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  1. The N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, Takafumi; Sriram, Shashikanth M.; Park, Kyong Soo; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2013-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a proteolytic system in which N-terminal residues of short-lived proteins are recognized by recognition components (N-recognins) as essential components of degrons, called N-degrons. Known N-recognins in eukaryotes mediate protein ubiquitylation and selective proteolysis by the 26S proteasome. Substrates of N-recognins can be generated when normally embedded destabilizing residues are exposed at the N terminus by proteolytic cleavage. N-degrons can also be generated through modifications of posttranslationally exposed pro-N-degrons of otherwise stable proteins; such modifications include oxidation, arginylation, leucylation, phenylalanylation, and acetylation. Although there are variations in components, degrons, and hierarchical structures, the proteolytic systems based on generation and recognition of N-degrons have been observed in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined thus far. The N-end rule pathway regulates homeostasis of various physiological processes, in part, through interaction with small molecules. Here, we review the biochemical mechanisms, structures, physiological functions, and small-molecule-mediated regulation of the N-end rule pathway. PMID:22524314

  2. The N-end rule: functions, mysteries, uses.

    PubMed Central

    Varshavsky, A

    1996-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. Similar but distinct versions of the N-end rule operate in all organisms examined, from mammals to fungi and bacteria. In eukaryotes, the N-end rule pathway is a part of the ubiquitin system. I discuss the mechanisms and functions of this pathway, and consider its applications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8901547

  3. The Molecular Basis of N-End Rule Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.H.; Roman-Hernandez, G.; Grant, R.A.; Sauer, R.T.; Baker, T.A.

    2009-03-27

    The N-end rule targets specific proteins for destruction in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we report a crystal structure of a bacterial N-end rule adaptor, ClpS, bound to a peptide mimic of an N-end rule substrate. This structure, which was solved at a resolution of 1.15 {angstrom}, reveals specific recognition of the peptide {alpha}-amino group via hydrogen bonding and shows that the peptide's N-terminal tyrosine side chain is buried in a deep hydrophobic cleft that pre-exists on the surface of ClpS. The adaptor side chains that contact the peptide's N-terminal residue are highly conserved in orthologs and in E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate eukaryotic N-end rule recognition. We show that mutation of critical ClpS contact residues abrogates substrate delivery to and degradation by the AAA+ protease ClpAP, demonstrate that modification of the hydrophobic pocket results in altered N-end rule specificity, and discuss functional implications for the mechanism of substrate delivery.

  4. The N-end rule pathway and regulation by proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Varshavsky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the regulation of the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. Degradation signals (degrons) that are targeted by the N-end rule pathway include a set called N-degrons. The main determinant of an N-degron is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein. In eukaryotes, the N-end rule pathway is a part of the ubiquitin system and consists of two branches, the Ac/N-end rule and the Arg/N-end rule pathways. The Ac/N-end rule pathway targets proteins containing Nα-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) residues. The Arg/N-end rule pathway recognizes unacetylated N-terminal residues and involves N-terminal arginylation. Together, these branches target for degradation a majority of cellular proteins. For example, more than 80% of human proteins are cotranslationally Nt-acetylated. Thus, most proteins harbor a specific degradation signal, termed AcN-degron, from the moment of their birth. Specific N-end rule pathways are also present in prokaryotes and in mitochondria. Enzymes that produce N-degrons include methionine-aminopeptidases, caspases, calpains, Nt-acetylases, Nt-amidases, arginyl-transferases, and leucyl-transferases. Regulated degradation of specific proteins by the N-end rule pathway mediates a legion of physiological functions, including the sensing of heme, oxygen, and nitric oxide; selective elimination of misfolded proteins; the regulation of DNA repair, segregation, and condensation; the signaling by G proteins; the regulation of peptide import, fat metabolism, viral and bacterial infections, apoptosis, meiosis, spermatogenesis, neurogenesis, and cardiovascular development; and the functioning of adult organs, including the pancreas and the brain. Discovered 25 years ago, this pathway continues to be a fount of biological insights. PMID:21633985

  5. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  6. Homeostatic response to hypoxia is regulated by the N-end rule pathway in plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Lee, Seung Cho; Isa, Nurulhikma Md; Gramuglia, Silvia; Fukao, Takeshi; Bassel, George W; Correia, Cristina Sousa; Corbineau, Françoise; Theodoulou, Frederica L; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2011-10-23

    Plants and animals are obligate aerobes, requiring oxygen for mitochondrial respiration and energy production. In plants, an unanticipated decline in oxygen availability (hypoxia), as caused by roots becoming waterlogged or foliage submergence, triggers changes in gene transcription and messenger RNA translation that promote anaerobic metabolism and thus sustain substrate-level ATP production. In contrast to animals, oxygen sensing has not been ascribed to a mechanism of gene regulation in response to oxygen deprivation in plants. Here we show that the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis acts as a homeostatic sensor of severe low oxygen levels in Arabidopsis, through its regulation of key hypoxia-response transcription factors. We found that plants lacking components of the N-end rule pathway constitutively express core hypoxia-response genes and are more tolerant of hypoxic stress. We identify the hypoxia-associated ethylene response factor group VII transcription factors of Arabidopsis as substrates of this pathway. Regulation of these proteins by the N-end rule pathway occurs through a characteristic conserved motif at the amino terminus initiating with Met-Cys. Enhanced stability of one of these proteins, HRE2, under low oxygen conditions improves hypoxia survival and reveals a molecular mechanism for oxygen sensing in plants via the evolutionarily conserved N-end rule pathway. SUB1A-1, a major determinant of submergence tolerance in rice, was shown not to be a substrate for the N-end rule pathway despite containing the N-terminal motif, indicating that it is uncoupled from N-end rule pathway regulation, and that enhanced stability may relate to the superior tolerance of Sub1 rice varieties to multiple abiotic stresses.

  7. N-end rule pathway inhibition assists colon tumor regression via necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwalla, Pritha; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Recent study has shown that N-end rule pathway, an ubiquitin dependent proteolytic system, counteracts cell death by degrading many antisurvival protein fragments like BCLxL, BRCA1, RIPK1, etc. Inhibition of the N-end rule pathway can lead to metabolic stabilization of proapoptotic protein fragments like RIPK1, thereby sensitizing cells to programmed cell death. Receptor interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-1 (RIPK1) is one of the upstream regulators of programmed necrosis known as necroptosis. Necroptosis is particularly gaining attention of cancer biologists as it provides an alternate therapeutic modality to kill cancer cells, which often evolve multiple strategies to circumvent growth inhibition by apoptosis. Utilizing the over expression of biotin receptor in cancer cells, herein, we report that coadministration of synthetic hetero-bivalent N-end rule inhibitor RFC11 and anticancer drug shikonin solubilized in a stable biotin receptor-targeted liposome exhibited significant synergistic antitumor effect in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse colon tumor model through induction of necroptosis with distinctive upregulation of RIPK1. Besides developing a newly targeted formulation for necroptosis induction, this report is the first in vivo evidence demonstrating that potent inhibition of N-end rule pathway can enhance therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:27556106

  8. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  9. The Substrate Recognition Domains of the N-end Rule Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, Takafumi; Zakrzewska, Adriana; Dudgeon, Drew D.; Jiang, Yonghua; Lazo, John S.; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2009-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a ubiquitin-dependent system where E3 ligases called N-recognins, including UBR1 and UBR2, recognize type-1 (basic) and type-2 (bulky hydrophobic) N-terminal residues as part of N-degrons. We have recently reported an E3 family (termed UBR1 through UBR7) characterized by the 70-residue UBR box, among which UBR1, UBR2, UBR4, and UBR5 were captured during affinity-based proteomics with synthetic degrons. Here we characterized substrate binding specificity and recognition domains of UBR proteins. Pull-down assays with recombinant UBR proteins suggest that 570-kDa UBR4 and 300-kDa UBR5 bind N-degron, whereas UBR3, UBR6, and UBR7 do not. Binding assays with 24 UBR1 deletion mutants and 31 site-directed UBR1 mutations narrow down the degron-binding activity to a 72-residue UBR box-only fragment that recognizes type-1 but not type-2 residues. A surface plasmon resonance assay shows that the UBR box binds to the type-1 substrate Arg-peptide with Kd of ∼3.4 μm. Downstream from the UBR box, we identify a second substrate recognition domain, termed the N-domain, required for type-2 substrate recognition. The ∼80-residue N-domain shows structural and functional similarity to 106-residue Escherichia coli ClpS, a bacterial N-recognin. We propose a model where the 70-residue UBR box functions as a common structural element essential for binding to all known destabilizing N-terminal residues, whereas specific residues localized in the UBR box (for type 1) or the N-domain (for type 2) provide substrate selectivity through interaction with the side group of an N-terminal amino acid. Our work provides new insights into substrate recognition in the N-end rule pathway. PMID:19008229

