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  1. Rab27a negatively regulates CFTR chloride channel function in colonic epithelia: Involvement of the effector proteins in the regulatory mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Sunil K. . E-mail: ssaxena@stevens.edu; Kaur, Simarna

    2006-07-21

    Cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by the disruption of biosynthesis or function of CFTR. CFTR regulatory mechanisms include channel transport to plasma membrane and protein-protein interactions. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in vesicle transport, docking, and fusion. The colorectal epithelial HT-29 cells natively express CFTR and respond to cAMP with an increase in CFTR-mediated currents. DPC-inhibited currents could be completely eliminated with CFTR-specific SiRNA. Over-expression of Rab27a inhibited, while isoform specific SiRNA and Rab27a antibody stimulated CFTR-mediated currents in HT-29 cells. CFTR activity is inhibited both by Rab27a (Q78L) (constitutive active GTP-bound form of Rab27a) and Rab27a (T23N) (constitutive negative form that mimics the GDP-bound form). Rab27a mediated effects could be reversed by Rab27a-binding proteins, the synaptotagmin-like protein (SLP-5) and Munc13-4 accessory protein (a putative priming factor for exocytosis). The SLP reversal of Rab27a effect was restricted to C2A/C2B domains while the SHD motif imparted little more inhibition. The CFTR-mediated currents remain unaffected by Rab3 though SLP-5 appears to weakly bind it. The immunoprecipitation experiments suggest protein-protein interactions between Rab27a and CFTR. Rab27a appears to impair CFTR appearance at the cell surface by trapping CFTR in the intracellular compartments. Munc13-4 and SLP-5, on the other hand, limit Rab27a availability to CFTR, thus minimizing its effect on channel function. These observations decisively prove that Rab27a is involved in CFTR channel regulation through protein-protein interactions involving Munc13-4 and SLP-5 effector proteins, and thus could be a potential target for cystic fibrosis therapy.

  2. CFTR-associated ligand is a negative regulator of Mrp2 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Soroka, Carol J; Harry, Kathy; Boyer, James L

    2017-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that transports a wide variety of organic anions across the apical membrane of epithelial cells. The expression of Mrp2 on the plasma membrane is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-associated ligand (CAL) interacts with transmembrane proteins via its PDZ domain and reduces their cell surface expression by increasing lysosomal degradation and intracellular retention. Our results showed that CAL is localized at the trans-Golgi network of rat hepatocytes. The expression of CAL is increased, and Mrp2 expression is decreased, in the liver of mice deficient in sodium/hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1. To determine whether CAL interacts with Mrp2 and is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of Mrp2, we used glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with or without the COOH-terminal PDZ binding motif of Mrp2 as the bait in GST pull-down assays. We demonstrated that Mrp2 binds to CAL via its COOH-terminal PDZ-binding motif in GST pull-down assays, an interaction verified by coimmunoprecipitation of these two proteins in cotransfected COS-7 cells. In COS-7 and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with Mrp2 alone, only a mature, high-molecular-mass band of Mrp2 was detected. However, when cells were cotransfected with Mrp2 and CAL, Mrp2 was expressed as both mature and immature forms. Biotinylation and streptavidin pull-down assays confirmed that CAL dramatically reduces the expression level of total and cell surface Mrp2 in Huh-7 cells. Our findings suggest that CAL interacts with Mrp2 and is a negative regulator of Mrp2 expression.

  3. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Kleizen, B; Braakman, I; de Jonge, H R

    2000-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ABC transporter encoded by the cystic fibrosis gene, is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells where it functions as a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and as a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. Whereas a key role of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in CFTR-channel gating has been firmly established, more recent studies have provided clear evidence for the existence of a second level of cAMP regulation, i.e. the exocytotic recruitment of CFFR to the plasma membrane and its endocytotic retrieval. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR Cl- channel has sofar been demonstrated only in a subset of CFTR-expressing cell types. However, with the introduction of more sensitive methods to measure CFTR cycling and submembrane localization, it might turn out to be a more general phenomenon that could contribute importantly to both the regulation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport itself and to the regulation of other transporters and CFTR-modulated cellular functions. This review aims to summarize the present state of knowledge regarding polarized and regulated CFTR trafficking and endosomal recycling in epithelial cells, to discuss present gaps in our understanding of these processes at the cellular and molecular level, and to consider its possible implications for cystic fibrosis.

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  5. Epigenetic regulation of CFTR in salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Woo; Kim, Minkyoung; Choi, Se-Young; Cong, Xin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Park, Kyungpyo

    2016-12-02

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a key role in exocrine secretion, including salivary glands. However, its functional expression in salivary glands has not been rigorously studied. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern and regulatory mechanism of CFTR in salivary glands using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, Ussing chamber study, methylation-specific PCR, and bisulfite sequencing. Using an organ culture technique, we found that CFTR expression was first detected on the 15th day at the embryonic stage (E15) and was observed in ducts but not in acini. CFTR expression was confirmed in HSG and SIMS cell lines, which both originated from ducts, but not in the SMG C-6 cell line, which originated from acinar cells. Treatment of SMG C-6 cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) restored the expression level of CFTR mRNA in a time-dependent manner. Restoration of CFTR was further confirmed by a functional study. In the Ussing chamber study, 10 μM Cact-A1, a CFTR activator, did not evoke any currents in SMG C-6 cells. In contrast, in SMG C-6 cells pretreated with 5-Aza-CdR, Cact-A1 evoked a robust increase of currents, which were inhibited by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172. Furthermore, forskolin mimicked the currents activated by Cact-A1. In our epigenetic study, SMG C-6 cells showed highly methylated CG pairs in the CFTR CpG island and most of the methylated CG pairs were demethylated by 5-Aza-CdR. Our results suggest that epigenetic regulation is involved in the development of salivary glands by silencing the CFTR gene in a tissue-specific manner.

  6. The hypertonic environment differentially regulates wild-type CFTR and TNR-CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Cheng, Jie; Krasnov, Kristina; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Cutting, Garry R; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that the hypertonic environment of the renal medulla regulates the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) and its natural splice variant, TNR-CFTR. To accomplish this, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) stable cell lines expressing TNR-CFTR or CFTR were used. The cells were treated with hypertonic medium made with either NaCl or urea or sucrose (480 mOsm/kg or 560 mOsm/kg) to mimic the tonicity of the renal medulla environment. Western blot data showed that CFTR and TNR-CFTR total cell protein is increased by hypertonic medium, but using the surface biotinylation technique, only CFTR was found to be increased in cell plasma membrane. Confocal microscopy showed TNR-CFTR localization primarily at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. In conclusion, CFTR and TNR-CFTR have different patterns of distribution in MDCK cells and they are modulated by a hypertonic environment, suggesting their physiological importance in renal medulla.

  7. Developmental regulation of CFTR expression during human nephrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, O; Burrow, C R; Schwiebert, E M; Guggino, W B; Wilson, P D

    1996-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA and protein are expressed in proximal and distal tubules of the human kidney, but CFTR expression pattern during human nephrogenesis is unknown. We have now studied CFTR expression in fetal kidneys by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, using six antibodies against human CFTR. CFTR was expressed in 12-wk human fetal kidneys, mostly in the apical membrane region of the ureteric bud epithelial cells. By 15 wk, CFTR was also diffusely expressed throughout the cytoplasm of proximal tubules and loops of Henle. No glomerular staining was seen at any state. From 15 to 24 wk of gestation this staining pattern remained constant and also included immunoreactivity of the transitional epithelium. Western blot for CFTR was performed on membrane extracts of human fetal kidneys, using T84 cells as a positive control. A 165-kDa protein corresponding to the predicted size of CFTR was seen at 13 wk and throughout development. We also observed a 75-kDa protein that was distinctly regulated during development. This protein was detected with several antibodies against the first half of CFTR (including the regulatory "R" domain) but not with a COOH-terminal-specific antibody and had the predicted size of a functional splice variant of CFTR identified in the human kidney. These results show the complex regulation of CFTR during nephrogenesis and raise the question of the respective roles of the full-length and the splice variant CFTR proteins in the human kidney.

  8. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  9. Regulation of CFTR chloride channel macroscopic conductance by extracellular bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Song; Holstead, Ryan G; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR contributes to Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport across epithelial cell apical membranes. The extracellular face of CFTR is exposed to varying concentrations of Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in epithelial tissues, and there is evidence that CFTR is sensitive to changes in extracellular anion concentrations. Here we present functional evidence that extracellular Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ regulate anion conduction in open CFTR channels. Using cell-attached and inside-out patch-clamp recordings from constitutively active mutant E1371Q-CFTR channels, we show that voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR currents in intact cells is significantly stronger when the extracellular solution contains HCO₃⁻ than when it contains Cl⁻. This difference appears to reflect differences in the ability of extracellular HCO₃⁻ and Cl⁻ to interact with and repel intracellular blocking anions from the pore. Strong block by endogenous cytosolic anions leading to reduced CFTR channel currents in intact cells occurs at physiologically relevant HCO₃⁻ concentrations and membrane potentials and can result in up to ∼50% inhibition of current amplitude. We propose that channel block by cytosolic anions is a previously unrecognized, physiologically relevant mechanism of channel regulation that confers on CFTR channels sensitivity to different anions in the extracellular fluid. We further suggest that this anion sensitivity represents a feedback mechanism by which CFTR-dependent anion secretion could be regulated by the composition of the secretions themselves. Implications for the mechanism and regulation of CFTR-dependent secretion in epithelial tissues are discussed.

  10. Correctors and Potentiators Rescue Function of the Truncated W1282X-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) Translation Product.

    PubMed

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Xu, Haijin; Avramescu, Radu G; Perdomo, Doranda; Zlock, Lorna; Nielson, Dennis W; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-01-20

    W1282X is the fifth most common cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation that causes cystic fibrosis. Here, we investigated the utility of a small molecule corrector/potentiator strategy, as used for ΔF508-CFTR, to produce functional rescue of the truncated translation product of the W1282X mutation, CFTR1281, without the need for read-through. In transfected cell systems, certain potentiators and correctors, including VX-809 and VX-770, increased CFTR1281 activity. To identify novel correctors and potentiators with potentially greater efficacy on CFTR1281, functional screens were done of ∼30,000 synthetic small molecules and drugs/nutraceuticals in CFTR1281-transfected cells. Corrector scaffolds of 1-arylpyrazole-4-arylsulfonyl-piperazine and spiro-piperidine-quinazolinone classes were identified with up to ∼5-fold greater efficacy than VX-809, some of which were selective for CFTR1281, whereas others also corrected ΔF508-CFTR. Several novel potentiator scaffolds were identified with efficacy comparable with VX-770; remarkably, a phenylsulfonamide-pyrrolopyridine acted synergistically with VX-770 to increase CFTR1281 function ∼8-fold over that of VX-770 alone, normalizing CFTR1281 channel activity to that of wild type CFTR. Corrector and potentiator combinations were tested in primary cultures and conditionally reprogrammed cells generated from nasal brushings from one W1282X homozygous subject. Although robust chloride conductance was seen with correctors and potentiators in homozygous ΔF508 cells, increased chloride conductance was not found in W1282X cells despite the presence of adequate transcript levels. Notwithstanding the negative data in W1282X cells from one human subject, we speculate that corrector and potentiator combinations may have therapeutic efficacy in cystic fibrosis caused by the W1282X mutation, although additional studies are needed on human cells from W1282X subjects. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry

  11. MiR-101 and miR-144 Regulate the Expression of the CFTR Chloride Channel in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3′UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients. PMID:23226399

  12. MiR-101 and miR-144 regulate the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in the lung.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3'UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients.

  13. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and its stability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xin; Clews, Jack; Kargas, Vasileios; Wang, Xiaomeng; Ford, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is responsible for the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). It is a membrane protein belonging to the ABC transporter family functioning as a chloride/anion channel in epithelial cells around the body. There are over 1500 mutations that have been characterised as CF-causing; the most common of these, accounting for ~70 % of CF cases, is the deletion of a phenylalanine at position 508. This leads to instability of the nascent protein and the modified structure is recognised and then degraded by the ER quality control mechanism. However, even pharmacologically 'rescued' F508del CFTR displays instability at the cell's surface, losing its channel function rapidly and it is rapidly removed from the plasma membrane for lysosomal degradation. This review will, therefore, explore the link between stability and structure/function relationships of membrane proteins and CFTR in particular and how approaches to study CFTR structure depend on its stability. We will also review the application of a fluorescence labelling method for the assessment of the thermostability and the tertiary structure of CFTR.

  14. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-08

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators.

  15. Phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 protein interactions regulate CFTR biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiubin; Da Paula, Ana Carina; Bozóky, Zoltán; Zhang, Hui; Bertrand, Carol A.; Peters, Kathryn W.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)–regulated chloride channel whose phosphorylation controls anion secretion across epithelial cell apical membranes. We examined the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA stimulation regulates CFTR biogenesis posttranslationally, based on predicted 14-3-3 binding motifs within CFTR and forskolin-induced CFTR expression. The 14-3-3β, γ, and ε isoforms were expressed in airway cells and interacted with CFTR in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Forskolin stimulation (15 min) increased 14-3-3β and ε binding to immature and mature CFTR (bands B and C), and 14-3-3 overexpression increased CFTR bands B and C and cell surface band C. In pulse-chase experiments, 14-3-3β increased the synthesis of immature CFTR, reduced its degradation rate, and increased conversion of immature to mature CFTR. Conversely, 14-3-3β knockdown decreased CFTR B and C bands (70 and 55%) and elicited parallel reductions in cell surface CFTR and forskolin-stimulated anion efflux. In vitro, 14-3-3β interacted with the CFTR regulatory region, and by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, this interaction occurred at known PKA phosphorylated sites. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, forskolin stimulated the CFTR/14-3-3β interaction while reducing CFTR's interaction with coat protein complex 1 (COP1). Thus 14-3-3 binding to phosphorylated CFTR augments its biogenesis by reducing retrograde retrieval of CFTR to the endoplasmic reticulum. This mechanism permits cAMP/PKA stimulation to make more CFTR available for anion secretion. PMID:22278744

  16. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  1. Function and regulation of TRPM7, as well as intracellular magnesium content, are altered in cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR.

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Calvez, M L; Benz, N; Le Hir, S; Mignen, O; Buscaglia, P; Horgen, F D; Férec, C; Kerbiriou, M; Trouvé, P

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common fatal hereditary disorders, is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The CFTR gene product is a multidomain adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) protein that functions as a chloride (Cl(-)) channel that is regulated by intracellular magnesium [Mg(2+)]i. The most common mutations in CFTR are a deletion of a phenylalanine residue at position 508 (ΔF508-CFTR, 70-80 % of CF phenotypes) and a Gly551Asp substitution (G551D-CFTR, 4-5 % of alleles), which lead to decreased or almost abolished Cl(-) channel function, respectively. Magnesium ions have to be finely regulated within cells for optimal expression and function of CFTR. Therefore, the melastatin-like transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), which is responsible for Mg(2+) entry, was studies and [Mg(2+)]i measured in cells stably expressing wildtype CFTR, and two mutant proteins (ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR). This study shows for the first time that [Mg(2+)]i is decreased in cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR and G551D-CFTR mutated proteins. It was also observed that the expression of the TRPM7 protein is increased; however, membrane localization was altered for both ΔF508del-CFTR and G551D-CFTR. Furthermore, both the function and regulation of the TRPM7 channel regarding Mg(2+) is decreased in the cells expressing the mutated CFTR. Ca(2+) influx via TRPM7 were also modified in cells expressing a mutated CFTR. Therefore, there appears to be a direct involvement of TRPM7 in CF physiopathology. Finally, we propose that the TRPM7 activator Naltriben is a new potentiator for G551D-CFTR as the function of this mutant increases upon activation of TRPM7 by Naltriben.

  2. Chloride channel and chloride conductance regulator domains of CFTR, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Morales, Marcelo M.; Devidas, Sreenivas; Egan, Marie E.; Guggino, William B.

    1998-01-01

    CFTR is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-activated chloride (Cl−) channel and a regulator of outwardly rectifying Cl− channels (ORCCs) in airway epithelia. CFTR regulates ORCCs by facilitating the release of ATP out of cells. Once released from cells, ATP stimulates ORCCs by means of a purinergic receptor. To define the domains of CFTR important for Cl− channel function and/or ORCC regulator function, mutant CFTRs with N- and C-terminal truncations and selected individual amino acid substitutions were created and studied by transfection into a line of human airway epithelial cells from a cystic fibrosis patient (IB3–1) or by injection of in vitro transcribed complementary RNAs (cRNAs) into Xenopus oocytes. Two-electrode voltage clamp recordings, 36Cl− efflux assays, and whole cell patch-clamp recordings were used to assay for the Cl− channel function of CFTR and for its ability to regulate ORCCs. The data showed that the first transmembrane domain (TMD-1) of CFTR, especially predicted α-helices 5 and 6, forms an essential part of the Cl− channel pore, whereas the first nucleotide-binding and regulatory domains (NBD1/R domain) are essential for its ability to regulate ORCCs. Finally, the data show that the ability of CFTR to function as a Cl− channel and a conductance regulator are not mutually exclusive; one function could be eliminated while the other was preserved. PMID:9482946

  3. CFTR channel in oocytes from Xenopus laevis and its regulation by xShroom1 protein.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alejandra G; Galizia, Luciano; Kotsias, Basilio A; Marino, Gabriela I

    2016-05-01

    Shroom is a family of related proteins linked to the actin cytoskeleton. xShroom1 is constitutively expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and it is required for the expression of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). As there is a close relationship between ENaC and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), we examined the action of xShroom1 on CFTR expression and activity. Biotinylation was used to measure CFTR surface expression, and currents were registered with voltage clamp when stimulated with forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Oocytes were coinjected with CFTR complementary RNAs (cRNAs) and xShroom1 sense or antisense oligonucleotides. We observed an increment in CFTR currents and CFTR surface expression in oocytes coinjected with CFTR and xShroom1 antisense oligonucleotides. MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor, did not prevent the increment in currents when xShroom1 was suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides. In addition, we inhibited the delivery of newly synthesized proteins to the plasma membrane with BFA and we found that the half-life of plasma membrane CFTR was prolonged when coinjected with the xShroom1 antisense oligonucleotides. Chloroquine, an inhibitor of the late endosome/lysosome, did not significantly increase CFTR currents when xShroom1 expression was inhibited. The higher expression of CFTR when xShroom1 is suppressed is in concordance with the functional studies suggesting that the suppression of the xShroom1 protein resulted in an increment in CFTR currents by promoting the increase of the half-life of CFTR in the plasma membrane. The role of xShroom1 in regulating CFTR expression could be relevant in the understanding of the channel malfunction in several diseases.

  4. CFTR pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Galietta, Luis J V

    2017-01-01

    CFTR protein is an ion channel regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and expressed in many types of epithelial cells. CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate secretion play an important role in the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Pharmacological modulators of CFTR represent promising drugs for a variety of diseases. In particular, correctors and potentiators may restore the activity of CFTR in cystic fibrosis patients. Potentiators are also potentially useful to improve mucociliary clearance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On the other hand, CFTR inhibitors may be useful to block fluid and electrolyte loss in secretory diarrhea and slow down the progression of polycystic kidney disease.

  5. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  6. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W. Joon; Pyle, Louise C.; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M.; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Lewis, Hal A.; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kirk, Kevin L.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating. PMID:26627831

  7. Low temperature and chemical rescue affect molecular proximity of DeltaF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC).

    PubMed

    Qadri, Yawar J; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Rooj, Arun K; Lee, William; Parpura, Vladimir; Fuller, Cathy M; Berdiev, Bakhrom K

    2012-05-11

    An imbalance of chloride and sodium ion transport in several epithelia is a feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), an inherited disease that is a consequence of mutations in the cftr gene. The cftr gene codes for a Cl(-) channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Some mutations in this gene cause the balance between Cl(-) secretion and Na(+) absorption to be disturbed in the airways; Cl(-) secretion is impaired, whereas Na(+) absorption is elevated. Enhanced Na(+) absorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is attributed to the failure of mutated CFTR to restrict ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport. The mechanism of this regulation is controversial. Recently, we have found evidence for a close association of wild type (WT) CFTR and WT ENaC, further underscoring the role of ENaC along with CFTR in the pathophysiology of CF airway disease. In this study, we have examined the association of ENaC subunits with mutated ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation in CF. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) prevents proper processing and targeting of CFTR to the plasma membrane. When ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC subunits were co-expressed in HEK293T cells, we found that individual ENaC subunits could be co-immunoprecipitated with ΔF508-CFTR, much like WT CFTR. However, when we evaluated the ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC association using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), FRET efficiencies were not significantly different from negative controls, suggesting that ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC are not in close proximity to each other under basal conditions. However, with partial correction of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing by low temperature and chemical rescue, leading to surface expression as assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we observed a positive FRET signal. Our findings suggest that the ΔF508 mutation alters the close association of CFTR and ENaC.

  8. Low Temperature and Chemical Rescue Affect Molecular Proximity of ΔF508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC)*

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Rooj, Arun K.; Lee, William; Parpura, Vladimir; Fuller, Cathy M.; Berdiev, Bakhrom K.

    2012-01-01

    An imbalance of chloride and sodium ion transport in several epithelia is a feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), an inherited disease that is a consequence of mutations in the cftr gene. The cftr gene codes for a Cl− channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Some mutations in this gene cause the balance between Cl− secretion and Na+ absorption to be disturbed in the airways; Cl− secretion is impaired, whereas Na+ absorption is elevated. Enhanced Na+ absorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is attributed to the failure of mutated CFTR to restrict ENaC-mediated Na+ transport. The mechanism of this regulation is controversial. Recently, we have found evidence for a close association of wild type (WT) CFTR and WT ENaC, further underscoring the role of ENaC along with CFTR in the pathophysiology of CF airway disease. In this study, we have examined the association of ENaC subunits with mutated ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation in CF. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) prevents proper processing and targeting of CFTR to the plasma membrane. When ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC subunits were co-expressed in HEK293T cells, we found that individual ENaC subunits could be co-immunoprecipitated with ΔF508-CFTR, much like WT CFTR. However, when we evaluated the ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC association using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), FRET efficiencies were not significantly different from negative controls, suggesting that ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC are not in close proximity to each other under basal conditions. However, with partial correction of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing by low temperature and chemical rescue, leading to surface expression as assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we observed a positive FRET signal. Our findings suggest that the ΔF508 mutation alters the close association of CFTR and ENaC. PMID:22442149

  9. Correctors and Potentiators Rescue Function of the Truncated W1282X-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) Translation Product*♦

    PubMed Central

    Haggie, Peter M.; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Xu, Haijin; Avramescu, Radu G.; Perdomo, Doranda; Zlock, Lorna; Nielson, Dennis W.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2017-01-01

    W1282X is the fifth most common cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation that causes cystic fibrosis. Here, we investigated the utility of a small molecule corrector/potentiator strategy, as used for ΔF508-CFTR, to produce functional rescue of the truncated translation product of the W1282X mutation, CFTR1281, without the need for read-through. In transfected cell systems, certain potentiators and correctors, including VX-809 and VX-770, increased CFTR1281 activity. To identify novel correctors and potentiators with potentially greater efficacy on CFTR1281, functional screens were done of ∼30,000 synthetic small molecules and drugs/nutraceuticals in CFTR1281-transfected cells. Corrector scaffolds of 1-arylpyrazole-4-arylsulfonyl-piperazine and spiro-piperidine-quinazolinone classes were identified with up to ∼5-fold greater efficacy than VX-809, some of which were selective for CFTR1281, whereas others also corrected ΔF508-CFTR. Several novel potentiator scaffolds were identified with efficacy comparable with VX-770; remarkably, a phenylsulfonamide-pyrrolopyridine acted synergistically with VX-770 to increase CFTR1281 function ∼8-fold over that of VX-770 alone, normalizing CFTR1281 channel activity to that of wild type CFTR. Corrector and potentiator combinations were tested in primary cultures and conditionally reprogrammed cells generated from nasal brushings from one W1282X homozygous subject. Although robust chloride conductance was seen with correctors and potentiators in homozygous ΔF508 cells, increased chloride conductance was not found in W1282X cells despite the presence of adequate transcript levels. Notwithstanding the negative data in W1282X cells from one human subject, we speculate that corrector and potentiator combinations may have therapeutic efficacy in cystic fibrosis caused by the W1282X mutation, although additional studies are needed on human cells from W1282X subjects. PMID:27895116

  10. Applying Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Genetics and CFTR2 Data to Facilitate Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Salinas, Danieli B; White, Terry B; Ren, Clement L; Farrell, Philip M; Raraigh, Karen S; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Castellani, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    As a Mendelian disease, genetics plays an integral role in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). The identification of 2 disease-causing mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in an individual with a phenotype provides evidence that the disease is CF. However, not all variations in CFTR always result in CF. Therefore, for CFTR genotype to provide the same level of evidence of CFTR dysfunction as shown by direct tests such as sweat chloride or nasal potential difference, the mutations identified must be known to always result in CF. The use of CFTR genetics in CF diagnosis, therefore, relies heavily on mutation interpretation. Progress that has been made on mutation interpretation and annotation was reviewed at the recent CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference. A modified Delphi method was used to identify consensus statements on the use of genetic analysis in CF diagnosis. The largest recent advance in CF genetics has come through the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR (CFTR2) project. This undertaking seeks to characterize CFTR mutations from patients with CF around the world. The project also established guidelines for the clinical, functional, and population/penetrance criteria that can be used to interpret mutations not yet included in CFTR2's review. The use of CFTR genetics to aid in diagnosis of CF requires that the mutations identified have a known disease liability. The demonstration of 2 in trans mutations known to always result in CF is satisfactory evidence of CFTR dysfunction. However, if the identified mutations are known to be associated with variable outcomes, or have unknown consequence, that genotype may not result in a CF phenotype. In these cases, other tests of CFTR function may help. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergy of cAMP and calcium signaling pathways in CFTR regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bozoky, Zoltan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Milman, Tal; Kim, Tae Hun; Du, Kai; Di Paola, Michelle; Pasyk, Stan; Pekhletski, Roman; Keller, Jacob P.; Bear, Christine E.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, leading to defective apical chloride transport. Patients also experience overactivation of inflammatory processes, including increased calcium signaling. Many investigations have described indirect effects of calcium signaling on CFTR or other calcium-activated chloride channels; here, we investigate the direct response of CFTR to calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling. We characterize an interaction between the regulatory region of CFTR and calmodulin, the major calcium signaling molecule, and report protein kinase A (PKA)-independent CFTR activation by calmodulin. We describe the competition between calmodulin binding and PKA phosphorylation and the differential effects of this competition for wild-type CFTR and the major F508del mutant, hinting at potential therapeutic strategies. Evidence of CFTR binding to isolated calmodulin domains/lobes suggests a mechanism for the role of CFTR as a molecular hub. Together, these data provide insights into how loss of active CFTR at the membrane can have additional consequences besides impaired chloride transport. PMID:28242698

  12. Synergy of cAMP and calcium signaling pathways in CFTR regulation.

    PubMed

    Bozoky, Zoltan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Milman, Tal; Kim, Tae Hun; Du, Kai; Di Paola, Michelle; Pasyk, Stan; Pekhletski, Roman; Keller, Jacob P; Bear, Christine E; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-02-27

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, leading to defective apical chloride transport. Patients also experience overactivation of inflammatory processes, including increased calcium signaling. Many investigations have described indirect effects of calcium signaling on CFTR or other calcium-activated chloride channels; here, we investigate the direct response of CFTR to calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling. We characterize an interaction between the regulatory region of CFTR and calmodulin, the major calcium signaling molecule, and report protein kinase A (PKA)-independent CFTR activation by calmodulin. We describe the competition between calmodulin binding and PKA phosphorylation and the differential effects of this competition for wild-type CFTR and the major F508del mutant, hinting at potential therapeutic strategies. Evidence of CFTR binding to isolated calmodulin domains/lobes suggests a mechanism for the role of CFTR as a molecular hub. Together, these data provide insights into how loss of active CFTR at the membrane can have additional consequences besides impaired chloride transport.

  13. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael J; Lee, Shernita L; Marklew, Abigail J; Gilmore, Rodney C; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F; Gray, Michael A; Tarran, Robert

    2016-06-09

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR's function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR's PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs.

  14. Cadmium Regulates the Expression of the CFTR Chloride Channel in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rennolds, Jessica; Butler, Susie; Maloney, Kevin; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Davis, Ian C.; Knoell, Daren L.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal ranked seventh on the Priority List of Hazardous Substances. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. It is also a major component of cigarette smoke, and its inhalation is associated with decreased pulmonary function, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), play a central role in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lung functions. CFTR is mostly expressed in epithelial cells, and little is known about the effect of cadmium exposure on lung epithelial cell function. We show that exposure to cadmium decreases the expression of the CFTR protein and subsequent chloride transport in human airway epithelial cells in vitro. Impairment of CFTR protein expression was also observed in vivo in the lung of mice after intranasal instillation of cadmium. We established that the inhibitory effect of cadmium was not a nonspecific effect of heavy metals, as nickel had no effect on CFTR protein levels. Finally, we show that selected antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), but not N-acetylcysteine, can prevent the cadmium-induced suppression of CFTR. In summary, we have identified cadmium as a regulator of the CFTR chloride channel present in lung epithelial cells. Future strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of cadmium on epithelial cells and lung functions may benefit from the finding that alpha-tocopherol protects CFTR expression and function. PMID:20363832

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel.

  16. Cadmium regulates the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rennolds, Jessica; Butler, Susie; Maloney, Kevin; Boyaka, Prosper N; Davis, Ian C; Knoell, Daren L; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal ranked seventh on the Priority List of Hazardous Substances. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. It is also a major component of cigarette smoke, and its inhalation is associated with decreased pulmonary function, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), play a central role in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lung functions. CFTR is mostly expressed in epithelial cells, and little is known about the effect of cadmium exposure on lung epithelial cell function. We show that exposure to cadmium decreases the expression of the CFTR protein and subsequent chloride transport in human airway epithelial cells in vitro. Impairment of CFTR protein expression was also observed in vivo in the lung of mice after intranasal instillation of cadmium. We established that the inhibitory effect of cadmium was not a nonspecific effect of heavy metals, as nickel had no effect on CFTR protein levels. Finally, we show that selected antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), but not N-acetylcysteine, can prevent the cadmium-induced suppression of CFTR. In summary, we have identified cadmium as a regulator of the CFTR chloride channel present in lung epithelial cells. Future strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of cadmium on epithelial cells and lung functions may benefit from the finding that alpha-tocopherol protects CFTR expression and function.

  17. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine.

  18. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  19. Lower Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Promotes the Proliferation and Migration of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xian; Wang, Jie; Liu, Yuan; Yue, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence and death rates of endometrial cancer are alarmingly increasing. The diagnosis and treatment of endometrial cancer is crucial to decreasing mortality. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter family and plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. This study explored the expression of CFTR in endometrial carcinoma and the role of CFTR in proliferation and migration of endometrial carcinoma cells. Material/Methods Immunohistochemistry and real-time (RT)-PCR were used to test the expression of CFTR in normal endometrium and endometrial carcinoma. CFTR inhibitor was used to restrain the expression of CFTR on the endometrial carcinoma, the effects on the proliferation and migration of endometrial carcinoma cells were also studied. RT-PCR was performed to test the expression of mir-125b after restraining CFTR. Proliferation and migration capability of endometrial carcinoma cells were detected after transfection of endometrial carcinoma cells with mir-125b mimic. Results Compared with cells from normal endometrium, the expression of CFTR was significantly upregulated in endometrial carcinoma cells. After adding CFTR(inh)172, the capability for proliferation and transfer of endometrial carcinoma cells was strengthened, the expression of mir-125b was reduced, and after transfection with mir-125b mimics entering the endometrial carcinoma cells, the ability of the proliferation and transfer of endometrial carcinoma cells was also reduced. Conclusions The high expression of CFTR in the endometrial carcinoma cells played a pivotal role in restraining the proliferation and transfer of endometrial carcinoma cells. PMID:28225751

  20. Lower Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Promotes the Proliferation and Migration of Endometrial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xian; Wang, Jie; Liu, Yuan; Yue, Ming

    2017-02-22

    BACKGROUND The incidence and death rates of endometrial cancer are alarmingly increasing. The diagnosis and treatment of endometrial cancer is crucial to decreasing mortality. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter family and plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. This study explored the expression of CFTR in endometrial carcinoma and the role of CFTR in proliferation and migration of endometrial carcinoma cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunohistochemistry and real-time (RT)-PCR were used to test the expression of CFTR in normal endometrium and endometrial carcinoma. CFTR inhibitor was used to restrain the expression of CFTR on the endometrial carcinoma, the effects on the proliferation and migration of endometrial carcinoma cells were also studied. RT-PCR was performed to test the expression of mir-125b after restraining CFTR. Proliferation and migration capability of endometrial carcinoma cells were detected after transfection of endometrial carcinoma cells with mir-125b mimic. RESULTS Compared with cells from normal endometrium, the expression of CFTR was significantly upregulated in endometrial carcinoma cells. After adding CFTR(inh)172, the capability for proliferation and transfer of endometrial carcinoma cells was strengthened, the expression of mir-125b was reduced, and after transfection with mir-125b mimics entering the endometrial carcinoma cells, the ability of the proliferation and transfer of endometrial carcinoma cells was also reduced. CONCLUSIONS The high expression of CFTR in the endometrial carcinoma cells played a pivotal role in restraining the proliferation and transfer of endometrial carcinoma cells.

  1. CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB signaling in pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi Wei; Chen, Jing; Ruan, Ye Chun; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Yu; Chen, YaJie; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Peng, Yi Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury remains elusive. Cystic fibrosis, also hallmarked with pulmonary inflammation, is caused by mutations in CFTR, the expression of which is temperature-sensitive. We investigated whether CFTR is involved in heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. We applied heat-treatment in 16HBE14o- cells with CFTR knockdown or overexpression and heat-inhalation in rats in vivo. Heat-treatment caused significant reduction in CFTR and, reciprocally, increase in COX-2 at early stages both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of ERK/JNK, NF-κB and COX-2/PGE2 were detected in heat-treated cells, which were mimicked by knockdown, and reversed by overexpression of CFTR or VX-809, a reported CFTR mutation corrector. JNK/ERK inhibition reversed heat-/CFTR-knockdown-induced NF-κB activation, whereas NF-κB inhibitor showed no effect on JNK/ERK. IL-8 was augmented by heat-treatment or CFTR-knockdown, which was abolished by inhibition of NF-κB, JNK/ERK or COX-2. Moreover, in vitro or in vivo treatment with curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, significantly enhanced CFTR expression and reversed the heat-induced increases in COX-2/PGE2/IL-8, neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in the airway. These results have revealed a CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB pathway leading to COX-2/PGE2/IL-8 activation in thermal inhalation injury, and demonstrated therapeutic potential of curcumin for alleviating heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26515683

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor) opens the defective channel gate of mutant CFTR in a phosphorylation-dependent but ATP-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Bear, Christine E

    2012-10-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a channel on the apical membrane of epithelia. Disease-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene can lead to CFTR protein misfolding as in the case of the F508del mutation and/or channel dysfunction. Recently, a small molecule, VX-770 (ivacaftor), has shown efficacy in restoring lung function in patients bearing the G551D mutation, and this has been linked to repair of its channel gating defect. However, these studies did not reveal the mechanism of action of VX-770 in detail. Normally, CFTR channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation, ATP binding, and hydrolysis. Hence, it has been hypothesized that VX-770 modifies one or more of these metabolic events. In this study, we examined VX-770 activity using a reconstitution system for purified CFTR protein, a system that enables control of known regulatory factors. We studied the consequences of VX-770 interaction with CFTR incorporated in planar lipid bilayers and in proteoliposomes, using a novel flux-based assay. We found that purified and phosphorylated CFTR was potentiated in the presence of Mg-ATP, suggesting that VX-770 bound directly to the CFTR protein, rather than associated kinases or phosphatases. Interestingly, we also found that VX-770 enhanced the channel activity of purified and mutant CFTR in the nominal absence of Mg-ATP. These findings suggest that VX-770 can cause CFTR channel opening through a nonconventional ATP-independent mechanism. This work sets the stage for future studies of the structural properties that mediate CFTR gating using VX-770 as a probe.

  3. HNF1alpha is involved in tissue-specific regulation of CFTR gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Mouchel, Nathalie; Henstra, Sytse A; McCarthy, Victoria A; Williams, Sarah H; Phylactides, Marios; Harris, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene shows a complex pattern of expression with tissue-specific and temporal regulation. However, the genetic elements and transcription factors that control CFTR expression are largely unidentified. The CFTR promoter does not confer tissue specificity on gene expression, suggesting that there are regulatory elements outside the upstream region. Analysis of potential regulatory elements defined as DNase 1-hypersensitive sites within introns of the gene revealed multiple predicted binding sites for the HNF1alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha) transcription factor. HNF1alpha, which is expressed in many of the same epithelial cell types as CFTR and shows similar differentiation-dependent changes in gene expression, bound to these sites in vitro. Overexpression of heterologous HNF1alpha augmented CFTR transcription in vivo. In contrast, antisense inhibition of HNF1 alpha transcription decreased the CFTR mRNA levels. Hnf1 alpha knockout mice showed lower levels of CFTR mRNA in their small intestine in comparison with wild-type mice. This is the first report of a transcription factor, which confers tissue specificity on the expression of this important disease-associated gene. PMID:14656222

  4. Differential regulation of single CFTR channels by PP2C, PP2A, and other phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Pato, M D; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel activity declines rapidly when excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) or human airway cells because of membrane-associated phosphatase activity. In the present study, we found that CFTR channels usually remained active in patches excised from baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing CFTR. Those patches with stable channel activity were used to investigate the regulation of CFTR by exogenous protein phosphatases (PP). Adding PP2A, PP2C, or alkaline phosphatase to excised patches reduced CFTR channel activity by > 90% but did not abolish it completely. PP2B caused weak deactivation, whereas PP1 had no detectable effect on open probability (Po). Interestingly, the time course of deactivation by PP2C was identical to that of the spontaneous rundown observed in some patches after excision. PP2C and PP2A had distinct effects on channel gating Po declined during exposure to exogenous PP2C (and during spontaneous rundown, when it was observed) without any change in mean burst duration. By contrast, deactivation by exogenous PP2A was associated with a dramatic shortening of burst duration similar to that reported previously in patches from cardiac cells during deactivation of CFTR by endogenous phosphatases. Rundown of CFTR-mediated current across intact T84 epithelial cell monolayers was insensitive to toxic levels of the PP2A inhibitor calyculin A. These results demonstrate that exogenous PP2C is a potent regulator of CFTR activity, that its effects on single-channel gating are distinct from those of PP2A but similar to those of endogenous phosphatases in CHO, BHK, and T84 epithelial cells, and that multiple protein phosphatases may be required for complete deactivation of CFTR channels.

  5. Anchored PDE4 regulates chloride conductance in wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Elise; Zlock, Lorna; Lao, Anna; Mika, Delphine; Namkung, Wan; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Gruenert, Dieter C; Verkman, Alan S; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that impair its expression and/or chloride channel function. Here, we provide evidence that type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are critical regulators of the cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of CFTR in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. In non-CF cells, PDE4 inhibition increased CFTR activity under basal conditions (ΔISC 7.1 μA/cm(2)) and after isoproterenol stimulation (increased ΔISC from 13.9 to 21.0 μA/cm(2)) and slowed the return of stimulated CFTR activity to basal levels by >3-fold. In cells homozygous for ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation found in CF, PDE4 inhibition alone produced minimal channel activation. However, PDE4 inhibition strongly amplified the effects of CFTR correctors, drugs that increase expression and membrane localization of CFTR, and/or CFTR potentiators, drugs that increase channel gating, to reach ∼ 25% of the chloride conductance observed in non-CF cells. Biochemical studies indicate that PDE4s are anchored to CFTR and mediate a local regulation of channel function. Taken together, our results implicate PDE4 as an important determinant of CFTR activity in airway epithelia, and support the use of PDE4 inhibitors to potentiate the therapeutic benefits of CFTR correctors and potentiators.

  6. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael J.; Lee, Shernita L.; Marklew, Abigail J.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F.; Gray, Michael A.; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR’s function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR’s PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  7. CFTR mutations altering CFTR fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Kendra; Stobbart, Michelle; Cassidy, Diane M.; Venerando, Andrea; Pagano, Mario A.; Luz, Simão; Amaral, Margarida D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Farinha, Carlos M.; Mehta, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Most CF (cystic fibrosis) results from deletion of a phenylalanine (F508) in the CFTR {CF transmembrane-conductance regulator; ABCC7 [ABC (ATP-binding cassette) sub-family C member 7]} which causes ER (endoplasmic reticulum) degradation of the mutant. Using stably CFTR-expressing BHK (baby-hamster kidney) cell lines we demonstrated that wild-type CTFR and the F508delCFTR mutant are cleaved into differently sized N- and C-terminal-bearing fragments, with each hemi-CFTR carrying its nearest NBD (nucleotide-binding domain), reflecting differential cleavage through the central CFTR R-domain. Similar NBD1-bearing fragments are present in the natively expressing HBE (human bronchial epithelial) cell line. We also observe multiple smaller fragments of different sizes in BHK cells, particularly after F508del mutation (ladder pattern). Trapping wild-type CFTR in the ER did not generate a F508del fragmentation fingerprint. Fragments change their size/pattern again post-mutation at sites involved in CFTR's in vitro interaction with the pleiotropic protein kinase CK2 (S511A in NBD1). The F508del and S511A mutations generate different fragmentation fingerprints that are each unlike the wild-type; yet, both mutants generate new N-terminal-bearing CFTR fragments that are not observed with other CK2-related mutations (S511D, S422A/D and T1471A/D). We conclude that the F508delCFTR mutant is not degraded completely and there exists a relationship between CFTR's fragmentation fingerprint and the CFTR sequence through putative CK2-interactive sites that lie near F508. PMID:23067305

  8. Relating the disease mutation spectrum to the evolution of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Varghese, Neha; Tyagi, Eishita; Harvey, Stephen C; Jordan, I King; McCarty, Nael A

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, and accordingly the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein has perhaps the best characterized disease mutation spectrum with more than 1,500 causative mutations having been identified. In this study, we took advantage of that wealth of mutational information in an effort to relate site-specific evolutionary parameters with the propensity and severity of CFTR disease-causing mutations. To do this, we devised a scoring scheme for known CFTR disease-causing mutations based on the Grantham amino acid chemical difference matrix. CFTR site-specific evolutionary constraint values were then computed for seven different evolutionary metrics across a range of increasing evolutionary depths. The CFTR mutational scores and the various site-specific evolutionary constraint values were compared in order to evaluate which evolutionary measures best reflect the disease-causing mutation spectrum. Site-specific evolutionary constraint values from the widely used comparative method PolyPhen2 show the best correlation with the CFTR mutation score spectrum, whereas more straightforward conservation based measures (ConSurf and ScoreCons) show the greatest ability to predict individual CFTR disease-causing mutations. While far greater than could be expected by chance alone, the fraction of the variability in mutation scores explained by the PolyPhen2 metric (3.6%), along with the best set of paired sensitivity (58%) and specificity (60%) values for the prediction of disease-causing residues, were marginal. These data indicate that evolutionary constraint levels are informative but far from determinant with respect to disease-causing mutations in CFTR. Nevertheless, this work shows that, when combined with additional lines of evidence, information on site-specific evolutionary conservation can and should be used to guide site-directed mutagenesis experiments by more narrowly defining the

  9. Defective CFTR-regulated granulosa cell proliferation in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Guo, Jing Hui; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2015-05-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most frequent causes of female infertility, featured by abnormal hormone profile, chronic oligo/anovulation, and presence of multiple cystic follicles in the ovary. However, the mechanism underlying the abnormal folliculogenesis remains obscure. We have previously demonstrated that CFTR, a cAMP-dependent Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) conducting anion channel, is expressed in the granulosa cells and its expression is downregulated in PCOS rat models and human patients. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible involvement of downregulation of CFTR in the impaired follicle development in PCOS using two rat PCOS models and primary culture of granulosa cells. Our results indicated that the downregulation of CFTR in the cystic follicles was accompanied by reduced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in rat PCOS models. In addition, knockdown or inhibition of CFTR in granulosa cell culture resulted in reduced cell viability and downregulation of PCNA. We further demonstrated that CFTR regulated both basal and FSH-stimulated granulosa cell proliferation through the HCO3 (-)/sAC/PKA pathway leading to ERK phosphorylation and its downstream target cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) upregulation. Reduced ERK phosphorylation and CCND2 were found in ovaries of rat PCOS model compared with the control. This study suggests that CFTR is required for normal follicle development and that its downregulation in PCOS may inhibit granulosa cell proliferation, resulting in abnormal follicle development in PCOS.

  10. Ouabain Regulates CFTR-Mediated Anion Secretion and Na,K-ATPase Transport in ADPKD Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Kyle; Venugopal, Jessica; Sánchez, Gladis; Magenheimer, Brenda S.; Reif, Gail A.; Wallace, Darren P.; Calvet, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Cyst enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) requires the transepithelial secretion of fluid into the cyst lumen. We previously showed that physiological amounts of ouabain enhance cAMP-dependent fluid secretion and cyst growth of human ADPKD cyst epithelial cells in culture and formation of cyst-like dilations in metanephric kidneys from Pkd1 mutant mice. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which ouabain promotes cAMP-dependent fluid secretion and cystogenesis. Ouabain (3 nM) enhanced cAMP-induced cyst-like dilations in embryonic kidneys from Pkd1m1Bei mice, but had no effect on metanephroi from Pkd1m1Bei mice that lack expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Similarly, ouabain stimulation of cAMP-induced fluid secretion and in vitro cyst growth of ADPKD cells were abrogated by CFTR inhibition, showing that CFTR is required for ouabain effects on ADPKD fluid secretion. Moreover, ouabain directly enhanced the cAMP-dependent Cl− efflux mediated by CFTR in ADPKD monolayers. Ouabain increased the trafficking of CFTR to the plasma membrane and upregulated the expression of the CFTR activator PDZK1. Finally, ouabain decreased plasma membrane expression and activity of the Na,K-ATPase in ADPKD cells. Altogether, these results show that ouabain enhances net fluid secretion and cyst formation by activating apical anion secretion via CFTR and decreasing basolateral Na+ transport via Na,K-ATPase. These results provide new information on the mechanisms by which ouabain affects ADPKD cells and further highlight the importance of ouabain as a non-genomic stimulator of cystogenesis in ADPKD. PMID:26289599

  11. Optimization of the degenerated interfacial ATP binding site improves the function of disease-related mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Jih, Kang-Yang; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-11-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP molecule in each of the two interfacial composite ATP binding sites (site 1 and site 2). Experimental evidence also suggests that CFTR gating is mainly controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis in site 2, whereas site 1, which harbors several non-canonical substitutions in ATP-interacting motifs, is considered degenerated. The CF-associated mutation G551D, by introducing a bulky and negatively charged side chain into site 2, completely abolishes ATP-induced openings of CFTR. Here, we report a strategy to optimize site 1 for ATP binding by converting two amino acid residues to ABC consensus (i.e. H1348G) or more commonly seen residues in other ABC proteins (i.e. W401Y,W401F). Introducing either one or both of these mutations into G551D-CFTR confers ATP responsiveness for this disease-associated mutant channel. We further showed that the same maneuver also improved the function of WT-CFTR and the most common CF-associated ΔF508 channels, both of which rely on site 2 for gating control. Thus, our results demonstrated that the degenerated site 1 can be rebuilt to complement or support site 2 for CFTR function. Possible approaches for developing CFTR potentiators targeting site 1 will be discussed.

  12. Acute inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel by thyroid hormones involves multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiwei; Li, Hongyu; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Sheppard, David N

    2013-10-15

    The chemical structures of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) resemble those of small-molecules that inhibit the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. We therefore tested the acute effects of T3, T4 and reverse T3 (rT3) on recombinant wild-type human CFTR using the patch-clamp technique. When added directly to the intracellular solution bathing excised membrane patches, T3, T4, and rT3 (all tested at 50 μM) inhibited CFTR in several ways: they strongly reduced CFTR open probability by impeding channel opening; they moderately decreased single-channel current amplitude, and they promoted transitions to subconductance states. To investigate the mechanism of CFTR inhibition, we studied T3. T3 (50 μM) had multiple effects on CFTR gating kinetics, suggestive of both allosteric inhibition and open-channel blockade. Channel inhibition by T3 was weakly voltage dependent and stronger than the allosteric inhibitor genistein, but weaker than the open-channel blocker glibenclamide. Raising the intracellular ATP concentration abrogated T3 inhibition of CFTR gating, but not the reduction in single-channel current amplitude nor the transitions to subconductance states. The decrease in single-channel current amplitude was relieved by membrane depolarization, but not the transitions to subconductance states. We conclude that T3 has complex effects on CFTR consistent with both allosteric inhibition and open-channel blockade. Our results suggest that there are multiple allosteric mechanisms of CFTR inhibition, including interference with ATP-dependent channel gating and obstruction of conformational changes that gate the CFTR pore. CFTR inhibition by thyroid hormones has implications for the development of innovative small-molecule CFTR inhibitors.

  13. The ΔF508-CFTR mutation inhibits wild-type CFTR processing and function when co-expressed in human airway epithelia and in mouse nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rescue or correction of CFTR function in native epithelia is the ultimate goal of CF therapeutics development. Wild-type (WT) CFTR introduction and replacement is also of particular interest. Such therapies may be complicated by possible CFTR self-assembly into an oligomer or multimer. Results Surprisingly, functional CFTR assays in native airway epithelia showed that the most common CFTR mutant, ΔF508-CFTR (ΔF-CFTR), inhibits WT-CFTR when both forms are co-expressed. To examine more mechanistically, both forms of CFTR were transfected transiently in varying amounts into IB3-1 CF human airway epithelial cells and HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells null for endogenous CFTR protein expression. Increasing amounts of ΔF-CFTR inhibited WT-CFTR protein processing and function in CF human airway epithelial cells but not in heterologous HEK-293 cells. Stably expressed ΔF-CFTR in clones of the non-CF human airway epithelial cell line, CALU-3, also showed reduction in cAMP-stimulated anion secretion and in WT-CFTR processing. An ultimate test of this dominant negative-like effect of ΔF-CFTR on WT-CFTR was the parallel study of two different CF mouse models: the ΔF-CFTR mouse and the bitransgenic CFTR mouse corrected in the gut but null in the lung and airways. WT/ΔF heterozygotes had an intermediate phenotype with regard to CFTR agonist responses in in vivo nasal potential difference (NPD) recordings and in Ussing chamber recordings of short-circuit current (ISC) in vitro on primary tracheal epithelial cells isolated from the same mice. In contrast, CFTR bitransgenic +/− heterozygotes had no difference in their responses versus +/+ wild-type mice. Conclusions Taken altogether, these data suggest that ΔF-CFTR and WT-CFTR co-assemble into an oligomeric macromolecular complex in native epithelia and share protein processing machinery and regulation at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). As a consequence, ΔF-CFTR slows WT-CFTR protein processing

  14. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor regulates human fetal lung development via CFTR.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Wilkinson, William J; Tseng, Hsiu-Er; Finney, Brenda; Monk, Bethan; Dibble, Holly; Quilliam, Samantha; Warburton, David; Galietta, Luis J; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-02-25

    Optimal fetal lung growth requires anion-driven fluid secretion into the lumen of the developing organ. The fetus is hypercalcemic compared to the mother and here we show that in the developing human lung this hypercalcaemia acts on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, to promote fluid-driven lung expansion through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. Several chloride channels including TMEM16, bestrophin, CFTR, CLCN2 and CLCA1, are also expressed in the developing human fetal lung at gestational stages when CaSR expression is maximal. Measurements of Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion in organ explant cultures show that pharmacological CaSR activation by calcimimetics stimulates lung fluid secretion through CFTR, an effect which in humans, but not mice, was also mimicked by fetal hypercalcemic conditions, demonstrating that the physiological relevance of such a mechanism appears to be species-specific. Calcimimetics promote CFTR opening by activating adenylate cyclase and we show that Ca(2+)-stimulated type I adenylate cyclase is expressed in the developing human lung. Together, these observations suggest that physiological fetal hypercalcemia, acting on the CaSR, promotes human fetal lung development via cAMP-dependent opening of CFTR. Disturbances in this process would be expected to permanently impact lung structure and might predispose to certain postnatal respiratory diseases.

  15. Arsenic Promotes Ubiquitinylation and Lysosomal Degradation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Chloride Channels in Human Airway Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Coutermarsh, Bonita A.; Barnaby, Roxanna L.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens. PMID:22467879

  16. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  17. Increased NF-κB Activity and Decreased Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Mediate Reduced Osteoblast Differentiation and Function in ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Le Henaff, Carole; Mansouri, Rafik; Modrowski, Dominique; Zarka, Mylène; Geoffroy, Valérie; Marty, Caroline; Tarantino, Nadine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Marie, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent human ΔF508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is associated with reduced bone formation and bone loss in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which the ΔF508-CFTR mutation causes alterations in bone formation are poorly known. In this study, we analyzed the osteoblast phenotype in ΔF508-CFTR mice and characterized the signaling mechanisms underlying this phenotype. Ex vivo studies showed that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation negatively impacted the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into osteoblasts and the activity of osteoblasts, demonstrating that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation alters both osteoblast differentiation and function. Treatment with a CFTR corrector rescued the abnormal collagen gene expression in ΔF508-CFTR osteoblasts. Mechanistic analysis revealed that NF-κB signaling and transcriptional activity were increased in mutant osteoblasts. Functional studies showed that the activation of NF-κB transcriptional activity in mutant osteoblasts resulted in increased β-catenin phosphorylation, reduced osteoblast β-catenin expression, and altered expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity or activation of canonical Wnt signaling rescued Wnt target gene expression and corrected osteoblast differentiation and function in bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts from ΔF508-CFTR mice. Overall, the results show that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation impairs osteoblast differentiation and function as a result of overactive NF-κB and reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB or activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can rescue the abnormal osteoblast differentiation and function induced by the prevalent ΔF508-CFTR mutation, suggesting novel therapeutic strategies to correct the osteoblast dysfunctions in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26060255

  18. Increased NF-κB Activity and Decreased Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Mediate Reduced Osteoblast Differentiation and Function in ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Henaff, Carole; Mansouri, Rafik; Modrowski, Dominique; Zarka, Mylène; Geoffroy, Valérie; Marty, Caroline; Tarantino, Nadine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Marie, Pierre J

    2015-07-17

    The prevalent human ΔF508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is associated with reduced bone formation and bone loss in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which the ΔF508-CFTR mutation causes alterations in bone formation are poorly known. In this study, we analyzed the osteoblast phenotype in ΔF508-CFTR mice and characterized the signaling mechanisms underlying this phenotype. Ex vivo studies showed that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation negatively impacted the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into osteoblasts and the activity of osteoblasts, demonstrating that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation alters both osteoblast differentiation and function. Treatment with a CFTR corrector rescued the abnormal collagen gene expression in ΔF508-CFTR osteoblasts. Mechanistic analysis revealed that NF-κB signaling and transcriptional activity were increased in mutant osteoblasts. Functional studies showed that the activation of NF-κB transcriptional activity in mutant osteoblasts resulted in increased β-catenin phosphorylation, reduced osteoblast β-catenin expression, and altered expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity or activation of canonical Wnt signaling rescued Wnt target gene expression and corrected osteoblast differentiation and function in bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts from ΔF508-CFTR mice. Overall, the results show that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation impairs osteoblast differentiation and function as a result of overactive NF-κB and reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB or activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can rescue the abnormal osteoblast differentiation and function induced by the prevalent ΔF508-CFTR mutation, suggesting novel therapeutic strategies to correct the osteoblast dysfunctions in cystic fibrosis.

