as Q-learning, where choice policies are instead generated by learning an intermediate representation (reward expectancy). Behaviorally, we found human participants' choices were significantly influenced by obtained as well as forgone rewards from the previous trial. We also found subjects' blood oxygen level-dependent responses in striatum were modulated in opposite directions by the experienced and forgone rewards but not by reward expectancy. This neural pattern, as well as subjects' choice behavior, is consistent with a teaching signal for developing habits or relative action preferences, rather than prediction errors for updating separate action values. PMID:21471387

  14. Promoting breastfeeding in Bolivia: do social networks add to the predictive value of traditional socioeconomic characteristics?

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Becker, Fannie; Valente, Thomas W

    2006-03-01

    This study tested whether the prediction of health-related knowledge (correct breastfeeding practices in this case) could be improved by including information about the composition of an individual's personal network above and beyond that predicted by his/her socioeconomic or demographic characteristics. Few studies have tested the predictive value of social networks, especially for population-based studies, despite an increased use of social networks in the past few years in several fields of health research, especially in research relating to prevention of HIV/AIDS and design of HIV/AIDS programmes. Promotion of breastfeeding practices that enhance child survival is important in Bolivia because of high infant morbidity and mortality in the country. Data on a cross-sectional urban probability sample of 2,354 women and men aged 15-49 years were collected from seven urban areas in Bolivia. Model building and the log likelihood ratio criteria were used for assessing the significance of variables in a logistic model. Results showed that the network variables added significantly (p < 0.05 for knowledge of breastfeeding only with no other liquids and for knowledge of breastfeeding only with no solids p < 0.01) to the predictive power of the socioeconomic variables. These results may also hold for other health research areas, increasingly using social network analysis, such as that of HIV/AIDS.

  15. Visualizing lighting with images: converging between the predictive value of renderings and photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, Ulrich; Stokkermans, Mariska G. M.; Murdoch, Michael J.

    2013-03-01

    Performing psychophysical experiments to investigate lighting perception can be expensive and time consuming if complex lighting systems need to be implemented. In this paper, display-based experiments are explored as a cost effective and less time consuming alternative to real-world experiments. The aim of this work is to better understand the upper limit of prediction accuracy that can be achieved when presenting an image on a display rather than the real-world scene. We compare the predictive value of photographs and physically-based renderings on a number of perceptual lighting attributes. It is shown that the photographs convey statistically the same lighting perception as in a real-world scenario. Initial renderings have an inferior performance, but are shown to converge towards the performance of the photographs through iterative improvements.

  16. The Prostate Health Index adds predictive value to multi-parametric MRI in detecting significant prostate cancers in a repeat biopsy population

    PubMed Central

    Gnanapragasam, V. J.; Burling, K.; George, A.; Stearn, S.; Warren, A.; Barrett, T.; Koo, B.; Gallagher, F. A.; Doble, A.; Kastner, C.; Parker, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Both multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) and the Prostate Health Index (PHI) have shown promise in predicting a positive biopsy in men with suspected prostate cancer. Here we investigated the value of combining both tests in men requiring a repeat biopsy. PHI scores were measured in men undergoing re-biopsy with an mpMRI image-guided transperineal approach (n = 279, 94 with negative mpMRIs). The PHI was assessed for ability to add value to mpMRI in predicting all or only significant cancers (Gleason ≥7). In this study adding PHI to mpMRI improved overall and significant cancer prediction (AUC 0.71 and 0.75) compared to mpMRI + PSA alone (AUC 0.64 and 0.69 respectively). At a threshold of ≥35, PHI + mpMRI demonstrated a NPV of 0.97 for excluding significant tumours. In mpMRI negative men, the PHI again improved prediction of significant cancers; AUC 0.76 vs 0.63 (mpMRI + PSA). Using a PHI≥35, only 1/21 significant cancers was missed and 31/73 (42%) men potentially spared a re-biopsy (NPV of 0.97, sensitivity 0.95). Decision curve analysis demonstrated clinically relevant utility of the PHI across threshold probabilities of 5–30%. In summary, the PHI adds predictive performance to image-guided detection of clinically significant cancers and has particular value in determining re-biopsy need in men with a negative mpMRI. PMID:27748407

  17. Maximal aerobic capacity in ageing subjects: actual measurements versus predicted values

    PubMed Central

    Pistea, Cristina; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Oswald, Monique; Enache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of selection of reference values on the categorisation of measured maximal oxygen consumption (V′O2peak) as “normal” or “abnormal” in an ageing population. We compared measured V′O2peak with predicted values and the lower limit of normal (LLN) calculated with five equations. 99 (58 males and 41 females) disease-free subjects aged ≥70 years completed an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Mean V′O2peak was 1.88 L·min−1 in men and 1.26 L·min−1 in women. V′O2peak ranged from 89% to 108% of predicted in men, and from 88% to 164% of predicted in women, depending on the reference equation used. The proportion of subjects below the LLN ranged from 5% to 14% in men and 0–22% in women, depending on the reference equation. The LLN was lacking in one study, and was unsuitable for women in another. Most LLNs ranged between 53% and 73% of predicted. Therefore, choosing an 80% cut-off leads to overestimation of the proportion of “abnormal” subjects. To conclude, the proportion of subjects aged ≥70 years with a “low” V′O2peak differs markedly according to the chosen reference equations. In clinical practice, it is still relevant to test a sample of healthy volunteers and select the reference equations that better characterise this sample. PMID:27730176

  18. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  19. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-10-27

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤ vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  20. Heating value prediction for combustible fraction of municipal solid waste in Semarang using backpropagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuriati, Ainie; Setiabudi, Wahyu; Nur, Muhammad; Istadi, Istadi

    2015-12-01

    Backpropgation neural network was trained to predict of combustible fraction heating value of MSW from the physical composition. Waste-to-Energy (WtE) is a viable option for municipal solid waste (MSW) management. The influence of the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW) is very important on the implementation of WtE systems. As MSW is heterogeneous material, direct heating value measurements are often not feasible. In this study an empirical model was developed to describe the heating value of the combustible fraction of municipal solid waste as a function of its physical composition of MSW using backpropagation neural network. Sampling process was carried out at Jatibarang landfill. The weight of each sorting sample taken from each discharged MSW vehicle load is 100 kg. The MSW physical components were grouped into paper wastes, absorbent hygiene product waste, styrofoam waste, HD plastic waste, plastic waste, rubber waste, textile waste, wood waste, yard wastes, kitchen waste, coco waste, and miscellaneous combustible waste. Network was trained by 24 datasets with 1200, 769, and 210 epochs. The results of this analysis showed that the correlation from the physical composition is better than multiple regression method .

  1. Does the singular value decomposition entropy have predictive power for stock market? - Evidence from the Shenzhen stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Rongbao; Xiong, Wei; Li, Xinjie

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes the predictive ability of the singular value decomposition entropy for the Shenzhen Component Index based on different scales. It is found that, the predictive ability of the entropy for the index is affected by the width of moving time windows and the structural break in stock market. By moving time windows with one year, the predictive power of singular value decomposition entropy of Shenzhen stock market for its component index is found after the reform of non-tradable shares.

  2. Predicting Prostate Biopsy Outcomes: A Preliminary Investigation on Screening with Ultrahigh B-Value Diffusion-Weighted Imaging as an Innovative Diagnostic Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Shen, Yanguang; Zhang, Xu; Ma, Lu; Wang, Haiyi; An, Ningyu; Guo, Aitao; Ye, Huiyi

    2016-01-01

    Background Routine screening of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is no longer recommended because of a high rate of over-diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Objective To evaluate the efficacy of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) for PCa detection, and to explore the clinical utility of ultrahigh b-value DW-MRI in predicting prostate biopsy outcomes. Methodology 73 male patients were selected for the study. They underwent 3T MRI using T2WI conventional DW-MRI with b-value 1000 s/mm2, and ultrahigh b-value DW-MRI with b-values of 2000 s/mm2 and 3000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated individual prostate gland images on a 5-point rating scale using PI-RADS, for the purpose of region-specific comparisons among modalities. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and likelihood ratios (LR) were investigated for each MRI modality. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was also calculated. Results Results showed the improved diagnostic value of ultrahigh b-value DWI-MRI for detection of PCa when compared to other b values and conventional MRI protocols. Sensitivity values for 3000 s/mm2 in both peripheral zone (PZ) and transition zone (TZ) were significantly higher than those observed with conventional DW-MRI—Specificity values for 3000 s/mm2 in the TZ were significantly higher than other b-value images, whereas specificity values using 3000 s/mm2 in the PZ were not significantly higher than 2000 s/mm2 images. PPV and NPV between 3000 s/mm2 and the other three modalities were significantly higher for both PZ and TZ images. The PLRs and NLRs of b-value 3000 s/mm2 DW-MRI in the PZ and TZ were also recorded. ROC analysis showed greater AUCs for the b value 3000 s/mm2 DWI than for the other three modalities. Conclusions DW-MRI with a b-value of 3000 s/mm2 was found to be the most accurate and reliable MRI modality for PCa tumor detection and localization

  3. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy may predict response in HER2-negative, but not in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Miao; Bao, Xiao; Zhang, Yingjian; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Daoying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer, and to investigate whether timing of the scan and trastuzumab treatment influence the accuracy of pCR prediction in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients. We treated 81 locally advanced breast cancer patients with four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). HER2-negative breast cancer patients received NAC alone, while HER2-positive breast cancer patients received NAC plus trastuzumab. 18FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled at baseline and after the second cycle of NAC. Axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection was performed after the last cycle of neoadjuvant therapy. Relative changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) between the two PET/CT scans (ΔSUV) in primary tumors and ALN metastases were calculated. There were 75 patients with 150 PET/CT scans in the final analysis, including 41 HER2-negative and 34 HER2-positive cases. In the HER2-negative group, the ΔSUV predicted overall and ALN pCR; the receiver operating characteristics-areas under curve (ROC-AUC) were 0.87 and 0.80 (P = 0.0014 and 0.031, respectively) and the negative predictive values were 94% and 89% respectively. However, in the HER2-positive group, ΔSUV could predict neither overall nor ALN pCR; the ROC-AUCs were only 0.56 and 0.53, with P = 0.53 and 0.84, respectively. Hence, the ΔSUV after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy could predict pCR in HER2-negative patients treated with NAC alone, but not in HER2-positive patients treated with NAC plus trastuzumab. PMID:26336821

  4. Predictive value of attitude, cognitive ability, and personality to science achievement in the middle school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Dale R.

    This article examines the factors of attitude toward science, spatial ability, mathematical ability, and the scientific personality, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, in a sample of middle school students. Males and females with science grades of A and B were found to have several characteristics of the scientific personality, good grades in mathematics, but negative attitudes toward science. Males and females with science grades of C and D had a more positive attitude toward science, but poor mathematical and spatial abilities and few characteristics of the scientific personality. There were no sex differences except on the Thinking/Feeling (TF) scale of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. As expected females portrayed themselves as preferring the (F) scale, the use of personal values when making decisions and males portrayed themselves as preferring the (T) scale, the use of logical analysis when making decisions.

  5. A CBR-based and MAHP-based customer value prediction model for new product development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Jie; Luo, Xin-xing; Deng, Li

    2014-01-01

    In the fierce market environment, the enterprise which wants to meet customer needs and boost its market profit and share must focus on the new product development. To overcome the limitations of previous research, Chan et al. proposed a dynamic decision support system to predict the customer lifetime value (CLV) for new product development. However, to better meet the customer needs, there are still some deficiencies in their model, so this study proposes a CBR-based and MAHP-based customer value prediction model for a new product (C&M-CVPM). CBR (case based reasoning) can reduce experts' workload and evaluation time, while MAHP (multiplicative analytic hierarchy process) can use actual but average influencing factor's effectiveness in stimulation, and at same time C&M-CVPM uses dynamic customers' transition probability which is more close to reality. This study not only introduces the realization of CBR and MAHP, but also elaborates C&M-CVPM's three main modules. The application of the proposed model is illustrated and confirmed to be sensible and convincing through a stimulation experiment. PMID:25162050

  6. Change ratio of hemoglobin has predictive value for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify novel predictors of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding by assessing change ratios of blood test variables. Records of 1,023 patients (431 men and 592 women) who underwent endoscopy between October 2014 and September 2015 at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital (Yotsukaido, Japan) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients whose blood test variables for the time-point of endoscopy and three months previously were available were enrolled and subsequently categorized into a group with and another one without upper GI bleeding (n=32 and 84, respectively), and the respective change ratios were calculated for each group. One-way analysis of variance revealed that in patients with upper GI bleeding, change ratios of white blood cell count and alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher than those in patients without, while change ratios of hemoglobin (Hb), total protein and albumin were significantly reduced. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the change ratio of Hb was significantly correlated with upper GI bleeding. Receiver-operator characteristic analysis revealed that an 18.7% reduction of Hb was the threshold value for the prediction of upper GI bleeding. In conclusion, the present study revealed that a ≥18.7% reduction in Hb over three months has predictive value for upper GI bleeding.

  7. A CBR-Based and MAHP-Based Customer Value Prediction Model for New Product Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Jie; Luo, Xin-xing; Deng, Li

    2014-01-01

    In the fierce market environment, the enterprise which wants to meet customer needs and boost its market profit and share must focus on the new product development. To overcome the limitations of previous research, Chan et al. proposed a dynamic decision support system to predict the customer lifetime value (CLV) for new product development. However, to better meet the customer needs, there are still some deficiencies in their model, so this study proposes a CBR-based and MAHP-based customer value prediction model for a new product (C&M-CVPM). CBR (case based reasoning) can reduce experts' workload and evaluation time, while MAHP (multiplicative analytic hierarchy process) can use actual but average influencing factor's effectiveness in stimulation, and at same time C&M-CVPM uses dynamic customers' transition probability which is more close to reality. This study not only introduces the realization of CBR and MAHP, but also elaborates C&M-CVPM's three main modules. The application of the proposed model is illustrated and confirmed to be sensible and convincing through a stimulation experiment. PMID:25162050

  8. Metacognitive deficits predict future levels of negative symptoms in schizophrenia controlling for neurocognition, affect recognition, and self-expectation of goal attainment.

    PubMed

    Lysaker, Paul H; Kukla, Marina; Dubreucq, Julien; Gumley, Andrew; McLeod, Hamish; Vohs, Jenifer L; Buck, Kelly D; Minor, Kyle S; Luther, Lauren; Leonhardt, Bethany L; Belanger, Elizabeth A; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    The recalcitrance of negative symptoms in the face of pharmacologic treatment has spurred interest in understanding the psychological factors that contribute to their formation and persistence. Accordingly, this study investigated whether deficits in metacognition, or the ability to form integrated ideas about oneself, others, and the world, prospectively predicted levels of negative symptoms independent of deficits in neurocognition, affect recognition and defeatist beliefs. Participants were 53 adults with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Prior to entry into a rehabilitation program, all participants completed concurrent assessments of metacognition with the Metacognitive Assessment Scale-Abbreviated, negative symptoms with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, neurocognition with the MATRICS battery, affect recognition with the Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task, and one form of defeatist beliefs with the Recovery Assessment Scale. Negative symptoms were then reassessed one week, 9weeks, and 17weeks after entry into the program. A mixed effects regression model revealed that after controlling for baseline negative symptoms, a general index of neurocognition, defeatist beliefs and capacity for affect recognition, lower levels of metacognition predicted higher levels of negative symptoms across all subsequent time points. Poorer metacognition was able to predict later levels of elevated negative symptoms even after controlling for initial levels of negative symptoms. Results may suggest that metacognitive deficits are a risk factor for elevated levels of negative symptoms in the future. Clinical implications are also discussed. PMID:26164820

  9. Metacognitive deficits predict future levels of negative symptoms in schizophrenia controlling for neurocognition, affect recognition, and self-expectation of goal attainment.

    PubMed

    Lysaker, Paul H; Kukla, Marina; Dubreucq, Julien; Gumley, Andrew; McLeod, Hamish; Vohs, Jenifer L; Buck, Kelly D; Minor, Kyle S; Luther, Lauren; Leonhardt, Bethany L; Belanger, Elizabeth A; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2015-10-01

    The recalcitrance of negative symptoms in the face of pharmacologic treatment has spurred interest in understanding the psychological factors that contribute to their formation and persistence. Accordingly, this study investigated whether deficits in metacognition, or the ability to form integrated ideas about oneself, others, and the world, prospectively predicted levels of negative symptoms independent of deficits in neurocognition, affect recognition and defeatist beliefs. Participants were 53 adults with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Prior to entry into a rehabilitation program, all participants completed concurrent assessments of metacognition with the Metacognitive Assessment Scale-Abbreviated, negative symptoms with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, neurocognition with the MATRICS battery, affect recognition with the Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task, and one form of defeatist beliefs with the Recovery Assessment Scale. Negative symptoms were then reassessed one week, 9weeks, and 17weeks after entry into the program. A mixed effects regression model revealed that after controlling for baseline negative symptoms, a general index of neurocognition, defeatist beliefs and capacity for affect recognition, lower levels of metacognition predicted higher levels of negative symptoms across all subsequent time points. Poorer metacognition was able to predict later levels of elevated negative symptoms even after controlling for initial levels of negative symptoms. Results may suggest that metacognitive deficits are a risk factor for elevated levels of negative symptoms in the future. Clinical implications are also discussed.

  10. New insights into the prognostic value of Ki-67 labeling index in patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuang; He, Zhi-Xian; Yu, Ke-Da; Yang, Wen-Tao; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2016-04-26

    The clinicopathological importance of the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in breast cancer has been studied intensely; however, its prognostic significance in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is unclear. We aimed to determine the optimal Ki-67 cut-off point to demonstrate its prognostic relevance for breast-cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in TNBC patients. A total of 571 female TNBC patients underwent diagnosis and surgery at our institution from January 2002 to June 2011. Clinicopathological information for all patients was available and categorized by Ki-67 LI and age at diagnosis. The cut-off values for Ki-67 LI and age were selected using the medians. A varying-coefficient Cox model was used to describe the effect of Ki-67 LI on BCSS outcomes changing with age after adjustment for disease characteristics. For survival analysis, the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to determine the association of Ki-67 LI and age with BCSS outcomes after adjustment for disease characteristics. Median age was 50 years, and median Ki-67 LI was 35% (range, 0 - 97.5%). There was no prognostic significance of stratification by Ki-67 LI in all patients. When analyzing age at diagnosis as a continuous variable, the log-transformed HRKi67 > 35% vs. ≤ 35% for BCSS increased in an S-shaped curve with increasing age up to about 50 years-old and remained higher-risk for high Ki-67 LI. After adjusting for clinicopathological risk factors, low Ki-67 LI was a poor prognostic factor for BCSS (HR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14-0.96, P = 0.042) in patients of ≤ 50 years, but not in patients diagnosed at > 50 years (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.57, 95% CI: 0.76-3.22, P = 0.241). In conclusion, lower Ki-67 LI has poor prognosis relevance in TNBC patients diagnosed at ≤ 50 years-old. Further validation of the clinical significance of Ki-67 LI in TNBC is required. PMID:27050075

  11. New insights into the prognostic value of Ki-67 labeling index in patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ke-Da; Yang, Wen-Tao; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathological importance of the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in breast cancer has been studied intensely; however, its prognostic significance in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is unclear. We aimed to determine the optimal Ki-67 cut-off point to demonstrate its prognostic relevance for breast-cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in TNBC patients. A total of 571 female TNBC patients underwent diagnosis and surgery at our institution from January 2002 to June 2011. Clinicopathological information for all patients was available and categorized by Ki-67 LI and age at diagnosis. The cut-off values for Ki-67 LI and age were selected using the medians. A varying-coefficient Cox model was used to describe the effect of Ki-67 LI on BCSS outcomes changing with age after adjustment for disease characteristics. For survival analysis, the Kaplan–Meier method and the log-rank test were used. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to determine the association of Ki-67 LI and age with BCSS outcomes after adjustment for disease characteristics. Median age was 50 years, and median Ki-67 LI was 35% (range, 0 – 97.5%). There was no prognostic significance of stratification by Ki-67 LI in all patients. When analyzing age at diagnosis as a continuous variable, the log-transformed HRKi67 > 35% vs. ≤ 35% for BCSS increased in an S-shaped curve with increasing age up to about 50 years-old and remained higher-risk for high Ki-67 LI. After adjusting for clinicopathological risk factors, low Ki-67 LI was a poor prognostic factor for BCSS (HR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14–0.96, P = 0.042) in patients of ≤ 50 years, but not in patients diagnosed at > 50 years (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.57, 95% CI: 0.76–3.22, P = 0.241). In conclusion, lower Ki-67 LI has poor prognosis relevance in TNBC patients diagnosed at ≤ 50 years-old. Further validation of the clinical significance of Ki-67 LI in TNBC is required. PMID:27050075

  12. Differences in the diagnostic value of various criteria of negative T waves for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy based on a molecular genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tetsuo; Fujino, Noboru; Hayashi, Kenshi; Uchiyama, Katsuharu; Masuta, Eiichi; Katoh, Hiromasa; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Tsubokawa, Toshinari; Ino, Hidekazu; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2007-06-01

    Differences in the diagnostic value of a variety of definitions of negative T waves for HCM (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) have not yet been clarified, resulting in a number of definitions being applied in previous studies. The aim of the present study was to determine the most accurate diagnostic definition of negative T waves for HCM in genotyped populations. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings were analysed in 161 genotyped subjects (97 carriers and 64 non-carriers). We applied three different criteria that have been used in previous studies: Criterion 1, negative T wave >10 mm in depth in any leads; Criterion 2, negative T wave >3 mm in depth in at least two leads; and Criterion 3, negative T wave >1 mm in depth in at least two leads. Of the three criteria, Criterion 3 had the highest sensitivity (43% compared with 5 and 26% in Criterion 1 and Criterion 2 respectively; P<0.0001) and retained a specificity of 95%, resulting in the highest accuracy. In comparison with abnormal Q waves, negative T waves for Criterion 3 had a lower sensitivity in detecting carriers without LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy) (12.9% for negative T waves compared with 22.6% for abnormal Q waves). On the other hand, in detecting carriers with LVH, the sensitivity of negative T waves increased in a stepwise direction with the increasing extent of LVH (P<0.001), whereas there was less association between the sensitivity of abnormal Q waves and the extent of LVH. In conclusion, Criterion 3 for negative T waves may be the most accurate definition of HCM based on genetic diagnoses. Negative T waves may show different diagnostic value according to the different criteria and phenotypes in genotyped populations with HCM.