  10. The N-end rule pathway catalyzes a major fraction of the protein degradation in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Lecker, S. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, overall protein degradation involves the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One property of a protein that leads to rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation is the presence of a basic, acidic, or bulky hydrophobic residue at its N terminus. However, in normal cells, substrates for this N-end rule pathway, which involves ubiquitin carrier protein (E2) E214k and ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) E3alpha, have remained unclear. Surprisingly, in soluble extracts of rabbit muscle, we found that competitive inhibitors of E3alpha markedly inhibited the 125I-ubiquitin conjugation and ATP-dependent degradation of endogenous proteins. These inhibitors appear to selectively inhibit E3alpha, since they blocked degradation of 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, but did not affect the degradation of proteins whose ubiquitination involved other E3s. The addition of several E2s or E3alpha to the muscle extracts stimulated overall proteolysis and ubiquitination, but only the stimulation by E3alpha or E214k was sensitive to these inhibitors. A similar general inhibition of ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins was observed with a dominant negative inhibitor of E214k. Certain substrates of the N-end rule pathway are degraded after their tRNA-dependent arginylation. We found that adding RNase A to muscle extracts reduced the ATP-dependent proteolysis of endogenous proteins, and supplying tRNA partially restored this process. Finally, although in muscle extracts the N-end rule pathway catalyzes most ubiquitin conjugation, it makes only a minor contribution to overall protein ubiquitination in HeLa cell extracts.

  11. Plant cysteine oxidases are dioxygenases that directly enable arginyl transferase-catalysed arginylation of N-end rule targets.

    PubMed

    White, Mark D; Klecker, Maria; Hopkinson, Richard J; Weits, Daan A; Mueller, Carolin; Naumann, Christin; O'Neill, Rebecca; Wickens, James; Yang, Jiayu; Brooks-Bartlett, Jonathan C; Garman, Elspeth F; Grossmann, Tom N; Dissmeyer, Nico; Flashman, Emily

    2017-03-23

    Crop yield loss due to flooding is a threat to food security. Submergence-induced hypoxia in plants results in stabilization of group VII ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs (ERF-VIIs), which aid survival under these adverse conditions. ERF-VII stability is controlled by the N-end rule pathway, which proposes that ERF-VII N-terminal cysteine oxidation in normoxia enables arginylation followed by proteasomal degradation. The PLANT CYSTEINE OXIDASEs (PCOs) have been identified as catalysts of this oxidation. ERF-VII stabilization in hypoxia presumably arises from reduced PCO activity. We directly demonstrate that PCO dioxygenase activity produces Cys-sulfinic acid at the N terminus of an ERF-VII peptide, which then undergoes efficient arginylation by an arginyl transferase (ATE1). This provides molecular evidence of N-terminal Cys-sulfinic acid formation and arginylation by N-end rule pathway components, and a substrate of ATE1 in plants. The PCOs and ATE1 may be viable intervention targets to stabilize N-end rule substrates, including ERF-VIIs, to enhance submergence tolerance in agriculture.

  12. Rates of ubiquitin conjugation increase when muscles atrophy, largely through activation of the N-end rule pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Baracos, V.; Sarraf, P.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid loss of muscle mass that accompanies many disease states, such as cancer or sepsis, is primarily a result of increased protein breakdown in muscle, and several observations have suggested an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Accordingly, in extracts of atrophying muscles from tumor-bearing or septic rats, rates of 125I-ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins were found to be higher than in control extracts. On the other hand, in extracts of muscles from hypothyroid rats, where overall proteolysis is reduced below normal, the conjugation of 125I-ubiquitin to soluble proteins decreased by 50%, and treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) restored ubiquitination to control levels. Surprisingly, the N-end rule pathway, which selectively degrades proteins with basic or large hydrophobic N-terminal residues, was found to be responsible for most of these changes in ubiquitin conjugation. Competitive inhibitors of this pathway that specifically block the ubiquitin ligase, E3alpha, suppressed most of the increased ubiquitin conjugation in the muscle extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats. These inhibitors also suppressed ubiquitination in normal extracts toward levels in hypothyroid extracts, which showed little E3alpha-dependent ubiquitination. Thus, the inhibitors eliminated most of the differences in ubiquitination under these different pathological conditions. Moreover, 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, was ubiquitinated more rapidly in extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats, and more slowly in those from hypothyroid rats, than in controls. Thus, the rate of ubiquitin conjugation increases in atrophying muscles, and these hormone- and cytokine-dependent responses are in large part due to activation of the N-end rule pathway.

  13. New role for an old rule: N-end rule-mediated degradation of ethylene responsive factor proteins governs low oxygen response in plants(F).

    PubMed

    Licausi, Francesco; Pucciariello, Chiara; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2013-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway regulates protein degradation, which depends on exposed N-terminal sequences in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, conserved and specific enzymes stimulate selective proteolysis. Although a number of developmental and growth phenotypes have been reported for mutants in the N-end rule, its function has remained unrelated to specific physiological pathways. The first report of the direct involvement of the N-end rule in stress responses focused on hypoxic signaling and how the oxygen-dependent oxidation of cystein promotes the N-end rule-mediated degradation of ethylene responsive factor (ERF)-VII proteins, the master regulators of anaerobic responses. It has been suggested that plants have evolved specific mechanisms to tune ERF-VII availability in the nucleus. In this review, we speculate that ERF-VII proteins are reversibly protected from degradation via membrane sequestration. The oxidative response in plants subjected to anoxic conditions suggests that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species) may interact or interfere with the N-end rule pathway-mediated response to hypoxia.

  14. The anti-apoptotic form of tyrosine kinase Lyn that is generated by proteolysis is degraded by the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eldeeb, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of apoptotic pathways results in the caspase cleavage of the Lyn tyrosine kinase to generate the N-terminal truncated LynΔN. This LynΔN fragment has been demonstrated to exert negative feedback on imatinib induced apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562 cells. Our investigations focus on LynΔN stability and how reduced stability reduces imatinib resistance. As the proteolytical generated LynΔN has a leucine as an N-terminal amino acid, we hypothesized that LynΔN would be degraded by the N-end rule pathway. We demonstrated that LynΔN is unstable and that its stability is dependent on the identity of its N-terminus. Additionally we established that LynΔN degradation could be inhibited by either inhibiting the proteasome or knocking down the UBR1 and UBR2 ubiquitin E3 ligases. Importantly, we also demonstrate that LynΔN degradation by the N-end rule counters the imatinib resistance of K562 cells provided by LynΔN expression. Together our data suggest a possible mechanism for the N-end rule pathway having a link to imatinib resistance in CML. With LynΔN being an N-end rule substrate, it provides the first example that this pathway can also provide a pro-apoptotic function as previous reports have currently only demonstrated anti-apoptotic roles for the N-end rule pathway. PMID:24798867

  15. DPP9 is a novel component of the N-end rule pathway targeting the tyrosine kinase Syk

    PubMed Central

    Justa-Schuch, Daniela; Silva-Garcia, Maria; Pilla, Esther; Engelke, Michael; Kilisch, Markus; Lenz, Christof; Möller, Ulrike; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Urlaub, Henning; Geiss-Friedlander, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The aminopeptidase DPP9 removes dipeptides from N-termini of substrates having a proline or alanine in second position. Although linked to several pathways including cell survival and metabolism, the molecular mechanisms underlying these outcomes are poorly understood. We identified a novel interaction of DPP9 with Filamin A, which recruits DPP9 to Syk, a central kinase in B-cell signalling. Syk signalling can be terminated by degradation, requiring the ubiquitin E3 ligase Cbl. We show that DPP9 cleaves Syk to produce a neo N-terminus with serine in position 1. Pulse-chases combined with mutagenesis studies reveal that Ser1 strongly influences Syk stability. Furthermore, DPP9 silencing reduces Cbl interaction with Syk, suggesting that DPP9 processing is a prerequisite for Syk ubiquitination. Consistently, DPP9 inhibition stabilizes Syk, thereby modulating Syk signalling. Taken together, we demonstrate DPP9 as a negative regulator of Syk and conclude that DPP9 is a novel integral aminopeptidase of the N-end rule pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16370.001 PMID:27614019