  19. VAMP-associated Proteins (VAP) as Receptors That Couple Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Proteostasis with Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Wayne L; Shome, Kuntala; Wu, Christine C; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Aridor, Meir

    2016-03-04

    Unesterified cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes in cells expressing the misfolded cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or general activation of ER stress led to dynein-mediated clustering of cholesterol-loaded late endosomes at the Golgi region, a process regulated by ER-localized VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs). We hypothesized that VAPs serve as intracellular receptors that couple lipid homeostasis through interactions with two phenylalanines in an acidic track (FFAT) binding signals (found in lipid sorting and sensing proteins, LSS) with proteostasis regulation. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR. The activity was mapped to the ligand-binding major sperm protein (MSP) domain, which was sufficient in regulating CFTR biogenesis. We identified mutations in an unstructured loop within the MSP that uncoupled VAPB-regulated CFTR biogenesis from basic interactions with FFAT. Using this information, we defined functional and physical interactions between VAPB and proteostasis regulators (ligands), including the unfolded protein response sensor ATF6 and the ER degradation cluster that included FAF1, VCP, BAP31, and Derlin-1. VAPB inhibited the degradation of ΔF508-CFTR in the ER through interactions with the RMA1-Derlin-BAP31-VCP pathway. Analysis of pseudoligands containing tandem FFAT signals supports a competitive model for VAP interactions that direct CFTR biogenesis. The results suggest a model in which VAP-ligand binding couples proteostasis and lipid homeostasis leading to observed phenotypes of lipid abnormalities in protein folding diseases.

  20. Cysteine String Protein Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by Increasing Its Interaction with the C Terminus of Hsp70-interacting Protein and Promoting CFTR Ubiquitylation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Béla Z.; Watts, Rebecca J.; Aridor, Meir; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (Csp) is a J-domain-containing protein whose overexpression blocks the exit of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Another method of blocking ER exit, the overexpression of Sar1-GTP, however, yielded twice as much immature CFTR compared with Csp overexpression. This finding suggested that Csp not only inhibits CFTR ER exit but also facilitates the degradation of immature CFTR. This was confirmed by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, which returned the level of immature CFTR to that found in cells expressing Sar1-GTP only. CspH43Q, which does not interact with Hsc70/Hsp70 efficiently, did not promote CFTR degradation, suggesting that the pro-degradative effect of Csp requires Hsc70/Hsp70 binding/activation. In agreement with this, Csp overexpression increased the amount of Hsc70/Hsp70 co-immunoprecipitated with CFTR, whereas overexpression of CspH43Q did not. The Hsc70/Hsp70 binding partner C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) can target CFTR for proteasome-mediated degradation. Csp overexpression also increased the amount of CHIP co-immunoprecipitated with CFTR. In addition, CHIP interacted directly with Csp, which was confirmed by in vitro binding experiments. Csp overexpression also increased CFTR ubiquitylation and reduced the half-life of immature CFTR. These findings indicate that Csp not only regulates the exit of CFTR from the ER, but that this action is accompanied by Hsc70/Hsp70 and CHIP-mediated CFTR degradation. PMID:19098309

  1. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibits ENaC through an increase in the intracellular Cl– concentration

    PubMed Central

    König, Jens; Schreiber, Rainer; Voelcker, Thilo; Mall, Marcus; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2001-01-01

    Activation of the CFTR Cl– channel inhibits epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC), according to studies on epithelial cells and overexpressing recombinant cells. Here we demonstrate that ENaC is inhibited during stimulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR) in Xenopus oocytes, independent of the experimental set-up and the magnitude of the whole-cell current. Inhibition of ENaC is augmented at higher CFTR Cl– currents. Similar to CFTR, ClC-0 Cl– currents also inhibit ENaC, as well as high extracellular Na+ and Cl– in partially permeabilized oocytes. Thus, inhibition of ENaC is not specific to CFTR and seems to be mediated by Cl–. PMID:11606421

  2. Folate Protects Hepatocytes of Hyperhomocysteinemia Mice from Apoptosis via Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)-activated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Anning; Sun, Yue; Mao, Caiyan; Yang, Songhao; Huang, Min; Deng, Mei; Ding, Ning; Yang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Minghao; Jin, Shaoju; Jiang, Yideng; Huang, Ying

    2017-02-23

    Folate deficiency is a known risk factor for liver injury; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we employed a high homocysteine-induced liver injury model of Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-) ) mice fed high-methionine diet and found that high homocysteine induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and liver cell apoptosis by downregulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression; observations that were attenuated with supplementation of dietary folate. The regulation on CFTR expression was mediated by CFTR promoter methylation and trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3). Mechanistically, folate inhibited homocysteine-induced CFTR promoter methylation and H3K27me3, which resulted in upregulation of CFTR expression, and reduced ER stress and liver cell apoptosis. Further study showed that folate inhibited the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2, downregulated the cellular concentrations of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and upregulated the SAM/SAH ratio, leading to the inhibition of Hcy-induced DNA hypermethylation and H3K27me3 in CFTR promoter. In conclusion, our results provide insight into the protective role of folate in homocysteine-induced ER stress and liver cell apoptosis through the regulation of CFTR expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    LaRusch, Jessica; Jung, Jinsei; General, Ignacio J; Lewis, Michele D; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B; Amann, Stephen T; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C

    2014-07-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  4. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  5. SYVN1, NEDD8, and FBXO2 Proteins Regulate ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Ubiquitin-mediated Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shyam; Osterhaus, Samantha R; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Jacobi, Ashley M; Behlke, Mark A; McCray, Paul B

    2016-12-02

    We previously reported that delivery of a microRNA-138 mimic or siRNA against SIN3A to cultured cystic fibrosis (ΔF508/ΔF508) airway epithelia partially restored ΔF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated cAMP-stimulated Cl(-) conductance. We hypothesized that dissecting this microRNA-138/SIN3A-regulated gene network would identify individual proteins contributing to the rescue of ΔF508-CFTR function. Among the genes in the network, we rigorously validated candidates using functional CFTR maturation and electrolyte transport assays in polarized airway epithelia. We found that depletion of the ubiquitin ligase SYVN1, the ubiquitin/proteasome system regulator NEDD8, or the F-box protein FBXO2 partially restored ΔF508-CFTR-mediated Cl(-) transport in primary cultures of human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia. Moreover, knockdown of SYVN1, NEDD8, or FBXO2 in combination with corrector compound 18 further potentiated rescue of ΔF508-CFTR-mediated Cl(-) conductance. This study provides new knowledge of the CFTR biosynthetic pathway. It suggests that SYVN1 and FBXO2 represent two distinct multiprotein complexes that may degrade ΔF508-CFTR in airway epithelia and identifies a new role for NEDD8 in regulating ΔF508-CFTR ubiquitination.

  6. Mechanosensitivity of wild-type and G551D cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) controls regulatory volume decrease in simple epithelia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Changyan; Cao, Xu; Chen, Xibing; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Wei Kevin; Sun, Ying; Hu, Wenbao; Zhou, Zijing; Wang, Yan; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-04-01

    Mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an epithelial ligand-gated anion channel, are associated with the lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. The CFTR G551D mutation impairs ATP hydrolysis and thereby makes CFTR refractory to cAMP stimulation. Both wild-type (WT) and G551D CFTR have been implicated in regulatory volume decrease (RVD), but the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the channel activity of both WT and G551D CFTR is directly stimulated by mechanical perturbation induced by cell swelling at the single-channel, cellular, and tissue levels. Hypotonicity activated CFTR single channels in cell-attached membrane patches and WT-CFTR-mediated short-circuit current (Isc) in Calu-3 cells, and this was independent of Ca(2+)and cAMP/PKA signaling. Genetic suppression and ablation but not G551D mutation of CFTR suppressed the hypotonicity- and stretch-inducedIscin Calu-3 cells and mouse duodena. Moreover, ablation but not G551D mutation of the CFTR gene inhibited the RVD of crypts isolated from mouse intestine; more importantly, CFTR-specific blockers markedly suppressed RVD in both WT- and G551D CFTR mice, demonstrating for the first time that the channel activity of both WT and G551D CFTR is required for epithelial RVD. Our findings uncover a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying CFTR involvement in epithelial RVD and suggest that the mechanosensitivity of G551D CFTR might underlie the mild phenotypes resulting from this mutation.-Xie, C., Cao, X., Chen, X, Wang, D., Zhang, W. K., Sun, Y., Hu, W., Zhou, Z., Wang, Y., Huang, P. Mechanosensitivity of wild-type and G551D cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) controls regulatory volume decrease in simple epithelia.

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH-101 target mitochondrial functions, independently of chloride channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Mairead; Trudel, Stephanie; Brouillard, Franck; Bouillaud, Frederick; Colas, Julien; Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Ollero, Mario; Edelman, Aleksander; Fritsch, Janine

    2010-04-01

    Two highly potent and selective cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane regulator (CFTR) inhibitors have been identified by high-throughput screening: the thiazolidinone CFTR(inh)-172 [3-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methylene]- 2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone] and the glycine hydrazide GlyH-101 [N-(2-naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide]. Inhibition of the CFTR chloride channel by these compounds has been suggested to be of pharmacological interest in the treatment of secretory diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. In addition, functional inhibition of CFTR by CFTR(inh)-172 has been proposed to be sufficient to mimic the CF inflammatory profile. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the two compounds on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential in several cell lines: the CFTR-deficient human lung epithelial IB3-1 (expressing the heterozygous F508del/W1282X mutation), the isogenic CFTR-corrected C38, and HeLa and A549 as non-CFTR-expressing controls. Both inhibitors were able to induce a rapid increase in ROS levels and depolarize mitochondria in the four cell types, suggesting that these effects are independent of CFTR inhibition. In HeLa cells, these events were associated with a decrease in the rate of oxygen consumption, with GlyH-101 demonstrating a higher potency than CFTR(inh)-172. The impact of CFTR inhibitors on inflammatory parameters was also tested in HeLa cells. CFTR(inh)-172, but not GlyH-101, induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). CFTR(inh)-172 slightly decreased interleukin-8 secretion, whereas GlyH-101 induced a slight increase. These results support the conclusion that CFTR inhibitors may exert nonspecific effects regarding ROS production, mitochondrial failure, and activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway, independently of CFTR inhibition.

  8. Immune Mediators Regulate CFTR Expression through a Bifunctional Airway-Selective Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Leir, Shih-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    An airway-selective DNase-hypersensitive site (DHS) at kb −35 (DHS-35kb) 5′ to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene is evident in many lung cell lines and primary human tracheal epithelial cells but is absent from intestinal epithelia. The DHS-35kb contains an element with enhancer activity in 16HBE14o- airway epithelial cells and is enriched for monomethylated H3K4 histones (H3K4me1). We now define a 350-bp region within DHS-35kb which has full enhancer activity and binds interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) and nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) in vitro and in vivo. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of IRF1 or overexpression of IRF2, an antagonist of IRF1, reduces CFTR expression in 16HBE14o- cells. NF-Y is critical for maintenance of H3K4me1 enrichment at DHS-35kb since depletion of NF-YA, a subunit of NF-Y, reduces H3K4me1 enrichment at this site. Moreover, depletion of SETD7, an H3K4 monomethyltransferase, reduces both H3K4me1 and NF-Y occupancy, suggesting a requirement of H3K4me1 for NF-Y binding. NF-Y depletion also represses Sin3A and reduces its occupancy across the CFTR locus, which is accompanied by an increase in p300 enrichment at multiple sites. Our results reveal that the DHS-35kb airway-selective enhancer element plays a pivotal role in regulation of CFTR expression by two independent regulatory mechanisms. PMID:23689137

  9. Regulated recycling of mutant CFTR is partially restored by pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, John P.; Zeng, Jianxin; Frizzell, Raymond A.; Watkins, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Efficient trafficking of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to and from the cell surface is essential for maintaining channel density at the plasma membrane (PM) and ensuring proper physiological activity. The most common mutation, F508del, exhibits reduced surface expression and impaired function despite treatment with currently available pharmacological small molecules, called correctors. To gain more detailed insight into whether CFTR enters compartments that allow corrector stabilization in the cell periphery, we investigated the peripheral trafficking itineraries and kinetics of wild type (WT) and F508del in living cells using high-speed fluorescence microscopy together with fluorogen activating protein detection. We directly visualized internalization and accumulation of CFTR WT from the PM to a perinuclear compartment that colocalized with the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) markers Rab11 and EHD1, reaching steady-state distribution by 25 minutes. Stimulation by protein kinase A (PKA) depleted this intracellular pool and redistributed CFTR channels to the cell surface, elicited by reduced endocytosis and active translocation to the PM. Corrector or temperature rescue of F508del also resulted in targeting to the ERC and exhibited subsequent PKA-stimulated trafficking to the PM. Corrector treatment (24 hours) led to persistent residence of F508del in the ERC, while thermally destabilized F508del was targeted to lysosomal compartments by 3 hours. Acute addition of individual correctors, C4 or C18, acted on peripheral trafficking steps to partially block lysosomal targeting of thermally destabilized F508del. Taken together, corrector treatment redirects F508del trafficking from a degradative pathway to a regulated recycling route, and proteins that mediate this process become potential targets for improving the efficacy of current and future correctors. PMID:23572510

  10. CFTR: the nucleotide binding folds regulate the accessibility and stability of the activated state

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The functional roles of the two nucleotide binding folds, NBF1 and NBF2, in the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were investigated by measuring the rates of activation and deactivation of CFTR Cl- conductance in Xenopus oocytes. Activation of wild-type CFTR in response to application of forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) was described by a single exponential. Deactivation after washout of the cocktail consisted of two phases: an initial slow phase, described by a latency, and an exponential decline. Rate analysis of CFTR variants bearing analogous mutations in NBF1 and NBF2 permitted us to characterize amino acid substitutions according to their effects on the accessibility and stability of the active state. Access to the active state was very sensitive to substitutions for the invariant glycine (G551) in NBF1, where mutations to alanine (A), serine (S), or aspartic acid (D) reduced the apparent on rate by more than tenfold. The analogous substitutions in NBF2 (G1349) also reduced the on rate, by twofold to 10-fold, but substantially destabilized the active state as well, as judged by increased deactivation rates. In the putative ATP-binding pocket of either NBF, substitution of alanine, glutamine (Q), or arginine (R) for the invariant lysine (K464 or K1250) reduced the on rate similarly, by two- to fourfold. In contrast, these analogous substitutions produced opposite effects on the deactivation rate. NBF1 mutations destabilized the active state, whereas the analogous substitutions in NBF2 stabilized the active state such that activation was prolonged compared with that seen with wild-type CFTR. Substitution of asparagine (N) for a highly conserved aspartic acid (D572) in the ATP-binding pocket of NBF1 dramatically slowed the on rate and destabilized the active state. In contrast, the analogous substitution in NBF2 (D1370N) did not appreciably affect the on rate and markedly stabilized the active state

  11. Tobacco Carcinogen NNK Transporter MRP2 Regulates CFTR Function in Lung Epithelia: Implications for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. About 85% of all lung cancers are linked to tobacco smoke, in which more than 50 lung carcinogens have been identified and one of the most abundant is 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)- 1-butanone (NNK). The human lung epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against tobacco specific carcinogens, in which apically-localized receptors, transporters, and ion channels in the airway may play a critical role in this native defense against tobacco smoke. Here we showed that multidrug resistance protein-2 (MRP2) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, are localized to the apical surfaces of plasma membrane in polarized lung epithelial cells. We observed that there is a functional coupling between CFTR and MRP2 that may be mediated by PDZ proteins. We also observed the existence of a macromolecular complex containing CFTR, MRP2, and PDZ proteins, which might form the basis for the regulatory cooperation between these two ABC transporters. Our results have important implications for cigarette smoke-associated lung diseases (such as smoke-related emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer). PMID:20089353

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-05-01

    The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings.

  14. MRP4 and CFTR in the regulation of cAMP and β-adrenergic contraction in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Zachary M; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Xiang, Yang; Best, Philip M

    2012-04-15

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP in cardiac myocytes is integral to regulating the diverse functions downstream of β-adrenergic stimulation. The activities of cAMP phosphodiesterases modulate critical and well-studied cellular processes. Recently, in epithelial and smooth muscle cells, it was found that the multi-drug resistant protein 4 (MRP4) acts as a cAMP efflux pump to regulate intracellular cAMP levels and alter effector function, including activation of the cAMP-stimulated Cl(-) channel, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). In the current study we investigated the potential role of MRP4 in regulating intracellular cAMP and β-adrenergic stimulated contraction rate in cardiac myocytes. Cultured neonatal ventricular myocytes were used for all experiments. In addition to wildtype mice, β(1)-, β(2)-, and β(1)/β(2)-adrenoceptor, and CFTR knockout mice were used. MRP4 expression was probed via Western blot, intracellular cAMP was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, while the functional role of MRP4 was assayed via monitoring of isoproterenol-stimulated contraction rate. We found that MRP4 is expressed in mouse neonatal ventricular myocytes. A pharmacological inhibitor of MRP4, MK571, potentiated submaximal isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation and cardiomyocyte contraction rate via β(1)-adrenoceptors. CFTR expression was critical for submaximal isoproterenol-stimulated contraction rate. Interestingly, MRP4-dependent changes in contraction rate were CFTR-dependent, however, PDE4-dependent potentiation of contraction rate was CFTR-independent. We have shown, for the first time, a role for MRP4 in the regulation of cAMP in cardiac myocytes and involvement of CFTR in β-adrenergic stimulated contraction. Together with phosphodiesterases, MRP4 must be considered when examining cAMP regulation in cardiac myocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MRP4 and CFTR in the regulation of cAMP and β-adrenergic contraction in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Zachary M.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Xiang, Yang; Best, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP in cardiac myocytes is integral to regulating the diverse functions downstream of β-adrenergic stimulation. The activities of cAMP phosphodiesterases modulate critical and well-studied cellular processes. Recently, in epithelial and smooth muscle cells, it was found that the multi-drug resistant protein 4 (MRP4) acts as a cAMP efflux pump to regulate intracellular cAMP levels and alter effector function, including activation of the cAMP-stimulated Cl− channel, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). In the current study we investigated the potential role of MRP4 in regulating intracellular cAMP and β-adrenergic stimulated contraction rate in cardiac myocytes. Cultured neonatal ventricular myocytes were used for all experiments. In addition to wildtype mice, β1-, β2-, β1/β2-adrenoceptor, and CFTR knockout mice were used. MRP4 expression was probed via Western blot, intracellular cAMP was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, while the functional role of MRP4 was assayed via monitoring of isoproterenol-stimulated contraction rate. We found that MRP4 is expressed in mouse neonatal ventricular myocytes. A pharmacological inhibitor of MRP4, MK571, potentiated submaximal isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation and cardiomyocyte contraction rate via β1-adrenoceptors. CFTR expression was critical for submaximal isoproterenol-stimulated contraction rate. Interestingly, MRP4-dependent changes in contraction rate were CFTR-dependent, however, PDE4-dependent potentiation of contraction rate was CFTR-independent. We have shown, for the first time, a role for MRP4 in the regulation of cAMP in cardiac myocytes and involvement of CFTR in β-adrenergic stimulated contraction. Together with phosphodiesterases, MRP4 must be considered when examining cAMP regulation in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22381067

  16. P2Y purinergic receptor regulation of CFTR chloride channels in mouse cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Mizuma, Shintaro; Wang, Ge-Xin; Hume, Joseph R

    2004-05-01

    The intracellular signalling pathways and molecular mechanisms responsible for P2-purinoceptor-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) currents (I(Cl,ATP)) were studied in mouse ventricular myocytes. In standard NaCl-containing extracellular solutions, extracellular ATP (100 microm) activated two different currents, I(Cl,ATP) with a linear I-V relationship in symmetrical Cl(-) solutions, and an inwardly rectifying cation conductance (cationic I(ATP)). Cationic I(ATP) was selectively inhibited by Gd(3+) and Zn(2+), or by replacement of extracellular NaCl by NMDG; I(Cl,ATP) was Cl(-) selective, and inhibited by replacement of extracellular Cl(-) by Asp(-); both currents were prevented by suramin or DIDS pretreatment. In GTPgammaS-loaded cells, I(Cl,ATP) was irreversibly activated by ATP, but cationic I(ATP) was still regulated reversibly. GDPbetaS prevented activation of the I(Cl,ATP,) even though pertussis toxin pretreatment did not modulate I(Cl,ATP). These results suggest that activation of I(Cl,ATP) occurs via a G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptor. The I(Cl,ATP) persistently activated by GTPgammaS, was inhibited by glibenclamide but not by DIDS, thus exhibiting known pharmacological properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. In ventricular cells of cftr(-/-) mice, extracellular ATP activated cationic I(ATP), but failed to activate any detectable I(Cl,ATP). These results provide compelling evidence that activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels in mouse heart are coupled to G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptors.

  17. Analysis of DNase-I-hypersensitive sites at the 3' end of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR).

    PubMed Central

    Nuthall, H N; Moulin, D S; Huxley, C; Harris, A

    1999-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) exhibits a complex pattern of expression that shows temporal and spatial regulation, although the control mechanisms are not fully known. We have mapped DNase-I-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) flanking the CFTR gene with the aim of identifying potential regulatory elements. We previously characterized DHSs at -79.5 and -20.9 kb with respect to the CFTR translational start site and a regulatory element in the first intron of the gene at 185+10 kb. We have now mapped five DHSs lying 3' to the CFTR gene at 4574+5.4, +6.8, +7.0, +7.4 and +15.6 kb that show some degree of tissue specificity. The DHSs are seen in chromatin extracted from human primary epithelial cells and cell lines; the presence of the +15.6 kb site is tissue-specific in transgenic mice carrying a human CFTR yeast artificial chromosome. Further analysis of the 4574+15.6 kb DHS implicates the involvement of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP), cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) family transcription factors at this regulatory element. PMID:10417323

  18. Arginine vasopressin regulates CFTR and ClC-2 mRNA expression in rat kidney cortex and medulla.

    PubMed

    Morales, M M; Nascimento, D S; Capella, M A; Lopes, A G; Guggino, W B

    2001-11-01

    The presence of both CFTR and ClC-2 proteins in the kidney suggest that they are involved in chloride transport along the nephron but their physiological roles in this organ are not known. To further understand the role of these chloride channels we studied Wistar rats subjected to dehydration for 2 days and also the homozygous Brattleboro rats, a strain of Long-Evans rats carrying an autosomal recessive mutation that leads to a deficiency of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) secretion in the plasma. The expression of CFTR was increased in the medulla of dehydrated Wistar rats and no variation was observed in the cortex. The expression of both ClC-2 and CFTR mRNAs was low in the renal cortex and medulla of the homozygous Brattleboro rats but returned to normal levels after AVP reposition. By the use of Madine-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) type I epithelial cells, it was observed that AVP (10(-8), 10(-7) and 10(-6) M) increased CFTR mRNA expression "in vitro" but no effect was observed when changes in the medium tonicity were caused by the addition of sucrose, NaCl, manitol or urea. The modulation of both CFTR and ClC-2 mRNA by AVP, the main hormone involved in the regulation of body fluid osmolality, suggests the participation of these two chloride channels in the renal tubule transcellular chloride transport modulated by AVP.

  19. Characterization of Defects in Ion Transport and Tissue Development in Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)-Knockout Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tuggle, Katherine L.; Birket, Susan E.; Cui, Xiaoxia; Hong, Jeong; Warren, Joe; Reid, Lara; Chambers, Andre; Ji, Diana; Gamber, Kevin; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Tearney, Guillermo; Tang, Li Ping; Fortenberry, James A.; Du, Ming; Cadillac, Joan M.; Bedwell, David M.; Rowe, Steven M.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models for cystic fibrosis (CF) have contributed significantly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Here we describe development and characterization of the first cystic fibrosis rat, in which the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) was knocked out using a pair of zinc finger endonucleases (ZFN). The disrupted Cftr gene carries a 16 base pair deletion in exon 3, resulting in loss of CFTR protein expression. Breeding of heterozygous (CFTR+/−) rats resulted in Mendelian distribution of wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous (CFTR−/−) pups. Nasal potential difference and transepithelial short circuit current measurements established a robust CF bioelectric phenotype, similar in many respects to that seen in CF patients. Young CFTR−/− rats exhibited histological abnormalities in the ileum and increased intracellular mucus in the proximal nasal septa. By six weeks of age, CFTR−/− males lacked the vas deferens bilaterally. Airway surface liquid and periciliary liquid depth were reduced, and submucosal gland size was abnormal in CFTR−/− animals. Use of ZFN based gene disruption successfully generated a CF animal model that recapitulates many aspects of human disease, and may be useful for modeling other CF genotypes, including CFTR processing defects, premature truncation alleles, and channel gating abnormalities. PMID:24608905

  20. Walker mutations reveal loose relationship between catalytic and channel-gating activities of purified CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator).

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Garami, E; Huan, L J; Galley, K; Wang, Y; Bear, C E

    1999-02-02

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as an ATPase and as a chloride channel. It has been hypothesized, on the basis of electrophysiological findings, that the catalytic activity of CFTR is tightly coupled to the opening and closing of the channel gate. In the present study, to determine the structural basis for the ATPase activity of CFTR, we assessed the effect of mutations within the "Walker A" consensus motifs on ATP hydrolysis by the purified, intact protein. Mutation of the lysine residue in the "Walker A" motif of either the first nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK464A) or the second nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK1250A) inhibited the ATPase activity of the purified intact CFTR protein significantly, by greater than 50%. This finding suggests that the two nucleotide binding folds of CFTR are functioning cooperatively in catalysis. However, the rate of channel gating was only significantly inhibited in one of these purified mutants, CFTRK1250A, suggesting that ATPase activity may not be tightly coupled to channel gating as previously hypothesized.

  1. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): three-dimensional structure and localization of a channel gate.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Mark F; O'Ryan, Liam P; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2011-12-09

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located).

  2. Cigarette smoke exposure reveals a novel role for the MEK/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway in regulation of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Balsiger, Robert; Tyrrell, Jean; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Tarran, Robert; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Background CFTR plays a key role in maintenance of lung fluid homeostasis. Cigarette smoke decreases CFTR expression in the lung but neither the mechanisms leading to CFTR loss, nor potential ways to prevent its loss have been identified to date. Methods The molecular mechanisms leading to down-regulation of CFTR by cigarette smoke were determined using pharmacologic inhibitors and silencing RNAs. Results Using human bronchial epithelial cells, here we show that cigarette smoke induces degradation of CFTR that is attenuated by the lysosomal inhibitors, but not proteasome inhibitors. Cigarette smoke can activate multiple signaling pathways in airway epithelial cells, including the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway regulating cell survival. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the loss of plasma membrane CFTR upon cigarette smoke exposure. Similarly, decreased expression of Erk1/2 using silencing RNAs prevented the suppression of CFTR protein by cigarette smoke. Conversely, specific inhibitors of the JNK or p38 MAPK pathways had no effect on CFTR decrease after cigarette smoke exposure. In addition, inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the reduction of the airway surface liquid observed upon cigarette smoke exposure of primary human airway epithelial cells. Finally, addition of the antioxidant NAC inhibited activation of Erk1/2 by cigarette smoke and precluded the cigarette smoke-induced decrease of CFTR. Conclusions These results show that the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway regulates plasma membrane CFTR in human airway cells. General Significance The MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway should be considered as a target for strategies to maintain/restore CFTR expression in the lung of smokers. PMID:25697727

  3. Attenuation of Phosphorylation-dependent Activation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by Disease-causing Mutations at the Transmission Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Stephanie; Yang, Donghe; Miles, Andrew J.; Eckford, Paul D. W.; Molinski, Steven; Wallace, B. A.; Bear, Christine E.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a multidomain membrane protein that functions as a phosphorylation-regulated anion channel. The interface between its two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains and coupling helices conferred by intracellular loops extending from the channel pore domains has been referred to as a transmission interface and is thought to be critical for the regulated channel activity of CFTR. Phosphorylation of the regulatory domain of CFTR by protein kinase A (PKA) is required for its channel activity. However, it was unclear if phosphorylation modifies the transmission interface. Here, we studied purified full-length CFTR protein using spectroscopic techniques to determine the consequences of PKA-mediated phosphorylation. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that purified full-length wild-type CFTR is folded and structurally responsive to phosphorylation. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence studies of CFTR showed that phosphorylation reduced iodide-mediated quenching, consistent with an effect of phosphorylation in burying tryptophans at the transmission interface. Importantly, the rate of phosphorylation-dependent channel activation was compromised by the introduction of disease-causing mutations in either of the two coupling helices predicted to interact with nucleotide binding domain 1 at the interface. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation modifies the interface between the catalytic and pore domains of CFTR and that this modification facilitates CFTR channel activation. PMID:28003367

  4. Attenuation of Phosphorylation-dependent Activation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) by Disease-causing Mutations at the Transmission Interface.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stephanie; Yang, Donghe; Miles, Andrew J; Eckford, Paul D W; Molinski, Steven; Wallace, B A; Bear, Christine E

    2017-02-03

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a multidomain membrane protein that functions as a phosphorylation-regulated anion channel. The interface between its two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains and coupling helices conferred by intracellular loops extending from the channel pore domains has been referred to as a transmission interface and is thought to be critical for the regulated channel activity of CFTR. Phosphorylation of the regulatory domain of CFTR by protein kinase A (PKA) is required for its channel activity. However, it was unclear if phosphorylation modifies the transmission interface. Here, we studied purified full-length CFTR protein using spectroscopic techniques to determine the consequences of PKA-mediated phosphorylation. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that purified full-length wild-type CFTR is folded and structurally responsive to phosphorylation. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence studies of CFTR showed that phosphorylation reduced iodide-mediated quenching, consistent with an effect of phosphorylation in burying tryptophans at the transmission interface. Importantly, the rate of phosphorylation-dependent channel activation was compromised by the introduction of disease-causing mutations in either of the two coupling helices predicted to interact with nucleotide binding domain 1 at the interface. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation modifies the interface between the catalytic and pore domains of CFTR and that this modification facilitates CFTR channel activation.

  5. Probing Conformational Rescue Induced by a Chemical Corrector of F508del-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mutant*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wilson; Chiaw, Patrick Kim; Bear, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that cause loss of function of the CFTR channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells. The major CF-causing mutation, F508del-CFTR, is misfolded, retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, and degraded. Small molecule corrector compounds have been identified using high throughput screens, which partially rescue the trafficking defect of F508del-CFTR, allowing a fraction of the mutant protein to escape endoplasmic reticulum retention and traffic to the plasma membrane, where it exhibits partial function as a cAMP-regulated chloride channel. A subset of such corrector compounds binds directly to the mutant protein, prompting the hypothesis that they rescue the biosynthetic defect by inducing improved protein conformation. We tested this hypothesis directly by evaluating the consequences of a corrector compound on the conformation of each nucleotide binding domain (NBD) in the context of the full-length mutant protein in limited proteolytic digest studies. Interestingly, we found that VRT-325 was capable of partially restoring compactness in NBD1. However, VRT-325 had no detectable effect on the conformation of the second half of the molecule. In comparison, ablation of the di-arginine sequence, R553XR555 (F508del-KXK-CFTR), modified protease susceptibility of NBD1, NBD2, and the full-length protein. Singly, each intervention led to a partial correction of the processing defect. Together, these interventions restored processing of F508del-CFTR to near wild type. Importantly, however, a defect in NBD1 conformation persisted, as did a defect in channel activation after the combined interventions. Importantly, this defect in channel activation can be fully corrected by the addition of the potentiator, VX-770. PMID:21602569

  6. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met strict criteria for the diagnosis of ABPA and had normal sweat electrolytes ({le}40 mmol/liter). One patient carried two CF mutations ({Delta}F508/R347H), and five were found to carry one CF mutation (four {Delta}F508; one R117H). The frequency of the {Delta}F508 mutation in patients with ABPA was significantly higher than in 53 Caucasian patients with chronic bronchitis (P < .0003) and the general population (P < .003). These results suggest that CFTR plays an etiologic role in a subset of ABPA patients. 54 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, P. W.; Hamosh, A.; Macek, M.; Greenberger, P. A.; MacLean, J.; Walden, S. M.; Slavin, R. G.; Cutting, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is not well understood. A clinical phenotype resembling the pulmonary disease seen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can occur in some individuals with ABPA. Reports of familial occurrence of ABPA and increased incidence in CF patients suggest a possible genetic basis for the disease. To test this possibility, the entire coding region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene was analyzed in 11 individuals who met strict criteria for the diagnosis of ABPA and had normal sweat electrolytes (< or = 40 mmol/liter). One patient carried two CF mutations (deltaF508/R347H), and five were found to carry one CF mutation (four deltaF508; one R117H). The frequency of the deltaF508 mutation in patients with ABPA was significantly higher than in 53 Caucasian patients with chronic bronchitis (P < .0003) and the general population (P < .003). These results suggest that CFTR plays an etiologic role in a subset of ABPA patients. PMID:8659542

  8. Asymmetric 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines potentiate mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Giampieri, Michele; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Nieddu, Erika; Mazzei, Marco T; Anzaldi, Maria; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Galietta, Luis J V; Roussel, Christian; Mazzei, Mauro

    2012-10-01

    Some of the genetic mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF) impair the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) ion channel. This defect can be corrected with pharmacological tools (potentiators) that belong to various chemical families, including the 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs). A small set of asymmetric 4-aryl-DHPs was synthesized, and each racemic couple was tested in a functional assay carried out on cells expressing the G1349D, ΔF508, and G551D mutants. The most active racemates were subjected to chiral separation by HPLC, and the pure enantiomers were tested to evaluate any gains in activity. Although three enantiomers demonstrated high potency (K(d) values less than 0.09, 0.1, and 0.5 μM in G1349D, ΔF508, and G551D, respectively), in general, the screening of pure enantiomers did not produce a great diversity in potency values. It is probable that the degree of DHP asymmetry considered in our analysis is still insufficient with respect to that allowed in a putative DHP binding site in CFTR, so that the site could equally accommodate both enantiomers.

  9. Cigarette smoke exposure reveals a novel role for the MEK/ERK1/2 MAPK pathway in regulation of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohua; Balsiger, Robert; Tyrrell, Jean; Boyaka, Prosper N; Tarran, Robert; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2015-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator plays a key role in maintenance of lung fluid homeostasis. Cigarette smoke decreases CFTR expression in the lung but neither the mechanisms leading to CFTR loss, nor potential ways to prevent its loss have been identified to date. The molecular mechanisms leading to down-regulation of CFTR by cigarette smoke were determined using pharmacologic inhibitors and silencing ribonucleic acids (RNAs). Using human bronchial epithelial cells, here we show that cigarette smoke induces degradation of CFTR that is attenuated by lysosomal inhibitors, but not proteasome inhibitors. Cigarette smoke can activate multiple signaling pathways in airway epithelial cells, including the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK (MEK: mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase Erk1/2: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 MAPK: Mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway regulating cell survival. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the loss of plasma membrane CFTR upon cigarette smoke exposure. Similarly, decreased expression of Erk1/2 using silencing RNAs prevented the suppression of CFTR protein by cigarette smoke. Conversely, specific inhibitors of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPK pathways had no effect on CFTR decrease after cigarette smoke exposure. In addition, inhibition of the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway prevented the reduction of the airway surface liquid observed upon cigarette smoke exposure of primary human airway epithelial cells. Finally, addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited activation of Erk1/2 by cigarette smoke and precluded the cigarette smoke-induced decrease of CFTR. These results show that the MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway regulates plasma membrane CFTR in human airway cells. The MEK/Erk1/2 MAPK pathway should be considered as a target for strategies to maintain/restore CFTR expression in the lung of smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. CFTR Gating I

    PubMed Central

    Bompadre, Silvia G.; Ai, Tomohiko; Cho, Jeong Han; Wang, Xiaohui; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-01-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is activated by phosphorylation of serine residues in the regulatory (R) domain and then gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Studies of the ATP-dependent gating process in excised inside-out patches are very often hampered by channel rundown partly caused by membrane-associated phosphatases. Since the severed ΔR-CFTR, whose R domain is completely removed, can bypass the phosphorylation-dependent regulation, this mutant channel might be a useful tool to explore the gating mechanisms of CFTR. To this end, we investigated the regulation and gating of the ΔR-CFTR expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the cell-attached mode, basal ΔR-CFTR currents were always obtained in the absence of cAMP agonists. Application of cAMP agonists or PMA, a PKC activator, failed to affect the activity, indicating that the activity of ΔR-CFTR channels is indeed phosphorylation independent. Consistent with this conclusion, in excised inside-out patches, application of the catalytic subunit of PKA did not affect ATP-induced currents. Similarities of ATP-dependent gating between wild type and ΔR-CFTR make this phosphorylation-independent mutant a useful system to explore more extensively the gating mechanisms of CFTR. Using the ΔR-CFTR construct, we studied the inhibitory effect of ADP on CFTR gating. The Ki for ADP increases as the [ATP] is increased, suggesting a competitive mechanism of inhibition. Single channel kinetic analysis reveals a new closed state in the presence of ADP, consistent with a kinetic mechanism by which ADP binds at the same site as ATP for channel opening. Moreover, we found that the open time of the channel is shortened by as much as 54% in the presence of ADP. This unexpected result suggests another ADP binding site that modulates channel closing. PMID:15767295

  11. Localization studies of rare missense mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) facilitate interpretation of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kristina V; Tzetis, Maria; Cheng, Jie; Guggino, William B; Cutting, Garry R

    2008-11-01

    We have been investigating the functional consequences of rare disease-associated amino acid substitutions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Mutations of the arginine residue at codon 1070 have been associated with different disease consequences; R1070P and R1070Q with "severe" pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) and R1070W with "mild" pancreatic sufficient CF or congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens. Intriguingly, CFTR bearing each of these mutations is functional when expressed in nonpolarized cells. To determine whether R1070 mutations cause disease by affecting CFTR localization, we created polarized Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell lines that express either wild-type or mutant CFTR from the same genomic integration site. Confocal microscopy and biotinylation studies revealed that R1070P was not inserted into the apical membrane, R1070W was inserted at levels reduced from wild-type while R1070Q was present in the apical membrane at levels comparable to wild-type. The abnormal localization of CFTR bearing R1070P and R1070W was consistent with deleterious consequences in patients; however, the profile of CFTR R1070Q was inconsistent with a "severe" phenotype. Reanalysis of 16 patients with the R1070Q mutation revealed that 11 carried an in cis nonsense mutation, S466X. All 11 patients carrying the complex allele R1070Q-S466X had severe disease, while 4 out of 5 patients with R1070Q had "mild" disease, thereby reconciling the apparent discrepancy between the localization studies of R1070Q and the phenotype of patients bearing this mutation. Our results emphasize that localization studies in relevant model systems can greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare missense mutations.

  12. The gating of the CFTR channel.

    PubMed

    Moran, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelia. Mutations in the CFTR gene are the cause of cystsic fibrosis. CFTR is the only ABC-protein that constitutes an ion channel pore forming subunit. CFTR gating is regulated in complex manner as phosphorylation is mandatory for channel activity and gating is directly regulated by binding of ATP to specific intracellular sites on the CFTR protein. This review covers our current understanding on the gating mechanism in CFTR and illustrates the relevance of alteration of these mechanisms in the onset of cystic fibrosis.

  13. ΔF508 CFTR Surface Stability Is Regulated by DAB2 and CHIP-Mediated Ubiquitination in Post-Endocytic Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lianwu; Rab, Andras; Tang, Li ping; Bebok, Zsuzsa; Rowe, Steven M.; Bartoszewski, Rafal; Collawn, James F.

    2015-01-01

    The ΔF508 mutant form of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508 CFTR) that is normally degraded by the ER-associated degradative pathway can be rescued to the cell surface through low-temperature (27°C) culture or small molecular corrector treatment. However, it is unstable on the cell surface, and rapidly internalized and targeted to the lysosomal compartment for degradation. To understand the mechanism of this rapid turnover, we examined the role of two adaptor complexes (AP-2 and Dab2) and three E3 ubiquitin ligases (c-Cbl, CHIP, and Nedd4-2) on low-temperature rescued ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis and degradation in human airway epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that siRNA depletion of either AP-2 or Dab2 inhibits ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis by 69% and 83%, respectively. AP-2 or Dab2 depletion also increases the rescued protein half-life of ΔF508 CFTR by ~18% and ~91%, respectively. In contrast, the depletion of each of the E3 ligases had no effect on ΔF508 CFTR endocytosis, whereas CHIP depletion significantly increased the surface half-life of ΔF508 CFTR. To determine where and when the ubiquitination occurs during ΔF508 CFTR turnover, we monitored the ubiquitination of rescued ΔF508 CFTR during the time course of CFTR endocytosis. Our results indicate that ubiquitination of the surface pool of ΔF508 CFTR begins to increase 15 min after internalization, suggesting that CFTR is ubiquitinated in a post-endocytic compartment. This post-endocytic ubiquination of ΔF508 CFTR could be blocked by either inhibiting endocytosis, by siRNA knockdown of CHIP, or by treating cells with the CFTR corrector, VX-809. Our results indicate that the post-endocytic ubiquitination of CFTR by CHIP is a critical step in the peripheral quality control of cell surface ΔF508 CFTR. PMID:25879443

  14. Duplicated CFTR isoforms in eels diverged in regulatory structures and osmoregulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marty Kwok-Shing; Pipil, Supriya; Kato, Akira; Takei, Yoshio

    2016-09-01

    Two cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) isoforms, CFTRa and CFTRb, were cloned in Japanese eel and their structures and functions were studied in different osmoregulatory tissues in freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) eels. Molecular phylogenetic results suggested that the CFTR duplication in eels occurred independently of the duplication event in salmonid. CFTRa was expressed in the intestine and kidney and downregulated in both tissues in SW eels, while CFTRb was specifically expressed in the gill and greatly upregulated in SW eels. Structurally, the CFTR isoforms are similar in most functional domains except the regulatory R domain, where the R domain of CFTRa is similar to that of human CFTR but the R domain of CFTRb is unique in having high intrinsic negative charges and fewer phosphorylation sites, suggesting divergence of isoforms in terms of gating properties and hormonal regulation. Immunohistochemical results showed that CFTR was localized on the apical regions of SW ionocytes, suggesting a Cl(-) secretory role as in other teleosts. In intestine and kidney, however, immunoreactive CFTR was mostly found in the cytosolic vesicles in FW eels, indicating that Cl(-) channel activity could be low at basal conditions, but could be rapidly increased by membrane insertion of the stored channels. Guanylin (GN), a known hormone that increases CFTR activity in mammalian intestine, failed to redistribute CFTR and to affect its expression in eel intestine. The results suggested that GN-independent CFTR regulation is present in eel intestine and kidney.

  15. Distribution of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mutations in a Cohort of Patients Residing in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Siryani, Issa; Jama, Mohamed; Rumman, Nisreen; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Kannan, Moein; Lyon, Elaine; Hindiyeh, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited life-threatening disorder that causes severe damage to the lungs and the digestive system. In Palestine, mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator gene (CFTR) that contributes to the clinical presentation of CF are ill defined. A cohort of thirty three clinically diagnosed CF patients from twenty one different Palestinian families residing in the central and southern part of Palestine were incorporated in this study. Sweat chloride testing was performed using the Sweat Chek Conductivity Analyzer (ELITECH Group, France) to confirm the clinical diagnosis of CF. In addition, nucleic acid from the patients' blood samples was extracted and the CFTR mutation profiles were assessed by direct sequencing of the CFTR 27 exons and the intron-exon boundaries. For patient's DNA samples where no homozygous or two heterozygous CFTR mutations were identified by exon sequencing, DNA samples were tested for deletions or duplications using SALSA MLPA probemix P091-D1 CFTR assay. Sweat chloride testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis of CF in those patients. All patients had NaCl conductivity >60 mmol/l. In addition, nine different CFTR mutations were identified in all 21 different families evaluated. These mutations were c.1393-1G>A, F508del, W1282X, G85E, c.313delA, N1303K, deletion exons 17a-17b-18, deletion exons 17a-17b and Q1100P. c.1393-1G>A was shown to be the most frequent occurring mutation among tested families. We have profiled the underling mutations in the CFTR gene of a cohort of 21 different families affected by CF. Unlike other studies from the Arab countries where F508del was reported to be the most common mutation, in southern/central Palestine, the c.1393-1G>A appeared to be the most common. Further studies are needed per sample size and geographic distribution to account for other possible CFTR genetic alterations and their frequencies. Genotype/phenotype assessments are also

  16. A novel natural product compound enhances cAMP-regulated chloride conductance of cells expressing CFTR[delta]F508.

    PubMed Central

    deCarvalho, Ana C. V.; Ndi, Chi P.; Tsopmo, Apollinaire; Tane, Pierre; Ayafor, Johnson; Connolly, Joseph D.; Teem, John L.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a chloride channel localized at the plasma membrane of diverse epithelia. The most common mutation leading to CF, Delta F508, occurs in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR. The Delta F508 mutation disrupts protein processing, leading to a decreased level of mutant channels at the plasma membrane and reduced transepithelial chloride permeability. Partial correction of the Delta F508 molecular defect in vitro is achieved by incubation of cells with several classes of chemical chaperones, indicating that further investigation of novel small molecules is warranted as a means for producing new therapies for CF. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The yeast two-hybrid assay was used to study the effect of CF-causing mutations on the ability of NBD1 to self-associate and form dimers. A yeast strain demonstrating defective growth as a result of impaired NBD1 dimerization due to Delta F508 was used as a drug discovery bioassay for the identification of plant natural product compounds restoring mutant NBD1 interaction. Active compounds were purified and the chemical structures determined. The purified compounds were tested in epithelial cells expressing CFTR Delta F508 and the resulting effect on transepithelial chloride permeability was assessed using short-circuit chloride current measurements. RESULTS: Wild-type NBD1 of CFTR forms homodimers in a yeast two-hybrid assay. CF-causing mutations within NBD1 that result in defective processing of CFTR (Delta F508, Delta I507, and S549R) disrupted NBD1 interaction in yeast. In contrast, a CF-causing mutation that does not impair CFTR processing (G551D) had no effect on NBD1 dimerization. Using the yeast-based assay, we identified a novel limonoid compound (TS3) that corrected the Delta F508 NBD1 dimerization defect in yeast and also increased the chloride permeability of Fisher Rat

  17. S-palmitoylation regulates biogenesis of core glycosylated wild-type and F508del CFTR in a post-ER compartment.

    PubMed

    McClure, Michelle L; Wen, Hui; Fortenberry, James; Hong, Jeong S; Sorscher, Eric J

    2014-04-15

    Defects in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) maturation are central to the pathogenesis of CF (cystic fibrosis). Palmitoylation serves as a key regulator of maturational processing in other integral membrane proteins, but has not been tested previously for functional effects on CFTR. In the present study, we used metabolic labelling to confirm that wild-type and F508del CFTR are palmitoylated, and show that blocking palmitoylation with the pharmacologic inhibitor 2-BP (2-bromopalmitate) decreases steady-state levels of both wild-type and low temperature-corrected F508del CFTR, disrupts post-ER (endoplasmic reticulum) maturation and reduces ion channel function at the cell surface. PATs (protein acyl transferases) comprise a family of 23 gene products that contain a DHHC motif and mediate palmitoylation. Recombinant expression of specific PATs led to increased levels of CFTR protein and enhanced palmitoylation as judged by Western blot and metabolic labelling. Specifically, we show that DHHC-7 (i) increases steady-state levels of wild-type and F508del CFTR band B, (ii) interacts preferentially with the band B glycoform, and (iii) augments radiolabelling by [3H]palmitic acid. Interestingly, immunofluorescence revealed that DHHC-7 also sequesters the F508del protein to a post-ER (Golgi) compartment. Our findings point to the importance of palmitoylation during wild-type and F508del CFTR trafficking.

  18. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Allelic Variants Relate to Shifts in Faecal Microbiota of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; De Biase, Riccardo Valerio; Stamato, Antonella; Bertasi, Serenella; Lucarelli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF). CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common) lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. Methods Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. Results Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1) presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2) disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme) were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum) were reduced. Conclusions This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a ‘systemic disease’, linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis. PMID:23613805

  19. Characterization of mitochondrial function in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function.

    PubMed

    Atlante, Anna; Favia, Maria; Bobba, Antonella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-06-01

    Evidence supporting the occurrence of oxidative stress in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is well established and the literature suggests that oxidative stress is inseparably linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have characterized mitochondrial function, in particular as it regards the steps of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production, in airway cells either homozygous for the F508del-CFTR allele or stably expressing wt-CFTR. We find that oxygen consumption, ΔΨ generation, adenine nucleotide translocator-dependent ADP/ATP exchange and both mitochondrial Complex I and IV activities are impaired in CF cells, while both mitochondrial ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation increase. Importantly, treatment of CF cells with the small molecules VX-809 and 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin, which act as "correctors" for F508del CFTR by rescuing the F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion, while having no effect per sè on mitochondrial function in wt-CFTR cells, significantly improved all the above mitochondrial parameters towards values found in the airway cells expressing wt-CFTR. This novel study on mitochondrial bioenergetics provides a springboard for future research to further understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the involvement of mitochondria in CF and identify the proteins primarily responsible for the F508del-CFTR-dependent mitochondrial impairment and thus reveal potential novel targets for CF therapy.

  20. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and K(+) channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Purinergic agonists have been considered for the treatment of respiratory epithelia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The pancreas, one of the most seriously affected organs in CF, expresses various purinergic receptors. Studies on the rodent pancreas show that purinergic signaling regulates pancreatic secretion. In the present study we aim to identify Cl(-) and K(+) channels in human pancreatic ducts and their regulation by purinergic receptors. Human pancreatic duct epithelia formed by Capan-1 or CFPAC-1 cells were studied in open-circuit Ussing chambers. In Capan-1 cells, ATP/UTP effects were dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have mutated CFTR, basolateral ATP and UTP had negligible effects. In addition to Cl(-) transport in Capan-1 cells, the effects of 5,6-dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (DC-EBIO) and clotrimazole indicated functional expression of the intermediate conductance K(+) channels (IK, KCa3.1). The apical effects of ATP/UTP were greatly potentiated by the IK channel opener DC-EBIO. Determination of RNA and protein levels revealed that Capan-1 cells have high expression of TMEM16A (ANO1), a likely CaCC candidate. We conclude that in human pancreatic duct cells ATP/UTP regulates via purinergic receptors both Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/ANO1 and CFTR) and K(+) channels (IK). The K(+) channels provide the driving force for Cl(-)-channel-dependent secretion, and luminal ATP provided locally or secreted from acini may potentiate secretory processes. Future strategies in augmenting pancreatic duct function should consider sidedness of purinergic signaling and the essential role of K(+) channels.

  1. Phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) serine-511 by the combined action of tyrosine kinases and CK2: the implication of tyrosine-512 and phenylalanine-508.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Luca; Marin, Oriano; Venerando, Andrea; Donella-Deana, Arianna; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2013-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) harbors, close to Phe-508, whose deletion is the commonest cause of cystic fibrosis, a conserved potential CK2 phospho-acceptor site (Ser511), which however is not susceptible to phosphorylation by CK2. To shed light on this apparent paradox, a series of systematically substituted peptides encompassing Ser511 were assayed for their ability to be phosphorylated. The main outcomes of our study are the following: (a) Tyr512 plays a prominent role as a negative determinant as its replacement by Ala restores Ser511 phosphorylation by CK2; (b) an even more pronounced phosphorylation of Ser511 is promoted if Tyr512 is replaced by phospho-tyrosine instead of alanine; (c) Tyr512 and, to a lesser extent, Tyr515 are readily phosphorylated by Lyn, a protein tyrosine kinase of the Src family, in a manner which is enhanced by the concomitant Phe508 deletion. Collectively taken, our data, in conjunction with the notion that Tyr515 is phosphorylated in vivo, disclose the possibility that CFTR Ser511 can be phosphorylated by the combined action of tyrosine kinases and CK2 and disclose a new mechanism of hierarchical phosphorylation where the role of the priming kinase is that of removing negative determinant(s).

  2. S-palmitoylation regulates biogenesis of core glycosylated wild-type and F508del CFTR in a post-ER compartment

    PubMed Central

    McClure, M.L.; Wen, H.; Fortenberry, J.; Hong, J.S.; Sorscher, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Defects in CFTR maturation are central to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Palmitoylation serves as a key regulator of maturational processing in other integral membrane proteins, but has not been tested previously for functional effects on CFTR. In this study, we used metabolic labeling to confirm that wild-type and F508del CFTR are palmitoylated, and show that blocking palmitoylation with the pharmacologic inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP) decreases steady state levels of both wild-type and low temperature-corrected F508del CFTR, disrupts post-ER maturation, and reduces ion channel function at the cell surface. Protein acyl transferases (PATs) comprise a family of 23 gene products that contain a DHHC motif and mediate palmitoylation. Recombinant expression of specific PATs led to increased levels of CFTR protein and enhanced palmitoylation as judged by western blot and metabolic labeling. Specifically, we show that DHHC-7: 1) increases steady state levels of wild-type and F508del CFTR band B, 2) interacts preferentially with the band B glycoform, and 3) augments radiolabeling by 3H-palmitic acid. Interestingly, immunofluorescence revealed that DHHC-7 also sequesters the F508del protein to a post-ER (Golgi) compartment. Our findings point to the importance of palmitoylation during wild-type and F508del CFTR trafficking. PMID:24475974

  3. The CFTR trafficking mutation F508del inhibits the constitutive activity of SLC26A9.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Carol A; Mitra, Shalini; Mishra, Sanjay K; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yu; Pilewski, Joseph M; Madden, Dean R; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2017-06-01

    Several members of the SLC26A family of anion transporters associate with CFTR, forming complexes in which CFTR and SLC26A functions are reciprocally regulated. These associations are thought to be facilitated by PDZ scaffolding interactions. CFTR has been shown to be positively regulated by NHERF-1, and negatively regulated by CAL in airway epithelia. However, it is unclear which PDZ-domain protein(s) interact with SLC26A9, a SLC26A family member found in airway epithelia. We have previously shown that primary, human bronchial epithelia (HBE) from non-CF donors exhibit constitutive anion secretion attributable to SLC26A9. However, constitutive anion secretion is absent in HBE from CF donors. We examined whether changes in SLC26A9 constitutive activity could be attributed to a loss of CFTR trafficking, and what role PDZ interactions played. HEK293 coexpressing SLC26A9 with the trafficking mutant F508del CFTR exhibited a significant reduction in constitutive current compared with cells coexpressing SLC26A9 and wt CFTR. We found that SLC26A9 exhibits complex glycosylation when coexpressed with F508del CFTR, but its expression at the plasma membrane is decreased. SLC26A9 interacted with both NHERF-1 and CAL, and its interaction with both significantly increased with coexpression of wt CFTR. However, coexpression with F508del CFTR only increased SLC26A9's interaction with CAL. Mutation of SLC26A9's PDZ motif decreased this association with CAL, and restored its constitutive activity. Correcting aberrant F508del CFTR trafficking in CF HBE with corrector VX-809 also restored SLC26A9 activity. We conclude that when SLC26A9 is coexpressed with F508del CFTR, its trafficking defect leads to a PDZ motif-sensitive intracellular retention of SLC26A9. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Roscovitine is a proteostasis regulator that corrects the trafficking defect of F508del-CFTR by a CDK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Norez, C; Vandebrouck, C; Bertrand, J; Noel, S; Durieu, E; Oumata, N; Galons, H; Antigny, F; Chatelier, A; Bois, P; Meijer, L; Becq, F

    2014-11-01

    The most common mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), F508del, causes defects in trafficking, channel gating and endocytosis of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Because CF is an orphan disease, therapeutic strategies aimed at improving mutant CFTR functions are needed to target the root cause of CF. Human CF airway epithelial cells were treated with roscovitine 100 μM for 2 h before CFTR maturation, expression and activity were examined. The mechanism of action of roscovitine was explored by recording the effect of depleting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) on the F508del-CFTR/calnexin interaction and by measuring proteasome activity. Of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors investigated, roscovitine was found to restore the cell surface expression and defective channel function of F508del-CFTR in human CF airway epithelial cells. Neither olomoucine nor (S)-CR8, two very efficient CDK inhibitors, corrected F508del-CFTR trafficking demonstrating that the correcting effect of roscovitine was independent of CDK inhibition. Competition studies with inhibitors of the ER quality control (ERQC) indicated that roscovitine acts on the calnexin pathway and on the degradation machinery. Roscovitine was shown (i) to partially inhibit the interaction between F508del-CFTR and calnexin by depleting ER Ca(2+) and (ii) to directly inhibit the proteasome activity in a Ca(2+) -independent manner. Roscovitine is able to correct the defective function of F508del-CFTR by preventing the ability of the ERQC to interact with and degrade F508del-CFTR via two synergistic but CDK-independent mechanisms. Roscovitine has potential as a pharmacological therapy for CF. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Roscovitine is a proteostasis regulator that corrects the trafficking defect of F508del-CFTR by a CDK-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Norez, C; Vandebrouck, C; Bertrand, J; Noel, S; Durieu, E; Oumata, N; Galons, H; Antigny, F; Chatelier, A; Bois, P; Meijer, L; Becq, F

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The most common mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), F508del, causes defects in trafficking, channel gating and endocytosis of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Because CF is an orphan disease, therapeutic strategies aimed at improving mutant CFTR functions are needed to target the root cause of CF. Experimental Approach Human CF airway epithelial cells were treated with roscovitine 100 μM for 2 h before CFTR maturation, expression and activity were examined. The mechanism of action of roscovitine was explored by recording the effect of depleting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ on the F508del-CFTR/calnexin interaction and by measuring proteasome activity. Key Results Of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors investigated, roscovitine was found to restore the cell surface expression and defective channel function of F508del-CFTR in human CF airway epithelial cells. Neither olomoucine nor (S)-CR8, two very efficient CDK inhibitors, corrected F508del-CFTR trafficking demonstrating that the correcting effect of roscovitine was independent of CDK inhibition. Competition studies with inhibitors of the ER quality control (ERQC) indicated that roscovitine acts on the calnexin pathway and on the degradation machinery. Roscovitine was shown (i) to partially inhibit the interaction between F508del-CFTR and calnexin by depleting ER Ca2+ and (ii) to directly inhibit the proteasome activity in a Ca2+-independent manner. Conclusions and Implications Roscovitine is able to correct the defective function of F508del-CFTR by preventing the ability of the ERQC to interact with and degrade F508del-CFTR via two synergistic but CDK-independent mechanisms. Roscovitine has potential as a pharmacological therapy for CF. PMID:25065395

  6. Glibenclamide induces apoptosis through inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, J A; Kang, Y S; Lee, S H; Lee, E H; Yoo, B H; Lee, Y S

    1999-08-11

    Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels, induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells. Glibenclamide increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which was significantly inhibited by Ca(2+) release blockers dantrolene and TMB-8. BAPTA/AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, and the Ca(2+) release blockers significantly inhibited glibenclamide-induced apoptosis. Glibanclamide also increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration, which was significantly blocked by CFTR Cl(-) channel activators levamisole and bromotetramisole. These activators also significantly inhibited both intracellular Ca(2+) release and apoptosis induced by glibenclamide. The expression of CFTR protein in the cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results suggest that glibenclamide induced apoptosis through inhibition of CFTR Cl(-) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release and that this protein may be a good target for treatment of human hepatomas.