  13. Potential Clinical Value of Multiparametric PET in the Prediction of Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueqi; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Rongfu; Cao, Haoyin; Reid, Savina; Gao, Rui; Han, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential clinical value of quantitative functional FDG PET and pathological amyloid-β PET with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and clinical assessments in the prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. Methods We studied 82 subjects for up to 96 months (median = 84 months) in a longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. All preprocessed PET images were spatially normalized to standard Montreal Neurologic Institute space. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined on MRI template, and standard uptake values ratios (SUVRs) to the cerebellum for FDG and amyloid-β PET were calculated. Predictive values of single and multiparametric PET biomarkers with and without clinical assessments and CSF biomarkers for AD progression were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression model. Results The posterior precuneus and cingulate SUVRs were identified for both FDG and amyloid-β PET in predicating progression in normal controls (NCs) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). FDG parietal and lateral temporal SUVRs were suggested for monitoring NCs and MCI group progression, respectively. 18F-AV45 global cortex attained (78.6%, 74.5%, 75.4%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy) in predicting NC progression, which is comparable to the 11C-PiB global cortex SUVR’s in predicting MCI to AD. A logistic regression model to combine FDG parietal and posterior precuneus SUVR and Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) Total Mod was identified in predicating NC progression with (80.0%, 94.9%, 93.9%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). The selected model including FDG posterior cingulate SUVR, ADAS-Cog Total Mod, and Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores for predicating MCI to AD attained (96.4%, 81.2%, 83.6%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). 11C-PiB medial temporal SUVR with MMSE significantly increased 11C-PiB PET AUC to 0.915 (p<0

  14. High positive predictive value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in intensive care neonates.

    PubMed

    Deleers, M; Dodémont, M; Van Overmeire, B; Hennequin, Y; Vermeylen, D; Roisin, S; Denis, O

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) remain a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in preterm infants. Rapid and accurate methods for the diagnosis of CRBSIs are needed in order to implement timely and appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted during a 7-year period (2005-2012) in the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital Erasme to assess the value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples (CDBS) to predict CRBSIs. Both peripheral samples and CDBS were obtained from neonates with clinically suspected CRBSI. Gram stain, automated culture and quantitative cultures on blood agar plates were performed for each sample. The paired quantitative blood culture was used as the standard to define CRBSI. Out of 397 episodes of suspected CRBSIs, 35 were confirmed by a positive ratio of quantitative culture (>5) or a colony count of CDBS culture >100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. All but two of the 30 patients who had a CDBS with a positive Gram stain were confirmed as having a CRBSI. Seven patients who had a CDBS with a negative Gram stain were diagnosed as CRBSI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain on CDBS were 80, 99.4, 93.3 and 98.1 %, respectively. Gram staining on CDBS is a viable method for rapidly (<1 h) detecting CRBSI without catheter withdrawal. PMID:26864043

  15. High positive predictive value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in intensive care neonates.

    PubMed

    Deleers, M; Dodémont, M; Van Overmeire, B; Hennequin, Y; Vermeylen, D; Roisin, S; Denis, O

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) remain a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in preterm infants. Rapid and accurate methods for the diagnosis of CRBSIs are needed in order to implement timely and appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted during a 7-year period (2005-2012) in the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital Erasme to assess the value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples (CDBS) to predict CRBSIs. Both peripheral samples and CDBS were obtained from neonates with clinically suspected CRBSI. Gram stain, automated culture and quantitative cultures on blood agar plates were performed for each sample. The paired quantitative blood culture was used as the standard to define CRBSI. Out of 397 episodes of suspected CRBSIs, 35 were confirmed by a positive ratio of quantitative culture (>5) or a colony count of CDBS culture >100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. All but two of the 30 patients who had a CDBS with a positive Gram stain were confirmed as having a CRBSI. Seven patients who had a CDBS with a negative Gram stain were diagnosed as CRBSI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain on CDBS were 80, 99.4, 93.3 and 98.1 %, respectively. Gram staining on CDBS is a viable method for rapidly (<1 h) detecting CRBSI without catheter withdrawal.

  16. Classification of breast tissue density by optical transillumination spectroscopy: optical and physiological effects governing predictive value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyschak, Kristina; Simick, Michelle K.; Jong, Roberta A.; Lilge, Lothar D.

    2003-12-01

    Preventive oncology is in need of a risk assessment technique that can identify individuals at high risk for breast cancer and that has the ability to monitor the efficacy of a risk reducing intervention. Optical transillumination spectroscopy (OTS) was shown to give information about breast tissue composition and tissue density. OTS is non-invasive, and in contrast to mammography, uses non-ionizing radiation. It is safe and can be used frequently on younger women, potentially permitting early risk detection and thus increasing the time available for risk reduction interventions to assert their influence. Before OTS can be used as a risk assessment and/or monitoring technique, its predictive ability needs to be demonstrated and maximized through the construction of mathematical models relating OTS and risk. To establish a correlation between OTS and mammographic density, Principle Components Analysis (PCA), using risk classification, is employed. PCA scores are presented in 3D cluster plots and a plane of differentiation that separates high and low tissue density is used to calculate the predictive value. Stratificaiton of PCA for measurement position on the breast in cranial-caudal projection is introduced. Analysis of PCA scores as a function of the volunteer's age and body mass index (BMI) is examined. A small but significant correlation between the component scores and age or BMI is noted but the correlation is dependnet on the tissue density category examined. Correction of the component scores for age and BMI is not recommended, since a priori knowledge of a women's tissue density is required. Stratification for the center and distal measurement positions provides a predictive value for OTS above 96%.

  17. Predictive value of early brain atrophy on response in patients treated with interferon β

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Miralles, Francisco Carlos; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Río, Jordi; Auger, Cristina; Pareto, Deborah; Tintoré, Mar; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between brain volume loss during the first year of interferon treatment and clinical outcome at 4 years. Methods: Patients with multiple sclerosis initiating interferon β were clinically evaluated every 6 months for the presence of relapses and assessment of global disability using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). MRI scans were performed at baseline and after 12 months, and the percentage of brain volume change (PBVC), brain parenchymal volume change (BPVc%), gray matter volume change (GMVc%), and white matter volume change (WMVc%) were estimated. Patients were divided based on the cutoff values for predicting confirmed EDSS worsening obtained by receiver operating characteristic analysis for all atrophy measurements. Survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression to predict disability worsening at last observation were applied, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and radiologic variables. Results: Larger PBVC and WMVc% decreases were observed in patients with disability worsening at 4 years of follow-up, whereas no differences were found in BPVc% or GMVc%. Cutoff points were obtained for PBVC (−0.86%; sensitivity 65.5%, specificity 71.4%) and WMVc% (−2.49%; sensitivity 85.3%, specificity 43.8%). Patients with decreases of PBVC and WMVc% below cutoff values were more prone to develop disability worsening (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.875, p = 0.005; HR 4.246, p = 0.004, respectively). PBVC (HR 4.751, p = 0.008) and the interaction of new T2 lesions with WMVc% (HR 1.086, p = 0.005) were found to be independent predictors of disability worsening in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: At the patient level, whole-brain and white matter volume changes in the first year of interferon β therapy are predictive of subsequent clinical evolution under treatment. PMID:26185778

  18. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios in tree rings: how well do models predict observed values?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, J. S.; Switsur, V. R.; Barker, A. C.; Carter, A. H. C.; Robertson, I.

    2002-07-01

    We have measured annual oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios in the α-cellulose of the latewood of oak ( Quercus robur L.) growing on well-drained ground in Norfolk, UK. We compare the observed values of isotope ratios with those calculated using equations that allow for isotopic fractionation during the transfer of oxygen and hydrogen from source water taken by the tree to cellulose laid down in the cambium. The equations constitute a model in which isotopic fractionation occurs during evaporative enrichment within the leaf and during isotopic change between carbohydrates and water in the trunk during cellulose synthesis. From the relationship between isotope ratios in precipitation and α-cellulose, we deduce that the source water used by the tree comprises a constant mixture of groundwater and precipitation, chiefly from the months of May, June and July of the growth year. By selection of isotopic fractionation factors and the degree of isotope exchange within the trunk, we are able to model the observed annual values of oxygen isotope ratios of α-cellulose to a significant level ( r=0.77, P<0.01). When we apply the same model to hydrogen isotope ratios, however, we find that, although we can predict the average value over the time series, we can no longer predict the year-to-year variation. We suggest that this loss of environmental signal in the hydrogen isotopes is caused by differences in the kinetic isotope effects of the biochemical reactions involved in the fixation of hydrogen in different positions of the glucose molecule. Owing to these effects, the hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose can vary in a way not anticipated in current models and hence may induce non-climatic 'noise' in the hydrogen isotope time series.

  19. [Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of methods of evaluation in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Fombonne, E; Fuhrer, R

    1991-01-01

    Clinical assessments, psychological examinations, biological parameters and other indices are commonly used in psychiatry to measure disease status. These evaluation tools are not perfect and, in general, they will fail to perfectly discriminate "cases" from normal controls. When a gold standard is available, their performances can be evaluated. If the results of a measurement are tabulated with true disease status in a contingency table, the proportions of cases and normals correctly identified (sensitivity and specificity) are useful coefficients of validity of the instrument studied. It is shown that unbiased estimates of the prevalence rate cannot however be derived directly from the proportion of sample respondents identified by a test. Practical examples with a psychiatric rating scale are provided which illustrate the importance and magnitude of this bias. Formulas are subsequently given which permit the calculation of the "true" prevalence rate from the proportion of screen positives when the sensitivity and the specificity of the test are known. The proportion of true cases among those individuals identified by a test is another important property of psychiatric measures, particularly for screening purposes. It is also called the positive predictive value and, like sensitivity and specificity, predictive values are probabilities for which high values are desirable. However, this critical characteristic of a test depends on the prevalence rate, the sensitivity and the specificity of the test used. Using an example, major changes in the probability of a screen positive individual to be truly diseased are shown to depend upon varying levels of the base rate of the disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Predicting effective caloric value of nonnutritive factors: I. Pellet quality and II. Prediction of consequential formulation dead zones.

    PubMed

    McKinney, L J; Teeter, R G

    2004-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted with male broilers to 1) establish a methodology for predicting effective caloric value (ECV), defined as dietary caloric density (CD) necessary for broilers to achieve specific BW and feed conversion ratio (FCR) combinations under standardized conditions and 2) quantify the ECV attributable to pellet quality (PQ), defined as the pellet to pellet fines ratio in the feeder. In experiment 1, chicks were reared to 56 d on diets varying in CD. Dietary caloric densities examined ranged from 2,650 to 3,250 kcal of MEn/kg. Pen BW, feed intake, and FCR were measured at 21, 42, and 56 d. On 42 and 56 d, carcass traits were measured. Increasing CD significantly enhanced BW, energy consumption, and FCR. Feed intake remained similar across the upper 3 CD treatments to 42 d. By d 56, feed consumption tended to decline as CD increased. Increasing CD beyond 3,066 kcal of MEn/kg diet did not increase lean tissue accretion, while fat deposition rose disproportionately. Experiment 1 results enabled development of equations whereby CD, hence ECV, might be predicted using BW and FCR. In experiment 2, 38-d-old broilers were used to evaluate PQ effects on growth, feed intake, FCR, and behavior in a 7-d FCR assay. The BW gain and FCR were significantly enhanced by pelleting and were positively correlated with PQ. Feed intake was not affected by PQ. The experiment 1 model was validated for experiment 2, as it closely estimated the CD for diets of similar PQ used in experiment 1. Results suggest pelleting contributes 187 kcal/kg of diet at 100% PQ and that the ECV declines curvilinearly as PQ falls. Birds were observed eating less and resting more as PQ increased, suggesting that ECV of pelleting is mediated by energy expenditure for activity. These studies provide a method for estimating ECV of nonnutritive factors that impact BW, FCR, or both. Further, the application reveals potential for creation of formulation "dead zones" whereby dietary changes to

  1. Predictive Value of IL-8 for Sepsis and Severe Infections After Burn Injury: A Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Song, Juquan; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    The inflammatory response induced by burn injury contributes to increased incidence of infections, sepsis, organ failure, and mortality. Thus, monitoring postburn inflammation is of paramount importance but, so far, there are no reliable biomarkers available to monitor and/or predict infectious complications after burn. As interleukin 8 (IL-8) is a major mediator for inflammatory responses, the aim of our study was to determine whether IL-8 expression can be used to predict postburn sepsis, infections, and mortality. Plasma cytokines, acute-phase proteins, constitutive proteins, and hormones were analyzed during the first 60 days after injury from 468 pediatric burn patients. Demographics and clinical outcome variables (length of stay, infection, sepsis, multiorgan failure [MOF], and mortality) were recorded. A cutoff level for IL-8 was determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Statistical significance is set at P < 0.05. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified a cutoff level of 234 pg/mL for IL-8 for survival. Patients were grouped according to their average IL-8 levels relative to this cutoff and stratified into high (H) (n = 133) and low (L) (n = 335) groups. In the L group, regression analysis revealed a significant predictive value of IL-8 to percent of total body surface area burned and incidence of MOF (P < 0.001). In the H group, IL-8 levels were able to predict sepsis (P < 0.002). In the H group, elevated IL-8 was associated with increased inflammatory and acute-phase responses compared with the L group (P < 0.05). High levels of IL-8 correlated with increased MOF, sepsis, and mortality. These data suggest that serum levels of IL-8 may be a valid biomarker for monitoring sepsis, infections, and mortality in burn patients.

  2. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms. PMID:27049793

  3. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms.

  4. Additional Value of Transluminal Attenuation Gradient in CT Angiography to Predict Hemodynamic Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Stuijfzand, Wynand J.; Danad, Ibrahim; Raijmakers, Pieter G.; Marcu, C. Bogdan; Heymans, Martijn W.; van Kuijk, Cornelis C.; van Rossum, Albert C.; Nieman, Koen; Min, James K.; Leipsic, Jonathon; van Royen, Niels; Knaapen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The current study evaluates the incremental value of transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG), TAG with corrected contrast opacification (CCO), and TAG with exclusion of calcified coronary segments (ExC) over coronary computed tomography angiogram (CTA) alone using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the gold standard. BACKGROUND TAG is defined as the contrast opacification gradient along the length of a coronary artery on a coronary CTA. Preliminary data suggest that TAG provides additional functional information. Interpretation of TAG is hampered by multiple heartbeat acquisition algorithms and coronary calcifications. Two correction models have been proposed based on either dephasing of contrast delivery by relating coronary density to corresponding descending aortic opacification (TAG-CCO) or excluding calcified coronary segments (TAG-ExC). METHODS Eighty-five patients with intermediate probability of coronary artery disease were prospectively included. All patients underwent step-and-shoot 256-slice coronary CTA. TAG, TAG-CCO, and TAG-ExC analyses were performed followed by invasive coronary angiography in conjunction with FFR measurements of all major coronary branches. RESULTS Thirty-four patients (40%) were diagnosed with hemodynamically-significant coronary artery disease (i.e., FFR ≤0.80). On a per-vessel basis (n = 253), 59 lesions (23%) were graded as hemodynamically significant, and the diagnostic accuracy of coronary CTA (diameter stenosis ≥50%) was 95%, 75%, 98%, and 54% for sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value, respectively. TAG and TAG-ExC did not discriminate between vessels with or without hemodynamically significant lesions (−13.5 ± 17.1 HU [Hounsfield units] × 10 mm−1 vs. −11.6 ± 13.3 HU × 10 mm−1, p = 0.36; and 13.1 ± 15.9 HU × 10 mm−1 vs. −11.4 ± 11.7 HU × 10 mm−1, p = 0.77, respectively). TAG-CCO was lower in vessels with a hemodynamically-significant lesion (−0

  5. Predictive Value of Class III D Cytological Diagnosis (Munich II, Low and Moderate Dysplasia) and Additional High-risk HPV Testing.

    PubMed

    Ziemke, P

    2012-07-01

    The validity of cytological diagnostic procedures for the detection of pre- and early cervical cancer stages is limited due to biological conditions, the uncertainty of cell sampling, and the subjective nature of microscopic assessment. Particularly in class III D cases (Munich II) this can lead to a stigmatization of patients and uncertainty with regard to further clinical follow-up and therapy. Prior to carrying out additional investigations such as high-risk HPV testing or the examination of biomarkers, the positive predictive values of patients with a class III D cytological diagnosis need to be assessed in routine practice. To this end, all relevant data from patients from our practice classed as class III D (pap smears) between 2002 and 2008 (n = 1190; 38.2 % histological diagnosis = therapeutic endpoint) and their current HPV status were recorded. Cytology, histology, persistence, age and follow-up were recorded. The database was used for comparative statistical analysis. Overall, the positive predictive value of conventional pap smear for CIN 2+ was calculated to be 32.3 % (mean follow-up: 39.7 months). The following values were calculated for high-risk HPV testing: sensitivity 94.8 %, specificity 39 %, positive predictive value 42.8 %, negative predictive value 94 %. The additional information obtained from high-risk HPV testing resulted in a significantly better positive predictive value only in patients older than 40 years. However, there was no evidence for an individual risk stratification approach which would reduce uncertainty in the management of III D patients.

  6. Tree-Based Models for Predicting Mortality in Gram-Negative Bacteremia: Avoid Putting the CART before the Horse

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lizza, Bryan D.; McLaughlin, Milena M.; Esterly, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, infectious disease studies employ tree-based approaches, e.g., classification and regression tree modeling, to identify clinical thresholds. We present tree-based-model-derived thresholds along with their measures of uncertainty. We explored individual and pooled clinical cohorts of bacteremic patients to identify modified acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (II) (m-APACHE-II) score mortality thresholds using a tree-based approach. Predictive performance measures for each candidate threshold were calculated. Candidate thresholds were examined according to binary logistic regression probabilities of the primary outcome, correct classification predictive matrices, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Three individual cohorts comprising a total of 235 patients were studied. Within the pooled cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) m-APACHE-II score was 13.6 ± 5.3, with an in-hospital mortality of 16.6%. The probability of death was greater at higher m-APACHE II scores in only one of three cohorts (odds ratio for cohort 1 [OR1] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99 to 1.34; OR2 = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.16; OR3 = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.38) and was greater at higher scores within the pooled cohort (OR4 = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19). In contrast, tree-based models overcame power constraints and identified m-APACHE-II thresholds for mortality in two of three cohorts (P = 0.02, 0.1, and 0.008) and the pooled cohort (P = 0.001). Predictive performance at each threshold was highly variable among cohorts. The selection of any one predictive threshold value resulted in fixed sensitivity and specificity. Tree-based models increased power and identified threshold values from continuous predictor variables; however, sample size and data distributions influenced the identified thresholds. The provision of predictive matrices or graphical displays of predicted probabilities within infectious disease studies can improve the

  7. Tree-Based Models for Predicting Mortality in Gram-Negative Bacteremia: Avoid Putting the CART before the Horse.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Nathaniel J; O'Donnell, J Nicholas; Lizza, Bryan D; McLaughlin, Milena M; Esterly, John S; Scheetz, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Increasingly, infectious disease studies employ tree-based approaches, e.g., classification and regression tree modeling, to identify clinical thresholds. We present tree-based-model-derived thresholds along with their measures of uncertainty. We explored individual and pooled clinical cohorts of bacteremic patients to identify modified acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (II) (m-APACHE-II) score mortality thresholds using a tree-based approach. Predictive performance measures for each candidate threshold were calculated. Candidate thresholds were examined according to binary logistic regression probabilities of the primary outcome, correct classification predictive matrices, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Three individual cohorts comprising a total of 235 patients were studied. Within the pooled cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) m-APACHE-II score was 13.6 ± 5.3, with an in-hospital mortality of 16.6%. The probability of death was greater at higher m-APACHE II scores in only one of three cohorts (odds ratio for cohort 1 [OR1] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99 to 1.34; OR2 = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.16; OR3 = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.38) and was greater at higher scores within the pooled cohort (OR4 = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19). In contrast, tree-based models overcame power constraints and identified m-APACHE-II thresholds for mortality in two of three cohorts (P = 0.02, 0.1, and 0.008) and the pooled cohort (P = 0.001). Predictive performance at each threshold was highly variable among cohorts. The selection of any one predictive threshold value resulted in fixed sensitivity and specificity. Tree-based models increased power and identified threshold values from continuous predictor variables; however, sample size and data distributions influenced the identified thresholds. The provision of predictive matrices or graphical displays of predicted probabilities within infectious disease studies can improve the

  8. Tree-Based Models for Predicting Mortality in Gram-Negative Bacteremia: Avoid Putting the CART before the Horse.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Nathaniel J; O'Donnell, J Nicholas; Lizza, Bryan D; McLaughlin, Milena M; Esterly, John S; Scheetz, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Increasingly, infectious disease studies employ tree-based approaches, e.g., classification and regression tree modeling, to identify clinical thresholds. We present tree-based-model-derived thresholds along with their measures of uncertainty. We explored individual and pooled clinical cohorts of bacteremic patients to identify modified acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (II) (m-APACHE-II) score mortality thresholds using a tree-based approach. Predictive performance measures for each candidate threshold were calculated. Candidate thresholds were examined according to binary logistic regression probabilities of the primary outcome, correct classification predictive matrices, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Three individual cohorts comprising a total of 235 patients were studied. Within the pooled cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) m-APACHE-II score was 13.6 ± 5.3, with an in-hospital mortality of 16.6%. The probability of death was greater at higher m-APACHE II scores in only one of three cohorts (odds ratio for cohort 1 [OR1] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99 to 1.34; OR2 = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.16; OR3 = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.38) and was greater at higher scores within the pooled cohort (OR4 = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19). In contrast, tree-based models overcame power constraints and identified m-APACHE-II thresholds for mortality in two of three cohorts (P = 0.02, 0.1, and 0.008) and the pooled cohort (P = 0.001). Predictive performance at each threshold was highly variable among cohorts. The selection of any one predictive threshold value resulted in fixed sensitivity and specificity. Tree-based models increased power and identified threshold values from continuous predictor variables; however, sample size and data distributions influenced the identified thresholds. The provision of predictive matrices or graphical displays of predicted probabilities within infectious disease studies can improve the

  9. Predictive value of antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune diseases classified by clinical criteria: Analytical study in a specialized health institute, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Soto, María Elena; Hernández-Becerril, Nidia; Perez-Chiney, Ada Claudia; Hernández-Rizo, Alfredo; Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Juárez-Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Melendez, Gabriela; Bojalil, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Determination of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is usually the initial test for the diagnosis of systemic rheumatic diseases (SRD). Assigning predictive values to positive and negative results of the test is vital because lack of knowledge about ANAs and their usefulness in classification criteria of SRD leads to inappropriate use. Methods: Retrospective study, ANA tests requested by different specialties, correlation to patients' final diagnosis. Results: The prevalence of autoimmune disease was relatively low in our population yielding a low PPV and a high NPV for the ANA test. 40% of the patients had no clinical criteria applied prior to test. Coexistence of two or more autoimmune disorders affects prevalence and predictive values. Conclusion: Application of the test after careful evaluation for clinical criteria remarkably improves the positive likelihood ratio for the diagnosis. PMID:26623249