  16. Altered Activity, Social Behavior, and Spatial Memory in Mice Lacking the NTAN1p Amidase and the Asparagine Branch of the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Balogh, Seth A.; Davydov, Ilia V.; Kashina, Anna S.; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Xie, Youming; Gaur, Arti; Hyde, Lynn; Denenberg, Victor H.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. N-terminal asparagine and glutamine are tertiary destabilizing residues, in that they are enzymatically deamidated to yield secondary destabilizing residues aspartate and glutamate, which are conjugated to arginine, a primary destabilizing residue. N-terminal arginine of a substrate protein is bound by the Ubr1-encoded E3α, the E3 component of the ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent N-end rule pathway. We describe the construction and analysis of mouse strains lacking the asparagine-specific N-terminal amidase (NtN-amidase), encoded by the Ntan1 gene. In wild-type embryos, Ntan1 was strongly expressed in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The Ntan1−/− mouse strains lacked the NtN-amidase activity but retained glutamine-specific NtQ-amidase, indicating that the two enzymes are encoded by different genes. Among the normally short-lived N-end rule substrates, only those bearing N-terminal asparagine became long-lived in Ntan1−/− fibroblasts. The Ntan1−/− mice were fertile and outwardly normal but differed from their congenic wild-type counterparts in spontaneous activity, spatial memory, and a socially conditioned exploratory phenotype that has not been previously described with other mouse strains. PMID:10805755

  17. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  18. Ubiquitin conjugation by the N-end rule pathway and mRNAs for its components increase in muscles of diabetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, S. H.; Solomon, V.; Price, S. R.; Kwon, Y. T.; Mitch, W. E.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin deficiency (e.g., in acute diabetes or fasting) is associated with enhanced protein breakdown in skeletal muscle leading to muscle wasting. Because recent studies have suggested that this increased proteolysis is due to activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome (Ub-proteasome) pathway, we investigated whether diabetes is associated with an increased rate of Ub conjugation to muscle protein. Muscle extracts from streptozotocin-induced insulin-deficient rats contained greater amounts of Ub-conjugated proteins than extracts from control animals and also 40-50% greater rates of conjugation of (125)I-Ub to endogenous muscle proteins. This enhanced Ub-conjugation occurred mainly through the N-end rule pathway that involves E2(14k) and E3alpha. A specific substrate of this pathway, alpha-lactalbumin, was ubiquitinated faster in the diabetic extracts, and a dominant negative form of E2(14k) inhibited this increase in ubiquitination rates. Both E2(14k) and E3alpha were shown to be rate-limiting for Ub conjugation because adding small amounts of either to extracts stimulated Ub conjugation. Furthermore, mRNA for E2(14k) and E3alpha (but not E1) were elevated 2-fold in muscles from diabetic rats, although no significant increase in E2(14k) and E3alpha content could be detected by immunoblot or activity assays. The simplest interpretation of these results is that small increases in both E2(14k) and E3alpha in muscles of insulin-deficient animals together accelerate Ub conjugation and protein degradation by the N-end rule pathway, the same pathway activated in cancer cachexia, sepsis, and hyperthyroidism.

  19. Ubiquitin Ligases of the N-End Rule Pathway: Assessment of Mutations in UBR1 That Cause the Johanson-Blizzard Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Sukalo, Maja; Batygin, Olga; Addor, Marie-Claude; Brunner, Han; Aytes, Antonio Perez; Mayerle, Julia; Song, Hyun Kyu; Varshavsky, Alexander; Zenker, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS; OMIM 243800) is an autosomal recessive disorder that includes congenital exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, facial dysmorphism with the characteristic nasal wing hypoplasia, multiple malformations, and frequent mental retardation. Our previous work has shown that JBS is caused by mutations in human UBR1, which encodes one of the E3 ubiquitin ligases of the N-end rule pathway. The N-end rule relates the regulation of the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. One class of degradation signals (degrons) recognized by UBR1 are destabilizing N-terminal residues of protein substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings Most JBS-causing alterations of UBR1 are nonsense, frameshift or splice-site mutations that abolish UBR1 activity. We report here missense mutations of human UBR1 in patients with milder variants of JBS. These single-residue changes, including a previously reported missense mutation, involve positions in the RING-H2 and UBR domains of UBR1 that are conserved among eukaryotes. Taking advantage of this conservation, we constructed alleles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae UBR1 that were counterparts of missense JBS-UBR1 alleles. Among these yeast Ubr1 mutants, one of them (H160R) was inactive in yeast-based activity assays, the other one (Q1224E) had a detectable but weak activity, and the third one (V146L) exhibited a decreased but significant activity, in agreement with manifestations of JBS in the corresponding JBS patients. Conclusions/Significance These results, made possible by modeling defects of a human ubiquitin ligase in its yeast counterpart, verified and confirmed the relevance of specific missense UBR1 alleles to JBS, and suggested that a residual activity of a missense allele is causally associated with milder variants of JBS. PMID:21931868

  20. UBR2 of the N-End Rule Pathway Is Required for Chromosome Stability via Histone Ubiquitylation in Spermatocytes and Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Jee Young; Kim, Euna; Zakrzewska, Adriana; Yoo, Young Dong; Jang, Jun Min; Han, Dong Hoon; Lee, Min Jae; Seo, Jai Wha; Lee, Yong Jun; Kim, Tae-You; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2012-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a proteolytic system in which its recognition components (N-recognins) recognize destabilizing N-terminal residues of short-lived proteins as an essential element of specific degrons, called N-degrons. The RING E3 ligases UBR2 and UBR1 are major N-recognins that share size (200 kDa), conserved domains and substrate specificities to N-degrons. Despite the known function of the N-end rule pathway in degradation of cytosolic proteins, the major phenotype of UBR2-deficient male mice is infertility caused by arrest of spermatocytes at meiotic prophase I. UBR2-deficient spermatocytes are impaired in transcriptional silencing of sex chromosome-linked genes and ubiquitylation of histone H2A. In this study we show that the recruitment of UBR2 to meiotic chromosomes spatiotemporally correlates to the induction of chromatin-associated ubiquitylation, which is significantly impaired in UBR2-deficient spermatocytes. UBR2 functions as a scaffold E3 that promotes HR6B/UbcH2-dependent ubiquitylation of H2A and H2B but not H3 and H4, through a mechanism distinct from typical polyubiquitylation. The E3 activity of UBR2 in histone ubiquitylation is allosterically activated by dipeptides bearing destabilizing N-terminal residues. Insufficient monoubiquitylation and polyubiquitylation on UBR2-deficient meiotic chromosomes correlate to defects in double strand break (DSB) repair and other meiotic processes, resulting in pachytene arrest at stage IV and apoptosis. Some of these functions of UBR2 are observed in somatic cells, in which UBR2 is a chromatin-binding protein involved in chromatin-associated ubiquitylation upon DNA damage. UBR2-deficient somatic cells show an array of chromosomal abnormalities, including hyperproliferation, chromosome instability, and hypersensitivity to DNA damage-inducing reagents. UBR2-deficient mice enriched in C57 background die upon birth with defects in lung expansion and neural development. Thus, UBR2, known as the recognition

  1. The Deubiquitinase USP47 Stabilizes MAPK by Counteracting the Function of the N-end Rule ligase POE/UBR4 in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Udell, Christian M.; Sahmi, Malha; Rochette, Samuel; Therrien, Marc

    2016-01-01

    RAS-induced MAPK signaling is a central driver of the cell proliferation apparatus. Disruption of this pathway is widely observed in cancer and other pathologies. Consequently, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the mechanistic aspects of RAS-MAPK signal transmission and regulation. While much information has been garnered on the steps leading up to the activation and inactivation of core pathway components, comparatively little is known on the mechanisms controlling their expression and turnover. We recently identified several factors that dictate Drosophila MAPK levels. Here, we describe the function of one of these, the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP47. We found that USP47 acts post-translationally to counteract a proteasome-mediated event that reduces MAPK half-life and thereby dampens signaling output. Using an RNAi-based genetic interaction screening strategy, we identified UBC6, POE/UBR4, and UFD4, respectively, as E2 and E3 enzymes that oppose USP47 activity. Further characterization of POE-associated factors uncovered KCMF1 as another key component modulating MAPK levels. Together, these results identify a novel protein degradation module that governs MAPK levels. Given the role of UBR4 as an N-recognin ubiquitin ligase, our findings suggest that RAS-MAPK signaling in Drosophila is controlled by the N-end rule pathway and that USP47 counteracts its activity. PMID:27552662

  2. UBR box N-recognin-4 (UBR4), an N-recognin of the N-end rule pathway, and its role in yolk sac vascular development and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Takafumi; Kim, Sung Tae; Zakrzewska, Adriana; Lee, Bo Eun; Kang, Min Jueng; Yoo, Young Dong; Cha-Molstad, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Joonsung; Soung, Nak Kyun; Sung, Ki Sa; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Sun, Ming; Yi, Eugene C; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2013-03-05