  7. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines for ivacaftor therapy in the context of CFTR genotype.

    PubMed

    Clancy, J P; Johnson, S G; Yee, S W; McDonagh, E M; Caudle, K E; Klein, T E; Cannavo, M; Giacomini, K M

    2014-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease arising as a consequence of mutations within the CFTR gene. Novel therapeutics for CF are emerging that target CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) defects resulting from specific CFTR variants. Ivacaftor is a drug that potentiates CFTR gating function and is specifically indicated for CF patients with a particular CFTR variant, G551D-CFTR (rs75527207). Here, we provide therapeutic recommendations for ivacaftor based on preemptive CFTR genotype results.

  8. Differential sensitivity of the cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated mutants G551D and G1349D to potentiators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiwei; Taddei, Alessandro; Sheppard, David N

    2006-01-27

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss of function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Two CF mutants, G551D and G1349D, affect equivalent residues in the highly conserved LSGGQ motifs that are essential components of the ATP-binding sites of CFTR. Both mutants severely disrupt CFTR channel gating by decreasing mean burst duration (MBD) and prolonging greatly the interburst interval (IBI). To identify small molecules that rescue the gating defects of G551D- and G1349D-CFTR and understand better how these agents work, we used the patch clamp technique to study the effects on G551D- and G1349D-CFTR of phloxine B, pyrophosphate (PP(i)), and 2'-deoxy ATP (2'-dATP), three agents that strongly enhance CFTR channel gating. Phloxine B (5 microm) potentiated robustly G551D-CFTR Cl- channels by altering both MBD and IBI. In contrast, phloxine B (5 microm) decreased the IBI of G1349D-CFTR, but this effect was insufficient to rescue G1349D-CFTR channel gating. PP(i) (5 mm) potentiated weakly G551D-CFTR and was without effect on the G1349D-CFTR Cl- channel. However, by altering both MBD and IBI, albeit with different efficacies, 2'-dATP (1 mm) potentiated both G551D- and G1349D-CFTR Cl- channels. Using the ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerization model of CFTR channel gating, we suggest that phloxine B, PP(i) and 2'-dATP alter channel gating by distinct mechanisms. We conclude that G551D- and G1349D-CFTR have distinct pharmacological profiles and speculate that drug therapy for CF is likely to be mutation-specific.

  9. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase.

  10. Optimization of a Yellow fluorescent protein-based iodide influx high-throughput screening assay for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jinliang; Cotard, Shakira; Andersen, Jennifer; Zhu, Ping; Staunton, Jane; Lee, Margaret; Lin, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited, life-threatening disease associated with mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The most common mutation, F508del CFTR, is found in 90% of CF patients. The loss of a single amino acid (phenylalanine at position 508) results in malformed CFTR with defective trafficking to the plasma membrane and impaired channel function. A functional assay with cells expressing F508del CFTR has been previously described by others using genetically engineered halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein to screen for CFTR modulators. We adapted this yellow fluorescent protein assay to 384-well plate format with a high-throughput screening plate reader, and optimized the assay in terms of data quality, resolution, and throughput, with target-specific protocols. The optimized assay was validated with reference compounds from cystic fibrosis foundation therapeutics. On the basis of the Z-factor range (≥0.5) and the potential productivity, this assay is well suited for high-throughput screening. It was successfully used to screen for active single agent and synergistic combinations of single agent modulators of F508del CFTR from a library collection of current active pharmaceutical ingredients (supported by Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics).

  11. Exploiting species differences to understand the CFTR Cl- channel.

    PubMed

    Bose, Samuel J; Scott-Ward, Toby S; Cai, Zhiwei; Sheppard, David N

    2015-10-01

    The anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. CFTR plays a pivotal role in transepithelial ion transport as its dysfunction in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) dramatically demonstrates. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that CFTR first appeared in aquatic vertebrates fulfilling important roles in osmosensing and organ development. Here, we review selectively, knowledge of CFTR structure, function and pharmacology, gleaned from cross-species comparative studies of recombinant CFTR proteins, including CFTR chimeras. The data argue that subtle changes in CFTR structure can affect strongly channel function and the action of CF mutations.

  12. Oxidative Stress Regulates CFTR Gene Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells through a Distal Antioxidant Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Leir, Shih-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) expression in human airway epithelial cells involves the recruitment of distal cis-regulatory elements, which are associated with airway-selective DNase hypersensitive sites at −44 kb and −35 kb from the gene. The −35-kb site encompasses an enhancer that is regulated by the immune mediators interferon regulatory factor 1 and 2 and by nuclear factor Y. Here we investigate the −44-kb element, which also has enhancer activity in vitro in airway epithelial cells but is inactive in intestinal epithelial cells. This site contains an antioxidant response element (ARE) that plays a critical role in its function in airway cell lines and primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The natural antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN) induces nuclear translocation of nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that regulates genes with AREs in their promoters, many of which are involved in response to injury. Under normal conditions, the −44-kb ARE is occupied by the repressor BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor (Bach1), and v-Maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog K (MafK) heterodimers. After 2 hours of SFN treatment, Nrf2 displaces these repressive factors and activates CFTR expression. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that both the ARE and an adjacent NF-κB binding site are required for activation of the –44-kb element in airway epithelial cells. Moreover, this element is functionally linked to the −35-kb enhancer in modulating CFTR expression in response to environmental stresses in the airway. PMID:25259561

  13. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  14. CFTR potentiators partially restore channel function to A561E-CFTR, a cystic fibrosis mutant with a similar mechanism of dysfunction as F508del-CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiting; Liu, Jia; Loizidou, Avgi; Bugeja, Luc A; Warner, Ross; Hawley, Bethan R; Cai, Zhiwei; Toye, Ashley M; Sheppard, David N; Li, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel causes the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Towards the development of transformational drug therapies for CF, we investigated the channel function and action of CFTR potentiators on A561E, a CF mutation found frequently in Portugal. Like the most common CF mutation F508del, A561E causes a temperature-sensitive folding defect that prevents CFTR delivery to the cell membrane and is associated with severe disease. Experimental Approach Using baby hamster kidney cells expressing recombinant CFTR, we investigated CFTR expression by cell surface biotinylation, and function and pharmacology with the iodide efflux and patch-clamp techniques. Key Results Low temperature incubation delivered a small proportion of A561E-CFTR protein to the cell surface. Like F508del-CFTR, low temperature-rescued A561E-CFTR exhibited a severe gating defect characterized by brief channel openings separated by prolonged channel closures. A561E-CFTR also exhibited thermoinstability, losing function more quickly than F508del-CFTR in cell-free membrane patches and intact cells. Using the iodide efflux assay, CFTR potentiators, including genistein and the clinically approved small-molecule ivacaftor, partially restored function to A561E-CFTR. Interestingly, ivacaftor restored wild-type levels of channel activity (as measured by open probability) to single A561E- and F508del-CFTR Cl− channels. However, it accentuated the thermoinstability of both mutants in cell-free membrane patches. Conclusions and Implications Like F508del-CFTR, A561E-CFTR perturbs protein processing, thermostability and channel gating. CFTR potentiators partially restore channel function to low temperature-rescued A561E-CFTR. Transformational drug therapy for A561E-CFTR is likely to require CFTR correctors, CFTR potentiators and special attention to thermostability. PMID:24902474

  15. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  16. RNF185 Is a Novel E3 Ligase of Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation (ERAD) That Targets Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)*

    PubMed Central

    El Khouri, Elma; Le Pavec, Gwenaëlle; Toledano, Michel B.; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded or improperly assembled proteins are exported to the cytoplasm and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through a process called ER-associated degradation (ERAD). ER-associated E3 ligases, which coordinate substrate recognition, export, and proteasome targeting, are key components of ERAD. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is one ERAD substrate targeted to co-translational degradation by the E3 ligase RNF5/RMA1. RNF185 is a RING domain-containing polypeptide homologous to RNF5. We show that RNF185 controls the stability of CFTR and of the CFTRΔF508 mutant in a RING- and proteasome-dependent manner but does not control that of other classical ERAD model substrates. Reciprocally, its silencing stabilizes CFTR proteins. Turnover analyses indicate that, as RNF5, RNF185 targets CFTR to co-translational degradation. Importantly, however, simultaneous depletion of RNF5 and RNF185 profoundly blocks CFTRΔF508 degradation not only during translation but also after synthesis is complete. Our data thus identify RNF185 and RNF5 as a novel E3 ligase module that is central to the control of CFTR degradation. PMID:24019521

  17. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  18. A truncated CFTR protein rescues endogenous DeltaF508-CFTR and corrects chloride transport in mice.

    PubMed

    Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Hong, Jeong S; Berdiev, Bakhram K; Fortenberry, James A; Rennolds, Jessica; Clancy, J P; Benos, Dale J; Boyaka, Prosper N; Sorscher, Eric J

    2009-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is most frequently associated with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (DeltaF508) in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The DeltaF508-CFTR mutant protein exhibits a folding defect that affects its processing and impairs chloride-channel function. This study aimed to determine whether CFTR fragments approximately half the size of wild-type CFTR and complementary to the portion of CFTR bearing the mutation can specifically rescue the processing of endogenous DeltaF508-CFTR in vivo. cDNA encoding CFTR fragments were delivered to human airway epithelial cells and mice harboring endogenous DeltaF508-CFTR. Delivery of small CFTR fragments, which do not act as chloride channels by themselves, rescue DeltaF508-CFTR. Therefore, we can speculate that the presence of the CFTR fragment, which does not harbor a mutation, might facilitate intermolecular interactions. The rescue of CFTR was evident by the restoration of chloride transport in human CFBE41o- bronchial epithelial cells expressing DeltaF508-CFTR in vitro. More important, nasal administration of an adenovirus expressing a complementary CFTR fragment restored some degree of CFTR activity in the nasal airways of DeltaF508 homozygous mice in vivo. These findings identify complementary protein fragments as a viable in vivo approach for correcting disease-causing misfolding of plasma membrane proteins.

  19. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  20. The Mitochondrial Complex I Activity Is Reduced in Cells with Impaired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Function

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Angel G.; Clauzure, Mariángeles; Marín, María C.; Taminelli, Guillermo L.; Massip Copiz, María M.; Sánchez, Francisco; Schulman, Gustavo; Teiber, María L.; Santa-Coloma, Tomás A.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease. It results from different possible mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes the CFTR chloride channel. We have previously studied the differential expression of genes in CF and CF corrected cell lines, and found a reduced expression of MTND4 in CF cells. MTND4 is a mitochondrial gene encoding the MTND4 subunit of the mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I). Since this subunit is essential for the assembly and activity of mCx-I, we have now studied whether the activity of this complex was also affected in CF cells. By using Blue Native-PAGE, the in-gel activity (IGA) of the mCx-I was found reduced in CFDE and IB3-1 cells (CF cell lines) compared with CFDE/6RepCFTR and S9 cells, respectively (CFDE and IB3-1 cells ectopically expressing wild-type CFTR). Moreover, colon carcinoma T84 and Caco-2 cells, which express wt-CFTR, either treated with CFTR inhibitors (glibenclamide, CFTR(inh)-172 or GlyH101) or transfected with a CFTR-specific shRNAi, showed a significant reduction on the IGA of mCx-I. The reduction of the mCx-I activity caused by CFTR inhibition under physiological or pathological conditions may have a profound impact on mitochondrial functions of CF and non-CF cells. PMID:23185247

  1. Ethnic heterogeneity and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation frequencies in Chicago-area CF families

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.; Lester, L.A.; Mott, C.; Billstrand, C.; Lemke, A.; Ven, K. van der ); Marcus, S.; Kraut, J.; Booth, C. ); Lloyd-Still, J. )

    1992-12-01

    The identification of a common mutation, [Delta]F508, in the CFTR gene allowed, for the first time, the detection of cystic fibrosis (CF) carriers in the general population. Further genetic studies revealed >100 additional disease-causing mutations in this gene, few of which occur on >1% of CF chromosomes in any ethnic group. Prior to establishing counseling guidelines and carrier risk assessments, the authors sought to establish the frequencies of the CFTR mutations that are present in CF families living in the Chicago are, a region notable for its ethnic heterogeneity. Their sample included 283 unrelated CF carriers, with the following ethnic composition: 78% non-Ashkenazi Caucasians, 5% Ashkenazi, 9% African-American, 3% Mexican, 0.3% Native American, and 5% mixed ancestry. When a panel of 10 mutations ([Delta]F508, [Delta]I507, G542X, G551D, R553X, S549N, R1162X, W1282X, N1303K, and 1717-1G[r arrow]A) was used, detection rates ranged from 75% in non-Ashkenazi Caucasians to 40% in African-Americans. These data suggest that the goal of screening for 90%-95% of CF mutations may be unrealistic in this and other, similar US populations. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  2. CFTR transcription defects in pancreatic sufficient cystic fibrosis patients with only one mutation in the coding region of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Molly B; Hefferon, Timothy W; Wang, Nulang; Merlo, Christian; Milla, Carlos; Borowitz, Drucy; Green, Eric D; Mogayzel, Peter J; Cutting, Garry R

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) manifest a multisystem disease due to deleterious mutations in each gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). However, the role of dysfunctional CFTR is uncertain in individuals with mild forms of CF (ie, pancreatic sufficiency) and mutation in only one CFTR gene. Methods Eleven pancreatic sufficient (PS) CF patients with only one CFTR mutation identified after mutation screening (three patients), mutation scanning (four patients) or DNA sequencing (four patients) were studied. Bi-directional sequencing of the coding region of CFTR was performed in patients who had mutation screening or scanning. If a second CFTR mutation was not identified, CFTR mRNA transcripts from nasal epithelial cells were analysed to determine if any PS-CF patients harboured a second CFTR mutation that altered RNA expression. Results Sequencing of the coding regions of CFTR identified a second deleterious mutation in five of the seven patients who previously had mutation screening or mutation scanning. Five of the remaining six patients with only one deleterious mutation identified in the coding region of one CFTR gene had a pathologic reduction in the amount of RNA transcribed from their other CFTR gene (8.4–16% of wild type). Conclusions These results show that sequencing of the coding region of CFTR followed by analysis of CFTR transcription could be a useful diagnostic approach to confirm that patients with mild forms of CF harbour deleterious alterations in both CFTR genes. PMID:21097845

  3. Characterization of a disease-associated mutation affecting a putative splicing regulatory element in intron 6b of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed

    Faà, Valeria; Incani, Federica; Meloni, Alessandra; Corda, Denise; Masala, Maddalena; Baffico, A Maria; Seia, Manuela; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, M Cristina

    2009-10-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common recessive disorder caused by >1600 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. About 13% of CFTR mutations are classified as "splicing mutations," but for almost 40% of these, their role in affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of the gene is not yet defined. In this work, we describe a new splicing mutation detected in three unrelated Italian CF patients. By DNA analyses and mRNA studies, we identified the c.1002-1110_1113delTAAG mutation localized in intron 6b of the CFTR gene. At the mRNA level, this mutation creates an aberrant inclusion of a sequence of 101 nucleotides between exons 6b and 7. This sequence corresponds to a portion of intron 6b and resembles a cryptic exon because it is characterized by an upstream ag and a downstream gt sequence, which are most probably recognized as 5'- and 3'-splice sites by the spliceosome. Through functional analysis of this splicing defect, we show that this mutation abolishes the interaction of the splicing regulatory protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 with an intronic splicing regulatory element and creates a new recognition motif for the SRp75 splicing factor, causing activation of the cryptic exon. Our results show that the c.1002-1110_1113delTAAG mutation creates a new intronic splicing regulatory element in intron 6b of the CFTR gene exclusively recognized by SRp75.

  4. Identification of mutations in exons 1 through 8 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed

    Zielenski, J; Bozon, D; Kerem, B; Markiewicz, D; Durie, P; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C

    1991-05-01

    Five different mutations have been identified in the gene causing cystic fibrosis (CF) through sequencing regions encompassing exons 1-8, including the 5' untranslated leader. Two of these apparent mutations are missense mutations, one in exon 3 (Gly to Glu at position 85; G85E) and another in exon 5 (Gly to Arg at 178; G178R), both causing significant changes in the corresponding amino acids in the encoded protein--cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Two others affect the highly conserved RNA splice junction flanking the 3' end of exons 4 and 5 (621 + 1G----T, 711 + 1G----T), resulting in a probable splicing defect. The last mutation is a single-basepair deletion in exon 4, causing a frameshift. These five mutations account for the 9 of 31 non-delta F508 CF chromosomes in our Canadian CF family collection and they are not found in any of the normal chromosomes. Three of the mutations, 621 + 1G----T, 711 + 1G----T, and G85E, are found in the French-Canadian population, with 621 + 1G----T being the most abundant (5/7). There are two other sequence variations in the CFTR gene; one of them (129G----C) is located 4 nucleotides upstream of the proposed translation initiation codon and, although present only on CF chromosomes, it is not clear whether it is a disease-causing mutation; the other (R75Q) is most likely a sequence variation within the coding region.

  5. Complete and rapid scanning of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC): major implications for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Le Maréchal, C; Audrézet, M P; Quéré, I; Raguénès, O; Langonné, S; Férec, C

    2001-04-01

    More than 900 mutations and more than 200 different polymorphisms have now been reported in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Ten years after the cloning of the CFTR gene, the complete scanning of the 27 exons to identify known and novel mutations remains challenging. Rapid accurate identification of mutated alleles is important for prenatal diagnosis, for cascade screening in families at risk of cystic fibrosis (CF) and for understanding the correlation between genotype and phenotype. In this study, we report the successful use of denaturing ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC) to analyse rapidly the complete coding sequence of the CFTR gene. With 27 pairs of polymerase chain reaction primers, we optimised the temperature conditions required for the analysis of each amplicon and validated thetest conditions on samples from a panel of 1552 CF patients who came from France and other European countries and who had mutations and polymorphisms located in the various melting domains of the gene. D-HPLC identified 415 mutated alleles previously characterised by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing, plus 74 novel mutations reported here. This new technique for screening DNA for sequence variation was extremely accurate (it identified 100% of the CFTR alleles tested so far) and rapid (the complete CFTR gene could be analysed in less than a week). Our approach should reduce the number of untyped CF alleles in populations and thus decrease the residual risk in couples at risk of CF. This technique may be important not only for CF,but also for many other genes with a high frequency of point mutations at a variety of sites.

  6. Mammalian osmolytes and S-nitrosoglutathione promote Delta F508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Howard, Marybeth; Fischer, Horst; Roux, Jeremie; Santos, Bento C; Gullans, Steven R; Yancey, Paul H; Welch, William J

    2003-09-12

    In cystic fibrosis, the absence of functional CFTR results in thick mucous secretions in the lung and intestines, as well as pancreatic deficiency. Although expressed at high levels in the kidney, mutations in CFTR result in little or no apparent kidney dysfunction. In an effort to understand this phenomenon, we analyzed Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function in kidney cells under conditions that are common to the kidney, namely osmotic stress. Kidney cells were grown in culture and adapted to 250 mM NaCl and 250 mM urea. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of lysates from kidney cells adapted to these conditions identified an increase in the cellular osmolytes glycerophosphorylcholine, myo-inositol, sorbitol, and taurine. In contrast to isoosmotic conditions, hyperosmotic stress led to the proper folding and processing of Delta F508 CFTR. Furthermore, three of the cellular osmolytes, when added individually to cells, proved effective in promoting the proper folding and processing of the Delta F508 CFTR protein in both epithelial and fibroblast cells. Whole-cell patch clamping of osmolyte-treated cells showed that Delta F508 CFTR had trafficked to the plasma membrane and was activated by forskolin. Encouraged by these findings, we looked at other features common to the kidney that may impact Delta F508 maturation and function. Interestingly, a small molecule, S-nitrosoglutathione, which is a substrate for gamma glutamyltranspeptidase, an abundant enzyme in the kidney, likewise promoted Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function. S-Nitrosoglutathione-corrected Delta F508 CFTR exhibited a shorter half-life as compared with wild type CFTR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a small molecule approach as a therapeutic treatment in promoting Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function and suggest that an additional treatment may be required to stabilize Delta F508 CFTR protein once present at the plasma membrane. Finally, our observations may help to

  7. Aqueous cigarette smoke extract induces a voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A. R.; Norimatsu, Y.; Dawson, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel inhabits the apical membrane of airway epithelia, where its function is essential for mucus hydration, mucociliary clearance, and airway defense. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), most often a consequence of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, affects 15 million persons in the US. Clinically, COPD is characterized by many of the salient features of cystic fibrosis lung disease, where CFTR is either absent or reduced in function. CS is an acidic aerosol (pH 5.3 to 6.3) reported to contain over 4,000 constituents. Acute CS exposure has been reported to decrease airway transepithelial voltage in vivo and short-circuit current in vitro; however, the mechanistic basis of these effects is uncertain. The goal of the studies described here was to develop a bioassay to characterize the effects of aqueous CS preparations on the channel function of CFTR. We studied aqueous CS extract (CSE) prepared in our laboratory, as well as commercial cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in Xenopus oocytes expressing human CFTR. Application of CSE at pH 5.3 produced a reversible, voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR conductance. CSE neutralized to pH 7.3 produced less inhibition of CFTR conductance. Serial dilution of CSE revealed a dose-dependent effect at acidic and neutral pH. In contrast, CSC did not inhibit CFTR conductance in oocytes. We conclude that one or more components of CSE inhibits CFTR in a manner similar to diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a negatively charged, open-channel blocker. PMID:24318115

  8. Specific stabilization of CFTR by phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; Khazanov, Netaly; Kappes, John C; Dai, Qun; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Urbatsch, Ina L

    2017-02-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, ABCC7) is a plasma membrane chloride ion channel in the ABC transporter superfamily. CFTR is a key target for cystic fibrosis drug development, and its structural elucidation would advance those efforts. However, the limited in vivo and in vitro stability of the protein, particularly its nucleotide binding domains, has made structural studies challenging. Here we demonstrate that phosphatidylserine uniquely stimulates and thermally stabilizes the ATP hydrolysis function of purified human CFTR. Among several lipids tested, the greatest stabilization was observed with brain phosphatidylserine, which shifted the Tm for ATPase activity from 22.7±0.8°C to 35.0±0.2°C in wild-type CFTR, and from 26.6±0.7°C to 42.1±0.2°C in a more stable mutant CFTR having deleted regulatory insertion and S492P/A534P/I539T mutations. When ATPase activity was measured at 37°C in the presence of brain phosphatidylserine, Vmax for wild-type CFTR was 240±60nmol/min/mg, a rate higher than previously reported and consistent with rates for other purified ABC transporters. The significant thermal stabilization of CFTR by phosphatidylserine may be advantageous in future structural and biophysical studies of CFTR.

  9. Identification of the M1101K mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and complete detection of cystic fibrosis mutations in the Hutterite population

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D. ); Fujiwara, M.; Paradis, A.J.; Anacleto, A.I.; Morgan, K. ); Richards, B.; Klinger, K.W. ); Schwartz, R.H. ); Lapchee Tsui Univ. of Toronto, Ontario )

    1993-03-01

    The Hutterite population is a genetic isolate with an increased incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF). Previously the authors identified three CF haplotypes defined by polymorphisms flanking the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. [Delta]F508 was present on one of the haplotypes in only 35% of CF chromosomes. They hypothesized that the other two CF haplotypes, one of which was the most common and the other of which is rare, each harbored different non-[Delta]F508 mutations. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis detected a missense mutation, M1101K, in both chromosomes of a Hutterite patient carrying the two non-[Delta]F508 haplotypes. M1101K appears to have originated on an uncommon CFTR allele and to be infrequent outside the Hutterite population. The presence of M1101K on two haplotypes is likely the result of a CFTR intragenic recombination which occurred since the founding, 10-12 generations ago, of the Hutterite population. The crossover was located between exons 14a and 17b, an interval of approximately 15 kbp. [Delta]F508 and M1101K accounted for all of the CF mutations in patients from 16 CF families representing the three subdivisions of the Hutterite population. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Basal expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene is dependent on protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, R A; Matthews, R P; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1995-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel that becomes activated after phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We demonstrate that PKA also plays a crucial role in maintaining basal expression of the CFTR gene in the human colon carcinoma cell line T84. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of a dominant-negative regulatory subunit or treatment with the PKA-selective inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89) caused a complete suppression of CFTR gene expression without affecting other constitutively active genes. Basal expression of a 2.2-kb region of the CFTR promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene (CFTR-luc) exhibited the same dependence on PKA. The ability of cAMP to induce CFTR over basal levels is cell-type specific. In T84 cells, both the endogenous CFTR gene and CFTR-luc exhibited only a modest inducibility (approximately 2-fold), whereas in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3, CFTR-luc could be induced at least 4-fold. A variant cAMP-response element is present at position -48 to -41 in the CFTR promoter, and mutation of this sequence blocks basal expression. We conclude that cAMP, acting through PKA, is an essential regulator of basal CFTR gene expression and may mediate an induction of CFTR in responsive cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7543684

  11. Rescue of functional DeltaF508-CFTR channels by co-expression with truncated CFTR constructs in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Owsianik, Grzegorz; Cao, Lishuang; Nilius, Bernd

    2003-11-06

    The most frequent mutant variant of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), DeltaF508-CFTR, is misprocessed and subsequently degraded in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using the patch-clamp technique, we showed that co-expressions of DeltaF508-CFTR with the N-terminal CFTR truncates containing bi-arginine (RXR) retention/retrieval motifs result in a functional rescue of the DeltaF508-CFTR mutant channel in COS-1 cells. This DeltaF508-CFTR rescue process was strongly impaired when truncated CFTR constructs possessed either the DeltaF508 mutation or arginine-to-lysine mutations in RXRs. In conclusions, our data demonstrated that expression of truncated CFTR constructs could be a novel promising approach to improve maturation of DeltaF508-CFTR channels.

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in North Egyptian population: implications for the genetic diagnosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Seedy, A; Pasquet, M C; Shafiek, H; Morsi, T; Kitzis, A; Ladevèze, V

    2016-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) occurrence in Arab populations is not common and still remains underidentified. Furthermore, the lack of disease awareness and diagnosis facilities have mislead the identification of cystic fibrosis for decades. The knowledge about cystic fibrosis (CF) in Egypt is very limited, and a few reports have drawn attention to the existence of CF or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RDs) in the Egyptian population. Therefore a comprehensive genetic analysis of the CFTR gene was realized in patients of North Egypt. DNA samples of 56 Egyptian patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutations. The 27 exons and their flanking regions of the CFTR gene were amplified by PCR, using the published primer pairs, and were studied by automated direct DNA sequencing to detect disease-causing mutations. Moreover, large duplication/deletion was analysed by MLPA technique. CFTR screening revealed the identification of thirteen mutations including four novel ones: c.92G>A (p.Arg31His), c.2782G>C (p.Ala928Pro), c.3718-24G>A, c.4207A>G (p.Arg1403Gly) and nine previously reported mutations: c.454A>T (p.Met152Leu), c.902A>G (p.Tyr301Cys), c.1418delG, c.2620-15C>G, c.2997_3000delAATT, c.3154T>G (p.Phe1052Val), c.3872A>G (p.Gln1291Arg), c.3877G>A (p.Val1293Ile), c.4242+10T>C. Furthermore, eight polymorphisms were found: c.743+40A>G, c.869+11C>T, c.1408A>G, c.1584G>A, c.2562T>G, c.3870A>G, c.4272C>T, c.4389G>A. These mutations and polymorphisms were not previously described in the Egyptian population except for the c.1408A>G polymorphism. Here we demonstrate the importance of the newly discovered mutations in Egyptian patients and the presence of CF, whereas the p.Phe508del mutation is not detected. The identification of CFTR mutations will become increasingly important in undocumented populations. The current findings will help us expand the mutational spectrum of CF and establish the first panel of the CFTR gene mutations in the Egyptian population and design an appropriate

  13. Cif is negatively regulated by the TetR family repressor CifR.

    PubMed

    MacEachran, Daniel P; Stanton, Bruce A; O'Toole, George A

    2008-07-01

    We previously reported that the novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Cif is capable of decreasing apical membrane expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We further demonstrated that Cif is capable of degrading the synthetic epoxide hydrolase (EH) substrate S-NEPC [(2S,3S)-trans-3-phenyl-2-oxiranylmethyl 4-nitrophenol carbonate], suggesting that Cif may be reducing apical membrane expression of CFTR via its EH activity. Here we report that Cif is capable of degrading the xenobiotic epoxide epibromohydrin (EBH) to its vicinal diol 3-bromo-1,2-propanediol. We also demonstrate that this epoxide is a potent inducer of cif gene expression. We show that the predicted TetR family transcriptional repressor encoded by the PA2931 gene, which is immediately adjacent to and divergently transcribed from the cif-containing, three-gene operon, negatively regulates cif gene expression by binding to the promoter region immediately upstream of the cif-containing operon. Furthermore, this protein-DNA interaction is disrupted by the epoxide EBH in vitro, suggesting that the binding of EBH by the PA2931 protein product drives the disassociation from its DNA-binding site. Given its role as a repressor of cif gene expression, we have renamed PA2931 as CifR. Finally, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patient sputum with increased cif gene expression are impaired for the expression of the cifR gene.

  14. Cif Is Negatively Regulated by the TetR Family Repressor CifR▿

    PubMed Central

    MacEachran, Daniel P.; Stanton, Bruce A.; O'Toole, George A.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that the novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Cif is capable of decreasing apical membrane expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We further demonstrated that Cif is capable of degrading the synthetic epoxide hydrolase (EH) substrate S-NEPC [(2S,3S)-trans-3-phenyl-2-oxiranylmethyl 4-nitrophenol carbonate], suggesting that Cif may be reducing apical membrane expression of CFTR via its EH activity. Here we report that Cif is capable of degrading the xenobiotic epoxide epibromohydrin (EBH) to its vicinal diol 3-bromo-1,2-propanediol. We also demonstrate that this epoxide is a potent inducer of cif gene expression. We show that the predicted TetR family transcriptional repressor encoded by the PA2931 gene, which is immediately adjacent to and divergently transcribed from the cif-containing, three-gene operon, negatively regulates cif gene expression by binding to the promoter region immediately upstream of the cif-containing operon. Furthermore, this protein-DNA interaction is disrupted by the epoxide EBH in vitro, suggesting that the binding of EBH by the PA2931 protein product drives the disassociation from its DNA-binding site. Given its role as a repressor of cif gene expression, we have renamed PA2931 as CifR. Finally, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patient sputum with increased cif gene expression are impaired for the expression of the cifR gene. PMID:18458065

  15. Prevalence of meconium ileus marks the severity of mutations of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Annie; Keenan, Katherine; Ooi, Chee Y; Dorfman, Ruslan; Sontag, Marci K; Naehrlich, Lutz; Castellani, Carlo; Strug, Lisa J; Rommens, Johanna M; Gonska, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Meconium ileus (MI) is a perinatal complication in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is only minimally influenced by environmental factors. We derived and examined MI prevalence (MIP) scores to assess CFTR phenotype-phenotype correlation for severe mutations. MIP scores were established using a Canadian CF population (n = 2,492) as estimates of the proportion of patients with MI among all patients carrying the same CFTR mutation, focusing on patients with p.F508del as the second allele. Comparisons were made to the registries from the US CF Foundation (n = 43,432), Italy (Veneto/Trentino/Alto Adige regions) (n = 1,788), and Germany (n = 3,596). The prevalence of MI varied among the different registries (13-21%). MI was predominantly prevalent in patients with pancreatic insufficiency carrying "severe" CFTR mutations. In this severe spectrum MIP scores further distinguished between mutation types, for example, G542X (0.31) with a high, F508del (0.22) with a moderate, and G551D (0.08) with a low MIP score. Higher MIP scores were associated with more severe clinical phenotypes, such as a lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (P = 0.01) and body mass index z score (P = 0.04). MIP scores can be used to rank CFTR mutations according to their clinical severity and provide a means to expand delineation of CF phenotypes.Genet Med 18 4, 333-340.

  16. Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0167 TITLE: Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation... Breast Cancer and Metabolic Regulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0167 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Amy...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents 20-25% of sporadic breast

  17. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  18. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  19. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function☆

    PubMed Central

    Valdivieso, Angel Gabriel; Santa-Coloma, Tomás A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR). Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy. PMID:24024153

  20. Individualized medicine using intestinal responses to CFTR potentiators and correctors.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that target the mutant CFTR protein are being introduced for treatment of cystic fibrosis. Stratification of subjects based on their CFTR genotype has been proven essential to demonstrate clinical efficacy of these novel treatments. Despite this stratification, considerable heterogeneity between subjects receiving CFTR modulators is still observed which remains largely uncharacterized. The CFTR genotype, and additional genetic and environmental factors that impact either tissue-specific CFTR protein characteristics or the pharmacokinetic properties of treatments will likely determine the individual response to therapy. The development of intestinal biomarkers for CFTR modulators may help to better quantitate individual responses to treatment, with potential to optimize treatments for subjects with limited responses, and the selection of responsive subjects that currently do not receive treatments. Here, recent advances concerning the use of intestinal biomarkers for CFTR modulator treatments are reviewed, with a focus on biomarkers of CFTR function in ex vivo rectal biopsies and in vitro cultured primary intestinal organoids. Their potential value is considered in the context of the current unmet needs for better treatments for the majority of subjects with CF, and individual biomarkers that enable the prediction of long term therapeutic responses to CFTR modulators. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:S23-S34. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Molecular modelling and molecular dynamics of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Hoffmann, Brice; Lehn, Pierre; Mornon, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as an ATP-gated channel. Considerable progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the molecular basis of the CFTR functions, as well as dysfunctions causing the common genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This review provides a global overview of the theoretical studies that have been performed so far, especially molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A special emphasis is placed on the CFTR-specific evolution of an ABC transporter framework towards a channel function, as well as on the understanding of the effects of disease-causing mutations and their specific modulation. This in silico work should help structure-based drug discovery and design, with a view to develop CFTR-specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of CF in the context of precision medicine.

  2. CFTR-France, a national relational patient database for sharing genetic and phenotypic data associated with rare CFTR variants.

    PubMed

    Claustres, Mireille; Thèze, Corinne; des Georges, Marie; Baux, David; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Thierry; Audrezet, Marie-Pierre; Dugueperoux, Ingrid; Férec, Claude; Lalau, Guy; Pagin, Adrien; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent; Gaston, Véronique; Bieth, Eric; Malinge, Marie-Claire; Reboul, Marie-Pierre; Fergelot, Patricia; Lemonnier, Lydie; Mekki, Chadia; Fanen, Pascale; Bergougnoux, Anne; Sasorith, Souphatta; Raynal, Caroline; Bareil, Corinne

    2017-10-01

    Most of the 2,000 variants identified in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) gene are rare or private. Their interpretation is hampered by the lack of available data and resources, making patient care and genetic counseling challenging. We developed a patient-based database dedicated to the annotations of rare CFTR variants in the context of their cis- and trans-allelic combinations. Based on almost 30 years of experience of CFTR testing, CFTR-France (https://cftr.iurc.montp.inserm.fr/cftr) currently compiles 16,819 variant records from 4,615 individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) or CFTR-RD (related disorders), fetuses with ultrasound bowel anomalies, newborns awaiting clinical diagnosis, and asymptomatic compound heterozygotes. For each of the 736 different variants reported in the database, patient characteristics and genetic information (other variations in cis or in trans) have been thoroughly checked by a dedicated curator. Combining updated clinical, epidemiological, in silico, or in vitro functional data helps to the interpretation of unclassified and the reassessment of misclassified variants. This comprehensive CFTR database is now an invaluable tool for diagnostic laboratories gathering information on rare variants, especially in the context of genetic counseling, prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. CFTR-France is thus highly complementary to the international database CFTR2 focused so far on the most common CF-causing alleles. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Bronchorelaxation of the human bronchi by CFTR activators.

    PubMed

    Norez, Caroline; Jayle, Christophe; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2014-02-01

    The airway functions are profoundly affected in many diseases including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis (CF). CF the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease is caused by mutations of the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis transmembrane Conductance Regulator) gene, which normally encodes a multifunctional and integral membrane cAMP regulated and ATP gated Cl(-) channel expressed in airway epithelial cells. Using human lung tissues obtained from patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer, we demonstrated that CFTR participates in bronchorelaxation. Using human bronchial smooth muscle cells (HBSMC), we applied iodide influx assay to analyze the CFTR-dependent ionic transport and immunofluorescence technique to localize CFTR proteins. Moreover, the relaxation was studied in isolated human bronchial segments after pre-contraction with carbachol to determine the implication of CFTR in bronchodilation. We found in HBSMC that the pharmacology and regulation of CFTR is similar to that of its epithelial counterpart both for activation (using forskolin/genistein or a benzo[c]quinolizinium derivative) and for inhibition (CFTR(inh)-172 and GPinh5a). With human bronchial rings, we observed that whatever the compound used including salbutamol, the activation of muscular CFTR leads to a bronchodilation after constriction with carbachol. Altogether, these observations revealed that CFTR in the human airways is expressed in bronchial smooth muscle cells and can be pharmacologically manipulated leading to the hypothesis that this ionic channel could contribute to bronchodilation in human.

  4. Localizing a gate in CFTR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-02-24

    Experimental and computational studies have painted a picture of the chloride permeation pathway in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a short narrow tunnel flanked by wider inner and outer vestibules. Although these studies also identified a number of transmembrane segments (TMs) as pore-lining, the exact location of CFTR's gate(s) remains unknown. Here, using a channel-permeant probe, [Au(CN)2](-), we provide evidence that CFTR bears a gate that coincides with the predicted narrow section of the pore defined as residues 338-341 in TM6. Specifically, cysteines introduced cytoplasmic to the narrow region (i.e., positions 344 in TM6 and 1148 in TM12) can be modified by intracellular [Au(CN)2](-) in both open and closed states, corroborating the conclusion that the internal vestibule does not harbor a gate. However, cysteines engineered to positions external to the presumed narrow region (e.g., 334, 335, and 337 in TM6) are all nonreactive toward cytoplasmic [Au(CN)2](-) in the absence of ATP, whereas they can be better accessed by extracellular [Au(CN)2](-) when the open probability is markedly reduced by introducing a second mutation, G1349D. As [Au(CN)2](-) and chloride ions share the same permeation pathway, these results imply a gate is situated between amino acid residues 337 and 344 along TM6, encompassing the very segment that may also serve as the selectivity filter for CFTR. The unique position of a gate in the middle of the ion translocation pathway diverges from those seen in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and thus distinguishes CFTR from other members of the ABC transporter family.

  5. Association of CFTR gene mutation with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Nutan; Awasthi, Shally; Dixit, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Mutation on both the copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is a recessively transmitted genetic disorder. It is hypothesized that individuals heterozygous for CFTR gene mutation may develop obstructive pulmonary diseases like asthma. There is great heterogeneity in the phenotypic presentation and severity of CF lung disease. This could be due to genetic or environmental factors. Several modifier genes have been identified which may directly or indirectly interact with CFTR pathway and affect the severity of disease. This review article discusses the information related to the association of CFTR gene mutation with asthma. Association between CFTR gene mutation and asthma is still unclear. Report ranges from studies showing positive or protective association to those showing no association. Therefore, studies with sufficiently large sample size and detailed phenotype are required to define the potential contribution of CFTR in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22664493

  6. Molecular consequences of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in the exocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, N; Corey, M; Forstner, G; Zielenski, J; Tsui, L-C; Ellis, L; Tullis, E; Durie, P

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: We tested the hypothesis that the actual or predicted consequences of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene correlate with the pancreatic phenotype and with measures of quantitative exocrine pancreatic function. Methods: We assessed 742 patients with cystic fibrosis for whom genotype and clinical data were available. At diagnosis, 610 were pancreatic insufficient, 110 were pancreatic sufficient, and 22 pancreatic sufficient patients progressed to pancreatic insufficiency after diagnosis. Results: We identified mutations on both alleles in 633 patients (85.3%), on one allele in 95 (12.8%), and on neither allele in 14 (1.9%). Seventy six different mutations were identified. The most common mutation was ΔF508 (71.3%) followed by G551D (2.9%), G542X (2.3%), 621+1G→T (1.2%), and W1282X (1.2%). Patients were categorized into five classes according to the predicted functional consequences of each mutation. Over 95% of patients with severe class I, II, and III mutations were pancreatic insufficient or progressed to pancreatic insufficiency. In contrast, patients with mild class IV and V mutations were consistently pancreatic sufficient. In all but four cases each genotype correlated exclusively with the pancreatic phenotype. Quantitative data of acinar and ductular secretion were available in 93 patients. Patients with mutations belonging to classes I, II, and III had greatly reduced acinar and ductular function compared with those with class IV or V mutations. Conclusion: The predicted or known functional consequences of specific mutant alleles correlate with the severity of pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis. PMID:12865275

  7. Molecular consequences of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Corey, M; Forstner, G; Zielenski, J; Tsui, L-C; Ellis, L; Tullis, E; Durie, P

    2003-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the actual or predicted consequences of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene correlate with the pancreatic phenotype and with measures of quantitative exocrine pancreatic function. We assessed 742 patients with cystic fibrosis for whom genotype and clinical data were available. At diagnosis, 610 were pancreatic insufficient, 110 were pancreatic sufficient, and 22 pancreatic sufficient patients progressed to pancreatic insufficiency after diagnosis. We identified mutations on both alleles in 633 patients (85.3%), on one allele in 95 (12.8%), and on neither allele in 14 (1.9%). Seventy six different mutations were identified. The most common mutation was DeltaF508 (71.3%) followed by G551D (2.9%), G542X (2.3%), 621+1G-->T (1.2%), and W1282X (1.2%). Patients were categorized into five classes according to the predicted functional consequences of each mutation. Over 95% of patients with severe class I, II, and III mutations were pancreatic insufficient or progressed to pancreatic insufficiency. In contrast, patients with mild class IV and V mutations were consistently pancreatic sufficient. In all but four cases each genotype correlated exclusively with the pancreatic phenotype. Quantitative data of acinar and ductular secretion were available in 93 patients. Patients with mutations belonging to classes I, II, and III had greatly reduced acinar and ductular function compared with those with class IV or V mutations. The predicted or known functional consequences of specific mutant alleles correlate with the severity of pancreatic disease in cystic fibrosis.

  8. Inhibiting an epoxide hydrolase virulence strategy protects CFTR**

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Christopher D.; Hvorecny, Kelli L.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, Cif's mechanism of action has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. Here, we show that Cif's hydrolase activity is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. We also uncover a small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system. Our results provide a basis for targeting Cif's distinctive virulence chemistry and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:26136396

  9. Expression of carbonic anhydrase, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) and V-H(+)-ATPase in the lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Pallas, 1774).

    PubMed

    Pederzoli, Aurora; Mandrioli, Mauro; Mola, Lucrezia

    2014-04-01

    Sequencing of the amphioxus genome revealed that it contains a basic set of chordate genes involved in development and cell signaling. Despite the availability of genomic data, up till now no studies have been addressed on the comprehension of the amphioxus osmoregulation. Using primers designed on Branchiostoma floridae carbonic anhydrase (CA) II, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) and V-H(+)-ATPase, a 100bp long region, containing the protein region recognized by the respective antibodies, has been amplified and sequenced in B. lanceolatum indicating the presence of hortologous V-ATPase, CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II genes in Branchiostoma lanceolatum. Immunohistochemical results showed that all three transporting proteins are expressed in almost 90% of epithelial cells of the skin in B. lanceolatum adults with a different degree of positivity in different regions of body wall and with a different localization in the cells. The comparison of results between young and adult lancelets showed that the distribution of these transporters is quite different. Indeed, in the young specimens the expression pattern of all tested molecules appears concentrated at the gut level, whereas in adult the gut loses its key role that is mostly supported by skin.

  10. Interaction between CFTR and prestin (SLC26A5).

    PubMed

    Homma, Kazuaki; Miller, Katharine K; Anderson, Charles T; Sengupta, Soma; Du, Guo-Guang; Aguiñaga, Salvador; Cheatham, Maryann; Dallos, Peter; Zheng, Jing

    2010-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated chloride channel that is present in a variety of epithelial cell types, and usually expressed in the luminal membrane. In contrast, prestin (SLC26A5) is a voltage-dependent motor protein, which is present in the basolateral membrane of cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), and plays an important role in the frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. By using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, we found that both mRNA and protein of CFTR are present in OHCs, and that CFTR localizes in both the apical and the lateral membranes. CFTR was not detected in the lateral membrane of inner hair cells (IHCs) or in that of OHCs derived from prestin-knockout mice, i.e., in instances where prestin is not expressed. These results suggest that prestin may interact physically with CFTR in the lateral membrane of OHCs. Immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed a prestin-CFTR interaction. Because chloride is important for prestin function and for the efferent-mediated inhibition of cochlear output, the prestin-directed localization of CFTR to the lateral membrane of OHCs has a potential physiological significance. Aside from its role as a chloride channel, CFTR is known as a regulator of multiple protein functions, including those of the solute carrier family 26 (SLC26). Because prestin is in the SLC26 family, several members of which interact with CFTR, we explored the potential modulatory relationship associated with a direct, physical interaction between prestin and CFTR. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that cAMP-activated CFTR is capable of enhancing voltage-dependent charge displacement, a signature of OHC motility, whereas prestin does not affect the chloride conductance of CFTR.

  11. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals common differential and global gene expression profiles in cystic fibrosis and other respiratory disorders and identifies CFTR regulators.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Sousa, Lisete; Falcao, Andre O; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-11-01

    A meta-analysis of 13 independent microarray data sets was performed and gene expression profiles from cystic fibrosis (CF), similar disorders (COPD: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, asthma), environmental conditions (smoking, epithelial injury), related cellular processes (epithelial differentiation/regeneration), and non-respiratory "control" conditions (schizophrenia, dieting), were compared. Similarity among differentially expressed (DE) gene lists was assessed using a permutation test, and a clustergram was constructed, identifying common gene markers. Global gene expression values were standardized using a novel approach, revealing that similarities between independent data sets run deeper than shared DE genes. Correlation of gene expression values identified putative gene regulators of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, of potential therapeutic significance. Our study provides a novel perspective on CF epithelial gene expression in the context of other lung disorders and conditions, and highlights the contribution of differentiation/EMT and injury to gene signatures of respiratory disease.

  12. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M.; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C.; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L.; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca2+ mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca2+ mobilization. Ca2+ mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  13. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-03-31

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca(2+) mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca(2+) mobilization. Ca(2+) mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction.

  14. Functional architecture of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of membrane transport proteins. CFTR is unique among ABC proteins in that it functions not as an active transporter but as an ATP-gated Cl(-) channel. As an ion channel, the function of the CFTR transmembrane channel pore that mediates Cl(-) movement has been studied in great detail. On the other hand, only low resolution structural data is available on the transmembrane parts of the protein. The structure of the channel pore has, however, been modeled on the known structure of active transporter ABC proteins. Currently, significant barriers exist to building a unified view of CFTR pore structure and function. Reconciling functional data on the channel with indirect structural data based on other proteins with very different transport functions and substrates has proven problematic. This review summarizes current structural and functional models of the CFTR Cl(-) channel pore, including a comprehensive review of previous electrophysiological investigations of channel structure and function. In addition, functional data on the three-dimensional arrangement of pore-lining helices, as well as contemporary hypotheses concerning conformational changes in the pore that occur during channel opening and closing, are discussed. Important similarities and differences between different models of the pore highlight current gaps in our knowledge of CFTR structure and function. In order to fill these gaps, structural and functional models of the membrane-spanning pore need to become better integrated.

  15. Partial Restoration of CFTR Function in cftr-Null Mice following Targeted Cell Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duchesneau, Pascal; Besla, Rickvinder; Derouet, Mathieu F; Guo, Li; Karoubi, Golnaz; Silberberg, Amanda; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2017-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the gene encoding CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Alteration in CFTR leads to thick airway mucus and bacterial infection. Cell therapy has been proposed for CFTR restoration, but efficacy has been limited by low engraftment levels. In our previous studies, we have shown that using a pre-conditioning regimen in combination with optimization of cell number and time of delivery, we could obtain greater bone marrow cell (BMC) retention in the lung. Here, we found that optimized delivery of wild-type (WT) BMC contributed to apical CFTR expression in airway epithelium and restoration of select ceramide species and fatty acids in CFTR(-/-) mice. Importantly, WT BMC delivery delayed Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection and increased survival of CFTR(-/-) recipients. Only WT BMCs had a beneficial effect beyond 6 months, suggesting a dual mechanism of BMC benefit: a non-specific effect early after cell delivery, possibly due to the recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils, and a late beneficial effect dependent on long-term CFTR expression. Taken together, our results suggest that BMC can improve overall lung function and may have potential therapeutic benefit for the treatment of CF.

  16. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-22

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to two drugs-the prototypical CFTR potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor/KALYDECO) and the CFTR corrector VX-809 (lumacaftor)-in organoid cultures derived from the rectal epithelia of subjects with CF, who expressed a broad range of CFTR mutations. We observed that CFTR residual function and responses to drug therapy depended on both the CFTR mutation and the genetic background of the subjects. In vitro drug responses in rectal organoids positively correlated with published outcome data from clinical trials with VX-809 and VX-770, allowing us to predict from preclinical data the potential for CF patients carrying rare CFTR mutations to respond to drug therapy. We demonstrated proof of principle by selecting two subjects expressing an uncharacterized rare CFTR genotype (G1249R/F508del) who showed clinical responses to treatment with ivacaftor and one subject (F508del/R347P) who showed a limited response to drug therapy both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that in vitro measurements of CFTR function in patient-derived rectal organoids may be useful for identifying subjects who would benefit from CFTR-correcting treatment, independent of their CFTR mutation.

  17. Understanding how cystic fibrosis mutations disrupt CFTR function: from single molecules to animal models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiting; Wrennall, Joe A; Cai, Zhiwei; Li, Hongyu; Sheppard, David N

    2014-07-01

    Defective epithelial ion transport is the hallmark of the life-limiting genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This abnormality is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ATP-binding cassette transporter that functions as a ligand-gated anion channel. Since the identification of the CFTR gene, almost 2000 disease-causing mutations associated with a spectrum of clinical phenotypes have been reported, but the majority remain poorly characterised. Studies of a small number of mutations including the most common, F508del-CFTR, have identified six general mechanisms of CFTR dysfunction. Here, we review selectively progress to understand how CF mutations disrupt CFTR processing, stability and function. We explore CFTR structure and function to explain the molecular mechanisms of CFTR dysfunction and highlight new knowledge of disease pathophysiology emerging from large animal models of CF. Understanding CFTR dysfunction is crucial to the development of transformational therapies for CF patients.

  18. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of colon tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junjie; Zepp, Jarod; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiaoxia

    2012-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the Toll-IL-1R (TL-IL-1) signaling by commensal bacteria contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer. Recent studies have identified SIGIRR as a negative regulator of TL-IL-1 signaling. It dampens intestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon. In this review, we will discuss the role of SIGIRR in different cell types and the mechanisms underlying its tumor suppressor function. PMID:22529873

  19. SIGIRR, a negative regulator of colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junjie; Zepp, Jarod; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiaoxia

    2011-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the Toll-IL-1R (TL-IL-1) signaling by commensal bacteria contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer. Recent studies have identified SIGIRR as a negative regulator of TL-IL-1 signaling. It dampens intestinal inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon. In this review, we will discuss the role of SIGIRR in different cell types and the mechanisms underlying its tumor suppressor function.

  20. Two salt bridges differentially contribute to the maintenance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel function.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2013-07-12

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg(352)-Asp(993) and Arg(347)-Asp(924), that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg(347) not only interacts with Asp(924) but also interacts with Asp(993). The tripartite interaction Arg(347)-Asp(924)-Asp(993) mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg(352)-Asp(993) salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg(352) and Asp(993), channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle.

  1. Two Salt Bridges Differentially Contribute to the Maintenance of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S.; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z.; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg352-Asp993 and Arg347-Asp924, that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg347 not only interacts with Asp924 but also interacts with Asp993. The tripartite interaction Arg347-Asp924-Asp993 mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg352-Asp993 salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg352 and Asp993, channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  2. Rhizobial gibberellin negatively regulates host nodule number

    PubMed Central

    Tatsukami, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In legume–rhizobia symbiosis, the nodule number is controlled to ensure optimal growth of the host. In Lotus japonicus, the nodule number has been considered to be tightly regulated by host-derived phytohormones and glycopeptides. However, we have discovered a symbiont-derived phytohormonal regulation of nodule number in Mesorhizobium loti. In this study, we found that M. loti synthesized gibberellic acid (GA) under symbiosis. Hosts inoculated with a GA-synthesis-deficient M. loti mutant formed more nodules than those inoculated with the wild-type form at four weeks post inoculation, indicating that GA from already-incorporated rhizobia prevents new nodule formation. Interestingly, the genes for GA synthesis are only found in rhizobial species that inhabit determinate nodules. Our findings suggest that the already-incorporated rhizobia perform GA-associated negative regulation of nodule number to prevent delayed infection by other rhizobia. PMID:27307029

  3. Lumacaftor alone and combined with ivacaftor: preclinical and clinical trial experience of F508del CFTR correction.

    PubMed

    Brewington, John J; McPhail, Gary L; Clancy, John P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), leading to significant morbidity and mortality. CFTR is a chloride and bicarbonate channel at the epithelial cell membrane. The most common CFTR mutation is F508del, resulting in minimal CFTR at the plasma membrane. Current disease management is supportive, whereas an ultimate goal is to develop therapies to restore CFTR activity. We summarize experience with lumacaftor, a small molecule that increases F508del-CFTR levels at the plasma membrane. Lumacaftor in combination with ivacaftor, a modulator of CFTR gating defects, improves clinical outcome measures in patients homozygous for the F508del mutation. Lumacaftor represents a significant advancement in the treatment of biochemical abnormalities in CF. Further development of CFTR modulators will improve upon current therapies, although it remains unclear whether this approach will provide therapies for all CFTR mutations.