  10. MELANCHOLIC DEPRESSION PREDICTION BY IDENTIFYING REPRESENTATIVE FEATURES IN METABOLIC AND MICROARRAY PROFILES WITH MISSING VALUES

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhi; Yang, Tao; Liu, Yashu; Lin, Binbin; Li, Qingyang; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Wittenberg, Gayle; Ye, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that melancholic depression, one major subtype of depression, is closely associated with the concentration of some metabolites and biological functions of certain genes and pathways. Meanwhile, recent advances in biotechnologies have allowed us to collect a large amount of genomic data, e.g., metabolites and microarray gene expression. With such a huge amount of information available, one approach that can give us new insights into the understanding of the fundamental biology underlying melancholic depression is to build disease status prediction models using classification or regression methods. However, the existence of strong empirical correlations, e.g., those exhibited by genes sharing the same biological pathway in microarray profiles, tremendously limits the performance of these methods. Furthermore, the occurrence of missing values which are ubiquitous in biomedical applications further complicates the problem. In this paper, we hypothesize that the problem of missing values might in some way benefit from the correlation between the variables and propose a method to learn a compressed set of representative features through an adapted version of sparse coding which is capable of identifying correlated variables and addressing the issue of missing values simultaneously. An efficient algorithm is also developed to solve the proposed formulation. We apply the proposed method on metabolic and microarray profiles collected from a group of subjects consisting of both patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls. Results show that the proposed method can not only produce meaningful clusters of variables but also generate a set of representative features that achieve superior classification performance over those generated by traditional clustering and data imputation techniques. In particular, on both datasets, we found that in comparison with the competing algorithms, the representative features learned by the proposed

  11. High Levels of Nucleolar Spindle-Associated Protein and Reduced Levels of BRCA1 Expression Predict Poor Prognosis in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Li, Shan; Yao, Ling; Yang, Xue-Li; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nucleolar spindle-associated protein (NuSAP1) is an important mitosis-related protein, and aberrant NuSAP1 expression is associated with abnormal spindles and mitosis. This study investigated the prognostic value of NuSAP1 in breast cancer. Methods Two sets of tissue microarrays (TMAs) that included samples from 450 breast cancer patients were constructed, of which 250 patients were training set and the other 200 patients were validation set. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to determine the NuSAP1 levels. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the prognostic value of NuSAP1 in breast cancer. A stepwise Cox analysis was performed to construct a risk-prediction model for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software. Results There were 108 (43.5%) and 88 (44.0%) patients expressed NuSAP1 in the training set and validation set respectively. High levels of NuSAP1 expression were related to poor disease-free survival (DFS) in both training (P = 0.028) and validation (P = 0.006) cohorts, particularly in TNBC. With combination of two cohorts, both NuSAP1 (HR = 4.136, 95% CI: 1.956–8.747, P < 0.001) and BRCA1 (HR = 0.383, 95% CI: 0.160–0.915, P = 0.031) were independent prognostic indicators of DFS in TNBC. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that the combination of NuSAP1 and BRCA1 significantly improved the prognostic power compared with the traditional model (0.778 versus 0.612, P < 0.001). Conclusions Our study confirms the prognostic value of NuSAP1 in breast cancer. The combination of NuSAP1 and BRCA1 could improve the DFS prediction accuracy in TNBC. PMID:26485712

  12. The role of negative mood states and consequences of hypersexual behaviours in predicting hypersexuality among university students

    PubMed Central

    Dhuffar, Manpreet K.; Pontes, Halley M.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The issue of whether hypersexual behaviours exist among university students is controversial because many of these individuals engage in sexual exploration during their time at university. To date, little is known about the correlates of hypersexual behaviours among university students in the UK. Therefore, the aims of this exploratory study were two-fold. Firstly, to explore and establish the correlates of hypersexual behaviours, and secondly, to investigate whether hypersexuality among university students can be predicted by variables relating to negative mood states (i.e., emotional dysregulation, loneliness, shame, and life satisfaction) and consequences of hypersexual behaviour. Methods Survey data from 165 British university students was analysed using regression analyses. Results The full regression model significantly predicted hypersexual behaviours. However, only a small number of predictor variables (i.e., gender, consequences of hypersexual behaviours, life satisfaction and emotional dysregulation) accounted for the significant unique influence on hypersexual behaviours among the sample. Conclusions The study empirically supported the concept of hypersexual disorder. The implications of these findings are also discussed. PMID:26551908

  13. Predictive control for voltage collapse avoidance using a modified discrete multi-valued PSO algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pourjafari, Ebrahim; Mojallali, Hamed

    2011-04-01

    Voltage stability is one of the most challenging concerns that power utilities are confronted with, and this paper proposes a voltage control scheme based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) to overcome this kind of instability. Voltage instability has a close relation with the adequacy of reactive power and the response of Under Load Tap Changers (ULTCs) to the voltage drop after the occurrence of a contingency. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes reactive power injection and tap changing to avoid voltage collapse. Considering discrete nature of the changes in the tap ratio and also in the reactive power injected by capacitor banks, the search area for the optimizer of MPC will be an integer area; consequently, a modified discrete multi-valued Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is considered to perform this optimization. Simulation results of applying the proposed control scheme to a 4-bus system confirm its capability to prevent voltage collapse. PMID:21251650

  14. Predictive value of myocardial radioisotope scanning in animals treated with doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, S.J.; Wilson, G.A.; Sutherland, R.; Schenk, E.; Chacko, A.K.; Durakovic, A.; Bennett, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Thirty-four New Zealand white rabbit were treated with doxorubicin and imaged weekly with Tc-99m pyrophosphate to define the value of abnormal myocardial images in predicting doxorubicin-induced cardiac toxicity. Increased myocardial uptake was detected in most animals on sustained treatment with doxorubicin. A greater proportion of the heart was involved with doxorubicin-related histologic changes in animals with strongly positive myocardial images than in treated animals with moderately positive or normal scans. The myocardial images returned to normal levels 2-6 wk after doxorubicin was discontinued. Five of seven rabbits that received doxorubicin after they had three moderately positive myocardial scans, died from congestive heart failure. Three rabbits whose doxorubicin was discontinued because of scan findings, survived for 6 wk or more before dying from renal failure. The three rabbits who received the highest total dose of doxorubicin died of renal failure without developing abnormal myocardial scans.

  15. Discrete coding of stimulus value, reward expectation, and reward prediction error in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kei; Tateyama, Yukina; Hernádi, István; Tobler, Philippe N; Iijima, Toshio; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro

    2015-11-01

    To investigate how the striatum integrates sensory information with reward information for behavioral guidance, we recorded single-unit activity in the dorsal striatum of head-fixed rats participating in a probabilistic Pavlovian conditioning task with auditory conditioned stimuli (CSs) in which reward probability was fixed for each CS but parametrically varied across CSs. We found that the activity of many neurons was linearly correlated with the reward probability indicated by the CSs. The recorded neurons could be classified according to their firing patterns into functional subtypes coding reward probability in different forms such as stimulus value, reward expectation, and reward prediction error. These results suggest that several functional subgroups of dorsal striatal neurons represent different kinds of information formed through extensive prior exposure to CS-reward contingencies. PMID:26378201

  16. Determination of whether screening tests for chronic atrophic gastritis really has a positive predictive value.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Flaviano; D'Angelo, Valentina; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Barchiesi, Vittoria; Rizzo, Marianna; Cantile, Monica; Botti, Gerardo; Cavalcanti, Ernesta

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal‑type gastric adenocarcinomas are preceded by precancerous lesions, which begin with chronic atrophic gastritis. Over the last few years, multiple serological screening techniques have been performed and commercialized for the diagnosis of chronic atrophic gastritis. In the present study, 123 patients were recruited at the International Cancer Institute 'G. Pascale' Foundation (Naples, Italy) to test commercial kits for the serological determination of chronic atrophic gastritis, supported by histological analysis, according to the International Group of Gastroenterologists 'Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment Staging System'. The results revealed a significant discrepancy between serological screening and histological evaluation in 10.6% of patients, which highlighted the dubious positive predictive value of commercial serological screening kits.

  17. A comparison of airborne wake vortex detection measurements with values predicted from potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of flight measurements made near a wake vortex was conducted to explore the feasibility of providing a pilot with useful wake avoidance information. The measurements were made with relatively low cost flow and motion sensors on a light airplane flying near the wake vortex of a turboprop airplane weighing approximately 90000 lbs. Algorithms were developed which removed the response of the airplane to control inputs from the total airplane response and produced parameters which were due solely to the flow field of the vortex. These parameters were compared with values predicted by potential theory. The results indicated that the presence of the vortex could be detected by a combination of parameters derived from the simple sensors. However, the location and strength of the vortex cannot be determined without additional and more accurate sensors.

  18. Malignancy Rate, Number Needed to Treat, and Positive Predictive Value for Breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, John S; Robbins, Patrick A

    2016-09-01

    Breast MRI is being used more frequently for advanced screening for breast cancer. Patients may be at increased risk, or are symptomatic, with nonsuspicious mammograms. There is little data regarding the likelihood of a recommendation for biopsy, or for detecting a malignancy, in this population. We intended to determine the malignancy rate, number needed to treat, and positive predictive value for patients receiving adjunctive MRI at our institution. A retrospective review of all breast MRIs from 2008 to 2010 was done. Patients with any prior diagnosis of breast cancer, or BRCA+ were excluded. There were 324 patients. Most common reasons for ordering the breast MRI included: abnormal test result 130 (44%), palpable mass 74 (23%), family history 58 (18%), breast pain 47 (15%), and nipple discharge 45 (14%). Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System score (BIRADS) was 1 or 2 in 36 per cent, 4 or 5 in 18 per cent, 3 in 26 per cent, 0 in 10 per cent, and not given in 9 per cent. Biopsy was recommended in 77 (24%), with biopsy actually performed in 57 (18%). Of the eight cancers identified, four (1.2%) were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and four (1.2%) were invasive cancer, yielding a true-positive rate of 2.5 per cent. Number needed to treat was 40. Positive predictive value was 14 per cent with a false-positive rate of 86 per cent. In this group of generally higher risk women, typically prescreened with mammography, 1.2 per cent had an invasive cancer, and another 1.2 per cent had DCIS. Those who undergo biopsy are 6.1 times more likely to have benign pathology. The efficacy of adjunctive breast MRI could be improved through refinements in indication, test interpretation, or alternative screening strategies.

  19. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs) of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias registered in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients and methods All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion. Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. Results We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all, hemolysis was confirmed in 359 patients, yielding an overall PPV of 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.5%–90.2%). A diagnosis could be established in 392 patients of whom 355 patients had a hemolytic diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed in 197 of the 249 patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, yielding a PPV of 79.1% (95% CI: 73.5%–84.0%). Diagnosis of acquired hemolytic anemia could be confirmed in 136 of the 163 patients, resulting in a PPV of 83.4% (95% CI: 76.8%–88.8%). For hemoglobinopathy PPV was 84.1% (95% CI: 77.4%–89.4%), for hereditary spherocytosis PPV was 80.6% (95% CI: 69.5%–88.9%), and for autoimmune hemolytic anemia PPV was 78.4% (95% CI: 70.4%–85.0%). Conclusion The PPV of hemolytic anemias was moderately high. The PPVs were comparable in the three main categories of overall hemolysis, and congenital and acquired hemolytic anemia. PMID:27445504

  20. Positive predictive value of the infant respiratory distress syndrome diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Olsen, Morten; Christian, Fynbo Christiansen

    2013-01-01

    Background Infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) is the most common respiratory disease in preterm infants, and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Valid data on IRDS are important in clinical epidemiological research. Objectives The objective of this study was to estimate the positive predictive value (PPV) of the IRDS diagnosis registered in the population-based Danish National Patient Registry according to the International Classification of Diseases, 8th and 10th revisions. Methods Between January 1, 1977 and December 31, 2008, we randomly selected three patients per year, 96 in total, who were registered with an IRDS diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry and living in the northern part of Denmark. Data on the infants included information on the presence of predefined clinical symptoms. We defined IRDS as the presence of at least two of four clinical symptoms (tachypnea, retractions or nasal flaring, grunting, and central cyanosis), which had to be present for more than 30 minutes. Using medical record review as the reference standard, we computed the positive predictive value of the registered IRDS diagnosis including 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We located the medical record for 90 of the 96 patients (94%), and found an overall PPV of the IRDS diagnosis of 81% (95% CI 72%–88%). This did not vary substantially between primary and secondary diagnoses. The PPV was higher, at 89% (95% CI 80%–95%), for preterm infants born before 37 weeks of gestation. Conclusion The PPV of the IRDS diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry is reasonable when compared with symptoms described in the corresponding medical records. The Danish National Patient Registry is a useful data source for studies of IRDS, particularly if restricted to preterm infants. Nonetheless, the potential impact of misclassification of the IRDS diagnosis must be considered. PMID:23976865

  1. Strongyloides stercoralis, Eosinophilia, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Predictive Value of Eosinophilia in the Diagnosis of S stercoralis Infection in an Endemic Community

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Russell; Thompson, Fintan; Esterman, Adrian; McDermott, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study examines the predictive value of eosinophilia for Strongyloides stercoralis infection, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing, in an endemic community. In remote communities, eosinophilia is frequently used as a proxy test for the presence of helminth infections. Past studies of eosinophilia and Strongyloides infection have been conducted in specific groups such as immigrants and refugees, or in subpopulations of nonendemic communities, rather than in endemic communities. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study of the relationship between eosinophilia and Strongyloides ELISA serology, as part of a study into the relationship between S stercoralis infection and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in an Indigenous community in northern Australia. Results. Two hundred thirty-nine adults had their eosinophil count and S stercoralis ELISA serology measured in 2012 and 2013, along with other biometric and metabolic data. Eosinophilia was found to have a relatively poor sensitivity (60.9%), specificity (71.1%), positive predictive value (54.6%), and negative predictive value (76.1%) for S stercoralis ELISA positivity in this group. However, there was a more constant relationship between eosinophilia and S Stercoralis ELISA positivity in patients with T2DM (negative predictive value 87.5%). Conclusion. This study suggests that the presence or absence of eosinophilia is not an adequate proxy test for S stercoralis infection in a community where the infection is prevalent, and that the association between eosinophilia and S stercoralis ELISA positivity is more constant in patients with T2DM. PMID:26989753

  2. Quantum dot-based immunofluorescent imaging and quantitative detection of TOP2A and prognostic value in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongmei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Chuang; Chen, Jian; Sun, Jinzhong; Sun, Si; Jin, Liting; Li, Juanjuan; Sun, Shengrong; Wu, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Topoisomerase 2 alpha (TOP2A) is a key enzyme in DNA replication and a target of various cytotoxic agents including anthracyclines. Previous studies evaluating the predictive and prognostic values of TOP2A in breast cancer are contradictory, likely secondary to the use of both different detection methods and different cutoff thresholds for positive status. Our own studies have previously confirmed the advantages of quantum dot-based nanotechnology for quantitative analysis of biomarkers relative to conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC). This study was designed to 1) assess the expression of TOP2A, 2) investigate the relationship between TOP2A expression and major clinical pathological parameters, and 3) evaluate the prognostic value of TOP2A by quantum dot-based immunofluorescent imaging and quantitative analytical system (QD-IIQAS) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Patients and methods TOP2A expression in 145 TNBC specimens was detected using IHC and QD-IIQAS, and a comparative analysis of the two methods was conducted, including an exploration of the relationship between TOP2A expression and major clinical pathological parameters in TNBC. The prognostic value of TOP2A in TNBC was assessed. Results A similar antigen localization, a high correlation of staining rates (r=0.79), and a high agreement of measurements (κ=0.763) of TOP2A expression in TNBC were found by QD-IIQAS and conventional IHC (cutoff: 45.0 and 0.45, respectively). TOP2A was significantly higher in larger tumors (P=0.002), higher grade tumors (P=0.005), and lymph node positive patients (P<0.001). The 5-year disease-free survival (5-DFS) of the high and low TOP2A subgroups was significantly different for both QD-IIQAS and IHC (P<0.001, log-rank test for both). TOP2A expression was an independent predictor of survival in TNBC (P=0.001). Conclusion QD-IIQAS was an easy and accurate method for detecting and assessing TOP2A. The TOP2A expression was an independent prognostic

  3. On marker-assisted prediction of genetic value: beyond the ridge.

    PubMed Central

    Gianola, Daniel; Perez-Enciso, Miguel; Toro, Miguel A

    2003-01-01

    Marked-assisted genetic improvement of agricultural species exploits statistical dependencies in the joint distribution of marker genotypes and quantitative traits. An issue is how molecular (e.g., dense marker maps) and phenotypic information (e.g., some measure of yield in plants) is to be used for predicting the genetic value of candidates for selection. Multiple regression, selection index techniques, best linear unbiased prediction, and ridge regression of phenotypes on marker genotypes have been suggested, as well as more elaborate methods. Here, phenotype-marker associations are modeled hierarchically via multilevel models including chromosomal effects, a spatial covariance of marked effects within chromosomes, background genetic variability, and family heterogeneity. Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients are suggested for assessing the inequality of the contribution of different marked effects to genetic variability. Classical and Bayesian methods are presented. The Bayesian approach includes a Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. The generality and flexibility of the Bayesian method is illustrated when a Lorenz curve is to be inferred. PMID:12586721

  4. Value of MR histogram analyses for prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Qin; Liang, He-Yue; Yang, Zhao-Xia; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Meng-Su; Rao, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective is to explore the value of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) histogram analyses in predicting microvascular invasion (MVI) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fifty-one patients with histologically confirmed HCC who underwent diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced MR imaging were included. Histogram analyses were performed and mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis, 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles were derived. Quantitative histogram parameters were compared between HCCs with and without MVI. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses were generated to compare the diagnostic performance of tumor size, histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and MR enhancement. The mean, 1th, 10th, and 50th percentiles of ADC maps, and the mean, variance. 1th, 10th, 50th, 90th, and 99th percentiles of the portal venous phase (PVP) images were significantly different between the groups with and without MVI (P <0.05), with area under the ROC curves (AUCs) of 0.66 to 0.74 for ADC and 0.76 to 0.88 for PVP. The largest AUC of PVP (1th percentile) showed significantly higher accuracy compared with that of arterial phase (AP) or tumor size (P <0.001). MR histogram analyses—in particular for 1th percentile for PVP images—held promise for prediction of MVI of HCC. PMID:27368028

  5. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Annika; Richter, Rolf; Dragun, Duska; Heidecke, Harald; Dechend, Ralf; Muller, Dominik N.; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected. PMID:27660742

  6. Valuing structured professional judgment: predictive validity, decision-making, and the clinical-actuarial conflict.

    PubMed

    Falzer, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Structured professional judgment (SPJ) has received considerable attention as an alternative to unstructured clinical judgment and actuarial assessment, and as a means of resolving their ongoing conflict. However, predictive validity studies have typically relied on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the same technique commonly used to validate actuarial assessment tools. This paper presents SPJ as distinct from both unstructured clinical judgment and actuarial assessment. A key distinguishing feature of SPJ is the contribution of modifiable factors, either dynamic or protective, to summary risk ratings. With modifiable factors, the summary rating scheme serves as a prognostic model rather than a classification procedure. However, prognostic models require more extensive and thorough predictive validity testing than can be provided by ROC analysis. It is proposed that validation should include calibration and reclassification techniques, as well as additional measures of discrimination. Several techniques and measures are described and illustrated. The paper concludes by tracing the limitations of ROC analysis to its philosophical foundation and its origin as a statistical theory of decision-making. This foundation inhibits the performance of crucial tasks, such as determining the sufficiency of a risk assessment and examining the evidentiary value of statistical findings. The paper closes by noting a current effort to establish a viable and complementary relationship between SPJ and decision-making theory.

  7. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Annika; Richter, Rolf; Dragun, Duska; Heidecke, Harald; Dechend, Ralf; Muller, Dominik N.; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected.

  8. Prognostic and Predictive Value of DAMPs and DAMP-Associated Processes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fucikova, Jitka; Moserova, Irena; Urbanova, Linda; Bezu, Lucillia; Kepp, Oliver; Cremer, Isabelle; Salek, Cyril; Strnad, Pavel; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Spisek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    It is now clear that human neoplasms form, progress, and respond to therapy in the context of an intimate crosstalk with the host immune system. In particular, accumulating evidence demonstrates that the efficacy of most, if not all, chemo- and radiotherapeutic agents commonly employed in the clinic critically depends on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. One of the mechanisms whereby conventional chemotherapeutics, targeted anticancer agents, and radiotherapy can provoke a therapeutically relevant, adaptive immune response against malignant cells is commonly known as “immunogenic cell death.” Importantly, dying cancer cells are perceived as immunogenic only when they emit a set of immunostimulatory signals upon the activation of intracellular stress response pathways. The emission of these signals, which are generally referred to as “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs), may therefore predict whether patients will respond to chemotherapy or not, at least in some settings. Here, we review clinical data indicating that DAMPs and DAMP-associated stress responses might have prognostic or predictive value for cancer patients. PMID:26300886

  9. Radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: the predictive value of interim survival assessment

    PubMed Central

    Toya, Ryo; Murakami, Ryuji; Saito, Tetsuo; Murakami, Daizo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Baba, Yuji; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Hirai, Toshinori; Semba, Akiko; Yumoto, Eiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment characteristics are suggested as predictive and/or prognostic factors for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC); however, individual tumor radiosensitivities have previously not been considered. As boost planning is recommended for NPC, we performed interim assessments of magnetic resonance (MR) images for boost planning and retrospectively evaluated their predictive value for the survival of NPC patients. Radiation therapy via elective nodal irradiation (median dose: 39.6 Gy) with/without chemotherapy was used to treat 63 NPC patients. Boost irradiation (median total dose: 70 Gy) was performed based on the interim assessment. The largest lymph node (LN) was measured on MR images acquired at the time of interim assessment. The site of first failure was local in 8 (12.7%), regional in 7 (11.1%), and distant in 12 patients (19.0%). All 7 patients with regional failure harbored LNs ≥15 mm at interim assessment. We divided the 63 patients into two groups based on LN size [large (≥15 mm), n = 10 and small (<15 mm), n = 53]. Univariate analysis showed that 5-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) rates for large LNs were significantly lower than for small LNs (OS: 12.5% vs 70.5%, P < 0.001 and CSS: 25.0% vs 80.0%, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that large LNs were a significantly unfavorable factor for both OS (hazard ratio = 4.543, P = 0.002) and CSS (hazard ratio = 6.020, P = 0.001). The results suggest that LN size at interim assessment could predict survival in NPC patients. PMID:27242338

  10. Poor Predictive Value of Intraoperative Real-Time Dosimetry for Prostate Seed Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Donath, David; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Lassalle, Stephanie; Hervieux, Yannick; David, Sandrine; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters predictive of a good prostate seed I{sup 125} quality implant. We analyzed preimplant and postimplant realtime dosimetry in patients treated with intraoperative (IO) inverse planning. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 127 consecutively treated patients with primarily low-risk prostate carcinoma who underwent prostate permanent seed I{sup 125} brachytherapy using an IO planning approach. The implant was done using the three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound (PRE-TRUS)-guided IO interactive inverse preplanning system. The TRUS was repeated in the operating room after the implant procedure was complete (POST-TRUS). The prostate was recontoured and postimplant dosimetry was calculated. Each patient underwent computed tomography scan on Day 28 (CT-D28) to evaluate implant quality. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) was evaluated for models predictive of a V100 of {>=}90% and a D90 of {>=}140 Gy on the basis of CT-D28 values. Results: On CT-D28, 72.4% of patients had a V100 of {>=}90% and 74.8% had a D90 of {>=}140 Gy. AUROC for a V100 of {>=}90% was 0.665 (p = 0.004) on PRE-TRUS and 0.619 (p = 0.039) on POST-TRUS. AUROC for D90 of {>=}140 Gy was 0.602 (p = 0.086) on PRE-TRUS and 0.614 (p = 0.054) on POST-TRUS. Using PRE-TRUS V100 cutoff of >97% gives sensitivity of 88% and a false-positive rate of 63%. A POST-TRUS D90 cutoff of >170 Gy resulted in a sensitivity of 62% and a false-positive rate of 34%. Conclusions: Because of unacceptably high false-positive rates, IO preimplant and postimplant TRUS-based dosimetry are not accurate tools to predict for postimplant computed tomography-based dosimetry.