    The N-end rule pathway is a proteolytic system in which destabilizing N-terminal residues of short-lived proteins act as degradation determinants (N-degrons). Substrates carrying N-degrons are recognized by N-recognins that mediate ubiquitylation-dependent selective proteolysis through the proteasome. Our previous studies identified the mammalian N-recognin family consisting of UBR1/E3α, UBR2, UBR4/p600, and UBR5, which recognize destabilizing N-terminal residues through the UBR box. In the current study, we addressed the physiological function of a poorly characterized N-recognin, 570-kDa UBR4, in mammalian development. UBR4-deficient mice die during embryogenesis and exhibit pleiotropic abnormalities, including impaired vascular development in the yolk sac (YS). Vascular development in UBR4-deficient YS normally advances through vasculogenesis but is arrested during angiogenic remodeling of primary capillary plexus associated with accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. In the YS, UBR4 marks endoderm-derived, autophagy-enriched cells that coordinate differentiation of mesoderm-derived vascular cells and supply autophagy-generated amino acids during early embryogenesis. UBR4 of the YS endoderm is associated with a tissue-specific autophagic pathway that mediates bulk lysosomal proteolysis of endocytosed maternal proteins into amino acids. In cultured cells, UBR4 subpopulation is degraded by autophagy through its starvation-induced association with cellular cargoes destined to autophagic double membrane structures. UBR4 loss results in multiple misregulations in autophagic induction and flux, including synthesis and lipidation/activation of the ubiquitin-like protein LC3 and formation of autophagic double membrane structures. Our results suggest that UBR4 plays an important role in mammalian development, such as angiogenesis in the YS, in part through regulation of bulk degradation by lysosomal hydrolases.

  3. Use of a Conditional Ubr5 Mutant Allele to Investigate the Role of an N-End Rule Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase in Hedgehog Signalling and Embryonic Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Elaine; Dora, Natalie; Mellis, David; Lettice, Laura; Deveney, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling is a potent regulator of cell fate and function. While much is known about the events within a Hh-stimulated cell, far less is known about the regulation of Hh-ligand production. Drosophila Hyperplastic Discs (Hyd), a ubiquitin-protein ligase, represents one of the few non-transcription factors that independently regulates both hh mRNA expression and pathway activity. Using a murine embryonic stem cell system, we revealed that shRNAi of the mammalian homologue of hyd, Ubr5, effectively prevented retinoic-acid-induced Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression. We next investigated the UBR5:Hh signalling relationship in vivo by generating and validating a mouse bearing a conditional Ubr5 loss-of-function allele. Conditionally deleting Ubr5 in the early embryonic limb-bud mesenchyme resulted in a transient decrease in Indian hedgehog ligand expression and decreased Hh pathway activity, around E13.5. Although Ubr5-deficient limbs and digits were, on average, shorter than control limbs, the effects were not statistically significant. Hence, while loss of UBR5 perturbed Hedgehog signalling in the developing limb, there were no obvious morphological defects. In summary, we report the first conditional Ubr5 mutant mouse and provide evidence for a role for UBR5 in influencing Hh signalling, but are uncertain to whether the effects on Hedgehog signaling were direct (cell autonomous) or indirect (non-cell-autonomous). Elaboration of the cellular/molecular mechanism(s) involved may help our understanding on diseases and developmental disorders associated with aberrant Hh signalling. PMID:27299863

  4. Papers of note in Science 355 (6323).

    PubMed

    VanHook, Annalisa M

    2017-01-31

    This week's articles include new research about how dengue virus can deplete platelets; a distinct N-end rule pathway for turnover of gluconeogenic enzymes in yeast; and the involvement of SUMO, ubiquitin, and the proteasome in meiotic recombination.

  5. The ClpS adaptor mediates staged delivery of N-end-rule substrates to the AAA+ ClpAP protease

    PubMed Central

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Hou, Jennifer Y.; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ClpS adaptor delivers N-end-rule substrates to ClpAP, an energy-dependent AAA+ protease, for degradation. How ClpS binds specific N-end residues is known in atomic detail and clarified here, but the delivery mechanism is poorly understood. We show that substrate binding is enhanced when ClpS binds hexameric ClpA. Reciprocally, N-end-rule substrates increase ClpS affinity for ClpA6. Enhanced binding requires the N-end residue and peptide bond of the substrate, as well as multiple aspects of ClpS, including, a side chain that contacts the substrate α-amino group and the flexible N-terminal extension (NTE). Finally, enhancement also needs the N domain and AAA+ rings of ClpA, connected by a long linker. The NTE can be engaged by the ClpA translocation pore, but ClpS resists unfolding/degradation. We propose a staged-delivery model that illustrates how intimate contacts between the substrate, adaptor, and protease reprogram specificity and coordinate handoff from the adaptor to the protease. PMID:21777811

  6. Spatio-temporal patterning of arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE) contributes to gametophytic development in a moss.

    PubMed

    Schuessele, Christian; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Mueller, Stefanie J; Rodriguez-Franco, Marta; Lorenz, Timo; Lang, Daniel; Igloi, Gabor L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    The importance of the arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE), the enzyme mediating post-translation arginylation of proteins in the N-end rule degradation (NERD) pathway of protein stability, was analysed in Physcomitrella patens and compared to its known functions in other eukaryotes. We characterize ATE:GUS reporter lines as well as ATE mutants in P. patens to study the impact and function of arginylation on moss development and physiology. ATE protein abundance is spatially and temporally regulated in P. patens by hormones and light and is highly abundant in meristematic cells. Further, the amount of ATE transcript is regulated during abscisic acid signalling and downstream of auxin signalling. Loss-of-function mutants exhibit defects at various levels, most severely in developing gametophores, in chloroplast starch accumulation and senescence. Thus, arginylation is necessary for moss gametophyte development, in contrast to the situation in flowering plants. Our analysis further substantiates the conservation of the N-end rule pathway components in land plants and highlights lineage-specific features. We introduce moss as a model system to characterize the role of the NERD pathway as an additional layer of complexity in eukaryotic development.

  7. Plant cysteine oxidases control the oxygen-dependent branch of the N-end-rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Weits, Daan A.; Giuntoli, Beatrice; Kosmacz, Monika; Parlanti, Sandro; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Riegler, Heike; Hoefgen, Rainer; Perata, Pierdomenico; van Dongen, Joost T.; Licausi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In plant and animal cells, amino-terminal cysteine oxidation controls selective proteolysis via an oxygen-dependent branch of the N-end rule pathway. It remains unknown how the N-terminal cysteine is specifically oxidized. Here we identify plant cysteine oxidase (PCO) enzymes that oxidize the penultimate cysteine of ERF-VII transcription factors by using oxygen as a co-substrate, thereby controlling the lifetime of these proteins. Consequently, ERF-VII proteins are stabilized under hypoxia and activate the molecular response to low oxygen while the expression of anaerobic genes is repressed in air. Members of the PCO family are themselves targets of ERF-VII transcription factors, generating a feedback loop that adapts the stress response according to the extent of the hypoxic condition. Our results reveal that PCOs act as sensor proteins for oxygen in plants and provide an example of how proactive regulation of the N-end rule pathway balances stress response to optimal growth and development in plants. PMID:24599061

  8. KCMF1 (potassium channel modulatory factor 1) Links RAD6 to UBR4 (ubiquitin N-recognin domain-containing E3 ligase 4) and Lysosome-Mediated Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jenny H.; Kaustov, Lilia; Coyaud, Etienne; Srikumar, Tharan; Wan, Janet; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Raught, Brian

    2015-01-01

    RAD6 is a ubiquitin E2 protein with roles in a number of different biological processes. Here, using affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry, we identify a number of new RAD6 binding partners, including the poorly characterized ubiquitin E3 ligases KCMF1 (potassium channel modulatory factor 1) and UBR4 (ubiquitin N-recognin domain-containing E3 ligase 4), a protein that can bind N-end rule substrates, and which was recently linked to lysosome-mediated degradation and autophagy. NMR, combined with in vivo and in vitro interaction mapping, demonstrate that the KCMF1 C terminus binds directly to RAD6, whereas N-terminal domains interact with UBR4 and other intracellular vesicle- and mitochondria-associated proteins. KCMF1 and RAD6 colocalize at late endosomes and lysosomes, and cells disrupted for KCMF1 or RAD6 function display defects in late endosome vesicle dynamics. Notably, we also find that two different RAD6A point mutants (R7W and R11Q) found in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients specifically lose the interaction with KCMF1 and UBR4, but not with other previously identified RAD6 interactors. We propose that RAD6-KCMF1-UBR4 represents a unique new E2-E3 complex that targets unknown N-end rule substrates for lysosome-mediated degradation, and that disruption of this complex via RAD6A mutations could negatively affect neuronal function in XLID patients. PMID:25582440

  9. Structural evolution, tunable electronic and magnetic properties of bare and semi-hydrogenated two-dimensional cubic boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Li, Hongdong; Yin, Hong

    2014-08-01

    By first-principles calculations, we study the layer number (n) dependent structural evolution, electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional bare and semi-hydrogenated (1 1 1)-oriented cubic boron nitride (c-BN) nanosheets. After energy optimization, there is a threshold of n = 7 for maintaining the cubic phase of the bare BN nanosheets. The hydrogenation on either B-end or N-end surface sites would be helpful for stabilizing the c-BN nanosheets with small n, and the structural relaxations on both two outermost surface sides are asymmetric due to different electronegativity between B and N atoms. The bare nanosheets are ferrimagnetic metallic and further turn into ferrimagnetic semiconductor after semi-hydrogenation.