  4. Protection of Cftr knockout mice from acute lung infection by a helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing Cftr in airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, David R.; Sajjan, Umadevi; Chow, Yu-Hua; Martin, Bernard; Kent, Geraldine; Tanswell, A. Keith; McKerlie, Colin; Forstner, Janet F.; Hu, Jim

    2003-01-01

    We developed a helper-dependent adenoviral vector for cystic fibrosis lung gene therapy. The vector expresses cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr) using control elements from cytokeratin 18. The vector expressed properly localized CFTR in cultured cells and in the airway epithelia of mice. Cftr RNA and protein were present in whole lung and bronchioles, respectively, for 28 days after a vector dose. Acute inflammation was minimal to moderate. To test the therapeutic potential of the vector, we challenged mice with a clinical strain of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Cftr knockout mice (but not Cftr+/+ littermates) challenged with Bcc developed severe lung histopathology and had high lung bacteria counts. Cftr knockout mice receiving gene therapy 7 days before Bcc challenge had less severe histopathology, and the number of lung bacteria was reduced to the level seen in Cftr+/+ littermates. These data suggest that gene therapy could benefit cystic fibrosis patients by reducing susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. PMID:14673110

  5. Localizing a gate in CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaolong; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies have painted a picture of the chloride permeation pathway in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a short narrow tunnel flanked by wider inner and outer vestibules. Although these studies also identified a number of transmembrane segments (TMs) as pore-lining, the exact location of CFTR’s gate(s) remains unknown. Here, using a channel-permeant probe, [Au(CN)2]−, we provide evidence that CFTR bears a gate that coincides with the predicted narrow section of the pore defined as residues 338–341 in TM6. Specifically, cysteines introduced cytoplasmic to the narrow region (i.e., positions 344 in TM6 and 1148 in TM12) can be modified by intracellular [Au(CN)2]− in both open and closed states, corroborating the conclusion that the internal vestibule does not harbor a gate. However, cysteines engineered to positions external to the presumed narrow region (e.g., 334, 335, and 337 in TM6) are all nonreactive toward cytoplasmic [Au(CN)2]− in the absence of ATP, whereas they can be better accessed by extracellular [Au(CN)2]− when the open probability is markedly reduced by introducing a second mutation, G1349D. As [Au(CN)2]− and chloride ions share the same permeation pathway, these results imply a gate is situated between amino acid residues 337 and 344 along TM6, encompassing the very segment that may also serve as the selectivity filter for CFTR. The unique position of a gate in the middle of the ion translocation pathway diverges from those seen in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and thus distinguishes CFTR from other members of the ABC transporter family. PMID:25675504

  6. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Than, BLN; Linnekamp, JF; Starr, TK; Largaespada, DA; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O’Sullivan, MG; Medema, JP; Fijneman, RJA; Meijer, GA; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, CA; Scott, PM; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, RT

    2016-01-01

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid–base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated ApcMin mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc+/+ mice aged to ~ 1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc+/+ Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  7. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  8. FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ritu; Colarusso, Pina; Zhang, Hong; Stevens, Katarzyna M; Patel, Kamala D

    2015-02-15

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-related nonkinase (PTK2 isoform 6 in humans, hereafter referred to as FRNK) is a cytoskeletal regulatory protein that has recently been shown to dampen lung fibrosis, yet its role in inflammation is unknown. Here, we show for the first time that expression of FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation in a human model of eosinophil recruitment. Mechanistically, FRNK blocks eosinophil accumulation, firm adhesion and transmigration by preventing transcription and protein expression of VCAM-1 and CCL26. IL-4 activates STAT6 to induce VCAM-1 and CCL26 transcription. We now show that IL-4 also increases GATA6 to induce VCAM-1 expression. FRNK blocks IL-4-induced GATA6 transcription but has little effect on GATA6 protein expression and no effect on STAT6 activation. FRNK can block FAK or Pyk2 signaling and we, thus, downregulated these proteins using siRNA to determine whether signaling from either protein is involved in the regulation of VCAM-1 and CCL26. Knockdown of FAK, Pyk2 or both had no effect on VCAM-1 or CCL26 expression, which suggests that FRNK acts independently of FAK and Pyk2 signaling. Finally, we found that IL-4 induces the late expression of endogenous FRNK. In summary, FRNK represents a novel mechanism to negatively regulate IL-4-mediated inflammation.

  9. A rapid membrane potential assay to monitor CFTR function and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Rangan; Sivashanmugam, Perumal; Warner, Keith

    2013-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is an important regulator of ion transport and fluid secretion in humans. Mutations to CFTR cause cystic fibrosis, which is a common recessive genetic disorder in Caucasians. Involvement of CFTR has been noted in other important diseases, such as secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease. The assays to monitor CFTR function that have been described to date either are complicated or require specialized instrumentation and training for execution. In this report, we describe a rapid FlexStation-based membrane potential assay to monitor CFTR function. In this assay, agonist-mediated activation of CFTR results in membrane depolarization that can be monitored using a fluorescent membrane potential probe. Availability of a simple mix-and-read assay to monitor the function of this important protein might accelerate the discovery of CFTR ligands to study a variety of conditions.

  10. Activation of CFTR trafficking and gating by vasoactive intestinal peptide in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fei; Liu, Hui-Jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-Rong; Liu, Chi; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Qin, Xiao-Qun

    2011-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an apical membrane chloride channel critical to the regulation of fluid, chloride, and bicarbonate transport in epithelia and other cell types. The most common cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the abnormal trafficking of CFTR mutants. Therefore, understanding the cellular machineries that transit CFTR from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface is important. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) plays an important role in CFTR-dependent chloride transport. The present study was designed to observe the affection of VIP on the trafficking of CFTR, and channel gating in human bronchial epithelium cells (HBEC). Confocal microscopy revealed CFTR immunofluorescence extending from the apical membrane deeply into the cell cytoplasm. After VIP treatment, apical extension of CFTR immunofluorescence into the cell was reduced and the peak intensity of CFTR fluorescence shifted towards the apical membrane. Western blot showed VIP increased cell surface and total CFTR. Compared with the augmented level of total CFTR, the surface CFTR increased more markedly. Immunoprecipitation founded that the mature form of CFTR had a marked increase in HBEC treated with VIP. VIP led to a threefold increase in Cl(-) efflux in HBEC. Glibenclamide-sensitive and DIDS-insensitive CFTR Cl(-) currents were consistently observed after stimulation with VIP (10(-8) mol/L). The augmentation of CFTR Cl(-) currents enhanced by VIP (10(-8) mol/L) was reversed, at least in part, by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H-89 and the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, H-7, suggesting PKA and PKC participate in the VIP-promoted CFTR Cl(-) currents.

  11. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying

    2015-01-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as “Kalydeco.” Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators. PMID:26209275

  12. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators.

  13. Capturing the Direct Binding of CFTR Correctors to CFTR by Using Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Chandrima; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, Chang Suk; Actis, Marcelo; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Woodroofe, Koryse; Clancy, John P; Lin, Songbai; Ziady, Assem G; Frizzell, Raymond; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-09-21

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disease caused by the loss or dysfunction of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. F508del is the most prevalent mutation of the CFTR gene and encodes a protein defective in folding and processing. VX-809 has been reported to facilitate the folding and trafficking of F508del-CFTR and augment its channel function. The mechanism of action of VX-809 has been poorly understood. In this study, we sought to answer a fundamental question underlying the mechanism of VX-809: does it bind CFTR directly in order to exert its action? We synthesized two VX-809 derivatives, ALK-809 and SUL-809, that possess an alkyne group and retain the rescue capacity of VX-809. By using Cu(I) -catalyzed click chemistry, we provide evidence that the VX-809 derivatives bind CFTR directly in vitro and in cells. Our findings will contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of action of CFTR correctors and the design of more potent therapeutics to combat CF.

  14. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  15. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, David A; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Samuel, Melissa S; Reznikov, Leah R; Rector, Michael V; Gansemer, Nicholas D; Bouzek, Drake C; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Hoegger, Mark J; Ludwig, Paula S; Taft, Peter J; Wallen, Tanner J; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L; Adam, Ryan J; Hornick, Emma E; Nelson, George A; Hoffman, Eric A; Chang, Eugene H; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B; Prather, Randall S; Meyerholz, David K; Welsh, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR-/-;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies.

  16. Organelle Redox of CF and CFTR-Corrected Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Christian; Illek, Beate; Suh, Jung H.; Remington, S. James; Fischer, Horst; Machen, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis reduced CFTR function may alter redox properties of airway epithelial cells. Redox-sensitive GFP (roGFP1) and imaging microscopy were used to measure redox potentials of cytosol, ER, mitochondria and cell surface of cystic fibrosis nasal epithelial cells and CFTR-corrected cells. We also measured glutathione and cysteine thiol redox states in cell lysates and apical fluids to provide coverage over a range of redox potentials and environments that might be affected by CFTR. As measured with roGFP1, redox potentials at the cell surface (~ -207 ±8 mV) and in the ER (~ -217 ±1 mV) and rates of regulation of the apical fluid and ER lumen following DTT treatment were similar for CF and CFTR-corrected cells. CF and CFTR-corrected cells had similar redox potentials in mitochondria (-344 ±9 mV) and cytosol (-322 ±7 mV). Oxidation of carboxy-dichlorodihydrofluoresceindiacetate and of apical Amplex Red occurred at equal rates in CF and CFTR-corrected cells. Glutathione and cysteine redox couples in cell lysates and apical fluid were equal in CF and CFTR-corrected cells. These quantitative estimates of organelle redox potentials combined with apical and cell measurements using small molecule couples confirmed there were no differences in redox properties of CF and CFTR-corrected cells. PMID:17603939

  17. Islet-intrinsic effects of CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Fiona N Manderson; McClenaghan, Neville H; Harper, Alan G S; Kelly, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most significant extra-pulmonary comorbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and accelerates lung decline. In addition to the traditional view that CFRD is a consequence of fibrotic destruction of the pancreas as a whole, emerging evidence may implicate a role for cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) in the regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic islet. Impaired first-phase insulin responses and glucose homeostasis have also been reported in CF patients. CFTR expression in both human and mouse beta cells has been confirmed, and recent studies have shown differences in endocrine pancreatic morphology from birth in CF. Recent experimental evidence suggests that functional CFTR channels are required for insulin exocytosis and the regulation of membrane potential in the pancreatic beta cell, which may account for the impairments in insulin secretion observed in many CF patients. These novel insights suggest that the pathogenesis of CFRD is more complicated than originally thought, with implications for diabetes treatment and screening in the CF population. This review summarises recent emerging evidence in support of a primary role for endocrine pancreatic dysfunction in the development of CFRD. Summary • CF is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CFTR gene • The vast majority of morbidity and mortality in CF results from lung disease. However CFRD is the largest extra-pulmonary co-morbidity and rapidly accelerates lung decline • Recent experimental evidence shows that functional CFTR channels are required for normal patterns of first phase insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta cell • Current clinical recommendations suggest that insulin is more effective than oral glucose-lowering drugs for the treatment of CFRD. However, the emergence of CFTR corrector and potentiator drugs may offer a personalised approach to treating diabetes in the CF population.

  18. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  19. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  20. CFTR is a potential marker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma prognosis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ziwei; Chen, Qu; Zhang, Jie Ting; Jiang, Xiaohua; Xia, Yunfei; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2016-01-01

    While there is an increasing interest in the correlation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and cancer incidence, the role of CFTR in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) development remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to explore the prognostic value of CFTR in NPC patients. The expression of CFTR was determined in NPC cell lines and tissues. Statistical analysis was utilized to evaluate the correlation between CFTR expression levels and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in 225 cases of NPC patients. The results showed that CFTR was down-regulated in NPC tissues and cell lines. Low expression of CFTR was correlated with advanced stage (p = 0.026), distant metastasis (p < 0.001) and poor prognosis (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis identified CFTR as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.003). Additionally, wound healing and transwell assays revealed that overexpression of CFTR inhibited NPC cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of CFTR promoted cell migration and invasion. Thus, the current study indicates that CFTR, as demonstrated to play an important role in tumor migration and invasion, may be used as a potential prognostic indicator in NPC. PMID:27769067

  1. CFTR is a potential marker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma prognosis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ziwei; Chen, Qu; Zhang, Jie Ting; Jiang, Xiaohua; Xia, Yunfei; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2016-11-22

    While there is an increasing interest in the correlation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and cancer incidence, the role of CFTR in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) development remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to explore the prognostic value of CFTR in NPC patients. The expression of CFTR was determined in NPC cell lines and tissues. Statistical analysis was utilized to evaluate the correlation between CFTR expression levels and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in 225 cases of NPC patients. The results showed that CFTR was down-regulated in NPC tissues and cell lines. Low expression of CFTR was correlated with advanced stage (p = 0.026), distant metastasis (p < 0.001) and poor prognosis (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis identified CFTR as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.003). Additionally, wound healing and transwell assays revealed that overexpression of CFTR inhibited NPC cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of CFTR promoted cell migration and invasion. Thus, the current study indicates that CFTR, as demonstrated to play an important role in tumor migration and invasion, may be used as a potential prognostic indicator in NPC.

  2. Therapeutic approaches to CFTR dysfunction: From discovery to drug development.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Pesce, Emanuela; Sheppard, David N; Singh, Ashvani K; Pedemonte, Nicoletta

    2017-09-12

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations have complex effects on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. They disrupt its processing to and stability at the plasma membrane and function as an ATP-gated Cl(-) channel. Here, we review therapeutic strategies to overcome defective CFTR processing and stability. Because CF mutations have multiple impacts on the assembly of CFTR protein, combination therapy with several pharmacological chaperones is likely to be required to rescue mutant CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Alternatively, proteostasis regulators, proteins which regulate the synthesis, intracellular transport and membrane stability of CFTR might be targeted to enhance the plasma membrane expression of mutant CFTR. Finally, we consider an innovative approach to bypass CFTR dysfunction in CF, the delivery of artificial anion transporters to CF epithelia to shuttle Cl(-) across the apical membrane. The identification of therapies or combinations of therapies, which rescue all CF mutations, is now a priority. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CFTR chloride channel in the apical compartments: spatiotemporal coupling to its interacting partners.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2010-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel located primarily at the apical or luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, kidney, sweat gland, as well as male reproductive tract, where it plays a crucial role in transepithelial fluid homeostasis. CFTR dysfunction can be detrimental and may result in life-threatening disorders. CFTR hypofunctioning because of genetic defects leads to cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, whereas CFTR hyperfunctioning resulting from various infections evokes secretory diarrhea, the leading cause of mortality in early childhood. Therefore, maintaining a dynamic balance between CFTR up-regulating processes and CFTR down-regulating processes is essential for maintaining fluid and body homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that protein-protein interactions play a critical role in the fine-tuned regulation of CFTR function. A growing number of proteins have been reported to interact directly or indirectly with CFTR chloride channel, suggesting that CFTR might be coupled spatially and temporally to a wide variety of interacting partners including ion channels, receptors, transporters, scaffolding proteins, enzyme molecules, signaling molecules, and effectors. Most interactions occur primarily between the opposing terminal tails (amino or carboxyl) of CFTR protein and its binding partners, either directly or mediated through various PDZ scaffolding proteins. These dynamic interactions impact the channel function, as well as localization and processing of CFTR protein within cells. This article reviews the most recent progress and findings about the interactions between CFTR and its binding partners through PDZ scaffolding proteins, as well as the spatiotemporal regulation of CFTR-containing macromolecular signaling complexes in the apical compartments of polarized cells lining the secretory epithelia.

  4. Osteoblast CFTR inactivation reduces differentiation and osteoprotegerin expression in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis-related bone disease.

    PubMed

    Stalvey, Michael S; Clines, Katrina L; Havasi, Viktoria; McKibbin, Christopher R; Dunn, Lauren K; Chung, W Joon; Clines, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mass and increased fracture risk are recognized complications of cystic fibrosis (CF). CF-related bone disease (CFBD) is characterized by uncoupled bone turnover--impaired osteoblastic bone formation and enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption. Intestinal malabsorption, vitamin D deficiency and inflammatory cytokines contribute to CFBD. However, epidemiological investigations and animal models also support a direct causal link between inactivation of skeletal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the gene that when mutated causes CF, and CFBD. The objective of this study was to examine the direct actions of CFTR on bone. Expression analyses revealed that CFTR mRNA and protein were expressed in murine osteoblasts, but not in osteoclasts. Functional studies were then performed to investigate the direct actions of CFTR on osteoblasts using a CFTR knockout (Cftr-/-) mouse model. In the murine calvarial organ culture assay, Cftr-/- calvariae displayed significantly less bone formation and osteoblast numbers than calvariae harvested from wildtype (Cftr+/+) littermates. CFTR inactivation also reduced alkaline phosphatase expression in cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts. Although CFTR was not expressed in murine osteoclasts, significantly more osteoclasts formed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ bone marrow cultures. Indirect regulation of osteoclastogenesis by the osteoblast through RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling was next examined. Although no difference in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (Rankl) mRNA was detected, significantly less osteoprotegerin (Opg) was expressed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ osteoblasts. Together, the Rankl:Opg ratio was significantly higher in Cftr-/- murine calvarial osteoblasts contributing to a higher osteoclastogenesis potential. The combined findings of reduced osteoblast differentiation and lower Opg expression suggested a possible defect in canonical Wnt signaling. In fact, Wnt3a and PTH-stimulated canonical Wnt signaling

  5. CFTR: A new horizon in the pathomechanism and treatment of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking or bile acids strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  6. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis.

  7. LINGO-1 negatively regulates myelination by oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mi, Sha; Miller, Robert H; Lee, Xinhua; Scott, Martin L; Shulag-Morskaya, Svetlane; Shao, Zhaohui; Chang, Jufang; Thill, Greg; Levesque, Melissa; Zhang, Mingdi; Hession, Cathy; Sah, Dinah; Trapp, Bruce; He, Zhigang; Jung, Vincent; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2005-06-01

    The control of myelination by oligodendrocytes in the CNS is poorly understood. Here we show that LINGO-1 is an important negative regulator of this critical process. LINGO-1 is expressed in oligodendrocytes. Attenuation of its function by dominant-negative LINGO-1, LINGO-1 RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) or soluble human LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) leads to differentiation and increased myelination competence. Attenuation of LINGO-1 results in downregulation of RhoA activity, which has been implicated in oligodendrocyte differentiation. Conversely, overexpression of LINGO-1 leads to activation of RhoA and inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Treatment of oligodendrocyte and neuron cocultures with LINGO-1-Fc resulted in highly developed myelinated axons that have internodes and well-defined nodes of Ranvier. The contribution of LINGO-1 to myelination was verified in vivo through the analysis of LINGO-1 knockout mice. The ability to recapitulate CNS myelination in vitro using LINGO-1 antagonists and the in vivo effects seen in the LINGO-1 knockout indicate that LINGO-1 signaling may be critical for CNS myelination.

  8. Direct interaction with filamins modulates the stability and plasma membrane expression of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, William R.; Chen, Yun; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sallee, Jennifer L.; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Jacobson, Ken; Stutts, M. Jackson; Milgram, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel on the apical membrane of epithelia is well established. However, the processes by which CFTR is regulated on the cell surface are not clear. Here we report the identification of a protein-protein interaction between CFTR and the cytoskeletal filamin proteins. Using proteomic approaches, we identified filamins as proteins that associate with the extreme CFTR N terminus. Furthermore, we identified a disease-causing missense mutation in CFTR, serine 13 to phenylalanine (S13F), which disrupted this interaction. In cells, filamins tethered plasma membrane CFTR to the underlying actin network. This interaction stabilized CFTR at the cell surface and regulated the plasma membrane dynamics and confinement of the channel. In the absence of filamin binding, CFTR was internalized from the cell surface, where it prematurely accumulated in lysosomes and was ultimately degraded. Our data demonstrate what we believe to be a previously unrecognized role for the CFTR N terminus in the regulation of the plasma membrane stability and metabolic stability of CFTR. In addition, we elucidate the molecular defect associated with the S13F mutation. PMID:17235394

  9. Rattlesnake Phospholipase A2 Increases CFTR-Chloride Channel Current and Corrects ∆F508CFTR Dysfunction: Impact in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Faure, Grazyna; Bakouh, Naziha; Lourdel, Stéphane; Odolczyk, Norbert; Premchandar, Aiswarya; Servel, Nathalie; Hatton, Aurélie; Ostrowski, Maciej K; Xu, Haijin; Saul, Frederick A; Moquereau, Christelle; Bitam, Sara; Pranke, Iwona; Planelles, Gabrielle; Teulon, Jacques; Herrmann, Harald; Roldan, Ariel; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Dadlez, Michal; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Ollero, Mario; Corringer, Pierre-Jean; Edelman, Aleksander

    2016-07-17

    Deletion of Phe508 in the nucleotide binding domain (∆F508-NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR; a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel) is the most frequent mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. This mutation affects the maturation and gating of CFTR protein. The search for new high-affinity ligands of CFTR acting as dual modulators (correctors/activators) presents a major challenge in the pharmacology of cystic fibrosis. Snake venoms are a rich source of natural multifunctional proteins, potential binders of ion channels. In this study, we identified the CB subunit of crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus as a new ligand and allosteric modulator of CFTR. We showed that CB interacts with NBD1 of both wild type and ∆F508CFTR and increases their chloride channel currents. The potentiating effect of CB on CFTR activity was demonstrated using electrophysiological techniques in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in CFTR-HeLa cells, and ex vivo in mouse colon tissue. The correcting effect of CB was shown by functional rescue of CFTR activity after 24-h ΔF508CFTR treatments with CB. Moreover, the presence of fully glycosylated CFTR was observed. Molecular docking allowed us to propose a model of the complex involving of the ABCβ and F1-like ATP-binding subdomains of ΔF508-NBD1. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis confirmed stabilization in these regions, also showing allosteric stabilization in two other distal regions. Surface plasmon resonance competition studies showed that CB disrupts the ∆F508CFTR-cytokeratin 8 complex, allowing for the escape of ∆F508CFTR from degradation. Therefore CB, as a dual modulator of ΔF508CFTR, constitutes a template for the development of new anti-CF agents.

  10. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  11. Therapeutic benefit observed with the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor, in a CF patient homozygous for the W1282X CFTR nonsense mutation.

    PubMed

    Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Libby, Emily Falk; Peng, Ning; Hadjiliadis, Denis; Bonk, Michael; Solomon, George M; Rowe, Steven M

    2017-01-01

    Premature termination codons (PTCs) in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene result in nonfunctional CFTR protein and are the proximate cause of ~11% of CF causing alleles. Aminoglycosides and other novel agents are known to induce translational readthrough of PTCs, a potential therapeutic approach. Among PTCs, W1282X CFTR is unique, as it is a C-terminal CFTR mutation that can exhibit partial activity, even in the truncated state. The potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770) is approved for treating CF patients with G551D and other gating mutations. Based on previous studies demonstrating the beneficial effect of ivacaftor for PTC mutations following readthrough in vitro, we hypothesized that ivacaftor may enhance CFTR activity in CF patients expressing W1282X CFTR, and could be further enhanced by readthrough. Ivacaftor significantly increased CFTR activity in W1282X-expressing cells compared to R1162X CFTR cells, and was further enhanced by readthrough with the aminoglycoside G418. Primary nasal epithelial cells from a W1282X homozygous patient showed improved CFTR function in the presence of ivacaftor. Upon ivacaftor administration to the same patient, there was significant improvement in pulmonary exacerbation frequency, BMI, and insulin requirement, whereas FEV1 remained stable over 3years. These studies suggest that ivacaftor may have moderate clinical benefit in patients with preserved expression of the W1282X CFTR mutation by stimulating residual activity of the truncated protein, suggesting the need for further studies including the addition of efficacious readthrough agents.

  12. Modulation of CFTR gating by permeant ions

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Han-I; Yeh, Jiunn-Tyng

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is unique among ion channels in that after its phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA), its ATP-dependent gating violates microscopic reversibility caused by the intimate involvement of ATP hydrolysis in controlling channel closure. Recent studies suggest a gating model featuring an energetic coupling between opening and closing of the gate in CFTR’s transmembrane domains and association and dissociation of its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). We found that permeant ions such as nitrate can increase the open probability (Po) of wild-type (WT) CFTR by increasing the opening rate and decreasing the closing rate. Nearly identical effects were seen with a construct in which activity does not require phosphorylation of the regulatory domain, indicating that nitrate primarily affects ATP-dependent gating steps rather than PKA-dependent phosphorylation. Surprisingly, the effects of nitrate on CFTR gating are remarkably similar to those of VX-770 (N-(2,4-Di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide), a potent CFTR potentiator used in clinics. These include effects on single-channel kinetics of WT CFTR, deceleration of the nonhydrolytic closing rate, and potentiation of the Po of the disease-associated mutant G551D. In addition, both VX-770 and nitrate increased the activity of a CFTR construct lacking NBD2 (ΔNBD2), indicating that these gating effects are independent of NBD dimerization. Nonetheless, whereas VX-770 is equally effective when applied from either side of the membrane, nitrate potentiates gating mainly from the cytoplasmic side, implicating a common mechanism for gating modulation mediated through two separate sites of action. PMID:25512598

  13. Functional characteristics of L1156F-CFTR associated with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shiho; Fujiki, Kotoyo; Ko, Shigeru B H; Yamamoto, Akiko; Nakakuki, Miyuki; Ito, Yasutomo; Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Kitagawa, Motoji; Naruse, Satoru; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2015-08-15

    Although cystic fibrosis is rare in Japanese, measurement of sweat Cl(-) has suggested mild dysfunction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in some patients with chronic pancreatitis. In the present study, we have investigated the association of CFTR variants and chronic pancreatitis in Japanese and the functional characteristics of a Japanese- and pancreatitis-specific CFTR variant, L1156F. Seventy patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 18 patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis, and 180 normal subjects participated. All exons and their boundaries and promoter region of the CFTR gene were sequenced. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were transfected with three CFTR variants (M470V, L1156F, and M470V+L1156F), and the protein expression was examined. Xenopus laevis oocytes were injected with the CFTR variants, and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) transport activity was examined. CFPAC-1 cells were transfected with the CFTR variants and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange activity was examined. Six variants (E217G, I556V, M470V, L1156F, Q1352H, and R1453W) were identified in the coding region of the CFTR gene. Cystic fibrosis-causing mutations were not found. The allele frequencies of L1156F and Q1352H in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (5.0 and 7.9%) were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than those in normal subjects (0.6 and 1.9%). L1156F was linked with a worldwide CFTR variant, M470V. Combination of M470V and L1156F significantly reduced CFTR expression to ∼60%, impaired CFTR-mediated HCO3 (-)/Cl(-) transport activity to 50-60%, and impaired CFTR-coupled Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange activity to 20-30%. The data suggest that the Japanese-specific CFTR variant L1156F causes mild dysfunction of CFTR and increases the risk of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in Japanese.

  14. Intestinal CFTR expression alleviates meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A.; Rokhlina, Tatiana; Ernst, Sarah E.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Karp, Philip H.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Rector, Michael V.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Hoegger, Mark J.; Ludwig, Paula S.; Taft, Peter J.; Wallen, Tanner J.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine; McMenimen, James D.; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Bogan, Katrina L.; Adam, Ryan J.; Hornick, Emma E.; Nelson, George A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Chang, Eugene H.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Prather, Randall S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) pigs develop disease with features remarkably similar to those in people with CF, including exocrine pancreatic destruction, focal biliary cirrhosis, micro-gallbladder, vas deferens loss, airway disease, and meconium ileus. Whereas meconium ileus occurs in 15% of babies with CF, the penetrance is 100% in newborn CF pigs. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of porcine CF transmembrane conductance regulator (pCFTR) cDNA under control of the intestinal fatty acid–binding protein (iFABP) promoter would alleviate the meconium ileus. We produced 5 CFTR–/–;TgFABP>pCFTR lines. In 3 lines, intestinal expression of CFTR at least partially restored CFTR-mediated anion transport and improved the intestinal phenotype. In contrast, these pigs still had pancreatic destruction, liver disease, and reduced weight gain, and within weeks of birth, they developed sinus and lung disease, the severity of which varied over time. These data indicate that expressing CFTR in intestine without pancreatic or hepatic correction is sufficient to rescue meconium ileus. Comparing CFTR expression in different lines revealed that approximately 20% of wild-type CFTR mRNA largely prevented meconium ileus. This model may be of value for understanding CF pathophysiology and testing new preventions and therapies. PMID:23676501

  15. Association of cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator gene mutation with negative outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection pregnancy in cases of congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoming; Cui, Yanyi; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Haobo; Liu, Jiaolong; Kong, Bin; Cai, Feifei; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) results with regard to congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) versus non-CBAVD obstruction, cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations versus non-CFTR mutations, and miscarriages or stillbirths versus live births per embryo transferred. Retrospective study with detailed chart review. Center for reproductive medicine. Nine hundred forty-five men with obstructive azoospermia. One thousand four hundred fourteen ICSI cycles classified as CBAVD versus non-CBAVD obstruction, CFTR mutations versus non-CFTR mutations, and miscarriages/stillbirths versus live births per embryo transferred. Frequency of CFTR mutations and rates of fertilization, good embryos, clinical pregnancy, miscarriages and stillbirths, ectopic pregnancy, and live births. CFTR mutations were more prevalent in men with CBAVD than in those with non-CBAVD obstruction. The rate of miscarriages and stillbirths per embryo transferred was higher in men with CBAVD than in those with non-CBAVD obstruction, whereas the rate of live births per embryo transferred was lower in men with CBAVD than in those with non-CBAVD obstruction. The rate of miscarriages and stillbirths per embryo transferred was higher in men with CFTR mutations than in those with non-CFTR mutations. The frequency of CFTR mutations was higher in patients who experienced miscarriages/stillbirths than in those with live births. The frequency of CFTR mutations was higher in cases of CBAVD versus non-CBAVD obstruction. Possibly as a result of CFTR mutations, patients with CBAVD had a significantly increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirth and a reduced rate of live birth compared with patients with non-CBAVD. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel Hits in the Correction of ΔF508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Protein: Synthesis, Pharmacological, and ADME Evaluation of Tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidines for the Potential Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pesci, Elisabetta; Bettinetti, Laura; Fanti, Paola; Galietta, Luis J V; La Rosa, Salvatore; Magnoni, Letizia; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Sardone, Gian Luca; Maccari, Laura

    2015-12-24

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disease caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with a prevalence of the ΔF508 mutation. Whereas the detailed mechanisms underlying disease have yet to be fully elucidated, recent breakthroughs in clinical trials have demonstrated that CFTR dysfunction can be corrected by drug-like molecules. On the basis of this success, a screening campaign was carried out, seeking new drug-like compounds able to rescue ΔF508-CFTR that led to the discovery of a novel series of correctors based on a tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine core. These molecules proved to be soluble, cell-permeable, and active in a disease relevant functional-assay. The series was then further optimized with emphasis on biological data from multiple cell systems while keeping physicochemical properties under strict control. The pharmacological and ADME profile of this corrector series hold promise for the development of more efficacious compounds to be explored for therapeutic use in CF.

  17. CFTR in a lipid raft-TNFR1 complex modulates gap junctional intercellular communication and IL-8 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Dudez, Tecla; Borot, Florence; Huang, Song; Kwak, Brenda R.; Bacchetta, Marc; Ollero, Mario; Stanton, Bruce A.; Chanson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause a chronic inflammatory response in the lung of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). We have showed that TNF-α signaling through the Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) was defective as determined by an inability of TNF-α to regulate gap junctional communication (GJIC) in CF cells. Here, we sought to elucidate the mechanisms linking TNF-α signaling to the functions of CFTR at the molecular level. In a MDCKI epithelial cell model expressing wild-type (WtCFTR) or mutant CFTR lacking its PDZ-interacting motif (CFTR-ΔTRL), TNF-α increased the amount of WtCFTR but not CFTR-ΔTRL in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). This recruitment was modulated by SFK activity and associated with DRM localization of TNFR1 and c-Src. Activation of TNFR1 signaling also decreased GJIC and markedly stimulated IL-8 production in WtCFTR cells. In contrast, the absence of CFTR in DRMs was associated with abnormal TNFR1 signaling as revealed by no recruitment of TNFR1 and c-Src to lipid rafts in CFTR-ΔTRL cells and loss of regulation of GJIC and IL-8 secretion. These results suggest that localization of CFTR in lipid rafts in association with c-Src and TNFR1 provides a responsive signaling complex to regulate GJIC and cytokine signaling. PMID:18255040

  18. Critical modifier role of membrane-CFTR dependent ceramide signaling in lung injury and emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Mazur, Steven; Vij, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Ceramide accumulation mediates the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive lung diseases. Although, an association between lack of CFTR and ceramide accumulation has been described, it is unclear how membrane-CFTR may modulate ceramide signaling in lung injury and emphysema. The Cftr+/+- and Cftr−/−- mice and cells were used to evaluate the CFTR-dependent ceramide signaling in lung injury. Lung tissue from control and COPD patients was used to verify the role of CFTR-dependent ceramide signaling in pathogenesis of chronic emphysema. Our data reveals a novel finding that CFTR expression inversely correlates with severity of emphysema and ceramide-accumulation in COPD subjects compared to controls. We found that chemical inhibition of de novo- ceramide-synthesis controls Pa-LPS induced lung injury in Cftr+/+-mice, while its efficacy was significantly lower in Cftr−/−-mice indicating that membrane-CFTR is required for controlling lipid-raft ceramide levels. Inhibition of membrane-ceramide release showed enhanced protective effect in controlling Pa-LPS induced lung injury in Cftr−/−- mice as compared to the Cftr+/+, confirming our observation that CFTR regulates lipid-raft ceramide- levels and signaling. Our results indicate that inhibition of de novo- ceramide-synthesis may be effective in disease states with low-CFTR expression like emphysema and chronic lung injury but not in complete absence of lipid-raft CFTR as in ΔF508-CF. In contrast, inhibiting membrane ceramide release has the potential of a more effective drug candidate for ΔF508-CF but may not be effectual in treating lung injury and emphysema. Our data demonstrates the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating ceramide-accumulation and inflammatory-signaling in lung injury and emphysema. PMID:21135173

  19. CFTR Knockdown induces proinflammatory changes in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Crites, Karoline St-Martin; Morin, Geneviève; Orlando, Valérie; Patey, Natacha; Cantin, Catherine; Martel, Judith; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Mailhot, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinflammation is a hallmark feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) airways. However, inflammation has also been documented systemically and, more recently, in extrapulmonary CF-affected tissues such as the pancreas and intestine. The pathogenesis of CF-related inflammation and more specifically the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in that respect are not entirely understood. We have tested the hypothesis that genetic depletion of CFTR will affect the inflammatory status of human intestinal epithelial cell lines. CFTR expression was genetically depleted from Caco-2/15 and HT-29 cells using short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi). Inflammatory conditions were induced by the addition of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) for various periods of time. Gene expression, mRNA stability and secreted levels of interleukin (IL)-6, -8 and 10 were assessed. Analysis of pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways including mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38, ERK 1/2 and JNK), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor alpha (IκBα), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was also performed. Eosinophils were counted in the jejunal mucosa of Cftr-/- and Cftr+/+ mice. CFTR gene and protein knockdown caused a significant increase in basal secretion of IL-8 as well as in IL-1β-induced secretion of IL-6 and -8. Release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, remained unaffected by CFTR depletion. The enhanced secretion of IL-8 stems in part from increased IL8 mRNA levels and greater activation of ERK1/2 MAPK, IκBα and NF-κB in the CFTR knockdown cells. By contrast, phosphorylation levels of p38 and JNK MAPK did not differ between control and knockdown cells. We also found a higher number of infiltrating eosinophils in the jejunal mucosa of Cftr -/- females, but not males, compared to Cftr +/+ mice, thus providing in vivo support to our in vitro findings. Collectively

  20. Nanomolar-Potency Aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine Activators of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Chloride Channel for Prosecretory Therapy of Dry Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Felix, Christian M; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Levin, Marc H; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-02-09

    Dry eye disorders are a significant health problem for which limited therapeutic options are available. CFTR is a major prosecretory chloride channel at the ocular surface. We previously identified, by high-throughput screening, aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine CFTRact-K089 (1) that activated CFTR with EC50 ≈ 250 nM, which when delivered topically increased tear fluid secretion in mice and showed efficacy in an experimental dry eye model. Here, functional analysis of aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine analogs elucidated structure-activity relationships for CFTR activation and identified substantially more potent analogs than 1. The most potent compound, 12, fully activated CFTR chloride conductance with EC50 ≈ 30 nM, without causing cAMP or calcium elevation. 12 was rapidly metabolized by hepatic microsomes, which supports its topical use. Single topical administration of 25 pmol of 12 increased tear volume in wild-type mice with sustained action for 8 h and was without effect in CFTR-deficient mice. Topically delivered 12 may be efficacious in human dry eye diseases.

  1. [CFTR and ENaC functions in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Palma, Alejandra G; Kotsias, Basilio A; Marino, Gabriela I

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by dysfunction or lack of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that has a key role in maintaining ion and water homoeostasis in different tissues. CFTR is a cyclic AMP-activated Cl- channel found in the apical and basal plasma membrane of airway, intestinal, and exocrine epithelial cells. One of CFTR's primary roles in the lungs is to maintain homoeostasis of the airway surface liquid layer through its function as a chloride channel and its regulation of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC. More than 1900 CFTR mutations have been identified in the cftr gene. The disease is characterized by viscous secretions of the exocrine glands in multiple organs and elevated levels of sweat sodium chloride. In cystic fibrosis, salt and fluid absorption is prevented by the loss of CFTR and ENaC is not appropriately regulated, resulting in increased fluid and sodium resorption from the airways and formation of a contracted viscous surface liquid layer. In the sweat glands both Na+ and Cl- ions are retained in the lumen, causing significant loss of electrolytes during sweating. Thus, elevated sweat NaCl concentration is the basis of the classic pilocarpine-induced sweat test as a diagnostic feature of the disease. Here we discuss the ion movement of Cl- and Na+ ions in two tissues, sweat glands and in the air surface as well as the role of ENaC in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  2. PDE11A negatively regulates lithium responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, G.; Agostino, M.J.; Bishara, K.; Capell, W.R.; Fisher, J.L.; Hegde, S.; Ibrahim, B.A.; Pilarzyk, Kaitlyn; Sabin, C.; Tuczkewycz, Taras; Wilson, Steven; Kelly, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium responsivity in patients with bipolar disorder has been genetically associated with Phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A), and lithium decreases PDE11A mRNA in IPSC-derived hippocampal neurons originating from lithium responsive patients. PDE11 is an enzyme uniquely enriched in the hippocampus that breaks down cAMP and cGMP. Here, we determined if decreasing PDE11A expression is sufficient to increase lithium responsivity in mice. In dorsal hippocampus (DHIPP) and ventral hippocampus (VHIPP), lithium-responsive C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEvTac mice show decreased PDE11A4 protein expression relative to lithium-unresponsive BALB/cJ mice. In VHIPP, C57BL/6J mice also show differences in PDE11A4 compartmentalization relative to BALB/cJ mice. In contrast, neither PDE2A nor PDE10A expression differ among the strains. The compartment-specific differences in PDE11A4 protein expression are explained by a coding SNP at amino acid 499, which falls within the GAF-B homodimerization domain. Relative to the BALB/cJ 499T, the C57BL/6J 499A decreases PDE11A4 homodimerization, which removes PDE11A4 from the membrane. Consistent with the observation that lower PDE11A4 expression correlates with better lithium responsiveness, we found that Pde11a KO mice given 0.4% lithium chow for 3+ weeks exhibit greater lithium responsivity relative to WT littermates in tail suspension, an antidepressant predictive assay, and amphetamine hyperlocomotion, an anti-manic predictive assay. Reduced PDE11A4 expression may represent a lithium-sensitive pathophysiology, because both C57BL/6J and Pde11a KO mice show increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 relative to BALB/cJ and PDE11A WT mice, respectively. Our finding that PDE11A4 negatively regulates lithium responsivity in mice suggests that the PDE11A SNPs identified in patients may be functionally relevant. PMID:27646265

  3. Stimulation effect of wide type CFTR chloride channel by the naturally occurring flavonoid tangeretin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Wang, Xue; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2014-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated chloride channel expressed in the apical membrane of serous epithelial cells. Both deficiency and overactivation of CFTR may cause fluid and salt secretion related diseases. In the present study, we identified tangeretin from Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Viride as a CFTR activator using high-throughput screening based on FRT cell-based fluorescence assay. The activation effect of tangeretin on CFTR chloride channel and the possible underlying mechanisms were investigated. Fluorescence quenching tests showed that tangeretin dose- and time-dependently activated CFTR chloride channel, the activity had rapid and reversible characteristics and the activation effect could be completely reversed by the CFTR specific blocker CFTRinh-172. Primary mechanism studies indicated that the activation effect of tangeretin on CFTR chloride channel was FSK dependent as well as had additional effect with FSK and IBMX suggesting that tangeretin activates CFTR by direct interacting with the protein. Ex-vivo tests revealed that tangeretin could accelerate the speed of the submucosal gland fluid secretion. Short-circuit current measurement demonstrated that tangeretin activated rat colonic mucosa chloride current. Thus, CFTR Cl(-) channel is a molecular target of natural compound tangeretin. Tangeretin may have potential use for the treatment of CFTR-related diseases like cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis and habitual constipation.

  4. Optimal correction of distinct CFTR folding mutants in rectal cystic fibrosis organoids.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Gogorza Gondra, Ricardo A; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte M; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Small-molecule therapies that restore defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gating (potentiators) or trafficking (correctors) are being developed for cystic fibrosis (CF) in a mutation-specific fashion. Options for pharmacological correction of CFTR-p.Phe508del (F508del) are being extensively studied but correction of other trafficking mutants that may also benefit from corrector treatment remains largely unknown.We studied correction of the folding mutants CFTR-p.Phe508del, -p.Ala455Glu (A455E) and -p.Asn1303Lys (N1303K) by VX-809 and 18 other correctors (C1-C18) using a functional CFTR assay in human intestinal CF organoids.Function of both CFTR-p.Phe508del and -p.Ala455Glu was enhanced by a variety of correctors but no residual or corrector-induced activity was associated with CFTR-p.Asn1303Lys. Importantly, VX-809-induced correction was most dominant for CFTR-p.Phe508del, while correction of CFTR-p.Ala455Glu was highest by a subgroup of compounds called bithiazoles (C4, C13, C14 and C17) and C5.These data support the development of mutation-specific correctors for optimal treatment of different CFTR trafficking mutants, and identify C5 and bithiazoles as the most promising compounds for correction of CFTR-p.Ala455Glu.

  5. Conformational changes opening and closing the CFTR chloride channel: insights from cysteine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease affecting young people in North America, is caused by failure of the chloride ion channel known as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). CFTR belongs to the large family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters. In CFTR, ATP-driven events at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) open and close a gate that controls chloride permeation. However, the conformational changes concomitant with opening and closing of the CFTR gate are unknown. Diverse techniques including substituted cysteine accessibility method, disulfide cross-linking, and patch-clamp recording have been used to explore CFTR channel structure. Here, we consider the architecture of both the open and the closed CFTR channel. We review how CFTR channel structure changes between the closed and the open channel conformations and portray the relative function of both cytoplasmic and vestigial gates during the gating cycle. Understanding how the CFTR channel gates chloride permeation is central for understanding how CFTR defects lead to CF. Such knowledge opens the door for novel ways to maximize CFTR channel activity in a CF setting.

  6. ΔF508 CFTR interactome remodeling promotes rescue of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankow, Sandra; Bamberger, Casimir; Calzolari, Diego; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Balch, William E.; Yates, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deletion of phenylalanine 508 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is the major cause of Cystic Fibrosis (CF), one of the most common inherited childhood diseases. The mutated CFTR anion channel is not fully glycosylated and shows minimal activity in bronchial epithelial cells of CF patients. Low temperature or inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACi) can partially rescue ΔF508 CFTR cellular processing defects and function. A favorable change of ΔF508 CFTR protein-protein interactions was proposed as mechanism of rescue, however CFTR interactome dynamics during temperature-shift and HDACi rescue are unknown. Here, we report the first comprehensive analysis of the wt and ΔF508 CFTR interactome and its dynamics during temperature shift and HDACi. By using a novel deep proteomic analysis method (CoPIT), we identified 638 individual high-confidence CFTR interactors and discovered a mutation-specific interactome, which is extensively remodeled upon rescue. Detailed analysis of the interactome remodeling identified key novel interactors, whose loss promoted enhanced CFTR channel function in primary CF epithelia or which were critical for normal CFTR biogenesis. Our results demonstrate that global remodeling of ΔF508 CFTR interactions is crucial for rescue, and provide comprehensive insight into the molecular disease mechanisms of CF caused by deletion of F508. PMID:26618866

  7. Prediction of Cellular Immune Responses against CFTR in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis after Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, Joanita; Limberis, Maria P.; Wilson, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Different classes of mutations (class I–VI) of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene are responsible for lung/pancreatic disease. The most common mutation, ΔF508, is characterized by expression of precursor forms of CFTR but no functional CFTR. Since only 5–10% of normal CFTR function is required to correct the electrophysiologic defect across the airway epithelium, gene therapy holds promise for treatment of patients with CF lung disease. However, efficient delivery and transgene expression are not the only parameters that may influence the success of gene therapy. Host-specific immune responses generated against the therapeutic CFTR protein may pose a problem, especially when the coding sequence between the normal CFTR and mutated CFTR differ. This phenomenon is more pertinent to class I mutations in which large fragments of the protein are not expressed. However, T cells directed against epitopes that span sequences containing class II–V mutations are also possible. We used MHC-binding prediction programs to predict the probability of cellular immune responses that may be generated against CFTR in ΔF508 homozygote patients. Results obtained from running the prediction algorithms yielded a few high-scoring MHC-Class I binders within the specific sequences, suggesting that there is a possibility of the host to mount a cellular immune response against CFTR, even when the difference between therapeutic and host CFTR is a single amino acid (F) at position 508. PMID:17218617

  8. Recent advances and new perspectives in targeting CFTR for therapy of cystic fibrosis and enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized primarily at the apical surfaces of epithelial cells lining airway, gut and exocrine glands, where it is responsible for transepithelial salt and water transport. Several human diseases are associated with an altered channel function of CFTR. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss or dysfunction of CFTR-channel activity resulting from the mutations on the gene; whereas enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas are caused by the hyperactivation of CFTR channel function. CFTR is a validated target for drug development to treat these diseases. Significant progress has been made in developing CFTR modulator therapy by means of high-throughput screening followed by hit-to-lead optimization. Several oral administrated investigational drugs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for CF. Also importantly, new ideas and methodologies are emerging. Targeting CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes is one such novel approach. PMID:22393940

  9. CFTR genotype and clinical outcomes of adult patients carried as cystic fibrosis disease.

    PubMed

    Bonadia, Luciana Cardoso; de Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, Jose Dirceu; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida; Pereira, Monica Corso; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2014-05-01

    There are nearly 2000 cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF). These mutations are classified into six classes; on the one hand, the first three classes cause severe disease involvement in early childhood, on the other hand, the Class IV, V and VI mutations cause minor severe disease in the same age. Nowadays, with therapeutic advances in CF management and competence of pediatricians, physicians of adults have to deal with two groups of CF patients: (i) adults diagnosed in childhood with severe mutations and (ii) adults who initiated symptoms in adulthood and with Class IV, V and VI mutations. The aim of this study was to analyze adults from a clinical center, treated as CF disease, screening the CFTR genotype and evaluating the clinical characteristics. Thirty patients followed as CF disease at the University Hospital were enrolled. After a complete molecular CFTR negative screening and sweat test levels between 40 and 59mEq/L, five patients were characterized as non-CF disease and were excluded. Molecular screening was performed by CFTR gene sequencing/MLPA or by specific mutation screening. Clinical data was obtained from medical records. The patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients with Class I, II and III mutations in two CFTR alleles; (2) genotype with at least one allele of Class IV, V or VI CFTR mutations and, (3) non-identified CFTR mutation+one patient with one allele with CFTR mutation screened (Class I). There was an association of CFTR class mutation and sodium/chloride concentration in the sweat test (sodium: p=0.040; chloride: p=0.016), onset of digestive symptoms (p=0.012), lung function parameter (SpO2 - p=0.016), Bhalla score (p=0.021), age at diagnosis (p=0.008) and CF-related diabetes (p=0.029). There was an association between Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic colonization (as clinical marker for the lung disease status) and lung impairment (FEV1% - p=0.027; Bhalla score - p=0.021), CF

  10. Cardiomyocytes with disrupted CFTR function require CaMKII and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel activity to maintain contraction rate.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Zachary M; De Arcangelis, Vania; Xiang, Yang; Best, Philip M

    2010-07-01

    The physiological role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cardiomyocytes remains unclear. Using spontaneously beating neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes from wild-type (WT) or CFTR knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of CFTR in the modulation of cardiomyocyte contraction rate. Contraction rates of spontaneously beating myocytes were captured by video imaging. Real-time changes in intracellular ([Ca(2+)](i)) and protein kinase A (PKA) activity were measured by fura-2 and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, respectively. Acute inhibition of CFTR in WT cardiomyocytes using the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)-172 transiently inhibited the contraction rate. By contrast, cardiomyocytes from CFTR KO mice displayed normal contraction rates. Further investigation revealed that acute inhibition of CFTR activity in WT cardiomyocytes activated L-type Ca(2+) channels, leading to a transient increase of [Ca(2+)](i) and inhibition of PKA activity. Additionally, we found that contraction rate normalization following acute CFTR inhibition in WT cardiomyocytes or chronic deletion in cardiomyocytes from CFTR KO mice requires the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCC) because simultaneous addition of myristoylated-autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide or niflumic acid and CFTR(inh)-172 to WT cardiomyocytes or treatment of cardiomyoctes from CFTR KO mice with these agents caused sustained attenuation of contraction rates. Our results demonstrate that regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction involves CFTR. They also reveal that activation of CaMKII and CaCC compensates for loss of CFTR function. Increased dependence on CaMKII upon loss of CFTR function might leave cystic fibrosis patients at increased risk of heart dysfunction and disease.

  11. Optimization of hCFTR Lung Expression in Mice Using DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Padegimas, Linas; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Adams, Sam; Gedeon, Chris R; Oette, Sharon M; Dines, Karla; Hyatt, Susannah L; Sesenoglu-Laird, Ozge; Tyr, Olena; Moen, Robert C; Cooper, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Efficient and prolonged human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (hCFTR) expression is a major goal for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung therapy. A hCFTR expression plasmid was optimized as a payload for compacted DNA nanoparticles formulated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-substituted 30-mer lysine peptides. A codon-optimized and CpG-reduced hCFTR synthetic gene (CO-CFTR) was placed in a polyubiquitin C expression plasmid. Compared to hCFTR complementary DNA (cDNA), CO-CFTR produced a ninefold increased level of hCFTR protein in transfected HEK293 cells and, when compacted as DNA nanoparticles, produced a similar improvement in lung mRNA expression in Balb/c and fatty acid binding protein promoter (FABP) CF mice, although expression duration was transient. Various vector modifications were tested to extend duration of CO-CFTR expression. A novel prolonged expression (PE) element derived from the bovine growth hormone (BGH) gene 3′ flanking sequence produced prolonged expression of CO-CFTR mRNA at biologically relevant levels. A time course study in the mouse lung revealed that CO-CFTR mRNA did not change significantly, with CO-CFTR/mCFTR geometric mean ratios of 94% on day 2, 71% on day 14, 53% on day 30, and 14% on day 59. Prolonged CO-CFTR expression is dependent on the orientation of the PE element and its transcription, is not specific to the UbC promoter, and is less dependent on other vector backbone elements. PMID:21952168

  12. Cultural differences in hedonic emotion regulation after a negative event.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuri; Ma, Xiaoming; Petermann, Amelia G

    2014-08-01

    Beliefs about emotions can influence how people regulate their emotions. The present research examined whether Eastern dialectical beliefs about negative emotions lead to cultural differences in how people regulate their emotions after experiencing a negative event. We hypothesized that, because of dialectical beliefs about negative emotions prevalent in Eastern culture, Easterners are less motivated than Westerners to engage in hedonic emotion regulation-up-regulation of positive emotions and down-regulation of negative emotions. By assessing online reactions to a recent negative event, Study 1 found that European Americans are more motivated to engage in hedonic emotion regulation. Furthermore, consistent with the reported motivation to regulate emotion hedonically, European Americans show a steeper decline in negative emotions 1 day later than do Asians. By examining retrospective memory of reactions to a past negative event, Study 2 further showed that cultural differences in hedonic emotion regulation are mediated by cultural differences in dialectical beliefs about motivational and cognitive utility of negative emotions, but not by personal deservingness or self-efficacy beliefs. These findings demonstrate the role of cultural beliefs in shaping emotion regulation and emotional experiences.

  13. Metformin treatment of diabetes mellitus increases the risk for pancreatitis in patients bearing the CFTR-mutation S573C.

    PubMed

    Kongsuphol, Patthara; Cassidy, Diane; Romeiras, Francisco; Schreiber, Rainer; Mehta, Anil; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Metformin use in diabetes can cause acidosis and might be linked to pancreatitis. Here, we mechanistically focus on this relationship via a point mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR; ABCC7). CFTR is an ATP-hydrolyzing, cAMP/PKA-activated anion channel regulating pancreatic bicarbonate/chloride secretion across duct-facing apical membranes in epithelia. CFTR has two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1/2) which clamp two ATP molecules across their opposed, inverted interfacial surfaces which generates anion-conductance after ATP hydrolysis. Notably, CFTR mutations not causal for classical cystic fibrosis segregate with unexplained pancreatitis and one of these lies in NBD1 near its ATP-clamp (S573C; close to the Walker B aspartate D572). We recently showed that after raising [cAMP], wt-CFTR chloride-conductance, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, remains elevated despite the presence of metformin. Yet here, we find that S573C-CFTR manifests a metformin-inhibitable whole cell chloride-conductance after cAMP elevation. In the absence of metformin, cAMP-activated S573C-CFTR also displays a reduced anion-conductance relative to wt-CFTR. Furthermore, intra-oocyte acidification inhibited wt-CFTR and abolished S573C-CFTR conductance. We conclude that defective S573C-CFTR remains both poorly conducting and inhibited by metformin and intracellular acidosis. This might explain the propensity to pancreatitis with this rare CF mutation.