  11. Climate change is predicted to negatively influence Moroccan endemic reptile richness. Implications for conservation in protected areas.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Freiría, Fernando; Argaz, Hamida; Fahd, Soumía; Brito, José C

    2013-09-01

    The identification of species-rich areas and their prognosticated turnover under climate change are crucial for the conservation of endemic taxa. This study aims to identify areas of reptile endemicity richness in a global biodiversity hot spot (Morocco) under current and future climatic conditions and to investigate the role of protected areas in biodiversity conservation under climate change. Species distribution models (SDM) were performed over the distribution of 21 endemic reptiles, combined to estimate current species richness at 1 × 1 km resolution and projected to years 2050 and 2080 according to distinct story lines and ensemble global circulation models, assuming unlimited and null dispersion ability. Generalized additive models were performed between species richness and geographic characteristics of 43 protected areas. SDM found precipitation as the most important factor related to current species distributions. Important reductions in future suitable areas were predicted for 50 % of species, and four species were identified as highly vulnerable to extinction. Drastic reductions in species-rich areas were predicted for the future, with considerable variability between years and dispersal scenarios. High turnover rates of species composition were predicted for eastern Morocco, whereas low values were forecasted for the Northern Atlantic coast and mountains. Species richness for current and future conditions was significantly related to the altitude and latitude of protected areas. Protected areas located in mountains and/or in the Northern Atlantic coast were identified as refugia, where population monitoring and conservation management is needed.

  12. Climate change is predicted to negatively influence Moroccan endemic reptile richness. Implications for conservation in protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Freiría, Fernando; Argaz, Hamida; Fahd, Soumía; Brito, José C.

    2013-09-01

    The identification of species-rich areas and their prognosticated turnover under climate change are crucial for the conservation of endemic taxa. This study aims to identify areas of reptile endemicity richness in a global biodiversity hot spot (Morocco) under current and future climatic conditions and to investigate the role of protected areas in biodiversity conservation under climate change. Species distribution models (SDM) were performed over the distribution of 21 endemic reptiles, combined to estimate current species richness at 1 × 1 km resolution and projected to years 2050 and 2080 according to distinct story lines and ensemble global circulation models, assuming unlimited and null dispersion ability. Generalized additive models were performed between species richness and geographic characteristics of 43 protected areas. SDM found precipitation as the most important factor related to current species distributions. Important reductions in future suitable areas were predicted for 50 % of species, and four species were identified as highly vulnerable to extinction. Drastic reductions in species-rich areas were predicted for the future, with considerable variability between years and dispersal scenarios. High turnover rates of species composition were predicted for eastern Morocco, whereas low values were forecasted for the Northern Atlantic coast and mountains. Species richness for current and future conditions was significantly related to the altitude and latitude of protected areas. Protected areas located in mountains and/or in the Northern Atlantic coast were identified as refugia, where population monitoring and conservation management is needed.

  13. Using Heuristic Value Prediction and Dynamic Task Granularity Resizing to Improve Software Speculation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Wang, Zhiying; Guo, Hui; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting potential thread-level parallelism (TLP) is becoming the key factor to improving performance of programs on multicore or many-core systems. Among various kinds of parallel execution models, the software-based speculative parallel model has become a research focus due to its low cost, high efficiency, flexibility, and scalability. The performance of the guest program under the software-based speculative parallel execution model is closely related to the speculation accuracy, the control overhead, and the rollback overhead of the model. In this paper, we first analyzed the conventional speculative parallel model and presented an analytic model of its expectation of the overall overhead, then optimized the conventional model based on the analytic model, and finally proposed a novel speculative parallel model named HEUSPEC. The HEUSPEC model includes three key techniques, namely, the heuristic value prediction, the value based correctness checking, and the dynamic task granularity resizing. We have implemented the runtime system of the model in ANSI C language. The experiment results show that when the speedup of the HEUSPEC model can reach 2.20 on the average (15% higher than conventional model) when depth is equal to 3 and 4.51 on the average (12% higher than conventional model) when speculative depth is equal to 7. Besides, it shows good scalability and lower memory cost. PMID:24971374

  14. Prediction of hepatic microsomal intrinsic clearance and human clearance values for drugs.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Katarina; Agababa, Danica

    2009-10-01

    Twenty-nine drugs of different structures were used in theoretical QSAR analysis of human hepatic microsomal intrinsic clearance (in vitro T(1/2) and in vitro CL'(int)) and whole body clearance (CL(blood)). The examined compounds demonstrated a wide range of scaled intrinsic clearance values. Constitutional, geometrical, physico-chemical and electronic descriptors were computed for the examined structures by use of the Marvin Sketch 5.1.3_2, the Chem3D Ultra 7.0.0 and the Dragon 5.4 program. Partial least squares regression (PLSR), has been applied for selection of the most relevant molecular descriptors and development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model for human hepatic microsomal intrinsic clearance (in vitro T(1/2)). Optimal QSAR models with nine and ten variables, R(2)>0.808 and cross-validation parameter q(pre)(2)>0.623, were selected and compared. Since the microsomal in vitro T(1/2) data can be used for calculation of in vitro CL'(int) and in vivo CL(blood), the developed QSAR model will enable one to analyze the kinetics of cytochrome P450-mediated reactions in term of intrinsic clearance and whole body clearance. A comparison is made between predictions produced from the QSAR analysis and experimental data, and there appears to be generally satisfactory correlations with the literature values for intrinsic clearance data. PMID:19713138

  15. Pulse perfusion value predicts eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Enekvist, Bruno; Johansson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    The variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphical pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after general anaesthesia. The objective was to investigate whether PV can predict eye opening after sevoflurane anaesthesia. Prospective, explorative clinical study included 20 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, at Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden, from November 2012 to January 2013 scheduled for elective breast tumour surgery. A general anaesthesia was delivered with inhalation of oxygen, nitrous oxide and sevoflurane anaesthesia to a depth of 1.2 minimal alveolar concentration. Sevoflurane inspiratory and expiratory concentrations were measured. Bispectral index monitoring, PV as measured by pulse oximeter, heart rate and carbon dioxide were registered at before anaesthesia, 15 min after induction (at 1.2 minimal alveolar concentration), at end of surgery and at eye opening at the end of anaesthesia. PV values were lower before anaesthesia and at eye opening compared to at 15 min after induction and at end of surgery (P < 0.05). The reduction of PV between end of surgery and eye opening was 0.76. We conclude that the pulse oximeter PV could be a useful variable to assess the timing of recovery, in terms of eye opening after a general anaesthesia.

  16. Prediction of breeding values for tenderness of market animals from measurements on bulls.

    PubMed

    Barkhouse, K L; Van Vleck, L D; Cundiff, L V; Koohmaraie, M; Lunstra, D D; Crouse, J D

    1996-11-01

    Data were tenderness measures on steaks from 237 bulls (Group II) slaughtered after producing freezable semen and on 1,431 related steers and heifers (market animals, Group I) from Angus, Hereford, Pinzgauer, Brahman, and Sahiwal crosses from the Germ Plasm Evaluation project at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center. Tenderness was assessed through Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (SF), taste panel tenderness (TPT), marbling score (MS), and myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI). For all traits, as fraction Bos indicus inheritance increased, implied tenderness decreased. Heritability estimates were generally not significantly different from zero. Genetic correlations generally indicated favorable associations among the traits. The range in predicted breeding values of bulls for market animal tenderness was small and from -.34 to .32 kg for market animal shear force. Because of low estimates of heritability for SF or TPT, results from this experiment indicate that selection based on tenderness of steaks sampled from intact or late castrate males slaughtered following collection of freezable quality semen would not be very effective in improving average tenderness of steaks from steers of heifer progeny. If a mean of heritability estimates reported in the literature of .27 for shear value was assumed for market steer and heifer progeny instead of .02 as found in the present study, then selection based on estimates of shear force in young bulls would be relatively more effective in improving shear force of market progeny. PMID:8923175

  17. Predictive value of specific ultrasound findings when used as a screening test for abnormalities on VCUG

    PubMed Central

    Logvinenko, Tanya; Chow, Jeanne S.; Nelson, Caleb P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Renal and bladder ultrasound (RBUS) is often used as an initial screening test for children after urinary tract infection (UTI). The 2011 AAP guidelines specifically recommend that RBUS be performed first, with voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) to be performed only if the ultrasound is abnormal. While prior research has suggested that RBUS is neither sensitive nor specific for VCUG findings, such as vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), it is uncertain as to whether specific RBUS findings, alone or in combination, might make RBUS more useful as a predictor of VCUG abnormalities. Aims To evaluate the association of specific RBUS with VCUG findings, and determine whether predictive models that accurately predict patients at high risk of VCUG abnormalities, based on RBUS findings, can be constructed. Methods and study sample A total of 3995 patients were identified with VCUG and RBUS performed on the same day. The RBUS and VCUG reports were reviewed and the findings were classified. Analysis was limited to patients aged 0–60 months with no prior postnatal genitourinary imaging and no history of prenatal hydronephrosis. Analysis The associations between large numbers of specific RBUS findings with abnormalities seen on VCUG were investigated. Both multivariate logistic models and a neural network machine learning algorithms were constructed to evaluate the predictive power of RBUS for VCUG abnormalities (including VUR or bladder/urethral findings). Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and area under receiving operating curves (AUROC) of RBUS for VCUG abnormalities were determined. Results A total of 2259 patients with UTI as the indication for imaging were identified. The RBUS was reported as “normal” in 75.0%. On VCUG, any VUR was identified in 41.7%, VUR grade >II in 20.9%, and VUR grade >III in 2.8%. Many individual RBUS findings were significantly associated with VUR on VCUG. Despite these strong univariate associations, multivariate modeling

  18. Protein charge ladders reveal that the net charge of ALS-linked superoxide dismutase can be different in sign and magnitude from predicted values.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunhua; Abdolvahabi, Alireza; Shaw, Bryan F

    2014-10-01

    This article utilized "protein charge ladders"-chemical derivatives of proteins with similar structure, but systematically altered net charge-to quantify how missense mutations that cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) affect the net negative charge (Z) of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) as a function of subcellular pH and Zn(2+) stoichiometry. Capillary electrophoresis revealed that the net charge of ALS-variant SOD1 can be different in sign and in magnitude-by up to 7.4 units per dimer at lysosomal pH-than values predicted from standard pKa values of amino acids and formal oxidation states of metal ions. At pH 7.4, the G85R, D90A, and G93R substitutions diminished the net negative charge of dimeric SOD1 by up to +2.29 units more than predicted; E100K lowered net charge by less than predicted. The binding of a single Zn(2+) to mutant SOD1 lowered its net charge by an additional +2.33 ± 0.01 to +3.18 ± 0.02 units, however, each protein regulated net charge when binding a second, third, or fourth Zn(2+) (ΔZ < 0.44 ± 0.07 per additional Zn(2+) ). Both metalated and apo-SOD1 regulated net charge across subcellular pH, without inverting from negative to positive at the theoretical pI. Differential scanning calorimetry, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry confirmed that the structure, stability, and metal content of mutant proteins were not significantly affected by lysine acetylation. Measured values of net charge should be used when correlating the biophysical properties of a specific ALS-variant SOD1 protein with its observed aggregation propensity or clinical phenotype.

  19. Incremental shuttle walk test: Reference values and predictive equation for healthy Indian adults

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Bela; Shah, Monal; Andhare, Nilesh; Mullerpatan, Rajani

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Physical inactivity in Indians is leading to an increase in noncommunicable disorders at an early age in life. Early identification and quantification of the lack of physical activity using simple and reliable exercise testing is the need of the hour. The incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) is an externally paced walk test widely used for the evaluation of exercise capacity. Currently the normative values available for clinical reference are generated from Western populations. Hence, the study was conducted to find normative values for the ISWT in healthy Indian adults (17-75 years). Materials and Methods: A convenience sample of 862 subjects was recruited after ethical approval was obtained. All subjects were divided into groups as per age and gender. For age, the grouping was as follows: Group 1: Young adulthood (17-40 years), group 2: Middle adulthood (40-65 years), and group 3: Old adulthood (>65 years). The ISWT was performed as per standard protocol by Sally Singh. Results: The average distance walked were 709.2m,556.4m and 441.3m in females and 807.9 m, 639.6 m and 478.2 m in males in the three respective age groups. Stepwise regression analysis revealed age and gender as key variables correlating with incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD). The derived predictive equations for males and females may be given as follows: 740.351 - (5.676 × age) + (99.007 × gender). Conclusion: Reference values were generated for healthy Indian adults. Physiological response to the ISWT was shown to be affected by gender and increasing age. Easily measurable variables explained 68% of the variance seen in the test, making the reference equation a relevant part of the evaluation of the ISWT. PMID:26933305

  20. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiogram in Predicting Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Testing

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Ali; Ebdali, Reyhaneh Takalloo; Sajjadi, Seyed Sajed; Golnezhad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is believed that an exaggerated blood pressure response (EBPR) to exercise stress test is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events. It is also assumed that QT dispersion (QT-d), which was originally proposed to measure the spatial dispersion of ventricular recovery times, may have a relationship to cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to examine the difference of changes in QT-d, Maxi-QT, Mini-QT, and QT-c (corrected QT interval) of the electrocardiogram in two groups of patients with exaggerated blood pressure responses (EBPR group) and normal responses (control group) to exercise testing. Also, the diagnostic value of each of these criteria in the prediction of EBPR was studied. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2015 to February 2016 on patients suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing exercise testing who had been referred to Ghaem and Imam Reza hospitals in Mashhad (Iran). All patients underwent a treadmill exercise test with the 12-lead ECG, which was optically scanned and digitized for analysis of QT-d, QT max, and QT min. Patients were divided into two groups of normal and EBPR to exercise testing. QT changes of ECG were compared between the two groups, and the diagnostic accuracy of QT variables for prediction of EBPR to exercise testing was studied. A multiple linear regression analysis (MLR), Pearson Chi-qquare, independent samples t-test, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used as statistical methods in IBM SPSS version 19. Results Sixty patients (55% male) with a mean age of 50.48 ± 10.89 years were studied in two groups of normal (n=30) and exaggerated blood pressure response (n=30) to exercise testing. Maximum QT and QT dispersion were statistically different in individuals’ exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise stress test (p < 0.05). The logistic regression analysis revealed that none of our parameters predicted the EBPR. The ROC

  1. Does total manual rescreening of negative pap tests screened by the ThinPrep imaging system add any value?

    PubMed

    Martin, Erica L; Michael, Claire W; Bomeisl, Philip E; Shyu, Susan; Wasman, Jay K

    2014-10-01

    We compared the performance of utilizing the ThinPrep® Imaging System (TIS) according to the manufacturer's directions to screening with the TIS plus total manual rescreening in Pap tests that were initially diagnosed as NIL to determine whether manual rescreening decreases the false-negative rate for epithelial lesions. Three thousand three hundred forty cases were diagnosed as NIL on the 22 fields of view selected by the TIS and subsequently manually rescreened by the same cytotechnologist. Six hundred seventy-four cases were sent to a cytopathologist for final diagnosis based on review criteria. Biopsy follow-up and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) test results were noted if available for cases with a diagnosis of ASCUS or above. Three thousand one hundred fifty-nine (94.6%) were confirmed NIL and 181 cases were diagnosed as abnormal on manual rescreen. There were 147 ASCUS, 6 ASCH, 9 AGC, 19 LSIL, and 0 HSIL cases. The overall false-negative rate of screening for atypia/SIL with the TIS was 5.4%. Of the 147 cases with HPV results, 43 (29%) were positive. Only 1 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 was found on biopsy follow-up, in a case of ASCUS with a positive HPV. Based on our data, the TIS for screening of Pap tests is reliable in NIL cases as compared to total manual rescreening. The majority of the false-negative cases were diagnosed as ASCUS on subsequent review, with 0 HSIL cases. Our results confirm that the TIS is highly accurate in excluding HSIL, negating the need for total manual rescreening of NIL Pap tests.

  2. The predictive value of a maculopapular rash in children hospitalized for dengue fever in Cayenne, French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Basurko, Célia; Alvarez, Emma Cuadro; Djossou, Félix; Ardillon, Vanessa; Demar, Magalie; Villeneuve, Chantal; Elenga, Narcisse; Bonnet, Philippe; Carme, Bernard; Nacher, Mathieu

    2012-12-01

    In order to determine the predictive value of a rash during dengue fever, a cohort study was conducted in children hospitalized for dengue during an epidemic in French Guiana. A rash was predictive of uncomplicated dengue: the HR of developing a severe form of disease was 0.43 (95% CI 0.21-0.88; p-value=0.021) for patients with rash.

  3. Meditation experience predicts less negative appraisal of pain: electrophysiological evidence for the involvement of anticipatory neural responses.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Jones, Anthony K P

    2010-09-01

    The aim of mindfulness meditation is to develop present-focused, non-judgmental, attention. Therefore, experience in meditation should be associated with less anticipation and negative appraisal of pain. In this study we compared a group of individuals with meditation experience to a control group to test whether any differences in the affective appraisal of pain could be explained by lower anticipatory neural processing. Anticipatory and pain-evoked ERPs and reported pain unpleasantness were recorded in response to laser stimuli of matched subjective intensity between the two groups. ERP data were analysed after source estimation with LORETA. No group effects were found on the laser energies used to induce pain. More experienced meditators perceived the pain as less unpleasant relative to controls, with meditation experience correlating inversely with unpleasantness ratings. ERP source data for anticipation showed that in meditators, lower activity in midcingulate cortex relative to controls was related to the lower unpleasantness ratings, and was predicted by lifetime meditation experience. Meditators also reversed the normal positive correlation between medial prefrontal cortical activity and pain unpleasantness during anticipation. Meditation was also associated with lower activity in S2 and insula during the pain-evoked response, although the experiment could not disambiguate this activity from the preceding anticipation response. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that meditation reduces the anticipation and negative appraisal of pain, but effects on pain-evoked activity are less clear and may originate from preceding anticipatory activity. Further work is required to directly test the causal relationship between meditation, pain anticipation, and pain experience.

  4. The value of using feasibility models in systematic conservation planning to predict landholder management uptake.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, Ayesha I T; Tulloch, Vivitskaia J D; Evans, Megan C; Mills, Morena

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the social dimensions of conservation opportunity is crucial for conservation planning in multiple-use landscapes. However, factors that influence the feasibility of implementing conservation actions, such as the history of landscape management, and landholders' willingness to engage are often difficult or time consuming to quantify and rarely incorporated into planning. We examined how conservation agencies could reduce costs of acquiring such data by developing predictive models of management feasibility parameterized with social and biophysical factors likely to influence landholders' decisions to engage in management. To test the utility of our best-supported model, we developed 4 alternative investment scenarios based on different input data for conservation planning: social data only; biological data only; potential conservation opportunity derived from modeled feasibility that incurs no social data collection costs; and existing conservation opportunity derived from feasibility data that incurred collection costs. Using spatially explicit information on biodiversity values, feasibility, and management costs, we prioritized locations in southwest Australia to control an invasive predator that is detrimental to both agriculture and natural ecosystems: the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). When social data collection costs were moderate to high, the most cost-effective investment scenario resulted from a predictive model of feasibility. Combining empirical feasibility data with biological data was more cost-effective for prioritizing management when social data collection costs were low (<4% of the total budget). Calls for more data to inform conservation planning should take into account the costs and benefits of collecting and using social data to ensure that limited funding for conservation is spent in the most cost-efficient and effective manner.