  10. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling.

  11. Nitric oxide sensing in plants is mediated by proteolytic control of group VII ERF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Md Isa, Nurulhikma; Movahedi, Mahsa; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Mendiondo, Guillermina M; Berckhan, Sophie; Marín-de la Rosa, Nora; Vicente Conde, Jorge; Sousa Correia, Cristina; Pearce, Simon P; Bassel, George W; Hamali, Bulut; Talloji, Prabhavathi; Tomé, Daniel F A; Coego, Alberto; Beynon, Jim; Alabadí, David; Bachmair, Andreas; León, José; Gray, Julie E; Theodoulou, Frederica L; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2014-02-06

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling compound in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, NO regulates critical developmental transitions and stress responses. Here, we identify a mechanism for NO sensing that coordinates responses throughout development based on targeted degradation of plant-specific transcriptional regulators, the group VII ethylene response factors (ERFs). We show that the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis targets these proteins for destruction in the presence of NO, and we establish them as critical regulators of diverse NO-regulated processes, including seed germination, stomatal closure, and hypocotyl elongation. Furthermore, we define the molecular mechanism for NO control of germination and crosstalk with abscisic acid (ABA) signaling through ERF-regulated expression of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5). Our work demonstrates how NO sensing is integrated across multiple physiological processes by direct modulation of transcription factor stability and identifies group VII ERFs as central hubs for the perception of gaseous signals in plants.

  12. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  13. Quantitative proteomics analysis of the Arg/N-end rule pathway of targeted degradation in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Gannon, Lucy; Powers, Stephen J; Lilley, Kathryn S; Theodoulou, Frederica L

    2015-01-01

    According to the Arg/N-end rule pathway, proteins with basic N-termini are targeted for degradation by the Arabidopsis thaliana E3 ligase, PROTEOLYSIS6 (PRT6). Proteins can also become PRT6 substrates following post-translational arginylation by arginyltransferases ATE1 and 2. Here, we undertook a quantitative proteomics study of Arg/N-end rule mutants, ate1/2 and prt6, to investigate the impact of this pathway on the root proteome. Tandem mass tag labelling identified a small number of proteins with increased abundance in the mutants, some of which represent downstream targets of transcription factors known to be N-end rule substrates. Isolation of N-terminal peptides using terminal amine isotope labelling of samples (TAILS) combined with triple dimethyl labelling identified 1465 unique N-termini. Stabilising residues were over-represented among the free neo-N-termini, but destabilising residues were not markedly enriched in N-end rule mutants. The majority of free neo-N-termini were revealed following cleavage of organellar targeting signals, thus compartmentation may account in part for the presence of destabilising residues in the wild-type N-terminome. Our data suggest that PRT6 does not have a marked impact on the global proteome of Arabidopsis roots and is likely involved in the controlled degradation of relatively few regulatory proteins. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001719 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001719). PMID:25728785

  14. Using Ubiquitin to Follow the Metabolic Fate of a Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Frederic; Johnsson, Nils; Rumenapf, Tillmann; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1996-05-01

    We describe a method that can be used to produce equimolar amounts of two or more specific proteins in a cell. In this approach, termed the ubiquitin/protein/reference (UPR) technique, a reference protein and a protein of interest are synthesized as a polyprotein separated by a ubiquitin moiety. This tripartite fusion is cleaved, co-translationally or nearly so, by ubiquitin-specific processing proteases after the last residue of ubiquitin, producing equimolar amounts of the protein of interest and the reference protein bearing a C-terminal ubiquitin moiety. In applications such as pulse-chase analysis, the UPR technique can compensate for the scatter of immunoprecipitation yields, sample volumes, and other sources of sample-to-sample variation. In particular, this method allows a direct comparison of proteins' metabolic stabilities from the pulse data alone. We used UPR to examine the N-end rule (a relation between the in vivo half-life of a protein and the identity of its N-terminal residue) in L cells, a mouse cell line. The increased accuracy afforded by the UPR technique underscores insufficiency of the current ``half-life'' terminology, because in vivo degradation of many proteins deviates from first-order kinetics. We consider this problem and discuss other applications of UPR.

  15. Physicochemical properties and amino acid composition of highly purified preparation of distinctive estrogen-binding protein from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunova, T.A.; Smirnov, A.N.; Rozen, V.B.

    1986-12-10

    The structure and properties of a distinctive estrogen-binding protein (DEBP) from the livers of male rats, purified with the aid of an affinity sorbent, was investigated. A high degree of purification of the DEBP obtained (> 99%), associated with the pronounced microheterogeneity, was found. Apparently, this microheterogeneity is the result of partial proteolysis of the protein from the N-end during isolation. Purified DEBP molecules have the following parameters: molecular weight 31,000 (according to the data of electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS), sedimentation coefficient 3.765, Stokes' radius 25.6 A, frictional ratio 1.11. Absorption maximum of the protein in the ultraviolet region 276 nm; extinction coefficient 26; content of ..cap alpha..-helical segments 25-30%. The equilibrium constant of the association with estradiol is 5 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/. Estriol (> 100%) and, to a lesser degree, estrone and testosterone (approx. 10%) compete for the protein-binding sites on (/sup 3/H) estradiol, whereas androsterone has practically no competitive effect. A study of the amino acid composition of the DEBP showed that the protein contains a large number of residues with hydrophobic side groups (34.4%), it has more acidic than basic amino acids, and possesses a low content of cysteine, threonine, and histidine.

  16. Plant arginyltransferases (ATEs).

    PubMed

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Fausto, Anna K; Silva, Tatiane da F; Romanel, Elisson; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2017-02-13

    Regulation of protein stability and/or degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are essential cellular processes. A part of this regulation is mediated by the so-called N-end rule proteolytic pathway, which, in concert with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), drives protein degradation depending on the N-terminal amino acid sequence. One important enzyme involved in this process is arginyl-t-RNA transferase, known as ATE. This enzyme acts post-translationally by introducing an arginine residue at the N-terminus of specific protein targets to signal degradation via the UPS. However, the function of ATEs has only recently begun to be revealed. Nonetheless, the few studies to date investigating ATE activity in plants points to the great importance of the ATE/N-end rule pathway in regulating plant signaling. Plant development, seed germination, leaf morphology and responses to gas signaling in plants are among the processes affected by the ATE/N-end rule pathway. In this review, we present some of the known biological functions of plant ATE proteins, highlighting the need for more in-depth studies on this intriguing pathway.

  17. Redundant ERF-VII Transcription Factors Bind to an Evolutionarily Conserved cis-Motif to Regulate Hypoxia-Responsive Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gasch, Philipp; Fundinger, Moritz; Müller, Jana T.; Lee, Travis; Mustroph, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana to low-oxygen stress (hypoxia), such as during shoot submergence or root waterlogging, includes increasing the levels of ∼50 hypoxia-responsive gene transcripts, many of which encode enzymes associated with anaerobic metabolism. Upregulation of over half of these mRNAs involves stabilization of five group VII ethylene response factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are routinely degraded via the N-end rule pathway of proteolysis in an oxygen- and nitric oxide-dependent manner. Despite their importance, neither the quantitative contribution of individual ERF-VIIs nor the cis-regulatory elements they govern are well understood. Here, using single- and double-null mutants, the constitutively synthesized ERF-VIIs RELATED TO APETALA2.2 (RAP2.2) and RAP2.12 are shown to act redundantly as principle activators of hypoxia-responsive genes; constitutively expressed RAP2.3 contributes to this redundancy, whereas the hypoxia-induced HYPOXIA RESPONSIVE ERF1 (HRE1) and HRE2 play minor roles. An evolutionarily conserved 12-bp cis-regulatory motif that binds to and is sufficient for activation by RAP2.2 and RAP2.12 is identified through a comparative phylogenetic motif search, promoter dissection, yeast one-hybrid assays, and chromatin immunopurification. This motif, designated the hypoxia-responsive promoter element, is enriched in promoters of hypoxia-responsive genes in multiple species. PMID:26668304

  18. Annotating N termini for the human proteome project: N termini and Nα-acetylation status differentiate stable cleaved protein species from degradation remnants in the human erythrocyte proteome.