  14. Targeting the Intracellular Environment in Cystic Fibrosis: Restoring Autophagy as a Novel Strategy to Circumvent the CFTR Defect

    PubMed Central

    Villella, Valeria Rachela; Esposito, Speranza; Bruscia, Emanuela M.; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Raia, Valeria; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients harboring the most common deletion mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), F508del, are poor responders to potentiators of CFTR channel activity which can be used to treat a small subset of CF patients who genetically carry plasma membrane (PM)-resident CFTR mutants. The misfolded F508del-CFTR protein is unstable in the PM even if rescued by pharmacological agents that prevent its intracellular retention and degradation. CF is a conformational disease in which defective CFTR induces an impressive derangement of general proteostasis resulting from disabled autophagy. In this review, we discuss how rescuing Beclin 1 (BECN1), a major player of autophagosome formation, either by means of direct gene transfer or indirectly by administration of proteostasis regulators, could stabilize F508del-CFTR at the PM. We focus on the relationship between the improvement of peripheral proteostasis and CFTR PM stability in F508del-CFTR homozygous bronchial epithelia or mouse lungs. Moreover, this article reviews recent pre-clinical evidence indicating that targeting the intracellular environment surrounding the misfolded mutant CFTR instead of protein itself could constitute an attractive therapeutic option to sensitize patients carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation to the beneficial action of CFTR potentiators on lung inflammation. PMID:23346057

  15. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Andreas; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Dübbers, Angelika; Bruns, Reimer; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann

    2008-09-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl-) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  16. RNA Interference Screen to Identify Kinases That Suppress Rescue of ΔF508-CFTR*

    PubMed Central

    Trzcińska-Daneluti, Agata M.; Chen, Anthony; Nguyen, Leo; Murchie, Ryan; Jiang, Chong; Moffat, Jason; Pelletier, Lawrence; Rotin, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). ΔF508-CFTR, the most common disease-causing CF mutant, exhibits folding and trafficking defects and is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is targeted for proteasomal degradation. To identify signaling pathways involved in ΔF508-CFTR rescue, we screened a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs) that target ∼750 different kinases and associated signaling proteins. We identified 20 novel suppressors of ΔF508-CFTR maturation, including the FGFR1. These were subsequently validated by measuring channel activity by the YFP halide-sensitive assay following shRNA-mediated knockdown, immunoblotting for the mature (band C) ΔF508-CFTR and measuring the amount of surface ΔF508-CFTR by ELISA. The role of FGFR signaling on ΔF508-CFTR trafficking was further elucidated by knocking down FGFRs and their downstream signaling proteins: Erk1/2, Akt, PLCγ-1, and FRS2. Interestingly, inhibition of FGFR1 with SU5402 administered to intestinal organoids (mini-guts) generated from the ileum of ΔF508-CFTR homozygous mice resulted in a robust ΔF508-CFTR rescue. Moreover, combination of SU5402 and VX-809 treatments in cells led to an additive enhancement of ΔF508-CFTR rescue, suggesting these compounds operate by different mechanisms. Chaperone array analysis on human bronchial epithelial cells harvested from ΔF508/ΔF508-CFTR transplant patients treated with SU5402 identified altered expression of several chaperones, an effect validated by their overexpression or knockdown experiments. We propose that FGFR signaling regulates specific chaperones that control ΔF508-CFTR maturation, and suggest that FGFRs may serve as important targets for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of CF. PMID:25825526

  17. Calumenin contributes to ER-Ca(2+) homeostasis in bronchial epithelial cells expressing WT and F508del mutated CFTR and to F508del-CFTR retention.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Réginald; Antigny, Fabrice; Buscaglia, Paul; Norez, Caroline; Huguet, Florentin; Castelbou, Cyril; Trouvé, Pascal; Becq, Frédéric; Frieden, Maud; Férec, Claude; Mignen, Olivier

    2017-02-04

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent fatal genetic disease in Caucasian populations. Mutations in the chloride channel CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene are responsible for functional defects of the protein and multiple associated dysregulations. The most common mutation in patients with CF, F508del-CFTR, causes defective CFTR protein folding. Thus minimal levels of the receptor are expressed at the cell surface as the mutated CFTR is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it correlates with defective calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis. In this study, we discovered that the Ca(2+) binding protein Calumenin (CALU) is a key regulator in the maintenance of ER-Ca(2+) calcium homeostasis in both wild type and F508del-CFTR expressing cells. Calumenin modulates SERCA pump activity without drastically affecting ER-Ca(2+) concentration. In addition, reducing Calumenin expression in CF cells results in a partial restoration of CFTR activity, highlighting a potential function of Calumenin in CFTR maturation. These findings demonstrate a pivotal role for Calumenin in CF cells, providing insights into how modulation of Calumenin expression or activity may be used as a potential therapeutic tool to correct defects in F508del-CFTR.

  18. Cigarette smoke and CFTR: implications in the pathogenesis of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Raju, S. Vamsee; Bebok, Zsuzsa; Matalon, Sadis; Collawn, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive respiratory disorder consisting of chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. COPD patients suffer from chronic infections and display exaggerated inflammatory responses and a progressive decline in respiratory function. The respiratory symptoms of COPD are similar to those seen in cystic fibrosis (CF), although the molecular basis of the two disorders differs. CF is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding a chloride and bicarbonate channel (CFTR), leading to CFTR dysfunction. The majority of COPD cases result from chronic oxidative insults such as cigarette smoke. Interestingly, environmental stresses including cigarette smoke, hypoxia, and chronic inflammation have also been implicated in reduced CFTR function, and this suggests a common mechanism that may contribute to both the CF and COPD. Therefore, improving CFTR function may offer an excellent opportunity for the development of a common treatment for CF and COPD. In this article, we review what is known about the CF respiratory phenotype and discuss how diminished CFTR expression-associated ion transport defects may contribute to some of the pathological changes seen in COPD. PMID:23934925

  19. CFTR protein expression in primary and cultured epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, P L; Crawford, I; Lu, L; Woel, S; Cohen, M E; Donowitz, M; Montrose, M H; Hamosh, A; Cutting, G R; Gruenert, D

    1992-01-01

    The gene responsible for the lethal disorder cystic fibrosis encodes a 1480-amino acid glycoprotein, CFTR. Using polyclonal antibodies directed against separate phosphorylation sites in the pre-nucleotide-binding fold (exon 9) and the R domain (exon 13), we have identified a 165-kDa protein in Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with recombinant CFTR cRNA transcribed from the full-length CFTR plasmid pBQ4.7. A protein of the same mobility was also detected with Western blotting techniques in whole cell extracts of cells that express CFTR mRNA (T84, FHTE, HT-29), including biopsied human nasal and bronchial tissue. Immunodetectable 165-kDa protein was concentrated in the apical membrane fraction of ileal villus tissue. We also report that the 165-kDa protein levels can be modulated pharmacologically, and these levels are appropriately correlated with second-messenger-regulated Cl- efflux. Thus, native or recombinant CFTR can be recognized by these anti-CFTR peptide polyclonal antibodies. Images PMID:1370353

  20. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; de Jonge, Hugo R; Bronsveld, Inez; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Brandsma, Arianne M; de Jong, Nienke W M; Bijvelds, Marcel J C; Scholte, Bob J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Middendorp, Sabine; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease caused by mutations in CFTR, encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Forskolin induces rapid swelling of organoids derived from healthy controls or wild-type mice, but this effect is strongly reduced in organoids of subjects with cystic fibrosis or in mice carrying the Cftr F508del mutation and is absent in Cftr-deficient organoids. This pattern is phenocopied by CFTR-specific inhibitors. Forskolin-induced swelling of in vitro-expanded human control and cystic fibrosis organoids corresponds quantitatively with forskolin-induced anion currents in freshly excised ex vivo rectal biopsies. Function of the CFTR F508del mutant protein is restored by incubation at low temperature, as well as by CFTR-restoring compounds. This relatively simple and robust assay will facilitate diagnosis, functional studies, drug development and personalized medicine approaches in cystic fibrosis.

  1. Thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor identified by high-throughput screening blocks cholera toxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tonghui; Thiagarajah, Jay R; Yang, Hong; Sonawane, Nitin D; Folli, Chiara; Galietta, Luis J V; Verkman, A S

    2002-12-01

    Secretory diarrhea is the leading cause of infant death in developing countries and a major cause of morbidity in adults. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is required for fluid secretion in the intestine and airways and, when defective, causes the lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We screened 50,000 chemically diverse compounds for inhibition of cAMP/flavone-stimulated Cl(-) transport in epithelial cells expressing CFTR. Six CFTR inhibitors of the 2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone chemical class were identified. The most potent compound discovered by screening of structural analogs, CFTR(inh)-172, reversibly inhibited CFTR short-circuit current in less than 2 minutes in a voltage-independent manner with K(I) approximately 300 nM. CFTR(inh)-172 was nontoxic at high concentrations in cell culture and mouse models. At concentrations fully inhibiting CFTR, CFTR(inh)-172 did not prevent elevation of cellular cAMP or inhibit non-CFTR Cl(-) channels, multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR-1), ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, or a series of other transporters. A single intraperitoneal injection of CFTR(inh)-172 (250 micro g/kg) in mice reduced by more than 90% cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion in the small intestine over 6 hours. Thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitors may be useful in developing large-animal models of cystic fibrosis and in reducing intestinal fluid loss in cholera and other secretory diarrheas.

  2. Impact of the F508del mutation on ovine CFTR, a Cl− channel with enhanced conductance and ATP-dependent gating

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiwei; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Khuituan, Pissared; Mutolo, Michael J; Boinot, Clément; Liu, Beihui; Scott-Ward, Toby S; Callebaut, Isabelle; Harris, Ann; Sheppard, David N

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species comparative studies are a powerful approach to understanding the epithelial Cl− channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which is defective in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we investigate the single-channel behaviour of ovine CFTR and the impact of the most common CF mutation, F508del-CFTR, using excised inside-out membrane patches from transiently transfected CHO cells. Like human CFTR, ovine CFTR formed a weakly inwardly rectifying Cl− channel regulated by PKA-dependent phosphorylation, inhibited by the open-channel blocker glibenclamide. However, for three reasons, ovine CFTR was noticeably more active than human CFTR. First, single-channel conductance was increased. Second, open probability was augmented because the frequency and duration of channel openings were increased. Third, with enhanced affinity and efficacy, ATP more strongly stimulated ovine CFTR channel gating. Consistent with these data, the CFTR modulator phloxine B failed to potentiate ovine CFTR Cl− currents. Similar to its impact on human CFTR, the F508del mutation caused a temperature-sensitive folding defect, which disrupted ovine CFTR protein processing and reduced membrane stability. However, the F508del mutation had reduced impact on ovine CFTR channel gating in contrast to its marked effects on human CFTR. We conclude that ovine CFTR forms a regulated Cl− channel with enhanced conductance and ATP-dependent channel gating. This phylogenetic analysis of CFTR structure and function demonstrates that subtle changes in structure have pronounced effects on channel function and the consequences of the CF mutation F508del. Key points Malfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a gated pathway for chloride movement, causes the common life-shortening genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Towards the development of a sheep model of CF, we have investigated the function of sheep CFTR. We found that

  3. Negative Regulation of Violacein Biosynthesis in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Devescovi, Giulia; Kojic, Milan; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Bertani, Iris; Subramoni, Sujatha; Venturi, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    In Chromobacteium violaceum, the purple pigment violacein is under positive regulation by the N-acylhomoserine lactone CviI/R quorum sensing system and negative regulation by an uncharacterized putative repressor. In this study we report that the biosynthesis of violacein is negatively controlled by a novel repressor protein, VioS. The violacein operon is regulated negatively by VioS and positively by the CviI/R system in both C. violaceum and in a heterologous Escherichia coli genetic background. VioS does not regulate the CviI/R system and apart from violacein, VioS, and quorum sensing regulate other phenotypes antagonistically. Quorum sensing regulated phenotypes in C. violaceum are therefore further regulated providing an additional level of control. PMID:28326068

  4. Negative Regulation of Violacein Biosynthesis in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Devescovi, Giulia; Kojic, Milan; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Bertani, Iris; Subramoni, Sujatha; Venturi, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    In Chromobacteium violaceum, the purple pigment violacein is under positive regulation by the N-acylhomoserine lactone CviI/R quorum sensing system and negative regulation by an uncharacterized putative repressor. In this study we report that the biosynthesis of violacein is negatively controlled by a novel repressor protein, VioS. The violacein operon is regulated negatively by VioS and positively by the CviI/R system in both C. violaceum and in a heterologous Escherichia coli genetic background. VioS does not regulate the CviI/R system and apart from violacein, VioS, and quorum sensing regulate other phenotypes antagonistically. Quorum sensing regulated phenotypes in C. violaceum are therefore further regulated providing an additional level of control.

  5. A single amino acid substitution in CFTR converts ATP to an inhibitory ligand

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Ying; Jih, Kang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common lethal genetic diseases, is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a chloride channel that, when phosphorylated, is gated by ATP. The third most common pathogenic mutation, a glycine-to-aspartate mutation at position 551 or G551D, shows a significantly decreased open probability (Po) caused by failure of the mutant channel to respond to ATP. Recently, a CFTR-targeted drug, VX-770 (Ivacaftor), which potentiates G551D-CFTR function in vitro by boosting its Po, has been approved by the FDA to treat CF patients carrying this mutation. Here, we show that, in the presence of VX-770, G551D-CFTR becomes responsive to ATP, albeit with an unusual time course. In marked contrast to wild-type channels, which are stimulated by ATP, sudden removal of ATP in excised inside-out patches elicits an initial increase in macroscopic G551D-CFTR current followed by a slow decrease. Furthermore, decreasing [ATP] from 2 mM to 20 µM resulted in a paradoxical increase in G551D-CFTR current. These results suggest that the two ATP-binding sites in the G551D mutant mediate opposite effects on channel gating. We introduced mutations that specifically alter ATP-binding affinity in either nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1 or NBD2) into the G551D background and determined that this disease-associated mutation converts site 2, formed by the head subdomain of NBD2 and the tail subdomain of NBD1, into an inhibitory site, whereas site 1 remains stimulatory. G551E, but not G551K or G551S, exhibits a similar phenotype, indicating that electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged side chain of aspartate and the γ-phosphate of ATP accounts for the observed mutational effects. Understanding the molecular mechanism of this gating defect lays a foundation for rational drug design for the treatment of CF. PMID:25225552

  6. CFTR is required for maximal transepithelial liquid transport in pig alveolar epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Comellas, Alejandro P.; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah E.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Rector, Michael V.; Rossen, Nathan; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A balance between alveolar liquid absorption and secretion is critical for maintaining optimal alveolar subphase liquid height and facilitating gas exchange in the alveolar space. However, the role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) in this homeostatic process has remained elusive. Using a newly developed porcine model of cystic fibrosis, in which CFTR is absent, we investigated ion transport properties and alveolar liquid transport in isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells (T2AECs) cultured at the air-liquid interface. CFTR was distributed exclusively to the apical surface of cultured T2AECs. Alveolar epithelia from CFTR−/− pigs failed to increase liquid absorption in response to agents that increase cAMP, whereas cAMP-stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR+/− epithelia was similar to that in CFTR+/+ epithelia. Expression of recombinant CFTR restored stimulated liquid absorption in CFTR−/− T2AECs but had no effect on CFTR+/+ epithelia. In ex vivo studies of nonperfused lungs, stimulated liquid absorption was defective in CFTR−/− alveolar epithelia but similar between CFTR+/+ and CFTR+/− epithelia. When epithelia were studied at the air-liquid interface, elevating cAMP levels increased subphase liquid height in CFTR+/+ but not in CFTR−/− T2AECs. Our findings demonstrate that CFTR is required for maximal liquid absorption under cAMP stimulation, but it is not the rate-limiting factor. Furthermore, our data define a role for CFTR in liquid secretion by T2AECs. These insights may help to develop new treatment strategies for pulmonary edema and respiratory distress syndrome, diseases in which lung liquid transport is disrupted. PMID:22637155

  7. Synonymous Codon Usage Affects the Expression of Wild Type and F508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kalpit; Cheng, Yi; Hahn, Brian; Bridges, Robert; Bradbury, Neil; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel composed of 1480 amino acids. The major mutation responsible for cystic fibrosis results in loss of amino acid residue, F508, (F508del). Loss of F508 in CFTR alters the folding pathway resulting in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD). This study investigates the role of synonymous codon in the expression of CFTR and CFTR F508del in human HEK293 cells. DNA encoding the open reading frame (ORF) for CFTR containing synonymous codon replacements, were expressed using a heterologous vector integrated into the genome. The results indicate that the codon usage greatly affects the expression of CFTR. While the promoter strength driving expression of the ORFs was largely unchanged and the mRNA half-lives were unchanged, the steady state levels of the mRNA varied by as much as 30 fold. Experiments support that this apparent inconsistency is attributed to exon junction complex independent nonsense mediated decay. The ratio of CFTR/mRNA indicates that mRNA containing native codons was more efficient in expressing mature CFTR as compared to mRNA containing synonymous high expression codons. However, when F508del CFTR was expressed after codon optimization, a greater percentage of the protein escaped ERAD resulting in considerable levels of mature F508del CFTR on the plasma membrane, which showed channel activity. These results indicate that for CFTR, codon usage has an effect on mRNA levels, protein expression and likely, for F508del CFTR, chaperone assisted folding pathway. PMID:25676312

  8. From the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane: mechanisms of CFTR folding and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Canato, Sara

    2017-01-01

    CFTR biogenesis starts with its co-translational insertion into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and folding of the cytosolic domains, towards the acquisition of a fully folded compact native structure. Efficiency of this process is assessed by the ER quality control system that allows the exit of folded proteins but targets unfolded/misfolded CFTR to degradation. If allowed to leave the ER, CFTR is modified at the Golgi and reaches the post-Golgi compartments to be delivered to the plasma membrane where it functions as a cAMP- and phosphorylation-regulated chloride/bicarbonate channel. CFTR residence at the membrane is a balance of membrane delivery, endocytosis, and recycling. Several adaptors, motor, and scaffold proteins contribute to the regulation of CFTR stability and are involved in continuously assessing its structure through peripheral quality control systems. Regulation of CFTR biogenesis and traffic (and its dysregulation by mutations, such as the most common F508del) determine its overall activity and thus contribute to the fine modulation of chloride secretion and hydration of epithelial surfaces. This review covers old and recent knowledge on CFTR folding and trafficking from its synthesis to the regulation of its stability at the plasma membrane and highlights how several of these steps can be modulated to promote the rescue of mutant CFTR.

  9. Tropomodulins are negative regulators of neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Thomas; Fischer, Robert S.; Dehmelt, Leif; Halpain, Shelley; Fowler, Velia M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is critical for neurite formation. Tropomodulins (Tmods) regulate polymerization at actin filament pointed ends. Previous experiments using a mouse model deficient for the neuron specific isoform Tmod2 suggested a role for Tmods in neuronal function by impacting processes underlying learning and memory. However, the role of Tmods in neuronal function on the cellular level remains unknown. Immunofluorescence localization of the neuronal isoforms Tmod1 and Tmod2 in cultured rat primary hippocampal neurons revealed that Tmod1 is enriched along the proximal part of F-actin bundles in lamellipodia of spreading cells and in growth cones of extending neurites, while Tmod2 appears largely cytoplasmic. Functional analysis of these Tmod isoforms in a mouse neuroblastoma N2a cell line showed that knockdown of Tmod2 resulted in a significant increase in number of neurite-forming cells and in neurite length. While N2a cells compensated for Tmod2 knockdown by increasing Tmod1 levels, over-expression of exogenous Tmod1 had no effect on neurite outgrowth. Moreover, knockdown of Tmod1 increased the number of neurites formed per cell, without effect on number of neurite-forming cells or neurite length. Taken together, these results indicate that Tmod1 and Tmod2 have mechanistically distinct inhibitory roles in neurite formation, likely mediated via different effects on F-actin dynamics and via differential localizations during early neuritogenesis. PMID:21146252

  10. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70 000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF. PMID:26903594

  11. Arsenic inhibits SGK1 activation of CFTR Cl- channels in the gill of killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph R; Bomberger, Jennifer M; VanderHeide, John; LaCasse, Taylor; Stanton, Sara; Coutermarsh, Bonita; Barnaby, Roxanna; Stanton, Bruce A

    2010-06-10

    Seawater acclimation in killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, is mediated in part by a rapid (1h) translocation of CFTR Cl(-) channels from an intracellular pool to the plasma membrane in gill and increased CFTR-mediated Cl(-) secretion. This effect is mediated by serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1), which is stimulated by plasma hypertonicity rather than cortisol. Since arsenic exposure prevents acclimation to seawater by decreasing CFTR protein levels we tested the hypothesis that arsenic (as sodium arsenite) blocks acclimation to seawater by down regulating SGK1 expression. Freshwater adapted killifish were exposed to arsenic (48h) and transferred to seawater containing arsenic, and SGK and CFTR expression were measured. Arsenic reduced the seawater induced increase in SGK1 mRNA and protein abundance, and reduced both the total amount of CFTR and the amount of CFTR in the plasma membrane. The decrease in membrane CFTR reduced Cl(-) secretion. Arsenic also increased the amount of ubiquitinated CFTR and its degradation by the lysosome. Thus, we propose a model whereby arsenic reduces the ability of killifish to acclimate to seawater by blocking the seawater induced increase in SGK1, which results in increased ubiquitination and degradation of CFTR.

  12. Advancing clinical development pathways for new CFTR modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; VanDevanter, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening genetic disease affecting approximately 70,000 individuals worldwide. Until recently, drug development efforts have emphasised therapies treating downstream signs and symptoms resulting from the underlying CF biological defect: reduced function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The current CF drug development landscape has expanded to include therapies that enhance CFTR function by either restoring wild-type CFTR protein expression or increasing (modulating) the function of mutant CFTR proteins in cells. To date, two systemic small-molecule CFTR modulators have been evaluated in pivotal clinical trials in individuals with CF and specific mutant CFTR genotypes that have led to regulatory review and/or approval. Advances in the discovery of CFTR modulators as a promising new class of therapies have been impressive, yet work remains to develop highly effective, disease-modifying modulators for individuals of all CF genotypes. The objectives of this review are to outline the challenges and opportunities in drug development created by systemic genotype-specific CFTR modulators, highlight the advantages of sweat chloride as an established biomarker of CFTR activity to streamline early-phase development and summarise options for later phase clinical trial designs that respond to the adoption of approved genotype-specific modulators into standard of care. An optimal development framework will be needed to move the most promising therapies efficiently through the drug development pipeline and ultimately deliver efficacious and safe therapies to all individuals with CF.

  13. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intestinal organoids to screen a GPCR-modulating compound library and identified β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as the most potent inducers of CFTR function.β2-Agonist-induced organoid swelling correlated with the CFTR genotype, and could be induced in homozygous CFTR-F508del organoids and highly differentiated primary CF airway epithelial cells after rescue of CFTR trafficking by small molecules. The in vivo response to treatment with an oral or inhaled β2-agonist (salbutamol) in CF patients with residual CFTR function was evaluated in a pilot study. 10 subjects with a R117H or A455E mutation were included and showed changes in the nasal potential difference measurement after treatment with oral salbutamol, including a significant improvement of the baseline potential difference of the nasal mucosa (+6.35 mV, p<0.05), suggesting that this treatment might be effective in vivo Furthermore, plasma that was collected after oral salbutamol treatment induced CFTR activation when administered ex vivo to organoids.This proof-of-concept study suggests that organoids can be used to identify drugs that activate CFTR function in vivo and to select route of administration.

  14. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  15. Critical role of CFTR-dependent lipid rafts in cigarette smoke-induced lung epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong; Vij, Neeraj

    2011-06-01

    Apoptosis of lung epithelial and endothelial cells by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) severely damages the lung tissue, leading to the pathogenesis of emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We have recently established a direct correlation between decreased lipid raft CFTR expression and emphysema progression through increased ceramide accumulation. In the present work, we investigated the role of membrane CFTR in regulating apoptosis and autophagy responses to CS exposure. We report a constitutive and CS-induced increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in Cftr(-/-) murine lungs compared with Cftr(+/+) murine lungs that also correlated with a concurrent increase in the expression of ceramide, NF-κB, CD95/Fas, lipid raft proteins, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/2 (P < 0.001). We also verified that stable wild-type CFTR expression in CFBE41o(-) cells controls constitutively elevated caspase-3/7 activity (-1.6-fold, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that membrane CFTR regulates ceramide-enriched lipid raft signaling platforms required for the induction of Fas-mediated apoptotic signaling. In addition, lack of membrane CFTR also modulates autophagy, as demonstrated by the significant increase in constitutive (P < 0.001) and CSE-induced (P < 0.005) perinuclear accumulation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 (LC3) in the absence of membrane CFTR (CFBE41o(-) cells). The significant constitutive and CS-induced increase (P < 0.05) in p62 and LC3β expression in CFTR-deficient cells and mice corroborates these findings and suggest a defective autophagy response in the absence of membrane CFTR. Our data demonstrate the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating apoptotic and autophagic responses in CS-induced lung injury that may be involved in the pathogenesis of severe emphysema.

  16. Improved clinical and radiographic outcomes after treatment with ivacaftor in a young adult with cystic fibrosis with the P67L CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Shatha; Solomon, George M; Brody, Alan; Rowe, Steven M; Colin, Andrew A

    2015-03-01

    The underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the loss of epithelial chloride and bicarbonate transport due to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein. Ivacaftor is a gene-specific CFTR potentiator that augments in vivo chloride transport in CFTR mutations affecting channel gating. Originally approved for the G511D CFTR mutation, ivacaftor is now approved for eight additional alleles exhibiting gating defects and has also been tested in R117H, a CFTR mutation with residual function that exhibits abnormal gating. P67L is a class 4 conductance (nongating) mutation exhibiting residual CFTR function. We report marked clinical improvement, normalization of spirometry, and dramatic reduction in radiographic structural airway changes after > 1 year of treatment with ivacaftor in a young adult with the compound heterozygous genotype P67L/F508del CFTR. The case suggests that ivacaftor may have a potential benefit for patients with CF with nongating mutations.

  17. Disruption of Interleukin-1β Autocrine Signaling Rescues Complex I Activity and Improves ROS Levels in Immortalized Epithelial Cells with Impaired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Function

    PubMed Central

    Clauzure, Mariángeles; Valdivieso, Angel G.; Massip Copiz, María M.; Schulman, Gustavo; Teiber, María Luz; Santa-Coloma, Tomás A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have elevated concentration of cytokines in sputum and a general inflammatory condition. In addition, CF cells in culture produce diverse cytokines in excess, including IL-1β. We have previously shown that IL-1β, at low doses (∼30 pM), can stimulate the expression of CFTR in T84 colon carcinoma cells, through NF-κB signaling. However, at higher doses (>2.5 ng/ml, ∼150 pM), IL-1β inhibit CFTR mRNA expression. On the other hand, by using differential display, we found two genes with reduced expression in CF cells, corresponding to the mitochondrial proteins CISD1 and MTND4. The last is a key subunit for the activity of mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I); accordingly, we later found a reduced mCx-I activity in CF cells. Here we found that IB3-1 cells (CF cells), cultured in serum-free media, secrete 323±5 pg/ml of IL-1β in 24 h vs 127±3 pg/ml for S9 cells (CFTR-corrected IB3-1 cells). Externally added IL-1β (5 ng/ml) reduces the mCx-I activity and increases the mitochondrial (MitoSOX probe) and cellular (DCFH-DA probe) ROS levels of S9 (CFTR-corrected IB3-1 CF cells) or Caco-2/pRSctrl cells (shRNA control cells) to values comparable to those of IB3-1 or Caco-2/pRS26 cells (shRNA specific for CFTR). Treatments of IB3-1 or Caco-2/pRS26 cells with either IL-1β blocking antibody, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IKK inhibitor III (NF-κB pathway) or SB203580 (p38 MAPK pathway), restored the mCx-I activity. In addition, in IB3-1 or Caco-2/pRS26 cells, IL-1β blocking antibody, IKK inhibitor III or SB203580 reduced the mitochondrial ROS levels by ∼50% and the cellular ROS levels near to basal values. The AP-1 inhibitors U0126 (MEK1/2) or SP600125 (JNK1/2/3 inhibitor) had no effects. The results suggest that in these cells IL-1β, through an autocrine effect, acts as a bridge connecting the CFTR with the mCx-I activity and the ROS levels. PMID:24901709

  18. The intact CFTR protein mediates ATPase rather than adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Ugwu, Francisca; Stratford, Fiona L L; Huan, Ling-Jun; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2008-06-01

    The two NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) proteins function in a complex to mediate ATPase activity and this activity has been linked to their regulated transport activity. A similar model has been proposed for CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the chloride channel defective in cystic fibrosis, wherein ATP binding and hydrolysis regulate the channel gate. Recently, it was shown that the individual NBDs isolated from CFTR primarily mediate adenylate kinase activity, raising the possibility that this activity may also contribute to gating of the CFTR channel. However, this present study shows that whereas the isolated NBDs exhibit adenylate kinase activity, the full-length purified and reconstituted CFTR protein functions as an ATPase, arguing that the enzymatic activity of the NBDs is dependent on their molecular context and appropriate domain-domain assembly. As expected, the disease-causing mutant bearing a mutation in the ABC signature motif, CFTR-G551D, exhibited a markedly reduced ATPase activity. Furthermore, mutation of the putative catalytic base in CFTR caused a reduction in ATPase activity, with the CFTR-E1371Q mutant supporting a low level of residual activity. Neither of these mutants exhibited detectable adenylate kinase activity. Together, these findings support the concept that the molecular mechanism of action of CFTR is dependent on ATP binding and hydrolysis, and that the structure of prokaryotic ABC ATPases provide a useful template for understanding their mechanism of action.

  19. Dehydrocostuslactone, a sesquiterpene lactone activates wild-type and ΔF508 mutant CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Yu, Bo; Yang, Shuang; Luan, Jian; Liu, Xin; Yang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) represents the main cAMP-activated Cl⁻ channel expressed in the apical membrane of serous epithelial cells. Both deficiency and overactivation of CFTR may cause fluid and salt secretion related diseases. The aim of this study was to identify natural compounds that are able to stimulate wild-type (wt) and ΔF508 mutant CFTR channel activities in CFTR-expressing Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells. We found that dehydrocostuslactone [DHC, (3aS, 6aR, 9aR, 9bS)-decahydro-3,6,9-tris (methylene) azuleno [4,5-b] furan-2(3H)-one)] dose dependently potentiates both wt and ΔF508 mutant CFTR-mediated iodide influx in cell-based fluorescent assays and CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ currents in short-circuit current studies, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172. Maximal CFTR-mediated apical Cl⁻ current secretion in CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by 100 μM DHC. Determination of intracellular cAMP content showed that DHC modestly but significantly increased cAMP level in FRT cells, but cAMP elevation effects contributed little to DHC-stimulated iodide influx. DHC also stimulated CFTR-mediated apical Cl⁻ current secretion in FRT cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR. Subsequent studies demonstrated that activation of CFTR by DHC is forskolin dependent. DHC represents a new class of CFTR potentiators that may have therapeutic potential in CFTR-related diseases.

  20. CFTR and Ca2+ Signaling in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Antigny, Fabrice; Norez, Caroline; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2011-01-01

    Among the diverse physiological functions exerted by calcium signaling in living cells, its role in the regulation of protein biogenesis and trafficking remains incompletely understood. In cystic fibrosis (CF) disease the most common CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation, F508del-CFTR generates a misprocessed protein that is abnormally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) compartment, rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and hence absent at the plasma membrane of CF epithelial cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that intracellular calcium signals consequent to activation of apical G-protein-coupled receptors by different agonists are increased in CF airway epithelia. Moreover, the regulation of various intracellular calcium storage compartments, such as ER is also abnormal in CF cells. Although the molecular mechanism at the origin of this increase remains puzzling in epithelial cells, the F508del-CFTR mutation is proposed to be the onset of abnormal Ca2+ influx linking the calcium signaling to CFTR pathobiology. This article reviews the relationships between CFTR and calcium signaling in the context of the genetic disease CF. PMID:22046162

  1. Drug-induced secretory diarrhea: A role for CFTR.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Reddy, Vadde Sudhakar; Arora, Kavisha; Helmrath, Michael A; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-12-01

    Many medications induce diarrhea as a side effect, which can be a major obstacle to therapeutic efficacy and also a life-threatening condition. Secretory diarrhea can be caused by excessive fluid secretion in the intestine under pathological conditions. The cAMP/cGMP-regulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the primary chloride channel at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells and plays a major role in intestinal fluid secretion and homeostasis. CFTR forms macromolecular complexes at discreet microdomains at the plasma membrane, and its chloride channel function is regulated spatiotemporally through protein-protein interactions and cAMP/cGMP-mediated signaling. Drugs that perturb CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes in the intestinal epithelium and upregulate intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP levels can hyperactivate the CFTR channel, causing excessive fluid secretion and secretory diarrhea. Inhibition of CFTR chloride-channel activity may represent a novel approach to the management of drug-induced secretory diarrhea.

  2. Fatty Acid Cysteamine Conjugates as Novel and Potent Autophagy Activators That Enhance the Correction of Misfolded F508del-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Vu, Chi B; Bridges, Robert J; Pena-Rasgado, Cecilia; Lacerda, Antonio E; Bordwell, Curtis; Sewell, Abby; Nichols, Andrew J; Chandran, Sachin; Lonkar, Pallavi; Picarella, Dominic; Ting, Amal; Wensley, Allison; Yeager, Maisy; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-12

    A depressed autophagy has previously been reported in cystic fibrosis patients with the common F508del-CFTR mutation. This report describes the synthesis and preliminary biological characterization of a novel series of autophagy activators involving fatty acid cysteamine conjugates. These molecular entities were synthesized by first covalently linking cysteamine to docosahexaenoic acid. The resulting conjugate 1 synergistically activated autophagy in primary homozygous F508del-CFTR human bronchial epithelial (hBE) cells at submicromolar concentrations. When conjugate 1 was used in combination with the corrector lumacaftor and the potentiator ivacaftor, it showed an additive effect, as measured by the increase in the chloride current in a functional assay. In order to obtain a more stable form for oral dosing, the sulfhydryl group in conjugate 1 was converted into a functionalized disulfide moiety. The resulting conjugate 5 is orally bioavailable in the mouse, rat, and dog and allows a sustained delivery of the biologically active conjugate 1.

  3. Identification of eight mutations and three sequence variations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, N.; Costes, B.; Girodon, E.; Martin, J.; Fanen, P.; Goossens, M. )

    1994-05-15

    To determine cystic fibrosis (CF) defects in a sample of 224 non-[Delta]F508 CF chromosomes, the authors used denaturing gradient gel multiplex analysis of CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene segments, a strategy based on blind exhaustive analysis rather than a search for known mutations. This process allowed detection of 11 novel variations comprising two nonsense mutations (Q890X and W1204X), a splice defect (405 + 4 A [yields] G), a frameshift (3293delA), four presumed missense mutations (S912L, H949Y, L1065P, Q1071P), and three sequence polymorphisms (R31C or 223 C/T, 3471 T/C, and T1220I or 3791 C/T). The authors describe these variations, together with the associated phenotype when defects on both CF chromosomes were identified. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Biophysical Characterisation of Calumenin as a Charged F508del-CFTR Folding Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Rashmi; Benz, Nathalie; Culleton, Bridget; Trouvé, Pascal; Férec, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic-AMP dependent chloride channel expressed at the apical surface of epithelial cells lining various organs such as the respiratory tract. Defective processing and functioning of this protein caused by mutations in the CFTR gene results in loss of ionic balance, defective mucus clearance, increased proliferation of biofilms and inflammation of human airways observed in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The process by which CFTR folds and matures under the influence of various chaperones in the secretory pathway remains incompletely understood. Recently, calumenin, a secretory protein, belonging to the CREC family of low affinity calcium binding proteins has been identified as a putative CFTR chaperone whose biophysical properties and functions remain uncharacterized. We compared hydropathy, instability, charge, unfoldability, disorder and aggregation propensity of calumenin and other CREC family members with CFTR associated chaperones and calcium binding proteins, wild-type and mutant CFTR proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). We observed that calumenin, along with other CREC proteins, was significantly more charged and less folded compared to CFTR associated chaperones. Moreover like IDPs, calumenin and other CREC proteins were found to be less hydrophobic and aggregation prone. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close link between calumenin and other CREC proteins indicating how evolution might have shaped their similar biophysical properties. Experimentally, calumenin was observed to significantly reduce F508del-CFTR aggregation in a manner similar to AavLEA1, a well-characterized IDP. Fluorescence microscopy based imaging analysis also revealed altered trafficking of calumenin in bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR, indicating its direct role in the pathophysiology of CF. In conclusion, calumenin is characterized as a charged protein exhibiting close similarity with IDPs and is

  5. Simple image-based no-wash method for quantitative detection of surface expressed CFTR.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mads Breum; Hu, Jennifer; Frizzell, Raymond A; Watkins, Simon C

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disease among Caucasians. It is caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes an apical membrane anion channel that is required for regulating the volume and composition of epithelial secretions. The most common CFTR mutation, present on at least one allele in >90% of CF patients, deletes phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del), which causes the protein to misfold. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control elicits the degradation of mutant CFTR, compromising its trafficking to the epithelial cell apical membrane. The absence of functional CFTR leads to depletion of airway surface liquid, impaired clearance of mucus and bacteria from the lung, and predisposes to recurrent infections. Ultimately, respiratory failure results from inflammation and bronchiectasis. Although high throughput screening has identified small molecules that can restore the anion transport function of F508del CFTR, they correct less than 15% of WT CFTR activity, yielding insufficient clinical benefit. To date, most primary CF drug discovery assays have employed measurements of CFTR's anion transport function, a method that depends on the recruitment of a functional CFTR to the cell surface, involves multiple wash steps, and relies on a signal that saturates rapidly. Screening efforts have also included assays for detection of extracellularly HA-tagged or HRP-tagged CFTR, which require multiple washing steps. We have recently developed tools and cell lines that report the correction of mutant CFTR trafficking by currently available small molecules, and have extended this assay to the 96-well format. This new and simple no-wash assay of F508del CFTR at the cell surface may permit the discovery of more efficacious drugs, and hopefully thereby prevent the catastrophic effects of this disease. In addition, the modular design of this platform should make it useful for other diseases where loss

  6. Cardiomyocytes with disrupted CFTR function require CaMKII and Ca2+-activated Cl− channel activity to maintain contraction rate

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Zachary M; De Arcangelis, Vania; Xiang, Yang; Best, Philip M

    2010-01-01

    The physiological role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cardiomyocytes remains unclear. Using spontaneously beating neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes from wild-type (WT) or CFTR knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of CFTR in the modulation of cardiomyocyte contraction rate. Contraction rates of spontaneously beating myocytes were captured by video imaging. Real-time changes in intracellular ([Ca2+]i) and protein kinase A (PKA) activity were measured by fura-2 and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, respectively. Acute inhibition of CFTR in WT cardiomyocytes using the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172 transiently inhibited the contraction rate. By contrast, cardiomyocytes from CFTR KO mice displayed normal contraction rates. Further investigation revealed that acute inhibition of CFTR activity in WT cardiomyoctyes activated L-type Ca2+ channels, leading to a transient increase of [Ca2+]i and inhibition of PKA activity. Additionally, we found that contraction rate normalization following acute CFTR inhibition in WT cardiomyocytes or chronic deletion in cardiomyocytes from CFTR KO mice requires the activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCC) because simultaneous addition of myristoylated-autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide or niflumic acid and CFTRinh-172 to WT cardiomyocytes or treatment of cardiomyoctes from CFTR KO mice with these agents caused sustained attenuation of contraction rates. Our results demonstrate that regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction involves CFTR. They also reveal that activation of CaMKII and CaCC compensates for loss of CFTR function. Increased dependence on CaMKII upon loss of CFTR function might leave cystic fibrosis patients at increased risk of heart dysfunction and disease. PMID:20442264

  7. Defective CFTR-dependent CREB activation results in impaired spermatogenesis and azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen Ming; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hui; Diao, Rui Ying; Fok, Kin Lam; Dong, Jian Da; Sun, Ting Ting; Chen, Wen Ying; Yu, Mei Kuen; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Tsang, Lai Ling; Lau, Ann; Shi, Qi Xian; Shi, Qing Hua; Huang, Ping Bo; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting recessive genetic disease among Caucasians caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with over 95% male patients infertile. However, whether CFTR mutations could affect spermatogenesis and result in azoospermia remains an open question. Here we report compromised spermatogenesis, with significantly reduced testicular weight and sperm count, and decreased cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) expression in the testes of CFTR knockout mice. The involvement of CFTR in HCO(3) (-) transport and the expression of the HCO(3) (-) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), are demonstrated for the first time in the primary culture of rat Sertoli cells. Inhibition of CFTR or depletion of HCO(3) (-) could reduce FSH-stimulated, sAC-dependent cAMP production and phosphorylation of CREB, the key transcription factor in spermatogenesis. Decreased CFTR and CREB expression are also observed in human testes with azoospermia. The present study reveals a previously undefined role of CFTR and sAC in regulating the cAMP-CREB signaling pathway in Sertoli cells, defect of which may result in impaired spermatogenesis and azoospermia. Altered CFTR-sAC-cAMP-CREB functional loop may also underline the pathogenesis of various CF-related diseases.

  8. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o−) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o− cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions. PMID:26637637

  9. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S.; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3–5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  10. Vx-770 potentiates CFTR function by promoting decoupling between the gating cycle and ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2013-03-12

    Vx-770 (Ivacaftor), a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug for clinical application to patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), shifts the paradigm from conventional symptomatic treatments to therapeutics directly tackling the root of the disease: functional defects of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel caused by pathogenic mutations. The underlying mechanism for the action of Vx-770 remains elusive partly because this compound not only increases the activity of wild-type (WT) channels whose gating is primarily controlled by ATP binding/hydrolysis, but also improves the function of G551D-CFTR, a disease-associated mutation that abolishes CFTR's responsiveness to ATP. Here we provide a unified theory to account for this dual effect of Vx-770. We found that Vx-770 enhances spontaneous, ATP-independent activity of WT-CFTR to a similar magnitude as its effects on G551D channels, a result essentially explaining Vx-770's effect on G551D-CFTR. Furthermore, Vx-770 increases the open time of WT-CFTR in an [ATP]-dependent manner. This distinct kinetic effect is accountable with a newly proposed CFTR gating model depicting an [ATP]-dependent "reentry" mechanism that allows CFTR shuffling among different open states by undergoing multiple rounds of ATP hydrolysis. We further examined the effect of Vx-770 on R352C-CFTR, a unique mutant that allows direct observation of hydrolysis-triggered gating events. Our data corroborate that Vx-770 increases the open time of WT-CFTR by stabilizing a posthydrolytic open state and thereby fosters decoupling between the gating cycle and ATP hydrolysis cycle. The current study also suggests that this unique mechanism of drug action can be further exploited to develop strategies that enhance the function of CFTR.

  11. Modulation of endocytic trafficking and apical stability of CFTR in primary human airway epithelial cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cholon, Deborah M.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Randell, Scott H.; Riordan, John R.

    2010-01-01

    CFTR is a highly regulated apical chloride channel of epithelial cells that is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, we characterized the apical stability and intracellular trafficking of wild-type and mutant CFTR in its native environment, i.e., highly differentiated primary human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures. We labeled the apical pool of CFTR and subsequently visualized the protein in intracellular compartments. CFTR moved from the apical surface to endosomes and then efficiently recycled back to the surface. CFTR endocytosis occurred more slowly in polarized than in nonpolarized HAE cells or in a polarized epithelial cell line. The most common mutation in CF, ΔF508 CFTR, was rescued from endoplasmic reticulum retention by low-temperature incubation but transited from the apical membrane to endocytic compartments more rapidly and recycled less efficiently than wild-type CFTR. Incubation with small-molecule correctors resulted in ΔF508 CFTR at the apical membrane but did not restore apical stability. To stabilize the mutant protein at the apical membrane, we found that the dynamin inhibitor Dynasore and the cholesterol-extracting agent cyclodextrin dramatically reduced internalization of ΔF508, whereas the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 completely blocked endocytosis of ΔF508. On examination of intrinsic properties of CFTR that may affect its apical stability, we found that N-linked oligosaccharides were not necessary for transport to the apical membrane but were required for efficient apical recycling and, therefore, influenced the turnover of surface CFTR. Thus apical stability of CFTR in its native environment is affected by properties of the protein and modulation of endocytic trafficking. PMID:20008117

  12. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3-5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein.

  13. Identification of natural coumarin compounds that rescue defective DeltaF508-CFTR chloride channel gating.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Na; Na, Wan-Li; Liu, Xin; Hou, Shu-Guang; Lin, Sen; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2008-08-01

    1. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (DeltaF508) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis (CF). Effective pharmacological therapy of CF caused by the DeltaF508-CFTR mutation requires the rescue of both intracellular processing and channel gating defects. 2. We identified a class of natural coumarin compounds that can correct the defective DeltaF508-CFTR chloride channel gating by screening a collection of 386 single natural compounds from Chinese medicinal herbs. Screening was performed with an iodide influx assay in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial cells coexpressing DeltaF508-CFTR and an iodide-sensitive fluorescent indicator (YFP-H148Q/I152L). 3. Dose-dependent potentiation of defective DeltaF508-CFTR chloride channel gating by five coumarin compounds was demonstrated by the fluorescent iodide influx assay and confirmed by an Ussing chamber short-circuit current assay. Activation was fully abolished by the specific CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)-172. Two potent compounds, namely imperatorin and osthole, have activation K(d) values of approximately 10 micromol/L, as determined by the short-circuit current assay. The active coumarin compounds do not elevate intracellular cAMP levels. Activation of DeltaF508-CFTR by the coumarin compounds requires cAMP agonist, suggesting direct interaction with the mutant CFTR molecule. Kinetics analysis indicated rapid activation of DeltaF508-CFTR by the coumarin compounds, with half-maximal activation of < 5 min. The activating effect was fully reversed for all five active compounds 45 min after washout. 4. In conclusion, the natural coumarin DeltaF508-CFTR activators may represent a new class of natural lead compounds for the development of pharmacological therapies for CF caused by the DeltaF508 mutation.

  14. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  15. Investigating CFTR and KCa3.1 Protein/Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Luo, Yishan; Wiseman, Paul W.; Hanrahan, John W.; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Sauvé, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    In epithelia, Cl- channels play a prominent role in fluid and electrolyte transport. Of particular importance is the cAMP-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR) with mutations of the CFTR encoding gene causing cystic fibrosis. The bulk transepithelial transport of Cl- ions and electrolytes needs however to be coupled to an increase in K+ conductance in order to recycle K+ and maintain an electrical driving force for anion exit across the apical membrane. In several epithelia, this K+ efflux is ensured by K+ channels, including KCa3.1, which is expressed at both the apical and basolateral membranes. We show here for the first time that CFTR and KCa3.1 can physically interact. We first performed a two-hybrid screen to identify which KCa3.1 cytosolic domains might mediate an interaction with CFTR. Our results showed that both the N-terminal fragment M1-M40 of KCa3.1 and part of the KCa3.1 calmodulin binding domain (residues L345-A400) interact with the NBD2 segment (G1237-Y1420) and C- region of CFTR (residues T1387-L1480), respectively. An association of CFTR and F508del-CFTR with KCa3.1 was further confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrating the formation of immunoprecipitable CFTR/KCa3.1 complexes in CFBE cells. Co-expression of KCa3.1 and CFTR in HEK cells did not impact CFTR expression at the cell surface, and KCa3.1 trafficking appeared independent of CFTR stimulation. Finally, evidence is presented through cross-correlation spectroscopy measurements that KCa3.1 and CFTR colocalize at the plasma membrane and that KCa3.1 channels tend to aggregate consequent to an enhanced interaction with CFTR channels at the plasma membrane following an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest 1) that the physical interaction KCa3.1/CFTR can occur early during the biogenesis of both proteins and 2) that KCa3.1 and CFTR form a dynamic complex, the formation of which depends on

  16. Investigating CFTR and KCa3.1 Protein/Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hélène; Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Luo, Yishan; Wiseman, Paul W; Hanrahan, John W; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Sauvé, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    In epithelia, Cl- channels play a prominent role in fluid and electrolyte transport. Of particular importance is the cAMP-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR) with mutations of the CFTR encoding gene causing cystic fibrosis. The bulk transepithelial transport of Cl- ions and electrolytes needs however to be coupled to an increase in K+ conductance in order to recycle K+ and maintain an electrical driving force for anion exit across the apical membrane. In several epithelia, this K+ efflux is ensured by K+ channels, including KCa3.1, which is expressed at both the apical and basolateral membranes. We show here for the first time that CFTR and KCa3.1 can physically interact. We first performed a two-hybrid screen to identify which KCa3.1 cytosolic domains might mediate an interaction with CFTR. Our results showed that both the N-terminal fragment M1-M40 of KCa3.1 and part of the KCa3.1 calmodulin binding domain (residues L345-A400) interact with the NBD2 segment (G1237-Y1420) and C- region of CFTR (residues T1387-L1480), respectively. An association of CFTR and F508del-CFTR with KCa3.1 was further confirmed in co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrating the formation of immunoprecipitable CFTR/KCa3.1 complexes in CFBE cells. Co-expression of KCa3.1 and CFTR in HEK cells did not impact CFTR expression at the cell surface, and KCa3.1 trafficking appeared independent of CFTR stimulation. Finally, evidence is presented through cross-correlation spectroscopy measurements that KCa3.1 and CFTR colocalize at the plasma membrane and that KCa3.1 channels tend to aggregate consequent to an enhanced interaction with CFTR channels at the plasma membrane following an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest 1) that the physical interaction KCa3.1/CFTR can occur early during the biogenesis of both proteins and 2) that KCa3.1 and CFTR form a dynamic complex, the formation of which depends on

  17. Critical role of CFTR-dependent lipid rafts in cigarette smoke-induced lung epithelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Bodas, Manish; Min, Taehong

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis of lung epithelial and endothelial cells by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) severely damages the lung tissue, leading to the pathogenesis of emphysema, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We have recently established a direct correlation between decreased lipid raft CFTR expression and emphysema progression through increased ceramide accumulation. In the present work, we investigated the role of membrane CFTR in regulating apoptosis and autophagy responses to CS exposure. We report a constitutive and CS-induced increase in the number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in Cftr−/− murine lungs compared with Cftr+/+ murine lungs that also correlated with a concurrent increase in the expression of ceramide, NF-κB, CD95/Fas, lipid raft proteins, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1/2 (P < 0.001). We also verified that stable wild-type CFTR expression in CFBE41o− cells controls constitutively elevated caspase-3/7 activity (−1.6-fold, P < 0.001). Our data suggest that membrane CFTR regulates ceramide-enriched lipid raft signaling platforms required for the induction of Fas-mediated apoptotic signaling. In addition, lack of membrane CFTR also modulates autophagy, as demonstrated by the significant increase in constitutive (P < 0.001) and CSE-induced (P < 0.005) perinuclear accumulation of green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 (LC3) in the absence of membrane CFTR (CFBE41o− cells). The significant constitutive and CS-induced increase (P < 0.05) in p62 and LC3β expression in CFTR-deficient cells and mice corroborates these findings and suggest a defective autophagy response in the absence of membrane CFTR. Our data demonstrate the critical role of membrane-localized CFTR in regulating apoptotic and autophagic responses in CS-induced lung injury that may be involved in the pathogenesis of severe emphysema. PMID:21378025

  18. Syntaxin 1A is expressed in airway epithelial cells, where it modulates CFTR Cl– currents

    PubMed Central

    Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Di, Anke; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Boyaka, Prosper N.; McGhee, Jerry R.; Zhou, Weihong; Akagawa, Kimio; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Thome, Ulrich; Engelhardt, John F.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2000-01-01

    The CFTR Cl– channel controls salt and water transport across epithelial tissues. Previously, we showed that CFTR-mediated Cl– currents in the Xenopus oocyte expression system are inhibited by syntaxin 1A, a component of the membrane trafficking machinery. This negative modulation of CFTR function can be reversed by soluble syntaxin 1A peptides and by the syntaxin 1A binding protein, Munc-18. In the present study, we determined whether syntaxin 1A is expressed in native epithelial tissues that normally express CFTR and whether it modulates CFTR currents in these tissues. Using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, we observed syntaxin 1A in native gut and airway epithelial tissues and showed that epithelial cells from these tissues express syntaxin 1A at >10-fold molar excess over CFTR. Syntaxin 1A is seen near the apical cell surfaces of human bronchial airway epithelium. Reagents that disrupt the CFTR-syntaxin 1A interaction, including soluble syntaxin 1A cytosolic domain and recombinant Munc-18, augmented cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl– currents by more than 2- to 4-fold in mouse tracheal epithelial cells and cells derived from human nasal polyps, but these reagents did not affect CaMK II–activated Cl– currents in these cells. PMID:10675364

  19. Steviol reduces MDCK Cyst formation and growth by inhibiting CFTR channel activity and promoting proteasome-mediated CFTR degradation.

    PubMed

    Yuajit, Chaowalit; Homvisasevongsa, Sureeporn; Chatsudthipong, Lisa; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-01-01

    Cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) involves cAMP-activated proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. This study aimed to investigate an inhibitory effect and detailed mechanisms of steviol and its derivatives on cyst growth using a cyst model in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Among 4 steviol-related compounds tested, steviol was found to be the most potent at inhibiting MDCK cyst growth. Steviol inhibition of cyst growth was dose-dependent; steviol (100 microM) reversibly inhibited cyst formation and cyst growth by 72.53.6% and 38.2±8.5%, respectively. Steviol at doses up to 200 microM had no effect on MDCK cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, steviol acutely inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current in MDCK epithelia, measured with the Ussing chamber technique, in a dose-dependent manner. Prolonged treatment (24 h) with steviol (100 microM) also strongly inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current, in part by reducing CFTR protein expression in MDCK cells. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, abolished the effect of steviol on CFTR protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that prolonged treatment (24 h) with steviol (100 microM) markedly reduced CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Taken together, the data suggest that steviol retards MDCK cyst progression in two ways: first by directly inhibiting CFTR chloride channel activity and second by reducing CFTR expression, in part, by promoting proteasomal degradation of CFTR. Steviol and related compounds therefore represent drug candidates for treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  20. Steviol Reduces MDCK Cyst Formation and Growth by Inhibiting CFTR Channel Activity and Promoting Proteasome-Mediated CFTR Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yuajit, Chaowalit; Homvisasevongsa, Sureeporn; Chatsudthipong, Lisa; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-01-01

    Cyst enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) involves cAMP-activated proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells and transepithelial fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. This study aimed to investigate an inhibitory effect and detailed mechanisms of steviol and its derivatives on cyst growth using a cyst model in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Among 4 steviol-related compounds tested, steviol was found to be the most potent at inhibiting MDCK cyst growth. Steviol inhibition of cyst growth was dose-dependent; steviol (100 microM) reversibly inhibited cyst formation and cyst growth by 72.53.6% and 38.2±8.5%, respectively. Steviol at doses up to 200 microM had no effect on MDCK cell viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, steviol acutely inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current in MDCK epithelia, measured with the Ussing chamber technique, in a dose-dependent manner. Prolonged treatment (24 h) with steviol (100 microM) also strongly inhibited forskolin-stimulated apical chloride current, in part by reducing CFTR protein expression in MDCK cells. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, abolished the effect of steviol on CFTR protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that prolonged treatment (24 h) with steviol (100 microM) markedly reduced CFTR expression at the plasma membrane. Taken together, the data suggest that steviol retards MDCK cyst progression in two ways: first by directly inhibiting CFTR chloride channel activity and second by reducing CFTR expression, in part, by promoting proteasomal degradation of CFTR. Steviol and related compounds therefore represent drug candidates for treatment of polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23536832

  1. Restoration of CFTR function in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Daniela De; Villella, Valeria R; Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Sepe, Angela; Gregorio, Fabiola De; Salvadori, Laura; Grassia, Rosa; Leone, Carlo A; Rosa, Giuseppe De; Maiuri, Maria C; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Guido, Stefano; Bossi, Anna; Zolin, Anna; Venerando, Andrea; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Mehta, Anil; Bona, Gianni; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi; Raia, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of BECN1/Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depletion of SQSTM1/p62 by genetic manipulation or autophagy-stimulatory proteostasis regulators, such as cystamine, have positive effects on mouse models of human cystic fibrosis (CF). These measures rescue the functional expression of the most frequent pathogenic CFTR mutant, F508del, at the respiratory epithelial surface and reduce lung inflammation in CftrF508del homozygous mice. Cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine, is an FDA-approved drug. Here, we report that oral treatment with cysteamine greatly reduces the mortality rate and improves the phenotype of newborn mice bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation. Cysteamine was also able to increase the plasma membrane expression of the F508del-CFTR protein in nasal epithelial cells from F508del homozygous CF patients, and these effects persisted for 24 h after cysteamine withdrawal. Importantly, this cysteamine effect after washout was further sustained by the sequential administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea flavonoid, both in vivo, in mice, and in vitro, in primary epithelial cells from CF patients. In a pilot clinical trial involving 10 F508del-CFTR homozygous CF patients, the combination of cysteamine and EGCG restored BECN1, reduced SQSTM1 levels and improved CFTR function from nasal epithelial cells in vivo, correlating with a decrease of chloride concentrations in sweat, as well as with a reduction of the abundance of TNF/TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) and CXCL8 (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 8) transcripts in nasal brushing and TNF and CXCL8 protein levels in the sputum. Altogether, these results suggest that optimal schedules of cysteamine plus EGCG might be used for the treatment of CF caused by the F508del-CFTR mutation. PMID:25350163

  2. Restoration of CFTR function in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Daniela; Villella, Valeria R; Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Sepe, Angela; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Salvadori, Laura; Grassia, Rosa; Leone, Carlo A; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Maria C; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Guido, Stefano; Bossi, Anna; Zolin, Anna; Venerando, Andrea; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Mehta, Anil; Bona, Gianni; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi; Raia, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of BECN1/Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depletion of SQSTM1/p62 by genetic manipulation or autophagy-stimulatory proteostasis regulators, such as cystamine, have positive effects on mouse models of human cystic fibrosis (CF). These measures rescue the functional expression of the most frequent pathogenic CFTR mutant, F508del, at the respiratory epithelial surface and reduce lung inflammation in Cftr(F508del) homozygous mice. Cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine, is an FDA-approved drug. Here, we report that oral treatment with cysteamine greatly reduces the mortality rate and improves the phenotype of newborn mice bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation. Cysteamine was also able to increase the plasma membrane expression of the F508del-CFTR protein in nasal epithelial cells from F508del homozygous CF patients, and these effects persisted for 24 h after cysteamine withdrawal. Importantly, this cysteamine effect after washout was further sustained by the sequential administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea flavonoid, both in vivo, in mice, and in vitro, in primary epithelial cells from CF patients. In a pilot clinical trial involving 10 F508del-CFTR homozygous CF patients, the combination of cysteamine and EGCG restored BECN1, reduced SQSTM1 levels and improved CFTR function from nasal epithelial cells in vivo, correlating with a decrease of chloride concentrations in sweat, as well as with a reduction of the abundance of TNF/TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) and CXCL8 (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 8) transcripts in nasal brushing and TNF and CXCL8 protein levels in the sputum. Altogether, these results suggest that optimal schedules of cysteamine plus EGCG might be used for the treatment of CF caused by the F508del-CFTR mutation.