  5. Predictive value of strength loss as an indicator of muscle damage across multiple drop jumps.

    PubMed

    Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Venckūnas, Tomas; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the time-course of indirect symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage after 50 and 100 drop jumps. A high-force, low intensity exercise protocol was used to avoid discrepancies regarding metabolic fatigue immediately after exercise. Healthy untrained men performed 50 ("50 group", n = 13) or 100 ("100 group", n = 13) intermittent (30-s interval between each jump) drop jumps, respectively, from the height of 0.5 m with a counter-movement to a 90° knee flexion angle and immediate maximal rebound. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor strength was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer immediately before and at 2 min after exercise, as well as 3, 7, and 14 days after exercise. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and muscle soreness within 7 days after exercise were also determined. The results showed that the decrease in voluntary isometric and isokinetic torque as well as 100 Hz stimulation torque at the end of the 50 and 100 drop jumps was very similar, while substantial differences were found in low-frequency fatigue, shift in optimal knee joint angle, muscle soreness, and CK activity. In addition, there was slower muscle strength recovery after the 100 drop jumps. It is concluded that the predictive value of strength loss immediately after exercise as an indicator of muscle damage decreases as the jump number increases. Still, stimuli must be large enough for muscle torque to reach the reduction plateau. Therefore, magnitude of exercise becomes a major factor in accuracy of muscle damage predictions. PMID:21574783

  6. The value of using feasibility models in systematic conservation planning to predict landholder management uptake.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, Ayesha I T; Tulloch, Vivitskaia J D; Evans, Megan C; Mills, Morena

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the social dimensions of conservation opportunity is crucial for conservation planning in multiple-use landscapes. However, factors that influence the feasibility of implementing conservation actions, such as the history of landscape management, and landholders' willingness to engage are often difficult or time consuming to quantify and rarely incorporated into planning. We examined how conservation agencies could reduce costs of acquiring such data by developing predictive models of management feasibility parameterized with social and biophysical factors likely to influence landholders' decisions to engage in management. To test the utility of our best-supported model, we developed 4 alternative investment scenarios based on different input data for conservation planning: social data only; biological data only; potential conservation opportunity derived from modeled feasibility that incurs no social data collection costs; and existing conservation opportunity derived from feasibility data that incurred collection costs. Using spatially explicit information on biodiversity values, feasibility, and management costs, we prioritized locations in southwest Australia to control an invasive predator that is detrimental to both agriculture and natural ecosystems: the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). When social data collection costs were moderate to high, the most cost-effective investment scenario resulted from a predictive model of feasibility. Combining empirical feasibility data with biological data was more cost-effective for prioritizing management when social data collection costs were low (<4% of the total budget). Calls for more data to inform conservation planning should take into account the costs and benefits of collecting and using social data to ensure that limited funding for conservation is spent in the most cost-efficient and effective manner. PMID:25382827

  7. Predictive value of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis as intermediate markers for colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, W C; Chapkin, R S; Lupton, J R

    1997-04-01

    In order to determine the prognostic significance of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis as intermediate markers for colon tumor development, these indices were measured during the promotion phase of tumorigenesis. Two hundred and sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with one of two fats (corn oil and fish oil) and two fibers (pectin and cellulose) plus or minus the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) and killed at two time points (18 and 36 wk) in a 2x2x2x2 factorial design. In vivo cell proliferation was measured immunohistochemically using incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into DNA. Differentiation was assessed by binding of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) to colonocytes. Apoptosis was measured by immunoperoxidase detection of digoxigenin-labeled genomic DNA. Adenocarcinoma incidence results at week 36 were 70.3% for corn oil + AOM and 56.1% for fish oil + AOM treatment (P < 0.05); no main effect of fiber was observed. At week 18, AOM treatment increased the number of cells per crypt column in the proximal colon compared with saline controls (P = 0.0358) and increased the proliferative zone in the distal colon compared with controls (P = 0.0073). However, changes in cell proliferation at week 18 did not predict the beneficial effect of fish oil versus corn oil. In contrast, DBA binding (the marker for differentiation) was higher in fish oil versus corn oil fed animals in both the proximal and distal colon and in each portion of the crypt (P = 0.0001). There were a greater number of apoptotic cells/crypt column in the proximal colon (P = 0.0019) and distal colon (P = 0.0358) with fish oil compared with corn oil, and indices of apoptosis also predicted certain fat/fiber interactions. Measurements of differentiation and apoptosis had greater prognostic value to detect dietary effects on tumor incidence than did measurements of cell proliferation.

  8. Generalized approach for using unbiased symmetric metrics with negative values: normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Yu, Shaocai

    2012-10-23

    Unbiased symmetric metrics provide a useful measure to quickly compare two datasets, with similar interpretations for both under and overestimations. Two examples include the normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor. However, the original formulations of these metrics are only valid for datasets with positive means. This paper presents a methodology to use and interpret the metrics with datasets that have negative means. The updated formulations give identical results compared to the original formulations for the case of positive means, so researchers are encouraged to use the updated formulations going forward without introducing ambiguity.

  9. Anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies and their value for predicting responses to biologic agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Martin-Mola, Emilio; Balsa, Alejandro; García-Vicuna, Rosario; Gómez-Reino, Juan; González-Gay, Miguel Angel; Sanmartí, Raimon; Loza, Estíbaliz

    2016-08-01

    Anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs) play an important pathogenic role both at the onset and during the disease course. These antibodies precede the clinical appearance of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are associated with a less favorable prognosis, both clinically and radiologically. The objective of this work was to conduct a comprehensive review of studies published through September 2015 of ACPAs' role as a predictor of the therapeutic response to the biological agents in RA patients. The review also includes summary of the biology and detection of ACPAs as well as ACPAs in relation to joint disease and CV disease and the possible role of seroconversion. The reviews of studies examining TNF inhibitors and tocilizumab yielded negative results. In the case of rituximab, the data indicated a greater probability of clinical benefit in ACPA(+) patients versus ACPA(-) patients, as has been previously described for rheumatoid factor. Nonetheless, the effect is discreet and heterogeneous. Another drug that may have greater effectiveness in ACPA(+) patients is abatacept. Some studies have suggested that the drug is more efficient in ACPA(+) patients and that those patients show greater drug retention. In a subanalysis of the AMPLE trial, patients with very high ACPA titers who were treated with abatacept had a statistically significant response compared to patients with lower titers. In summary, the available studies suggest that the presence of or high titers of ACPA may predict a better response to rituximab and/or abatacept. Evidence regarding TNFi and tocilizumab is lacking. However, there is a lack of studies with appropriate designs to demonstrate that some drugs are superior to others for ACPA(+) patients. PMID:27271502

  10. Predictive value of bovine follicular components as markers of oocyte developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Satoko; Bender, Katrin; Fahey, Alan G; Mamo, Solomon; Brennan, Lorraine; Lonergan, Patrick; Fair, Trudee

    2014-01-01

    The follicle is a unique micro-environment within which the oocyte can develop and mature to a fertilisable gamete. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a panel of follicular parameters, including intrafollicular steroid and metabolomic profiles and theca, granulosa and cumulus cell candidate gene mRNA abundance, to predict the potential of bovine oocytes to develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro. Individual follicles were dissected from abattoir ovaries, carefully ruptured under a stereomicroscope and the oocyte was recovered and individually processed through in vitro maturation, fertilisation and culture. The mean (±s.e.m.) follicular concentrations of testosterone (62.8±4.8 ngmL(-1)), progesterone (616.8±31.9 ngmL(-1)) and oestradiol (14.4±2.4 ngmL(-1)) were not different (P>0.05) between oocytes that formed (competent) or failed to form (incompetent) blastocysts. Principal-component analysis of the quantified aqueous metabolites in follicular fluid showed differences between oocytes that formed blastocysts and oocytes that degenerated; l-alanine, glycine and l-glutamate were positively correlated and urea was negatively correlated with blastocyst formation. Follicular fluid associated with competent oocytes was significantly lower in palmitic acid (P=0.023) and total fatty acids (P=0.031) and significantly higher in linolenic acid (P=0.036) than follicular fluid from incompetent oocytes. Significantly higher (P<0.05) transcript abundance of LHCGR in granulosa cells, ESR1 and VCAN in thecal cells and TNFAIP6 in cumulus cells was associated with competent compared with incompetent oocytes.

  11. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Personal distress, but not sympathy, predicts the negative influence of bystanders on responding to an emergency.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    At the request of the authors this article has been retracted. During the preparation of a follow-up study, a mistake was found in the experimental script of the cued reaction time task of experiment 2. Four out of six conditions were mislabeled. Consequently, the reported findings and their interpretation and discussion are incorrect. Careful reexamination and reanalyzing of the data using the correct labels revealed a pattern of results that is not entirely compatible with several of the main claims of the article. Importantly, the corrected results show that reaction times do not increase with more bystanders present at an emergency.Moreover, not only personal distress but also perspective taking predicts the negative influence of bystanders on reaction times.We believe that these new findings undermine our central claim of decreased action preparation as a function of bystanders present at an emergency and the enhancement of this effect in people with higher levels of trait personal distress. While the results and discussion of experiment 1 and 3 remain correct, the new results of experiment 2 influence the article to such an extent that we currently see no other option than to retract the article from publication. We will continue to work on this topic and hope to publish the new results in due time. We deeply regret the publication of invalid results.We sincerely apologize to the Editor and reviewers of the manuscript, and the readers of Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience.

  12. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Confirms the Prediction that D-3h Carbontrioxide (CO3) Has a Singlet Ground State

    DOE PAGES

    Hrovat, David; Hou, Gao-Lei; Chen, Bo; Wang, Xue B.; Borden, Weston

    2015-11-13

    The CO3 radical anion (CO3•–) has been formed by electrospraying carbonate dianion (CO32–) into the gas phase. The negative ion photoelectron (NIPE) spectrum of CO3•– shows that, unlike trimethylenemethane [C(CH2)3], carbontrioxide (CO3) has a singlet ground state. From the NIPE spectrum, the electron affinity of CO3 was determined to be EA = 4.06 ± 0.03 eV, and the singlet-triplet energy difference was found to be ΔEST = - 17.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. B3LYP, CCSD(T), and CASPT2 calculations all find that the two lowest triplet states of CO3 are very close in energy, a prediction that is confirmed by the relativemore » intensities of the bands in the NIPE spectrum of CO3•–. The 560 cm-1 vibrational progression, seen in the low energy region of the triplet band, enables the identification of the lowest, Jahn-Teller-distorted, triplet state as 3A1, in which both unpaired electrons reside in σ MOs, rather than 3A2, in which one unpaired electron occupies the b2 σ MO, and the other occupies the b1 π MO.« less

  13. Bullying and cyberbullying: overlapping and predictive value of the co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    del Rey, Rosario; Elipe, Paz; Ortega-Ruiz, Rosario

    2012-11-01

    Several studies show certain co-occurrence of the traditional bullying and the cyberbullying. However, the results about relation and homogeneity among the roles of each of them are not unanimous. The present study intends to advance in the knowledge about the above-mentioned co-occurrence by exploring the dimensions of victimization and traditional aggression and cyber-victimization and cyber-aggression and by identifying its eventual directionality. A short-term longitudinal design was developed. The sample was formed by 274 adolescents, aging 12 to 18 years-old, belonging to 2 schools of Andalusia (South of Spain). In order to value the impact of bullying and cyberbullying the European Cyberbullying Intervention Project Questionnaire (ECIPQ) and the European Bullying Intervention Project Questionnaire (EBIPQ) were used. The results show important simultaneity among both phenomena and suggest that although in cyberbullying -cyber-victimization and cyber-aggression- may be predicted because of previous involvement of the subject in traditional bullying, on the contrary it does not happen. In addition, previous victimization is a risk factor for traditional bullying and for cyberbullying. Results are discussed in relation to the process and socio-group dynamics arising from the bullying and cyberbullying phenomena, and in terms of their prevention.

  14. Relative atherogenicity and predictive value of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael; Ginsberg, Henry N; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2008-04-01

    Although low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a well-established atherogenic factor for coronary heart disease, it does not completely represent the risk associated with atherogenic lipoproteins in the presence of high triglyceride (TG) levels. Constituent lipoproteins constituting non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) include atherogenic TG-rich lipoproteins, cholesteryl ester-enriched remnants of TG-rich lipoproteins, and lipoprotein(a). Recent observational and intervention studies suggest that the predictive value of non-HDL-C for cardiovascular risk and mortality is better than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and that non-HDL-C correlates highly with plasma apolipoprotein B levels. Currently, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines identify non-HDL-C as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TG elevation (> or =200 mg/dl) after the attainment of LDL-C target goals. In patients with coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease risk equivalents, an optional non-HDL-C goal is <100 mg/dl. To achieve the non-HDL-C goal, statin therapy may be intensified or combined with ezetimibe, niacin, a fibrate, or omega-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, non-HDL-C remains an important target of therapy for patients with elevated TGs, although its widespread adoption has yet to gain a foothold among health care professionals treating patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:18359322

  15. Cut-Off Values of Visceral Adiposity to Predict NAFLD in Brazilian Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Grotti Clemente, Ana Paula; Molin Netto, Bárbara Dal; Ganen, Aline di Piano; Tock, Lian; Arisa Caranti, Danielle; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Tufik, Sergio; Dâmaso, Ana R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The present study aimed at determining cut-off points of visceral fat to predict NAFLD and analyzed metabolic disorders of obese adolescents. Methods. Cross-sectional study involved 165 obese adolescents ranged in age from 15 to 19 years. Glycemia, hepatic transaminases, lipid profile, and insulin resistance were analyzed. Visceral and subcutaneous fat were measured by ultrasound and body composition by plesthysmography. Results. The NAFLD adolescents had significantly higher values for body mass, BMI-for-age, BMI, total fat, waist circumference, and visceral fat when compared with non-NAFLD obese adolescents in both genders. Moreover, there were significant positive correlations between visceral fat with the variables BMI-for-age (r = 0.325,), TG (r = 0.277), AST (r = 0.509), ALT (r = 0.519), WC (r = 0.390), and visceral/subcutaneous ratio (r = 0.790) for NAFLD group. Total fat, triglycerides, and visceral fat were the independent predictors to NAFLD. Analysis of the ROC curves revealed cut-off points of visceral fat of 4.47 cm for girls and 4.21 cm for boys. Conclusions. The results may suggest that abdominal ultrasonography procedure may be a safe alternative method of assessing visceral adiposity aiming to be considered to the development of preventive and treatment strategies in obese individuals. This clinial trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov (NCT01358773). PMID:24381750

  16. Predictive value of brain-specific proteins in serum for neurodevelopmental outcome after birth asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Nagdyman, Nicole; Grimmer, Ingrid; Scholz, Tristess; Muller, Christian; Obladen, Michael

    2003-08-01

    Brain-specific proteins have been used to detect cerebral injury after birth asphyxia. Previous investigations suggest that serum protein S-100beta, brain-specific creatine kinase (CK-BB), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are capable of identifying patients with a risk of developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Whether detection of elevated serum concentrations of these proteins reflects long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remains to be investigated. We examined serum protein S-100beta, NSE, and CK-BB at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after birth in 29 asphyxiated infants and 20 control infants. Neurodevelopmental follow-up examinations were performed at 20 mo of age using the German revision of the Griffiths scales for developmental assessment. Elevated concentrations of serum protein S-100beta, NSE, and CK-BB within 24 h after asphyxia did not correlate with long-term neurodevelopmental delay. We conclude that serum protein S-100beta, NSE, and CK-BB, sampled on the first day of life, is of limited value in predicting severe brain damage after birth asphyxia.

  17. Prognostic and predictive values of long non-coding RNA LINC00472 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Loo, Lenora W M; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Chong, Clayton; Canuto, Emilie Marion; Biglia, Nicoletta; Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Harvey; Chu, Wen-Ming; Yu, Herbert

    2015-04-20

    LINC00472 is a novel long intergenic non-coding RNA. We evaluated LINC00472 expression in breast tumor samples using RT-qPCR, performed a meta-analysis of over 20 microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, and investigated the effect of LINC00472 expression on cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells transfected with a LINC00472-expressing vector. Our qPCR results showed that high LINC00472 expression was associated with less aggressive breast tumors and more favorable disease outcomes. Patients with high expression of LINC00472 had significantly reduced risk of relapse and death compared to those with low expression. Patients with high LINC00472 expression also had better responses to adjuvant chemo- or hormonal therapy than did patients with low expression. Results of meta-analysis on multiple studies from the GEO database were in agreement with the findings of our study. High LINC00472 was also associated with favorable molecular subtypes, Luminal A or normal-like tumors. Cell culture experiments showed that up-regulation of LINC00472 expression could suppress breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. Collectively, our clinical and in vitro studies suggest that LINC00472 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Evaluating this long non-coding RNA in breast tumors may have prognostic and predictive value in the clinical management of breast cancer.

  18. From 'solution shop' model to 'focused factory' in hospital surgery: increasing care value and predictability.

    PubMed

    Cook, David; Thompson, Jeffrey E; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Visscher, Sue L; Dearani, Joseph A; Roger, Veronique L; Borah, Bijan J

    2014-05-01

    The full-service US hospital has been described organizationally as a "solution shop," in which medical problems are assumed to be unstructured and to require expert physicians to determine each course of care. If universally applied, this model contributes to unwarranted variation in care, which leads to lower quality and higher costs. We purposely disrupted the adult cardiac surgical practice that we led at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, by creating a "focused factory" model (characterized by a uniform approach to delivering a limited set of high-quality products) within the practice's solution shop. Key elements of implementing the new model were mapping the care process, segmenting the patient population, using information technology to communicate clearly defined expectations, and empowering nonphysician providers at the bedside. Using a set of criteria, we determined that the focused-factory model was appropriate for 67 percent of cardiac surgical patients. We found that implementation of the model reduced resource use, length-of-stay, and cost. Variation was markedly reduced, and outcomes were improved. Assigning patients to different care models increases care value and the predictability of care process, outcomes, and costs while preserving (in a lesser clinical footprint) the strengths of the solution shop. We conclude that creating a focused-factory model within a solution shop, by applying industrial engineering principles and health information technology tools and changing the model of work, is very effective in both improving quality and reducing costs.

  19. Value of cyst localization to predict cystobiliary communication in patients undergoing conservative surgery with hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Bircan; Kapan, Murat; Teke, Memik; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Arıkanoğlu, Zülfü

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between the segmental localization of liver hydatid cyst by computed tomography (CT) and the presence of cystobiliary communication (CBC) and to identify the risk factors for CBC. Patients and methods One hundred and eleven of 163 patients who underwent liver hydatid surgery between January 2011 and September 2014 were included in this study and analyzed retrospectively. The size, number, stage, and segmental and lobar localization of the cysts were investigated by CT. The presence of CBC and preoperative laboratory findings were recorded from operation notes. Results CBC was more frequent in single large cysts. CBC was most commonly detected in segment 1 (50%), 8 (48.3%), 7 (41.2%), and 4 (40%). CBC was more frequent in the right lobe (40.4%) and Gharbi stage 3 (41.8%) and 4 (55.6%) lesions. There were no differences in CBC according to distance from the hilus. In addition, preoperative total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) elevations were associated with higher CBC frequency (P<0.05). Cyst diameter, number of cysts, and ALP and GGT elevations were independent predictors of CBC presence. Conclusion The evaluation of hydatid cyst diameter, morphological stage, and segmental and lobar localization by abdominal CT and measurement of preoperative cyst diameter, number of cysts, and ALP and GGT values may predict the presence of CBC. PMID:27366078

  20. The Value of Conditioning Data for Prediction of Conservative Solute Transport at the Oyster Site, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2001-12-01

    The large and diverse body of subsurface characterization data generated at a field research site near Oyster, VA provides a unique opportunity to test various approaches for characterizing field-scale heterogeneity in aquifer properties and modeling subsurface flow and transport. We are using observed bromide breakthrough curves (BTCs) from an injection experiment conducted in 1999 as a baseline for evaluating data worth and model effectiveness. BTCs are available at 24 multi-level samplers, eight ports each (192 total sampling points). Each BTC is a time series of measured concentrations, spaced two to twelve hours apart over the seven-day field experiment. A detailed model, implemented using the RAFT code, is used to simulate breakthrough curves at the sampler locations. This model requires the specification of spatial distributions of hydrologic parameters such as hydraulic conductivity. This in turn involves the integration of data of various types and amounts into a conceptual model framework. The number of possible conceptualizations and methods for data integration is nearly limitless, and each gives rise to a different prediction of bromide breakthrough at sampling points. To evaluate the relative appropriateness of each approach, and the value of the data utilized therein, we simulate BTCs at each sampler location and quantitatively compare them to the observed BTCs.

  1. Prognostic and predictive values of long non-coding RNA LINC00472 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Chong, Clayton; Canuto, Emilie Marion; Biglia, Nicoletta; Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Harvey; Chu, Wen-Ming; Yu, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    LINC00472 is a novel long intergenic non-coding RNA. We evaluated LINC00472 expression in breast tumor samples using RT-qPCR, performed a meta-analysis of over 20 microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, and investigated the effect of LINC00472 expression on cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells transfected with a LINC00472-expressing vector. Our qPCR results showed that high LINC00472 expression was associated with less aggressive breast tumors and more favorable disease outcomes. Patients with high expression of LINC00472 had significantly reduced risk of relapse and death compared to those with low expression. Patients with high LINC00472 expression also had better responses to adjuvant chemo- or hormonal therapy than did patients with low expression. Results of meta-analysis on multiple studies from the GEO database were in agreement with the findings of our study. High LINC00472 was also associated with favorable molecular subtypes, Luminal A or normal-like tumors. Cell culture experiments showed that up-regulation of LINC00472 expression could suppress breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. Collectively, our clinical and in vitro studies suggest that LINC00472 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Evaluating this long non-coding RNA in breast tumors may have prognostic and predictive value in the clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:25865225

  2. Evaluation of the positive predictive value of a rapid Immunochromatographic test to detect Campylobacter in stools.

    PubMed

    Floch, Pauline; Goret, Julien; Bessède, Emilie; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed rapid immunochromatographic tests (ICT) have the potential to provide a quick and easy diagnosis of Campylobacter enteritis in comparison to culture. In a previous study we found them sensitive but lacking in specificity. The aim of the present study was to focus on the problem of specificity and determine the positive predictive value (PPV) of a positive result of the ImmunoCard Stat! Campy (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH, USA). For this purpose, the stools positive by ICT were cultured according to 3 different protocols: Karmali agar, Preston enrichment broth subcultured on Karmali agar, and a filtration method on a blood agar without antibiotics, all incubated for 7 days at 37°C. Out of 609 stools from adults and children with community acquired enteritis, the reference methods detected 25 positive cases (4.1%) (culture: 19, specific PCR and ELISA both positive: 6) and the ICT: 31 including the 25 true positives. The PPV was 80.6%. We conclude that ICT is a good method to screen Campylobacter positive stools but because of its lack of specificity the positive stools must be tested by another method. PMID:23206554

  3. Molecular value predictions: associations with beef quality, carcass, production, behavior, and efficiency phenotypes in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, P L; Cafe, L M; McIntyre, B L; Geesink, G H; Thompson, J M; Polkinghorne, R; Pethick, D W; Robinson, D L

    2013-12-01

    Data from 2 previously published experiments, New South Wales (NSW; n = 161) and Western Australia (WA; n = 135), were used to test molecular value predictions (MVP), generated from commercially available gene markers, on economically important traits of Bos indicus (Brahman) cattle. Favorable tenderness MVP scores were associated with reduced shear force values of strip loin (LM) steaks aged 7 d from Achilles-hung carcasses (P ≤ 0.06), as well as steaks aged 1 (P ≤ 0.08) or 7 d (P ≤ 0.07) from carcasses hung from the pelvis (tenderstretch). Favorable tenderness MVP scores were also associated with improved consumer tenderness ratings for strip loin steaks aged 7 d and either Achilles hung (P ≤ 0.006) or tenderstretched (P ≤ 0.07). Similar results were observed in NSW for rump (top butt; gluteus medius) steaks, with favorable tenderness MVP scores associated with more tender (P = 0.006) and acceptable (P = 0.008) beef. Favorable marbling MVP scores were associated with improved (P ≤ 0.021) marbling scores and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the NSW experiment, despite low variation in marbling in the Brahman cattle. For the WA experiment, however, there were no (P ≥ 0.71) relationships between marbling MVP and marbling scores or IMF content. Although residual (net) feed intake (RFI) was not associated (P = 0.63) with the RFI (feed efficiency) MVP, the RFI MVP was adversely associated with LM tenderness and acceptability of 7-d-aged Achilles-hung carcasses in NSW (P ≤ 0.031) and WA (P ≤ 0.037). Some other relationships and trends were noted between the MVP and the other traits, but few reached statistical significance, and none were evident in both experiments. Results from this study provide evidence to support the use of the tenderness MVP. The value of the marbling MVP, which was associated with marbling in only 1 herd, warrants further evaluation; however, there appears to be no evidence to support use of the RFI MVP in Brahman cattle. PMID

  4. Molecular value predictions: associations with beef quality, carcass, production, behavior, and efficiency phenotypes in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, P L; Cafe, L M; McIntyre, B L; Geesink, G H; Thompson, J M; Polkinghorne, R; Pethick, D W; Robinson, D L

    2013-12-01

    Data from 2 previously published experiments, New South Wales (NSW; n = 161) and Western Australia (WA; n = 135), were used to test molecular value predictions (MVP), generated from commercially available gene markers, on economically important traits of Bos indicus (Brahman) cattle. Favorable tenderness MVP scores were associated with reduced shear force values of strip loin (LM) steaks aged 7 d from Achilles-hung carcasses (P ≤ 0.06), as well as steaks aged 1 (P ≤ 0.08) or 7 d (P ≤ 0.07) from carcasses hung from the pelvis (tenderstretch). Favorable tenderness MVP scores were also associated with improved consumer tenderness ratings for strip loin steaks aged 7 d and either Achilles hung (P ≤ 0.006) or tenderstretched (P ≤ 0.07). Similar results were observed in NSW for rump (top butt; gluteus medius) steaks, with favorable tenderness MVP scores associated with more tender (P = 0.006) and acceptable (P = 0.008) beef. Favorable marbling MVP scores were associated with improved (P ≤ 0.021) marbling scores and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the NSW experiment, despite low variation in marbling in the Brahman cattle. For the WA experiment, however, there were no (P ≥ 0.71) relationships between marbling MVP and marbling scores or IMF content. Although residual (net) feed intake (RFI) was not associated (P = 0.63) with the RFI (feed efficiency) MVP, the RFI MVP was adversely associated with LM tenderness and acceptability of 7-d-aged Achilles-hung carcasses in NSW (P ≤ 0.031) and WA (P ≤ 0.037). Some other relationships and trends were noted between the MVP and the other traits, but few reached statistical significance, and none were evident in both experiments. Results from this study provide evidence to support the use of the tenderness MVP. The value of the marbling MVP, which was associated with marbling in only 1 herd, warrants further evaluation; however, there appears to be no evidence to support use of the RFI MVP in Brahman cattle.