    PubMed

    Lange, Philipp F; Huesgen, Pitter F; Nguyen, Karen; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-04-04

    A goal of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project is to identify all human protein species. With 3844 proteins annotated as "missing", this is challenging. Moreover, proteolytic processing generates new protein species with characteristic neo-N termini that are frequently accompanied by altered half-lives, function, interactions, and location. Enucleated and largely void of internal membranes and organelles, erythrocytes are simple yet proteomically challenging cells due to the high hemoglobin content and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations that impedes protein identification. Using the N-terminomics procedure TAILS, we identified 1369 human erythrocyte natural and neo-N-termini and 1234 proteins. Multiple semitryptic N-terminal peptides exhibited improved mass spectrometric identification properties versus the intact tryptic peptide enabling identification of 281 novel erythrocyte proteins and six missing proteins identified for the first time in the human proteome. With an improved bioinformatics workflow, we developed a new classification system and the Terminus Cluster Score. Thereby we described a new stabilizing N-end rule for processed protein termini, which discriminates novel protein species from degradation remnants, and identified protein domain hot spots susceptible to cleavage. Strikingly, 68% of the N-termini were within genome-encoded protein sequences, revealing alternative translation initiation sites, pervasive endoproteolytic processing, and stabilization of protein fragments in vivo. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier .

  19. Protein Degradation Rate in Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J; Trösch, Josua; Castleden, Ian; Huang, Shaobai; Millar, A Harvey

    2017-02-01

    We applied (15)N labeling approaches to leaves of the Arabidopsis thaliana rosette to characterize their protein degradation rate and understand its determinants. The progressive labeling of new peptides with (15)N and measuring the decrease in the abundance of >60,000 existing peptides over time allowed us to define the degradation rate of 1228 proteins in vivo. We show that Arabidopsis protein half-lives vary from several hours to several months based on the exponential constant of the decay rate for each protein. This rate was calculated from the relative isotope abundance of each peptide and the fold change in protein abundance during growth. Protein complex membership and specific protein domains were found to be strong predictors of degradation rate, while N-end amino acid, hydrophobicity, or aggregation propensity of proteins were not. We discovered rapidly degrading subunits in a variety of protein complexes in plastids and identified the set of plant proteins whose degradation rate changed in different leaves of the rosette and correlated with leaf growth rate. From this information, we have calculated the protein turnover energy costs in different leaves and their key determinants within the proteome.

  20. Stimulation of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through the expression of amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine (Ntan1) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to static magnetism.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Taniura, Hideo; Goto, Yasuaki; Ogura, Masato; Sng, Judy C G; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    In order to elucidate mechanisms underlying modulation by static magnetism of the cellular functionality and/or integrity in the brain, we screened genes responsive to brief magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using differential display analysis. We have for the first time cloned and identified Ntan1 (amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine) as a magnetism responsive gene in rat brain. Ntan1 is an essential component of a protein degradation signal, which is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein, in the N-end rule. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed abundant expression of Ntan1 mRNA in hippocampal neurons in vivo. Northern blot analysis showed that Ntan1 mRNA was increased about three-fold after 3 h in response to brief magnetism. Brief magnetism also increased the transcriptional activity of Ntan1 promoter by luciferase reporter assay. Brief magnetism induced degradation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) without affecting cell morphology and viability, which was prevented by a selective inhibitor of 26S proteasome in hippocampal neurons. Overexpression of Ntan1 using recombinant Ntan1 adenovirus vector resulted in a marked decrease in the MAP2 protein expression in hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that brief magnetism leads to the induction of Ntan1 responsible for MAP2 protein degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in rat hippocampal neurons.

  1. Ubiquitylation activates a peptidase that promotes cleavage and destabilization of its activating E3 ligases and diverse growth regulatory proteins to limit cell proliferation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Dumenil, Jack; Lu, Fu-Hao; Na, Li; Vanhaeren, Hannes; Naumann, Christin; Klecker, Maria; Prior, Rachel; Smith, Caroline; McKenzie, Neil; Saalbach, Gerhard; Chen, Liangliang; Xia, Tian; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Seguela, Mathilde; Inzé, Dirk; Dissmeyer, Nico; Li, Yunhai; Bevan, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic shapes and sizes of organs are established by cell proliferation patterns and final cell sizes, but the underlying molecular mechanisms coordinating these are poorly understood. Here we characterize a ubiquitin-activated peptidase called DA1 that limits the duration of cell proliferation during organ growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. The peptidase is activated by two RING E3 ligases, Big Brother (BB) and DA2, which are subsequently cleaved by the activated peptidase and destabilized. In the case of BB, cleavage leads to destabilization by the RING E3 ligase PROTEOLYSIS 1 (PRT1) of the N-end rule pathway. DA1 peptidase activity also cleaves the deubiquitylase UBP15, which promotes cell proliferation, and the transcription factors TEOSINTE BRANCED 1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF 15 (TCP15) and TCP22, which promote cell proliferation and repress endoreduplication. We propose that DA1 peptidase activity regulates the duration of cell proliferation and the transition to endoreduplication and differentiation during organ formation in plants by coordinating the destabilization of regulatory proteins. PMID:28167503

  2. Protein Degradation Rate in Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Growth and Development[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Clark J.; Castleden, Ian

    2017-01-01

    We applied 15N labeling approaches to leaves of the Arabidopsis thaliana rosette to characterize their protein degradation rate and understand its determinants. The progressive labeling of new peptides with 15N and measuring the decrease in the abundance of >60,000 existing peptides over time allowed us to define the degradation rate of 1228 proteins in vivo. We show that Arabidopsis protein half-lives vary from several hours to several months based on the exponential constant of the decay rate for each protein. This rate was calculated from the relative isotope abundance of each peptide and the fold change in protein abundance during growth. Protein complex membership and specific protein domains were found to be strong predictors of degradation rate, while N-end amino acid, hydrophobicity, or aggregation propensity of proteins were not. We discovered rapidly degrading subunits in a variety of protein complexes in plastids and identified the set of plant proteins whose degradation rate changed in different leaves of the rosette and correlated with leaf growth rate. From this information, we have calculated the protein turnover energy costs in different leaves and their key determinants within the proteome. PMID:28138016

  3. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  4. Ablation of Arg-tRNA-protein transferases results in defective neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Kim, Seonmu; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-08-01

    The arginylation branch of the N-end rule pathway is a ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system in which post-translational conjugation of Arg by ATE1-encoded Arg-tRNA-protein transferase to N-terminal Asp, Glu, or oxidized Cys residues generates essential degradation signals. Here, we characterized the ATE1-/- mice and identified the essential role of N-terminal arginylation in neural tube development. ATE1-null mice showed severe intracerebral hemorrhages and cystic space near the neural tubes. Expression of ATE1 was prominent in the developing brain and spinal cord, and this pattern overlapped with the migration path of neural stem cells. The ATE1-/- brain showed defective G-protein signaling. Finally, we observed reduced mitosis in ATE1-/- neuroepithelium and a significantly higher nitric oxide concentration in the ATE1-/- brain. Our results strongly suggest that the crucial role of ATE1 in neural tube development is directly related to proper turn-over of the RGS4 protein, which participate in the oxygen-sensing mechanism in the cells. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 443-448].

  5. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  6. Artificial synthesis of swine hepcidin gene and expression in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Di, Yuanran; Cheng, Wei; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qingqiang; Lu, Min; Yuan, Lin; Dang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    In order to express swine hepcidin gene in Pichia pastoris, a DNA fragment coding hepcidin gene was synthesized with adaptation to yeast codon usage of highly expressed genes. A Kex2 signal cleavage site was fused in the 5' end of the DNA fragment for getting a peptide with the same N-end as native hepcidin. The 96-bp DNA fragment was ligated into the expression plasmid of pGAPZaA to construct pGAPZaA-hepcidin vector, which was transferred into P. pastoris (X33) to express hepcidin gene for extracellular secretion of protein at 86 µg/mL. A band of 2.76 kD molecular mass was detected by Tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis. Through antibacterial assay, the expressed hepcidin displayed obvious antibacterial activity. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 5.38 and 2.69 µg/mL for Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis prolification inhibitions, respectively.