  3. Characterization of primary rat nasal epithelial cultures in CFTR knockout rats as a model for CF sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Tipirneni, Kiranya E; Cho, Do-Yeon; Skinner, Daniel F; Zhang, Shaoyan; Mackey, Calvin; Lim, Dong-Jin; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2017-08-03

    The objectives of the current experiments were to develop and characterize primary rat nasal epithelial cultures and evaluate their usefulness as a model of cystic fibrosis (CF) sinonasal transepithelial transport and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. Laboratory in vitro and animal studies. CFTR(+/+) and CFTR(-/-) rat nasal septal epithelia (RNSE) were cultured on semipermeable supports at an air-liquid interface to confluence and full differentiation. Monolayers were mounted in Ussing chambers for pharmacologic manipulation of ion transport and compared to similar filters containing murine (MNSE) and human (HSNE) epithelia. Histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were completed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of CFTR(+/+) RNSE, MNSE, and HSNE was performed to evaluate relative CFTR gene expression. Forskolin-stimulated anion transport (ΔIsc in μA/cm(2) ) was significantly greater in epithelia derived from CFTR(+/+) when compared to CFTR(-/-) animals (100.9 ± 3.7 vs. 10.5 ± 0.9; P < 0.0001). Amiloride-sensitive ISC was equivalent (-42.3 ± 2.8 vs. -46.1 ± 2.3; P = 0.524). No inhibition of CFTR-mediated chloride (Cl(-) ) secretion was exhibited in CFTR(-/-) epithelia with the addition of the specific CFTR inhibitor, CFTRInh -172. However, calcium-activated Cl(-) secretion (UTP) was significantly increased in CFTR(-/-) RNSE (CFTR(-/-) -106.8 ± 1.6 vs. CFTR(+/+) -32.2 ± 3.1; P < 0.0001). All responses were larger in RNSE when compared to CFTR(+/+) and CFTR(-/-) (or F508del/F508del) murine and human cells (P < 0.0001). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated 80% to 90% ciliation in all RNSE cultures. There was no evidence of infection in CFTR(-/-) rats at 4 months. CFTR expression was similar among species. The successful development of the CFTR(-/-) rat enables improved evaluation of CF sinus disease based on characteristic abnormalities of ion transport. NA. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological

  4. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3- secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H; Parker, Connor P; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-05-10

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10-50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl(-) secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3 (-) secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3 (-) at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR(+/-) or CFTR(+/∆F508)) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3 (-) at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3 (-) secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl(-) secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3 (-) secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers.

  5. CFTR and defective endocytosis: new insights in the renal phenotype of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jouret, François; Devuyst, Olivier

    2009-04-01

    Inactivation of the chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although CFTR is expressed in the kidney, no overwhelming renal phenotype is associated with CF. Recent studies have shown that the level of CFTR mRNA in mouse kidney approaches that found in lung. CFTR is particularly abundant in the apical area of proximal tubule cells, where it co-distributes with the Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger ClC-5 and Rab5a in endosomes. The biological relevance of CFTR in proximal tubule endocytosis has been tested in CF mouse models and CF patients. Mice lacking CFTR show a defective receptor-mediated endocytosis, as evidenced by impaired uptake of (125)I-beta(2)-microglobulin, a decreased expression of the cubilin receptor in the kidney, and a significant excretion of cubilin and its low-molecular-weight ligands into the urine. Low-molecular-weight proteinuria (and particularly transferrinuria) is similarly detected in CF patients in comparison with normal controls or patients with chronic lung inflammation. These studies suggest that the functional loss of CFTR impairs the handling of low-molecular-weight proteins by the kidney, supporting a role of CFTR in receptor-mediated endocytosis in proximal tubule cells. The selective proteinuria should be integrated in the pathophysiology of multi-systemic complications increasingly observed in CF patients.

  6. CFTR chloride channel is a molecular target of the natural cancer preventive agent resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, B O; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Wang, Xue; Hou, Shuguang; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2013-09-01

    The naturally occurring polyphenol compound resveratrol (RES) has been receiving wide attention because of its variety of health benefits and favourable biological activities. Previous studies have shown that RES could induce intestinal chloride secretion in mouse jejunum and stimulate cAMP-dependent Cl- secretion in T84, primary cultured murine nasal septal and human sinonasal epithelial cells, but the precise molecular target is not clear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that RES may stimulate the activity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. Using cell-based fluorescent assays, transepithelial short-circuit current measurements and excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis; we found that RES dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl- channel activities, which was reversed by CFTR inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH101. Transepithelial Cl- secretion by CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by RES with half maximal concentration -80 microM. Intracellular cAMP content was not elevated by RES in FRT cells. Excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis indicated that RES significantly increased the chloride currents of CFTR. In ex vivo studies, RES stimulated the transmucosal chloride current of rat colon by short-circuit current assay. These data suggested that CFTR is a molecular target of RES. Our findings add a new molecular target to RES, and RES may represent a novel class of therapeutic lead compounds in treating CFTR-related diseases including CF and habitual constipation.

  7. Three-dimensional reconstruction of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel revealed an ellipsoidal structure with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-10-31

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 x 106 x 162 A. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR.anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain.

  8. COMPOSITION OF MINERALIZING INCISOR ENAMEL IN CFTR-DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bronckers, ALJJ; Lyaruu, DM; Guo, J; Bijvelds, MJC; Bervoets, TJM; Zandieh-Doulabi, B; Medina, JF; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; DenBesten, PK

    2014-01-01

    Formation of crystals in the enamel space releases protons that need to be buffered to sustain mineral accretion. We hypothesized that apical Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) in maturation ameloblasts transduces chloride into forming enamel as critical step to secrete bicarbonates. We tested this by determining the calcium, chloride and fluoride levels of developing enamel of Cftr-null mice by quantitative electron probe microanalysis. Maturation stage Cftr–null enamel contained less chloride and calcium than wild-type enamel, was more acidic when stained with pH dyes ex vivo and formed no fluorescent modulation bands after in vivo injection of the mice with calcein. To further acidify the enamel we exposed Cftr-null mice to fluoride in drinking water to stimulate proton release during formation of hypermineralized lines. In enamel of Cftr-deficient mice fluoride further lowered enamel calcium without further reducing chloride levels. The data support the view that apical Cftr in maturation ameloblasts transduces chloride into developing enamel as part of the machinery to buffer protons released during mineral accretion. PMID:25557910

  9. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  10. Rab4GTPase modulates CFTR function by impairing channel expression at plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Sunil K. . E-mail: ssaxena@stevens.edu; Kaur, Simarna; George, Constantine

    2006-03-03

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by the disruption of biosynthesis or the function of a membrane cAMP-activated chloride channel, CFTR. CFTR regulatory mechanisms include recruitment of channel proteins to the cell surface from intracellular pools and by protein-protein interactions. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in regulated trafficking controlling vesicle docking and fusion. Rab4 controls recycling events from endosome to the plasma membrane, fusion, and degradation. The colorectal cell line HT-29 natively expresses CFTR and responds to cAMP stimulation with an increase in CFTR-mediated currents. Rab4 over-expression in HT-29 cells inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated CFTR-mediated currents. GTPase-deficient Rab4Q67L and GDP locked Rab4S22N both inhibit channel activity, which appears characteristically different. Active status of Rab4 was confirmed by GTP overlay assay, while its expression was verified by Western blotting. The pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Rab4 physically interacts with CFTR through protein-protein interaction. Biotinylation with cell impermeant NHS-Sulfo-SS-Biotin implies that Rab4 impairs CFTR expression at cell surface. The enhanced cytosolic CFTR indicates that Rab4 expression restrains CFTR appearance at the cell membrane. The study suggests that Rab4 regulates the channel through multiple mechanisms that include protein-protein interaction, GTP/GDP exchange, and channel protein trafficking. We propose that Rab4 is a dynamic molecule with a significant role in CFTR function.

  11. Manipulating proteostasis to repair the F508del-CFTR defect in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Villella, Valeria R; Raia, Valeria; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal monogenic disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that entails the (diagnostic) increase in sweat electrolyte concentrations, progressive lung disease with chronic inflammation and recurrent bacterial infections, pancreatic insufficiency, and male infertility. Therapies aimed at restoring the CFTR defect have emerged. Thus, a small molecule which facilitates chloride channel opening, the potentiator Ivacaftor, has been approved for the treatment of CF patients bearing a particular class of rare CFTR mutations. However, small molecules that directly target the most common misfolded CFTR mutant, F508del, and improve its intracellular trafficking in vitro, have been less effective than expected when tested in CF patients, even in combination with Ivacaftor. Thus, new strategies are required to circumvent the F508del-CFTR defect. Airway and intestinal epithelial cells from CF patients bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation exhibit an impressive derangement of cellular proteostasis, with oxidative stress, overactivation of the tissue transglutaminase (TG2), and disabled autophagy. Proteostasis regulators such as cysteamine can rescue and stabilize a functional F508del-CFTR protein through suppressing TG2 activation and restoring autophagy in vivo in F508del-CFTR homozygous mice, in vitro in CF patient-derived cell lines, ex vivo in freshly collected primary patient's nasal cells, as well as in a pilot clinical trial involving homozygous F508del-CFTR patients. Here, we discuss how the therapeutic normalization of defective proteostasis can be harnessed for the treatment of CF patients with the F508del-CFTR mutation.

  12. New pulmonary therapies directed at targets other than CFTR.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Scott H; Galietta, Luis

    2013-06-01

    Our current understanding of the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease stresses the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the airway surface liquid (ASL). In particular, the loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function in CF reduces the volume and fluidity of the ASL, thus impairing mucociliary clearance and innate antimicrobial mechanisms. Besides direct approaches to restoring mutant CFTR function, alternative therapeutic strategies may also be considered to correct the basic defect of impaired salt and water transport. Such alternative strategies are focused on the restoration of mucociliary transport by (1) reducing sodium and fluid absorption by inhibiting the ENaC channel; (2) activating alternative chloride channels; and (3) increasing airway surface hydration with osmotic agents. Therapeutic approaches directed at targets other than CFTR are attractive because they are potentially useful to all patients irrespective of their genotype. Clinical trials are underway to test the efficacy of these approaches.

  13. New Pulmonary Therapies Directed at Targets Other than CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Scott H.; Galietta, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Our current understanding of the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease stresses the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the airway surface liquid (ASL). In particular, the loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function in CF reduces the volume and fluidity of the ASL, thus impairing mucociliary clearance and innate antimicrobial mechanisms. Besides direct approaches to restoring mutant CFTR function, alternative therapeutic strategies may also be considered to correct the basic defect of impaired salt and water transport. Such alternative strategies are focused on the restoration of mucociliary transport by (1) reducing sodium and fluid absorption by inhibiting the ENaC channel; (2) activating alternative chloride channels; and (3) increasing airway surface hydration with osmotic agents. Therapeutic approaches directed at targets other than CFTR are attractive because they are potentially useful to all patients irrespective of their genotype. Clinical trials are underway to test the efficacy of these approaches. PMID:23732851

  14. GATA4 negatively regulates bone sialoprotein expression in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Insun; Jeong, Byung-chul; Choi, Yong Jun; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    GATA4 has been reported to act as a negative regulator in osteoblast differentiation by inhibiting the Dlx5 transactivation of Runx2 via the attenuation of the binding ability of Dlx5 to the Runx2 promoter region. Here, we determine the role of GATA4 in the regulation of bone sialoprotein (Bsp) in osteoblasts. We observed that the overexpression of Runx2 or Sox9 induced the Bsp expression in osteoblastic cells. Silencing GATA4 further enhanced the Runx2- and Sox9-mediated Bsp promoter activity, whereas GATA4 overexpression down-regulated Bsp promoter activity mediated by Runx2 and Sox9. GATA4 also interacted with Runx2 and Sox9, by attenuating the binding ability of Runx2 and Sox9 to the Bsp promoter region. Our data suggest that GATA4 acts as a negative regulator of Bsp expression in osteoblasts. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 343-348] PMID:26973342

  15. Negative regulators of brown adipose tissue (BAT)-mediated thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bal Krishan; Patil, Mallikarjun; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2014-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for energy expenditure, a process called adaptive thermogenesis. PET-CT scans recently demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in adult humans, which revitalized our interest in BAT. Increasing the amount and/or activity of BAT holds tremendous promise for the treatment of obesity and its associated diseases. PGC1α is the master regulator of UCP1-mediated thermogenesis in BAT. A number of proteins have been identified to influence thermogenesis either positively or negatively through regulating the expression or transcriptional activity of PGC1α. Therefore, BAT activation can be achieved by either inducing the expression of positive regulators of PGC1α or by inhibiting the repressors of the PGC1α/UCP1 pathway. Here, we review the most important negative regulators of PGC1α/UCP1 signaling and their mechanism of action in BAT-mediated thermogenesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pkc-Mediated Stimulation of Amphibian Cftr Depends on a Single Phosphorylation Consensus Site. Insertion of This Site Confers Pkc Sensitivity to Human Cftr

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations of the CFTR, a phosphorylation-regulated Cl− channel, cause cystic fibrosis. Activation of CFTR by PKA stimulation appears to be mediated by a complex interaction between several consensus phosphorylation sites in the regulatory domain (R domain). None of these sites has a critical role in this process. Here, we show that although endogenous phosphorylation by PKC is required for the effect of PKA on CFTR, stimulation of PKC by itself has only a minor effect on human CFTR. In contrast, CFTR from the amphibians Necturus maculosus and Xenopus laevis (XCFTR) can be activated to similar degrees by stimulation of either PKA or PKC. Furthermore, the activation of XCFTR by PKC is independent of the net charge of the R domain, and mutagenesis experiments indicate that a single site (Thr665) is required for the activation of XCFTR. Human CFTR lacks the PKC phosphorylation consensus site that includes Thr665, but insertion of an equivalent site results in a large activation upon PKC stimulation. These observations establish the presence of a novel mechanism of activation of CFTR by phosphorylation of the R domain, i.e., activation by PKC requires a single consensus phosphorylation site and is unrelated to the net charge of the R domain. PMID:11331356

  17. Calpain inhibition promotes the rescue of F(508)del-CFTR in PBMC from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Averna, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Minicucci, Laura; De Tullio, Roberta; Cresta, Federico; Salamino, Franca; Pontremoli, Sandro; Melloni, Edon

    2013-01-01

    A basal calpain activity promotes the limited proteolysis of wild type (WT) cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR), inducing the internalization of the split channel. This process contributes to the regulation in the level of the active CFTR at the plasma membranes. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 16 healthy donors, the inhibition of calpain activity induces a 3-fold increase in the amount of active WT CFTR at the plasma membranes. Instead, in PBMC from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, calpain activity is expressed at aberrant levels causing the massive removal of F(508)del-CFTR from the cell surface. In these patients, the inhibition of such abnormal proteolysis rescues physiological amounts of active mutated CFTR in 90% of the patients (25 over 28). The recovery of functional F(508)del-CFTR at the physiological location, in cells treated with a synthetic calpain inhibitor, indicates that F(508)del-CFTR folding, maturation, and trafficking operate in CF-PBMC at significant rate. Thus, an increase in the basal calpain activity seems primarily involved in the CFTR defect observed in various CF cells. Furthermore, in CF-PBMC the recovery of the scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1), occurring following inhibition of the aberrant calpain activity, can contribute to rescue CFTR-functional clusters.

  18. Analysis of long-range interactions in primary human cells identifies cooperative CFTR regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Stéphanie; Berlivet, Soizik; Ka, Chandran; Gac, Gérald Le; Dostie, Josée; Férec, Claude

    2016-01-01

    A mechanism by which control DNA elements regulate transcription over large linear genomic distances is by achieving close physical proximity with genes, and looping of the intervening chromatin paths. Alterations of such regulatory ‘chromatin looping’ systems are likely to play a critical role in human genetic disease at large. Here, we studied the spatial organization of a ≈790 kb locus encompassing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Dysregulation of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis, which is the most common lethal genetic disorder in Caucasian populations. CFTR is a relatively large gene of 189 kb with a rather complex tissue-specific and temporal expression profile. We used chromatin conformation at the CFTR locus to identify new DNA sequences that regulate its transcription. By comparing 5C chromatin interaction maps of the CFTR locus in expressing and non-expressing human primary cells, we identified several new contact points between the CFTR promoter and its surroundings, in addition to regions featuring previously described regulatory elements. We demonstrate that two of these novel interacting regions cooperatively increase CFTR expression, and suggest that the new enhancer elements located on either side of the gene are brought together through chromatin looping via CTCF. PMID:26615198

  19. Analysis of long-range interactions in primary human cells identifies cooperative CFTR regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Stéphanie; Berlivet, Soizik; Ka, Chandran; Le Gac, Gérald; Dostie, Josée; Férec, Claude

    2016-04-07

    A mechanism by which control DNA elements regulate transcription over large linear genomic distances is by achieving close physical proximity with genes, and looping of the intervening chromatin paths. Alterations of such regulatory 'chromatin looping' systems are likely to play a critical role in human genetic disease at large. Here, we studied the spatial organization of a ≈790 kb locus encompassing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Dysregulation of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis, which is the most common lethal genetic disorder in Caucasian populations. CFTR is a relatively large gene of 189 kb with a rather complex tissue-specific and temporal expression profile. We used chromatin conformation at the CFTR locus to identify new DNA sequences that regulate its transcription. By comparing 5C chromatin interaction maps of the CFTR locus in expressing and non-expressing human primary cells, we identified several new contact points between the CFTR promoter and its surroundings, in addition to regions featuring previously described regulatory elements. We demonstrate that two of these novel interacting regions cooperatively increase CFTR expression, and suggest that the new enhancer elements located on either side of the gene are brought together through chromatin looping via CTCF.

  20. Unravelling druggable signalling networks that control F508del-CFTR proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Ramanath Narayana; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Capuani, Fabrizio; Carissimo, Annamaria; Carrella, Diego; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Advait; Bounti, Laura; Persico, Maria; Carlile, Graeme; Galietta, Luis; Thomas, David Y; Di Bernardo, Diego; Luini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The most frequent mutation (F508del-CFTR) results in altered proteostasis, that is, in the misfolding and intracellular degradation of the protein. The F508del-CFTR proteostasis machinery and its homeostatic regulation are well studied, while the question whether ‘classical’ signalling pathways and phosphorylation cascades might control proteostasis remains barely explored. Here, we have unravelled signalling cascades acting selectively on the F508del-CFTR folding-trafficking defects by analysing the mechanisms of action of F508del-CFTR proteostasis regulator drugs through an approach based on transcriptional profiling followed by deconvolution of their gene signatures. Targeting multiple components of these signalling pathways resulted in potent and specific correction of F508del-CFTR proteostasis and in synergy with pharmacochaperones. These results provide new insights into the physiology of cellular proteostasis and a rational basis for developing effective pharmacological correctors of the F508del-CFTR defect. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10365.001 PMID:26701908

  1. Unravelling druggable signalling networks that control F508del-CFTR proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Ramanath Narayana; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Iorio, Francesco; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Capuani, Fabrizio; Carissimo, Annamaria; Carrella, Diego; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Advait; Bounti, Laura; Persico, Maria; Carlile, Graeme; Galietta, Luis; Thomas, David Y; Di Bernardo, Diego; Luini, Alberto

    2015-12-23

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The most frequent mutation (F508del-CFTR) results in altered proteostasis, that is, in the misfolding and intracellular degradation of the protein. The F508del-CFTR proteostasis machinery and its homeostatic regulation are well studied, while the question whether 'classical' signalling pathways and phosphorylation cascades might control proteostasis remains barely explored. Here, we have unravelled signalling cascades acting selectively on the F508del-CFTR folding-trafficking defects by analysing the mechanisms of action of F508del-CFTR proteostasis regulator drugs through an approach based on transcriptional profiling followed by deconvolution of their gene signatures. Targeting multiple components of these signalling pathways resulted in potent and specific correction of F508del-CFTR proteostasis and in synergy with pharmacochaperones. These results provide new insights into the physiology of cellular proteostasis and a rational basis for developing effective pharmacological correctors of the F508del-CFTR defect.

  2. Inflammation, Prostate Cancer and Negative Regulation of Androgen Receptor Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    activity, 2) microRNA -mediated regulation of prostate cancer cell proliferation. My data establish that the human AR level is negatively regulated by... cancer , scanning of the cancer microRNA array shows that miR-454 is up regulated in androgen-independent C4-2 cells and overexpression of miR-454...TERMS Androgen receptor, prostate cancer , TNF-α, NF-κB, microRNA 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  3. How Novice EFL Teachers Regulate Their Negative Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizmendi Tejeda, Silvia; Gillings de González, Barbara Scholes; López Martínez, Cecilio Luis de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    This research report shares the findings that emerged from a qualitative study in which the main objective was to discover whether or not novice English as a foreign language teachers regulate their negative emotions during their initial teaching practice, and if so, how they do this. The data were collected by semi-structured interviews and…

  4. Emotional Competence in Children with Down Syndrome: Negativity and Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahromi, Laudan B.; Gulsrud, Amanda; Kasari, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Although often described as temperamentally "easy" and sociable, children with Down syndrome also exhibit behavior problems. Affective development is important for social and behavioral competence. We examined negative affective expressions and a range of emotion regulation/coping strategies during a frustrating task in a sample of children with…

  5. Revisiting CFTR inhibition: a comparative study of CFTRinh-172 and GlyH-101 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Melis, N; Tauc, M; Cougnon, M; Bendahhou, S; Giuliano, S; Rubera, I; Duranton, C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE For decades, inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel have been used as tools to investigate the role and function of CFTR conductance in cystic fibrosis research. In the early 2000s, two new and potent inhibitors of CFTR, CFTRinh-172 and GlyH-101, were described and are now widely used to inhibit specifically CFTR. However, despite some evidence, the effects of both drugs on other types of Cl−-conductance have been overlooked. In this context, we explore the specificity and the cellular toxicity of both inhibitors in CFTR-expressing and non–CFTR-expressing cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using patch-clamp technique, we tested the effects of CFTRinh-172 and GlyH-101 inhibitors on three distinct types of Cl− currents: the CFTR-like conductance, the volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl− conductance (VSORC) and finally the Ca2+-dependent Cl− conductance (CaCC). We also explored the effect of both inhibitors on cell viability using live/dead and cell proliferation assays in two different cell lines. KEY RESULTS We confirmed that these two compounds were potent inhibitors of the CFTR-mediated Cl− conductance. However,GlyH-101 also inhibited the VSORC conductance and the CaCC at concentrations used to inhibit CFTR. The CFTRinh-172 did not affect the CaCC but did inhibit the VSORC, at concentrations higher than 5 µM. Neither inhibitor (20 µM; 24 h exposure) affected cell viability, but both were cytotoxic at higher concentrations. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Both inhibitors affected Cl− conductances apart from CFTR. Our results provided insights into their use in mouse models. PMID:24758416

  6. Potentiator ivacaftor abrogates pharmacological correction of ΔF508 CFTR in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cholon, Deborah M; Quinney, Nancy L; Fulcher, M Leslie; Esther, Charles R; Das, Jhuma; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Randell, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C; Gentzsch, Martina

    2014-07-23

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Newly developed "correctors" such as lumacaftor (VX-809) that improve CFTR maturation and trafficking and "potentiators" such as ivacaftor (VX-770) that enhance channel activity may provide important advances in CF therapy. Although VX-770 has demonstrated substantial clinical efficacy in the small subset of patients with a mutation (G551D) that affects only channel activity, a single compound is not sufficient to treat patients with the more common CFTR mutation, ΔF508. Thus, patients with ΔF508 will likely require treatment with both correctors and potentiators to achieve clinical benefit. However, whereas the effectiveness of acute treatment with this drug combination has been demonstrated in vitro, the impact of chronic therapy has not been established. In studies of human primary airway epithelial cells, we found that both acute and chronic treatment with VX-770 improved CFTR function in cells with the G551D mutation, consistent with clinical studies. In contrast, chronic VX-770 administration caused a dose-dependent reversal of VX-809-mediated CFTR correction in ΔF508 homozygous cultures. This result reflected the destabilization of corrected ΔF508 CFTR by VX-770, markedly increasing its turnover rate. Chronic VX-770 treatment also reduced mature wild-type CFTR levels and function. These findings demonstrate that chronic treatment with CFTR potentiators and correctors may have unexpected effects that cannot be predicted from short-term studies. Combining these drugs to maximize rescue of ΔF508 CFTR may require changes in dosing and/or development of new potentiator compounds that do not interfere with CFTR stability.

  7. [Post-translational ligation and function of dual-vector transferred split CFTR gene].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fu-Xiang; Liu, Ze-Long; Qu, Hui-Ge; Chi, Xiao-Yan

    2010-01-01

    The mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to an autosomal recessive genetic disorder cystic fibrosis (CF). The gene therapy for CF using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors delivering CFTR gene is restricted by the contents limitation of AAV vectors. In this study the split CFTR genes severed at its regulatory domain were delivered by a dual-vector system with an intein-mediated protein trans-splicing as a technique to investigate the post-translational ligation of CFTR half proteins and its function as a chloride ion channel. A pair of eukaryotic expression vectors was constructed by breaking the human CFTR cDNA before Ser712 codon and fusing with Ssp DnaB intein coding sequences. After co-transfection into baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells followed by transient expression, patch clamps were carried out to record the chloride current of whole-cell and the activity of a single channel, and the ligation of two halves of CFTR was observed by Western blotting. The results showed that the intein-fused half genes co-transfected cells displayed a high whole cell chloride current and activity of a single channel indicating the functional recovery of chloride channel, and an intact CFTR protein band was figured out by CFTR-specific antibodies indicating that intein can efficiently ligate the separately expressed half CFTR proteins. The data demonstrated that protein splicing strategy could be used as a strategy in delivering CFTR gene by two vectors, encouraging our ongoing research program on dual AAV vector system based gene transfer in gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

  8. An unexpected effect of TNF-α on F508del-CFTR maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Bitam, Sara; Pranke, Iwona; Hollenhorst, Monika; Servel, Nathalie; Moquereau, Christelle; Tondelier, Danielle; Hatton, Aurélie; Urbach, Valérie; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Hinzpeter, Alexandre; Edelman, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multifactorial disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene ( CFTR), which encodes a cAMP-dependent Cl (-) channel. The most frequent mutation, F508del, leads to the synthesis of a prematurely degraded, otherwise partially functional protein. CFTR is expressed in many epithelia, with major consequences in the airways of patients with CF, characterized by both fluid transport abnormalities and persistent inflammatory responses. The relationship between the acute phase of inflammation and the expression of wild type (WT) CFTR or F508del-CFTR is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate this effect. The results show that 10 min exposure to TNF-alpha (0.5-50ng/ml) of F508del-CFTR-transfected HeLa cells and human bronchial cells expressing F508del-CFTR in primary culture (HBE) leads to the maturation of F508del-CFTR and induces CFTR chloride currents. The enhanced CFTR expression and function upon TNFα is sustained, in HBE cells, for at least 24 h. The underlying mechanism of action involves a protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathway, and occurs through insertion of vesicles containing F508del-CFTR to the plasma membrane, with TNFα behaving as a corrector molecule. In conclusion, a novel and unexpected action of TNFα has been discovered and points to the importance of systematic studies on the roles of inflammatory mediators in the maturation of abnormally folded proteins in general and in the context of CF in particular.

  9. Tyrosine kinase FYN negatively regulates NOX4 in cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Shouji; Kuroda, Junya; Zhai, Peiyong; Liu, Tong; Ikeda, Shohei; Nagarajan, Narayani; Yokota, Takashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Li, Hong; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (Noxes) produce ROS that regulate cell growth and death. NOX4 expression in cardiomyocytes (CMs) plays an important role in cardiac remodeling and injury, but the posttranslational mechanisms that modulate this enzyme are poorly understood. Here, we determined that FYN, a Src family tyrosine kinase, interacts with the C-terminal domain of NOX4. FYN and NOX4 colocalized in perinuclear mitochondria, ER, and nuclear fractions in CMs, and FYN expression negatively regulated NOX4-induced O2– production and apoptosis in CMs. Mechanistically, we found that direct phosphorylation of tyrosine 566 on NOX4 was critical for this FYN-mediated negative regulation. Transverse aortic constriction activated FYN in the left ventricle (LV), and FYN-deficient mice displayed exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and increased ROS production and apoptosis. Deletion of Nox4 rescued the exaggerated LV remodeling in FYN-deficient mice. Furthermore, FYN expression was markedly decreased in failing human hearts, corroborating its role as a regulator of cardiac cell death and ROS production. In conclusion, FYN is activated by oxidative stress and serves as a negative feedback regulator of NOX4 in CMs during cardiac remodeling. PMID:27525436

  10. Regulating positive and negative emotions in daily life.

    PubMed

    Nezlek, John B; Kuppens, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The present study examined how people regulate their emotions in daily life and how such regulation is related to their daily affective experience and psychological adjustment. Each day for an average of 3 weeks, participants described how they had regulated their emotions in terms of the reappraisal and suppression (inhibiting the expression) of positive and negative emotions, and they described their emotional experience, self-esteem, and psychological adjustment in terms of Beck's triadic model of depression. Reappraisal was used more often than suppression, and suppressing positive emotions was used less than the other three strategies. In general, regulation through reappraisal was found to be beneficial, whereas regulation by suppression was not. Reappraisal of positive emotions was associated with increases in positive affect, self-esteem, and psychological adjustment, whereas suppressing positive emotions was associated with decreased positive emotion, self-esteem, and psychological adjustment, and increased negative emotions. Moreover, relationships between reappraisal and psychological adjustment and self-esteem were mediated by experienced positive affect, whereas relationships between suppression of positive emotions and self-esteem adjustment were mediated by negative affect.

  11. Histone deacetylase 9 is a negative regulator of adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tapan K; Idelman, Gila; Blanco, Victor; Blomkalns, Andra L; Piegore, Mark G; Weintraub, Daniel S; Kumar, Santosh; Rajsheker, Srinivas; Manka, David; Rudich, Steven M; Tang, Yaoliang; Hui, David Y; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Lingrel, Jerry B; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Weintraub, Neal L

    2011-08-05

    Differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes capable of efficiently storing lipids is an important regulatory mechanism in obesity. Here, we examined the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) in the regulation of adipogenesis. We find that among the various members of the HDAC and HAT families, only HDAC9 exhibited dramatic down-regulation preceding adipogenic differentiation. Preadipocytes from HDAC9 gene knock-out mice exhibited accelerated adipogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC9 overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes suppressed adipogenic differentiation, demonstrating its direct role as a negative regulator of adipogenesis. HDAC9 expression was higher in visceral as compared with subcutaneous preadipocytes, negatively correlating with their potential to undergo adipogenic differentiation in vitro. HDAC9 localized in the nucleus, and its negative regulation of adipogenesis segregates with the N-terminal nuclear targeting domain, whereas the C-terminal deacetylase domain is dispensable for this function. HDAC9 co-precipitates with USF1 and is recruited with USF1 at the E-box region of the C/EBPα gene promoter in preadipocytes. Upon induction of adipogenic differentiation, HDAC9 is down-regulated, leading to its dissociation from the USF1 complex, whereas p300 HAT is up-regulated to allow its association with USF1 and accumulation at the E-box site of the C/EBPα promoter in differentiated adipocytes. This reciprocal regulation of HDAC9 and p300 HAT in the USF1 complex is associated with increased C/EBPα expression, a master regulator of adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation and document a critical regulatory role for HDAC9 in adipogenic differentiation through a deacetylase-independent mechanism.

  12. Spatiotemporal Coupling of cAMP Transporter to CFTR Chloride Channel Function in the Gut Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C.; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L.; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J.; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, is functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. MRP4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea. PMID:18045536

  13. Spatiotemporal coupling of cAMP transporter to CFTR chloride channel function in the gut epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J; Schuetz, John D; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2007-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here, we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. Mrp4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea.

  14. CFTR, bicarbonate, and the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, Drucy

    2015-10-01

    The gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR) was identified in 1989, yet major pathophysiologic questions remain unanswered. There is emerging evidence that CFTR is a bicarbonate channel, a driver of chloride-bicarbonate exchange and through its action on local pH, a regulator of other ion channels and of proteins that function optimally in a neutral environment. In both the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, bicarbonate drives ionic content and fluid on epithelial surfaces, allows mucins to unfold and become slippery, and contributes to innate immunity. In the GI tract bicarbonate neutralizes gastric acid to support digestion and absorption. When CFTR is dysfunctional, lack of bicarbonate secretion disrupts these normal processes and thus leads directly to the clinical symptoms and signs of CF. This article synthesizes evidence from cell, animal, and human investigations that support these concepts. Bicarbonate secretion does not seem to be the same in all tissues and varies with physiologic demand. Thus, tissue type and whether conditions are baseline or stimulated needs to be taken into account when evaluating the evidence concerning the role of bicarbonate in the pathophysiology of CF as a regulator of local pH. Basic and applied research that focuses on the role of CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion helps explain many of the diverse clinical manifestations that are CF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Bioelectric characterization of epithelia from neonatal CFTR knockout ferrets.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John T; Tyler, Scott R; Zhang, Yulong; Lee, Ben J; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Luo, Meihui; Xie, Weiliang; Yi, Yaling; Zhou, Weihong; Song, Yi; Keiser, Nicholas; Wang, Kai; de Jonge, Hugo R; Engelhardt, John F

    2013-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to understanding pathophysiology in CF and developing therapies. CFTR knockout ferrets manifest many of the phenotypes observed in the human disease, including lung infections, pancreatic disease and diabetes, liver disease, malnutrition, and meconium ileus. In the present study, we have characterized abnormalities in the bioelectric properties of the trachea, stomach, intestine, and gallbladder of newborn CF ferrets. Short-circuit current (ISC) analysis of CF and wild-type (WT) tracheas revealed the following similarities and differences: (1) amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were similar between genotypes; (2) responses to 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulphonic acid were 3.3-fold greater in CF animals, suggesting elevated baseline chloride transport through non-CFTR channels in a subset of CF animals; and (3) a lack of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)/forskolin-stimulated and N-(2-Naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101)-inhibited currents in CF animals due to the lack of CFTR. CFTR mRNA was present throughout all levels of the WT ferret and IBMX/forskolin-inducible ISC was only observed in WT animals. However, despite the lack of CFTR function in the knockout ferret, the luminal pH of the CF ferret gallbladder, stomach, and intestines was not significantly changed relative to WT. The WT stomach and gallbladder exhibited significantly enhanced IBMX/forskolin ISC responses and inhibition by GlyH-101 relative to CF samples. These findings demonstrate that multiple organs affected by disease in the CF ferret have bioelectric abnormalities consistent with the lack of cAMP-mediated chloride transport.

  16. Myostatin negatively regulates satellite cell activation and self-renewal.

    PubMed

    McCroskery, Seumas; Thomas, Mark; Maxwell, Linda; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2003-09-15

    Satellite cells are quiescent muscle stem cells that promote postnatal muscle growth and repair. Here we show that myostatin, a TGF-beta member, signals satellite cell quiescence and also negatively regulates satellite cell self-renewal. BrdU labeling in vivo revealed that, among the Myostatin-deficient satellite cells, higher numbers of satellite cells are activated as compared with wild type. In contrast, addition of Myostatin to myofiber explant cultures inhibits satellite cell activation. Cell cycle analysis confirms that Myostatin up-regulated p21, a Cdk inhibitor, and decreased the levels and activity of Cdk2 protein in satellite cells. Hence, Myostatin negatively regulates the G1 to S progression and thus maintains the quiescent status of satellite cells. Immunohistochemical analysis with CD34 antibodies indicates that there is an increased number of satellite cells per unit length of freshly isolated Mstn-/- muscle fibers. Determination of proliferation rate suggests that this elevation in satellite cell number could be due to increased self-renewal and delayed expression of the differentiation gene (myogenin) in Mstn-/- adult myoblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that Myostatin is a potent negative regulator of satellite cell activation and thus signals the quiescence of satellite cells.

  17. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  18. Current insights into the role of PKA phosphorylation in CFTR channel activity and the pharmacological rescue of cystic fibrosis disease-causing mutants.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stephanie; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel gating is predominantly regulated by protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation. In addition to regulating CFTR channel activity, PKA phosphorylation is also involved in enhancing CFTR trafficking and mediating conformational changes at the interdomain interfaces of the protein. The major cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutation is the deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del); it causes many defects that affect CFTR trafficking, stability, and gating at the cell surface. Due to the multiple roles of PKA phosphorylation, there is growing interest in targeting PKA-dependent signaling for rescuing the trafficking and functional defects of F508del-CFTR. This review will discuss the effects of PKA phosphorylation on wild-type CFTR, the consequences of CF mutations on PKA phosphorylation, and the development of therapies that target PKA-mediated signaling.

  19. Cholesterol modulates CFTR confinement in the plasma membrane of primary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Pandzic, Elvis; Goepp, Julie; Matthes, Elizabeth; Hanrahan, John W; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-07-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a plasma-membrane anion channel that, when mutated, causes the disease cystic fibrosis. Although CFTR has been detected in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction prepared from airway epithelial cells, suggesting that it may partition into cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts), its compartmentalization has not been demonstrated in intact cells and the influence of microdomains on CFTR lateral mobility is unknown. We used live-cell imaging, spatial image correlation spectroscopy, and k-space image correlation spectroscopy to examine the aggregation state of CFTR and its dynamics both within and outside microdomains in the plasma membrane of primary human bronchial epithelial cells. These studies were also performed during treatments that augment or deplete membrane cholesterol. We found two populations of CFTR molecules that were distinguishable based on their dynamics at the cell surface. One population showed confinement and had slow dynamics that were highly cholesterol dependent. The other, more abundant population was less confined and diffused more rapidly. Treatments that deplete the membrane of cholesterol caused the confined fraction and average number of CFTR molecules per cluster to decrease. Elevating cholesterol had the opposite effect, increasing channel aggregation and the fraction of channels displaying confinement, consistent with CFTR recruitment into cholesterol-rich microdomains with dimensions below the optical resolution limit. Viral infection caused the nanoscale microdomains to fuse into large platforms and reduced CFTR mobility. To our knowledge, these results provide the first biophysical evidence for multiple CFTR populations and have implications for regulation of their surface expression and channel function.

  20. Decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma in cftr-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Ollero, Mario; Junaidi, Omer; Zaman, Munir M; Tzameli, Iphigenia; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Andersson, Charlotte; Blanco, Paola G; Bialecki, Eldad; Freedman, Steven D

    2004-08-01

    Some of the pathological manifestations of cystic fibrosis are in accordance with an impaired expression and/or activity of PPARgamma. We hypothesized that PPARgamma expression is altered in tissues lacking the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein (CFTR). PPARgamma mRNA levels were measured in colonic mucosa, ileal mucosa, adipose tissue, lung, and liver from wild-type and cftr-/- mice by quantitative RT-PCR. PPARgamma expression was decreased twofold in CFTR-regulated tissues (colon, ileum, and lung) from cftr-/- mice compared to wild-type littermates. In contrast, no differences were found in fat and liver. Immunohistochemical analysis of PPARgamma in ileum and colon revealed a predominantly nuclear localization in wild-type mucosal epithelial cells while tissues from cftr-/- mice showed a more diffuse, lower intensity labeling. A significant decrease in PPARgamma expression was confirmed in nuclear extracts of colon mucosa by Western blot analysis. In addition, binding of the PPARgamma/RXR heterodimer to an oligonucletotide containing a peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE) was also decreased in colonic mucosa extracts from cftr-/- mice. Treatment of cftr-/- mice with the PPARgamma ligand rosiglitazone restored both the nuclear localization and binding to DNA, but did not increase RNA levels. We conclude that PPARgamma expression in cftr-/- mice is downregulated at the RNA and protein levels and its function diminished. These changes may be related to the loss of function of CFTR and may be relevant to the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities associated with cystic fibrosis in humans. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. The human CFTR protein expressed in CHO cells activates aquaporin-3 in a cAMP-dependent pathway: study by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Pascal; Becq, Frédéric; Lengacher, Sylvain; Boinot, Clément; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    The transmembrane water movements during cellular processes and their relationship to ionic channel activity remain largely unknown. As an example, in epithelial cells it was proposed that the movement of water could be directly linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity through a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore, or be dependent on aquaporin. Here, we used digital holographic microscopy (DHM) an interferometric technique to quantify in situ the transmembrane water fluxes during the activity of the epithelial chloride channel, CFTR, measured by patch-clamp and iodide efflux techniques. We showed that the water transport measured by DHM is fully inhibited by the selective CFTR blocker CFTRinh172 and is absent in cells lacking CFTR. Of note, in cells expressing the mutated version of CFTR (F508del-CFTR), which mimics the most common genetic alteration encountered in cystic fibrosis, we also show that the water movement is profoundly altered but restored by pharmacological manipulation of F508del-CFTR-defective trafficking. Importantly, whereas activation of this endogenous water channel required a cAMP-dependent stimulation of CFTR, activation of CFTR or F508del-CFTR by two cAMP-independent CFTR activators, genistein and MPB91, failed to trigger water movements. Finally, using a specific small-interfering RNA against the endogenous aquaporin AQP3, the water transport accompanying CFTR activity decreased. We conclude that water fluxes accompanying CFTR activity are linked to AQP3 but not to a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore in the CFTR protein.

  2. Pharmacological Correction of Cystic Fibrosis: Molecular Mechanisms at the Plasma Membrane to Augment Mutant CFTR Function.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavisha; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1980s, a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was identified to be the primary cause of cystic fibrosis (CF); a fatal multiple-organ disorder that mostly affects Caucasians. To date, approximately 2000 genetic mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene (http://www.genet.sickkids.on.ca/cftr/app). The most common cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with CF is a progressive deterioration in lung function leading ultimately to respiratory collapse. The median life expectancy of CF patients currently is estimated to be 39 years in the US. The most prevalent CFTR mutation, F508del, accounts for 70% of CF cases and causes a processing defect in the protein leading to premature endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) and reduced F508del-CFTR delivery to the cell surface. A CF corrector is defined as a chemical chaperone that increases cell-surface levels of F508del-CFTR. A series of CF correctors have been developed, and VX-809 (lumacaftor) has been cited as the most effective symptomatic CF corrector to date. VX-809 improves the function of the mutant protein by approximately 15% in in vitro culture systems. However, this effect did not completely translate clinically, with only a marginal improvement observed in lung function of the F508del-homozygous patients undergoing the therapy. New studies revealed that even after successful ER retrieval, rescued F508del-CFTR (rF508del-CFTR) once at the cell surface does not function properly, exhibiting poor stability and channel gating and structural abnormalities. This becomes further complicated by the existence of genes termed CFTR modifiers, which can alter CFTR function to be additionally defective and exacerbate the CF phenotype while also alternatively suggested be potentially targeted to improve F508del-CFTR functional outcome. It is necessary to understand the biology of F508del-CFTR post

  3. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane recruiter the alter ego of CFTR as a multi-kinase anchor.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Anil

    2007-11-01

    This review focuses on a newly discovered interaction between protein kinases involved in cellular energetics, a process that may be disturbed in cystic fibrosis for unknown reasons. I propose a new model where kinase-mediated cellular transmission of energy provides mechanistic insight to a latent role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). I suggest that CFTR acts as a multi-kinase recruiter to the apical epithelial membrane. My group finds that, in the cytosol, two protein kinases involved in cell energy homeostasis, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), bind one another. Preliminary data suggest that both can also bind CFTR (function unclear). The disrupted role of this CFTR-kinase complex as 'membrane transmitter to the cell' is proposed as an alternative paradigm to the conventional ion transport mediated and CFTR/chloride-centric view of cystic fibrosis pathogenesis. Chloride remains important, but instead, chloride-induced control of the phosphohistidine content of one kinase component (NDPK, via a multi-kinase complex that also includes a third kinase, CK2; formerly casein kinase 2). I suggest that this complex provides the necessary near-equilibrium conditions needed for efficient transmission of phosphate energy to proteins controlling cellular energetics. Crucially, a new role for CFTR as a kinase controller is proposed with ionic concentration acting as a signal. The model posits a regulatory control relay for energy sensing involving a cascade of protein kinases bound to CFTR.

  4. [Impact of the CFTR chloride channel on the cytoskeleton of mouse Sertoli cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-liang; Zhang, Zhe; Jiang, Hui; Gu, Yu-chun; Hong, Kai; Tang, Wen-hao; Zhao, Lian-ming; Liu, De-feng; Mao, Jia-ming; Yang, Yu-zhuo

    2016-02-01

    To study the impact of the chloride channel dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) on the cytoskeleton of Sertoli cells in the mouse. TM4 Sertoli cells were cultured and treated with CFTR(inh)-172 at the concentrations of 1, 5, 10 and 20 μmol/L for 48 hours. Then the cytotoxicity of CFT(inh)-172 was assessed by CCK-8 assay, the expressions of F-actin and Ac-tub in the TM4 Sertoli cells detected by immunofluorescence assay, and those of N-cadherin, vimentin and vinculin determined by qPCR. CFTR(inh)-172 produced cytotoxicity to the TM4 Sertoli cells at the concentration of 20 μmol/L. The expressions of F-actin and Ac-tub were decreased gradually in the TM4 Sertoli cells with the prolonging of treatment time and increasing concentration of CFTR(inh)-172 (P < 0.05). The results of qPCR showed that different concentrations of CFTR(inh)-172 worked no significant influence on the mRNA expressions of N-cadherin, vimentin and vinculin in the Sertoli cells. The CFTR chloride channel plays an important role in maintaining the normal cytoskeleton of Sertoli cells. The reduced function and expression of the CFTR chloride channel may affect the function of Sertoli cells and consequently spermatogenesis of the testis.

  5. PINOID functions in root phototropism as a negative regulator.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The PINOID (PID) family, which belongs to AGCVIII kinases, is known to be involved in the regulation of auxin efflux transporter PIN-formed (PIN) proteins through changes in the phosphorylation status. Recently, we demonstrated that the PID family is necessary for phytochrome-mediated phototropic enhancement in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and that the downregulation of PID expression by red-light pretreatment results in the promotion of the PIN-mediated auxin gradient during phototropic responses. However, whether PID participates in root phototropism in Arabidopsis seedlings has not been well studied. Here, we demonstrated that negative root phototropic responses are enhanced in the pid quadruple mutant and are severely impaired in transgenic plants expressing PID constitutively. The results indicate that the PID family functions in a negative root phototropism as a negative regulator. On the other hand, analysis with PID fused to a yellow fluorescent protein, VENUS, showed that unilateral blue-light irradiation causes a lower accumulation of PID proteins on the shaded side than on the irradiated side. This result suggests that the blue-light-mediated asymmetrical distribution of PID proteins may be one of the critical responses in phototropin-mediated signals during a negative root phototropism. Alternatively, such a transverse gradient of PID proteins may result from gravitropic stimulation produced by phototropic bending.

  6. PINOID functions in root phototropism as a negative regulator

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The PINOID (PID) family, which belongs to AGCVIII kinases, is known to be involved in the regulation of auxin efflux transporter PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins through changes in the phosphorylation status. Recently, we demonstrated that the PID family is necessary for phytochrome-mediated phototropic enhancement in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and that the downregulation of PID expression by red-light pretreatment results in the promotion of the PIN-mediated auxin gradient during phototropic responses. However, whether PID participates in root phototropism in Arabidopsis seedlings has not been well studied. Here, we demonstrated that negative root phototropic responses are enhanced in the pid quadruple mutant and are severely impaired in transgenic plants expressing PID constitutively. The results indicate that the PID family functions in a negative root phototropism as a negative regulator. On the other hand, analysis with PID fused to a yellow fluorescent protein, VENUS, showed that unilateral blue-light irradiation causes a lower accumulation of PID proteins on the shaded side than on the irradiated side. This result suggests that the blue-light-mediated asymmetrical distribution of PID proteins may be one of the critical responses in phototropin-mediated signals during a negative root phototropism. Alternatively, such a transverse gradient of PID proteins may result from gravitropic stimulation produced by phototropic bending. PMID:26039488

  7. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  8. USP13 negatively regulates antiviral responses by deubiquitinating STING

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Zhang, Qiang; Jing, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Man; Wang, Hai-Ying; Cai, Zeng; Liuyu, Tianzi; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Xiong, Tian-Chen; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Qi-Yun; Yao, Jing; Shu, Hong-Bing; Lin, Dandan; Zhong, Bo

    2017-01-01

    STING (also known as MITA) is critical for host defence against viruses and the activity of STING is regulated by ubiquitination. However, the deubiquitination of STING is not fully understood. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific protease 13 (USP13) is a STING-interacting protein that catalyses deubiquitination of STING. Knockdown or knockout of USP13 potentiates activation of IRF3 and NF-κB and expression of downstream genes after HSV-1 infection or transfection of DNA ligands. USP13 deficiency results in impaired replication of HSV-1. Consistently, USP13 deficient mice are more resistant than wild-type littermates to lethal HSV-1 infection. Mechanistically, USP13 deconjugates polyubiquitin chains from STING and prevents the recruitment of TBK1 to the signalling complex, thereby negatively regulating cellular antiviral responses. Our study thus uncovers a function of USP13 in innate antiviral immunity and provides insight into the regulation of innate immunity. PMID:28534493

  9. Negative Regulation of TLR4 Signaling by RP105

    PubMed Central

    Divanovic, Senad; Trompette, Aurelien; Atabani, Sowsan F.; Madan, Rajat; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Visintin, Alberto; Finberg, Robert W.; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Karp, Christopher L.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by microbial signatures is critical to the induction of immune responses. Such responses demand tight regulation. RP105 is a TLR homolog, thought to be largely B cell-specific, which lacks a signaling domain. We report that RP105 expression is wide, directly mirroring that of TLR4 on antigen presenting cells. We further show that RP105 is a specific inhibitor of TLR4 signaling in HEK293 cells, a function conferred by its extracellular domain. Notably, RP105 and its helper molecule, MD-1, interacted directly with the TLR4 signaling complex, inhibiting its ability to bind microbial ligand. Finally, we demonstrate that RP105 regulates TLR4 signaling in dendritic cells, as well as endotoxin responses in vivo. Thus, these results identify RP105 as a physiological negative regulator of TLR4 responses. PMID:15852007

  10. Lectin conjugates as potent, nonabsorbable CFTR inhibitors for reducing intestinal fluid secretion in cholera.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, N D; Zhao, Dan; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Galietta, Luis J V; Verkman, A S

    2007-04-01

    Inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel are predicted to prevent intestinal fluid secretion in cholera. We previously discovered low- affinity glycine hydrazide (GlyH) CFTR inhibitors that block CFTR at its external pore. The goal of this study was to develop potent CFTR inhibitors that are minimally absorbed and washed out of the intestinal lumen for application as antisecretory agents in cholera. GlyH analogs (malonic hydrazides, MalH) were chemically conjugated to various lectins ("MalH-lectin") and purified. CFTR inhibition potency was measured by short-circuit current analysis, mechanism of action by patch-clamp, and antidiarrheal efficacy in closed-loop and suckling mouse models. By lectin conjugation, we improved CFTR inhibitory potency by approximately 100-fold (to 50 nmol/L) and retarded washout. High-affinity CFTR inhibition was abolished by MalH-lectin heat denaturation, protease digestion, or competition by mannose or unconjugated lectin. Patch-clamp analysis indicated CFTR inhibition by an external pore occlusion mechanism. Fluorescently labeled MalH-lectin remained membrane bound for >6 hours after washout, whereas washout occurred in a few minutes without the lectin. MalH-ConA and MalH-wheat (IC50 50-100 pmol) blocked cholera toxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion in closed intestinal loops in mice and greatly reduced mortality in a suckling mouse model of cholera. The high potency of MalH-lectin conjugates results from "anchoring" the CFTR-blocking MalH to cell surface carbohydrates by the lectin. The high-affinity, slow washout, and external site of action of the MalH-lectin conjugates support their further development as antisecretory drugs for enterotoxin-mediated secretory diarrheas.

  11. Regulation of positive and negative emotion: effects of sociocultural context

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Sara A.; Heller, S. Megan; Lumian, Daniel S.; McRae, Kateri

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the use of emotion regulation strategies can vary by sociocultural context. In a previous study, we reported changes in the use of two different emotion regulation strategies at an annual alternative cultural event, Burning Man (McRae et al., 2011). In this sociocultural context, as compared to typically at home, participants reported less use of expressive suppression (a strategy generally associated with maladaptive outcomes), and greater use of cognitive reappraisal (a strategy generally associated with adaptive outcomes). What remained unclear was whether these changes in self-reported emotion regulation strategy use were characterized by changes in the regulation of positive emotion, negative emotion, or both. We addressed this issue in the current study by asking Burning Man participants separate questions about positive and negative emotion. Using multiple datasets, we replicated our previous findings, and found that the decreased use of suppression is primarily driven by reports of decreased suppression of positive emotion at Burning Man. By contrast, the increased use of reappraisal is not characterized by differential reappraisal of positive and negative emotion at Burning Man. Moreover, we observed novel individual differences in the magnitude of these effects. The contextual changes in self-reported suppression that we observe are strongest for men and younger participants. For those who had previously attended Burning Man, we observed lower levels of self-reported suppression in both sociocultural contexts: Burning Man and typically at home. These findings have implications for understanding the ways in which certain sociocultural contexts may decrease suppression, and possibly minimize its associated maladaptive effects. PMID:23840191

  12. Worldwide Genetic Analysis of the CFTR Region

    PubMed Central

    Mateu, Eva; Calafell, Francesc; Lao, Oscar; Bonné-Tamir, Batsheva; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2001-01-01

    Mutations at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis, the most prevalent severe genetic disorder in individuals of European descent. We have analyzed normal allele and haplotype variation at four short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) and two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CFTR in 18 worldwide population samples, comprising a total of 1,944 chromosomes. The rooted phylogeny of the SNP haplotypes was established by typing ape samples. STRP variation within SNP haplotype backgrounds was highest in most ancestral haplotypes—although, when STRP allele sizes were taken into account, differences among haplotypes became smaller. Haplotype background determines STRP diversity to a greater extent than populations do, which indicates that haplotype backgrounds are older than populations. Heterogeneity among STRPs can be understood as the outcome of differences in mutation rate and pattern. STRP sites had higher heterozygosities in Africans, although, when whole haplotypes were considered, no significant differences remained. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) shows a complex pattern not easily related to physical distance. The analysis of the fraction of possible different haplotypes not found may circumvent some of the methodological difficulties of LD measure. LD analysis showed a positive correlation with locus polymorphism, which could partly explain the unusual pattern of similar LD between Africans and non-Africans. The low values found in non-Africans may imply that the size of the modern human population that emerged “Out of Africa” may be larger than what previous LD studies suggested. PMID:11104661

  13. Anion conductance selectivity mechanism of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2016-04-01

    All ion channels are able to discriminate between substrate ions to some extent, a process that involves specific interactions between permeant anions and the so-called selectivity filter within the channel pore. In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion-selective channel, both anion relative permeability and anion relative conductance are dependent on anion free energy of hydration--anions that are relatively easily dehydrated tend to show both high permeability and low conductance. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the relative conductance of different anions in CFTR, and the effect of mutations within the channel pore. In constitutively-active E1371Q-CFTR channels, the anion conductance sequence was Cl(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > formate > SCN(-) > I(-). A mutation that disrupts anion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore (K95Q) disrupted anion conductance selectivity, such that anions with different permeabilities showed almost indistinguishable conductances. Conversely, a mutation at the putative narrowest pore region that is known to disrupt anion permeability selectivity (F337A) had minimal effects on anion relative conductance. Ion competition experiments confirmed that relatively tight binding of permeant anions resulted in relatively low conductance. These results suggest that the relative affinity of ion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore controls the relative conductance of different permeant anions in CFTR, and that the pore has two physically distinct anion selectivity filters that act in series to control anion conductance selectivity and anion permeability selectivity respectively.