  5. The predictive value of multiple electrode platelet aggregometry for postoperative bleeding complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Karolina; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Kruk, Mariusz; Różański, Jacek; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding Academic Research Consortium’ (‘Circulation’, 2011) for BARC type 4 bleeding (i.e. CABG-related bleeding). Results An ROC curve was constructed for the ASPI test and ADP test for a total of 200 patients. No significant correlations were demonstrated between the ASPI test results and either the primary endpoint or the secondary endpoints. A correlation was found between the ADP test results and the composite primary endpoint and each of the secondary endpoints. The primary endpoint of major postoperative bleeding occurred in 16 subjects. From the ROC curve, we established the optimal cut-off value for the ADP test of 26 U at sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 69%, positive predictive value of 69.90%, and negative predictive value of 71.13%. Conclusions In patients on antiplatelet therapy, an ADP test result of < 26 U is strongly predictive of serious bleeding complications after CABG surgery. The MEA ADP test allows to identify the group of patients at an increased risk of postoperative bleeding. PMID:27212971

  6. Amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex are inversely coupled during regulation of negative affect and predict the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion among older adults.

    PubMed

    Urry, Heather L; van Reekum, Carien M; Johnstone, Tom; Kalin, Ned H; Thurow, Marchell E; Schaefer, Hillary S; Jackson, Cory A; Frye, Corrina J; Greischar, Lawrence L; Alexander, Andrew L; Davidson, Richard J

    2006-04-19

    Among younger adults, the ability to willfully regulate negative affect, enabling effective responses to stressful experiences, engages regions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the amygdala. Because regions of PFC and the amygdala are known to influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, here we test whether PFC and amygdala responses during emotion regulation predict the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol secretion. We also test whether PFC and amygdala regions are engaged during emotion regulation in older (62- to 64-year-old) rather than younger individuals. We measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging as participants regulated (increased or decreased) their affective responses or attended to negative picture stimuli. We also collected saliva samples for 1 week at home for cortisol assay. Consistent with previous work in younger samples, increasing negative affect resulted in ventral lateral, dorsolateral, and dorsomedial regions of PFC and amygdala activation. In contrast to previous work, decreasing negative affect did not produce the predicted robust pattern of higher PFC and lower amygdala activation. Individuals demonstrating the predicted effect (decrease < attend in the amygdala), however, exhibited higher signal in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) for the same contrast. Furthermore, participants displaying higher VMPFC and lower amygdala signal when decreasing compared with the attention control condition evidenced steeper, more normative declines in cortisol over the course of the day. Individual differences yielded the predicted link between brain function while reducing negative affect in the laboratory and diurnal regulation of endocrine activity in the home environment.

  7. Why are the δ13Corg values in Phanerozoic black shales more negative than in modern marine organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Philip A.

    2014-07-01

    δ13Corg values of Phanerozoic black shales average -27‰, whereas those of modern marine organic matter average -20‰. The black shale isotopic values mimic those of continental organic matter, yet their organic geochemical properties mandate that they contain predominantly marine organic matter. Hypotheses that proposed to explain the low δ13C values of black shales include diagenetic losses of isotopically heavier organic matter components, releases of isotopically light carbon from methane clathrates or extensive magmatic events, greater photosynthetic discrimination against 13C during times of higher atmospheric pCO2, and greenhouse climate stratification of the surface ocean that magnified photic zone recycling of isotopically light organic matter. Although the last possibility seems contrary to the vertical mixing that leads to the high productivity of modern oceanic upwelling systems, it is consistent with the strongly stratified conditions that accompanied deposition of the organic carbon-rich Pliocene-Pleistocene sapropels of the Mediterranean Sea. Because most Phanerozoic black shales contain evidence of photic zone anoxia similar to the sapropels, well-developed surface stratification of the oceans was likely involved in their formation. Existence of isotopically light land plant organic matter during several episodes of extensive magmatism that accompanied black shale deposition implies massive release of mantle CO2 that added to the greenhouse conditions that favored oceanic stratification. The 13C depletion common to most Phanerozoic black shales apparently resulted from a greenhouse climate associated with elevated atmospheric pCO2 that led to a strongly stratified ocean and photic zone recycling of organic matter in, augmented by magmatic CO2 releases.

  8. Negative δ 18O values in Allan Hills 84001 carbonate: Possible evidence for water precipitation on mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, G.; Saxton, J. M.; Lyon, I. C.; Turner, G.

    2005-03-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains ˜1% by weight of carbonate formed by secondary processes on the Martian surface or in the shallow subsurface. The major form of this carbonate is chemically and isotopically zoned rosettes which have been well documented elsewhere. This study concentrates upon carbonate regions ˜200 μm across which possess previously unobserved magnesium rich inner cores, interpreted here as rosette fragments, surrounded by a later stage cement containing rare Ca-rich carbonates (up to Ca 81Mg 07Fe 04Mn 07) intimately associated with feldspar. High spatial resolution ion probe analyses of Ca-rich carbonate surrounding rosette fragments have δ 18O V-SMOW values as low as -10 ‰. These values are not compatible with deposition from a global Martian atmosphere invoked to explain ALH84001 rosettes. The range of δ 18O values are also incompatible with a fluid that has equilibrated with the Martian crust at high temperature or from remobilisation of carbonate of rosette isotopic composition. At Martian atmospheric temperatures, the small CO 2(gas)-CO 2(ice) fractionation makes meteoric CO 2 an unlikely source for -10 ‰ carbonates. In contrast, closed system Rayleigh fractionation of H 2O can generate δ 18O H2O -30 ‰, as observed at high latitudes on Earth. We suggest that atmospheric transport and precipitation of H 2O in a similar fashion to that on Earth provides a source of suitably 18O depleted water for generation of carbonate with δ 18O V-SMOW = -10 ‰.

  9. Stimuli associated with the cancellation of food and its cues enhance eating but display negative incentive value

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Initially neutral conditioned stimuli paired with food often acquire motivating properties, including serving as secondary reinforcers, enhancing instrumental responding in Pavlovian-instrumental transfer procedures and potentiating food consumption under conditions of food satiation. Interestingly, cues associated with the cancellation of food and food cues may also potentiate food consumption (e.g., Galarce and Holland, 2009), despite their apparent negative correlations with food delivery. In three experiments with rats, we investigated conditions under which potentiation of feeding by such “interruption stimuIi” (ISs) develops, and some aspects of the content of that learning. Although in all three experiments ISs enhanced food consumption beyond control levels, they were found to act as conditioned inhibitors for anticipatory food cup entry (Experiment 1), to serve as conditioned punishers of instrumental responding (Experiment 2), and to suppress instrumental lever press responding in a Pavlovian instrumental transfer procedure (Experiment 3). Furthermore, when given concurrent choice between different foods, an IS enhanced consumption of the food whose interruption it had previously signaled, but when given a choice between performing two instrumental responses, the IS shifted rats' choice away from the response that had previously yielded the food whose interruption had been signaled by IS (Experiment 3). Thus, the effects of an IS on appetitive responses were opposite to its effects on consummatory responding. Implications for our understanding of learned incentive motivation and the control of overeating are discussed. PMID:25209534

  10. Stimuli associated with the cancellation of food and its cues enhance eating but display negative incentive value.

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Initially neutral conditioned stimuli paired with food often acquire motivating properties, including serving as secondary reinforcers, enhancing instrumental responding in Pavlovian-instrumental transfer procedures, and potentiating food consumption under conditions of food satiation. Interestingly, cues associated with the cancellation of food and food cues may also potentiate food consumption (e.g., Galarce and Holland, 2009), despite their apparent negative correlations with food delivery. In three experiments with rats, we investigated conditions under which potentiation of feeding by such "interruption stimuIi" (ISs) develops, and some aspects of the content of that learning. Although in all three experiments ISs enhanced food consumption beyond control levels, they were found to act as conditioned inhibitors for anticipatory food cup entry (Experiment 1), to serve as conditioned punishers of instrumental responding (Experiment 2), and to suppress instrumental lever press responding in a Pavlovian instrumental transfer procedure (Experiment 3). Furthermore, when given concurrent choice between different foods, an IS enhanced consumption of the food whose interruption it had previously signaled, but when given a choice between performing two instrumental responses, the IS shifted rats' choice away from the response that had previously yielded the food whose interruption had been signaled by IS (Experiment 3). Thus, the effects of an IS on appetitive responses were opposite to its effects on consummatory responding. Implications for our understanding of learned incentive motivation and the control of overeating are discussed.

  11. Accuracy of Igenity genomically estimated breeding values for predicting Australian Angus BREEDPLAN traits.

    PubMed

    Boerner, V; Johnston, D; Wu, X-L; Bauck, S

    2015-02-01

    Genomically estimated breeding values (GEBV) for Angus beef cattle are available from at least 2 commercial suppliers (Igenity [http://www.igenity.com] and Zoetis [http://www.zoetis.com]). The utility of these GEBV for improving genetic evaluation depends on their accuracies, which can be estimated by the genetic correlation with phenotypic target traits. Genomically estimated breeding values of 1,032 Angus bulls calculated from prediction equations (PE) derived by 2 different procedures in the U.S. Angus population were supplied by Igenity. Both procedures were based on Illuminia BovineSNP50 BeadChip genotypes. In procedure sg, GEBV were calculated from PE that used subsets of only 392 SNP, where these subsets were individually selected for each trait by BayesCπ. In procedure rg GEBV were calculated from PE derived in a ridge regression approach using all available SNP. Because the total set of 1,032 bulls with GEBV contained 732 individuals used in the Igenity training population, GEBV subsets were formed characterized by a decreasing average relationship between individuals in the subsets and individuals in the training population. Accuracies of GEBV were estimated as genetic correlations between GEBV and their phenotypic target traits modeling GEBV as trait observations in a bivariate REML approach, in which phenotypic observations were those recorded in the commercial Australian Angus seed stock sector. Using results from the GEBV subset excluding all training individuals as a reference, estimated accuracies were generally in agreement with those already published, with both types of GEBV (sg and rg) yielding similar results. Accuracies for growth traits ranged from 0.29 to 0.45, for reproductive traits from 0.11 to 0.53, and for carcass traits from 0.3 to 0.75. Accuracies generally decreased with an increasing genetic distance between the training and the validation population. However, for some carcass traits characterized by a low number of phenotypic

  12. Diagnostic, prognostic and predictive value of MicroRNA-21 in breast cancer patients, their daughters and healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Ambreen; Shoro, Amir Ali; Memon, Zahida; Hussain, Mehvish; Rehman, Rehana

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) located on 17q23.1 expressed in breast cancer has anti-apoptotic ability and causes tumor cell growth. It is also involved in functions such as signal transduction pathways effecting normal cell growth and differentiation. The primary objective of the study was to identify presence of miR-21 in the serum levels of stage III invasive ductal carcinoma patients and compare its expression with age matched healthy individuals and daughters of index cases. The secondary objective was to evaluate the significance of serum miR-21 gene expression with histologically proven estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) proteins. A total of 132 subjects were recruited: 50 (cases) of stage III invasive ductal carcinoma patients who had not undergone any chemotherapy or surgery were randomly picked with exclusion of females with other types of breast carcinoma. Age-matched, 50 healthy individuals (control A) were selected by purposive sampling after confirmation of no palpable lump/s in their breasts together with 32 daughters of index cases (control B). Serum tests were run on Real Time quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR, threshold cycle was determined and fold change calculated.Normality of continuous variables was assessed by Shapiro-Wilk’s test, groups compared by student t-test, Mann-Whitney test and Fisher exact test, P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. We observed that miR-21 was significantly higher in cases as compared to control A and B (P = 0.001) however control B showed significant gene expression as compared to control A (P = 0.001). The cases were also divided as positive or negative for ER, PR and HER2. High expression of miR-21 in females with stage III invasive ductal carcinoma had been calculated as compared to its age matched healthy subjects. It was observed that triple negative cases showed a greater expression of gene as compared to other groups (P = 0

  13. Predictive value of serum myeloperoxidase activity for thrombosis of arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Stolic, Radojica V; Trajkovic, Goran Z; Kostic, Mirjana; Stolic, Dragica Z; Miric, Dijana J; Kisic, Bojana M; Pajovic, Slavica D; Peric, Vladan M

    2014-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase is a proinflammatory protein that appears as a result of increased oxidative stress. It plays an important role in the promotion and progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the importance of MPO as a predictive parameter for thrombosis of arteriovenous fistula (AVF). The study involved monitoring patients with AVFs for hemodialysis over a period of 2 years. There were 41 patients, 19 (46%) men and 22 (54%) women, with mean age of 65 ± 12.7 years. Routine laboratory analyses were carried out in all respondents, including determination of MPO concentration. Gender, demographic and anthropometrical characteristics, smoking, alcohol consumption, as well as the presence of diabetic nephropathy, as an etiological factor of kidney disease, were recorded. The group of patients who developed initial thrombosis of the AVFs had significantly different values for leukocytes (8.5 ± 3.8 vs. 7.3 ± 2.1, P = 0.024), erythrocytes (2.8 ± 0.27 vs. 3.2 ± 0.65; P = 0.019), hemoglobin (88.5 ± 81 vs. 99.1 ± 6.02; P = 0.041), and myeloperoxidase (19.3 ± 4.67 vs. 11.1 ± 4.43; P = 0.007) when compared with the group without fistula thrombosis. Diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.02) characterized the group of patients with thrombosis of the fistula. Diabetic nephropathy (B = 2.53, P = 0.049) and MPO (B = 0.03, P = 0.029) were statistically significant predictors of fistula thrombosis. In our study, MPO and diabetic nephropathy were predictors of thrombosis of the AVF.

  14. TSH receptor antibodies have predictive value for breast cancer – retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Associations between breast cancer and thyroid disorders are reported in numerous studies. Relationships between thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and breast cancer have been previously demonstrated. However, no analysis has been performed concerning an association between thyrotropin (TSH) receptor antibodies (TSHRAb) and breast cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of breast cancer or benign breast tumors in patients with Graves’ disease and to analyze a possible relationship between Graves’ disease and these two groups of breast diseases with emphasis to epidemiology and laboratory findings. Patients and methods Clinical and laboratory details of 2003 women hospitalized for endocrine disorders were retrospectively analyzed, using an unpaired Student’s t-test, logistic regression analysis, χ2 test of independence or the two-sided ratio comparison test. Results The coexistence of Graves’ disease and breast cancer was statistically significant. We observed TSHRAb and TgAb more frequently in patients with breast cancer. We found that TSHRAb is the only variable possessing predictive value for breast cancer. Conclusions The strong relationship between Graves’ disease and breast cancer is proposed. We suggest that TSHRAb could be described as a positive determinant of breast cancer. The present data call attention to the usefulness of screening for breast cancer in long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders, especially of those with Graves’ disease. Similarly, screening for autoimmune thyroid disorders should be performed in patients with nodular breast disease. Additionally, the article draws ideas for further research in order to develop targeted treatment for more successful outcome in patients with breast cancer. PMID:23680448

  15. A Global Overview of Short-Term Foreshocks and Their Predictive Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, G. A.; Avlonitis, M.; Di Fiore, B.; Minadakis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Foreshocks preceding mainshocks in the short-term, ranging from minutes to a few months prior the mainshock, have been known from several decades ago. Understanding the generation mechanisms of foreshocks was supported by seismicity observations and statistics, laboratory experiments, theoretical considerations and simulation results. However, important issues remain open. For example, (1) Why only some mainshocks are preceded by foreshocks and not others? (2) Is the mainshock size dependent on some attributes of the foreshock sequence? (3) Is that possible to discriminate foreshocks from other seismicity styles (e.g. swarms)? To approach possible replies to these issues we reviewed about 400 papers, reports, books and other documents referring to foreshocks as well as to relevant laboratory experiments. We found that the ratio of mainshocks preceded by foreshocks increases with the increase of monitoring capabilities and that foreshock activity is dependent on source mechanical properties and favoured by material heterogeneity. Also, the mainshock size does not depend on the largest foreshock size but rather by the foreshock area. Seismicity statistics may account for an effective discrimination of foreshocks from other seismicity styles. Our literature survey showed that only the last years the seismicity catalogs organized in some well monitored areas are adequately complete to search foreshock activities. Therefore, we investigated for a set of "positive foreshock examples" covering a wide range of mainshock magnitudes from 4.5 to 9 in Japan, S. California, Italy and Greece. The positive examples used indicate that foreshocks bear important value not only for the mainshock prediction but also for the operational discrimination between different styles of activity such as background seismicity, swarms, foreshocks, aftershocks.

  16. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  17. Prediction of moisture, calorific value, ash and carbon content of two dedicated bioenergy crops using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Colette C; Everard, Colm D; McDonnell, Kevin

    2011-04-01

    The potential of near infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with partial least squares regression to predict Miscanthus xgiganteus and short rotation coppice willow quality indices was examined. Moisture, calorific value, ash and carbon content were predicted with a root mean square error of cross validation of 0.90% (R(2) = 0.99), 0.13 MJ/kg (R(2) = 0.99), 0.42% (R(2) = 0.58), and 0.57% (R(2) = 0.88), respectively. The moisture and calorific value prediction models had excellent accuracy while the carbon and ash models were fair and poor, respectively. The results indicate that near infrared spectroscopy has the potential to predict quality indices of dedicated energy crops, however the models must be further validated on a wider range of samples prior to implementation. The utilization of such models would assist in the optimal use of the feedstock based on its biomass properties.

  18. How long the singular value decomposed entropy predicts the stock market? - Evidence from the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Rongbao; Shao, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new concept of multi-scales singular value decomposition entropy based on DCCA cross correlation analysis is proposed and its predictive power for the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index is studied. Using Granger causality analysis with different time scales, it is found that, the singular value decomposition entropy has predictive power for the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index for period less than one month, but not for more than one month. This shows how long the singular value decomposition entropy predicts the stock market that extends Caraiani's result obtained in Caraiani (2014). On the other hand, the result also shows an essential characteristic of stock market as a chaotic dynamic system.

  19. Clinical value of CT-based preoperative software assisted lung lobe volumetry for predicting postoperative pulmonary function after lung surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormanns, Dag; Beyer, Florian; Hoffknecht, Petra; Dicken, Volker; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Lange, Tobias; Thomas, Michael; Heindel, Walter

    2005-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate a morphology-based approach for prediction of postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after lung resection from preoperative CT scans. Fifteen Patients with surgically treated (lobectomy or pneumonectomy) bronchogenic carcinoma were enrolled in the study. A preoperative chest CT and pulmonary function tests before and after surgery were performed. CT scans were analyzed by prototype software: automated segmentation and volumetry of lung lobes was performed with minimal user interaction. Determined volumes of different lung lobes were used to predict postoperative FEV1 as percentage of the preoperative values. Predicted FEV1 values were compared to the observed postoperative values as standard of reference. Patients underwent lobectomy in twelve cases (6 upper lobes; 1 middle lobe; 5 lower lobes; 6 right side; 6 left side) and pneumonectomy in three cases. Automated calculation of predicted postoperative lung function was successful in all cases. Predicted FEV1 ranged from 54% to 95% (mean 75% +/- 11%) of the preoperative values. Two cases with obviously erroneous LFT were excluded from analysis. Mean error of predicted FEV1 was 20 +/- 160 ml, indicating absence of systematic error; mean absolute error was 7.4 +/- 3.3% respective 137 +/- 77 ml/s. The 200 ml reproducibility criterion for FEV1 was met in 11 of 13 cases (85%). In conclusion, software-assisted prediction of postoperative lung function yielded a clinically acceptable agreement with the observed postoperative values. This method might add useful information for evaluation of functional operability of patients with lung cancer.

  20. The weather roulette: assessing the economic value of seasonal wind speed predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christel, Isadora; Cortesi, Nicola; Torralba-Fernandez, Veronica; Soret, Albert; Gonzalez-Reviriego, Nube; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Climate prediction is an emerging and highly innovative research area. For the wind energy sector, predicting the future variability of wind resources over the coming weeks or seasons is especially relevant to quantify operation and maintenance logistic costs or to inform energy trading decision with potential cost savings and/or economic benefits. Recent advances in climate predictions have already shown that probabilistic forecasting can improve the current prediction practices, which are based in the use of retrospective climatology and the assumption that what happened in the past is the best estimation of future conditions. Energy decision makers now have this new set of climate services but, are they willing to use them? Our aim is to properly explain the potential economic benefits of adopting probabilistic predictions, compared with the current practice, by using the weather roulette methodology (Hagedorn & Smith, 2009). This methodology is a diagnostic tool created to inform in a more intuitive and relevant way about the skill and usefulness of a forecast in the decision making process, by providing an economic and financial oriented assessment of the benefits of using a particular forecast system. We have selected a region relevant to the energy stakeholders where the predictions of the EUPORIAS climate service prototype for the energy sector (RESILIENCE) are skillful. In this region, we have applied the weather roulette to compare the overall prediction success of RESILIENCE's predictions and climatology illustrating it as an effective interest rate, an economic term that is easier to understand for energy stakeholders.

  1. Resources Predicting Positive and Negative Affect during the Experience of Stress: A Study of Older Asian Indian Immigrants in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diwan, Sadhna; Jonnalagadda, Satya S.; Balaswamy, Shantha

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Using the life stress model of psychological well-being, in this study we examined risks and resources predicting the occurrence of both positive and negative affect among older Asian Indian immigrants who experienced stressful life events. Design and Methods: We collected data through a telephone survey of 226 respondents (aged 50 years…

  2. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Andres E.; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M.; Baker, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress. PMID:26049136

  3. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Park, Andres E; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M; Baker, Laura A

    2015-08-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress.

  4. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  5. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julien; Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-10-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  6. A simple method for predicting the lower heating value of municipal solid waste in China based on wet physical composition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuebin; Wang, Fei; Chi, Yong; Huang, Qunxing; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-02-01

    A rapid and cost-effective prediction method based on wet physical composition has been developed to determine the lower heating value (LHV) of municipal solid waste (MSW) for practical applications in China. The heating values (HVs) of clean combustibles were measured in detail, and the effect of combustibles, food waste, and ash content on HV was studied to develop the model. The weighted average HV can be used to predict the MSW HV with high accuracy. Based on the moisture measurements of each major real combustible and the HV of clean solid waste, a predictive model of the LHV of real MSW was developed. To assess the prediction performance, information was collected on 103 MSW samples from 31 major cities in China from 1994 to 2012. Compared with five predictive models based on the wet physical composition from different regions in the world, the predictive result of the developed model is the most accurate. The prediction performance can be improved further if the MSW is sorted better and if more information is collected on the individual moisture contents of the waste.

  7. Work or family or both? Value trajectories and their prediction over ten years.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Cécile; Keller, Anita C; Stalder, Barbara E

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that values are developed during young adulthood. This study investigated whether and when developmental trajectories of values depend on gender, language region, cognitive competence, expected education duration, and ambition. Longitudinal data of 2620 adolescents in Switzerland were collected at eight waves of measurement over 10 years. Latent growth model analysis revealed that work values mainly increase between ages 16 and 20, whereas family values primarily increase after age 20. This pattern fits the major life and career roles sequence: Becoming established in one's career comes first, and focusing on family building follows later. The initial levels and development of values were essentially affected by gender, but other individual factors such as cognitive competence, expected education duration, and ambition also showed some effect, particularly on family values. These new insights into the development of values improve the understanding of the career decisions and career behavior of adolescents. PMID:25899131

  8. Comparing the predictive value of multiple cognitive, affective, and motor tasks after rodent traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Loane, David J; Murray, Michael G; Stoica, Bogdan A; Faden, Alan I

    2012-10-10

    Controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) is a widely-used, clinically-relevant model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although functional outcomes have been used for years in this model, little work has been done to compare the predictive value of various cognitive and sensorimotor assessment tests, singly or in combination. Such information would be particularly useful for assessing mechanisms of injury or therapeutic interventions. Following isoflurane anesthesia, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham, mild (5.0 m/sec), moderate (6.0 m/sec), or severe (7.5 m/sec) CCI. A battery of behavioral tests were evaluated and compared, including the standard Morris water maze (sMWM), reversal Morris water maze (rMWM), novel object recognition (NOR), passive avoidance (PA), tail-suspension (TS), beam walk (BW), and open-field locomotor activity. The BW task, performed at post-injury days (PID) 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28, showed good discrimination as a function of injury severity. The sMWM and rMWM tests (PID 14-23), as well as NOR (PID 24 and 25), effectively discriminated spatial and novel object learning and memory across injury severity levels. Notably, the rMWM showed the greatest separation between mild and moderate/severe injury. PA (PID 27 and 28) and TS (PID 24) also reflected differences across injury levels, but to a lesser degree. We also compared individual functional measures with histological outcomes such as lesion volume and neuronal cell loss across anatomical regions. In addition, we created a novel composite behavioral score index from individual complementary behavioral scores, and it provided superior discrimination across injury severities compared to individual tests. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of using a larger number of complementary functional outcome behavioral tests than those traditionally employed to follow post-traumatic recovery after TBI, and suggests that the composite score may be a helpful tool for screening

  9. Comparing the predictive value of multiple cognitive, affective, and motor tasks after rodent traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaorui; Loane, David J; Murray, Michael G; Stoica, Bogdan A; Faden, Alan I

    2012-10-10

    Controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) is a widely-used, clinically-relevant model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although functional outcomes have been used for years in this model, little work has been done to compare the predictive value of various cognitive and sensorimotor assessment tests, singly or in combination. Such information would be particularly useful for assessing mechanisms of injury or therapeutic interventions. Following isoflurane anesthesia, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham, mild (5.0 m/sec), moderate (6.0 m/sec), or severe (7.5 m/sec) CCI. A battery of behavioral tests were evaluated and compared, including the standard Morris water maze (sMWM), reversal Morris water maze (rMWM), novel object recognition (NOR), passive avoidance (PA), tail-suspension (TS), beam walk (BW), and open-field locomotor activity. The BW task, performed at post-injury days (PID) 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28, showed good discrimination as a function of injury severity. The sMWM and rMWM tests (PID 14-23), as well as NOR (PID 24 and 25), effectively discriminated spatial and novel object learning and memory across injury severity levels. Notably, the rMWM showed the greatest separation between mild and moderate/severe injury. PA (PID 27 and 28) and TS (PID 24) also reflected differences across injury levels, but to a lesser degree. We also compared individual functional measures with histological outcomes such as lesion volume and neuronal cell loss across anatomical regions. In addition, we created a novel composite behavioral score index from individual complementary behavioral scores, and it provided superior discrimination across injury severities compared to individual tests. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of using a larger number of complementary functional outcome behavioral tests than those traditionally employed to follow post-traumatic recovery after TBI, and suggests that the composite score may be a helpful tool for screening

  10. A surge of p-values between 0.041 and 0.049 in recent decades (but negative results are increasing rapidly too)

    PubMed Central

    Dodou, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    It is known that statistically significant (positive) results are more likely to be published than non-significant (negative) results. However, it has been unclear whether any increasing prevalence of positive results is stronger in the “softer” disciplines (social sciences) than in the “harder” disciplines (physical sciences), and whether the prevalence of negative results is decreasing over time. Using Scopus, we searched the abstracts of papers published between 1990 and 2013, and measured longitudinal trends of multiple expressions of positive versus negative results, including p-values between 0.041 and 0.049 versus p-values between 0.051 and 0.059, textual reporting of “significant difference” versus “no significant difference,” and the reporting of p < 0.05 versus p > 0.05. We found no support for a “hierarchy of sciences” with physical sciences at the top and social sciences at the bottom. However, we found large differences in reporting practices between disciplines, with p-values between 0.041 and 0.049 over 1990–2013 being 65.7 times more prevalent in the biological sciences than in the physical sciences. The p-values near the significance threshold of 0.05 on either side have both increased but with those p-values between 0.041 and 0.049 having increased to a greater extent (2013-to-1990 ratio of the percentage of papers = 10.3) than those between 0.051 and 0.059 (ratio = 3.6). Contradictorily, p < 0.05 has increased more slowly than p > 0.05 (ratios = 1.4 and 4.8, respectively), while the use of “significant difference” has shown only a modest increase compared to “no significant difference” (ratios = 1.5 and 1.1, respectively). We also compared reporting of significance in the United States, Asia, and Europe and found that the results are too inconsistent to draw conclusions on cross-cultural differences in significance reporting. We argue that the observed longitudinal trends are caused by negative factors, such as an

  11. Deconstructing Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia: Avolition-Apathy and Diminished Expression Clusters Predict Clinical Presentation and Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Gregory P.; Horan, William P.; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Fischer, Bernard A.; Keller, William R.; Miski, Pinar; Buchanan, Robert W.; Green, Michael F.; Carpenter, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate that negative symptoms reflect a separable domain of pathology from other symptoms of schizophrenia. However, it is currently unclear whether negative symptoms themselves are multi-faceted, and whether sub-groups of patients who display unique negative symptom profiles can be identified. Methods A data-driven approach was used to examine the heterogeneity of negative symptom presentations in two samples: Study 1 included 199 individuals with schizophrenia assessed with a standard measure of negative symptoms and Study 2 included 169 individuals meeting criteria for deficit schizophrenia (i.e., primary and enduring negative symptoms) assessed with a specialized measure of deficit symptoms. Cluster analysis was used to determine whether different groups of patients with distinct negative symptoms profiles could be identified. Results Across both studies, we found evidence for two distinctive negative symptom sub-groups: one group with predominantly Avolition-Apathy (AA) symptoms and another with a predominantly Diminished Expression (DE) profile. Follow-up discriminant function analyses confirmed the validity of these groups. AA and DE negative symptom sub-groups significantly differed on clinically relevant external validators, including measures of functional outcome, premorbid adjustment, clinical course, disorganized symptoms, social cognition, sex, and ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that distinct subgroups of patients with elevated AA or DE can be identified within the broader diagnosis of schizophrenia and that these subgroups show clinically meaningful differences in presentation. Additionally, AA tends to be associated with poorer outcomes than DE, suggesting that it may be a more severe aspect of psychopathology. PMID:23453820

  12. Evaluation of the predictive value of coronary artery calcium score for obstructive coronary artery disease in asymptomatic Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Won, Ki-Bum; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Sung, Jimin; Shin, Sanghoon; Cho, In-Jeong; Shim, Chi-Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Byung-Wook; Chung, Namsik

    2015-01-01

    Background Compared with coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA), the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) may be limited in predicting adverse cardiovascular events in asymptomatic diabetic patients. Methods We evaluated the predictive value of CACS for obstructive coronary plaques (OCPs) assessed by CCTA in 328 consecutive asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had an estimated glomerular filtration rate greater than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Results In total, 29 (9%) patients had OCPs: calcified or mixed OCPs and noncalcified OCPs were found in 26 (8%) and three (1%) patients, respectively. On the basis of a CACS of 0, 1–10, 11–100, and greater than 100, OCPs were found in 2, 5, 15, and 36% of patients, respectively. On receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the optimal cutoff CACS for predicting OCPs was found to be 33, with 83% sensitivity and 81% specificity (area under the curve, 0.853; 95% confidence interval, 0.777–0.930; P<0.001). Positive and negative predictive values of a CACS of 33 for OCPs were 30 and 98%, respectively. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age [odds ratio (OR), 1.09], microalbuminuria (OR, 3.43), current smoking (OR, 3.93), and CACS greater than 33 (OR, 15.85) were found to be independently associated with an increased risk for OCPs (P<0.05, respectively). The predictive significance of CACS greater than 33 for OCPs improved after considering the status of microalbuminuria and current smoking. Conclusion These findings suggest that CACS is an effective gatekeeper for evaluating obstructive coronary artery disease using CCTA in asymptomatic Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have near-normal kidney function. PMID:25356815

  13. Predictive Value of C-Reactive Protein for Major Complications after Major Abdominal Surgery: A Systematic Review and Pooled-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Miguel A.; Berkhof, Johannes; Jansma, Elise P.; van der Peet, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis and treatment of complications after major abdominal surgery can decrease associated morbidity and mortality. Postoperative CRP levels have shown a strong correlation with complications. Aim of this systematic review and pooled-analysis was to assess postoperative values of CRP as a marker for major complications and construct a prediction model. Study design A systematic review was performed for CRP levels as a predictor for complications after major abdominal surgery (MAS). Raw data was obtained from seven studies, including 1427 patients. A logit regression model assessed the probability of major complications as a function of CRP levels on the third postoperative day. Two practical cut-offs are proposed: an optimal cut-off for safe discharge in a fast track protocol and another for early identification of patients with increased risk for major complications. Results A prediction model was calculated for major complications as a function of CRP levels on the third postoperative day. Based on the model several cut-offs for CRP are proposed. For instance, a two cut-off system may be applied, consisting of a safe discharge criterion with CRP levels below 75 mg/L, with a negative predictive value of 97.2%. A second cut-off is set at 215 mg/L (probability 20%) and serves as a predictor of complications, indicating additional CT-scan imaging. Conclusions The present study provides insight in the interpretation of CRP levels after major abdominal surgery, proposing a prediction model for major complications as a function of CRP on postoperative day 3. Cut-offs for CRP may be implemented for safe early-discharge in a fast-track protocol and, secondly as a threshold for additional examinations, such as CT-scan imaging, even in absence of clinical signs, to confirm or exclude major complications. The prediction model allows for setting a cut-off at the discretion of individual surgeons or surgical departments. PMID:26177542

  14. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  15. Predictive Relationships between Secondary School Students' Human Values, Motivational Beliefs, and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanriseven, Isil; Dilmac, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the exploratory and predictive relationships between secondary school students' human values and their motivational beliefs and self-regulated learning strategies and thus to test the relevant model was developed. A correlational filed study was used in this research. The sample of the research…

  16. An Interval-Valued Neural Network Approach for Uncertainty Quantification in Short-Term Wind Speed Prediction.

    PubMed

    Ak, Ronay; Vitelli, Valeria; Zio, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    We consider the task of performing prediction with neural networks (NNs) on the basis of uncertain input data expressed in the form of intervals. We aim at quantifying the uncertainty in the prediction arising from both the input data and the prediction model. A multilayer perceptron NN is trained to map interval-valued input data onto interval outputs, representing the prediction intervals (PIs) of the real target values. The NN training is performed by nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II, so that the PIs are optimized both in terms of accuracy (coverage probability) and dimension (width). Demonstration of the proposed method is given in two case studies: 1) a synthetic case study, in which the data have been generated with a 5-min time frequency from an autoregressive moving average model with either Gaussian or Chi-squared innovation distribution and 2) a real case study, in which experimental data consist of wind speed measurements with a time step of 1 h. Comparisons are given with a crisp (single-valued) approach. The results show that the crisp approach is less reliable than the interval-valued input approach in terms of capturing the variability in input.

  17. Development and Predictive Value of Early Vocalizations in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Children: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolt, Suvi; Lehtonen, Liisa; Haataja, Leena; Lapinleimu, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze early vocalization development, the predictive value of this development in terms of later language skills, and possible gender difference in early vocalization development in a selected cohort of 32 very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) children and 35 full-term controls. The data on early vocalization…

  18. Predicted Outcome Value of E-Mail Communication: Factors that Foster Professional Relational Development between Students and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Stacy; Kelsey, Dawn; Lancaster, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Using predicted outcome value theory as a guide, this study investigated the link between e-mail correspondence as a form of computer mediated extra class communication and how it may shape students' desire to foster student-teacher relational development. The findings revealed that when students believe their teacher e-mails the class frequently,…

  19. Validation of Prediction Equations of Energy Values of a Single Ingredient or Their Combinations in Male Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, R. R.; Rodrigues, P. B.; Zangeronimo, M. G.; Oliveira, E. C.; Mariano, F. C. M. Q.; Lima, E. M. C.; Garcia, A. A. P.; Naves, L. P.; Nardelli, N. B. S.

    2015-01-01

    A set of prediction equations to estimate the nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy (AMEn) of individual ingredients and diets used in the poultry feed industry was evaluated. The AMEn values of three energy ingredients (maize, sorghum and defatted maize germ meal), four protein ingredients (soybean meal, maize gluten meal 60% crude protein, integral micronized soy and roasted whole soybean) and four diets (three containing four feedstuffs, complex diets, and one containing only corn-soybean meal, basal diet) were determined using a metabolism assay with male broilers from 1 to 7, 8 to 21, 22 to 35, and 36 to 42 days old. These values were compared to the AMEn values presented in the tables of energy composition or estimated by equation predictions based on chemical composition data of feedstuffs. In general, the equation predictions more precisely estimated the AMEn of feedstuffs when compared to the tables of energy composition. The equation AMEn (dry matter [DM] basis) = 4,164.187+51.006 ether extract (% in DM basis)–197.663 ash–35.689 crude fiber (% in DM basis)–20.593 neutral detergent fiber (% in DM basis) (R2 = 0.75) was the most applicable for the prediction of the energy values of feedstuffs and diets used in the poultry feed industry. PMID:26194230

  20. Anticipating Their Future: Adolescent Values for the Future Predict Adult Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Andrea K.; Wray-Lake, Laura; Warren, Michael; Maggs, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent future values--beliefs about what will matter to them in the future--may shape their adult behavior. Utilizing a national longitudinal British sample, this study examined whether adolescent future values in six domains (i.e., family responsibility, full-time job, personal responsibility, autonomy, civic responsibility, and hedonistic…

  1. Negative Cognitive Styles Synergistically Predict Suicidal Ideation in Bipolar Spectrum Disorders: A Three-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Stange, Jonathan P.; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Burke, Taylor A.; Kleiman, Evan M.; O’Garro-Moore, Jared K.; Seligman, Nicole D.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of suicidal ideation and behavior are extremely high in Bipolar Spectrum Disorders (BSDs). However, relatively little work has evaluated potentially synergistic relationships between cognitive and emotion-regulatory processes proposed by theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs. The present study evaluated whether negative cognitive style and subtypes of rumination would exacerbate the impact of self-criticism on suicidal ideation in a prospective study of individuals with BSDs. Seventy-two young adults with BSDs (bipolar II, bipolar NOS, or cyclothymia) completed diagnostic interviews and trait measures of self-criticism, negative cognitive style, and brooding and reflective rumination at a baseline assessment. The occurrence of suicidal ideation was assessed as part of diagnostic interviews completed every four months for an average of three years of follow-up. Negative cognitive style and reflective rumination strengthened the association between self-criticism and the prospective occurrence of suicidal ideation across follow-up. Individuals with high levels of self-criticism in conjunction with negative cognitive style or reflective rumination were most likely to experience the onset of suicidal ideation. Self-criticism may work synergistically with negative cognitive style and rumination to confer risk for suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders. These results support theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs and indicate that evaluating and understanding negative cognitive styles may help to identify individuals who are at risk for suicide. PMID:25660736

  2. Accuracy of genomic prediction using deregressed breeding values estimated from purebred and crossbred offspring phenotypes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Bastiaansen, J W M; Lopes, M S; Veroneze, R; Groenen, M A M; de Koning, D-J

    2015-07-01

    Genomic selection is applied to dairy cattle breeding to improve the genetic progress of purebred (PB) animals, whereas in pigs and poultry the target is a crossbred (CB) animal for which a different strategy appears to be needed. The source of information used to estimate the breeding values, i.e., using phenotypes of CB or PB animals, may affect the accuracy of prediction. The objective of our study was to assess the direct genomic value (DGV) accuracy of CB and PB pigs using different sources of phenotypic information. Data used were from 3 populations: 2,078 Dutch Landrace-based, 2,301 Large White-based, and 497 crossbreds from an F1 cross between the 2 lines. Two female reproduction traits were analyzed: gestation length (GLE) and total number of piglets born (TNB). Phenotypes used in the analyses originated from offspring of genotyped individuals. Phenotypes collected on CB and PB animals were analyzed as separate traits using a single-trait model. Breeding values were estimated separately for each trait in a pedigree BLUP analysis and subsequently deregressed. Deregressed EBV for each trait originating from different sources (CB or PB offspring) were used to study the accuracy of genomic prediction. Accuracy of prediction was computed as the correlation between DGV and the DEBV of the validation population. Accuracy of prediction within PB populations ranged from 0.43 to 0.62 across GLE and TNB. Accuracies to predict genetic merit of CB animals with one PB population in the training set ranged from 0.12 to 0.28, with the exception of using the CB offspring phenotype of the Dutch Landrace that resulted in an accuracy estimate around 0 for both traits. Accuracies to predict genetic merit of CB animals with both parental PB populations in the training set ranged from 0.17 to 0.30. We conclude that prediction within population and trait had good predictive ability regardless of the trait being the PB or CB performance, whereas using PB population(s) to predict

  3. Total motile sperm count has a superior predictive value over the WHO 2010 cut-off values for the outcomes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

    PubMed

    Borges, E; Setti, A S; Braga, D P A F; Figueira, R C S; Iaconelli, A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare (i) the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes among groups with different total motile sperm count ranges, (ii) the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes between groups with normal and abnormal total motile sperm count, and (iii) the predictive values of WHO 2010 cut-off values and pre-wash total motile sperm count for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes, in couples with male infertility. This study included data from 518 patients undergoing their first intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle as a result of male infertility. Couples were divided into five groups according to their total motile sperm count: Group I, total motile sperm count <1 × 10(6) ; group II, total motile sperm count 1-5 × 10(6) ; group III, total motile sperm count 5-10 × 10(6) ; group IV, total motile sperm count 10-20 × 10(6) ; and group V, total motile sperm count >20 × 10(6) (which was considered a normal total motile sperm count value). Then, couples were grouped into an abnormal and normal total motile sperm count group. The groups were compared regarding intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes. The predictive values of WHO 2010 cut-off values and total motile sperm count for the intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes were also investigated. The fertilization rate was lower in total motile sperm count group I compared to total motile sperm count group V (72.5 ± 17.6 vs. 84.9 ± 14.4, p = 0.011). The normal total motile sperm count group had a higher fertilization rate (84.9 ± 14.4 vs. 81.1 ± 15.8, p = 0.016) and lower miscarriage rate (17.9% vs. 29.5%, p = 0.041) compared to the abnormal total motile sperm count group. The total motile sperm count was the only parameter that demonstrated a predictive value for the formation of high-quality embryos on D2 (OR: 1.18, p = 0.013), formation of high-quality embryos on D3 (OR: 1.12, p = 0.037), formation of blastocysts on D5 (OR: 1.16, p = 0

  4. Relationship among performance, carcass, and feed efficiency characteristics, and their ability to predict economic value in the feedlot.

    PubMed

    Retallick, K M; Faulkner, D B; Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Nkrumah, J D; Shike, D W

    2013-12-01

    A 4-yr study was conducted using 736 steers of known Angus, Simmental, or Simmental × Angus genetics to determine performance, carcass, and feed efficiency factors that explained variation in economic performance. Steers were pen fed and individual DMI was recorded using a GrowSafe automated feeding system (GrowSafe Systems Ltd., Airdrie, Alberta, Canada). Steers consumed a similar diet and received similar management each year. The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine current economic value of feed efficiency and 2) identify performance, carcass, and feed efficiency characteristics that predict: carcass value, profit, cost of gain, and feed costs. Economic data used were from 2011 values. Feed efficiency values investigated were: feed conversion ratio (FCR; feed to gain), residual feed intake (RFI), residual BW gain (RG), and residual intake and BW gain (RIG). Dependent variables were carcass value ($/steer), profit ($/steer), feed costs ($/steer • d(-1)), and cost of gain ($/kg). Independent variables were year, DMI, ADG, HCW, LM area, marbling, yield grade, dam breed, and sire breed. A 10% improvement in RG (P < 0.05) yielded the lowest cost of gain at $0.09/kg and highest carcass value at $17.92/steer. Carcass value increased (P < 0.05) as feed efficiency improved for FCR, RG, and RIG. Profit increased with a 10% improvement in feed efficiency (P < 0.05) with FCR at $34.65/steer, RG at $31.21/steer, RIG at $21.66/steer, and RFI at $11.47/steer. The carcass value prediction model explained 96% of the variation among carcasses and included HCW, marbling score, and yield grade. Average daily gain, marbling score, yield grade, DMI, HCW, and year born constituted 81% of the variation for prediction of profit. Eighty-five percent of the variation in cost of gain was explained by ADG, DMI, HCW, and year. Prediction equations were developed that excluded ADG and DMI, and included feed efficiency values. Using these equations, cost of gain was explained

  5. Relative value of diverse brain MRI and blood-based biomarkers for predicting cognitive decline in the elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Sarah K.; Ver Steeg, Greg; Daianu, Madelaine; Mezher, Adam; Jahanshad, Neda; Nir, Talia M.; Hua, Xue; Gutman, Boris A.; Galstyan, Aram; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive decline accompanies many debilitating illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In old age, brain tissue loss also occurs along with cognitive decline. Although blood tests are easier to perform than brain MRI, few studies compare brain scans to standard blood tests to see which kinds of information best predict future decline. In 504 older adults from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), we first used linear regression to assess the relative value of different types of data to predict cognitive decline, including 196 blood panel biomarkers, 249 MRI biomarkers obtained from the FreeSurfer software, demographics, and the AD-risk gene APOE. A subset of MRI biomarkers was the strongest predictor. There was no specific blood marker that increased predictive accuracy on its own, we found that a novel unsupervised learning method, CorEx, captured weak correlations among blood markers, and the resulting clusters offered unique predictive power.

  6. Measuring Negative Attitudes towards Overweight and Obesity in the German Population – Psychometric Properties and Reference Values for the German Short Version of the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Janine; Luppa, Melanie; Ruzanska, Ulrike; Sikorski, Claudia; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is one of the leading public health problems worldwide. Obese individuals are often stigmatized and the psychosocial consequences of overweight and obesity are the subject of current research. To detect stigmatizing attitudes towards obese people, the Fat Phobia Scale (FPS) was developed in the USA in the early nineties. In addition, the 14-item short form of the FPS was constructed. The FPS belongs to the most commonly used instruments for measuring negative attitudes towards obese people because of its good psychometric properties. For the recently developed German short form of the FPS, however, the comprehensive investigation of the psychometric properties and the determination of reference values are still pending. Thus, the main objectives of this study were the evaluation of the psychometric quality of the scale as well as the calculation of reference values. Methods The study was based on a representative survey in the German general population. A sample of 1,657 subjects (18–94 years) was assessed via structured telephone interviews including the 14-item German version of the FPS. Descriptive statistics and inference-statistical analyses were conducted. Reference values in terms of percentage ranks were calculated. Results Substantial evidence for the reliability and validity of the German short version of the FPS was found. This study, for the first time in Germany, provides age-specific reference values for the German short form of the FPS allowing the interpretation of individual test scores. Conclusion Facing the far-reaching consequences of experienced stigmatization of obese individuals, these study results provide an important basis for further studies aiming at the investigation of negative attitudes towards overweight and obesity. PMID:25474195

  7. Prediction of postoperative pulmonary function following thoracic operations. Value of ventilation-perfusion scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Bria, W.F.; Kanarek, D.J.; Kazemi, H.

    1983-08-01

    Surgical resection of lung cancer is frequently required in patients with severely impaired lung function resulting from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Twenty patients with obstructive lung disease and cancer (mean preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) . 1.73 L) were studied preoperatively and postoperatively by spirometry and radionuclide perfusion, single-breath ventilation, and washout techniques to test the ability of these methods to predict preoperatively the partial loss of lung function by the resection. Postoperative FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) were accurately predicted by the formula: postoperative FEV1 (or FVC) . preoperative FEV1 X percent function of regions of lung not to be resected (r . 0.88 and 0.95, respectively). Ventilation and perfusion scans are equally effective in prediction. Washout data add to the sophistication of the method by permitting the qualitative evaluation of ventilation during tidal breathing. Criteria for patients requiring the study are suggested.

  8. Predictive ability of genomic selection models for breeding value estimation on growth traits of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanchao; Yu, Yang; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2016-10-01

    Genomic selection (GS) can be used to accelerate genetic improvement by shortening the selection interval. The successful application of GS depends largely on the accuracy of the prediction of genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV). This study is a first attempt to understand the practicality of GS in Litopenaeus vannamei and aims to evaluate models for GS on growth traits. The performance of GS models in L. vannamei was evaluated in a population consisting of 205 individuals, which were genotyped for 6 359 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) and phenotyped for body length and body weight. Three GS models (RR-BLUP, BayesA, and Bayesian LASSO) were used to obtain the GEBV, and their predictive ability was assessed by the reliability of the GEBV and the bias of the predicted phenotypes. The mean reliability of the GEBVs for body length and body weight predicted by the different models was 0.296 and 0.411, respectively. For each trait, the performances of the three models were very similar to each other with respect to predictability. The regression coefficients estimated by the three models were close to one, suggesting near to zero bias for the predictions. Therefore, when GS was applied in a L. vannamei population for the studied scenarios, all three models appeared practicable. Further analyses suggested that improved estimation of the genomic prediction could be realized by increasing the size of the training population as well as the density of SNPs.

  9. What is the diagnostic value of head MRI after negative head CT in ED patients presenting with symptoms atypical of stroke?

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Khaled; Lanfranchi, Michael; Li, Sean X; Mehan, William A

    2016-08-01

    The diagnostic value of head magnetic resonance imaging after negative head computed tomography for emergency department patients with vague neurologic symptoms, such as dizziness and altered mental status, remains an ongoing discussion. The objective of this study is to detect the subgroup of patients with such presentations having minor strokes whom may benefit from primary and secondary stroke prevention. We conducted a retrospective analysis and stratified patient risk factors associated with positive findings on subsequent head MRI ordered by the emergency department physician following a normal head CT. Two hundred fifty-two patients presenting with atypical stroke symptoms to the emergency department had a negative head CT followed by head MRI within 24 h ordered by emergency department clinician (123 males and 129 females; mean age of 59.4). Twenty nine of the 252 patients (11.5 %) had findings of acute to subacute infarct on the subsequent MRI. Positive MRI findings were statistically correlated with the following variables: age (p < 0.001), history of hyperlipidemia (p = 0.019), hypertension (p < 0.001), diabetes (p = 0.004), anticoagulation use (p = 0.029), and prior transient ischemic attack or stroke (p < 0.001). The mean age of the MRI-positive group was 74.1 years, with a mean difference of 16.7 ± 2.4 years more than the MRI-negative group (95 % CI, 11.8-21.5 years) (t = 6.8, p < 0.001). Emergency physicians caring for patients with vague neurologic complaints should maintain a lower threshold for ordering a head MRI despite a negative head CT for elderly patients with a history of prior stroke or transient ischemic attack to exclude a CT occult or minor ischemic stroke. PMID:27220652

  10. Comparison of breeding value prediction for two traits in a Nellore-Angus crossbred population using different Bayesian modeling methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Hulsman Hanna, Lauren L.; Garrick, Dorian J.; Gill, Clare A.; Herring, Andy D.; Sanders, James O.; Riley, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to 1) compare four models for breeding value prediction using genomic or pedigree information and 2) evaluate the impact of fixed effects that account for family structure. Comparisons were made in a Nellore-Angus population comprising F2, F3 and half-siblings to embryo transfer F2 calves with records for overall temperament at weaning (TEMP; n = 769) and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF; n = 387). After quality control, there were 34,913 whole genome SNP markers remaining. Bayesian methods employed were BayesB (π̃ = 0.995 or 0.997 for WBSF or TEMP, respectively) and BayesC (π = 0 and π̃), where π̃ is the ideal proportion of markers not included. Direct genomic values (DGV) from single trait Bayesian analyses were compared to conventional pedigree-based animal model breeding values. Numerically, BayesC procedures (using π̃) had the highest accuracy of all models for WBSF and TEMP (ρ̂gĝ = 0.843 and 0.923, respectively), but BayesB had the least bias (regression of performance on prediction closest to 1, β̂y,x = 2.886 and 1.755, respectively). Accounting for family structure decreased accuracy and increased bias in prediction of DGV indicating a detrimental impact when used in these prediction methods that simultaneously fit many markers. PMID:25505837

  11. Predictive Value of Morphological Features in Patients with Autism versus Normal Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgen, H.; Hellemann, G. S.; de Jonge, M. V.; Beemer, F. A.; van Engeland, H.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive power of morphological features in 224 autistic patients and 224 matched-pairs controls. To assess the relationship between the morphological features and autism, we used the receiver operator curves (ROC). In addition, we used recursive partitioning (RP) to determine a specific pattern of abnormalities that is…

  12. Development of Antisocial Personality Disorder in Detained Youths: The Predictive Value of Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Jason J.; Romero, Erin Gregory; Welty, Leah J.; Abram, Karen M.; Teplin, Linda A.; McClelland, Gary M.; Paskar, Leah D.

    2007-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a serious public and mental health concern. Understanding how well conduct disorder (CD) and other mental disorders predict the development of APD among youths involved in the juvenile justice system is critical for prevention. The authors used a stratified random sample of 1,112 detained youths to examine…

  13. Sampling the Airway: Improving the Predictive and Toxicological Value of Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a relatively simple technique to obtain biological material in the form of BAL fluid (BALF) from airways of humans and laboratory animals. Numerous predictive biomarkers of pulmonary injury and diseases can be detected in BALF which aid in diagnosi...

  14. Predictive value of CASA parameters in IUI with frozen donor sperm.

    PubMed

    Freour, Thomas; Jean, Miguel; Mirallie, Sophie; Langlois, Marie-Laure; Dubourdieu, Sophie; Barriere, Paul

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if characteristics of sperm motion determined by computer-aided semen analysis (CASA) after thawing and preparation on discontinuous gradient could predict pregnancy outcome after intrauterine insemination (IUI) from frozen donor sperm. A retrospective analysis of 100 non-selected women undergoing 171 consecutive donor insemination cycles was conducted between January 2006 and April 2007. Semen samples from all donors were analysed after thawing and density gradient preparation. Women who became pregnant and those who did not were comparable in terms of age, ovarian stimulation regimen and indication of IUI with donor semen. Pregnancy rate per cycle was 21.8%, and pregnancy occurred after 2.5 IUI cycles on average. Motility parameters of sperm measured by CASA (VAP, VCL, VSL, LIN, STR, and ALH) and total spermatozoa concentration after preparation on discontinuous gradient showed no difference in both groups. Progressive and total motile spermatozoa concentration, as well as progressive and total motile percentages was significantly higher in pregnancy group. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that total motile percentage >17% and motile concentration >0.9 x 10(6)/mL best predicted pregnancy. In a multivariate analysis, only total motility percentage was able to predict pregnancy. Sperm motility parameters of frozen-thawed prepared donor sperm obtained by CASA do not seem to predict pregnancy in IUI cycles. Total motile and progressive percentages and concentrations remain the best prognostic elements for pregnancy in IUI with donor semen.

  15. Value of College Education Mediating the Predictive Effects of Causal Attributions on Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Ying; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Obade, Masela; Gerszewski, Tammy; Ruthig, Joelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Causal attributions (explanations for outcomes) have been found to predict college students' academic success; however, not all students attributing success or failure to adaptive (i.e., controllable) causes perform well in university. Eccles et al.'s ("Achievement and achievement motives." W.H. Freeman, San Francisco, pp 75-145, 1983)…

  16. Comparing Quantitative Values of Two Generations of Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography Systems: Can We Predict Necrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Mitchell S.; Rivara, Andrew; Dagum, Alexander B.; Huston, Tara L.; Ganz, Jason C.; Bui, Duc T.; Khan, Sami U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several devices exist today to assist the intraoperative determination of skin flap perfusion. Laser-Assisted Indocyanine Green Dye Angiography (LAICGA) has been shown to accurately predict mastectomy skin flap necrosis using quantitative perfusion values. The laser properties of the latest LAICGA device (SPY Elite) differ significantly from its predecessor system (SPY 2001), preventing direct translation of previous published data. The purpose of this study was to establish a mathematical relationship of perfusion values between these 2 devices. Methods: Breast reconstruction patients were prospectively enrolled into a clinical trial where skin flap evaluation and excision was based on quantitative SPY Q values previously established in the literature. Initial study patients underwent mastectomy skin flap evaluation using both SPY systems simultaneously. Absolute perfusion unit (APU) values at identical locations on the breast were then compared graphically. Results: 210 data points were identified on the same patients (n = 4) using both SPY systems. A linear relationship (y = 2.9883x + 12.726) was identified with a high level or correlation (R2 = 0.744). Previously published values using SPY 2001 (APU 3.7) provided a value of 23.8 APU on the SPY Elite. In addition, postoperative necrosis in these patients correlated to regions of skin identified with the SPY Elite with APU less than 23.8. Conclusion: Intraoperative comparison of LAICGA systems has provided direct correlation of perfusion values predictive of necrosis that were previously established in the literature. An APU value of 3.7 from the SPY 2001 correlates to a SPY Elite APU value of 23.8. PMID:25525483

  17. Oxygen isotopes in Indian Plate eclogites (Kaghan Valley, Pakistan): Negative δ18O values from a high latitude protolith reset by Himalayan metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Tanaka, Ryoji; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Kobayashi, Katsura; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Eizo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Khan, Tahseenullah; Kaneko, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions are reported for the first time for the Himalayan metabasites of the Kaghan Valley, Pakistan in this study. The highest metamorphic grades are recorded in the north of the valley, near the India-Asia collision boundary, in the form of high-pressure (HP: Group I) and ultrahigh-pressure (UHP: Group II) eclogites. The rocks show a step-wise decrease in grade from the UHP to HP eclogites and amphibolites. The protoliths of these metabasites were the Permian Panjal Trap basalts (ca. 267 ± 2.4 Ma), which were emplaced along the northern margin of India when it was part of Gondwana. After the break-up of Gondwana, India drifted northward, subducted beneath Asia and underwent UHP metamorphism during the Eocene (ca. 45 ± 1.2 Ma). At the regional scale, amphibolites, Group I and II eclogites yielded δ18O values of + 5.84 and + 5.91‰, + 1.66 to + 4.24‰, and - 2.25 to + 0.76‰, respectively, relative to VSMOW. On a more local scale, within a single eclogite body, the δ18O values were the lowest (- 2.25 to- 1.44‰) in the central, the best preserved (least retrograded) parts, and show a systematic increase outward into more retrograded rocks, reaching up to + 0.12‰. These values are significantly lower than the typical mantle values for basalts of + 5.7 ± 0.3‰. The unusually low or negative δ18O values in Group II eclogites potentially resulted from hydrothermal alteration of the protoliths by interactions with meteoric water when the Indian plate was at southern high latitudes (~ 60°S). The stepwise increase in δ18O values, among different eclogite bodies in general and at single outcrop-scales in particular, reflects differing degrees of resetting of the oxygen isotope compositions during exhumation-related retrogression.

  18. Negative Events in Childhood Predict Trajectories of Internalizing Symptoms Up to Young Adulthood: An 18-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, Maria; Touchette, Évelyne; Prokofyeva, Elena; Chollet, Aude; Fombonne, Eric; Elidemir, Gulizar; Galéra, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Background Common negative events can precipitate the onset of internalizing symptoms. We studied whether their occurrence in childhood is associated with mental health trajectories over the course of development. Methods Using data from the TEMPO study, a French community-based cohort study of youths, we studied the association between negative events in 1991 (when participants were aged 4–16 years) and internalizing symptoms, assessed by the ASEBA family of instruments in 1991, 1999, and 2009 (n = 1503). Participants' trajectories of internalizing symptoms were estimated with semi-parametric regression methods (PROC TRAJ). Data were analyzed using multinomial regression models controlled for participants' sex, age, parental family status, socio-economic position, and parental history of depression. Results Negative childhood events were associated with an increased likelihood of concurrent internalizing symptoms which sometimes persisted into adulthood (multivariate ORs associated with > = 3 negative events respectively: high and decreasing internalizing symptoms: 5.54, 95% CI: 3.20–9.58; persistently high internalizing symptoms: 8.94, 95% CI: 2.82–28.31). Specific negative events most strongly associated with youths' persistent internalizing symptoms included: school difficulties (multivariate OR: 5.31, 95% CI: 2.24–12.59), parental stress (multivariate OR: 4.69, 95% CI: 2.02–10.87), serious illness/health problems (multivariate OR: 4.13, 95% CI: 1.76–9.70), and social isolation (multivariate OR: 2.24, 95% CI: 1.00–5.08). Conclusions Common negative events can contribute to the onset of children's lasting psychological difficulties. PMID:25485875

  19. Graphical assessment of incremental value of novel markers in prediction models: From statistical to decision analytical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Steyerberg, Ewout W; Vedder, Moniek M; Leening, Maarten J G; Postmus, Douwe; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Van Calster, Ben; Pencina, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    New markers may improve prediction of diagnostic and prognostic outcomes. We aimed to review options for graphical display and summary measures to assess the predictive value of markers over standard, readily available predictors. We illustrated various approaches using previously published data on 3264 participants from the Framingham Heart Study, where 183 developed coronary heart disease (10-year risk 5.6%). We considered performance measures for the incremental value of adding HDL cholesterol to a prediction model. An initial assessment may consider statistical significance (HR = 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.80; likelihood ratio p < 0.001), and distributions of predicted risks (densities or box plots) with various summary measures. A range of decision thresholds is considered in predictiveness and receiver operating characteristic curves, where the area under the curve (AUC) increased from 0.762 to 0.774 by adding HDL. We can furthermore focus on reclassification of participants with and without an event in a reclassification graph, with the continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI) as a summary measure. When we focus on one particular decision threshold, the changes in sensitivity and specificity are central. We propose a net reclassification risk graph, which allows us to focus on the number of reclassified persons and their event rates. Summary measures include the binary AUC, the two-category NRI, and decision analytic variants such as the net benefit (NB). Various graphs and summary measures can be used to assess the incremental predictive value of a marker. Important insights for impact on decision making are provided by a simple graph for the net reclassification risk. PMID:25042996

  20. What makes a life event traumatic for a child? The predictive values of DSM-Criteria A1 and A2

    PubMed Central

    Verlinden, Eva; Schippers, Mirjam; Van Meijel, Els P. M.; Beer, Renée; Opmeer, Brent C.; Olff, Miranda; Boer, Frits; Lindauer, Ramón J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-Criteria A1 and A2 for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been discussed extensively, with several studies in adults or adolescents supporting the removal of Criterion A2. However, solid research in children is missing. Objective This study evaluated the DSM-Criteria A1 and A2 in predicting posttraumatic stress in children. Method A sample of 588 Dutch school children, aged 8–18 years, completed a self-report questionnaire to determine if they met Criteria A1 and/or A2. Their posttraumatic stress response was assessed using the Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale. Results The contribution of Criterion A2 to the prediction of posttraumatic stress in children is of greater importance than the contribution of Criterion A1. Children who met Criterion A2 reported significantly higher levels of posttraumatic stress and were nine times more likely to develop probable PTSD than children who did not meet Criterion A2. When Criterion A1 was met, a child was only two times more likely to develop probable PTSD as compared with those where Criterion A1 was not met. Furthermore, the low sensitivity of Criterion A1 suggests that children may regularly develop severe posttraumatic stress in the absence of Criterion A1. The remarkably high negative predictive value of Criterion A2 indicates that if a child does not have a subjective reaction during an event that it is unlikely that he or she will develop PTSD. Conclusions In contrast to most adult studies, the findings of this study emphasize the significant contribution of Criterion A2 to the prediction of posttraumatic stress in children and raise fundamental questions about the value of the current Criterion A1. PMID:23977424

  1. Prevalence and Predictive Value of Dyspnea Ratings in Hospitalized Patients: Pilot Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jennifer P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyspnea (breathing discomfort) can be as powerfully aversive as pain, yet is not routinely assessed and documented in the clinical environment. Routine identification and documentation of dyspnea is the first step to improved symptom management and it may also identify patients at risk of negative clinical outcomes. Objective To estimate the prevalence of dyspnea and of dyspnea-associated risk among hospitalized patients. Design Two pilot prospective cohort studies. Setting Single academic medical center. Patients Consecutive patients admitted to four inpatient units: cardiology, hematology/oncology, medicine, and bariatric surgery. Measurements In Study 1, nurses documented current and recent patient-reported dyspnea at the time of the Initial Patient Assessment in 581 inpatients. In Study 2, nurses documented current dyspnea at least once every nursing shift in 367 patients. We describe the prevalence of burdensome dyspnea, and compare it to pain. We also compared dyspnea ratings with a composite of adverse outcomes: 1) receipt of care from the hospital’s rapid response system, 2) transfer to the intensive care unit, or 3) death in hospital. We defined burdensome dyspnea as a rating of 4 or more on a 10-point scale. Results Prevalence of burdensome current dyspnea upon admission (Study 1) was 13% (77 of 581, 95% CI 11%-16%). Prevalence of burdensome dyspnea at some time during the hospitalization (Study 2) was 16% (57 of 367, 95% CI 12%-20%). Dyspnea was associated with higher odds of a negative outcome. Conclusions In two pilot studies, we identified a significant symptom burden of dyspnea in hospitalized patients. Patients reporting dyspnea may benefit from a more careful focus on symptom management and may represent a population at greater risk for negative outcomes. PMID:27070144

  2. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Pancreatic Amylase Value on Postoperative Day 1 After Pancreatic Resection to Predict Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongxiong; Wang, Xinjing; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Peng, Chenghong; Li, Hongwei; Deng, Xiaxing; Shen, Baiyong

    2016-02-01

    Early detection of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) may help to improve the outcome following pancreatic surgery, and exclusion of POPF may allow early drain removal which can accelerate recovery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of drain/plasma pancreatic amylase values on postoperative day 1 (DPA1/PPA1) in POPF by means of a systemic review and meta-analysis.Online journal databases and a manual search up to March 2015 were used. Studies clearly documenting DPA1 or PPA1 in predicting overall POPF (Grade 0 vs A+B+C) or clinically relevant POPF (Grade 0+A vs B+C) following pancreatic surgery were selected. Pooled predictive parameters were performed using STA