  7. Comparative analysis of mitochondrial N-termini from mouse, human, and yeast.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Sarah E; Julien, Olivier; Clauser, Karl R; Shen, Hongying; Kamer, Kimberli J; Wells, James A; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2017-01-25

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome, translated in the cytoplasm, and directed to the mitochondria by a N-terminal presequence that is cleaved upon import. Recently, N-proteome catalogs have been generated for mitochondria from yeast and from human U937 cells. Here we applied the subtiligase method to determine N-termini for 327 proteins in mitochondria isolated from mouse liver and kidney. Comparative analysis between mitochondrial N-termini from mouse, human, and yeast proteins shows that while presequences are poorly conserved at the sequence level, other presequence properties are extremely conserved including a length of ~20-60aa, a net charge between +3 to +6, and the presence of stabilizing amino acids at the N-termini of mature proteins that follows the N-end rule from bacteria. As in yeast, ~80% of mouse presequence cleavage sites match canonical motifs for three mitochondrial peptidases (MPP, Imp55, Oct1) while the remainder do not match any known peptidase motifs. We show that mature mitochondrial proteins often exist with a spectrum of N-termini, consistent with a model of multiple cleavage events by MPP and Imp55. In addition to analysis of canonical targeting presequences, our N-terminal dataset allows exploration of other cleavage events -- and provides support for polypeptide cleavage into two distinct enzymes (Hsd17b4), protein cleavages key for signaling (Oma1, Opa1, Htra2, Mavs, Bcs2l13), and in several cases suggests novel protein isoforms (Scp2, Acadm, Adck3, Hsdl2, Dlst, Ogdh). We present an integrated catalog of mammalian mitochondrial N-termini that can be used as a community resource to investigate individual proteins, to elucidate mechanisms of mammalian mitochondrial processing, and to allow researchers to engineer tags distal to presequence cleavage.

  8. The Arabidopsis Chloroplast Stromal N-Terminome: Complexities of Amino-Terminal Protein Maturation and Stability.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Elden; Kim, Jitae; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-11-01

    Protein amino (N) termini are prone to modifications and are major determinants of protein stability in bacteria, eukaryotes, and perhaps also in chloroplasts. Most chloroplast proteins undergo N-terminal maturation, but this is poorly understood due to insufficient experimental information. Consequently, N termini of mature chloroplast proteins cannot be accurately predicted. This motivated an extensive characterization of chloroplast protein N termini in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates and mass spectrometry, generating nearly 14,000 tandem mass spectrometry spectra matching to protein N termini. Many nucleus-encoded plastid proteins accumulated with two or three different N termini; we evaluated the significance of these different proteoforms. Alanine, valine, threonine (often in N-α-acetylated form), and serine were by far the most observed N-terminal residues, even after normalization for their frequency in the plastid proteome, while other residues were absent or highly underrepresented. Plastid-encoded proteins showed a comparable distribution of N-terminal residues, but with a higher frequency of methionine. Infrequent residues (e.g. isoleucine, arginine, cysteine, proline, aspartate, and glutamate) were observed for several abundant proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins 70 and 90, Rubisco large subunit, and ferredoxin-glutamate synthase), likely reflecting functional regulation through their N termini. In contrast, the thylakoid lumenal proteome showed a wide diversity of N-terminal residues, including those typically associated with instability (aspartate, glutamate, leucine, and phenylalanine). We propose that, after cleavage of the chloroplast transit peptide by stromal processing peptidase, additional processing by unidentified peptidases occurs to avoid unstable or otherwise unfavorable N-terminal residues. The possibility of a chloroplast N-end rule is discussed.

  9. Absence of the Yeast Hsp31 Chaperones of the DJ-1 Superfamily Perturbs Cytoplasmic Protein Quality Control in Late Growth Phase

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Ingo; Norell, Derrick; Wolf, Dieter H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat shock proteins Hsp31, Hsp32, Hsp33 and Hsp34 belong to the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily which includes the human protein DJ-1 (PARK7) as the most prominent member. Mutations in the DJ-1 gene are directly linked to autosomal recessive, early-onset Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 acts as an oxidative stress-induced chaperone preventing aggregation and fibrillation of α-synuclein, a critical factor in the development of the disease. In vivo assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the model substrate ΔssCPY*Leu2myc (ΔssCL*myc) as an aggregation-prone misfolded cytoplasmic protein revealed an influence of the Hsp31 chaperone family on the steady state level of this substrate. In contrast to the ubiquitin ligase of the N-end rule pathway Ubr1, which is known to be prominently involved in the degradation process of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins, the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family does not impair the degradation of newly synthesized misfolded substrate. Also degradation of substrates with strong affinity to Ubr1 like those containing the type 1 N-degron arginine is not affected by the absence of the Hsp31 chaperone family. Epistasis analysis indicates that one function of the Hsp31 chaperone family resides in a pathway overlapping with the Ubr1-dependent degradation of misfolded cytoplasmic proteins. This pathway gains relevance in late growth phase under conditions of nutrient limitation. Additionally, the Hsp31 chaperones seem to be important for maintaining the cellular Ssa Hsp70 activity which is important for Ubr1-dependent degradation. PMID:26466368

  10. Rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(A(2)Σ(+)) + Ar: Differential cross sections and rotational angular momentum polarization.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Thomas R; Luxford, Thomas F M; Townsend, Dave; McKendrick, Kenneth G; Costen, Matthew L

    2015-11-28

    We present the implementation of a new crossed-molecular beam, velocity-map ion-imaging apparatus, optimized for collisions of electronically excited molecules. We have applied this apparatus to rotational energy transfer in NO(A(2)Σ(+), v = 0, N = 0, j = 0.5) + Ar collisions, at an average energy of 525 cm(-1). We report differential cross sections for scattering into NO(A(2)Σ(+), v = 0, N' = 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9), together with quantum scattering calculations of the differential cross sections and angle dependent rotational alignment. The differential cross sections show dramatic forward scattered peaks, together with oscillatory behavior at larger scattering angles, while the rotational alignment moments are also found to oscillate as a function of scattering angle. In general, the quantum scattering calculations are found to agree well with experiment, reproducing the forward scattering and oscillatory behavior at larger scattering angles. Analysis of the quantum scattering calculations as a function of total rotational angular momentum indicates that the forward scattering peak originates from the attractive minimum in the potential energy surface at the N-end of the NO. Deviations in the quantum scattering predictions from the experimental results, for scattering at angles greater than 10°, are observed to be more significant for scattering to odd final N'. We suggest that this represents inaccuracies in the potential energy surface, and in particular in its representation of the difference between the N- and O-ends of the molecule, as given by the odd-order Legendre moments of the surface.

  11. Liat1, an arginyltransferase-binding protein whose evolution among primates involved changes in the numbers of its 10-residue repeats.

    PubMed

    Brower, Christopher S; Rosen, Connor E; Jones, Richard H; Wadas, Brandon C; Piatkov, Konstantin I; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2014-11-18

    The arginyltransferase Ate1 is a component of the N-end rule pathway, which recognizes proteins containing N-terminal degradation signals called N-degrons, polyubiquitylates these proteins, and thereby causes their degradation by the proteasome. At least six isoforms of mouse Ate1 are produced through alternative splicing of Ate1 pre-mRNA. We identified a previously uncharacterized mouse protein, termed Liat1 (ligand of Ate1), that interacts with Ate1 but does not appear to be its arginylation substrate. Liat1 has a higher affinity for the isoforms Ate1(1A7A) and Ate1(1B7A). Liat1 stimulated the in vitro N-terminal arginylation of a model substrate by Ate1. All examined vertebrate and some invertebrate genomes encode proteins sequelogous (similar in sequence) to mouse Liat1. Sequelogs of Liat1 share a highly conserved ∼30-residue region that is shown here to be required for the binding of Liat1 to Ate1. We also identified non-Ate1 proteins that interact with Liat1. In contrast to Liat1 genes of nonprimate mammals, Liat1 genes of primates are subtelomeric, a location that tends to confer evolutionary instability on a gene. Remarkably, Liat1 proteins of some primates, from macaques to humans, contain tandem repeats of a 10-residue sequence, whereas Liat1 proteins of other mammals contain a single copy of this motif. Quantities of these repeats are, in general, different in Liat1 of different primates. For example, there are 1, 4, 13, 13, 17, and 17 repeats in the gibbon, gorilla, orangutan, bonobo, neanderthal, and human Liat1, respectively, suggesting that repeat number changes in this previously uncharacterized protein may contribute to evolution of primates.