  14. Conformational maturation of CFTR but not its mutant counterpart (delta F508) occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and requires ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, G L; Mohamed, A; Kartner, N; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R; Grinstein, S

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic labeling experiments followed by immunoprecipitation were performed to investigate the kinetics, location and inhibitor sensitivity of degradation of both wild-type (wt) and mutant (delta F508) cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR). At the earliest stages of the biosynthetic process, both wt and delta F508 CFTR were found to be susceptible to degradation by endogenous proteases. Virtually all delta F508 CFTR and 45-80% of wt CFTR were rapidly degraded with a similar half-life (t1/2 approximately 0.5 h). The remaining wt CFTR attained a protease-resistant configuration regardless of whether traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi was operational. Metabolic energy is required for the conformational transition, but not to maintain the stability of the protease-resistant wt CFTR. Intracellular degradation of delta F508 CFTR and of incompletely folded wt CFTR occurs in a non-lysosomal, pre-Golgi compartment, as indicated by the sensitivity of proteolysis to different inhibitors and temperature. Accordingly, products of the degradation of delta F508 CFTR could be detected by immunoblotting in isolated ER, but not in the Golgi. Together, these results suggest a dynamic equilibrium between two forms of wt CFTR in the ER: an incompletely folded, protease-sensitive form which is partially converted by an ATP-dependent process to a more mature form that is protease-resistant and capable of leaving the ER. The inability delta F508 CFTR to undergo such a transition renders it susceptible to complete and rapid degradation in a pre-Golgi compartment. Images PMID:7529176

  15. Defective CFTR- β-catenin interaction promotes NF-κB nuclear translocation and intestinal inflammation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaisheng; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Jie Ting; Tsang, Lai Ling; Jiang, Xiaohua; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2016-09-27

    While inflammation with aberrant activation of NF-κB pathway is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF), the molecular mechanisms underlying the link between CFTR defect and activation of NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory response remain elusive. Here, we investigated the link between CFTR defect and NF-κB activation in ΔF508cftr-/- mouse intestine and human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Our results show that the NF-κB/COX-2/PGE2 pathway is activated whereas the β-catenin pathway is suppressed in CF mouse intestine and CFTR-knockdown cells. Activation of β-catenin pathway by GSK3 inhibitors suppresses CFTR mutation/knockdown-induced NF-κB/COX-2/PGE2 pathway in ΔF508 mouse intestine and CFTR-knockdown cells. In contrast, suppression of β-catenin signaling induces the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. In addition, CFTR co-localizes and interacts with β-catenin while CFTR mutation disrupts the interaction between NF-κB and β-catenin in mouse intestine. Treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 completely reverses the reduced expression of β-catenin in Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results indicate that CFTR stabilizes β-catenin and prevents its degradation, defect of which results in the activation of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory cascade. The present study has demonstrated a previously unsuspected interaction between CFTR and β-catenin that regulates NF-κB nuclear translocation in mouse intestine. Therefore, our study provides novel insights into the physiological function of CFTR and pathogenesis of CF-related diseases in addition to the NF-κB-mediated intestinal inflammation seen in CF.

  16. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C.; Rodig, Scott J.; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  17. Loss of cftr function leads to pancreatic destruction in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Navis, Adam; Bagnat, Michel

    2015-03-15

    The development and function of many internal organs requires precisely regulated fluid secretion. A key regulator of vertebrate fluid secretion is an anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Loss of CFTR function leads to defects in fluid transport and cystic fibrosis (CF), a complex disease characterized by a loss of fluid secretion and mucus buildup in many organs including the lungs, liver, and pancreas. Several animal models including mouse, ferret and pig have been generated to investigate the pathophysiology of CF. However, these models have limited accessibility to early processes in the development of CF and are not amenable for forward genetic or chemical screens. Here, we show that Cftr is expressed and localized to the apical membrane of the zebrafish pancreatic duct and that loss of cftr function leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas and a cystic fibrosis phenotype that mirrors human disease. Our analyses reveal that the cftr mutant pancreas initially develops normally, then rapidly loses pancreatic tissue during larval life, reflecting pancreatic disease in CF. Altogether, we demonstrate that the cftr mutant zebrafish is a powerful new model for pancreatitis and pancreatic destruction in CF. This accessible model will allow more detailed investigation into the mechanisms that drive CF of the pancreas and facilitate development of new therapies to treat the disease.

  18. Loss of cftr function leads to pancreatic destruction in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Navis, Adam; Bagnat, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The development and function of many internal organs requires precisely regulated fluid secretion. A key regulator of vertebrate fluid secretion is an anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Loss of CFTR function leads to defects in fluid transport and cystic fibrosis (CF), a complex disease characterized by a loss of fluid secretion and mucus buildup in many organs including the lungs, liver, and pancreas. Several animal models including mouse, ferret and pig have been generated to investigate the pathophysiology of CF. However, these models have limited accessibility to early processes in the development of CF and are not amenable for forward genetic or chemical screens. Here, we show that Cftr is expressed and localized to the apical membrane of the zebrafish pancreatic duct and that loss of cftr function leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas and a cystic fibrosis phenotype that mirrors human disease. Our analyses reveal that the cftr mutant pancreas initially develops normally, then rapidly loses pancreatic tissue during larval life, reflecting pancreatic disease in CF. Altogether, we demonstrate that the cftr mutant zebrafish is a powerful new model for pancreatitis and pancreatic destruction in CF. This accessible model will allow more detailed investigation into the mechanisms that drive CF of the pancreas and facilitate development of new therapies to treat the disease. PMID:25592226

  19. First functional polymorphism in CFTR promoter that results in decreased transcriptional activity and Sp1/USF binding

    SciTech Connect

    Taulan, M. Lopez, E.; Guittard, C.; Rene, C.; Baux, D.; Altieri, J.P.; DesGeorges, M.; Claustres, M.; Romey, M.C.

    2007-09-28

    Growing evidences show that functionally relevant polymorphisms in various promoters alter both transcriptional activity and affinities of existing protein-DNA interactions, and thus influence disease progression in humans. We previously reported the -94G>T CFTR promoter variant in a female CF patient in whom any known disease-causing mutation has been detected. To investigate whether the -94G>T could be a regulatory variant, we have proceeded to in silico analyses and functional studies including EMSA and reporter gene assays. Our data indicate that the promoter variant decreases basal CFTR transcriptional activity in different epithelial cells and alters binding affinities of both Sp1 and USF nuclear proteins to the CFTR promoter. The present report provides evidence for the first functional polymorphism that negatively affects the CFTR transcriptional activity and demonstrates a cooperative role of Sp1 and USF transcription factors in transactivation of the CFTR gene promoter.

  20. Personalized medicine in cystic fibrosis: genistein supplementation as a treatment option for patients with a rare S1045Y-CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavisha; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, ChangSuk; Bouquet, Erin; Srinivasan, Saumini; Li, Chunying; Stokes, Dennis C; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by the mutations that generate nonfunctional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. A rare serine-to-tyrosine (S1045Y) CFTR mutation was earlier reported to result in CF-associated fatality. We identified an African-American patient with the S1045Y mutation in CFTR, as well as a stop-codon mutation, who has a mild CF phenotype. The underlying mechanism of CF caused by S1045Y-CFTR has not been elucidated. In this study, we determined that S1045Y-CFTR exhibits twofold attenuated function compared with wild-type (WT)-CFTR. We report that serine-to-tyrosine mutation leads to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of S1045Y-CFTR, followed by recruitment and binding of E3-ubiquitin ligase c-cbl, resulting in enhanced ubiquitination and passage of S1045Y-CFTR in the endosome/lysosome degradative compartments. We demonstrate that inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation partially rescues S1045Y-CFTR surface expression and function. Based on our findings, it could be suggested that consuming genistein (a tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitor) would likely ameliorate CF symptoms in individuals with S1045Y-CFTR, providing a unique personalized therapy for this rare CF mutation.

  1. DR3 Regulates Negative Selection during Thymocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eddie C. Y.; Thern, Anette; Denzel, Angela; Kitson, Jeremy; Farrow, Stuart N.; Owen, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    DR3 (Ws1, Apo3, LARD, TRAMP, TNFSFR12) is a member of the death domain-containing tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, members of which mediate a variety of developmental events including the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. We have investigated the in vivo role(s) of DR3 by generating mice congenitally deficient in the expression of the DR3 gene. We show that negative selection and anti-CD3-induced apoptosis are significantly impaired in DR3-null mice. In contrast, both superantigen-induced negative selection and positive selection are normal. The pre-T-cell receptor-mediated checkpoint, which is dependent on TNFR signaling, is also unaffected in DR3-deficient mice. These data reveal a nonredundant in vivo role for this TNF receptor family member in the removal of self-reactive T cells in the thymus. PMID:11313471

  2. RAGE, Receptor of Advanced Glycation Endoproducts, Negatively Regulates Chondrocytes Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25275461

  3. Intrinsic and extrinsic negative regulators of nuclear protein transport processes

    PubMed Central

    Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear–cytoplasmic protein transport is a critical process in cellular events. The identification of transport signals (nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal) and their receptors has facilitated our understanding of this expanding field. Nuclear transport must be appropriately regulated to deliver proteins through the nuclear pore when their functions are required in the nucleus, and to export them into the cytoplasm when they are not needed in the nucleus. Altered nuclear transport processes have been observed in stressed cells, which would change gene expressions. Some viruses interfere with nuclear transport in host cells to evade immune defense. Moreover, certain transport factors negatively regulate nuclear protein transport in cells. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of nuclear–cytoplasmic trafficking not only provides important information about cellular processes, but also is of use for developing specific inhibitors for transport pathways. PMID:22672474

  4. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J.

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  5. Inhibiting an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Protects CFTR.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R

    2015-08-17

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, the mechanism of action of Cif has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. It was demonstrated that the hydrolase activity of Cif is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. A small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system was also uncovered. These results provide a basis for targeting the distinctive virulence chemistry of Cif and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking.

  6. CFTR-deficient pigs display peripheral nervous system defects at birth

    PubMed Central

    Reznikov, Leah R.; Dong, Qian; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Moninger, Thomas O.; Park, Jung Min; Zhang, Yuzhou; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Randak, Christoph O.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system abnormalities, including neuropathy, have been reported in people with cystic fibrosis. These abnormalities have largely been attributed to secondary manifestations of the disease. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene directly influences nervous system function by studying newborn CFTR−/− pigs. We discovered CFTR expression and activity in Schwann cells, and loss of CFTR caused ultrastructural myelin sheath abnormalities similar to those in known neuropathies. Consistent with neuropathic changes, we found increased transcripts for myelin protein zero, a gene that, when mutated, can cause axonal and/or demyelinating neuropathy. In addition, axon density was reduced and conduction velocities of the trigeminal and sciatic nerves were decreased. Moreover, in vivo auditory brainstem evoked potentials revealed delayed conduction of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Our data suggest that loss of CFTR directly alters Schwann cell function and that some nervous system defects in people with cystic fibrosis are likely primary. PMID:23382208

  7. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3− secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H.; Parker, Connor P.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10–50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl− secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3− secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3− at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR+/− or CFTR+/∆F508) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3− at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3− secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl− secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3− secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers. PMID:27114540

  8. Dynein-mediated trafficking negatively regulates LET-23 EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Skorobogata, Olga; Meng, Jassy; Gauthier, Kimberley; Rocheleau, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is essential for animal development, and increased signaling underlies many human cancers. Identifying the genes and cellular processes that regulate EGFR signaling in vivo will help to elucidate how this pathway can become inappropriately activated. Caenorhabditis elegans vulva development provides an in vivo model to genetically dissect EGFR signaling. Here we identified a mutation in dhc-1, the heavy chain of the cytoplasmic dynein minus end–directed microtubule motor, in a genetic screen for regulators of EGFR signaling. Despite the many cellular functions of dynein, DHC-1 is a strong negative regulator of EGFR signaling during vulva induction. DHC-1 is required in the signal-receiving cell and genetically functions upstream or in parallel to LET-23 EGFR. LET-23 EGFR accumulates in cytoplasmic foci in dhc-1 mutants, consistent with mammalian cell studies in which dynein is shown to regulate late endosome trafficking of EGFR with the Rab7 GTPase. However, we found different distributions of LET-23 EGFR foci in rab-7 versus dhc-1 mutants, suggesting that dynein functions at an earlier step of LET-23 EGFR trafficking to the lysosome than RAB-7. Our results demonstrate an in vivo role for dynein in limiting LET-23 EGFR signaling via endosomal trafficking. PMID:27654944

  9. Positive and Negative Regulation of Poly(A) Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mangus, David A.; Evans, Matthew C.; Agrin, Nathan S.; Smith, Mandy; Gongidi, Preetam; Jacobson, Allan

    2004-01-01

    PAN, a yeast poly(A) nuclease, plays an important nuclear role in the posttranscriptional maturation of mRNA poly(A) tails. The activity of this enzyme is dependent on its Pan2p and Pan3p subunits, as well as the presence of poly(A)-binding protein (Pab1p). We have identified and characterized the associated network of factors controlling the maturation of mRNA poly(A) tails in yeast and defined its relevant protein-protein interactions. Pan3p, a positive regulator of PAN activity, interacts with Pab1p, thus providing substrate specificity for this nuclease. Pab1p also regulates poly(A) tail trimming by interacting with Pbp1p, a factor that appears to negatively regulate PAN. Pan3p and Pbp1p both interact with themselves and with the C terminus of Pab1p. However, the domains required for Pan3p and Pbp1p binding on Pab1p are distinct. Single amino acid changes that disrupt Pan3p interaction with Pab1p have been identified and define a binding pocket in helices 2 and 3 of Pab1p's carboxy terminus. The importance of these amino acids for Pab1p-Pan3p interaction, and poly(A) tail regulation, is underscored by experiments demonstrating that strains harboring substitutions in these residues accumulate mRNAs with long poly(A) tails in vivo. PMID:15169912

  10. Trimethylangelicin promotes the functional rescue of mutant F508del CFTR protein in cystic fibrosis airway cells.

    PubMed

    Favia, Maria; Mancini, Maria T; Bezzerri, Valentino; Guerra, Lorenzo; Laselva, Onofrio; Abbattiscianni, Anna C; Debellis, Lucantonio; Reshkin, Stephan J; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio; Casavola, Valeria

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) carrying the F508del mutation is retained in endoplasmic reticulum and fails to traffic to the cell surface where it functions as a protein kinase A (PKA)-activated chloride channel. Pharmacological correctors that rescue the trafficking of F508del CFTR may overcome this defect; however, the rescued F508del CFTR still displays reduced chloride permeability. Therefore, a combined administration of correctors and potentiators of the gating defect is ideal. We recently found that 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin (TMA), besides inhibiting the expression of the IL-8 gene in airway cells in which the inflammatory response was challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also potentiates the cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of wild-type CFTR or F508del CFTR that has been restored to the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that long preincubation with nanomolar concentrations of TMA is able to effectively rescue both F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion and F508del CFTR cell surface expression in both primary or secondary airway cell monolayers homozygous for F508del mutation. The correction effect of TMA seems to be selective for CFTR and persisted for 24 h after washout. Altogether, the results suggest that TMA, besides its anti-inflammatory and potentiator activities, also displays corrector properties.

  11. Essential Role of CFTR in PKA-Dependent Phosphorylation, Alkalinization, and Hyperpolarization During Human Sperm Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Puga Molina, Lis C; Pinto, Nicolás A; Torres Rodríguez, Paulina; Romarowski, Ana; Vicens Sanchez, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E; Darszon, Alberto; Treviño, Claudia L; Buffone, Mariano G

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian sperm require to spend a limited period of time in the female reproductive tract to become competent to fertilize in a process called capacitation. It is well established that HCO3(-) is essential for capacitation because it activates the atypical soluble adenylate cyclase ADCY10 leading to cAMP production, and promotes alkalinization of cytoplasm, and membrane hyperpolarization. However, how HCO3(-) is transported into the sperm is not well understood. There is evidence that CFTR activity is involved in the human sperm capacitation but how this channel is integrated in the complex signaling cascades associated with this process remains largely unknown. In the present work, we have analyzed the extent to which CFTR regulates different events in human sperm capacitation. We observed that inhibition of CFTR affects HCO3(-) -entrance dependent events resulting in lower PKA activity. CFTR inhibition also affected cAMP/PKA-downstream events such as the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivated motility, and acrosome reaction. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time, that CFTR and PKA activity are essential for the regulation of intracellular pH, and membrane potential in human sperm. Addition of permeable cAMP partially recovered all the PKA-dependent events altered in the presence of inh-172 which is consistent with a role of CFTR upstream of PKA activation. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1404-1414, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Functional Reconstitution and Channel Activity Measurements of Purified Wildtype and Mutant CFTR Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eckford, Paul D. W.; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  13. Emerging relationship between CFTR, actin and tight junction organization in cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Favia, Maria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Carbone, Annalucia; Abbattiscianni, Anna Claudia; Di Gioia, Sante; Casavola, Valeria; Conese, Massimo

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common genetic disorders affecting primarily Caucasians, is due to mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, encoding for a chloride channel also acting as regulator of other transmembrane proteins. In healthy subjects, CFTR is maintained in its correct apical plasma membrane location via the formation of a multiprotein complex in which scaffold proteins (such as NHERF1) and signaling molecules (such as cAMP and protein kinases) guarantee its correct functioning. In CF, a disorganized and dysfunctional airway epithelium brings an altered flux of ions and water into the lumen of bronchioles, consequent bacterial infections and an enormous influx of inflammatory cells (mainly polymorphonuclear neutrophils) into the airway lumen. Recent evidence in healthy airway cells supports the notion that CFTR protein/function is strictly correlated with the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions status. In CF cells, the most frequent CFTR gene mutation, F508del, has been shown to be associated with a disorganized actin cytoskeleton and altered tight junction permeability. Thus, the correct localization of CFTR on the apical plasma membrane domain through the formation of the scaffolding and signaling complex is likely fundamental to determine a physiological airway epithelium. The correction of CFTR mutations by either gene or drug therapies, as well as by stem cell-based interventions, can determine the resumption of a physiological organization of actin stress fibers and TJ structure and barrier function, further indicating the close interrelationship among these processes.

  14. On the mechanism of CFTR inhibition by a thiazolidinone derivative

    PubMed Central

    Kopeikin, Zoia; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a thiazolidinone derivative, 3-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methylene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone (or CFTRinh-172), on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gating were studied in excised inside-out membrane patches from Chinese hamster ovary cells transiently expressing wild-type and mutant CFTR. We found that the application of CFTRinh-172 results in an increase of the mean closed time and a decrease of the mean open time of the channel. A hyperbolic relationship between the closing rate and [CFTRinh-172] suggests that CFTRinh-172 does not act as a simple pore blocker. Interestingly, the potency of inhibition increases as the open time of the channel is increased with an IC50 in the low nanomolar range for CFTR channels locked in an open state for tens of seconds. Our studies also provide evidence that CFTRinh-172 can bind to both the open state and the closed state. However, at least one additional step, presumably reflecting inhibitor-induced conformational changes, is required to shut down the conductance after the binding of the inhibitor to the channel. Using the hydrolysis-deficient mutant E1371S as a tool as the closing rate of this mutant is dramatically decreased, we found that CFTRinh-172–dependent inhibition of CFTR channel gating, in two aspects, mimics the inactivation of voltage-dependent cation channels. First, similar to the recovery from inactivation in voltage-gated channels, once CFTR is inhibited by CFTRinh-172, reopening of the channel can be seen upon removal of the inhibitor in the absence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Second, ATP induced a biphasic current response on inhibitor-bound closed channels as if the ATP-opened channels “inactivate” despite a continuous presence of ATP. A simplified six-state kinetic scheme can well describe our data, at least qualitatively. Several possible structural mechanisms for the effects of CFTRinh-172 will be discussed. PMID:21078867

  15. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore.

  16. ATP secretion in the male reproductive tract: essential role of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Ye Chun; Shum, Winnie W C; Belleannée, Clémence; Da Silva, Nicolas; Breton, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is essential for the function of the epididymis and spermatozoa, but ATP release in the epididymis remains uncharacterized. We investigated here whether epithelial cells release ATP into the lumen of the epididymis, and we examined the role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a Cl− and HCO3− conducting ion channel known to be associated with male fertility, in this process. Immunofluorescence labelling of mouse cauda epididymidis showed expression of CFTR in principal cells but not in other epithelial cells. CFTR mRNA was not detectable in clear cells isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from B1-EGFP mice, which express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) exclusively in these cells in the epididymis. ATP release was detected from the mouse epididymal principal cell line (DC2) and increased by adrenaline and forskolin. Inhibition of CFTR with CFTRinh172 and transfection with CFTR-specific siRNAs in DC2 cells reduced basal and forskolin-activated ATP release. CFTR-dependent ATP release was also observed in primary cultures of mouse epididymal epithelial cells. In addition, steady-state ATP release was detected in vivo in mice, by measuring ATP concentration in a solution perfused through the lumen of the cauda epididymidis tubule and collected by cannulation of the vas deferens. Luminal CFTRinh172 reduced the ATP concentration detected in the perfusate. This study shows that CFTR is involved in the regulation of ATP release from principal cells in the cauda epididymidis. Given that mutations in CFTR are a leading cause of male infertility, we propose that defective ATP signalling in the epididymis might contribute to dysfunction of the male reproductive tract associated with these mutations. PMID:22711960

  17. Flg22-Triggered Immunity Negatively Regulates Key BR Biosynthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Góngora, Tamara; Kim, Seong-Ki; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    In plants, activation of growth and activation of immunity are opposing processes that define a trade-off. In the past few years, the growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids (BR) have emerged as negative regulators of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI), promoting growth at the expense of defense. The crosstalk between BR and PTI signaling was described as negative and unidirectional, since activation of PTI does not affect several analyzed steps in the BR signaling pathway. In this work, we describe that activation of PTI by the bacterial PAMP flg22 results in the reduced expression of BR biosynthetic genes. This effect does not require BR perception or signaling, and occurs within 15 min of flg22 treatment. Since the described PTI-induced repression of gene expression may result in a reduction in BR biosynthesis, the crosstalk between PTI and BR could actually be negative and bidirectional, a possibility that should be taken into account when considering the interaction between these two pathways.

  18. Focal adhesion kinase negatively regulates neuronal insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Bisht, Bharti; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2012-06-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a non-receptor protein kinase, is known to be a phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activator and thus widely implicated in regulation of cell survival and cancer. In recent years FAK has also been strongly implicated as a crucial regulator of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues like skeletal muscle and liver, where decrease in its expression/activity has been shown to lead to insulin resistance. However, in the present study we report an altogether different role of FAK in regulation of insulin/PI3K signaling in neurons, the post-mitotic cells. An aberrant increase in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation was observed in insulin resistant Neuro-2a (N2A) cells. Downregulation of FAK expression utilizing RNAi mediated gene silencing in insulin resistant N2A cells completely ameliorated the impaired insulin/PI3K signaling and glucose uptake. FAK silencing in primary cortical neurons also showed marked enhancement in glucose uptake. The results thus suggest that in neurons FAK acts as a negative regulator of insulin/PI3K signaling. Interestingly, the available literature also demonstrates cell-type specific functions of FAK in neurons. FAK that is well known for its cell survival effects has been shown to be involved in neurodegeneration. Along with these previous reports, present findings highlight a novel and critical role of FAK in neurons. Moreover, as this implicates differential regulation of insulin/PI3K pathway by FAK in peripheral tissues and neuronal cells, it strongly suggests precaution while considering FAK modulators as possible therapeutics.

  19. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator controls biliary epithelial inflammation and permeability by regulating Src tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Fiorotto, Romina; Villani, Ambra; Kourtidis, Antonis; Scirpo, Roberto; Amenduni, Mariangela; Geibel, Peter J; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Spirli, Carlo; Anastasiadis, Panos Z; Strazzabosco, Mario

    2016-12-01

    In the liver, the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) regulates bile secretion and other functions at the apical membrane of biliary epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes). CF-related liver disease is a major cause of death in patients with CF. CFTR dysfunction affects innate immune pathways, generating a para-inflammatory status in the liver and other epithelia. This study investigates the mechanisms linking CFTR to toll-like receptor 4 activity. We found that CFTR is associated with a multiprotein complex at the apical membrane of normal mouse cholangiocytes, with proteins that negatively control Rous sarcoma oncogene cellular homolog (Src) activity. In CFTR-defective cholangiocytes, Src tyrosine kinase self-activates and phosphorylates toll-like receptor 4, resulting in activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in response to endotoxins. This Src/nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells-dependent inflammatory process attracts inflammatory cells but also generates changes in the apical junctional complex and loss of epithelial barrier function. Inhibition of Src decreased the inflammatory response of CF cholangiocytes to lipopolysaccharide, rescued the junctional defect in vitro, and significantly attenuated endotoxin-induced biliary damage and inflammation in vivo (Cftr knockout mice). These findings reveal a novel function of CFTR as a regulator of toll-like receptor 4 responses and cell polarity in biliary epithelial cells; this mechanism is pathogenetic, as shown by the protective effects of Src inhibition in vivo, and may be a novel therapeutic target in CF-related liver disease and other inflammatory cholangiopathies. (Hepatology 2016;64:2118-2134). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  20. Arabidopsis RGL1 Encodes a Negative Regulator of Gibberellin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chi-Kuang; Chang, Caren

    2002-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the DELLA subfamily of GRAS regulatory genes consists of GAI, RGA, RGA-LIKE1 (RGL1), RGL2, and RGL3. GAI and RGA are known to be negative regulators of gibberellin (GA) responses. We found that RGL1 is a similar repressor of GA responses, as revealed by RGL1 gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Repression of GA responses in Arabidopsis was conferred by a dominant 35S-rgl1 transgene carrying a DELLA domain deletion analogous to the GA-insensitive gai-1 mutation. As in GA-deficient Arabidopsis, the transgenic plants were dark green dwarfs with underdeveloped trichomes and flowers. Expression levels of GA4, a feedback-regulated GA biosynthetic gene, were increased correspondingly. Conversely, a loss-of-function rgl1 line had reduced GA4 expression and exhibited GA-independent activation of seed germination, leaf expansion, flowering, stem elongation, and floral development, as detected by resistance to the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. RGL1 plays a greater role in seed germination than do GAI and RGA. The expression profile of RGL1 differed from those of the four other DELLA homologs. RGL1 message levels were predominant in flowers, with transcripts detected in developing ovules and anthers. As with RGA, green fluorescent protein (GFP)–tagged RGL1 protein was localized to the nucleus, but unlike GFP-RGA, there was no degradation after GA treatment. These findings indicate that RGL1 is a partially redundant, but distinct, negative regulator of GA responses and suggest that all DELLA subfamily members might possess separate as well as overlapping roles in GA signaling. PMID:11826301

  1. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC.

  2. CHIP promotes Runx2 degradation and negatively regulates osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueni; Huang, Mei; Zheng, Huiling; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Shang, Yu; Zhai, Yonggong; Irwin, David M.; Shi, Yuguang; Chen, Di; Chang, Zhijie

    2008-01-01

    Runx2, an essential transactivator for osteoblast differentiation, is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In this paper, we report that CHIP (C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein)/STUB1 regulates Runx2 protein stability via a ubiquitination-degradation mechanism. CHIP interacts with Runx2 in vitro and in vivo. In the presence of increased Runx2 protein levels, CHIP expression decreases, whereas the expression of other E3 ligases involved in Runx2 degradation, such as Smurf1 or WWP1, remains constant or increases during osteoblast differentiation. Depletion of CHIP results in the stabilization of Runx2, enhances Runx2-mediated transcriptional activation, and promotes osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial cells. In contrast, CHIP overexpression in preosteoblasts causes Runx2 degradation, inhibits osteoblast differentiation, and instead enhances adipogenesis. Our data suggest that negative regulation of the Runx2 protein by CHIP is critical in the commitment of precursor cells to differentiate into the osteoblast lineage. PMID:18541707

  3. Validation of a semiconductor next-generation sequencing assay for the clinical genetic screening of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Trujillano, Daniel; Weiss, Maximilian E R; Köster, Julia; Papachristos, Efstathios B; Werber, Martin; Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Marais, Anett; Eichler, Sabrina; Creed, Jenny; Baysal, Erol; Jaber, Iqbal Yousuf; Mehaney, Dina Ahmed; Farra, Chantal; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-09-01

    Genetic testing for cystic fibrosis and CFTR-related disorders mostly relies on laborious molecular tools that use Sanger sequencing to scan for mutations in the CFTR gene. We have explored a more efficient genetic screening strategy based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the CFTR gene. We validated this approach in a cohort of 177 patients with previously known CFTR mutations and polymorphisms. Genomic DNA was amplified using the Ion AmpliSeq™ CFTR panel. The DNA libraries were pooled, barcoded, and sequenced using an Ion Torrent PGM sequencer. The combination of different robust bioinformatics tools allowed us to detect previously known pathogenic mutations and polymorphisms in the 177 samples, without detecting spurious pathogenic calls. In summary, the assay achieves a sensitivity of 94.45% (95% CI: 92% to 96.9%), with a specificity of detecting nonvariant sites from the CFTR reference sequence of 100% (95% CI: 100% to 100%), a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 100% to 100%), and a negative predictive value of 99.99% (95% CI: 99.99% to 100%). In addition, we describe the observed allelic frequencies of 94 unique definitely and likely pathogenic, uncertain, and neutral CFTR variants, some of them not previously annotated in the public databases. Strikingly, a seven exon spanning deletion as well as several more technically challenging variants such as pathogenic poly-thymidine-guanine and poly-thymidine (poly-TG-T) tracts were also detected. Targeted NGS is ready to substitute classical molecular methods to perform genetic testing on the CFTR gene.

  4. Negative regulation of the inflammasome: keeping inflammation under control.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor; Valdez-Hernández, Laura; Meza-Sosa, Karla F; Ando-Kuri, Masami

    2015-05-01

    In addition to its roles in controlling infection and tissue repair, inflammation plays a critical role in diverse and distinct chronic diseases, such as cancer, metabolic syndrome, and neurodegenerative disorders, underscoring the harmful effect of an uncontrolled inflammatory response. Regardless of the nature of the stimulus, initiation of the inflammatory response is mediated by assembly of a multimolecular protein complex called the inflammasome, which is responsible for the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. The different stimuli and mechanisms that control inflammasome activation are fairly well understood, but the mechanisms underlying the control of undesired inflammasome activation and its inactivation remain largely unknown. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that negatively regulate inflammasome activation to prevent unwanted activation in the resting state, as well as those involved in terminating the inflammatory response after a specific insult to maintain homeostasis.

  5. UMD-CFTR: a database dedicated to CF and CFTR-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Bareil, Corinne; Thèze, Corinne; Béroud, Christophe; Hamroun, Dalil; Guittard, Caroline; René, Céline; Paulet, Damien; Georges, Marie des; Claustres, Mireille

    2010-09-01

    With the increasing knowledge of cystic fibrosis (CF) and CFTR-related diseases (CFTR-RD), the number of sequence variations in the CFTR gene is constantly raising. CF and particularly CFTR-RD provide a particular challenge because of many unclassified variants and identical genotypes associated with different phenotypes. Using the Universal Mutation Database (UMD) software we have constructed UMD-CFTR (freely available at the URL: http://www.umd.be/CFTR/), the first comprehensive relational CFTR database that allows an in-depth analysis and annotation of all variations identified in individuals whose CFTR genes have been analyzed extensively. The system has been tested on the molecular data from 757 patients (540 CF and 217 CBAVD) including disease-causing, unclassified, and nonpathogenic alterations (301 different sequence variations) representing 3,973 entries. Tools are provided to assess the pathogenicity of mutations. UMD-CFTR also offers a number of query tools and graphical views providing instant access to the list of mutations, their frequencies, positions and predicted consequences, or correlations between genotypes, haplotypes, and phenotypes. UMD-CFTR offers a way to compile not only disease-causing genotypes but also haplotypes. It will help the CFTR scientific and medical communities to improve sequence variation interpretation, evaluate the putative influence of haplotypes on mutations, and correlate molecular data with phenotypes.

  6. Molecular and functional analysis of the large 5' promoter region of CFTR gene revealed pathogenic mutations in CF and CFTR-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Sonia; Amato, Felice; Elce, Ausilia; Monti, Maria; Iannone, Carla; Pucci, Pietro; Seia, Manuela; Angioni, Adriano; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) manifest a multisystemic disease due to mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); despite extensive testing of coding regions, a proportion of CF alleles remains unidentified. We studied 118 patients with CF and CFTR-related disorders, most with one or both unknown mutations after the scanning of CFTR coding regions, and a non-CF control group (n = 75) by sequencing the 6000-bp region at the 5' of the CFTR gene. We identified 23 mutations, of which 9 were novel. We expressed such mutations in vitro using four cell systems to explore their functional effect, relating the data to the clinical expression of each patient. Some mutations reduced expression of the gene reporter firefly luciferase in various cell lines and may act as disease-causing mutations. Other mutations caused an increase in luciferase expression in some cell lines. One mutation had a different effect in different cells. For other mutations, the expression assay excluded a functional role. Gene variants in the large 5' region may cause altered regulation of CFTR gene expression, acting as disease-causing mutations or modifiers of its clinical phenotype. Studies of in vitro expression in different cell systems may help reveal the effect of such mutations.

  7. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  8. CFTR impairment upregulates c-Src activity through IL-1β autocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Massip-Copiz, María Macarena; Clauzure, Mariángeles; Valdivieso, Ángel Gabriel; Santa-Coloma, Tomás Antonio

    2017-02-15

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Previously, we found several genes showing a differential expression in CFDE cells (epithelial cells derived from a CF patient). One corresponded to c-Src; its expression and activity was found increased in CFDE cells, acting as a signaling molecule between the CFTR activity and MUC1 overexpression. Here we report that bronchial IB3-1 cells (CF cells) also showed increased c-Src activity compared to 'CFTR-corrected' S9 cells. In addition, three different Caco-2 cell lines, each stably transfected with a different CFTR-specific shRNAs, displayed increased c-Src activity. The IL-1β receptor antagonist IL1RN reduced the c-Src activity of Caco-2/pRS26 cells (expressing a CFTR-specific shRNA). In addition, increased mitochondrial and cellular ROS levels were detected in Caco-2/pRS26 cells. ROS levels were partially reduced by incubation with PP2 (c-Src inhibitor) or IL1RN, and further reduced by using the NOX1/4 inhibitor GKT137831. Thus, IL-1β→c-Src and IL-1β→NOX signaling pathways appear to be responsible for the production of cellular and mitochondrial ROS in CFTR-KD cells. In conclusion, IL-1β constitutes a new step in the CFTR signaling pathway, located upstream of c-Src, which is stimulated in cells with impaired CFTR activity.

  9. Computational design of a PDZ domain peptide inhibitor that rescues CFTR activity.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kyle E; Cushing, Patrick R; Boisguerin, Prisca; Madden, Dean R; Donald, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial chloride channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The most prevalent CFTR mutation, ΔF508, blocks folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recent work has shown that some ΔF508-CFTR channel activity can be recovered by pharmaceutical modulators ("potentiators" and "correctors"), but ΔF508-CFTR can still be rapidly degraded via a lysosomal pathway involving the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL), which binds CFTR via a PDZ interaction domain. We present a study that goes from theory, to new structure-based computational design algorithms, to computational predictions, to biochemical testing and ultimately to epithelial-cell validation of novel, effective CAL PDZ inhibitors (called "stabilizers") that rescue ΔF508-CFTR activity. To design the "stabilizers", we extended our structural ensemble-based computational protein redesign algorithm K* to encompass protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. The computational predictions achieved high accuracy: all of the top-predicted peptide inhibitors bound well to CAL. Furthermore, when compared to state-of-the-art CAL inhibitors, our design methodology achieved higher affinity and increased binding efficiency. The designed inhibitor with the highest affinity for CAL (kCAL01) binds six-fold more tightly than the previous best hexamer (iCAL35), and 170-fold more tightly than the CFTR C-terminus. We show that kCAL01 has physiological activity and can rescue chloride efflux in CF patient-derived airway epithelial cells. Since stabilizers address a different cellular CF defect from potentiators and correctors, our inhibitors provide an additional therapeutic pathway that can be used in conjunction with current methods.

  10. Gene mutation in microRNA target sites of CFTR gene: a novel pathogenetic mechanism in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Amato, Felice; Seia, Manuela; Giordano, Sonia; Elce, Ausilia; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent lethal genetic disorder among Caucasians. It depends on alterations of a chloride channel expressed by most epithelial cells and encoded by CFTR gene. Also using scanning techniques to analyze the whole coding regions of CFTR gene, mutations are not identified in up to 10% of CF alleles, and such figure increases in CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD). Other gene regions may be the site of causing-disease mutations. We searched for genetic variants in the 1500 bp of CFTR 3' untranslated region, typical target of microRNA (miRNA) posttranscriptional gene regulation, in either CF patients with the F508del homozygous genotype and different clinical expression (n = 20), CF (n = 32) and CFTR-RD (n = 43) patients with one or none mutation after CFTR scanning and in controls (n = 50). We identified three SNPs, one of which, the c.*1043A>C, was located in a region predicted to bind miR-433 and miR-509-3p. Such mutation was peculiar of a CFTR-RD patient that had Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens (CBAVD), diffuse bronchiectasis, a borderline sweat chloride test and the heterozygous severe F508del mutation on the other allele. The expression analysis demonstrated that the c.*1043A>C increases the affinity for miR-509-3p and slightly decreases that for the miR-433. Both miRNAs cause in vitro a reduced expression of CFTR protein. Thus, the c.*1043A>C may act as a mild CFTR mutation enhancing the affinity for inhibitory miRNAs as a novel pathogenetic mechanism in CF.

  11. Defective CFTR- β-catenin interaction promotes NF-κB nuclear translocation and intestinal inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie Ting; Tsang, Lai Ling; Jiang, Xiaohua; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2016-01-01

    While inflammation with aberrant activation of NF-κB pathway is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF), the molecular mechanisms underlying the link between CFTR defect and activation of NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory response remain elusive. Here, we investigated the link between CFTR defect and NF-κB activation in ΔF508cftr−/− mouse intestine and human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Our results show that the NF-κB/COX-2/PGE2 pathway is activated whereas the β-catenin pathway is suppressed in CF mouse intestine and CFTR-knockdown cells. Activation of β-catenin pathway by GSK3 inhibitors suppresses CFTR mutation/knockdown-induced NF-κB/COX-2/PGE2 pathway in ΔF508 mouse intestine and CFTR-knockdown cells. In contrast, suppression of β-catenin signaling induces the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. In addition, CFTR co-localizes and interacts with β-catenin while CFTR mutation disrupts the interaction between NF-κB and β-catenin in mouse intestine. Treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 completely reverses the reduced expression of β-catenin in Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results indicate that CFTR stabilizes β-catenin and prevents its degradation, defect of which results in the activation of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory cascade. The present study has demonstrated a previously unsuspected interaction between CFTR and β-catenin that regulates NF-κB nuclear translocation in mouse intestine. Therefore, our study provides novel insights into the physiological function of CFTR and pathogenesis of CF-related diseases in addition to the NF-κB-mediated intestinal inflammation seen in CF. PMID:27588407

  12. A sequence upstream of canonical PDZ-binding motif within CFTR COOH-terminus enhances NHERF1 interaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; LaRusch, Jessica; Sosnay, Patrick R; Gottschalk, Laura B; Lopez, Andrea P; Pellicore, Matthew J; Evans, Taylor; Davis, Emily; Atalar, Melis; Na, Chan-Hyun; Rosson, Gedge D; Belchis, Deborah; Milewski, Michal; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-12-01

    The development of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) targeted therapy for cystic fibrosis has generated interest in maximizing membrane residence of mutant forms of CFTR by manipulating interactions with scaffold proteins, such as sodium/hydrogen exchange regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1). In this study, we explored whether COOH-terminal sequences in CFTR beyond the PDZ-binding motif influence its interaction with NHERF1. NHERF1 displayed minimal self-association in blot overlays (NHERF1, Kd = 1,382 ± 61.1 nM) at concentrations well above physiological levels, estimated at 240 nM from RNA-sequencing and 260 nM by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in sweat gland, a key site of CFTR function in vivo. However, NHERF1 oligomerized at considerably lower concentrations (10 nM) in the presence of the last 111 amino acids of CFTR (20 nM) in blot overlays and cross-linking assays and in coimmunoprecipitations using differently tagged versions of NHERF1. Deletion and alanine mutagenesis revealed that a six-amino acid sequence (1417)EENKVR(1422) and the terminal (1478)TRL(1480) (PDZ-binding motif) in the COOH-terminus were essential for the enhanced oligomerization of NHERF1. Full-length CFTR stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells fostered NHERF1 oligomerization that was substantially reduced (∼5-fold) on alanine substitution of EEN, KVR, or EENKVR residues or deletion of the TRL motif. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that the EENKVR and TRL sequences contribute to preferential localization of CFTR to the apical membrane. Together, these results indicate that COOH-terminal sequences mediate enhanced NHERF1 interaction and facilitate the localization of CFTR, a property that could be manipulated to stabilize mutant forms of CFTR at the apical surface to maximize the effect of CFTR-targeted therapeutics.

  13. Refining the continuum of CFTR-associated disorders in the era of newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Levy, H.; Nugent, M.; Schneck, K.; Stachiw-Hietpas, D.; Laxova, A.; Lakser, O.; Rock, M.; Dahmer, M.K.; Biller, J.; Nasr, S.Z.; Baker, M.; McColley, S.A.; Simpson, P.; Farrell, P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical heterogeneity in cystic fibrosis (CF) often causes diagnostic uncertainty in infants without symptoms and in older patients with milder phenotypes. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of a comprehensive set of clinical and laboratory descriptors in a physician-defined cohort (N = 376; Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and the American Family Children’s Hospital CF centers in Milwaukee and Madison, WI, USA) to determine the robustness of categorizing CF (N = 300), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-related disorder (N = 19), and CFTR-related (CRMS) metabolic syndrome (N = 57) according to current consensus guidelines. Outcome measures included patient demographics, clinical measures, sweat chloride levels, CFTR genotype, age at diagnosis, airway microbiology, pancreatic function, infection, and nutritional status. The CF cohort had a significantly higher median sweat chloride level (105 mmol/l) than CFTR-related disorder patients (43 mmol/l) and CFTR-related metabolic syndrome patients (35 mmol/l; p ≤ 0.001). Patient groups significantly differed in pancreatic sufficiency, immunoreactive trypsinogen levels, sweat chloride values, genotype, and positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures (p ≤ 0.001). An automated classification algorithm using recursive partitioning demonstrated concordance between physician diagnoses and consensus guidelines. Our analysis suggests that integrating clinical information with sweat chloride levels, CFTR genotype, and pancreatic sufficiency provides a context for continued longitudinal monitoring of patients for personalized and effective treatment. PMID:26671754

  14. Refining the continuum of CFTR-associated disorders in the era of newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Levy, H; Nugent, M; Schneck, K; Stachiw-Hietpas, D; Laxova, A; Lakser, O; Rock, M; Dahmer, M K; Biller, J; Nasr, S Z; Baker, M; McColley, S A; Simpson, P; Farrell, P M

    2016-05-01

    Clinical heterogeneity in cystic fibrosis (CF) often causes diagnostic uncertainty in infants without symptoms and in older patients with milder phenotypes. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of a comprehensive set of clinical and laboratory descriptors in a physician-defined cohort (N = 376; Children's Hospital of Wisconsin and the American Family Children's Hospital CF centers in Milwaukee and Madison, WI, USA) to determine the robustness of categorizing CF (N = 300), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-related disorder (N = 19), and CFTR-related (CRMS) metabolic syndrome (N = 57) according to current consensus guidelines. Outcome measures included patient demographics, clinical measures, sweat chloride levels, CFTR genotype, age at diagnosis, airway microbiology, pancreatic function, infection, and nutritional status. The CF cohort had a significantly higher median sweat chloride level (105 mmol/l) than CFTR-related disorder patients (43 mmol/l) and CFTR-related metabolic syndrome patients (35 mmol/l; p ≤ 0.001). Patient groups significantly differed in pancreatic sufficiency, immunoreactive trypsinogen levels, sweat chloride values, genotype, and positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures (p ≤ 0.001). An automated classification algorithm using recursive partitioning demonstrated concordance between physician diagnoses and consensus guidelines. Our analysis suggests that integrating clinical information with sweat chloride levels, CFTR genotype, and pancreatic sufficiency provides a context for continued longitudinal monitoring of patients for personalized and effective treatment.

  15. Conservation of CFTR codon frequency through primates suggests synonymous mutations could have a functional effect.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Iriarte, Andrés; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Marín, Mónica

    2015-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system, with a prevalence of about 1:3000 people. Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR gene, which lead to a defective function of the chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Up-to-date, more than 1900 mutations have been reported in CFTR. However for an important proportion of them, their functional effects and the relation to disease are still not understood. Many of these mutations are silent (or synonymous), namely they do not alter the encoded amino acid. These synonymous mutations have been considered as neutral to protein function. However, more recent evidence in bacterial and human proteins has put this concept under revision. With the aim of understanding possible functional effects of synonymous mutations in CFTR, we analyzed human and primates CFTR codon usage and divergence patterns. We report the presence of regions enriched in rare and frequent codons. This spatial pattern of codon preferences is conserved in primates, but this cannot be explained by sequence conservation alone. In sum, the results presented herein suggest a functional implication of these regions of the gene that may be maintained by purifying selection acting to preserve a particular codon usage pattern along the sequence. Overall these results support the idea that several synonymous mutations in CFTR may have functional importance, and could be involved in the disease.

  16. Functional and molecular identification of a TASK-1 potassium channel regulating chloride secretion through CFTR channels in the shark rectal gland: implications for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Telles, Connor J; Decker, Sarah E; Motley, William W; Peters, Alexander W; Mehr, Ali Poyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Forrest, John N

    2016-12-01

    In the shark rectal gland (SRG), apical chloride secretion through CFTR channels is electrically coupled to a basolateral K(+) conductance whose type and molecular identity are unknown. We performed studies in the perfused SRG with 17 K(+) channel inhibitors to begin this search. Maximal chloride secretion was markedly inhibited by low-perfusate pH, bupivicaine, anandamide, zinc, quinidine, and quinine, consistent with the properties of an acid-sensitive, four-transmembrane, two-pore-domain K(+) channel (4TM-K2P). Using PCR with degenerate primers to this family, we identified a TASK-1 fragment in shark rectal gland, brain, gill, and kidney. Using 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR and genomic walking, we cloned the full-length shark gene (1,282 bp), whose open reading frame encodes a protein of 375 amino acids that was 80% identical to the human TASK-1 protein. We expressed shark and human TASK-1 cRNA in Xenopus oocytes and characterized these channels using two-electrode voltage clamping. Both channels had identical current-voltage relationships (outward rectifying) and a reversal potential of -90 mV. Both were inhibited by quinine, bupivicaine, and acidic pH. The pKa for current inhibition was 7.75 for shark TASK-1 vs. 7.37 for human TASK-1, values similar to the arterial pH for each species. We identified this protein in SRG by Western blot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy and detected the protein in SRG and human airway cells. Shark TASK-1 is the major K(+) channel coupled to chloride secretion in the SRG, is the oldest 4TM 2P family member identified, and is the first TASK-1 channel identified to play a role in setting the driving force for chloride secretion in epithelia. The detection of this potassium channel in mammalian lung tissue has implications for human biology and disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Activation of 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent Kinase 1 (PDK1) and Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Protein Kinase 1 (SGK1) by Short-chain Sphingolipid C4-ceramide Rescues the Trafficking Defect of ΔF508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ΔF508-CFTR)*

    PubMed Central

    Caohuy, Hung; Yang, Qingfeng; Eudy, Yvonne; Ha, Thien-An; Xu, Andrew E.; Glover, Matthew; Frizzell, Raymond A.; Jozwik, Catherine; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to a folding defect in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The most common mutation, ΔF508, prevents CFTR from trafficking to the apical plasma membrane. Here we show that activation of the PDK1/SGK1 signaling pathway with C4-ceramide (C4-CER), a non-toxic small molecule, functionally corrects the trafficking defect in both cultured CF cells and primary epithelial cell explants from CF patients. The mechanism of C4-CER action involves a series of mutual autophosphorylation and phosphorylation events between PDK1 and SGK1. Detailed mechanistic studies indicate that C4-CER initially induces autophosphorylation of SGK1 at Ser422. SGK1[Ser(P)422] and C4-CER coincidently bind PDK1 and permit PDK1 to autophosphorylate at Ser241. Then PDK1[Ser(P)241] phosphorylates SGK1[Ser(P)422] at Thr256 to generate fully activated SGK1[Ser422, Thr(P)256]. SGK1[Ser(P)422,Thr(P)256] phosphorylates and inactivates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2. ΔF508-CFTR is thus free to traffic to the plasma membrane. Importantly, C4-CER-mediated activation of both PDK1 and SGK1 is independent of the PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. Physiologically, C4-CER significantly increases maturation and stability of ΔF508-CFTR (t½ ∼10 h), enhances cAMP-activated chloride secretion, and suppresses hypersecretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8). We suggest that candidate drugs for CF directed against the PDK1/SGK1 signaling pathway, such as C4-CER, provide a novel therapeutic strategy for a life-limiting disorder that affects one child, on average, each day. PMID:25384981

  18. Optimizing nasal potential difference analysis for CFTR modulator development: assessment of ivacaftor in CF subjects with the G551D-CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven M; Liu, Bo; Hill, Aubrey; Hathorne, Heather; Cohen, Morty; Beamer, John R; Accurso, Frank J; Dong, Qunming; Ordoñez, Claudia L; Stone, Anne J; Olson, Eric R; Clancy, John P

    2013-01-01

    Nasal potential difference (NPD) is used as a biomarker of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. We evaluated methods to detect changes in chloride and sodium transport by NPD based on a secondary analysis of a Phase II CFTR-modulator study. Thirty-nine subjects with CF who also had the G551D-CFTR mutation were randomized to receive ivacaftor (Kalydeco™; also known as VX-770) in four doses or placebo twice daily for at least 14 days. All data were analyzed by a single investigator who was blinded to treatment assignment. We compared three analysis methods to determine the best approach to quantify changes in chloride and sodium transport: (1) the average of both nostrils; (2) the most-polarized nostril at each visit; and (3) the most-polarized nostril at screening carried forward. Parameters of ion transport included the PD change with zero chloride plus isoproterenol (CFTR activity), the basal PD, Ringer's PD, and change in PD with amiloride (measurements of ENaC activity), and the delta NPD (measuring CFTR and ENaC activity). The average and most-polarized nostril at each visit were most sensitive to changes in chloride and sodium transport, whereas the most-polarized nostril at screening carried forward was less discriminatory. Based on our findings, NPD studies should assess both nostrils rather than a single nostril. We also found that changes in CFTR activity were more readily detected than changes in ENaC activity, and that rigorous standardization was associated with relatively good within-subject reproducibility in placebo-treated subjects (± 2.8 mV). Therefore, we have confirmed an assay of reasonable reproducibility for detecting chloride-transport improvements in response to CFTR modulation.

  19. Phosphofructokinase-1 Negatively Regulates Neurogenesis from Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengyun; Qian, Xiaodan; Qin, Cheng; Lin, Yuhui; Wu, Haiyin; Chang, Lei; Luo, Chunxia; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), a major regulatory glycolytic enzyme, has been implicated in the functions of astrocytes and neurons. Here, we report that PFK-1 negatively regulates neurogenesis from neural stem cells (NSCs) by targeting pro-neural transcriptional factors. Using in vitro assays, we found that PFK-1 knockdown enhanced, and PFK-1 overexpression inhibited the neuronal differentiation of NSCs, which was consistent with the findings from NSCs subjected to 5 h of hypoxia. Meanwhile, the neurogenesis induced by PFK-1 knockdown was attributed to the increased proliferation of neural progenitors and the commitment of NSCs to the neuronal lineage. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of PFK-1 also increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Finally, we demonstrated that the neurogenesis mediated by PFK-1 was likely achieved by targeting mammalian achaete-scute homologue-1 (Mash 1), neuronal differentiation factor (NeuroD), and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-related HMG box 2 (Sox2). All together, our results reveal PFK-1 as an important regulator of neurogenesis.

  20. FANCI is a negative regulator of Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoshan; Lu, Xiaoyan; Akhter, Shamima; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Legerski, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Akt is a critical mediator of the oncogenic PI3K pathway, and its activation is regulated by kinases and phosphatases acting in opposition. We report here the existence of a novel protein complex that is composed minimally of Akt, PHLPP1, PHLPP2, FANCI, FANCD2, USP1 and UAF1. Our studies show that depletion of FANCI, but not FANCD2 or USP1, results in increased phosphorylation and activation of Akt. This activation is due to a reduction in the interaction between PHLPP1 and Akt in the absence of FANCI. In response to DNA damage or growth factor treatment, the interactions between Akt, PHLPP1 and FANCI are reduced consistent with the known phosphorylation of Akt in response to these stimuli. Furthermore, depletion of FANCI results in reduced apoptosis after DNA damage in accord with its role as a negative regular of Akt. Our findings describe an unexpected function for FANCI in the regulation of Akt and define a previously unrecognized intersection between the PI3K-Akt and FA pathways.

  1. RGS10 Negatively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Tansey, Malú G.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins act as GTPase activating proteins to negatively regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Although several RGS proteins including RGS2, RGS16, RGS10, and RGS18 are expressed in human and mouse platelets, the respective unique function(s) of each have not been fully delineated. RGS10 is a member of the D/R12 subfamily of RGS proteins and is expressed in microglia, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and platelets. We used a genetic approach to examine the role(s) of RGS10 in platelet activation in vitro and hemostasis and thrombosis in vivo. GPCR-induced aggregation, secretion, and integrin activation was much more pronounced in platelets from Rgs10-/- mice relative to wild type (WT). Accordingly, these mice had markedly reduced bleeding times and were more susceptible to vascular injury-associated thrombus formation than control mice. These findings suggest a unique, non-redundant role of RGS10 in modulating the hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets in mice. RGS10 thus represents a potential therapeutic target to control platelet activity and/or hypercoagulable states. PMID:27829061

  2. HUA ENHANCER1 is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of positive and negative regulators in Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huang-Lung; Li, Yi-Hang; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Lin, Meng-Chun; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2014-07-01

    Light regulates growth and developmental processes in plants via global transcriptome adjustment, translational control, and multilayered posttranslational modification of proteins. The transcriptional activation and repression of light-responsive genes has been well documented; however, the impact of posttranscriptional regulation on conveying light signals has been less addressed. Here, we examined whether optimal photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the proper biogenesis of small regulatory RNAs that play pivotal roles in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Arabidopsis carrying a mutation in HUA ENHANCER1 (HEN1), required for stabilization of small regulatory RNAs, showed defects in multiple aspects of photomorphogenic and skotomorphogenic development. HEN1 negatively regulated Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis. Light-activated HEN1 expression depended on the photoreceptors phytochrome A (phyA), phyB, cryptochrome 1 (cry1), and cry2 and key transcriptional regulators ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) and HY5-HOMOLOG. We also demonstrate the involvement of the small regulatory RNAs miR157d and miR319 in modulating the expression of a positive regulator, HY5, and negative regulators TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA AND PCF family proteins, respectively, for optimal photomorphogenic development in Arabidopsis.

  3. Differential expression and localization of CFTR and ENaC in mouse endometrium during pre-implantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian Zhi; Ajonuma, Louis Chukwuemeka; Tsang, Lai Ling; Lam, Sun Yee; Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Ho, Lok Sze; Zhou, Chen Xi; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a CAMP-activated Cl- channel, and epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) has been proposed as the major mechanism regulating uterine fluid absorption and secretion. Differential expression of these ion channels may give rise to dynamic changes in the fluid environment affecting various reproductive events in the female reproductive tract. This study investigated the expression and localization of CFTR and ENaC during the pre-implantation period. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to study the expression and localization of CFTR and ENaC in uteri collected from mature superovulated female mice. RT-PCR showed maximal ENaC and CFTR expression on day 3 after mating. Maximal immunoreactivity was also observed for both ENaC and CFTR on day 3 after mating. However, ENaC was immunolocalized to the apical membrane of both luminal and glandular epithelia, while CFTR was predominantly found in the stromal cells rather than the epithelial cells. Differential expression and localization of CFTR and ENaC provide a molecular mechanism by which maximal fluid absorption can be achieved immediately prior to implantation, to ensure the immobilization of the blastocyst necessary for implantation.

  4. NHERF1 and CFTR restore tight junction organisation and function in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells: role of ezrin and the RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Guerra, Lorenzo; Favia, Maria; Di Gioia, Sante; Casavola, Valeria; Conese, Massimo

    2012-11-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) restrict the transit of ions and molecules through the paracellular route and act as a barrier to regulate access of inflammatory cells into the airway lumen. The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterised by abnormal ion and fluid transport across the epithelium and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte-dominated inflammatory response. Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a protein involved in PKA-dependent activation of CFTR by interacting with CFTR via its PDZ domains and with ezrin via its C-terminal domain. We have previously found that the NHERF1-overexpression dependent rescue CFTR-dependent chloride secretion is due to the re-organisation of the actin cytoskeleton network induced by the formation of the multiprotein complex NHERF1-RhoA-ezrin-actin. In this context, we here studied whether NHERF1 and CFTR are involved in the organisation and function of TJs. F508del CFBE41o⁻ monolayers presented nuclear localisation of zonula occludens (ZO-1) and occludin as well as disorganisation of claudin 1 and junction-associated adhesion molecule 1 as compared with wild-type 16HBE14o⁻ monolayers, paralleled by increased permeability to dextrans and PMN transmigration. Overexpression of either NHERF1 or CFTR in CFBE41o⁻ cells rescued TJ proteins to their proper intercellular location and decreased permeability and PMN transmigration, while this effect was not achieved by overexpressing either NHERF1 deprived of ezrin-binding domain. Further, expression of a phospho-dead ezrin mutant, T567A, increased permeability in both 16HBE14o⁻ cells and in a CFBE clone stably overexpressing NHERF1 (CFBE/sNHERF1), whereas a constitutively active form of ezrin, T567D, achieved the opposite effect in CFBE41o⁻ cells. A dominant-negative form of RhoA (RhoA-N19) also disrupted ZO-1 localisation at the intercellular contacts dislodging it to the nucleus and increased permeability in CFBE/sNHERF1. The inhibitor Y27632 of

  5. Serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase1 increases plasma membrane wt-CFTR in human airway epithelial cells by inhibiting its endocytic retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Sato, J Denry; Chapline, M Christine; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Chloride (Cl) secretion by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) located in the apical membrane of respiratory epithelial cells plays a critical role in maintenance of the airway surface liquid and mucociliary clearance of pathogens. Previously, we and others have shown that the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK1) increases wild type CFTR (wt-CFTR) mediated Cl transport in Xenopus oocytes by increasing the amount of wt-CFTR protein in the plasma membrane. However, the effect of SGK1 on the membrane abundance of wt-CFTR in airway epithelial cells has not been examined, and the mechanism whereby SGK1 increases membrane wt-CFTR has also not been examined. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanism whereby SGK1 regulates the membrane abundance of wt-CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. We report that elevated levels of SGK1, induced by dexamethasone, increase plasma membrane abundance of wt-CFTR. Reduction of SGK1 expression by siRNA (siSGK1) and inhibition of SGK1 activity by the SGK inhibitor GSK 650394 abrogated the ability of dexamethasone to increase plasma membrane wt-CFTR. Overexpression of a constitutively active SGK1 (SGK1-S422D) increased plasma membrane abundance of wt-CFTR. To understand the mechanism whereby SGK1 increased plasma membrane wt-CFTR, we examined the effects of siSGK1 and SGK1-S442D on the endocytic retrieval of wt-CFTR. While siSGK1 increased wt-CFTR endocytosis, SGK1-S442D inhibited CFTR endocytosis. Neither siSGK1 nor SGK1-S442D altered the recycling of endocytosed wt-CFTR back to the plasma membrane. By contrast, SGK1 increased the endocytosis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This study demonstrates for the first time that SGK1 selectively increases wt-CFTR in the plasma membrane of human airway epithelia cells by inhibiting its endocytic retrieval from the membrane.

  6. Combinatorial effects of genistein and sex-steroids on the level of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), adenylate cyclase (AC) and cAMP in the cervix of ovariectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Naguib; Ismail, Nurain; Muniandy, Sekaran; Korla, Praveen Kumar; Giribabu, Nelli

    2015-12-01

    The combinatorial effects of genistein and estrogen (E) or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) on CFTR, AC and cAMP levels in cervix were investigated. Ovariectomised adult female rats received 50 or 100mg/kg/day genistein with E or E followed by E+P [E+(E+P)] for seven consecutive days. Cervixes were harvested and analyzed for CFTR mRNA levels by Real-time PCR. Distribution of AC and CFTR proteins in endocervix were observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP were measured by enzyme-immunoassay. Molecular docking predicted interaction between genistein and AC. Our results indicate that levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of rats receiving genistein plus E were higher than E-only treatment (p<0.05) while genistein plus [E+(E+P)] were higher than E+(E+P)-only treatment (p<0.05). In conclusions, increased levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of E and E+(E+P)-treated rats by genistein could affect the cervical secretory function which could influence the female reproductive processes.

  7. Acute administration of ivacaftor to people with cystic fibrosis and a G551D-CFTR mutation reveals smooth muscle abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L.; Barnes, Janel K.; Gallagher, Charles G.; Sieren, Jered P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Fischer, Anthony J.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Welsh, Michael J.; McKone, Edward F.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Airflow obstruction is common in cystic fibrosis (CF), yet the underlying pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. People with CF often exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness, CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in airway smooth muscle (ASM), and ASM from newborn CF pigs has increased contractile tone, suggesting that loss of CFTR causes a primary defect in ASM function. We hypothesized that restoring CFTR activity would decrease smooth muscle tone in people with CF. METHODS. To increase or potentiate CFTR function, we administered ivacaftor to 12 adults with CF with the G551D-CFTR mutation; ivacaftor stimulates G551D-CFTR function. We studied people before and immediately after initiation of ivacaftor (48 hours) to minimize secondary consequences of CFTR restoration. We tested smooth muscle function by investigating spirometry, airway distensibility, and vascular tone. RESULTS. Ivacaftor rapidly restored CFTR function, indicated by reduced sweat chloride concentration. Airflow obstruction and air trapping also improved. Airway distensibility increased in airways less than 4.5 mm but not in larger-sized airways. To assess smooth muscle function in a tissue outside the lung, we measured vascular pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index, which both decreased following CFTR potentiation. Finally, change in distensibility of <4.5-mm airways correlated with changes in PWV. CONCLUSIONS. Acute CFTR potentiation provided a unique opportunity to investigate CFTR-dependent mechanisms of CF pathogenesis. The rapid effects of ivacaftor on airway distensibility and vascular tone suggest that CFTR dysfunction may directly cause increased smooth muscle tone in people with CF and that ivacaftor may relax smooth muscle. FUNDING. This work was funded in part from an unrestricted grant from the Vertex Investigator-Initiated Studies Program. PMID:27158673

  8. Acute administration of ivacaftor to people with cystic fibrosis and a G551D-CFTR mutation reveals smooth muscle abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ryan J; Hisert, Katherine B; Dodd, Jonathan D; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L; Barnes, Janel K; Gallagher, Charles G; Sieren, Jered P; Gross, Thomas J; Fischer, Anthony J; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Hoffman, Eric A; Singh, Pradeep K; Welsh, Michael J; McKone, Edward F; Stoltz, David A

    2016-04-07

    Airflow obstruction is common in cystic fibrosis (CF), yet the underlying pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. People with CF often exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness, CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in airway smooth muscle (ASM), and ASM from newborn CF pigs has increased contractile tone, suggesting that loss of CFTR causes a primary defect in ASM function. We hypothesized that restoring CFTR activity would decrease smooth muscle tone in people with CF. To increase or potentiate CFTR function, we administered ivacaftor to 12 adults with CF with the G551D-CFTR mutation; ivacaftor stimulates G551D-CFTR function. We studied people before and immediately after initiation of ivacaftor (48 hours) to minimize secondary consequences of CFTR restoration. We tested smooth muscle function by investigating spirometry, airway distensibility, and vascular tone. Ivacaftor rapidly restored CFTR function, indicated by reduced sweat chloride concentration. Airflow obstruction and air trapping also improved. Airway distensibility increased in airways less than 4.5 mm but not in larger-sized airways. To assess smooth muscle function in a tissue outside the lung, we measured vascular pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index, which both decreased following CFTR potentiation. Finally, change in distensibility of <4.5-mm airways correlated with changes in PWV. Acute CFTR potentiation provided a unique opportunity to investigate CFTR-dependent mechanisms of CF pathogenesis. The rapid effects of ivacaftor on airway distensibility and vascular tone suggest that CFTR dysfunction may directly cause increased smooth muscle tone in people with CF and that ivacaftor may relax smooth muscle. This work was funded in part from an unrestricted grant from the Vertex Investigator-Initiated Studies Program.

  9. Reduced GM1 ganglioside in CFTR-deficient human airway cells results in decreased β1-integrin signaling and delayed wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Itokazu, Yutaka; Pagano, Richard E.; Schroeder, Andreas S.; O'Grady, Scott M.; Limper, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function reduces chloride secretion and increases sodium uptake, but it is not clear why CFTR mutation also results in progressive lung inflammation and infection. We previously demonstrated that CFTR-silenced airway cells migrate more slowly during wound repair than CFTR-expressing controls. In addition, CFTR-deficient cells and mouse models have been reported to have altered sphingolipid levels. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that reduced migration in CFTR-deficient airway epithelial cells results from altered sphingolipid composition. We used cell lines derived from a human airway epithelial cell line (Calu-3) stably transfected with CFTR short hairpin RNA (CFTR-silenced) or nontargeting short hairpin RNA (controls). Cell migration was measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Lipid analyses, addition of exogenous glycosphingolipids, and immunoblotting were performed. We found that levels of the glycosphingolipid, GM1 ganglioside, were ∼60% lower in CFTR-silenced cells than in controls. CFTR-silenced cells exhibited reduced levels of activated β1-integrin, phosphorylated tyrosine 576 of focal adhesion kinase (pFAK), and phosphorylation of Crk-associated substrate (pCAS). Addition of GM1 (but not GM3) ganglioside to CFTR-silenced cells restored activated β1-integrin, pFAK, and pCAS to near control levels and partially restored (∼40%) cell migration. Our results suggest that decreased GM1 in CFTR-silenced cells depresses β1-integrin signaling, which contributes to the delayed wound repair observed in these cells. These findings have implications for the pathology of cystic fibrosis, where altered sphingolipid levels in airway epithelial cells could result in a diminished capacity for wound repair after injury. PMID:24500283

  10. CFTR inactivation by lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Jessica; Bacchetta, Marc; Losa, Davide; Anegon, Ignacio; Chanson, Marc; Nguyen, Tuan Huy

    2015-01-01

    Polarized airway epithelial cell cultures modelling Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) defect are crucial for CF and biomedical research. RNA interference has proven its value to generate knockdown models for various pathologies. More recently, genome editing using CRISPR-Cas9 artificial endonuclease was a valuable addition to the toolbox of gene inactivation. Calu-3 cells and primary HAECs were transduced with HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors (LVV) encoding small hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequence or CRISPR-Cas9 components targeting CFTR alongside GFP. After sorting of GFP-positive cells, CFTR expression was measured by RT-qPCR and Western blot in polarized or differentiated cells. CFTR channel function was assessed in Ussing chambers. Il-8 secretion, proliferation and cell migration were also studied in transduced cells. shRNA interference and CRISPRCas9 strategies efficiently decreased CFTR expression in Calu-3 cells. Strong CFTR knockdown was confirmed at the functional level in CRISPR-Cas9-modified cells. CFTR-specific shRNA sequences did not reduce gene expression in primary HAECs, whereas CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene modification activity was correlated with a reduction of transepithelial secretion and response to a CFTR inhibitor. CFTR inactivation in the CRISPR-Cas9-modified Calu-3 cells did not affect migration and proliferation but slightly increased basal interleukin-8 secretion. We generated CFTR inactivated cell lines and demonstrated that CRISPR-Cas9 vectorised in a single LVV efficiently promotes CFTR inactivation in primary HAECs. These results provide a new protocol to engineer CF primary epithelia with their isogenic controls and pave the way for manipulation of CFTR expression in these cultures.

  11. Influence of salinity on the localization and expression of the CFTR chloride channel in the ionocytes of Dicentrarchus labrax during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Bodinier, Charlotte; Boulo, Viviane; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine; Charmantier, Guy

    2009-03-01

    The expression and localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were determined in four osmoregulatory tissues during the ontogeny of the sea-bass Dicentrarchus labrax acclimated to fresh water and sea water. At hatch in sea water, immunolocalization showed an apical CFTR in the digestive tract and integumental ionocytes. During the ontogeny, although CFTR was consistently detected in the digestive tract, it shifted from the integument to the gills. In fresh water, CFTR was not present in the integument and the gills, suggesting the absence of chloride secretion. In the kidney, the CFTR expression was brief from D4 to D35, prior to the larva-juvenile transition. CFTR was apical in the renal tubules, suggesting a chloride secretion at both salinities, and it was basolateral only in sea water in the collecting ducts, suggesting chloride absorption. In the posterior intestine, CFTR was located differently from D4 depending on salinity. In sea water, the basolateral CFTR may facilitate ionic absorption, perhaps in relation to water uptake. In fresh water, CFTR was apical in the gut, suggesting chloride secretion. Increased osmoregulatory ability was acquired just before metamorphosis, which is followed by the sea-lagoon migration.

  12. Luminal acetylcholine does not affect the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Nikolaus P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Clauss, Wolfgang G; Fronius, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis mediated by the airway epithelium is required for proper lung function, and the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) Cl(-) channel is crucial for these processes. Luminal acetylcholine (ACh) acts as an auto-/paracrine mediator to activate Cl(-) channels in airway epithelia and evidence exists showing that nicotinic ACh receptors activate CFTR in murine airway epithelia. The present study investigated whether or not luminal ACh regulates CFTR activity in airway epithelia of pigs, an emerging model for investigations of human airway disease and cystic fibrosis (CF) in particular. Transepithelial ion currents of freshly dissected pig tracheal preparations were measured with Ussing chambers. Application of luminal ACh (100 μM) induced an increase of the short-circuit current (I(SC)). The ACh effect was mimicked by muscarine and pilocarpine (100 μM each) and was sensitive to muscarinic receptor antagonists (atropine, 4-DAMP, pirenzepine). No changes of the I(SC) were observed by nicotine (100 μM) and ACh responses were not affected by nicotine or mecamylamine (25 μM). Luminal application of IBMX (I, 100 μM) and forskolin (F, 10 μM), increase the I(SC) and the I/F-induced current were decreased by the CFTR inhibitor GlyH-101 (GlyH, 50 μM) indicating increased CFTR activity by I/F. In contrast, GlyH did not affect the ACh-induced current, indicating that the ACh response does not involve the activation of the CFTR. Results from this study suggest that luminal ACh does not regulate the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs which opposes observation from studies using mice airway epithelium.

  13. Positive and negative elements regulate a melanocyte-specific promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Lowings, P; Yavuzer, U; Goding, C R

    1992-01-01

    Melanocytes are specialized cells residing in the hair follicles, the eye, and the basal layer of the human epidermis whose primary function is the production of the pigment melanin, giving rise to skin, hair, and eye color. Melanogenesis, a process unique to melanocytes that involves the processing of tyrosine by a number of melanocyte-specific enzymes, including tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1), occurs only after differentiation from the melanocyte precursor, the melanoblast. In humans, melanogenesis is inducible by UV irradiation, with melanin being transferred from the melanocyte in the epidermis to the surrounding keratinocytes as protection from UV-induced damage. Excessive exposure to UV, however, is the primary cause of malignant melanoma, an increasingly common and highly aggressive disease. As an initial approach to understanding the regulation of melanocyte differentiation and melanocyte-specific transcription, we have isolated the gene encoding TRP-1 and examined the cis- and trans-acting factors required for cell-type-specific expression. We find that the TRP-1 promoter comprises both positive and negative regulatory elements which confer efficient expression in a TRP-1-expressing, pigmented melanoma cell line but not in NIH 3T3 or JEG3 cells and that a minimal promoter extending between -44 and +107 is sufficient for cell-type-specific expression. Assays for DNA-protein interactions coupled with extensive mutagenesis identified three factors, whose binding correlated with the function of two positive and one negative regulatory element. One of these factors, termed M-box-binding factor 1, binds to an 11-bp motif, the M box, which acts as a positive regulatory element both in TRP-1-expressing and -nonexpressing cell lines, despite being entirely conserved between the melanocyte-specific tyrosinase and TRP-1 promoters. The possible mechanisms underlying melanocyte-specific gene expression are discussed. Images PMID:1321344

  14. Plexin-A4 negatively regulates T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Midori; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Tatsusada; Ogata, Takehiro; Takegahara, Noriko; Takamatsu, Hyota; Mizui, Masayuki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Chédotal, Alain; Suto, Fumikazu; Fujisawa, Hajime; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Kikutani, Hitoshi

    2008-03-01

    Semaphorins and their receptors play crucial roles not only in axon guidance during neuronal development but also in the regulation of immune responses. Plexin-A4, a member of the plexin-A subfamily, forms a receptor complex with neuropilins and transduces signals for class III semaphorins in the nervous system. Although plexin-A4 is also expressed in the lymphoid tissues, the involvement of plexin-A4 in immune responses remains unknown. To explore the role of plexin-A4 in the immune system, we analyzed immune responses in plexin-A4-deficient (plexin-A4-/-) mice. Among immune cells, plexin-A4 mRNA was detected in T cells, dendritic cells and macrophages but not in B cells and NK cells. Plexin-A4-/- mice had normal numbers and cell surface markers for each lymphocyte subset, suggesting that plexin-A4 is not essential for lymphocyte development. However, plexin-A4-/- mice exhibited enhanced antigen-specific T cell responses and heightened sensitivity to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Plexin-A4-/- T cells exhibited hyperproliferative responses to anti-CD3 stimulation and to allogeneic dendritic cells in vitro. Furthermore, this hyperproliferation was also observed in both T cells from neuropilin-1 mutant (npn-1(Sema-)) mice, in which the binding site of class III semaphorins is disrupted, and T cells from Sema3A-deficient (Sema-3A-/-) mice. Collectively, these results suggest that plexin-A4, as a component of the receptor complex for class III semaphorins, negatively regulates T cell-mediated immune responses.

  15. Autophagy negatively regulates cancer cell proliferation via selectively targeting VPRBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Shi; Liu, Yi-Zhen; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Hao, Jia-Jie; Yang, Hai; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Zhan, Qi-Min; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-02-01

    There have been multiple lines of evidence suggesting that autophagy selectively targets signalling proteins and regulates cancer cell signalling in addition to bulk clearance of long-lived proteins and organelles. Protein degradation through autophagy requires receptor protein LC3B to sequester the substrates into the autophagosome. In the present study, we screened LC3B (light-chain 3B)-binding partners and identified autophagic substrates in cancer cells. With lung cancer NCI-H1975 and oesophageal cancer KYSE30 cell lines as models, we found that VPRBP (viral protein R-binding protein) was a novel LC3B-binding protein through GST (glutathione transferase)-LC3B pull-down combined with LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-tandem MS) methods. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that VPRBP-LC3/p62 were in the same protein complex as the two cell lines. Induction of autophagy led to a down-regulation of VPRPB, which could be rescued by the inhibition of autophagy degradation by BFA1 (bafilomycin A1) and by the disruption of autophagy through ATG5-knockdown. We also found that induction of autophagy promotes VPRBP-LC3/p62 interaction. Immunohistochemical examination of human NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) tissues showed that VPRBP was positively correlated with p62 and negatively correlated with LC3B. Moreover, p62 and VPRBP were associated with poor prognosis in lung ADC (adenocarcinoma) (p62, P=0.019; VPRBP, P=0.005). Patients with low expression of both p62 and VPRBP showed the best prognosis.

  16. Autophagy triggered by magnolol derivative negatively regulates angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Guru, S K; Pathania, A S; Kumar, A; Bhushan, S; Malik, F

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis has a key role in the tumor progression and metastasis; targeting endothelial cell proliferation has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention of cancer. Previous studies have revealed a complex association between the process of angiogenesis and autophagy and its outcome on tumorigenesis. Autophagy, also known as type-II cell death, has been identified as an alternative way of cell killing in apoptotic-resistant cancer cells. However, its involvement in chemoresistance and tumor promotion is also well known. In this study, we used a derivate of natural product magnolol (Ery5), a potent autophagy inducer, to study the association between the autophagy and angiogenesis in both in vitro and in vivo model system. We found that the robust autophagy triggered by Ery5, inhibited angiogenesis and caused cell death independent of the apoptosis in human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells and PC-3 cells. Ery5 induced autophagy effectively inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation. We further demonstrated that Ery5-mediated autophagy and subsequent inhibition of angiogenesis was reversed when autophagy was inhibited through 3-methyl adenine and knocking down of key autophagy proteins ATG7 and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3. While evaluating the negative regulation of autophagy on angiogenesis, it was interesting to find that angiogenic environment produced by the treatment of VEGF and CoCl2 remarkably downregulated the autophagy and autophagic cell death induced by Ery5. These studies, while disclosing the vital role of autophagy in the regulation of angiogenesis, also suggest that the potent modulators of autophagy can lead to the development of effective therapeutics in apoptosis-resistant cancer. PMID:24176847

  17. Human VAP-C negatively regulates hepatitis C virus propagation.

    PubMed

    Kukihara, Hiroshi; Moriishi, Kohji; Taguwa, Shuhei; Tani, Hideki; Abe, Takayuki; Mori, Yoshio; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Taketomi, Akinobu; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2009-08-01

    Human vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP) subtype A (VAP-A) and subtype B (VAP-B) are involved in the regulation of membrane trafficking, lipid transport and metabolism, and the unfolded protein response. VAP-A and VAP-B consist of the major sperm protein (MSP) domain, the coiled-coil motif, and the C-terminal transmembrane anchor and form homo- and heterodimers through the transmembrane domain. VAP-A and VAP-B interact with NS5B and NS5A of hepatitis C virus (HCV) through the MSP domain and the coiled-coil motif, respectively, and participate in the replication of HCV. VAP-C is a splicing variant of VAP-B consisting of the N-terminal half of the MSP domain of VAP-B followed by the subtype-specific frameshift sequences, and its biological function has not been well characterized. In this study, we have examined the biological functions of VAP-C in the propagation of HCV. VAP-C interacted with NS5B but not with VAP-A, VAP-B, or NS5A in immunoprecipitation analyses, and the expression of VAP-C inhibited the interaction of NS5B with VAP-A or VAP-B. Overexpression of VAP-C impaired the RNA replication of the HCV replicon and the propagation of the HCV JFH1 strain, whereas overexpression of VAP-A and VAP-B enhanced the replication. Furthermore, the expression of VAP-C was observed in various tissues, whereas it was barely detected in the liver. These results suggest that VAP-C acts as a negative regulator of HCV propagation and that the expression of VAP-C may participate in the determination of tissue tropism of HCV propagation.

  18. CFTR Folding Consortium: methods available for studies of CFTR folding and correction.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kathryn W; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Balch, William E; Braakman, Ineke; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Guggino, William B; Penland, Christopher M; Pollard, Harvey B; Sorscher, Eric J; Skach, William R; Thomas, Philip J; Lukacs, Gergely L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR Folding Consortium (CFC) was formed in 2004 under the auspices of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and its drug discovery and development affiliate, CFF Therapeutics. A primary goal of the CFC is the development and distribution of reagents and assay methods designed to better understand the mechanistic basis of mutant CFTR misfolding and to identify targets whose manipulation may correct CFTR folding defects. As such, reagents available from the CFC primarily target wild-type CFTR NBD1 and its common variant, F508del, and they include antibodies, cell lines, constructs, and proteins. These reagents are summarized here, and two protocols are described for the detection of cell surface CFTR: (a) an assay of the density of expressed HA-tagged CFTR by ELISA and (b) the generation and use of an antibody to CFTR's first extracellular loop for the detection of endogenous CFTR. Finally, we highlight a systematic collection of assays, the CFC Roadmap, which is being used to assess the cellular locus and mechanism of mutant CFTR correction. The Roadmap queries CFTR structure-function relations at levels ranging from purified protein to well-differentiated human airway primary cultures.

  19. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  20. Bone marrow adipocytes as negative regulators of the hematopoietic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Naveiras, Olaia; Nardi, Valentina; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Fahey, Frederic; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoblasts and endothelium constitute functional niches that support hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in mammalian bone marrow (BM) 1,2,3 . Adult BM also contains adipocytes, whose numbers correlate inversely with the hematopoietic activity of the marrow. Fatty infiltration of hematopoietic red marrow follows irradiation or chemotherapy and is a diagnostic feature in biopsies from patients with marrow aplasia 4. To explore whether adipocytes influence hematopoiesis or simply fill marrow space, we compared the hematopoietic activity of distinct regions of the mouse skeleton that differ in adiposity. By flow cytometry, colony forming activity, and competitive repopulation assay, HSCs and short-term progenitors are reduced in frequency in the adipocyte-rich vertebrae of the mouse tail relative to the adipocyte-free vertebrae of the thorax. In lipoatrophic A-ZIP/F1 “fatless” mice, which are genetically incapable of forming adipocytes8, and in mice treated with the PPARγ inhibitor Bisphenol-A-DiGlycidyl-Ether (BADGE), which inhibits adipogenesis9, post-irradiation marrow engraftment is accelerated relative to wild type or untreated mice. These data implicate adipocytes as predominantly negative regulators of the bone marrow microenvironment, and suggest that antagonizingmarrow adipogenesis may enhance hematopoietic recovery in clinical bone marrow transplantation. PMID:19516257

  1. Ribosomal Protein S14 Negatively Regulates c-Myc Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Jun-ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal gene RPS14 is associated with the cancer-prone 5q-syndrome, which is caused by an interstitial deletion of the long arm of human chromosome 5. Previously, we found that ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) binds to and inactivates MDM2, consequently leading to p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and growth inhibition. However, it remains elusive whether RPS14 regulates cell proliferation in a p53-independent manner. Here, we show that RPS14 interacts with the Myc homology box II (MBII) and the C-terminal basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domains of the oncoprotein c-Myc. Further, RPS14 inhibited c-Myc transcriptional activity by preventing the recruitment of c-Myc and its cofactor, TRRAP, to the target gene promoters, as thus suppressing c-Myc-induced cell proliferation. Also, siRNA-mediated RPS14 depletion elevated c-Myc transcriptional activity determined by its target gene, Nucleolin, expression. Interestingly, RPS14 depletion also resulted in the induction of c-Myc mRNA and subsequent protein levels. Consistent with this, RPS14 promoted c-Myc mRNA turnover through an Argonaute 2 (Ago2)- and microRNA-mediated pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrates that RPS14 negates c-Myc functions by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its mRNA degradation via miRNA. PMID:23775087

  2. Catalases negatively regulate methyl jasmonate signaling in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Jannat, Rayhanur; Uraji, Misugi; Hossain, Mohammad Anowar; Islam, Mohammad Muzahidul; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced stomatal closure is accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in guard cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of catalases (CATs) in MeJA-induced stomatal closure using cat mutants cat2, cat3-1 and cat1 cat3, and the CAT inhibitor, 3-aminotriazole (AT). When assessed with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein, the reduction of catalase activity by means of mutations and the inhibitor accumulated higher basal levels of H₂O₂ in guard cells whereas they did not affect stomatal aperture in the absence of MeJA. In contrast, the cat mutations and the treatment with AT potentiated MeJA-induced stomatal closure and MeJA-induced H₂O₂ production. These results indicate that CATs negatively regulate H₂O₂ accumulation in guard cells and suggest that inducible H₂O₂ production rather than constitutive elevation modulates stomatal apertures in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. HDAC2 negatively regulates memory formation and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ji-Song; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Giacometti, Emanuela; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; Joseph, Nadine; Gao, Jun; Nieland, Thomas J.F.; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Xinyu; Mazitschek, Ralph; Bradner, James E.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin modifications, especially histone-tail acetylation, have been implicated in memory formation. Increased histone-tail acetylation induced by inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) facilitates learning and memory in wildtype mice as well as in mouse models of neurodegeneration. Harnessing the therapeutic potential of HDACi requires knowledge of the specific HDAC family member(s) linked to cognitive enhancement. Here we show that neuron-specific overexpression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1, reduced dendritic spine density, synapse number, synaptic plasticity, and memory formation. Conversely, HDAC2 deficiency resulted in increased synapse number and memory facilitation, similar to chronic HDACi treatment in mice. Notably, reduced synapse number and learning impairment of HDAC2-overexpressing mice were ameliorated by chronic HDACi treatment. Correspondingly, HDACi treatment failed to further facilitate memory formation in HDAC2-deficient mice. Furthermore, analysis of promoter occupancy revealed association of HDAC2 with the promoters of genes implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Together, our results suggest that HDAC2 plays a role in modulating synaptic plasticity and long-lasting changes of neural circuits, which in turn negatively regulates learning and memory. These observations encourage the development and testing of HDAC2-selective inhibitors for human diseases associated with memory impairment. PMID:19424149

  4. Architecture and regulation of negative-strand viral enzymatic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kranzusch, Philip J.; Whelan, Sean P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses initiate infection with a unique polymerase complex that mediates both mRNA transcription and subsequent genomic RNA replication. For nearly all NS RNA viruses, distinct enzymatic domains catalyzing RNA polymerization and multiple steps of 5′ mRNA cap formation are contained within a single large polymerase protein (L). While NS RNA viruses include a variety of emerging human and agricultural pathogens, the enzymatic machinery driving viral replication and gene expression remains poorly understood. Recent insights with Machupo virus and vesicular stomatitis virus have provided the first structural information of viral L proteins, and revealed how the various enzymatic domains are arranged into a conserved architecture shared by both segmented and nonsegmented NS RNA viruses. In vitro systems reconstituting RNA synthesis from purified components provide new tools to understand the viral replicative machinery, and demonstrate the arenavirus matrix protein regulates RNA synthesis by locking a polymerase–template complex. Inhibition of gene expression by the viral matrix protein is a distinctive feature also shared with influenza A virus and nonsegmented NS RNA viruses, possibly illuminating a conserved mechanism for coordination of viral transcription and polymerase packaging PMID:22767259

  5. A novel treatment of cystic fibrosis acting on-target: cysteamine plus epigallocatechin gallate for the autophagy-dependent rescue of class II-mutated CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Tosco, A; De Gregorio, F; Esposito, S; De Stefano, D; Sana, I; Ferrari, E; Sepe, A; Salvadori, L; Buonpensiero, P; Di Pasqua, A; Grassia, R; Leone, C A; Guido, S; De Rosa, G; Lusa, S; Bona, G; Stoll, G; Maiuri, M C; Mehta, A; Kroemer, G; Maiuri, L; Raia, V

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the combination of two safe proteostasis regulators, cysteamine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can be used to improve deficient expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in patients homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Here we provide the proof-of-concept that this combination treatment restored CFTR function and reduced lung inflammation (P<0.001) in Phe508del/Phe508del or Phe508del/null-Cftr (but not in Cftr-null mice), provided that such mice were autophagy-competent. Primary nasal cells from patients bearing different class II CFTR mutations, either in homozygous or compound heterozygous form, responded to the treatment in vitro. We assessed individual responses to cysteamine plus EGCG in a single-centre, open-label phase-2 trial. The combination treatment decreased sweat chloride from baseline, increased both CFTR protein and function in nasal cells, restored autophagy in such cells, decreased CXCL8 and TNF-α in the sputum, and tended to improve respiratory function. These positive effects were particularly strong in patients carrying Phe508del CFTR mutations in homozygosity or heterozygosity. However, a fraction of patients bearing other CFTR mutations failed to respond to therapy. Importantly, the same patients whose primary nasal brushed cells did not respond to cysteamine plus EGCG in vitro also exhibited deficient therapeutic responses in vivo. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination treatment of cysteamine plus EGCG acts ‘on-target' because it can only rescue CFTR function when autophagy is functional (in mice) and improves CFTR function when a rescuable protein is expressed (in mice and men). These results should spur the further clinical development of the combination treatment. PMID:27035618

  6. A novel treatment of cystic fibrosis acting on-target: cysteamine plus epigallocatechin gallate for the autophagy-dependent rescue of class II-mutated CFTR.

    PubMed

    Tosco, A; De Gregorio, F; Esposito, S; De Stefano, D; Sana, I; Ferrari, E; Sepe, A; Salvadori, L; Buonpensiero, P; Di Pasqua, A; Grassia, R; Leone, C A; Guido, S; De Rosa, G; Lusa, S; Bona, G; Stoll, G; Maiuri, M C; Mehta, A; Kroemer, G; Maiuri, L; Raia, V

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that the combination of two safe proteostasis regulators, cysteamine and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can be used to improve deficient expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in patients homozygous for the CFTR Phe508del mutation. Here we provide the proof-of-concept that this combination treatment restored CFTR function and reduced lung inflammation (P<0.001) in Phe508del/Phe508del or Phe508del/null-Cftr (but not in Cftr-null mice), provided that such mice were autophagy-competent. Primary nasal cells from patients bearing different class II CFTR mutations, either in homozygous or compound heterozygous form, responded to the treatment in vitro. We assessed individual responses to cysteamine plus EGCG in a single-centre, open-label phase-2 trial. The combination treatment decreased sweat chloride from baseline, increased both CFTR protein and function in nasal cells, restored autophagy in such cells, decreased CXCL8 and TNF-α in the sputum, and tended to improve respiratory function. These positive effects were particularly strong in patients carrying Phe508del CFTR mutations in homozygosity or heterozygosity. However, a fraction of patients bearing other CFTR mutations failed to respond to therapy. Importantly, the same patients whose primary nasal brushed cells did not respond to cysteamine plus EGCG in vitro also exhibited deficient therapeutic responses in vivo. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination treatment of cysteamine plus EGCG acts 'on-target' because it can only rescue CFTR function when autophagy is functional (in mice) and improves CFTR function when a rescuable protein is expressed (in mice and men). These results should spur the further clinical development of the combination treatment.

  7. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  8. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kosak, Steven T.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms. CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for the locus. We showed previously that intronic and extragenic enhancers, when occupied by specific transcription factors, are recruited to the CFTR promoter by a looping mechanism to drive gene expression. Here we use a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 editing of cis-regulatory elements and siRNA-mediated depletion of architectural proteins to determine the relative contribution of structural elements and enhancers to the higher order structure and expression of the CFTR locus. We found the boundaries of the CFTR TAD are conserved among diverse cell types and are dependent on CTCF and cohesin complex. Removal of an upstream CTCF-binding insulator alters the interaction profile, but has little effect on CFTR expression. Within the TAD, intronic enhancers recruit cell-type selective transcription factors and deletion of a pivotal enhancer element dramatically decreases CFTR expression, but has minor effect on its 3D structure. PMID:26673704

  9. Cholesterol depletion and genistein as tools to promote F508delCFTR retention at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Lim, Christina H; Bijvelds, Marcel J; Nigg, Alex; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; de Jonge, Hugo R; Tilly, Ben C

    2007-01-01

    F508delCFTR-, but not wtCFTR-, expressing fibroblasts resemble Niemann Pick type C cells in the massive intracellular accumulation of free cholesterol. The recruitment and activation of F508delCFTR by cholesterol depletion was studied. Filipin staining, forskolin-stimulated anion efflux and FITC-dextran uptake were studied in control cells and fibroblasts treated with 2-hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin phosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles to deplete cellular free cholesterol. Treatment of F508delCFTR-, but not wtCFTR-, expressing fibroblasts with 2-hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin resulted in a reduction in cellular cholesterol and a potentiation of the forskolin-induced anion efflux. In addition, forskolin also promoted a massive increase in the rate of endocytosis in F508delCFTR fibroblasts, which was absent in genistein- or cyclodextrin-treated cultures. The results not only suggest that reducing cellular cholesterol may serve as pharmacotherapeutic tool in the treatment of cystic fibrosis but also reveal a novel mechanism for genistein regulation of F508delCFTR, i.e. retention by inhibition of endocytosis. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  11. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided.

  12. Ouabain Mimics Low Temperature Rescue of F508del-CFTR in Cystic Fibrosis Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Donglei; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Anjos, Suzana M.; Carissimo, Annamaria; Liao, Jie; Carlile, Graeme W.; Balghi, Haouaria; Robert, Renaud; Luini, Alberto; Hanrahan, John W.; Thomas, David Y.

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of cystic fibrosis (CF) are caused by the deletion of a single phenylalanine residue at position 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The mutant F508del-CFTR is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and degraded, but can be induced by low temperature incubation (29°C) to traffic to the plasma membrane where it functions as a chloride channel. Here we show that, cardiac glycosides, at nanomolar concentrations, can partially correct the trafficking of F508del-CFTR in human CF bronchial epithelial cells (CFBE41o-) and in an F508del-CFTR mouse model. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles obtained with polarized CFBE41o-cells after treatment with ouabain and by low temperature has revealed a striking similarity between the two corrector treatments that is not shared with other correctors. In summary, our study shows a novel function of ouabain and its analogs in the regulation of F508del-CFTR trafficking and suggests that compounds that mimic this low temperature correction of trafficking will provide new avenues for the development of therapeutics for CF. PMID:23060796

  13. Role of CFTR in oxidative stress and suicidal death of renal cells during cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rubera, I; Duranton, C; Melis, N; Cougnon, M; Mograbi, B; Tauc, M

    2013-10-03

    The clinical use of the antineoplastic drug cisplatin is limited by its deleterious nephrotoxic side effect. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with an increase in oxidative stress, leading ultimately to renal cell death and irreversible kidney dysfunction. Oxidative stress could be modified by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a Cl(-) channel not only involved in chloride secretion but as well in glutathione (GSH) transport. Thus, we tested whether the inhibition of CFTR could protect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Using a renal proximal cell line, we show that the specific inhibitor of CFTR, CFTR(inh)-172, prevents cisplatin-induced cell death and apoptosis by modulating the intracellular reactive oxygen species balance and the intracellular GSH concentration. This CFTR(inh)-172-mediated protective effect occurs without affecting cellular cisplatin uptake or the formation of platinum-DNA adducts. The protective effect of CFTR(inh)-172 in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was also investigated in a rat model. Five days after receiving a single cisplatin injection (5 mg/kg), rats exhibited renal failure, as evidenced by the alteration of biochemical and functional parameters. Pretreatment of rats with CFTR(inh)-172 (1 mg/kg) prior to cisplatin injection significantly prevented these deleterious cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic effects. Finally, we demonstrate that CFTR(inh)-172 does not impair cisplatin-induced cell death in the cisplatin-sensitive A549 cancer cell line. In conclusion, the use of a specific inhibitor of CFTR may represent a novel therapeutic approach in the prevention of nephrotoxic side effects during cisplatin treatment without affecting its antitumor efficacy.

  14. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S; Infield, Daniel T; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z; McCarty, Nael A

    2014-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1-6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues.

  15. Three charged amino acids in extracellular loop 1 are involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Rahman, Kazi S.; Infield, Daniel T.; Kuang, Christopher; Prince, Chengyu Z.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bears six extracellular loops (ECL1–6); ECL1 is the site of several mutations associated with CF. Mutation R117H has been reported to reduce current amplitude, whereas D110H, E116K, and R117C/L/P may impair channel stability. We hypothesized that these amino acids might not be directly involved in ion conduction and permeation but may contribute to stabilizing the outer vestibule architecture in CFTR. We used cRNA injected oocytes combined with electrophysiological techniques to test this hypothesis. Mutants bearing cysteine at these sites were not functionally modified by extracellular MTS reagents and were blocked by GlyH-101 similarly to WT-CFTR. These results suggest that these three residues do not contribute directly to permeation in CFTR. In contrast, mutants D110R-, E116R-, and R117A-CFTR exhibited instability of the open state and significantly shortened burst duration compared with WT-CFTR and failed to be locked into the open state by AMP-PNP (adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imido) triphosphate); charge-retaining mutants showed mainly the full open state with comparably longer open burst duration. These interactions suggest that these ECL1 residues might be involved in maintaining the outer pore architecture of CFTR. A CFTR homology model suggested that E116 interacts with R104 in both the closed and open states, D110 interacts with K892 in the fully closed state, and R117 interacts with E1126 in the open state. These interactions were confirmed experimentally. The results suggest that D110, E116, and R117 may contribute to stabilizing the architecture of the outer pore of CFTR by interactions with other charged residues. PMID:25024266

  16. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione (R)-BPO-27 Inhibits CFTR Chloride Channel Gating by Competition with ATP

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonjung; Anderson, Marc O.; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Min Goo; Namkung, Wan

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione BPO-27 [6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4′,5′:3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid] inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel with low nanomolar potency and reduces cystogenesis in a model of polycystic kidney disease. We used computational chemistry and patch-clamp to show that enantiomerically pure (R)-BPO-27 inhibits CFTR by competition with ATP, whereas (S)-BPO-27 is inactive. Docking computations using a homology model of CFTR structure suggested that (R)-BPO-27 binds near the canonical ATP binding site, and these findings were supported by molecular dynamics simulations showing a lower binding energy for the (R) versus (S) stereoisomers. Three additional lower-potency BPO-27 analogs were modeled in a similar fashion, with the binding energies predicted in the correct order. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed linear CFTR currents with a voltage-independent (R)-BPO-27 block mechanism. Single-channel recordings in inside-out patches showed reduced CFTR channel open probability and increased channel closed time by (R)-BPO-27 without altered unitary channel conductance. At a concentration of (R)-BPO-27 that inhibited CFTR chloride current by ∼50%, the EC50 for ATP activation of CFTR increased from 0.27 to 1.77 mM but was not changed by CFTRinh-172 [4-[[4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-[3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-thiazolidinylidene]methyl]benzoic acid], a thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor that acts at a site distinct from the ATP binding site. Our results suggest that (R)-BPO-27 inhibition of CFTR involves competition with ATP. PMID:26174774

  17. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione (R)-BPO-27 Inhibits CFTR Chloride Channel Gating by Competition with ATP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonjung; Anderson, Marc O; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Min Goo; Namkung, Wan; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported that benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione BPO-27 [6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4',5':3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid] inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel with low nanomolar potency and reduces cystogenesis in a model of polycystic kidney disease. We used computational chemistry and patch-clamp to show that enantiomerically pure (R)-BPO-27 inhibits CFTR by competition with ATP, whereas (S)-BPO-27 is inactive. Docking computations using a homology model of CFTR structure suggested that (R)-BPO-27 binds near the canonical ATP binding site, and these findings were supported by molecular dynamics simulations showing a lower binding energy for the (R) versus (S) stereoisomers. Three additional lower-potency BPO-27 analogs were modeled in a similar fashion, with the binding energies predicted in the correct order. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed linear CFTR currents with a voltage-independent (R)-BPO-27 block mechanism. Single-channel recordings in inside-out patches showed reduced CFTR channel open probability and increased channel closed time by (R)-BPO-27 without altered unitary channel conductance. At a concentration of (R)-BPO-27 that inhibited CFTR chloride current by ∼50%, the EC50 for ATP activation of CFTR increased from 0.27 to 1.77 mM but was not changed by CFTRinh-172 [4-[[4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-[3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-thiazolidinylidene]methyl]benzoic acid], a thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor that acts at a site distinct from the ATP binding site. Our results suggest that (R)-BPO-27 inhibition of CFTR involves competition with ATP.

  18. Functional differences in pore properties between wild-type and cysteine-less forms of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Holstead, Ryan G; Li, Man-Song; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-10-01

    Studies of the structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel have been advanced by the development of functional channel variants in which all 18 endogenous cysteine residues have been mutated ("cys-less" CFTR). However, cys-less CFTR has a slightly higher single-channel conductance than wild-type CFTR, raising questions as to the suitability of cys-less as a model of the wild-type CFTR pore. We used site-directed mutagenesis and patch-clamp recording to investigate the origin of this conductance difference and to determine the extent of functional differences between wild-type and cys-less CFTR channel permeation properties. Our results suggest that the conductance difference is the result of a single substitution, of C343: the point mutant C343S has a conductance similar to cys-less, whereas the reverse mutation, S343C in a cys-less background, restores wild-type conductance levels. Other cysteine substitutions (C128S, C225S, C376S, C866S) were without effect. Substitution of other residues for C343 suggested that conductance is dependent on amino acid side chain volume at this position. A range of other functional pore properties, including interactions with channel blockers (Au[CN] (2) (-) , 5-nitro-2-[3-phenylpropylamino]benzoic acid, suramin) and anion permeability, were not significantly different between wild-type and cys-less CFTR. Our results suggest that functional differences between these two CFTR constructs are of limited scale and scope and result from a small change in side chain volume at position 343. These results therefore support the use of cys-less as a model of the CFTR pore region.

  19. CFTR Folding Consortium: Methods Available for Studies of CFTR Folding and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kathryn W.; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Balch, William E.; Braakman, Ineke; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Guggino, William B.; Penland, Christopher M.; Pollard, Harvey B.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Skach, William R.; Thomas, Philip J.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2012-01-01

    The CFTR Folding Consortium (CFC) was formed in 2004 under the auspices of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and its drug discovery and development affiliate, CFF Therapeutics. A primary goal of the CFC is the development and distribution of reagents and assay methods designed to better understand the mechanistic basis of mutant CFTR misfolding and to identify targets whose manipulation may correct CFTR folding defects. As such, reagents available from the CFC primarily target wild-type CFTR NBD1 and its common variant, F508del, and they include antibodies, cell lines, constructs, and proteins. These reagents are summarized here, and two protocols are described for the detection of cell surface CFTR: (a) an assay of the density of expressed HA-tagged CFTR by ELISA and (b) the generation and use of an antibody to CFTR’s first extracellular loop for the detection of endogenous CFTR. Finally, we highlight a systematic collection of assays, the CFC Roadmap, which is being used to assess the cellular locus and mechanism of mutant CFTR correction. The Roadmap queries CFTR structure–function relations at levels ranging from purified protein to well-differentiated human airway primary cultures. PMID:21547742

  20. CFTR-Mediated Cl− Transport in the Acinar and Duct Cells of Rabbit Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Michael; Ding, Chuanqing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the role that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may play in Cl− transport in the acinar and ductal epithelial cells of rabbit lacrimal gland (LG). Methods Primary cultured LG acinar cells were processed for whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recording of Cl− currents by using perfusion media with high and low [Cl−], 10 μM forskolin and 100 μM 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), the non-specific Cl− channel blocker 4,4′-disothiocyanostilbene-2, 2′ sulphonic acid (DIDS; 100 μM) and CFTRinh-172 (10 μM), a specific blocker for CFTR. Ex vivo live cell imaging of [Cl−] changes in duct cells was performed on freshly dissected LG duct with a multiphoton confocal laser scanning microscope using a Cl− sensitive fluorescence dye, N-[ethoxycarbonylmethyl]-6-methoxy-quinolinium bromide. Results Whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrated the presence of Cl− current in isolated acinar cells and revealed that this Cl− current was mediated by CFTR channel. Live cell imaging also showed the presence of CFTR-mediated Cl− transport across the plasma membrane of duct cells. Conclusions Our previous data showed the presence of CFTR in all acinar and duct cells within the rabbit LG, with expression most prominent in the apical membranes of duct cells. The present study demonstrates that CFTR is actively involved in Cl− transport in both acinar cells and epithelial cells from duct segments, suggesting that CFTR may play a significant role in LG secretion. PMID:22578307

  1. Adverse Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on CFTR Chloride Secretion and the Host Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-01-25

    In the healthy lung the opportunistic pathogen, P. aeruginosa, is rapidly eliminated by mucociliary clearance, a process that is dependent on the activity of the CFTR anion channel that, in concert with a number of other transport proteins, regulates the volume and composition of the periciliary surface liquid. This fluid layer is essential to enable cilia to clear pathogens from the lungs. However, in cystic fibrosis (CF), mutations in the CFTR gene reduce Cl- and HCO3- secretion, thereby decreasing periciliary surface liquid volume and mucociliary clearance of bacteria. In CF this leads to persistent infection with the opportunistic pathogen, P. aeruginosa, which is the cause of reduced lung function and death in ~95% of CF patients. Others and we have conducted studies to elucidate the effects of P. aeruginosa on wild type and Phe508del-CFTR Cl- secretion as well as on the host immune response. These studies have demonstrated that Cif (CFTR Inhibitory Factor), a virulence factor secreted by P. aeruginosa, is associated with reduced lung function in CF, induces the ubiquitination and degradation of wt-CFTR as well as TAP1, which plays a key role in viral and bacterial antigen presentation, and inhibits the generation of host proresolving lipids. Cif also enhances the degradation of Phe508del-CFTR that has been rescued by ORKAMBI, a drug approved for CF patients homozygous for the PheF508del-CFTR mutation, thereby reducing drug efficacy. This review is based on the Hans Ussing Distinguished Lecture at the 2016 Experimental Biology Meeting given by the author.

  2. [Post-translational ligation of split CFTR severed before TMD2 and its chloride channel function].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fuxiang; Gong, Xiandi; Liu, Zelong; Yang, Shude; Qu, Huige; Chi, Xiaoyan

    2010-12-01

    Mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder affecting a number of organs including the lung airways, pancreas and sweat glands. In order to investigate the post-translational ligation of CFTR with reconstructed functional chloride ion channel and the split Ssp DnaB intein-mediated protein trans-splicing was explored to co-deliver CFTR gene into eukaryotic cells with two vectors. The human CFTR cDNA was split after Glu838 codon before the second transmembrane dome (TMD2) into two halves of N- and C-parts and fused with the coding sequences of split Ssp DnaB intein. Pair of eukaryotic expression vectors pEGFP-NInt and pEYFP-IntC were constructed by inserting them into the vectors pEGFP-N1 and pEYFP-N1 respectively. The transient expression was carried out for observing the ligation of CFTR by Western blotting and recording the chloride current by patch clamps when cotransfection of the pair of vectors into baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. The results showed that an obvious protein band proven to be ligated intact CFTR can be seen and a higher chloride current and activity of chloride channel were recorded after cotransfection. These data demonstrated that split Ssp DnaB intein could be used as a strategy in delivering CFTR gene by two vectors providing evidence for application of dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to overcome the limitation of packaging size in cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  3. EPAC1 activation by cAMP stabilizes CFTR at the membrane by promoting its interaction with NHERF1.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Miguel J; Amaral, Margarida D; Zaccolo, Manuela; Farinha, Carlos M

    2016-07-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates protein kinase A (PKA) but also the guanine nucleotide exchange factor 'exchange protein directly activated by cAMP' (EPAC1; also known as RAPGEF3). Although phosphorylation by PKA is known to regulate CFTR channel gating - the protein defective in cystic fibrosis - the contribution of EPAC1 to CFTR regulation remains largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that in human airway epithelial cells, cAMP signaling through EPAC1 promotes CFTR stabilization at the plasma membrane by attenuating its endocytosis, independently of PKA activation. EPAC1 and CFTR colocalize and interact through protein adaptor NHERF1 (also known as SLC9A3R1). This interaction is promoted by EPAC1 activation, triggering its translocation to the plasma membrane and binding to NHERF1. Our findings identify a new CFTR-interacting protein and demonstrate that cAMP activates CFTR through two different but complementary pathways - the well-known PKA-dependent channel gating pathway and a new mechanism regulating endocytosis that involves EPAC1. The latter might constitute a novel therapeutic target for treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  4. Eicosanoid Release Is Increased by Membrane Destabilization and CFTR Inhibition in Calu-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borot, Florence; Fritsch, Janine; Colas, Julien; Moriceau, Sandra; Baudouin-Legros, Maryvonne; Brouillard, Franck; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus; Touqui, Lhousseine; Chanson, Marc; Edelman, Aleksander; Ollero, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The antiinflammatory protein annexin-1 (ANXA1) and the adaptor S100A10 (p11), inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) by direct interaction. Since the latter is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid at membrane phospholipids, all three proteins modulate eicosanoid production. We have previously shown the association of ANXA1 expression with that of CFTR, the multifactorial protein mutated in cystic fibrosis. This could in part account for the abnormal inflammatory status characteristic of this disease. We postulated that CFTR participates in the regulation of eicosanoid release by direct interaction with a complex containing ANXA1, p11 and cPLA2α. We first analyzed by plasmon surface resonance the in vitro binding of CFTR to the three proteins. A significant interaction between p11 and the NBD1 domain of CFTR was found. We observed in Calu-3 cells a rapid and partial redistribution of all four proteins in detergent resistant membranes (DRM) induced by TNF-α. This was concomitant with increased IL-8 synthesis and cPLA2α activation, ultimately resulting in eicosanoid (PGE2 and LTB4) overproduction. DRM destabilizing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin induced further cPLA2α activation and eicosanoid release, but inhibited IL-8 synthesis. We tested in parallel the effect of short exposure of cells to CFTR inhibitors Inh172 and Gly-101. Both inhibitors induced a rapid increase in eicosanoid production. Longer exposure to Inh172 did not increase further eicosanoid release, but inhibited TNF-α-induced relocalization to DRM. These results show that (i) CFTR may form a complex with cPLA2α and ANXA1 via interaction with p11, (ii) CFTR inhibition and DRM disruption induce eicosanoid synthesis, and (iii) suggest that the putative cPLA2/ANXA1/p11/CFTR complex may participate in the modulation of the TNF-α-induced production of eicosanoids, pointing to the importance of membrane composition and CFTR function in the regulation of inflammation mediator synthesis

  5. Characterization and small-molecule stabilization of the multisite tandem binding between 14-3-3 and the R domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Stevers, Loes M; Lam, Chan V; Leysen, Seppe F R; Meijer, Femke A; van Scheppingen, Daphne S; de Vries, Rens M J M; Carlile, Graeme W; Milroy, Lech G; Thomas, David Y; Brunsveld, Luc; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a fatal genetic disease, most frequently caused by the retention of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The binding of the 14-3-3 protein to the CFTR regulatory (R) domain has been found to enhance CFTR trafficking to the plasma membrane. To define the mechanism of action of this protein-protein interaction, we have examined the interaction in vitro. The disordered multiphosphorylated R domain contains nine different 14-3-3 binding motifs. Furthermore, the 14-3-3 protein forms a dimer containing two amphipathic grooves that can potentially bind these phosphorylated motifs. This results in a number of possible binding mechanisms between these two proteins. Using multiple biochemical assays and crystal structures, we show that the interaction between them is governed by two binding sites: The key binding site of CFTR (pS768) occupies one groove of the 14-3-3 dimer, and a weaker, secondary binding site occupies the other binding groove. We show that fusicoccin-A, a natural-product tool compound used in studies of 14-3-3 biology, can stabilize the interaction between 14-3-3 and CFTR by selectively interacting with a secondary binding motif of CFTR (pS753). The stabilization of this interaction stimulates the trafficking of mutant CFTR to the plasma membrane. This definition of the druggability of the 14-3-3-CFTR interface might offer an approach for cystic fibrosis therapeutics.

  6. Involvement of the heterodimeric interface region of the nucleotide binding domain-2 (NBD2) in the CFTR quaternary structure and membrane stability.

    PubMed

    Micoud, Julien; Chauvet, Sylvain; Scheckenbach, Klaus Ernst Ludwig; Alfaidy, Nadia; Chanson, Marc; Benharouga, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the only member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily that functions as a chloride channel. The predicted st