  12. The ChIP-seq-Defined Networks of Bcl-3 Gene Binding Support Its Required Role in Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Robert W.; Wu, Chia-Ling; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    NF-kappaB transcriptional activation is required for skeletal muscle disuse atrophy. We are continuing to study how the activation of NF-kB regulates the genes that encode the protein products that cause atrophy. Using ChIP-sequencing we found that Bcl-3, an NF-kB transcriptional activator required for atrophy, binds to the promoters of a number of genes whose collective function describes two major aspects of muscle wasting. By means of bioinformatics analysis of ChIP-sequencing data we found Bcl-3 to be directing transcription networks of proteolysis and energy metabolism. The proteolytic arm of the Bcl-3 networks includes many E3 ligases associated with proteasomal protein degradation, including that of the N-end rule pathway. The metabolic arm appears to be involved in organizing the change from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in atrophying muscle. For one gene, MuRF1, ChIP-sequencing data identified the location of Bcl-3 and p50 binding in the promoter region which directed the creation of deletant and base-substitution mutations of MuRF1 promoter constructs to determine the effect on gene transcription. The results provide the first direct confirmation that the NF-kB binding site is involved in the muscle unloading regulation of MuRF1. Finally, we have combined the ChIP-sequencing results with gene expression microarray data from unloaded muscle to map several direct targets of Bcl-3 that are transcription factors whose own targets describe a set of indirect targets for NF-kB in atrophy. ChIP-sequencing provides the first molecular explanation for the finding that Bcl3 knockout mice are resistant to disuse muscle atrophy. Mapping the transcriptional regulation of muscle atrophy requires an unbiased analysis of the whole genome, which we show is now possible with ChIP-sequencing. PMID:23251550

  13. Inhibition of the Arg/N-end rule pathway-mediated proteolysis by dipeptide-mimetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ubr11 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin ligase functioning in the Arg/N-end rule pathway, which promotes degradation of substrate proteins via the proteasome. Ubr11 recognizes the N-degron sequence in substrates. The primary N-degron contains a destabilization-inducing N-terminal amino acid, which is either a basic (type 1) or bulky hydrophobic (type 2) residue. Dipeptides are known to inhibit proteolytic degradation via the Arg/N-end rule pathway. Here, I examined the potency of some amino acid- or dipeptide-related molecules in their inhibition of Ubr11/N-end rule-mediated degradation. An amide form of L-arginine and L-tryptophan had weak inhibitory activity for type 1 and type 2 substrates, respectively, although the unmodified amino acid monomer and its carboxymethylated ester were ineffective. Among the naturally occurring dipeptides tested, Lys-Leu and Tyr-Leu showed potent inhibitory activity, but their effect was transient, especially at submillimolar concentrations. L-arginine-β-naphthylamide (Arg-βNA) showed stronger activity than several dipeptides for type 1 substrates, but all Lys-Leu, Tyr-Leu, and Arg-βNA caused growth retardation. The inhibitory activity of the L-phenylalanine carbobenzoxy-hydrazide for type 2 substrates was not very strong, but it prolonged the action of Tyr-Leu at low concentrations and, importantly, did not interfere with cell growth. Apart from their utility, these dipeptidomimetics provide a clue for understanding the determinants of recognition by Ubr ubiquitin ligase and further designing novel inhibitors of the Arg/N-end rule pathway.

  14. The Arabidopsis Chloroplast Stromal N-Terminome: Complexities of Amino-Terminal Protein Maturation and Stability1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Elden; Kim, Jitae; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein amino (N) termini are prone to modifications and are major determinants of protein stability in bacteria, eukaryotes, and perhaps also in chloroplasts. Most chloroplast proteins undergo N-terminal maturation, but this is poorly understood due to insufficient experimental information. Consequently, N termini of mature chloroplast proteins cannot be accurately predicted. This motivated an extensive characterization of chloroplast protein N termini in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates and mass spectrometry, generating nearly 14,000 tandem mass spectrometry spectra matching to protein N termini. Many nucleus-encoded plastid proteins accumulated with two or three different N termini; we evaluated the significance of these different proteoforms. Alanine, valine, threonine (often in N-α-acetylated form), and serine were by far the most observed N-terminal residues, even after normalization for their frequency in the plastid proteome, while other residues were absent or highly underrepresented. Plastid-encoded proteins showed a comparable distribution of N-terminal residues, but with a higher frequency of methionine. Infrequent residues (e.g. isoleucine, arginine, cysteine, proline, aspartate, and glutamate) were observed for several abundant proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins 70 and 90, Rubisco large subunit, and ferredoxin-glutamate synthase), likely reflecting functional regulation through their N termini. In contrast, the thylakoid lumenal proteome showed a wide diversity of N-terminal residues, including those typically associated with instability (aspartate, glutamate, leucine, and phenylalanine). We propose that, after cleavage of the chloroplast transit peptide by stromal processing peptidase, additional processing by unidentified peptidases occurs to avoid unstable or otherwise unfavorable N-terminal residues. The possibility of a chloroplast N-end rule is discussed. PMID:26371235

  15. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  16. Rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}) + Ar: Differential cross sections and rotational angular momentum polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Sharples, Thomas R.; Luxford, Thomas F. M.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Costen, Matthew L.; Townsend, Dave

    2015-11-28

    We present the implementation of a new crossed-molecular beam, velocity-map ion-imaging apparatus, optimized for collisions of electronically excited molecules. We have applied this apparatus to rotational energy transfer in NO(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}, v = 0, N = 0, j = 0.5) + Ar collisions, at an average energy of 525 cm{sup −1}. We report differential cross sections for scattering into NO(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}, v = 0, N′ = 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9), together with quantum scattering calculations of the differential cross sections and angle dependent rotational alignment. The differential cross sections show dramatic forward scattered peaks, together with oscillatory behavior at larger scattering angles, while the rotational alignment moments are also found to oscillate as a function of scattering angle. In general, the quantum scattering calculations are found to agree well with experiment, reproducing the forward scattering and oscillatory behavior at larger scattering angles. Analysis of the quantum scattering calculations as a function of total rotational angular momentum indicates that the forward scattering peak originates from the attractive minimum in the potential energy surface at the N-end of the NO. Deviations in the quantum scattering predictions from the experimental results, for scattering at angles greater than 10°, are observed to be more significant for scattering to odd final N′. We suggest that this represents inaccuracies in the potential energy surface, and in particular in its representation of the difference between the N- and O-ends of the molecule, as given by the odd-order Legendre moments of the surface.

  17. Pharmacological Inhibitors of the Proteosome in Atrophying Muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Alfred

    1999-01-01

    depth extracts from normal and atrophying muscles to compare the activities of the Ub-activating enzyme (El), the various LTh-carrier proteins (E2s), and Ub-protein ligases (E3s). Recent studies of other types of muscle wasting -suggest a very important role in muscle proteolysis of certain ubiquitination enzymes, E214k and E3-alpha(i.e. components of the "N-end pathway"). Future studies will focus in understanding their role and test whether they are in fact critical for muscle atrophy in vivo. Since weightlessness leads to a specific loss of contractile proteins and to a switching of myosin isotypes, Dr. Goldberg's group will attempt to identify the ubiquitination enzymes specifically involved in myosin degradation both in normal muscle and after hind-limb suspension.

  18. Effect of the acidic strength on the vapor phase Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime over the MFI zeolite: an embedded ONIOM study.

    PubMed

    Sirijaraensre, Jakkapan; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2009-01-21

    The mechanism and energetic profile of the Beckmann rearrangement reaction of cyclohexanone oxime to epsilon-caprolactam catalyzed by the H-[Al]-MFI and H-[B]-MFI zeolites were investigated by both the bare cluster and the ONIOM models at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p):MNDO levels of theory, respectively. In order to improve the energetic properties and take into account the whole zeolite framework effect, single point calculations are undertaken at the embedded ONIOM2 schemes; MP2/6-311G(d,p):HF/6-31G(d) with an additional long-range electrostatic potential from the extended zeolite framework. The reaction mechanism of the Beckmann rearrangement over the acid site of zeolites consists of three steps: the 1,2 H shift, the rearrangement and the tautomerization. The activation energies for the Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime on the H-[Al]-MFI zeolite are calculated to be 31.46, 16.15 and 18.95 kcal mol(-1), for the first, second and third steps, respectively, whereas in the H-[B]-MFI zeolite, the energy barriers for each step of the reaction are 24.33, 7.46 and 20.43 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The rate-determining step of the reaction is the first step, which is the transformation from the N-ended cyclohexanone oxime adsorption complex and the O-ended one. These results signify the important role that the acid strength of zeolites plays in altering the energy profile of the reaction. The results further indicate that the weak Brønsted acid sites in the [B]-MFI zeolite could better catalyze the Beckmann rearrangement of cyclohexanone oxime than the strong acid sites in the [Al]-MFI zeolite, as compared with the quantitatively low activation energy of most steps. However, the turnover reaction of the H-[B]-MFI zeolite might be delayed by the quantitatively high desorption energy of the product as compared to the adsorption energy of the reactant.

  19. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen