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Sample records for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy

  1. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  2. Statin therapy is associated with improved pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mace, Adam G; Gantt, Gerald A; Skacel, Marek; Pai, Rish; Hammel, Jeff P; Kalady, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    Achieving a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves prognosis in rectal cancer. Statin therapy has been shown to enhance the impact of treatment in several malignancies, but little is known regarding the impact on rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation improves pathologic response in rectal cancer. This was a retrospective cohort study based on data from a prospectively maintained colorectal cancer database. The 2 cohorts were defined by statin use during neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This study was performed at a single tertiary referral center. Four hundred seven patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant therapy then proctectomy between 2000 and 2012 were included. Ninety-nine patients (24.3%) took a statin throughout the entire course of neoadjuvant therapy. The primary outcome measure was pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor regression grading system, grades 0 to 3. Patients in the statin cohort had a lower median regression grade (1 vs 2, p = 0.01) and were more likely to have a better response (grades 0-1 vs 2-3) than those not taking a statin (65.7% vs 48.7%, p = 0.004). Statin use remained a significant predictor of an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.33-3.82) in multivariate analyses. Although statin use itself did not significantly improve oncologic outcomes, an American Joint Committee on Cancer grade 0 to 1 response was associated with statistically significant improvements in overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific mortality, and local recurrence. This was a retrospective study and subject to nonrandomization of patients and incorporated patients on variable statin agents and doses. Statin therapy is associated with an improved response of rectal cancer to

  3. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for borderline pancreatic adenocarcinoma: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Galindo, José; Gabrielli, Mauricio; Guerra, Juan Francisco; Cassina, Juan Carlos; Garrido, Marcelo; Jarufe, Nicolás; Borghero, Yerko; Madrid, Jorge; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Roa, Juan Carlos; Martínez, Jorge

    2013-02-05

    Pancreatic cancer remains as one of the most aggressive human neoplasms, with overall poor survival rates. Radical surgery of the primary lesion is the best option for treatment. Borderline resectable pancreatic tumors (BRPT), defined as partial involvement of peripancreatic vasculature, may benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. We report on the first two BRPT cases treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation at our institution. Preoperative CT and MRI demonstrated pancreatic tumors encasing the porto-mesenteric confluence suggestive of BRPT. Patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (gemcitabine/cisplatin), followed by radiochemotherapy. After treatment, follow-up images demonstrated tumor downsize, allowing for the tumors to be considered then as resectable. They underwent partial pancreatoduodenectomies (Whipple procedure). In case 1, histopathology revealed a complete, margin-free resection, whereas in case 2 there was a complete pathological response, with no evidence of residual tumor. According to the literature, our initial experience using neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on BRPT allowed us to downsize the tumor and, subsequently, to perform a curative surgery.

  4. [A Case of Esophageal Cancer in a Patient with CMV Reactivation after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy].

    PubMed

    Megumi, Koichi; Okumura, Hiroshi; Shimonosono, Masataka; Ijichi, Tetsuya; Uchikado, Yasuto; Omoto, Itaru; Yo, Hiroyoshi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Arigami, Takaaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Baba, Kenji; Ishigami, Sumiya; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-10-01

    A 68-year-old woman was diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer with lymph node metastasis, for which she received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. During therapy, she had loss of appetite and weight; therefore, we inserted a nasal feeding tube for her nutrition, after which, she gained weight soon. After therapy, she had a high fever with lymphocytopenia and was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus infection because of significantly high CMV antigenemia. Ganciclovir was administered immediately, and she recovered soon. Two months later, we performed esophagectomy, and she recovered without complications. Immediate diagnosis of CMV infection, ganciclovir administration, and nutrition through a feeding tube were useful for the esophageal cancer patient in this report who had immunosuppression and malnutrition during chemoradiation.

  5. Predicting response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: diffusion-weighted 3 Tesla MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Se Hee; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Shin, Sang Soo; Soung, Min-Gyu; Kim, Heong Rok; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on 3 Tesla (T) MR imaging to predict the tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Thirty-five patients who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and subsequent surgical resection were included. Tumor volume was measured on T2-weighted MR images before and after neoadjuvant CRT and the percentage of tumor volume reduction was calculated. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured on the DWI before and after neoadjuvant CRT, and the change of ADC (Δ ADC) was calculated. The histopathologic response was categorized either as a responder to CRT or as a nonresponder. The relationship between the ADC parameters and the percentage of tumor volume reduction or histopathologic response was then evaluated. There was a significant correlation between tumor volume reduction and pre-CRT ADC and Δ ADC, respectively (r = -0.352, r = 0.615). Pre-CRT ADC of the histopathologic responders was significantly lower than that of the histopathologic nonresponders (P = 0.034). Δ ADC of the histopathologic responders was significantly higher than that of the histopathologic nonresponders (P < 0.005). DWI on 3T MR imaging may be a promising technique for helping to predict and monitor the treatment response to neoadjuvant CRT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation for advanced primary vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, H C; Ansink, A; Verhaar-Langereis, M; Stalpers, L

    2006-07-19

    In advanced stage primary vulvar cancer, treatment is tailored to individual patient needs. Combined treatment modalities have been developed, using chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. To determine whether the combined treatment strategy using concurrent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery is effective and safe in vulvar cancer patients with advanced primary disease. Main outcomes of interest were: types of surgical intervention following chemoradiation and survival, recurrence and complication rates. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group Specialised Register. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CANCERLIT, other databases and reference lists of articles. The latest search was conducted on 12 March 2005. Studies of curative treatment of patients with advanced, primary squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were included. Treatment included concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, followed by surgery. Twenty-eight abstracts and papers were selected either by the search strategy or by checking the cross references. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were not available. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. (Eifel 1995; Landoni 1996; Montana 2000; Moore 1998; Scheistroen 1993). Two authors (HCvD, MV-L) independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Chemotherapy was given uniformly within each of the five selected studies. However, four different chemoradiation schedules were applied. Radiotherapy dose fractionation techniques, fields and target definitions varied. Skin toxicity was observed in nearly all patients. Wound breakdown, infection, lymphedema, lymphorrhea and lymphoceles were also common. Operability was achieved in 63 to 92% of cases in the four studies using 5FU and CDDP or 5FU and MMC. In contrast, only 20% of

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is beneficial for clinical stage T2 N0 esophageal cancer patients due to inaccurate preoperative staging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jennifer Q; Hooker, Craig M; Brock, Malcolm V; Shin, James; Lee, Sue; How, Remealle; Franco, Noreli; Prevas, Helen; Hulbert, Alicia; Yang, Stephen C

    2012-02-01

    It remains unclear if patients with clinical stage T2 N0 (cT2 N0) esophageal cancer should be offered induction therapy vs surgical intervention alone. This was a retrospective cohort study of cT2 N0 patients undergoing induction therapy, followed by surgical resection, or resection alone, at the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1989 to 2009. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare all-cause mortality in cT2 N0 patients who had resection alone vs those who had induction chemoradiation therapy, followed by resection. A study cohort of 69 patients was identified and divided into two groups: 55 patients (79.7%) received induction therapy and 14 (20.3%) did not. No statistically significant difference in 5-year survival rate was observed for the two groups: 49.5% for the resection-only group and 53.8% for the induction group. More than 50% of cT2 N0 patients were understaged. For cT2 N0 esophageal cancer patients, the benefit of neoadjuvant therapy is still unclear. Induction therapy for cT2 N0 did not translate into a statistically significant improvement in survival. However, due to the significant understaging of T2 N0 patients, we recommend neoadjuvant therapy to all cT2N0 patients before operation. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Is Beneficial for Clinical Stage T2 N0 Esophageal Cancer Patients Due to Inaccurate Preoperative Staging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jennifer Q.; Hooker, Craig M.; Brock, Malcolm V.; Shin, James; Lee, Sue; How, Remealle; Franco, Noreli; Prevas, Helen; Hulbert, Alicia; Yang, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Background It remains unclear if patients with clinical stage T2 N0 (cT2 N0) esophageal cancer should be offered induction therapy vs surgical intervention alone. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of cT2 N0 patients undergoing induction therapy, followed by surgical resection, or resection alone, at the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1989 to 2009. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare all-cause mortality in cT2 N0 patients who had resection alone vs those who had induction chemoradiation therapy, followed by resection. Results A study cohort of 69 patients was identified and divided into two groups: 55 patients (79.7%) received induction therapy and 14 (20.3%) did not. No statistically significant difference in 5-year survival rate was observed for the two groups: 49.5% for the resection-only group and 53.8% for the induction group. More than 50% of cT2 N0 patients were understaged. Conclusions For cT2 N0 esophageal cancer patients, the benefit of neoadjuvant therapy is still unclear. Induction therapy for cT2 N0 did not translate into a statistically significant improvement in survival. However, due to the significant understaging of T2 N0 patients, we recommend neoadjuvant therapy to all cT2N0 patients before operation. PMID:22269708

  9. Interval Between Surgery and Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy for Distal Rectal Cancer: Does Delayed Surgery Have an Impact on Outcome?

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita Perez, Rodrigo Oliva; Proscurshim, Igor; Nunes dos Santos, Rafael Miyashiro; Kiss, Desiderio; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Cecconello, Ivan

    2008-07-15

    Background: The optimal interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgery in the treatment of patients with distal rectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether this interval has an impact on survival. Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent surgery after CRT were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a sustained complete clinical response (cCR) 1 year after CRT were excluded from this study. Clinical and pathologic characteristics and overall and disease-free survival were compared between patients undergoing surgery 12 weeks or less from CRT and patients undergoing surgery longer than 12 weeks from CRT completion and between patients with a surgery delay caused by a suspected cCR and those with a delay for other reasons. Results: Two hundred fifty patients underwent surgery, and 48.4% had CRT-to-surgery intervals of 12 weeks or less. There were no statistical differences in overall survival (86% vs. 81.6%) or disease-free survival rates (56.5% and 58.9%) between patients according to interval ({<=}12 vs. >12 weeks). Patients with intervals of 12 weeks or less had significantly higher rates of Stage III disease (34% vs. 20%; p = 0.009). The delay in surgery was caused by a suspected cCR in 23 patients (interval, 48 {+-} 10.3 weeks). Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates for this subset were 84.9% and 51.6%, not significantly different compared with the remaining group (84%; p = 0.96 and 57.8%; p = 0.76, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in surgery for the evaluation of tumor response after neoadjuvant CRT is safe and does not negatively affect survival. These results support the hypothesis that shorter intervals may interrupt ongoing tumor necrosis.

  10. Residual Tumor After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Outside the Radiation Therapy Target Volume: A New Prognostic Factor for Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet; Mul, Veronique; Dam, Go van; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 63 esophageal cancer patients treated with neo-CRT. GTV and CTV borders were demarcated in situ during surgery on the esophagus, using anatomical reference points to provide accurate information regarding tumor location at pathologic evaluation. To identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), a Cox regression analysis was performed. Results: After resection, macroscopic residual tumor was found outside the GTV in 7 patients (11%). Microscopic residual tumor was located outside the CTV in 9 patients (14%). The median follow-up was 15.6 months. With multivariate analysis, only microscopic tumor outside the CTV (hazard ratio [HR], 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-15.36), and perineural growth (HR, 5.77; 95% CI, 1.27-26.13) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. The 1-year OS was 20% for patients with tumor outside the CTV and 86% for those without (P<.01). For DFS, microscopic tumor outside the CTV (HR, 5.92; 95% CI, 1.89-18.54) and ypN+ (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.33-8.48) were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 1-year DFS was 23% versus 77% for patients with or without tumor outside the CTV (P<.01). Conclusions: Microscopic tumor outside the CTV is associated with markedly worse OS after neo-CRT. This may either stress the importance of accurate tumor delineation or reflect aggressive tumor behavior requiring new adjuvant treatment modalities.

  11. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  12. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuremsky, Jeffrey G.; Tepper, Joel E.; McLeod, Howard L. Phar

    2009-07-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  13. Predictors of Survival in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Pathologic Major Response after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery: The Impact of Chemotherapy Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia-Ying; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Po-Ming; Lin, Mong-Wei; Kuo, Shuenn-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Tumor recurrence is an important problem threatening esophageal cancer patients after surgery, even when they achieve a pathologic major response (pMR) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). The predictors related to overall survival and disease progression for these patients remain elusive. We aimed to identify factors that predict disease progression and overall survival in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients who achieve a pMR after neoadjuvant CCRT followed by surgery. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the factors influencing survival and disease progression after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer patients who had a major response to CCRT, which is defined by complete pathological response or microscopic residual disease without lymph node metastasis. From our study cohort, 285 patients underwent CCRT and subsequent esophagectomy; 171 (60%) of these patients achieved pMR. After excluding patients with lymph node metastases, incomplete clinical data, and adenocarcinomas, we enrolled 117 patients in this study. We found that the CCRT regimen was the only factor that influenced overall survival. The overall survival of the patients receiving taxane-incorporated CCRT was superior to that of patients receiving traditional cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) (P = 0.011). The CCRT regimen can significantly influence the clinical outcome of esophageal SCC patients who achieve pMR after neoadjuvant CCRT and esophagectomy. Incorporation of taxanes into cisplatin-based CCRT may be associated with prolonged survival. PMID:27777949

  14. Self-expanding plastic esophageal stents versus jejunostomy tubes for the maintenance of nutrition during neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in patients with esophageal cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, A A; Glynn, C; Loren, D; Kowalski, T

    2009-01-01

    In patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer, the inability to eat may severely impair nutritional status. We conducted a retrospective study to compare the efficacy of the Polyflex self-expanding silicone stent (PS) versus a jejunostomy tube (JT) for maintaining nutrition during neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in patients with esophageal cancer who were scheduled for resectional surgery. Thirty-six patients were treated either with PS placement (12 patients) or JT placement (24 patients) prior to receiving an 8-week course of chemoradiation therapy. Patients were interviewed weekly until cessation of therapy. Patient data were collected on procedural success and complication rates, nutritional status, and dysphagia scores. PS placement was successful in 11 of 12 patients (92%), and those 11 patients were able to resume oral nutrition. Dysphagia scores improved from a mean of 3 to 1 in the PS group (P < 0.005) but did not change significantly in the JT group. PS were removed endoscopically without complications prior to the esophagectomies. Albumin levels and weight increased significantly in both the PS and JT groups. There were no significant differences between groups in the procedural success rates (PS 92% vs. JT 100%, P = 0.33), complication rates (PS 22% vs. JT 4%, P = 0.11), mean increase in weight (PS 4.4 kg vs. JT 4.2 kg, P = 0.59), and mean increase in serum albumin (PS 0.62 g/dL vs. JT 0.44 g/dL, P = 0.05). PS is a safe and effective alternative to a surgical JT for maintaining nutrition in this subset of patients.

  15. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shan; Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh; Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Using Concurrent S-1 and Irinotecan in Rectal Cancer: Impact on Long-Term Clinical Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Keishi; Sato, Takeo; Ema, Akira; Naito, Masanori; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcomes of patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT) with concurrent S-1 and irinotecan (S-1/irinotecan) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 115 patients with clinical stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Patients received pelvic radiation therapy (45 Gy) plus concurrent oral S-1/irinotecan. The median follow-up was 60 months. Results: Grade 3 adverse effects occurred in 7 patients (6%), and the completion rate of NCRT was 87%. All 115 patients (100%) were able to undergo R0 surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients (24%) had a pathological complete response (ypCR). At 60 months, the local recurrence-free survival was 93%, disease-free survival (DFS) was 79%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. On multivariate analysis with a proportional hazards model, ypN2 was the only independent prognostic factor for DFS (P=.0019) and OS (P=.0064) in the study group as a whole. Multivariate analysis was additionally performed for the subgroup of 106 patients with ypN0/1 disease, who had a DFS rate of 85.3%. Both ypT (P=.0065) and tumor location (P=.003) were independent predictors of DFS. A combination of these factors was very strongly related to high risk of recurrence (P<.0001), which occurred most commonly in the lung. Conclusions: NCRT with concurrent S-1/irinotecan produced high response rates and excellent long-term survival, with acceptable adverse effects in patients with rectal cancer. ypN2 is a strong predictor of dismal outcomes, and a combination of ypT and tumor location can identify high-risk patients among those with ypN0/1 disease.

  17. Tolerability of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With Gemcitabine (GemX), With and Without Prior Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, in Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Catherine; Joseph, Nuradh; Sanderson, Benjamin; Logue, John; Wylie, James; Elliott, Tony; Lyons, Jeanette; Anandadas, Carmel; Choudhury, Ananya

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the tolerability of concurrent chemoradiation therapy with gemcitabine (GemX) in muscle invasive bladder cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (neoGemX) by use of patient- and provider-reported outcomes. Seventy-eight patients were treated with GemX. Thirty-eight received prior neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients were prospectively assessed during treatment and at 6 weeks and 12 months after treatment completion. Radiation therapy was given to a total dose of 52.5 Gy in 20 fractions with weekly concurrent gemcitabine chemotherapy, 100 mg/m(2). Toxicity was assessed by the care provider and by a patient-reported outcome questionnaire collecting scores on the late effects in normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, and analytic scales and was statistically compared at baseline and 12 months, as well as between the neoGemX and GemX groups. The median duration of follow-up was 15.9 months. The radiation therapy completion rate was 95%, and 96% of patients completed at least 3 cycles of gemcitabine. Bowel toxicity of grade 3 or greater was reported in 7 of 38 patients (18%) in the neoGemX group and 5 of 25 (20%) in the GemX group. Three GemX and two neoGemX patients had grade 3 or greater urinary toxicity. Forty-nine patients completed questionnaires and were included in the analysis. Scores on the late effects in normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, and analytic scales showed an expected peak by week 4 of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference between mean scores at baseline and 12 months after treatment completion or between the neoGemX and GemX groups. This study demonstrates that GemX, alone or following NAC, has manageable toxicity and acceptable treatment completion rates. Allowing for small patient numbers and the nonrandomized nature of this study, these results do not suggest any additional toxicity from the use of NAC prior to GemX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  18. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Fidler, Mary Jo; Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J.; Koshy, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  19. Oncologic and Functional Hazards of Obesity Among Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, In J; You, Y Nancy; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Kopetz, Scott; Wolff, Robert A; Crane, Christopher H; Krishnan, Sunil; Minsky, Bruce; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Nguyen, Sa; Chang, George J

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a major health concern and risk factor for colorectal cancer that may also impact cancer treatment and outcomes. Rectal cancer response to chemoradiotherapy (CXRT) is associated with long-term survival and sphincter preservation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on treatment outcomes after neoadjuvant CXRT for rectal cancer. A retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed (1993 to 2010) with cT3-4 or cN+ (by endorectal ultrasound, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging) rectal carcinoma and treated with CXRT and total mesorectal excision was performed. Patients were classified as obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m) or nonobese (body mass index <30 kg/m), and by response to CXRT: complete (pCR) or incomplete (pIR). Associations between obesity, tumor response, and sphincter preservation were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis and survival outcomes by Cox regression. A total of 753 patients met criteria and 28.7% (n=216) patients were obese. Obese and nonobese groups did not differ in age, sex, tumor location, grade, or number of examined lymph nodes. However, obesity was associated with a lower rate of pCR (ORmulti=0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.94; P=0.04) and among mid to low rectal cancer patients, a lower rate of sphincter preservation (ORmulti=0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.99). Among both obese and nonobese patients, CR was associated with more favorable recurrence-free survival than pIR. Considering the increasing obesity prevalence and its association with CXRT response, oncologic outcomes, and sphincter preservation, further study is needed regarding the impact of obesity on neoadjuvant treatment response. Moreover, obesity should be targeted as a modifiable risk factor for adverse outcomes following multimodality treatment for rectal cancer.

  20. Association Between Clinically Staged Node-Negative Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Overall Survival Benefit From Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Emmanuel; Attwood, Kristopher; Du, William; Tuttle, Rebecca; Alnaji, Raed M.; Nurkin, Steven; Malhotra, Usha; Hochwald, Steven N.; Kukar, Moshim

    2017-01-01

    Importance While neoadjuvant chemoradiation for esophageal cancer improves oncologic outcomes for a broad group of patients with locally advanced and/or node-positive tumors, it is less clear which specific subset of patients derives most benefit in terms of overall survival (OS). Objective To determine whether neoadjuvant chemoradiation based on esophageal adenocarcinoma histology has similar oncologic outcomes for patients treated with surgery alone when stratified by clinical nodal status. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective analysis using the American College of Surgeons National Cancer Database from 1998 to 2006. Patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma histology and clinical stage T1bN1-N3 or T2-T4aN−/+M0 were divided into 2 treatment groups: (1) neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery and (2) surgery alone. Subset analysis within each treatment group was performed for clinically node-negative patients (cN−) vs node-positive patients (cN+) in conjunction with pathological nodal status. A propensity score–adjusted analysis, which included patient demographics, comorbidity status, and clinical T stage, was also performed. Main Outcome and measures The primary outcome was 3-year OS. Secondary outcomes included margin status, postoperative length of stay, unplanned readmission rate, and 30-day mortality. Results A total of 1309 patients were identified, of whom 539 received neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery and 770 received surgery alone. Of the 1309 patients, 41.2% (n = 539) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation and 47.2% (n = 618) were cN+. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 73.3 months (interquartile range, 64.1-93.5 months). The 3-year OS was better for neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery compared with surgery alone (49% vs 38%, respectively; P < .001). Stratifying based on clinical nodal status, the propensity score–adjusted OS was significantly better for cN+ patients who received neoadjuvant

  1. Association of statin use with a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Matthew S.; Minsky, Bruce D. . E-mail: minskyb@mskcc.org; Saltz, Leonard B.; Riedel, Elyn; Chessin, David B.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To assess whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, might enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 358 patients with clinically resectable, nonmetastatic rectal cancer underwent surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for either locally advanced tumors or low-lying tumors that would require abdominoperineal resection. We excluded 9 patients for radiation therapy dose <45 Gy or if statin use was unknown, leaving 349 evaluable patients. Median radiation therapy dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy), and 308 patients (88%) received 5-flurouracil-based chemotherapy. Medication use, comorbid illnesses, clinical stage as assessed by digital rectal examination and ultrasound, and type of chemotherapy were analyzed for associations with pathologic complete response (pCR), defined as no microscopic evidence of tumor. Fisher's exact test was used for categoric variables, Mantel-Haenszel test for ordered categoric variables, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-three patients (9%) used a statin, with no differences in clinical stage according to digital rectal examination or ultrasound compared with the other 324 patients. At the time of surgery, 23 nonstatin patients (7%) were found to have metastatic disease, compared with 0% for statin patients. The unadjusted pCR rates with and without statin use were 30% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.10). Variables significant univariately at the p = 0.15 level were entered into a multivariate model, as were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which were strongly associated with statin use. The odds ratio for statin use on pCR was 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-12.1; p = 0.003) after adjusting for NSAID use, clinical stage, and type of chemotherapy. Conclusion: In multivariate analysis, statin use is associated with an improved p

  2. Laparoscopic TME associated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation towards aggressive colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Cui, Dian-Sheng; Xiong, Zhi-Guo; Wei, Shao-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the clinical synchronization of the neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NC) and the laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) in the treatment of locally aggressive colorectal cancer (LACC). 92 LACC patients were selected for the research, among who 46 cases, who were performed the synchronized NC, were divided into the treatment group, after having rest for 4-6 weeks after the treatment, the 40 patients of the treatment group, who were performed the laparoscopic surgery, formed the laparoscopy group. The rest 46 patients were divided into the control group, who were performed the conventional treatment. The intraoperative conditions, postoperative recoveries, postoperative complications and recurrence rates of the two groups were compared. The stage-declining rate of the treatment group was 67.3%, and the surgical resection rate, anal preservation rate and postoperative complications were 86.9%, 69.6% and 26%, respectively, which were significantly higher than the control group; while the long-term recurrence rate significantly decreased to 21.7%, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The NC could effectively achieve the stage-declining purpose against the LACC, improve the resection rate and reduce the postoperative recurrence rate.

  3. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  4. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hoetker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Dueber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p {<=} 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM {<=} 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p {<=} 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  5. Endosonographic radial tumor thickness after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy to predict response and survival in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer: a prospective multicenter phase ll study by the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK 75/02).

    PubMed

    Jost, Christian; Binek, Janek; Schuller, Jan C; Bauerfeind, Peter; Metzger, Urs; Werth, Baseli; Knuchel, Juerg; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Bertschinger, Philipp; Brauchli, Peter; Meyenberger, Christa; Ruhstaller, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    EUS response assessment in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is limited by disintegration of the involved anatomic structures. Predictive and prognostic values of a prospectively defined maximum tumor thickness (MTT). Prospective open-label phase ll study (SAKK 75/02). Multicenter, nationwide. Of 66 patients with primary CRT, 56 underwent en bloc esophagectomy. EUS-measured MTT before and 2-5 weeks after CRT (yMTT). Cutoffs: (1) absolute thickness (yMTT) after CRT < or = 6 mm; (2) relative reduction compared with baseline (ratio yMTT/MTT) < or = 50%. Correlation between EUS measurements and histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG) and overall survival (OS). Sixteen of 56 patients were not included for EUS evaluation (10 severe stenosis, 5 MTT not measured, 1 intolerance to second EUS). Characteristics (n = 40) were as follow: median age, 60 years; squamous cell carcinoma, 42%; and adenocarcinoma (AC), 58%. Initial stage was: 10 T2N1, 3 T3N0, 26 T3N1, 1 T3Nx; 14 of 23 AC Siewert type 1. Wilcoxon rank sum test showed significant correlation of TRG1 with yMTT < or = 6 mm (P = .008) and yMTT/MTT < or = 50% (P = .003). The effect of yMTT on TRG1 was significant (P = .0193; odds ratio, 0.687 [95% CI, 0.502-0.941]). The predefined cutoff of < or = 6 mm for yMTT was predictive for TRG1 (P = .0037; Fisher exact test). After a median follow-up of 28.6 months, there was a clear trend for benefit in OS with yMTT < or = 6 mm and yMTT/MTT < or = 50%. Small sample size. In a multicenter setting, MTT measured by EUS after CRT was highly predictive for response and showed a clear trend for predicting survival. Copyright 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  7. Expandable polyester silicon-covered stent for malignant esophageal strictures before neoadjuvant chemoradiation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ali A; Loren, David; Dudnick, Robert; Kowalski, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Patients with resectable esophageal cancer often require placement of a surgical jejunostomy tube prior to receiving chemoradiation so as to maintain adequate nutrition due to their inability to swallow and eat. This study reports a single institutional experience with the Polyflex self-expanding silicone stent (Riisch; Kernen. Germany) in patients with malignant stenosis receiving chemoradiation prior to esophagectomy. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized study of 6 patients who underwent Polyflex esophageal stent placement across a malignant stricture prior to receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The study assessed procedural success, restoration of oral nutrition, migration, and removal of the Polyflex stent. The outcomes measured were the efficacy of treatment, stent-related complications, and changes in the nutritional status of the patient after stent placement. Stent placement was successful in 5 of 6 patients (83%). Restoration of oral nutrition after stent placement occurred in 5 of 5 patients (100%). Migration of the stent into the stomach occurred in 3 patients (60%) without occurrence of gastric outlet obstruction; there was no proximal migration. Stents were successfully removed endoscopically or at the time of esophagectomy. This early experience suggests that the removable silicone Polyflex stent is an effective alternative to a surgical jejunostomy tube for the management of malignant esophageal stenosis in patients for whom neoadjuvant chemoradiation is planned prior to esophagectomy.

  8. Does Extending the Waiting Time of Low-Rectal Cancer Surgery after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Increase the Perioperative Complications?

    PubMed Central

    Timudom, Kittinut; Phothong, Natthawut; Akaraviputh, Thawatchai; Chinswangwatanakul, Vitoon; Pongpaibul, Ananya; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ithimakin, Suthinee

    2016-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, rectal cancer surgery is recommended 6 to 8 weeks after completing neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Extending the waiting time may increase the tumor response rate. However, the perioperative complication rate may increase. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between extending the waiting time of surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and perioperative outcomes. Methods. Sixty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection at Siriraj hospital between June 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data and perioperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results. The two groups were comparable in term of demographic parameters. The mean time interval from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery was 6.4 weeks in Group A and 11.7 weeks in Group B. The perioperative outcomes were not significantly different between Groups A and B. Pathologic examination showed a significantly higher rate of circumferential margin positivity in Group A than in Group B (30% versus 9.3%, resp.; P = 0.04). Conclusions. Extending the waiting to >8 weeks from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to surgery did not increase perioperative complications, whereas the rate of circumferential margin positivity decreased. PMID:27738430

  9. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    before surgical resection. In contrast, the data in favour of NACT before radiation or chemoradiation (CRT) is inconclusive, despite the suggestion that response to induction chemotherapy can predict response to subsequent radiotherapy. The observation that spectacular responses to chemotherapy before radical radiotherapy did not result in improved survival, was noted 25 years ago. However, multiple trials in head and neck cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer and cervical cancer do not support the routine use of NACT either as an alternative, or as additional benefit to CRT. The addition of NACT does not appear to enhance local control over concurrent CRT or radiotherapy alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy before CRT or radiation should be used with caution, and only in the context of clinical trials. The evidence base suggests that concurrent CRT with early positioning of radiotherapy appears the best option for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and in all disease sites where radiation is the primary local therapy. PMID:16465172

  10. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Paulus, Rebecca; Mitchell, Edith; Hanna, Nader; Yuen, Albert; Nichols, Romaine; Yalavarthi, Salochna; Hayostek, Cherie; Willett, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  11. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Surgery for Locally Advanced Gallbladder Cancers: A New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Reena; Goel, Mahesh; Chopra, Supriya; Patil, Prachi; Purandare, Nilendu; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Ph, Reena; Bal, Munita; Shrikhande, Shailesh; Shrivastava, S K; Mehta, S

    2016-09-01

    Locally advanced (T3/T4) gallbladder cancers with large fixed portal nodes have a dismal prognosis. If undertaken, surgery entails extensive resections with high morbidity; therefore, in many centers, patients are offered palliative chemotherapy. In this prospective study, we used neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with the intention of downstaging and facilitating R0 resection of these tumors. Twenty-eight patients with locally advanced carcinoma gallbladder (stage III, having deep liver infiltrations and/or large portal nodes) underwent prior positron emission tomography/computed tomography to rule out metastatic disease. All were treated with concomitant chemoradiation using helical tomotherapy (dose of 57 Gy over 25 fractions to the gross tumor and 45 Gy over 25 fractions to the surrounding nodes) with injectable gemcitabine (300 mg/m(2)/week × 5 weeks). Of the 28 patients, 25 (89 %) successfully completed planned chemoradiation and 20 (71 %) achieved partial or complete radiologic response. Eighteen (64 %) patients were surgically explored, of whom 14 (56 %) achieved R0 resection. At the median follow-up of 37 months for the surviving patients, the median overall survival (OS) was 20 months for all patients. Only one patient recurred in the common bile duct postsurgery, whereas six patients had distant metastasis. The 5-year OS was 24 % for all patients and 47 % for patients with R0 resection. Biliary leak was seen in 6 (43 %) patients, of whom two required interventions. Locally advanced unresectable cancers may benefit from neoadjuvant chemoradiation to facilitate a curative resection with a good survival.

  12. Hybrid minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiation yields excellent long-term survival outcomes with minimal morbidity.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Crockard, Jane C; Clary-Macy, Carolyn; Zoon-Besselink, Clara T; Jones, Kirk; Korn, Wolfgang Michael; Ko, Andrew H; Gottschalk, Alexander R; Rogers, Stanley J; Jablons, David M

    2016-12-01

    There is a clear survival benefit to neoadjuvant chemoradiation prior to esophagectomy for patients with stages II-III esophageal cancer. A minimally invasive esophagectomy approach may decrease morbidity but is more challenging in a previously radiated field and therefore patients who undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation may experience more postoperative complications. A prospective database of all esophageal cancer patients who underwent attempted hybrid minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy was maintained between 2006 and 2015. The clinical characteristics, neoadjuvant treatments, perioperative complications, and survival outcomes were reviewed. Overall 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0.8% (1/131) and 2.3% (3/131), respectively. The majority of patients 58% (76/131) underwent induction treatment without significant adverse impact on mortality, major complications, or hospital stay. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 85.9%, 65.3%, and 53.9%. Five-year survival by pathologic stage was stage I 68.9%, stage II 54.0%, and stage III 29.6%. The hybrid minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy approach results in low perioperative morbidity and mortality and is well tolerated after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Good long-term overall survival rates likely resulted from combined concurrent neoadjuvant chemoradiation in the majority of patients, which did not impact the ability to safely perform the operation or postoperative complications rates. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:838-847. © 2016 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Neoadjuvant treatment for advanced esophageal cancer: response assessment before surgery and how to predict response to chemoradiation before starting treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Arnulf H.; Schmidt, Matthias; Warnecke-Eberz, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Patients with advanced esophageal cancer (T3-4, N) have a poor prognosis. Chemoradiation or chemotherapy before esophagectomy with adequate lymphadenectomy is the standard treatment for patients with resectable advanced esophageal carcinoma. However, only patients with major histopathologic response (regression to less than 10% of the primary tumor) after preoperative treatment will have a prognostic benefit of preoperative chemoradiation. Using current therapy regimens about 40% to 50% of the patients show major histopathological response. The remaining cohort does not benefit from this neoadjuvant approach but might benefit from earlier surgical resection. Therefore, it is an aim to develop tools for response prediction before starting the treatment and for early response assessment identifying responders. The current review discusses the different imaging techniques and the most recent studies about molecular markers for early response prediction. The results show that [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has a good sensitivity but the specificity is not robust enough for routine clinical use. Newer positron emission tomography detector technology, the combination of FDG-PET with computed tomography, additional evaluation criteria and standardization of evaluation may improve the predictive value. There exist a great number of retrospective studies using molecular markers for prediction of response. Until now the clinical use is missing. But the results of first prospective studies are promising. A future perspective may be the combination of imaging technics and special molecular markers for individualized therapy. Another aspect is the response assessment after finishing neoadjuvant treatment protocol. The different clinical methods are discussed. The results show that until now no non-invasive method is valid enough to assess complete histopathological response. PMID:26157318

  14. Complete Response after Treatment with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation with Prolonged Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pompa, Tiffany A.; Jeurkar, Chetan; Li, Hui; Soundararajan, Suganthi; Poli, Jaganmohan; Styler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Surgery is the only chance for cure in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) suggests chemotherapy and consideration for radiation in cases of unresectable LAPC. Here we present a rare case of unresectable LAPC with a complete histopathological response after chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. A 54-year-old female presented to our clinic in December 2013 with complaints of abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. An MRI demonstrated a mass in the pancreatic body measuring 6.2 × 3.2 cm; biopsy revealed proven ductal adenocarcinoma. Due to splenic vein/artery and contiguous celiac artery encasement, she was deemed surgically unresectable. She was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy (three cycles), intensity modulated radiation to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions concurrent with capecitabine, followed by FOLFIRI, and finally XELIRI. After 8 cycles of ongoing XELIRI completed in March 2015, restaging showed a remarkable decrease in tumor size, along with PET-CT revealing no FDG-avid uptake. She was reevaluated by surgery and taken for definitive resection. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated a complete R0 resection and no residual tumor. Based on this patient and literature review, this strategy demonstrates potential efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with prolonged chemotherapy, followed by surgery, which may improve outcomes in patients deemed previously unresectable. PMID:28373919

  15. Neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy and drug development.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Patricia; Kluetz, Paul G

    2015-11-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer initially was limited to patients with locally advanced breast cancer in which downstaging was necessary. Now, neoadjuvant trials have become an increasingly common way to facilitate the rapid assessment of new cancer therapies. The appeal of neoadjuvant trials is that they provide the opportunity to study translational science, tumor biomarkers, and intermediate endpoints in response to systemic therapy within a shortened period. This review summarizes the data that contribute to our understanding of the association between pathological complete response and long-term outcomes, describes the implications of drug development and accelerated approval in neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer, and provides a perspective on future neoadjuvant drug development.

  16. Focal adhesion kinase: predictor of tumour response and risk factor for recurrence after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha; Fernández-Aceñero, Maria Jesús; Borrero-Palacios, Aurea; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Martínez-Useros, Javier; Marín-Arango, Juan Pablo; Caramés, Cristina; Vega-Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Remírez, María; Cruz-Ramos, Marlid; Manzarbeitia, Félix; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Rectal cancer represents about 30% of colorectal cancers, being around 50% locally advanced at presentation. Chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard of care for these locally advanced stages. However, it is not free of adverse effects and toxicity and the complete pathologic response rate is between 10% and 30%. This makes it extremely important to define factors that can predict response to this therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression has been correlated with worse prognosis in several tumours and its possible involvement in cancer radio- and chemosensitivity has been suggested; however, its role in rectal cancer has not been analysed yet. To analyse the association of FAK expression with tumour response to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. This study includes 73 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving standard neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Focal adhesion kinase protein levels were immunohistochemically analysed in the pre-treatment biopsies of these patients and correlated with tumour response to CRT and patients survival. Low FAK expression was significantly correlated with local and distant recurrence (P = 0.013). Low FAK expression was found to be a predictive marker of tumour response to neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.007) and patients whose tumours did not express FAK showed a strong association with lower disease-free survival (P = 0.01). Focal adhesion kinase expression predicts neoadjuvant CRT response in rectal cancer patients and it is a clinically relevant risk factor for local and distant recurrence. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  17. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  18. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Valerie H.; Camille, Nadia; Miles, Brett A.; Teng, Marita S.; Genden, Eric M.; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Invasion of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) into surrounding structures can lead to morbid procedures such as laryngectomy and tracheal resection. In these patients, there is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy. Methods. We identified three studies involving the treatment of DTC with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: two from Slovenia and one from Japan. Results. These studies demonstrate that in selected situations, neoadjuvant chemotherapy can have a good response and allow for a more complete surgical resection, the treatment of DTC. Additionally, the SELECT trial shows that the targeted therapy lenvatinib is effective in the treatment of DTC and could be useful as neoadjuvant therapy for this disease due to its short time to response. Pazopanib has also demonstrated promise in phase II data. Conclusions. Thus, chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting could possibly be useful for managing advanced DTC. Additionally, some of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) hold promise for use in the neoadjuvant setting in DTC. PMID:27747102

  19. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancers: is histology the key in patient selection?

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Nitin; Vallam, Karthik; Engineer, Reena; Ostwal, Vikas; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, there is no clarity regarding the necessity for restaging scans to rule out systemic progression of disease post chemoradiation with existing literature being divided on the need for the same. Methods Data from a prospectively maintained database was retrospectively analysed. All locally advanced rectal cancers (node positive/T4/T3 with threatened or involved CRM) were included. Biopsy proof of adenocarcinoma and CT scan of abdomen and chest were mandatory. Grade of tumor and response to CTRT on restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were documented. Results Out of 119 patients subjected to CTRT, 72 underwent definitive total mesorectal excision while 13 patients progressed locoregionally on restaging MR pelvis and 15 other patients progressed systemically while the rest defaulted. Patients with poorly differentiated (PD) cancers were compared to those with well/moderately differentiated (WMD) tumors. PD tumors had a significantly higher rate of local progression (32.1% vs. 5.6% %, P=0.0011) and systemic progression (35.7% vs. 6.9%, P=0.0008) as compared to WMD tumors. Only one-third (9/28) of PD patients underwent TME while the rest progressed. Conclusions Selecting poorly differentiated tumors alone for restaging CECT abdomen and thorax will be a cost effective strategy as the rate of progression is very high. Also patients with PD tumors need to be consulted about the high probability of progression of disease. PMID:27284467

  20. Predictive Factors of Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Farnault, Bertrand; de Chaisemartin, Cecile; Esterni, Benjamin; Lelong, Bernard; Viret, Frederic; Giovannini, Marc; Monges, Genevieve; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Bories, Erwan; Turrini, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Salem, Naji

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to correlate tumor response to survival and to identify predictive factors for tumor response after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, 168 patients with histologically proven locally advanced adenocarcinoma treated by preoperative chemoradiation before total mesorectal excision were retrospectively studied. They received a radiation dose of 45 Gy with a concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. Analysis of tumor response was based on lowering of the T stage between pretreatment endorectal ultrasound and pathologic specimens. Overall and progression-free survival rates were correlated with tumor response. Tumor response was analyzed with predictive factors. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. Five-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were, of 44.4% and 74.5% in the whole population, 83.4% and 83.4%, respectively, in patients with pathological complete response, 38.6% and 71.9%, respectively, in patients with tumor downstaging, and 29.1and 58.9% respectively, in patients with absence of response. A pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of <5 ng/ml was significantly independently associated with pathologic complete tumor response (p = 0.019). Pretreatment small tumor size (p = 0.04), pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml (p = 0.008), and chemotherapy with capecitabine (vs. 5-FU) (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with tumor downstaging. Conclusions: Downstaging and complete response after CRT improved progression-free survival and overall survival of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, a pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml was associated with complete tumor response. Thus, small tumor size, a pretreatment CEA level of < 5ng/ml, and use of capecitabine were associated with tumor downstaging.

  1. The impact of metabolic syndrome on outcome and response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brandon J; Wahlquist, Amy E; Hill, Elizabeth G; Marshall, David T; Kimchi, Eric T; Staveley O'Carroll, Kevin F; Camp, E Ramsay

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors shown to increase the risk of developing various malignancies, as well as diminish tumor response to conventional therapies. The effects of MetS and its individual components on therapeutic response and treatment-related outcomes were examined in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Data was retrospectively collected on LARC patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) and surgery. Medical records were reviewed for patient characteristics, staging, treatment plan, and outcomes. One hundred two patients were included in the study. Patients with HTN had a significantly decreased nCRT response and were four times more likely to experience a poor response to treatment compared to patients without HTN. Additionally, HTN was found to significantly increase the rate of surgical complications. Neither DM nor obesity exhibited any significant effect on therapeutic response or complication rates, either individually or in combination with another risk factor. This study demonstrates the importance of considering underlying MetS risk factors, especially HTN, when predicting tumor response in LARC patients undergoing nCRT followed by radical surgery. The results provide support for an increased focus on pre-treatment risk factor control to optimize cancer therapy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum CA 19-9 as a Marker of Resectability and Survival in Patients with Potentially Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.; Wolff, Robert A.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Pisters, Peter W. T.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Abdalla, Eddie K.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Wang, Huamin; Crane, Christopher H.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Tamm, Eric P.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Evans, Douglas B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The role of carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 in the evaluation of patients with resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy prior to planned surgical resection is unknown. We evaluated CA 19-9 as a marker of therapeutic response, completion of therapy, and survival in patients enrolled on two recently reported clinical trials. Patients and Methods We analyzed patients with radiographically resectable adenocarcinoma of the head/uncinate process treated on two phase II trials of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Patients without evidence of disease progression following chemoradiation underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). CA 19-9 was evaluated in patients with a normal bilirubin level. Results We enrolled 174 patients, and 119 (68%) completed all therapy including PD. Pretreatment CA 19-9 <37 U/ml had a positive predictive value (PPV) for completing PD of 86% but a negative predictive value (NPV) of 33%. Among patients without evidence of disease at last follow-up, the highest pretreatment CA 19-9 was 1,125 U/ml. Restaging CA 19-9 <61 U/ml had a PPV of 93% and a NPV of 28% for completing PD among resectable patients. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve of pretreatment and restaging CA 19-9 levels for completing PD was 0.59 and 0.74, respectively. We identified no association between change in CA 19-9 and histopathologic response (P = 0.74). Conclusions Although the PPV of CA 19-9 for completing neoadjuvant therapy and undergoing PD was high, its clinical utility was compromised by a low NPV. Decision-making for patients with resectable PC should remain based on clinical assessment and radiographic staging. PMID:20162463

  3. How reliable is immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiation?

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Boltin, Doron; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Welinsky, Sara; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Levi, Zohar

    2014-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) is currently being used primarily in colorectal cancer resection specimens. We aimed to compare the results of IHC staining performed on biopsy specimens obtained at endoscopy with that performed on surgical specimens after neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty-two rectal cancer subjects had paired preneoadjuvant and postneoadjuvant tissue available for IHC staining (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2), whereas 39 rectosigmoid cancer patients who did not receive neoadjuvant treatment served as controls. Each slide received a qualitative (absent, focal, and strong) and quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]). The quantitative scores of MMRP from the operative material were significantly lower in the neoadjuvant group than in the control (P < .05 for all).The scores of all MMRP from endoscopic biopsies were not significantly different between the neoadjuvant and the control groups. Disagreement between the endoscopic biopsy and the operative material was evident in 23 of 128 stains (18.5%) in the neoadjuvant group and in 12 of 156 stains (7.7%) in the control group (P = .009). In the neoadjuvant group, a disagreement pattern of "endoscopic strong operative focal" was observed in 28.1% for PMS2, 12.5% for MSH6, 12.5% for MLH1, and 6.3% for MSH2, and in the control group, this same disagreement pattern was found in 12.8% for PMS2, 7.7% for MSH6, 7.7% for MLH1, and 0% for MSH2. Based on our findings, we suggest that for rectal cancer, the endoscopic material rather than the operative material should serve as the primary material for IHC staining.

  4. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by orthotopic liver transplantation in cholangiocarcinomas: the emory experience

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Jerome C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a bile duct tumor with a grim prognosis. The median survival after radiotherapy of unresectable disease is 9-12 months. The following is a review of our experience with neoadjuvant (NEO) chemoradiation followed by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for CCA. Methods Ten patients with CCAs were selected as candidates for NEO-OLT between 2008-2011. Patients with unresectable CCA above the cystic duct without intra or extrahepatic metastases were eligible. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients were included due to their poor resection response. Patients initially received external-beam radiation [via conventional fields or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] plus capecitabine (XEL) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by either Iridium192 (Ir192) brachytherapy high dose rate (HDR) or external boost. 5-FU or XEL was administered until OLT. Patients underwent periodic surveillance computed tomography (CT)/MRIs after OLT. Primary endpoints included actuarial rates (AR)/crude rates (CR) of overall survival (OS), and local control (LC) at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Five males and five females were identified. Mean age was 58.3 years (range, 38-71 years). Mean composite radiation dose delivered was 59.0 Gy (range, 54-71.4 Gy). Forty percent of patients had an HDR boost. Fifty percent of patients received XEL during NEO. Two patients were excluded from the analysis as they did not go on to OLT due to metastases (n=1) and death due to GI bleed (n=1). Thirty-eight percent of the OLT patients had a pathological complete response (pCR) after NEO, while 25% required a Whipple due to positive margins. Median follow-up for the OLT group was 23 months (range, 6.5-37 months). Six, twelve, and twenty-four months LC AR was 100%. LC CR was 100% at longest interval (30 months). Six, twelve, and twenty-four months OS AR was 100%, 87.5%, and 87.5%, respectively. Mean OS AR was 30.2 months (95% CI: 22.8-37.7). OS CR was 75% at longest

  5. Pre-treatment high-resolution rectal MRI and treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, George J.; You, Y. Nancy; Park, In Ja; Kaur, Harmeet; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Ernst, Randy D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of rectal MRI evaluation of patients with rectal cancer for primary tumor staging and for identification for poor prognostic features is increasing. MR imaging permits precise delineation of tumor anatomy and assessment of mesorectal tumor penetration and radial margin risk. Objective To evaluate the ability of pre-treatment rectal MRI to classify tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Design Retrospective, consecutive cohort study, central review. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Patients 62 consecutive patients with locally advanced (stage cII-cIII)rectal cancer who underwent rectal cancer protocol high resolution MRI prior to surgery(12/09-3/11). Main Outcome Measures Probability of good (ypT0-2N0) vs. poor (≥ypT3N0) response as a function of mesorectal tumor depth, lymph node status, extramural vascular invasion, and grade assessed by uni- and multi-variate logistic regression. Results Tumor response was good in 25, 40.3% and poor in 37, 59.7%.Median interval from MRI to OP was 7.9weeks (IQR: 7.0–9.0). MRI tumor depth was <1 mm in 10 (16.9%), 1–5 mm in 30 (50.8%), and >5 mm in 21(33.9%). LN status was positive in 40 (61.5%) and vascular invasion was present in 16 (25.8%). Tumor response was associated with MRI tumor depth (P=0.001), MRI lymph nodes status (P=<0.001)and vascular invasion (P=0.009). Multivariate regression indicated >5mm MRI tumor depth (OR=0.08, 95% CI=0.01–0.93, p=0.04) and MRI LN positivity (OR=0.12, 95% CI=0.03–0.53, p=0.005) were less likely to achieve a good response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Limitations Uncertain generalizability in centers with limited experience with MRI staging for rectal cancer. Conclusion MRI assessment of tumor depth and lymph node status in rectal cancer is associated to tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. These factors should therefore be considered for stratification of patients for novel treatment strategies reliant on pathologic response to treatment or for

  6. Mucinous adenocarcinoma of perianal region: an uncommon disease treated with neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelam; Dutta, Vibha; Bisht, Niharika; Pandya, Tejas

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the perianal region is an oncologic rarity posing a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for treating oncologists due to very few reported cases without definite therapeutic guidelines. It accounts for 2% to 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies and are historically known to arise from chronic anal fistulas and ischiorectal or perianal abscesses. We hereby report a sporadic and interesting case of perianal mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old male initially treated with alternative medicines and local surgery for recurrent fistula in ano of 2 years duration. He presented with complaints of discharging growth in perianal region, painful defecation associated with occasional blood mixed stools of 6 months duration. Incisional biopsy from the ulcer revealed mucinous adenocarcinoma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan and whole body positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed a localized perianal growth which was further confirmed with colonoscopy. With no pre-set treatment protocol for this rare entity, he was managed with neo-adjuvant concurrent chemo-radiation (CCRT) followed by abdominoperineal resection (APR) and adjuvant chemotherapy. Presently he is on 3 monthly follow-up since last 1 year post APR and adjuvant chemotherapy without any evidence of recurrence or distant metastasis. To the best of knowledge, our report may be one of the rarest cases of this disease entity where the duration of anal fistula was merely 2 years in contrast to the established criteria that the fistula precedes carcinoma by at least 10 years. PMID:28138619

  7. Mucinous adenocarcinoma of perianal region: an uncommon disease treated with neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Abhishek; Sharma, Neelam; Dutta, Vibha; Bisht, Niharika; Pandya, Tejas

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the perianal region is an oncologic rarity posing a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for treating oncologists due to very few reported cases without definite therapeutic guidelines. It accounts for 2% to 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies and are historically known to arise from chronic anal fistulas and ischiorectal or perianal abscesses. We hereby report a sporadic and interesting case of perianal mucinous adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old male initially treated with alternative medicines and local surgery for recurrent fistula in ano of 2 years duration. He presented with complaints of discharging growth in perianal region, painful defecation associated with occasional blood mixed stools of 6 months duration. Incisional biopsy from the ulcer revealed mucinous adenocarcinoma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan and whole body positron emission tomography (PET) scan showed a localized perianal growth which was further confirmed with colonoscopy. With no pre-set treatment protocol for this rare entity, he was managed with neo-adjuvant concurrent chemo-radiation (CCRT) followed by abdominoperineal resection (APR) and adjuvant chemotherapy. Presently he is on 3 monthly follow-up since last 1 year post APR and adjuvant chemotherapy without any evidence of recurrence or distant metastasis. To the best of knowledge, our report may be one of the rarest cases of this disease entity where the duration of anal fistula was merely 2 years in contrast to the established criteria that the fistula precedes carcinoma by at least 10 years.

  8. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-01-01

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:28272347

  9. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-03-07

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer.

  10. Value of percent change in tumoral volume measured at T2 -weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI to identify responders after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Ricciardi, Maria Chiara; Ulcigrai, Veronica; Angileri, Roberta; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the percent change in tumoral volume measured at T2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2 WMRI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) as a method to identify responders after chemo- and radiation therapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Forty-five consecutive patients (mean age ± SD: 72 years ± 9.7; male/female = 24/21) with locally advanced rectal carcinoma underwent CRT followed by surgery. Each patient underwent T2 WMRI and DWI at 1.5T before and 6 weeks after the completion of CRT. The percent change in tumoral volume before and 6 weeks after CRT was compared in patients classified as responders and nonresponders according to rectal cancer regression grade. Twenty-five patients were classified as responders with either partial (n = 20) or complete response (n = 5), while 20 patients were classified as nonresponders due to stable disease (n = 18) or disease progression (n = 2). Responders vs. nonresponders differed in the percent change of tumoral volume at T2 WMRI (-67% ± 26% vs. -29% ± 26%; P < 0.05) and DWI images (-72% ± 24% vs. -33% ± 28%; P < 0.05) with a cutoff ≤ -70% for T2 WMRI (sensitivity = 69%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 48-85%; specificity = 100%, 95% CI 81-100%) and ≤66% for DWI (sensitivity = 73%, 95% CI: 52-88%; specificity = 100%, 95% CI 81-100%). The percent change in tumoral volume at T2 WMRI and DWI images can differentiate responders from nonresponders in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant CRT. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1415-1424. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  12. Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the rectum: a poor candidate for neo-adjuvant chemoradiation?

    PubMed

    Simha, Vijai; Kapoor, Rakesh; Gupta, Rajesh; Bahl, Amit; Nada, Ritambhara

    2014-08-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) is a distinct pathological entity associated with poor outcome. Due to different biological behavior, the response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiation (NACRT) may be inferior compared to non-mucinous tumours. In this study we compare the pathological response of mucinous tumours after NACRT. A total of 183 patients who underwent NACRT for rectal cancer were classified as mucinous and non-MAs. The dose of radiation was 45 Gy (at 1.8 Gy per fraction) delivered over five weeks with weekly 5-flourouracil (5-FU) (325 mg/m(2)) and leucovorin (20 mg/m(2)). After surgery, the pathological specimens were evaluated and staged. The data are reported as descriptive statistics and chi-square test used to determine difference in proportions. The two varieties were comparable on the basis of the computed tomography (CT) scan in terms of tumour size and lymph node metastasis. However in terms of pathological response, it was seen that there was a higher incidence of pT4 tumours (73.5% vs. 10.7%), margin positivity (11.7% vs. 2.3%) and advanced nodal disease pN2 (29.4% vs. 9.3%) in mucinous and non-mucinous tumours respectively. MA of the rectum show a poor response to NACRT as seen in terms of larger residual tumours, higher incidence of margin positivity, and greater residual nodal disease. Also they showed higher incidence of peritoneal and distant dissemination during NACRT. The role of NACRT in mucinous carcinoma of the rectum is of questionable benefit and needs to be examined in prospective trials.

  13. Evaluating Mesorectal Lymph Nodes in Rectal Cancer Before and After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Using Thin-Section T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Dow-Mu Chau, Ian; Tait, Diana; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Brown, Gina

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To apply thin-section T2-weighted magnetic resoance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the number, size, distribution, and morphology of benign and malignant mesorectal lymph nodes before and after chemoradiation treatment compared with histopathologic findings. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with poor-risk adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were evaluated prospectively. Thin-section T2-weighted MR images obtained before and after chemoradiation treatment were independently reviewed in consensus by 2 expert radiologists to determine the tumor stage, nodal size, nodal distribution, and nodal stage. Total mesorectal excision surgery after chemoradiation allowed MR nodal stage to be compared with histopathology using {kappa} statistics. Nodal downstaging was compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Before chemoradiation, 152 mesorectal nodes were visible (mean, 6.2 mm; 100 benign, 52 malignant) and 4 of 52 malignant nodes were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. The nodal staging was 7/25 N0, 10/25 N1, and 7/25 N2. After chemoradiation, only 29 nodes (mean, 4.1 mm; 24 benign, 5 malignant) were visible, and none were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. Nodal downstaging was observed: 20/25 N0 and 5/25 N1 (p < 0.01, Chi-square test). There was good agreement between MRI and pathologic T-staging ({kappa} = 0.64) and N-staging ({kappa} = 0.65) after chemoradiation. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation treatment resulted in a decrease in size and number of malignant- and benign-appearing mesorectal nodes on MRI. Nodal downstaging and nodal regression from the mesorectal fascia were observed after treatment. MRI is a useful tool for assessing nodal response to neoadjuvant treatment.

  14. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  15. Anastomotic leak rate after low anterior resection for rectal cancer after chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Benjamin R; Harris, Lisa J; Maxwell, Pinckney J; Isenberg, Gerald A; Goldstein, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Anastomotic leak may be the most concerning complication after colorectal anastomosis. To compare open with laparoscopic rectal resection, we must have accurate leak rates in patients who have received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy to serve as a benchmark for comparison. All patients who had preoperative chemoradiation therapy with rectal resection and low pelvic anastomosis for cancer in a single colorectal practice over a 7-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had proximal diversion and a contrast enema study before stoma reversal. Eighty-seven consecutive patients were included in the study. Average age was 58 years. Fifty-nine per cent of patients were male. Sixty-six per cent were smokers. Pathologic T stage was 5 per cent T0, 16 per cent T1, 28 per cent T2, 47 per cent T3, and 5 per cent T4. Seventy-five per cent of patients were pathologically lymph node-negative. Average time to stoma reversal was 122 days. Total anastomotic leak rate was 10.3 per cent (8% clinical leaks). Five (56%) patients with leak successfully underwent reversal of their diverting stoma (average time to reversal, 290 days). Patients who had the complication of anastomotic leakage had less likelihood of stoma reversal and a significantly prolonged time to stoma reversal.

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin and Bevacizumab Followed by Concomitant Chemoradiation and Surgical Resection in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with High Risk of Recurrence - A Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; Piringer, Gudrun; DE Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Samonigg, Hellmut; Sölkner, Lidija; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate feasibility and safety of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab followed by concomitant standard chemoradiation and surgical resection in patients with high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined high-risk cT3/4 rectal cancer patients were treated with 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily days 1-14, 22-35, 43-56), oxaliplatin (130 mg/sqm on days 1, 22, 43) and bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg on days 1, 22, 43) followed by capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) twice daily on radiotherapy days week 1-4) concomitantly with radiotherapy (1.8 Gy daily up to 45 Gy in 5 weeks) and surgical resection by total mesorectal excision. Feasibility, safety, response rate and postoperative morbidity were evaluated. Twenty-five patients were recruited. Median age was 62 years (range=24-78 years) and all patients had Eastern Cooperation Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0. From all patients, 79.2% finished neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty patients underwent surgery. Pathologic complete remission rate, R0 resection and T-downstaging were achieved in 25%, 95% and 54.2% of the "intention to treat" (ITT) patients. The most common grade 3 adverse events (AEs) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy were diarrhea (16.6%) and mucositis (12.5%). In one patient, a grade 4 acute renal failure occurred (4.2%). During chemoradiation, skin reactions (5.3%) were the most common grade 3 AEs. Two major perioperative complications required re-intervention. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin followed by concomitant standard chemoradiation is feasible in patients with high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and resulted in complete pathologic remission (pCR) rate of 25% and neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion rate of 80%. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy first, followed by chemoradiation and then surgery, in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cercek, Andrea; Goodman, Karyn A; Hajj, Carla; Weisberger, Emily; Segal, Neil H; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L; Stadler, Zsofia K; Wu, Abraham J; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Guillem, Jose G; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Saltz, Leonard B

    2014-04-01

    Standard therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. At Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) the authors began offering FOLFOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) as initial treatment for patients with high-risk LARC to target micrometastases while treating the primary tumor. The purpose of this study is to report the safety and efficacy of initial FOLFOX given before chemoradiotherapy on tumor downsizing and pathologic complete response (pathCR) in LARC. The records of patients with stage II/III rectal cancer treated at MSKCC between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. Of approximately 300 patients with LARC treated at MSKCC, 61 received FOLFOX as initial therapy. Of these 61 patients, 57 received induction FOLFOX (median 7 cycles) followed by chemoradiation, and 4 experienced an excellent response, declined chemoradiation, and underwent total mesorectal excision (TME). Twelve of the 61 patients did not undergo TME: 9 had a complete clinical response (CCR), 1 declined despite persistent tumor, 1 declined because of comorbidities, and 1 developed metastatic disease. Among the 61 patients receiving initial FOLFOX, 22 (36%) had either a pathCR (n=13) or a CCR (n=9). Of the 49 patients who underwent TME, all had R0 resections and 23 (47%) had tumor response greater than 90%, including 13 (27%) who experienced a pathCR. Of the 28 patients who received all 8 cycles of FOLFOX, 8 experienced a pathCR (29%) and 3 a CCR (11%). No serious adverse events occurred that required a delay in treatment during FOLFOX or chemoradiation. FOLFOX and chemoradiation before planned TME results in tumor regression, a high rate of delivery of planned therapy, and a substantial rate of pathCRs, and offers a good platform for nonoperative management in select patients.

  18. (Neo)adjuvant systemic therapy for melanoma.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, M C T; van den Eertwegh, A J; Haanen, J B; Wouters, M W J M

    2017-03-01

    Surgery still is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with stage II and III melanoma, but despite great efforts to gain or preserve locoregional control with excision of the primary tumour, satellites, intransits, sentinel node biopsy and lymphadenectomy, surgery alone does not seem to improve survival any further. Prognosis for patients with high risk melanoma remains poor with 5-year survival rates of 40 to 80%. Only interferon-2b has been approved as adjuvant therapy since 1995, but clinical integration is low considering the high risk-benefit ratio. In recent years systemic targeted- and immunotherapy have proven to be beneficial in advanced melanoma and could be a promising strategy for (neo)adjuvant treatment of patients with resectable high risk melanomas as well. Randomised, placebo- controlled phase III trials on adjuvant systemic targeted- and immunotherapy are currently being performed using new agents like ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, vemurafenib and dabrafenib plus trametinib. In this article we review the literature on currently known adjuvant therapies and currently ongoing trials of (neo)adjuvant therapies in high risk melanomas.

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy and risk of bronchopleural fistula after lung cancer surgery: a systematic meta-analysis of 14 912 patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangjiang; Fan, Jun; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Ren, Yutao; Shen, Cheng; Che, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy has been extensively analyzed in studies addressing the risk factors of bronchopleural fistula, but their results vary hugely. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to determine the association between neoadjuvant therapy and risk of bronchopleural fistula in patients undergoing lung cancer surgery. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to identify the full-text literatures that met our eligibility criteria. Odds ratio with 95% confidence interval served as the summarized statistics. Heterogeneity within this meta-analysis was evaluated by Q-test and I (2) statistic. Sensitivity analysis was performed for further assessments of robustness. Publication bias was detected by Begg's test and Egger's test. Thirty studies enrolling 14 912 lung cancer cases were included into this meta-analysis. The incidence of bronchopleural fistula was 2.4% (354/14 912) in the large scale. Overall, neoadjuvant therapy significantly increased the risk of bronchopleural fistula after pulmonary resections (odds ratio: 2.166; 95% confidence interval: 1.398-3.357; P = 0.001). In subgroup analysis, neoadjuvant radiotherapy (odds ratio: 3.914; 95% confidence interval: 1.401-10.935; P = 0.009) and chemo-radiation (odds ratio: 2.533; 95% confidence interval: 1.353-4.741; P = 0.004) were significantly associated with the bronchopleural fistula risk but neoadjuvant chemotherapy was not (odds ratio: 1.857; 95% confidence interval: 0.881-3.911; P = 0.104). The impact of neoadjuvant therapy on bronchopleural fistula occurrence remains statistically prominent in the other subgroups. Neoadjuvant therapy is significantly associated with the occurrence of bronchopleural fistula after lung cancer surgery. Both neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemo-radiation significantly increase the bronchopleural fistula risk but neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not. Some limitations still exist in this meta-analysis. The updated high-quality studies can help to further confirm and enrich our discoveries in

  20. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEM) Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Outcomes of Salvage Resection for Local Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Perez, Rodrigo Oliva; Habr-Gama, Angelita; São Julião, Guilherme Pagin; Proscurshim, Igor; Fernandez, Laura Melina; de Azevedo, Rafael Ulysses; Vailati, Bruna B; Fernandes, Felipe Alexandre; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) has been considered an alternative for selected patients with rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Immediate total mesorectal completion for all patients with unfavorable pathological features would result in unnecessary protectomies in a significant proportion of patients. Instead, salvage total mesorectal excision (TME) could be restricted for patients developing local recurrence. The aim of the present study is to determine oncological outcomes of salvage resection for local recurrences following CRT and TEM. Consecutive patients undergoing TEM following neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer were reviewed. Patients with "near" complete response to CRT (≤3 cm; ycT1-2N0) were offered TEM. Salvage surgery was attempted in the event of a local recurrence. A total of 53 patients were managed by CRT followed by TEM. Unfavorable pathological features were present in 36 patients (68 %). None of the patients underwent immediate completion TME. There were 12 patients who developed local recurrence resulting in a 2-year local recurrence-free survival of 77 % (95 % CI, 53-100 %). Of these patients, 9 developed exclusively local recurrences, and all had at least 1 unfavorable pathological feature in the specimen after TEM (100 %). Eight patients (8 of 9) underwent salvage resection (abdominoperineal resection [APR] in 87 %) with CRM+ in 7 of 8 patients (87 %). Four patients developed local re-recurrence after a median 36 months of follow-up. The 2-year local re-recurrence free survival was 60 %. Salvage resection for local recurrence following CRT and TEM is associated with high rates of R1 resection (CRM+) and local re-recurrence. Immediate completion of TME should be considered for patients with unfavorable pathological features after TEM.

  1. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Best MRI predictors of complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sathyakumar, Kirthi; Chandramohan, Anuradha; Masih, Dipti; Jesudasan, Mark Ranjan; Pulimood, Anna; Eapen, Anu

    2016-01-01

    To identify the MRI parameters which best predict complete response (CR) to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and to assess their diagnostic performance. This was a prospective study of pre- and post-CRT MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of 64 patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and subsequent surgery. Histopathological tumour regression grade was the reference standard. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify the best MRI predictors of CR to neoadjuvant CRT, and their diagnostic performance was assessed. The study cohort comprised 48 males and 16 females (n = 64), with mean age of 49.48 ± 14.3 years, range of 23-74 years. 11 patients had pathological complete response. The following factors predicted CR on univariate analysis: low initial (pre-CRT) tumour volume on T2 weighted high-resolution (HR) images and DWI, tumour volume-reduction rate (TVRR) of >95% on DWI and CR on post-CRT DWI (ydwiT0) as assessed by the radiologist. However, the best MRI predictors of CR on multivariate regression analysis were CR on post-CRT DWI (ydwiT0) as assessed by the radiologist and TVRR of >95% on DWI, and these parameters had an area under the curve (95% confidence interval) of 0.881 (0.74-1.0) and 0.843 (0.7-0.98), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value, negative-predictive value and accuracy of DWI in predicting CR was 81.8%, 94.3%, 75%, 96.1% and 76%; the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TVRR of >95% as a predictor of CR was 80%, 84.1% and 64.1%, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant. The interobserver agreement was substantial for ydwiT0. Visual assessment of CR on post-CRT DWI and TVRR of >95% on DWI were the best predictors of CR after neoadjuvant CRT in patients with LARC, and the former being more practical can be used in daily practice. In rectal cancer, ydwiT0 as assessed by the radiologist

  3. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation With Paclitaxel/Carboplatin for Selected Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Trimodality Phase II Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Thomas; Friedel, Godehard; Steger, Volker; Spengler, Werner; Eschmann, Susanne M.; Bamberg, Michael; Budach, Wilfried

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a Phase II trial conducted August 1998 through January 2001, the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and definitive surgery in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), Stages IIIA bulky and selected Stage IIIB. Patients and Methods: Staging of LA-NSCLC included computed tomography of cranium, thorax, and abdomen, whole-body positron emission tomography, and video mediastinoscopy. Induction chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was followed by hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy (45 Gy) with simultaneous weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin. Four to six weeks after completion of induction therapy, restaging and resection of primary tumor and lymph nodes was intended. Results: A total of 59 consecutive patients were enrolled, 25% with Stage IIIA bulky disease, 65% with Stage IIIB, and 10% with Stage IV (excluded from further analysis). Forty-one patients completed induction therapy; in 52.4% a functional (positron emission tomography) downstaging was proven. Thirty-two patients (59.3%) underwent complete tumor resection, and 5 patients had an exploratory thoracotomy only. Histopathologic downstaging was proven in 59.4% and complete response in 21.9%. Hospital mortality was 5.4%. Median duration of follow-up for living patients was 62.1 months. Overall median survival was 22.6 months, 58.2 months for completely resected patients. During induction chemotherapy, Grade 3/4 granulocytopenia occurred in 8% of patients; the most common Grade 3/4 toxicity of chemoradiation was esophagitis, in 26.4% of patients. Conclusions: Induction paclitaxel/carboplatin with hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiotherapy followed by complete tumor resection demonstrates high efficacy in LA-NSCLC and offers a promising chance of long-term survival.

  4. TU-G-BRA-06: PET-Based Treatment Response Assessement for Neoadjuvent Chemoradiation for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dalah, E; Tai, A; Oshima, K; Hall, W; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To address the limitations of the conventional response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), and validate PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST1.0). We analyze the relationship between the pathological treatment response (PTR) and PERCIST1.0 for patients treated with neoadjuvent chemoradiation (nCR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods: The pre- and post-nCR CT and PET data for a total of 8 patients with resectable, or borderline resectable pancreatic head adenocarcinoma treated with nCR were retrospectively analyzed. These data were compared with the PTR which were graded according to tumor cell destruction (cellularity), with Grade1, 2 or 3 (G1, G2 or G3) for good, moderate, and poor responses, respectively. RECIST-based PET (RECISTPET), and PERCIST1.0 were defined using lean body mass normalized SUV (nSUVlb). RECIST-based CT (RECISTCT) was defined by contouring the whole pancreas head (CTPH). Pre- and post-nSUVlb and SUVbw, PERCIST 1.0, were correlated with PTR using Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Results: The average mean and SD in nSUVlb for all 8 patients analyzed were lower in post-nCR (1.35±0.34) compared to those at pre-nCR (1.38±0.20). Using PERCIST1.0, 5/8 patients showed stable metabolic disease (SMD), 2/8 partial metabolic response (PMR), and 1/8 progressive metabolic disease (PMD). Using RECISTPET 4/8 showed stable disease (STD), 4/8 partial response (PR), whereas 8/8 showed stable disease (STD) using RECISTCT. PTR were correlated with PERCIST1.0 (R=0.3780/P=0.6071). Pathological tumor size was correlated with RECISTCT (R=0.0727/P=0.8679), and RECISTPET, R=−0.3333/P=0.3798. Conclusion: Chemoradiation treatment response assessment based on metabolic tumor activities using PRECIST1.0 and RECISTPET appears to provide better agreement with pathological assessment as compared to the conventional CT-based assessment using RECISTCT. The integration of these additional radiographic metrics in assessing treatment

  5. The changes of tumour vascular endothelial growth factor expression after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Josef; Sitorova, Veronika; Sirak, Igor; Voboril, Rene; Melichar, Bohuslav; Richter, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study The aim was to examine the effects of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on VEGF expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Materials and methods A total of 53 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were retrospectively studied. Neoadjuvant treatment comprised external beam radiation (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) with continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil. Four to 6 weeks after the chemoradiotherapy, the patients underwent surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess VEGF expression in the pretreatment biopsies and in resected specimens. Results Resection with microscopic residual tumour (R1) was performed in two patients while in the remaining 51 patients radical resection with microscopically negative margins (R0) was possible. Downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy was observed in 34 patients (64%). After chemoradiotherapy 24 patients (45%) had decreased VEGF expression, in 20 patients (38%) there was no change, and in two patients it was not possible to assess the dynamics of VEGF expression due to pathologic complete response after chemoradiotherapy. The five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 56% (95% CI: 43–70%). Although the median OS was 2.5 times shorter in patients who experienced decreased VEGF expression during therapy, this difference did not reach statistical significance. VEGF expression was not significant in Cox regression analysis or log-rank test. VEGF expression decreased after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in most patients with rectal adenocarcinoma examined. This decrease was associated with a trend of inferior prognosis. Conclusions VEGF expression decreased after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in most patients examined. This decrease was associated with a trend of inferior prognosis. PMID:28435398

  6. Does Delaying Surgical Resection After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Impact Clinical Outcomes in Locally Advanced Rectal Adenocarcinoma? A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong; Wuthrick, Evan; Chablani, Priyanka; Robinson, Andrew; Simmons, Luke; Wu, Christina; Arnold, Mark; Harzman, Alan E.; Husain, Syed; Schmidt, Carl; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chakravarti, Arnab; Williams, Terence M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Surgical resection for locally-advanced rectal adenocarcinoma commonly occurs 6–10 weeks after completion of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT). We sought to determine the optimal timing of surgery related to the pathological complete response (pCR) rate and survival endpoints. Methods Retrospective analysis of 92 patients treated with nCRT followed by surgery from 2004 – 2011 at our institution. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to assess the impact of timing of surgery on local regional control (LRC), distant failure (DF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results Time-to-surgery was ≤8 wks (group A) in 72% (median 6.1 weeks) and >8 weeks (group B) in 28% (median 8.9 weeks) of patients. No significant differences in patient characteristics, LRC, or pCR rates were noted between groups. Univariate analysis revealed that group B had significantly shorter time to DF (group B median 33 months; group A median not reached, p=0.047) and shorter OS compared to group A (group B median 52 months; group A median not reached, p=0.03). Multivariate analysis revealed that increased time-to-surgery showed a significant increase in DF (HR 2.96, p=0.02) and trends towards worse OS (HR 2.81, p=0.108) and DFS (HR 2.08, p=0.098). Conclusions We found that delaying surgical resection longer than 8 weeks after nCRT was associated with an increased risk of DF. This study, in combination with a recent larger study, question the recent trend in promoting surgical delay beyond the traditional 6–10 weeks. Larger, prospective databases or randomized studies may better clarify surgical timing following nCRT in rectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26535992

  7. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  8. Novel Neoadjuvant Therapy Paradigms for Bladder Cancer: Results from the National Cancer Center Institute Forum

    PubMed Central

    Dinney, Colin P.N.; Hansel, Donna; McConkey, David; Shipley, William; Hagan, Michael; Dreicer, Robert; Lerner, Seth; Czerniak, Bogdan; Waldman, Fred; Groshen, Susan; True, Lawrence D.; Petricoin, Emanuel; Theodorescu, Dan; Hruszkewycz, Andrew; Bajorin, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Although bladder cancer (BC) is a significant health threat to the US population, integrated clinical and laboratory investigations of this disease lag behind those of other types of cancer. Advances in BC are especially challenged due in part to a general decreased level of funding over the past 5 years. It is ironic that despite the awareness that BC is the 5th most commonly diagnosed solid malignancy in the United States, and one of the most costly to treat, funding for this organ site lags far behind that of other less common malignancies. Moreover, BC offers several unique opportunities for translational research that make it an ideal candidate for investigation. One distinct advantage over other solid tumor sites is that urine and tissue are readily available for translational studies that can direct the development of novel therapy for this disease. The NCI sponsored “Novel Neoadjuvant Therapy for Bladder Cancer” forum held in brought leading clinical and laboratory-based scientists together with the advocacy community to lay the groundwork for collaborative discovery and translation. The goal of the meeting was to bridge the gaps in translational science and develop the concepts for two novel biomarker-driven clinical trials, one in the neoadjuvant presurgical setting and the other in the setting of bladder preservation with chemoradiation. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to launch a collective effort to establish molecular-based therapy for UC. Herein, we summarize the proceedings of this meeting, and the future plans resulting from this forum. PMID:25443274

  9. Selective Changes in the Immune Profile of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes After Different Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Regimens for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results: Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup high} regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1{sup +}Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4{sup +}Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Conclusions: Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  10. Is it safe to omit neoadjuvant chemo-radiation in mucinous rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Madbouly, Khaled M; Mashhour, Abdrabou N; Omar, Waleed

    2015-11-01

    Purpose was to compare the oncologic outcome of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCXRT) versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy (pCXRT) for locally advanced mucinous rectal carcinoma (MRC) having curative total mesorectal excision (TME). One hundred and two patients with MRC (T3-4 and/or N1-2) of middle and lower third rectum were included. Patients were non-randomly divided into 2 groups: Group A (N = 61) had nCXRT followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) after 8-11 weeks and Group B (N = 41) had TME followed by pCXRT. Primary end points were disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were tumor regression grade (TRG) and morbidity. In group A, 29 patients had partial response after nCXRT, 26 patients showed no change and 6 patients had progression. TME was done in 55 patients in group A and 41 patients in group B. Six patients in group A turned to be unresectable after nCXRT due to progressive disease. Mean follow-up was 53 months. In patients received TME, Four-year DFS was higher in group A compared to group B yet not statistically significant (DFS 0.69 [95% CI 0.54-0.85] vs. 0.67 [95% CI 0.47-0.87]; P = 0.39). However, actuarial 4 years OS was comparable in both groups (0.72 [95% CI 0.59-0.91] vs. 0.70 [95% CI 0.55-0.88]; P = 0.46 in groups A and B respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that age <40, and N2 were risk factors of recurrence. Whilst accepting that the numbers are small, there was no statistical difference in outcome (DFS and OS) between patients receiving pre- or post-operative chemo-radiotherapy. In most MRC patients, tumor regression is not significant after nCXRT and there is considerable possibility of tumor progression during nCXRT treatment. So, nCXRT should be used with close follow-up in MRC for early detection of possible tumor progression. If the patient cannot tolerate nCXRT, it is possibly safe to do surgery followed by pCXRT. Prospective study is needed to study the value of nCXRT in MRC

  11. Current and future role of neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Untch, Michael; Konecny, Gottfried E; Paepke, Stefan; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2014-10-01

    Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy is a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of locally advanced operable, primarily non-operable or inflammatory breast cancer. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy is an option for breast cancer patients who would require adjuvant chemotherapy otherwise based on clinical and histological examination and imaging. The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy in operable breast cancer is currently increasing because of its advantages that include higher rates of breast conserving surgery and the possibility of measuring early in-vivo response to systemic treatment. The timing of axillary sentinel lymph node diagnosis (i.e. before or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) is critical in that it may influence the likelihood of axillary preservation. It is not yet clear if neoadjuvant therapy might improve outcomes in certain subgroups of breast cancer patients. Neoadjuvant treatment modalities require a close collaboration between oncology professionals, including surgeons, gynecologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists and pathologists. The most important parameter for treatment success and improved overall survival is the achievement of a pathologic complete response (pCR), although the role of pCR in patients with luminal A like tumours might be less informative. Identification of patient subgroups with high pCR rates may allow less invasive surgical or radiological interventions. Patients not achieving a pCR may be candidates for postoperative clinical trials exploring novel systemic treatments.

  12. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  13. Counterpoint: long-course chemoradiation is preferable in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-07-01

    There are 2 approaches to preoperative therapy. Short-course (25 Gy in 5 fractions) radiation and long-course (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) radiation combined with chemotherapy (CMT). Although short-course radiation therapy is used in some European countries, it is not favored in all European countries or North America. Unlike long-course CMT, it cannot be safely combined with adequate doses of systemic concurrent chemotherapy, and, as currently designed, it does not increase sphincter preservation. Long-course CMT remains the preferred regimen for cT3 and/or node-positive disease. With parallel advances in staging, surgery, systemic therapy, and molecular markers, more selective approaches are being investigated.

  14. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohashi, Toshio; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  15. Quantitative CT Variables Enabling Response Prediction in Neoadjuvant Therapy with EGFR-TKIs: Are They Different from Those in Neoadjuvant Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Yun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lee, Kyung Soo; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Kim, Jhingook; Shim, Young Mog; Han, Joungho; Choi, Yoon-La

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose To correlate changes of various CT parameters after the neoadjuvant treatment in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with pathologic responses, focused on their relationship with different therapeutic options, particularly of EGFR-TKI and concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) settings. Materials and Methods We reviewed pre-operative CT images of primary tumors and surgical specimens obtained after neoadjuvant therapy (TKI, n = 23; CCRT, n = 28) from 51 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Serial changes in tumor volume, density, mass, skewness/kurtosis, and size-zone variability/intensity variability) were assessed from CT datasets. The changes in CT parameters were correlated with histopathologic responses, and the relationship between CT variables and histopathologic responses was compared between TKI and CCRT groups. Results Tumor volume, mass, kurtosis, and skewness were significant predictors of pathologic response in CCRT group in univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, kurtosis was found to be independent predictor. In TKI group, intensity variability and size-zone variability were significantly decreased in pathologic responder group. Intensity variability was found to be an independent predictor for pathologic response on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Quantitative CT variables including histogram or texture analysis have potential as a predictive tool for response evaluation, and it may better reflect treatment response than standard response criteria based on size changes. PMID:24586348

  16. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Who Really Benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nipun B; Rymer, Jennifer; Koehler, Elizabeth AS; Ayers, G Daniel; Castellanos, Jason; Kooby, David A; Weber, Sharon H; Cho, Clifford S; Schmidt, C Max; Nakeeb, Atilla; Matos, Jesus M; Scoggins, Charles R; Martin, Robert CG; Kim, Hong Jin; Ahmad, Syed A; Chu, Carrie K; McClaine, Rebecca; Bednarski, Brian K; Staley, Charles A; Sharp, Kenneth; Parikh, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in pancreatic cancer remains controversial. The primary aim of this study was to determine if CRT improved survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer in a large, multiinstitutional cohort of patients. STUDY DESIGN Patients undergoing resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma from seven academic medical institutions were included. Exclusion criteria included patients with T4 or M1 disease, R2 resection margin, preoperative therapy, chemotherapy alone, or if adjuvant therapy status was unknown. RESULTS There were 747 patients included in the initial evaluation. Primary analysis was performed between patients that had surgery alone (n = 374) and those receiving adjuvant CRT (n = 299). Median followup time was 12.2 months and 14.5 months for survivors. Median overall survival for patients receiving adjuvant CRT was significantly longer than for those undergoing operation alone (20.0 months versus 14.5 months, p = 0.001). On subset and multivariate analysis, adjuvant CRT demonstrated a significant survival advantage only among patients who had lymph node (LN)-positive disease (hazard ratio 0.477, 95% CI 0.357 to 0.638) and not for LN-negative patients (hazard ratio 0.810, 95% CI 0.556 to 1.181). Disease-free survival in patients with LN-negative disease who received adjuvant CRT was significantly worse than in patients who had surgery alone (14.5 months versus 18.6 months, p = 0.034). CONCLUSIONS This large multiinstitutional study emphasizes the importance of analyzing subsets of patients with pancreas adenocarcinoma who have LN metastasis. Benefit of adjuvant CRT is seen only in patients with LN-positive disease, regardless of resection margin status. CRT in patients with LN-negative disease may contribute to reduced disease-free survival. PMID:19476845

  17. [Stomach carcinoma. Optimizing therapy by neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy?].

    PubMed

    Rosen, H

    1999-01-01

    Despite the decreasing frequency of gastric cancer in most Western countries prognosis could not be improved by surgery alone in the past. Advanced tumor stage due to late diagnosis is one of the reasons for this observation. Contrary to breast and colorectal cancer, postoperative chemotherapy failed to improve prognosis in gastric cancer. Small number of patients in Western studies, insufficient surgical procedures and the high frequency of locoregional relapse may be attributed for this observation. Intraperitoneal, adjuvant chemotherapy showed a positive impact on survival in Asian studies only, but was also used successfully as a part of a multimodality approach in Western phase II trials. Since neoadjuvant therapy proved to create downstaging of tumor size in some patients with advanced gastric cancer some working groups tried to influence prognosis of potentially resectable tumors by preoperative chemotherapy, surgical resection and postoperative, adjuvant therapy in the recent past. However, the efficacy of this therapeutic approach has to be reconfirmed in a controlled, phase III fashion.

  18. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 {+-} 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 {+-} 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 {+-} 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-{infinity}) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment

  19. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy with Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy for Medium-distal Oesophageal and Gastro-oesophageal Junction Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Cozzi, Luca; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Battista, Serena; Cavina, Raffaele; Clerici, Elena; Comito, Tiziana; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R; De Rose, Fiorenza; Franzese, Ciro; Garassino, Isabella; Romario, Uberto Fumagalli; Navarria, Pierina; Rosati, Riccardo; Spaggiari, Paola; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2015-07-01

    to appraise the role of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy management of advanced medium and distal oesophageal cancer in terms of toxicity and response to treatment. Thirty patients were treated according to the neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery versus surgery-alone trial scheme with VMAT radiation therapy. Patients presented mainly T3-T4 stage (80%) and N1-2 (96.6%) disease. The chemotherapy scheme consisted of 3-5 cycles, while a radiotherapy course of 41.4 Gy in 23 fractions was administered to all patients. The median age of patients was 65 years, and there was a predominance of males (80%), smokers or ex-smokers (90%) and modest alcohol habit (80% negative). Primary tumor localisation was in the medium and distal third of the oesophagus in 57% of the cases, the rest being in the gastro-oesophageal junction. Modest toxicity profiles were observed, with limited incidence of grade 2-3 events. Partial or complete response was observed in more than 90% of the cases (radiological/metabolic) and was confirmed after surgical intervention (67% partial or complete and 27% stable response). Tumor down-staging was recorded in 67% of patients and nodal down-staging in 50%. VMAT was applied in the context of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for the treatment of medium and distal oesophageal carcinoma with satisfactory results in terms of tolerance and toxicity. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. p53 protein overexpression and response to induction chemoradiation therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luna-Perez, P; Arriola, E L; Cuadra, Y; Alvarado, I; Quintero, A

    1998-01-01

    The association between mutations in the p53 gene and prognosis in colorectal cancer remains controversial. This report evaluates the role of p53 protein to predict the response of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. Between January 1993 and December 1994, 26 patients were seen with locally advanced primary rectal adenocarcinoma, located between 0 and 10 cm from the anal verge, demonstrated clinically and by CT scan. Each received 45 Gy of preoperative radiation therapy (RT) concomitantly with bolus infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) (450/mg/m2 on days 1 to 5 and 28 to 33 of RT). Surgery was performed between 4 and 8 weeks later. All the primary tumors were mapped and sliced. The response rate was divided according to the percentage of malignant cells in the rectal wall and perirectal fat. Lymph nodes were studied with the manual or modified clearing technique. p53 mutant status was assessed immunohistochemically from sections of the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pretreatment biopsy and the resected specimen. There were 14 females and 12 males, with a mean age of 54 years. All received the scheduled treatment. An abdominoperineal resection (n = 10), low anterior resection (n = 10), and pelvic exenteration (n = 6) were performed. The stages of tumors were as follows: no residual tumor (n = 4); T2 (n = 6); T3-4 (N = 9); and T3-4, N1,2 (n = 7). Fourteen specimens (54%) had mutated p53, and 10 (71%) had >50% of residual tumor, whereas only two (17%) of the specimens with normal p53 had >50% of residual tumor (P = .018). Eight of the 10 low anterior resections were performed in patients whose specimens expressed normal p53. Our results suggest that the determination of p53 is a factor in predicting tumor response in patients who undergo preoperative chemoradiation therapy for rectal adenocarcinoma.

  1. Anastomotic complications after Ivor Lewis esophagectomy in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation are related to radiation dose to the gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Vande Walle, Caroline; Ceelen, Wim P; Boterberg, Tom; Vande Putte, Dirk; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Varin, Oswald; Pattyn, Piet

    2012-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is increasingly used in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Some studies have suggested that CRT results in increased surgical morbidity. We assessed the influence of CRT on anastomotic complications in a cohort of patients who underwent CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Clinical and pathologic data were collected from all patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT (36 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. On the radiotherapy (RT) planning computed tomography scans, normal tissue volumes were drawn encompassing the proximal esophageal region and the gastric fundus. Within these volumes, dose-volume histograms were analyzed to generate the total dose to 50% of the volume (D(50)). We studied the ability of the D(50) to predict anastomotic complications (leakage, ischemia, or stenosis). Dose limits were derived using receiver operating characteristics analysis. Fifty-four patients were available for analysis. RT resulted in either T or N downstaging in 51% of patients; complete pathologic response was achieved in 11%. In-hospital mortality was 5.4%, and major morbidity occurred in 36% of patients. Anastomotic complications (AC) developed in 7 patients (13%). No significant influence of the D(50) on the proximal esophagus was noted on the anastomotic complication rate. The median D(50) on the gastric fundus, however, was 33 Gy in patients with AC and 18 Gy in patients without AC (p = 0.024). Using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the D(50) limit on the gastric fundus was defined as 29 Gy. In patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, the incidence of AC is related to the RT dose on the gastric fundus but not to the dose received by the proximal esophagus. When planning preoperative RT, efforts should be made to limit the median dose on the gastric fundus to 29 Gy with a V(30) below 40%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anastomotic Complications After Ivor Lewis Esophagectomy in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Are Related to Radiation Dose to the Gastric Fundus

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Walle, Caroline; Ceelen, Wim P.; Boterberg, Tom; Vande Putte, Dirk; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Varin, Oswald; Pattyn, Piet

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is increasingly used in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Some studies have suggested that CRT results in increased surgical morbidity. We assessed the influence of CRT on anastomotic complications in a cohort of patients who underwent CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. Patients and Methods: Clinical and pathologic data were collected from all patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT (36 Gy combined with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. On the radiotherapy (RT) planning computed tomography scans, normal tissue volumes were drawn encompassing the proximal esophageal region and the gastric fundus. Within these volumes, dose-volume histograms were analyzed to generate the total dose to 50% of the volume (D{sub 50}). We studied the ability of the D{sub 50} to predict anastomotic complications (leakage, ischemia, or stenosis). Dose limits were derived using receiver operating characteristics analysis. Results: Fifty-four patients were available for analysis. RT resulted in either T or N downstaging in 51% of patients; complete pathologic response was achieved in 11%. In-hospital mortality was 5.4%, and major morbidity occurred in 36% of patients. Anastomotic complications (AC) developed in 7 patients (13%). No significant influence of the D{sub 50} on the proximal esophagus was noted on the anastomotic complication rate. The median D{sub 50} on the gastric fundus, however, was 33 Gy in patients with AC and 18 Gy in patients without AC (p = 0.024). Using receiver operating characteristics analysis, the D{sub 50} limit on the gastric fundus was defined as 29 Gy. Conclusions: In patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by Ivor Lewis esophagectomy, the incidence of AC is related to the RT dose on the gastric fundus but not to the dose received by the proximal esophagus. When planning preoperative RT, efforts should be made to limit the median dose on the gastric fundus to 29 Gy with a V

  3. Prognostic influence of histopathological regression patterns in rectal adenocarcinoma receiving neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Estrada Muñoz, Lourdes; Sastre Varela, Javier; Corona Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Díaz del Arco, Cristina; García Paredes, Beatriz; Córdoba Largo, Sofía; del Puerto Nevado, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is an important management strategy in rectal carcinoma. Different systems grading response have shown varying prognostic influence. Methods To analyze the prognostic influence of pathological response in a series of 183 patients with rectal carcinoma receiving neoadjuvant therapy. To determine the prognostic significance of the histopathological patterns of response. Results A total of 183 patients from two hospitals. The concordance rate between pathologists was good. In total, 18% of the patients showed grade 0 (complete response), 31.7% grade 1, 19.2% grade 2 and 31.1% grade 3 regression. T down-staging was found in 51.9% of the cases. 46 patients recurred and 18 died of disease (median follow-up time: 39 months). We found a statistically significant association between pathological response and pT stage and down-staging. Inflammatory reaction in the tumor bed was significantly associated to regression and prognosis. Cox’s multivariate analysis of survival revealed that down-staging and presence of mucin pools in the tumor bed behaved as significant predictors of recurrence and regression grade and mucin pools as significant predictors of survival. Conclusions Pathological response is an important surrogate marker of prognosis in some large series, but results are varying. There are many systems to grade regression and this makes it difficult to compare the results by different groups. It is important to report the specific pattern of response, for some of them may have prognostic relevance. We feel there is an urgent need to develop standarized protocols and employ a universal regression scheme if we intend to use this factor to guide therapy. PMID:28280608

  4. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer Patient with Schizophrenia Successfully Treated with Chemoradiation Therapy with S-1 and CDDP].

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Yusuke; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Megumi, Koichi; Urata, Masakazu; Kawagoe, Kousuke; Satake, Souichi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Arigami, Takaaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Baba, Kenji; Ishigami, Sumiya; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man who was hospitalized at a mental hospital because of schizophrenia was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of dysphagia and vomiting. He was found to have advanced cancer in the middle thoracic esophagus. With the cooperation of a radiologist, a psychiatrist, and a nurse, we successfully performed chemoradiation therapy with S-1 and CDDP. The patient had adverse events of esophagitis and anuria during chemoradiation therapy. However, such adverse events were well controlled through the cooperation with a palliative care team and a urologist. Finally, we were able to enforce chemoradiation therapy with S-1 and CDDP without interruption.

  5. Neoadjuvant therapy for potentially resectable pancreatic cancer: an emerging paradigm?

    PubMed

    Brunner, Thomas B

    2013-04-01

    Although neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been tested for more than two decades and can be safely delivered to patients with non-metastatic pancreatic cancer, no randomised trials have been reported until now. Here we provide an overview of the first randomised trial in patients with potentially resectable cancer and of the latest developments in neoadjuvant therapy for this group of patients. It is necessary to continue to perform clinical trials in this field to accurately identify the effect on survival and quality of life in patients with potentially resectable, borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer. Aspects of imaging for restaging and clinical prognostic factors are also discussed given they will be useful instruments for future trials.

  6. Clinical and Molecular Methods in Drug Development: Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy in Breast Cancer as a Model.

    PubMed

    Braga, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NAET), and neoadjuvant targeted therapy (NATT), more recently, have been adopted worldwide as standard of care in locally advanced and inoperable BC. These modalities, collectively called neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST), are also used for organ preservation and for mechanistic biological studies on drug response and resistance, drug development, and clinical trials. Furthermore, the response to NACT is a valuable indicator of long-term survival. In this work, the advantages and pitfalls of using NAST in BC for studying drug response and resistance for drug development and clinical trials are discussed as well as practical points on how to set up a NAST clinical trial in BC.

  7. HIFU as a Neoadjuvant Therapy in Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, P.; Xing, F.; Huang, X.; Zhu, H.; Lo, H. W.; Zhong, X.; Pruitt, S.; Robertson, C.

    2011-09-01

    To broaden the application spectrum of HIFU in cancer therapy, we performed a pilot experiment to evaluate the potential of using HIFU as a neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Mice bearing wild-type B16F10 melanoma inoculated subcutaneously were either untreated (control) or treated by HIFU, CPA-7 or HIFU+CPA-7 before surgical resection of the primary tumor two days after HIFU treatment. The animals were then followed for four weeks or up to the humane endpoint to determine local recurrence, distant metastasis, and survival rate. The results demonstrate that animals treated by HIFU+CPA-7 (which is a small molecule that suppresses STAT3 activity) had a significantly lower recurrence rate, and slower growth of the recurrent tumor, with concomitantly higher survival rate, followed by those treated with CPA-7 and HIFU, respectively. Immunological assays revealed that CPA-7 treatment could significantly lower STAT3, and subsequently, Treg activities. In particular, the combination of HIFU and CPA-7 can induce a much stronger anti-tumor immune response than HIFU or surgery alone, as assessed by CTL and IFN-γ secretion. Overall, our results suggest that HIFU in combination with immunotherapy strategies has the potential to be used as a neoadjuvant therapy to prime the host with a strong anti-tumor immune response before surgical resection of the primary tumor. This multimodality, combinational therapy has the potential to greatly broaden the range of HIFU applications in cancer therapy with lower tumor recurrence and improved survival rate.

  8. Arterio-biliary fistula as rare complication of chemoradiation therapy for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hayano, Koichi; Miura, Fumihiko; Amano, Hodaka; Toyota, Naoyuki; Wada, Keita; Kato, Kenichiro; Takada, Tadahiro; Asano, Takehide

    2010-09-28

    Significant hemobilia due to arterio-biliary fistula is a very rare complication of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Here we report a case of arterio-biliary fistula after CRT for unresectable ICC demonstrated by angiographic examinations. This fistula was successfully treated by endovascular embolization. Hemobilia is a rare complication, but arterio-biliary fistula should be considered after CRT of ICC.

  9. Arterio-biliary fistula as rare complication of chemoradiation therapy for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Koichi; Miura, Fumihiko; Amano, Hodaka; Toyota, Naoyuki; Wada, Keita; Kato, Kenichiro; Takada, Tadahiro; Asano, Takehide

    2010-01-01

    Significant hemobilia due to arterio-biliary fistula is a very rare complication of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Here we report a case of arterio-biliary fistula after CRT for unresectable ICC demonstrated by angiographic examinations. This fistula was successfully treated by endovascular embolization. Hemobilia is a rare complication, but arterio-biliary fistula should be considered after CRT of ICC. PMID:21160700

  10. Surgical Considerations After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Breast Conservation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Thomas A; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Hunt, Kelly K

    2015-05-01

    The increasing use of chemotherapy before surgery has affected a number of local-regional treatment decisions including surgical and radiation management of the breast, management of axillary lymph nodes, and the indications for postmastectomy radiation. In this monograph, we will focus on surgical and radiation management as components of breast conservation therapy. The early randomized trials that compared neoadjuvant to adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer demonstrated that rates of breast conservation can be increased when chemotherapy is sequenced first. This was a direct consequence of high response rates seen with neoadjuvant treatment, which permitted downstaging of a large primary tumor to a volume that permitted breast-conserving surgery. Some initial studies found higher rates of breast recurrences with this approach but over time, with improved multidisciplinary coordination and proper patient selection, rates of breast recurrences have improved to the excellent levels achieved when surgery is performed first. New clinical trials are also ongoing to define the role of sentinel lymph node surgery and regional lymph node radiation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation does not depend on improved radiographic appearance of tumor–vessel relationships

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Raman, Siva P.; Wood, Laura D.; Huang, Peng; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Le, Dung T.; Schulick, Richard; Edil, Barish; Ellsworth, Susannah; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cameron, John L.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neoadjuvant therapy increases rates of margin-negative resection of borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BL-PDAC). Criteria for BL-PDAC resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy (NCRT) have not been clearly defined. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with BL-PDAC who received NCRT from 2007 to 2012 were identified. Computed tomography (CT) scans pre- and post-treatment were centrally reviewed. Results Twenty-nine patients (58 %) underwent resection following NCRT, while 21 (42 %) remained unresected. Patients selected for and successfully undergoing resection were more likely to have better performance status and absence of the following features on pre- and post-treatment CT: superior mesenteric vein/portal vein encasement, superior mesenteric artery involvement, tumor involvement of two or more vessels, and questionable/overt metastases (all p <0.05). Tumor volume and degree of tumor–vessel involvement did not significantly change in both groups after NCRT (all p > 0.05). The median overall survival was 22.9 months in resected versus 13.0 months in unresected patients (p < 0.001). Of patients undergoing resection, 93 % were margin-negative, 72 % were node-negative, and 54 % demonstrated moderate pathologic response to NCRT. Conclusion Apparent radiographic extent of vascular involvement does not change significantly after NCRT. Patients without metastatic disease should be chosen for surgical exploration based on adequate performance status and lack of disease progression. PMID:25755849

  12. Factors influencing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation and outcomes in rectal cancer patients: tertiary Indian cancer hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Reena; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-04-01

    In the treatment of rectal cancers several randomized trials have demonstrated benefits of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) in downstaging as well as survival among these patients. We investigated the patient and tumor related variables dictating the outcomes in these patients. Biopsy proven treatment naive 182 rectal cancer patients underwent NACRT from June 2006 to December 2010. The entire patients received long course conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy with concurrent oral Capecitabine. At 6 weeks from completion of NACRT clinico-radiological assessment was carried out for surgical feasibility. All patients were given postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy either single agent or multi drug regimen depending upon biopsy report. Among 182 patients, 131 (72%) underwent surgery and initial T stage and signet ring cell morphology were major determinant of operability. Among the 131 operated patients at median follow up of 36 months, 94 (72%) are alive and disease free. With a median follow up of 42 months the 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was 60% and 77%. The majority of the failures were distal but with more advanced disease at presentation both local and distal failures were similar. While assessing survival by multivariate analysis patients having positive nodes post-surgery had a significantly poorer DFS (P=0.001), while signet ring cell morphology and pre-treatment carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) levels strongly influenced OS (P=0.03). The outcome of our patients were similar to World Literature and signet ring cell morphology, pre-treatment CEA level, and pathological nodal staging all were influential in determining survival. Besides this, the study also highlights the fact that tumours with signet ring cell morphology appearing in younger population with poor survival needs prospective evaluation for more intense CRT regimen and aggressive surgical resections.

  13. Factors influencing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation and outcomes in rectal cancer patients: tertiary Indian cancer hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background In the treatment of rectal cancers several randomized trials have demonstrated benefits of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) in downstaging as well as survival among these patients. We investigated the patient and tumor related variables dictating the outcomes in these patients. Methods Biopsy proven treatment naive 182 rectal cancer patients underwent NACRT from June 2006 to December 2010. The entire patients received long course conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy with concurrent oral Capecitabine. At 6 weeks from completion of NACRT clinico-radiological assessment was carried out for surgical feasibility. All patients were given postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy either single agent or multi drug regimen depending upon biopsy report. Results Among 182 patients, 131 (72%) underwent surgery and initial T stage and signet ring cell morphology were major determinant of operability. Among the 131 operated patients at median follow up of 36 months, 94 (72%) are alive and disease free. With a median follow up of 42 months the 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was 60% and 77%. The majority of the failures were distal but with more advanced disease at presentation both local and distal failures were similar. While assessing survival by multivariate analysis patients having positive nodes post-surgery had a significantly poorer DFS (P=0.001), while signet ring cell morphology and pre-treatment carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) levels strongly influenced OS (P=0.03). Conclusions The outcome of our patients were similar to World Literature and signet ring cell morphology, pre-treatment CEA level, and pathological nodal staging all were influential in determining survival. Besides this, the study also highlights the fact that tumours with signet ring cell morphology appearing in younger population with poor survival needs prospective evaluation for more intense CRT regimen and aggressive surgical resections. PMID

  14. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  15. Coordinated chemoradiation therapy with genital preservation for the treatment of primary invasive carcinoma of the male urethra.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael S; Triaca, Veronica; Billmeyer, Brian; Hanley, Robert S; Girshovich, Lyubov; Shuster, Todd; Oberfield, Richard A; Zinman, Leonard

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a combined chemoradiation therapy protocol for the primary treatment of primary invasive carcinoma of the male urethra. From January 1991 to December 2006, 18 patients with invasive carcinoma of the male urethra referred to our institution were treated with a chemoradiation therapy protocol, consisting of 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m(2)) on days 1 to 4 and days 29 to 32, and mitomycin-C (10 mg/m(2)) on days 1 and 29 with concurrent external beam radiation therapy (45 to 55 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks) to the genitalia, perineum, and inguinal and external iliac lymph nodes. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to assess overall, disease specific and disease-free survival. The stage and node distribution was T2N0 in 2 patients (11%), T3N0 in 8 (44%), T4N0 in 2 (11%), TXN1 in 1(6%) and TXN2 in 5 (28%). The most prevalent histology was moderately (7 of 18 patients or 39%) or poorly (10 of 18 or 56%) differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (17 of 18 or 95%). Overall 83% (15 of 18) of the patients had a complete response to the primary chemoradiation therapy protocol, and the 5-year overall and disease specific survival rates were 60% and 83%, respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rates after chemoradiation therapy and after chemoradiation therapy with salvage surgery were 54% and 72%, respectively. The 3 nonresponders died of disease after undergoing salvage surgery and 5 of the 15 complete responders (30%) had recurrence. Complex urethral reconstruction was required in 3 of 10 patients (30%) who had prolonged disease-free survival. The chemoradiation therapy protocol is an alternative primary treatment modality for invasive urethral carcinoma. It enables an unprecedented potential for organ preservation.

  16. Neoadjuvant therapy does not affect lymph node ratio in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, K H; Kelly, N P; Duff, G P; Condon, E T; Waldron, D; Coffey, J C

    2016-10-01

    Recently, lymph-node ratio (LNR) has emerged as a prognostic tool in staging rectal cancer. Studies to date have demonstrated threshold values above and below which survival is differentially altered. Neoadjuvant therapy significantly reduces the number of lymph node retrieved. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of neoadjuvant therapy on LNR and its prognostic properties. Consecutive patients who underwent curative rectal cancer resections in a single institution from 2007 to 2010 were reviewed. LNR was stratified into five subgroups of 0, 0.01-0.17, 0.18-0.41, 0.42-0.69 and 0.7-1.0 based on a previous study. The effect of neoadjuvant therapy on lymph node retrieval, LNR, locoregional (LR) and systemic recurrence (SR), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was compared between patients who did (Neoadjuvant) and did not (Surgery Alone) receive neoadjuvant therapy. Neoadjuvant and Surgery Alone groups were comparable in gender, age and tumour stage. The number of lymph nodes retrieved were significantly lower in the Neoadjuvant group (p < 0.01). However, LNR remained similar in both groups (p = 0.36). There was no statistical difference in the DFS and OS between the Neoadjuvant and Surgery Alone groups at the various LNR cut off values in patients with AJCC Stage 3 tumours. LNR ratio remains unaltered despite reduced lymph node retrieval after neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer. LNR may therefore be a more reliable prognostic indicator in this subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  18. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Gastric Cancer: Critically Reviewing the Past and Visualizing the Next Step Forward

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Antoniou, Georgios; Bronte, Giuseppe; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Papamichael, Demetris; Peeters, Marc; Kountourakis, Panteleimon

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Despite the significant advances in surgical treatment and multimodality strategies, prognosis has modestly improved over the last two decades. Locoregional relapse remains one of the main issues and the combined chemoradiation treatment seems to be one of the preferred approaches. However, more than ten years after the hallmark INT-0116 trial, minimal progress has been made both in terms of effectiveness and toxicity. Moreover, new regimens added to combined therapy failed to prove favourable results. Herein, we attempt a thorough literature review comparing pros and cons of all relative studies and potential bias, targeting well-designed future approaches. PMID:26101524

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection: a pooled analysis of 3,313 patients.

    PubMed

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Beets, Geerard L

    2015-07-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorized into three groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios (HR) for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). One thousand seven hundred and twenty three (1723) (52%) of 3,313 included patients received aCT. Eight hundred and ninety eight (898) patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1,302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response, category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. HR for RFS with 95% CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging.

  20. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  1. Do Elderly Patients Experience Increased Perioperative or Postoperative Morbidity or Mortality When Given Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Before Esophagectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon E.; Yu, Anthony; Kubicek, Gregory J.; Scott, Walter; Mitchell, Edith; Rosato, Ernest L.; Berger, Adam C.

    2011-08-01

    Background: The use of induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been widely used for the treatment of esophageal cancer. The presumed risk of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality with this regimen has led to reluctance to offer this therapy to elderly patients. We compared the perioperative morbidity and mortality of patients 70 years old and older with those of patients younger than 70 who received CRT followed by esophagectomy and sought to identify preoperative risk factors that may predict higher risk of postoperative death or complications. Methods and Materials: We identified 260 patients who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy. The association of age with postoperative death and complications was evaluated. The Charlson index, prior cardiac history, and diabetes were identified as preoperative risk factors and were evaluated as potential confounders or effect modifiers. Results: Cardiac disease and the Charlson index were potential modifiers of the effect of age on length of hospital stay (p = 0.08 and p = 0.07, respectively) and postoperative complications (p = 0.1 and p = 0.2) but were not statistically significant. There was a slight nonsignificant decrease in the risk of death in elderly patients after adjustment for the Charlson index (p = 0.2). Conclusion: No significant differences were detected with respect to morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. The presence of cardiac disease, higher scores on the Charlson index, or diabetes did not significantly influence length of stay, postoperative complications, or postoperative death. Given the potential to improve outcomes, this regimen should not be discounted in elderly patients.

  2. [NEOADJUVANT TARGET THERAPY IN A RENAL-CELL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Stakhovskiy, E O; Voylenko, O A; Stakhovskiy, O E; Vitruk, Yu V; Vukalovych, P S; Kononenko, O A

    2015-12-01

    There were observed 30 patients (32 tumors), to whom preoperatively for renal-cell cancer (ROC) a neoadjuvant target therapy (NATTH) was conducted. In 19 (66.7%) of them a pazopanib (800 mg per os once a day through 2 mo) was applied, and in 10 (33.3%)--sunitinib (50 mg per os once a day through 28 days, the gap--14 days, repeated course--28 days). The indications for the NATTH conduction were: in 7 (21.9%) patients--a locally--spread RCC with the objective to localize a tumor and to search a further possibility of radical surgical intervention performance, and in 25 (78.1%)--the tumor reduction and searching possibility of the organpreserving treatment conduction. The NATTH conduction in the patients, suffering RCC, have guaranteed a primary pathological focus reduction in 90% of observations, and a partial regression in accordance to the RECIST criteria--in 28.1%. A tumor reduction by (22.9 ± 17.8)% at average have permitted to perform a renal resection in 75% of observations, concerning localized RCC, when indication of preservation of enough functioning renal parenchyma was secured.

  3. Neoadjuvant therapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a model for rational accelerated drug development.

    PubMed

    Balar, Arjun V; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2015-05-01

    Since the advent of cisplatin-based combination therapy in the management of muscle-invasive and advanced bladder cancer, there has been little progress in improving outcomes for patients. Novel therapies beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy are needed. The neoadjuvant paradigm lends to acquiring ample pretreatment and posttreatment tumor tissue as a standard of care, which enables comprehensive biomarker analyses to better understand mechanisms of both response and resistance, which will aid drug development. This article discusses the evolution of neoadjuvant therapy as standard treatment and the role it may serve toward the development of novel therapies.

  4. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy? A comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of the options for neoadjuvant therapy for treating oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han-Yu; Wang, Wen-Ping; Wang, Yun-Cang; Hu, Wei-Peng; Ni, Peng-Zhi; Lin, Yi-Dan; Chen, Long-Qi

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery is a standard treatment for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. However, the roles of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy in treating oesophageal cancer remain controversial. In this comprehensive meta-analysis, we examine the efficacy of adding radiotherapy to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for treating oesophageal cancer as reported in qualified randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We conducted a systematic literature search using PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library databases, Google Scholar and the American Society of Clinical Oncology database to identify relevant studies up to 31 March 2016. Data including the pathological complete response rate, R0 resection rate and 3-year survival rate were extracted and analysed. Five qualified RCTs were included with a total of 709 patients. Meta-analysis showed that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy significantly increases the rates of pathological complete response and R0 resection in patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, we found a significantly increased 3-year survival rate only in oesophageal SCC patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy compared with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (56.8 and 42.8%, respectively); relative risk (RR): 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.58, P = 0.003]. In oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients, no significant survival benefit of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was found compared with neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone (46.3 and 41.0%, respectively; RR: 1.13, 95% CI 0.88-1.45, P = 0.34). Our meta-analysis adds to the evidence showing that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy should be the standard preoperative treatment strategy for locally advanced oesophageal SCC. For oesophageal adenocarcinoma, neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone may be the best preoperative treatment strategy to avoid the risk of adverse effects of radiotherapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  5. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  6. Improved survival with neoadjuvant therapy and resection for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J R; Hoff, S J; Johnson, D H; Murray, M J; Butler, D R; Elkins, C C; Sharp, K W; Merrill, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to determine the impact of preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy (neoadjuvant therapy) followed by resection in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Long-term survival in patients with carcinoma of the esophagus has been poor. An increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus has been reported recently. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the esophagus treated at this institution from January 1951 through February 1993 were studied. Since 1989, 24 patients were entered prospectively into a multimodality treatment protocol consisting of preoperative cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and leucovorin with or without etoposide, and concomitant mediastinal radiation (30 Gy). Patients were re-evaluated and offered resection. RESULTS: There were no deaths related to neoadjuvant therapy and toxicity was minimal. Before multimodality therapy was used, the operative mortality rate was 19% (3 of 16 patients). With multimodality therapy, there have been no operative deaths (0 of 23 patients). The median survival time in patients treated before multimodality therapy was 8 months and has yet to be reached for those treated with the neoadjuvant regimen (> 26 months, p < 0.0001). The actuarial survival rate at 24 months was 15% before multimodality therapy and 76% with multimodality therapy. No difference in survival was noted in neoadjuvant protocols with or without etoposide (p = 0.827). CONCLUSIONS: Multimodality therapy with preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by resection appears to offer a survival advantage to patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. PMID:8215648

  7. NPTX2 is associated with neoadjuvant therapy response in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Karagkounis, Georgios; Thai, Leo; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Gantt, Gerald A; Duraes, Leonardo; Pai, Rish K; Kalady, Matthew F

    2016-05-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) is recommended for locally advanced rectal cancer. Tumor response varies from pathologic complete response (pCR) to no tumor regression. The mechanisms behind CRT resistance remain undefined. In our previously generated complementary DNA microarrays of pretreatment biopsies from rectal cancer patients, neuronal pentraxin 2 (NPTX2) expression discriminated patients with pCR from those with residual tumor. As tumor response is prognostic for survival, we sought to evaluate the clinical relevance of NPTX2 in rectal cancer. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate NPTX2 messenger RNA expression in individual rectal cancers before CRT. Tumors with NPTX2 expression <50% of normal rectum were defined as NPTX2-low and those with >50% were defined as NPTX2-high. NPTX2 levels were compared to response to therapy and oncologic outcomes using Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square, and Mantel-Cox (log-rank) tests, as appropriate. Rectal cancers from 40 patients were included. The mean patient age was 56.8 years, and 30% were female. pCR was achieved in eight of 40 patients (20%). In these patients, messenger RNA NPTX2 levels were significantly decreased compared to those with residual cancer (fold change 30.4, P = 0.017). Patients with NPTX2-low tumors (n = 13) achieved improved response to treatment (P = 0.012 versus NPXT2-high tumors), with 38.5% and 46.1% of patients achieving complete or moderate response, respectively. Of patients with NPTX2-high tumors (n = 27), 11.1% and 18.5% achieved complete or moderate response, respectively. No recurrence or death was recorded in patients with NPTX2-low tumors, reflecting more favorable disease-free survival (P = 0.045). Decreased NPTX2 expression in rectal adenocarcinomas is associated with improved response to CRT and improved prognosis. Further studies to validate these results and elucidate the biological role of NPTX2 in rectal cancer are needed. Copyright © 2016

  8. Acupuncture for Dysphagia after Chemoradiation Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer: A Case Series Report*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Weidong; Posner, Marshall R.; Wayne, Peter; Rosenthal, David S.; Haddad, Robert I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is a common side effect following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods In this retrospective case series, ten HNC patients were treated with acupuncture for radiation-induced dysphagia and xerostomia. All patients were diagnosed with stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma. Seven of 10 patients were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube-dependent when they began acupuncture. Manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture were used once a week. Results Nine of 10 patients reported various degrees of subjective improvement in swallowing functions, xerostomia, pain and fatigue levels. Six (86%) of 7 PEG tube-dependent patients had their feeding tubes removed after acupuncture, with a median duration of 114 days (range 49–368) post CRT. One typical case is described in detail. Conclusions A relatively short PEG tube duration and reduced symptom severity following CRT were observed in these patients. Formal clinical trials are required to determine the causality of our observations. PMID:20713374

  9. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for resectable breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leal, Frederico; Liutti, Vitor Teixeira; Antunes dos Santos, Vivian Castro; Novis de Figueiredo, Maximiliano Augusto; Macedo, Ligia Traldi; Rinck Junior, José Augusto; Sasse, Andre Deeke

    2015-08-01

    The role of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for resectable breast cancer is not well established, despite encouraging results obtained in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. This systematic review aims to examine existing medical literature on neoadjuvant hormone therapy (HT). Data from prospective, randomized trials was included if comparing neoadjuvant HT versus surgery alone without adjuvant treatment, or neoadjuvant HT versus chemotherapy (CT), or HT plus CT versus CT alone, or HT plus CT versus HT alone, or two distinct HT. Odds Ratios (OR) were calculated from pooled data. Five studies compared HT with tamoxifen versus HT with aromatase inhibitors (AI). A meta-analysis of their results demonstrated superiority of AIs in overall response rate (ORR) (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.17-3.08). Two trials compared HT against CT, and pooled data from them demonstrated a trend favoring CT (OR for ORR 0.75; 95% CI 0.35-1.6). That trend disappeared when only postmenopausal women were considered (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.62-1.63). One trial compared HT plus CT with no neoadjuvant treatment, and obtained an 83% ORR. One trial compared HT plus CT versus CT alone and found a non-significant increase in ORR for adding HT to CT (OR 1.48; 95% CI 0.58-3.77). No trial compared HT plus CT versus HT alone. Neoadjuvant HT is a safe and feasible option, but it cannot be considered equivalent to CT. If neoadjuvant HT is performed, AIs are preferable over tamoxifen due to higher response rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neoadjuvant therapy for localized prostate cancer: Examining mechanism of action and efficacy within the tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lou, David Y.; Fong, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Efforts to improve the clinical outcome for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer have led to the development of neoadjuvant systemic therapies. We review the different modalities of neoadjuvant therapies for localized prostate cancer and highlight emerging treatment approaches including immunotherapy and targeted therapy. Methods We performed a PubMed search of clinical trials evaluating preoperative systemic therapies for treating high-risk prostate cancer published after 2000, and those studies with the highest clinical relevance to current treatment approaches were selected for review. The database at clinicaltrials.gov was queried for neoadjuvant studies in high-risk prostate cancer, and those evaluating novel targeted therapies and immunotherapies are spotlighted here. Results Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become standard of care for treating some malignancies, including breast and bladder cancers. In prostate cancer, preoperative hormonal therapy or chemotherapy has failed to demonstrate improvements in overall survival. Nevertheless, the emergence of novel treatment modalities such as targeted small molecules and immunotherapy has spawned neoadjuvant clinical trials that provide a unique vantage from which to study mechanism of action and biological potency. Tissue-based biomarkers are being developed to elucidate the biological efficacy of these treatments. With targeted therapy, these can include phospho-proteomic signatures of target pathway activation and deactivation. With immunotherapies, including sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab, recruitment of immune cells to the tumor microenvironment can also be used as robust markers of a biological effect. Such studies can provide insight not only into mechanism of action for these therapies but can also provide paths forward to improving clinical efficacy like with rationally designed combinations and dose selection. Conclusions The use of neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy and

  11. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Perez, Rodrigo O; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-11-10

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice.

  12. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  13. Trastuzumab-based neoadjuvant therapy in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Helena R

    2010-06-15

    Overexpression, or gene amplification, of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is evident in 20% to 25% of breast cancers. The biologic agent trastuzumab is an HER2-targeted monoclonal antibody that inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells and induces tumor cell death through multiple mechanisms of action. Currently, trastuzumab is approved for use in the adjuvant and metastatic settings. Trials combining trastuzumab with neoadjuvant chemotherapy suggest that patients with HER2-positive breast cancer also may benefit from preoperative trastuzumab. For this article, the author reviewed efficacy and safety data from key studies of patients who received neoadjuvant trastuzumab-based therapy. Studies were identified from literature searches of publication and congress databases. The results of 3 large phase 3 trials (the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center neoadjuvant trastuzumab trial, the Neoadjuvant Herceptin [NOAH] trial, and the German Breast Group/Gynecologic Oncology Study Group "GeparQuattro" trial) demonstrated that, compared with chemotherapy alone, neoadjuvant trastuzumab plus chemotherapy significantly increased pathologic complete response rates to as high as 65%. Improvements in disease-free, overall, and event-free survival also were reported in the NOAH trial. In addition to demonstrated efficacy, a low incidence of cardiac dysfunction suggests that neoadjuvant trastuzumab is both effective and well tolerated. Similar results have been reported in a range of phase 2 studies using different trastuzumab-based regimens. These encouraging data led the National Comprehensive Cancer Network to recommend treating patients who have operable, locally advanced, HER2-positive breast cancer with neoadjuvant paclitaxel plus trastuzumab followed by 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide plus trastuzumab.

  14. Diffuse optical measurements of head and neck tumor hemodynamics for early prediction of chemoradiation therapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Irwin, Daniel; Chen, Li; Kumar, Sameera; Shang, Yu; Huang, Chong; Johnson, Ellis L.; Stevens, Scott D.; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    This study used a hybrid near-infrared diffuse optical instrument to monitor tumor hemodynamic responses to chemoradiation therapy for early prediction of treatment outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer. Forty-seven patients were measured once per week to evaluate the hemodynamic status of clinically involved cervical lymph nodes as surrogates for the primary tumor response. Patients were classified into two groups: complete response (CR) (n=29) and incomplete response (IR) (n=18). Tumor hemodynamic responses were found to be associated with clinical outcomes (CR/IR), wherein the associations differed depending on human papillomavirus (HPV-16) status. In HPV-16 positive patients, significantly lower levels in tumor oxygenated hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]) at weeks 1 to 3, total hemoglobin concentration at week 3, and blood oxygen saturation (StO2) at week 3 were found in the IR group. In HPV-16 negative patients, significantly higher levels in tumor blood flow index and reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) at week 3 were observed in the IR group. These hemodynamic parameters exhibited significantly high accuracy for early prediction of clinical outcomes, within the first three weeks of therapy, with the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.83 to 0.96.

  15. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  16. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  17. Persistence of senescent prostate cancer cells following prolonged neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blute, Michael L.; Damaschke, Nathan; Wagner, Jennifer; Yang, Bing; Gleave, Martin; Fazli, Ladan; Shi, Fangfang; Abel, E. Jason; Downs, Tracy M.; Huang, Wei; Jarrard, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) commonly leads to incomplete cell death and the fate of persistent cells involves, in part, a senescent phenotype. Senescence is terminal growth arrest in response to cell stress that is characterized by increased lysosomal-β-galactosidase (GLB1) the origin of senescence associated-β-gal activity (SA-β-gal). In the current study senescence is examined in vivo after ADT use in a neoadjuvant trial. Methods and materials Tissue microarrays were generated from prostate cancer specimens (n = 126) from a multicenter neoadjuvant ADT trial. Arrays were subjected to multiplexed immunofluorescent staining for GLB1, Ki67, cleaved caspase 3 (CC3) and E-cadherin. Automated quantitative imaging was performed using Vectra™ and expression correlated with clinicopathologic features. Results Tissue was analyzed from 59 patients treated with neoadjuvant ADT and 67 receiving no therapy preoperatively. Median follow-up was 85.3 mo and median ADT treatment was 5 mo. In PC treated with neoadjuvant ADT, GLB1 expression increased in intermediate Gleason score (GS 6–7; p = 0.001), but not high grade (GS 8–10) cancer. Significantly higher levels of GLB1 were seen in tissues undergoing neoadjuvant ADT longer than 5 months compared to untreated tissues (p = 0.002). In contrast, apoptosis significantly increased earlier (1–4 mo) after ADT treatment (p<0.5). Conclusions Increased GLB1 after neoadjuvant ADT occurs primarily among more clinically favorable intermediate grade cancers and enrichment of the phenotype occurs in a temporally prolonged fashion. Senescence may explain the persistence of PCa cells after ADT. Given concerns for the detrimental longer term presence of senescent cells, targeting these cells for removal may improve outcomes. PMID:28234906

  18. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Liptay, Michael J.; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  19. Phase 3 Trial of Postoperative Chemotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Gastric Cancer Treated With R0 Gastrectomy and D2 Lymph Node Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Methods and Materials: The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Results: Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Conclusions: Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

  20. Phase 3 trial of postoperative chemotherapy alone versus chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-12-01

    To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pneumo-CT assessing response to neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer: Imaging-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Ulla, Marina; Gentile, Ernestina; Yeyati, Ezequiel Levy; Diez, Maria L; Cavadas, Demetrio; Garcia-Monaco, Ricardo D; Ros, Pablo R

    2013-12-15

    Pneumo-computed tomography (PnCT) is a technique primarily developed and used to study stenotic lesions of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction and stomach for pre-surgical planning. It helps to define both upper and lower borders of neoplasms located in the aforementioned areas. It achieves maximum lumen distension with CO2 highlighting thickened areas of the esophageal wall, thus allowing an accurate quantification of their extents. Although there are other alternatives for distension (oral contrast agents, water and effervescent granules), they may be suboptimal. Patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer have a dismal prognosis despite surgical resection. Therefore, neoadjuvant treatment strategies using radiation therapy and chemotherapy were developed to improve survival. Neoadjuvant therapy improves esophageal tumor prognosis in a substantial proportion of patients, and the use of imaging techniques is mandatory to detect their response. PnCT combined with virtual endoscopy and multiplanar reconstruction enhances morphologic details in esophageal cancer, and thus would allow an improved assessment of response to neoadjuvant treatment. Therefore, more information could be provided to assess the efficacy of pre-surgical treatment. We describe the potential use of PnCT to assess the response to neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer with an imaging pathologic correlation.

  2. Pneumo-CT assessing response to neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer: Imaging-pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ulla, Marina; Gentile, Ernestina; Yeyati, Ezequiel Levy; Diez, Maria L; Cavadas, Demetrio; Garcia-Monaco, Ricardo D; Ros, Pablo R

    2013-01-01

    Pneumo-computed tomography (PnCT) is a technique primarily developed and used to study stenotic lesions of the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction and stomach for pre-surgical planning. It helps to define both upper and lower borders of neoplasms located in the aforementioned areas. It achieves maximum lumen distension with CO2 highlighting thickened areas of the esophageal wall, thus allowing an accurate quantification of their extents. Although there are other alternatives for distension (oral contrast agents, water and effervescent granules), they may be suboptimal. Patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer have a dismal prognosis despite surgical resection. Therefore, neoadjuvant treatment strategies using radiation therapy and chemotherapy were developed to improve survival. Neoadjuvant therapy improves esophageal tumor prognosis in a substantial proportion of patients, and the use of imaging techniques is mandatory to detect their response. PnCT combined with virtual endoscopy and multiplanar reconstruction enhances morphologic details in esophageal cancer, and thus would allow an improved assessment of response to neoadjuvant treatment. Therefore, more information could be provided to assess the efficacy of pre-surgical treatment. We describe the potential use of PnCT to assess the response to neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer with an imaging pathologic correlation. PMID:24363830

  3. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in Elderly Patients With Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, David P.; Hsu, Charles C.; Wang Jingya; Makary, Martin A.; Winter, Jordan M.; Robinson, Ray; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients {>=}75 years of age. Methods: The study group of 655 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 12-year period (8/30/1993 to 2/28/2005). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, intraoperative data, pathology data, and patient outcomes were collected and analyzed by adjuvant treatment status and age {>=}75 years. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined clinical predictors of mortality and morbidity. Results: We identified 166 of 655 (25.3%) patients were {>=}75 years of age and 489 of 655 patients (74.7%) were <75 years of age. Forty-nine patients in the elderly group (29.5%) received adjuvant CRT. For elderly patients, node-positive metastases (p = 0.008), poor/anaplastic differentiation (p = 0.012), and undergoing a total pancreatectomy (p = 0.010) predicted poor survival. The 2-year survival for elderly patients receiving adjuvant therapy was improved compared with surgery alone (49.0% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.013); however, 5-year survival was similar (11.7% vs. 19.8%, respectively, p = 0.310). After adjusting for major confounders, adjuvant therapy in elderly patients had a protective effect with respect to 2-year survival (relative risk [RR] 0.58, p = 0.044), but not 5-year survival (RR 0.80, p = 0.258). Among the nonelderly, CRT was significantly associated with 2-year survival (RR 0.60, p < 0.001) and 5-year survival (RR 0.69, p < 0.001), after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: Adjuvant therapy after PD is significantly associated with increased 2-year but not 5-year survival in elderly patients. Additional studies are needed to select which elderly patients are likely to benefit from adjuvant CRT.

  4. Neo-adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma before liver transplantation: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Masato; Aucejo, Federico; Choi, Minsig; Kim, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria is a widely accepted optimal therapy. Neo-adjuvant therapy before transplantation has been used as a bridging therapy to prevent dropout during the waiting period and as a down-staging method for the patient with intermediate HCC to qualify for liver transplantation. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation are the most commonly used method for locoregional therapy. The data associated with newer modalities including drug-eluting beads, radioembolization with Y90, stereotactic radiation therapy and sorafenib will be discussed as a tool for converting advanced HCC to LT candidates. The concept “ablate and wait” has gained the popularity where mandated observation period after neo-adjuvant therapy allows for tumor biology to become apparent, thus has been recommended after down-staging. The role of neo-adjuvant therapy with conjunction of “ablate and wait” in living donor liver transplantation for intermediate stage HCC is also discussed in the paper. PMID:24833861

  5. Timing of events during deglutition after chemoradiation therapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Katherine A; Tanner, Kristine; Kosek, Steven R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if persistent changes in the duration of bolus movement through the pharynx and bolus movement coordination with pharyngeal swallowing gestures occur after treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma with chemoradiation therapy. The timing of bolus movement and coordination with swallowing gestures was evaluated in 30 patients using a modified barium swallowing study at least 1 year after completion of treatment. Patients were recruited irrespective of any swallowing complaints. The mean of each measure from the study subjects was compared to those from a group of age-matched controls. Bolus transit duration in the study population was unchanged compared with normal controls. Unlike normal controls, the patients were found to allow the bolus to arrive in the vallecula before the initiation of swallowing gestures that resulted in a swallow. Earlier opening of the upper esophageal sphincter was found for a 1-cc bolus (p = .004). For the 20 cc bolus size, the onset of hyoid and aryepiglottic fold elevation was delayed (p = .029 and .037, respectively). Gesture timing did not change to accommodate larger bolus sizes, as it normally does, resulting in a delay in airway protection for the 20-cc bolus. Patients are able to move a liquid bolus through the pharynx in a timely manner. However, patients are unable to modify swallowing gestures to safely protect the airway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kordes, Sil; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M.; Vliet, Hans J. van der; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Wilmink, Johanna W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  7. Effects of Treatment Duration During Concomitant Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaverdian, Narek; Gondi, Vinai; Sklenar, Kathryn L.; Dunn, Emily F.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Straub, Margaret R.; Bradley, Kristin A.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether extended treatment duration (TD) impacts in-field relapse and survival in the setting of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 480 consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concomitant CRT for curative intent were retrospectively analyzed. Relapse was defined as in-field with respect to external beam radiation therapy fields. The effects of TD on in-field relapse, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were assessed continuously and categorically within the separate RT and CRT cohorts. Covariates included age, histology, stage, and cumulative dose to point A. In-field relapse, DFS, and OS rates were estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis; comparisons used log–rank statistic. Multivariate analysis used the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: A total of 372 patients (RT n=206, CRT n=166) were evaluable, with a median follow-up for relapse-free patients of 4.2 years (RT 4.4 years, CRT 4.2 years; P=.807). Treatment duration was longer in the RT cohort (median 55 days; range 35-99 days) versus the CRT cohort (median 51 days; range 35-92 days) (P=.001). In the RT cohort, TD ≥62 days trended to significance for predicting inferior DFS (hazard ratio 1.42, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.98, P=.086). However, in the CRT cohort, TD assessed continuously or categorically across multiple cutoff thresholds did not predict for in-field relapse, DFS, or OS. Conclusion: With RT alone, extended TD ≥62 days may adversely impact treatment efficacy. With the addition of concomitant chemotherapy to RT, however, extended TD has no effect on treatment efficacy.

  8. Neoadjuvant antiangiogenic therapy reveals contrasts in primary and metastatic tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ebos, John M L; Mastri, Michalis; Lee, Christina R; Tracz, Amanda; Hudson, John M; Attwood, Kristopher; Cruz-Munoz, William R; Jedeszko, Christopher; Burns, Peter; Kerbel, Robert S

    2014-10-31

    Thousands of cancer patients are currently in clinical trials evaluating antiangiogenic therapy in the neoadjuvant setting, which is the treatment of localized primary tumors prior to surgical intervention. The rationale is that shrinking a tumor will improve surgical outcomes and minimize growth of occult micrometastatic disease-thus delaying post-surgical recurrence and improving survival. But approved VEGF pathway inhibitors have not been tested in clinically relevant neoadjuvant models that compare pre- and post-surgical treatment effects. Using mouse models of breast, kidney, and melanoma metastasis, we demonstrate that primary tumor responses to neoadjuvant VEGFR TKI treatment do not consistently correlate with improved post-surgical survival, with survival worsened in certain settings. Similar negative effects did not extend to protein-based VEGF pathway inhibitors and could be reversed with altered dose, surgical timing, and treatment duration, or when VEGFR TKIs are combined with metronomic 'anti-metastatic' chemotherapy regimens. These studies represent the first attempt to recapitulate the complex clinical parameters of neoadjuvant therapy in mice and identify a novel tool to compare systemic antiangiogenic treatment effects on localized and disseminated disease.

  9. Induction chemoradiation therapy prior to esophagectomy is associated with superior long-term survival for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Speicher, P J; Wang, X; Englum, B R; Ganapathi, A M; Yerokun, B; Hartwig, M G; D'Amico, T A; Berry, M F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of induction chemoradiation in the treatment of potentially resectable locally advanced (T2-3N0 and T1-3N+) esophageal cancer utilizing a large national database. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for all patients undergoing esophagectomy for clinical T2-3N0 and T1-3N+ esophageal cancer of the mid- or lower esophagus. Patients were stratified by the use of induction chemoradiation therapy versus surgery-first. Trends were assessed with the Cochran-Armitage test. Predictors of receiving induction therapy were evaluated with multivariable logistic regression. A propensity-matched analysis was conducted to compare outcomes between groups, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate long-term survival. Within the NCDB, 7921 patients were identified, of which 6103 (77.0%) were treated with chemoradiation prior to esophagectomy, while the remaining 1818 (23.0%) were managed with surgery-first. Use of induction therapy increased over time, with an absolute increase of 11.8% from 2003-2011 (P < 0.001). As revealed by the propensity model, induction therapy was associated with higher rates of negative margins and shorter hospital length of stay, but no differences in unplanned readmission and 30-day mortality rates. In unadjusted survival analysis, induction therapy was associated with better long-term survival compared to a strategy of surgery-first, with 5-year survival rates of 37.2% versus 28.6%, P < 0.001. Following propensity score matching analysis, the use of induction therapy maintained a significant survival advantage over surgery-first (5-year survival: 37.9% vs. 28.7%, P < 0.001). Treatment with induction chemoradiation therapy prior to surgical resection is associated with significant improvement in long-term survival, even after adjusting for confounders with a propensity model. Induction therapy should be considered in all medically appropriate patients with resectable cT2-3N0 and cT1-3N

  10. [Histopathological effect and its predictors of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy by combined androgen blockade].

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Mamiya, Y; Aizawa, T; Akiyama, A; Yamamoto, S; Tsuzuki, M; Yoshimasa, O; Miki, M; Furusato, M

    1999-09-01

    Combined androgen blockade (CAB) uning LH-RH agonist and flutamide has been performed as neoadjuvant therapy for T 2, 3 prostate cancers (CaP). The histological effects of neoadjuvant CAB therapy and influential factors were investigated. Materials were 20 CaP cases which were underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant CAB therapy. All cases were diagnosed by echo-guided sextant needle biopsies. RP was performed after serum PSA was decreased to undetectable level. Histological effect was evaluated by general rule for clinical and pathological studies on prostate cancer (Japanese Urological Association). All cases were divided 2 groups by histological effects as follows: Group A (poor effect group): G 0 and G 1, Group B (good effect group): G 2 and G 3. Immunostaining of p 53 (mutant type), bcl-2 and Chromogranin A (ChA) were performed for both pretreatment needle biopsy and RP specimen. In addition, pretreatment serum PSA and Gleason grade were also investigated. Down grading were found in 30%. Down staging were found in 35% (7 cases). All 7 cases were negative surgical margins and 5 of 7 were clinical T 3. Negative bcl-2 of biopsy specimen was correlation with down grading (p = 0.008). In the histopathological evaluation, G 0 was 1, G 1 were 10, G 2 were 6 and G 3 were 3 cases. Gleason 4 or 5 elements of biopsy were found in 9/11 cases in Group A but only 3/9 cases in Group B (p = 0.027). The bcl-2 positive cells of biopsy were found in 8/11 cases in Group A but only 1/9 cases in Group B (p = 0.006). The p 53 and/or bcl-2 positive cells of biopsy were found in 10/11 cases in Group A but only 3/9 cases in Group B (p = 0.007). Serum PSA and ChA were not correlation with histological effect of neoadjuvant CAB therapy. But, in 3 cases, ChA positive cell appeared after neoadjuvant therapy. We could not expect more than 50% cases to show the down grading and down staging. But, in T 3 case, surgical failure could be decrease. We could expect prostate cancer

  11. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Young Eun; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Beom Kyung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Do Young

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  12. Prognostic value of pre-therapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Hayes, Amos J.; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D.; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y.; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A.; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data was extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p<0.03, p<0.04, and p<0.0001, respectively) for patients with PLT pre-chemoRT value of ≥350 × 109/L. Actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC) and FDM were 83% and 85% for non-thrombcythemic patients while patient with high platelets had 5-year LRC and FDM of 73% and 74%, respectively. Likewise, 5- year OS were better for patients with normal platelet counts by comparison (76% vs. 57%; p<0.0001). Comparison of univariate parametric models demonstrated PLTpre-chemoRT was better among tested models. Multivariate assessment demonstrated improved performance of models which included pre-therapy platelet indices. On Bayesian information criteria analysis, the optimal prognostic model was then used to develop nomograms predicting 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pre-treatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of anti-platelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  13. [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of a neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M.; Knieling, Anna; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Kurth, Jens; Steiger, Katja; Eiber, Matthias; Esposito, Irene; Retz, Margitta; Kübler, Hubert; Gschwend, Jürgen E.; Schwaiger, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Thalgott, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown promising results of neoadjuvant therapy in prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response monitoring after combined neoadjuvant docetaxel chemotherapy and complete androgen blockade in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Results In [11C]Choline PET/CT there was a significant decrease of SUVmax and SUVmean (p = 0.004, each), prostate volume (p = 0.005) and PSA value (p = 0.003) after combined neoadjuvant therapy. MRI showed a significant prostate and tumor volume reduction (p = 0.003 and 0.005, respectively). Number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group compared to pretherapeutic biopsies and the control group (p = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively). Methods 11 patients received two [11C]Choline PET/CT and MRI scans before and after combined neoadjuvant therapy followed by radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. [11C]Choline uptake, prostate and tumor volume, PSA value (before/after neoadjuvant therapy) and apoptosis (of pretherapeutic biopsy/posttherapeutic prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group and prostatectomy specimens of a matched control group without neoadjuvant therapy) were assessed and tested for differences and correlation using SPSS. Conclusions The results showing a decrease in choline uptake after combined neoadjuvant therapy (paralleled by regressive and apoptotic changes in histopathology) confirm the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT to monitor effects of neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Further studies are recommended to evaluate its use during the course of neoadjuvant therapy for early response assessment. PMID:27572317

  14. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes may predict neoadjuvant therapy response in triple negative breast patients.

    PubMed

    Spugnesi, Laura; Gabriele, Michele; Scarpitta, Rosa; Tancredi, Mariella; Maresca, Luisa; Gambino, Gaetana; Collavoli, Anita; Aretini, Paolo; Bertolini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Barbara; Landucci, Elisabetta; Fontana, Andrea; Rossetti, Elena; Roncella, Manuela; Naccarato, Giuseppe Antonio; Caligo, Maria Adelaide

    2016-12-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent about 15-20% of all breast cancer cases and are characterized by a complex molecular heterogeneity. Some TNBCs exhibit clinical and pathological properties similar to BRCA-mutated tumors, without actually bearing a mutation in BRCA genes. This "BRCAness" phenotype may be explained by germline mutations in other genes involved in DNA repair. Although respond to chemotherapy with alkylating agents, they have a high risk of recurrence and progression. Some studies have shown the efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy in TNBC patients with DNA repair defects, but proper biomarkers of DNA repair deficiency are still needed. Here, we investigated if mutations in DNA repair genes may be correlated with anthracyclines/taxanes neoadjuvant therapy response. DNA from 19 TNBC patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were subjected to next generation sequencing of a panel of 24 genes in DNA repair and breast cancer predisposition. In this study, 5 of 19 patients (26%) carried a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1, PALB2, RAD51C and two patients carried a probable pathogenic missense variant. Moreover, VUS (Variants of Unknown Significance) in other genes, predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, were detected in five patients. Germline mutations in DNA repair genes were found to be associated with the group of TNBC patients who responded to therapy. We conclude that a subgroup of TNBC patients have defects in DNA repair genes, other than BRCA1, and such patients respond favourably to neoadjuvant anthracyclines/taxanes therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Limitation of surgical radicality in rectal cancer responding to neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Troja, Achim; Hempen, Hans-Günther; Raab, Hans-Rudolf

    2009-05-01

    The basic principle in the treatment of rectal cancer is the complete surgical removal of the tumor together with the lymphatic drainage region, i.e. the mesorectum encased by the mesorectal 'fascia pelvis visceralis' according to Westhues. It was shown in the 1990s that the results of surgery alone could be improved by additional adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy. Because of less toxicity and a lower rate of local recurrence, neoadjuvant therapies in International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage II and III disease are now preferred over adjuvant strategies. The German Rectal Cancer study CAO/ARO/AIO-94 showed a full remission rate of 8% after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)based chemotherapy added to a conventional fractional radiation therapy (50.4 Gy). This figure, together with similar results of others, leads to the question whether surgical radicality in rectal cancer treatment could be limited in case of a good remission after neoadjuvant therapy. There are several promising possibilities under investigation, e.g. local excision instead of radical resection, or even no resection at all. Nevertheless, up to now these strategies did not prove to give comparable results to standard surgical procedures. Therefore, reduction of radicality in curable rectal cancer should be limited to accurately designed randomized clinical trials. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. T3+ and T4 rectal cancer patients seem to benefit from the addition of oxaliplatin to the neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimen.

    PubMed

    Martijnse, Ingrid S; Dudink, Ralph L; Kusters, Miranda; Vermeer, Thomas A; West, Nicholas P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A; van Lijnschoten, Ineke; Martijn, Hendrik; Creemers, Geert-Jan; Lemmens, Valery E; van de Velde, Cornelis J; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Glynne-Jones, Robert; Quirke, Phil; Rutten, Harm J

    2012-02-01

    To achieve T-downstaging and better resectability in locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT) has become the current standard of treatment. A variety of schemes have been used. This study investigates which scheme had the best effect on these parameters. Our institution is a referral center for locally advanced rectal cancer. Different neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy regimens were administered: long course radiotherapy (RTH), 5-FU and leucovorin (5FUBolus), a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CORE), and capecitabine only (CAP). Selection of patients for 1 of the regimens was based on hospital policy rather than patient or tumor characteristics. The data of 504 consecutive patients (n = 181 T3+, n = 323 T4) without metastatic disease (cM0) who underwent surgery for advanced rectal carcinoma between 1994 and 2010 were reviewed. The RTH, 5FUBolus, CORE, and CAP scheme were administered to 106, 137, 155, and 106 patients, respectively. Odds ratios for downstaging were less effective for RTH, 5FUBolus, and CAP (0.31, 0.44, and 0.31; P < .0001) when compared with the CORE scheme. Odds ratios for a R1 resection (3.74, 1.94, 1.14; P = .003) or CRM+ resection (3.78, 2.73, 1.34; P = .001) were also in favor of the CORE. Hazard ratios for CSS were significantly better for the CORE scheme. Downstaging with neoadjuvant treatment results in an increased number of radical resections. In our study, the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin appears to be the most effective regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer tumors. However, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm this conclusion.

  17. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  18. Complete pathologic response following preoperative chemoradiation therapy for middle to lower rectal cancer is not a prognostic factor for a better outcome.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Toppan, Paola; Friso, Maria Luisa; Russo, Valentina; Pasetto, Lara; Urso, Emanuele; Marino, Filippo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Lise, Mario

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with pathologic tumor response following pre-operative chemoradiation therapy, and the prognostic impact of pathologic response on overall and disease-free survival. Between 1994 and 2002, 132 patients underwent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery for middle to lower rectal cancer. After excluding 26 cases (metastatic cancer, n = 13; nonradical surgery, n = 6; local excision procedure, n = 4; non-5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, n = 2; incomplete data on preoperative chemoradiation therapy regimen used, n = 1), the remaining 106 patients were included in the study. Variables considered were the following: age, gender, tumor location, pretreatment T and N stage, modality of 5-fluorouracil administration, total radiotherapy dose delivered, chemoradiation therapy regimen used (Regimen A: chemotherapy (bolus of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin, days 1-5 and 29-33) + radiotherapy (45 Gy/25 F/1.8 Gy/F); Regimen B: chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil continuous venous infusion +/- weekly bolus of carboplatin or oxaliplatin) + radiotherapy (50.4 Gy/28 F/1.8 Gy/F)), time interval between completion of chemoradiation therapy and surgery, postoperative chemotherapy administration, surgical procedures, pT, pN, and pTNM stage, and response to chemoradiation therapy defined as tumor regression grade, scored from 1 (no tumor on surgical specimen) to 5 (absence of regressive changes). Statistical analysis was performed by means of logistic regression analysis (Cox's model for overall and disease-free survival). Median age of the 106 patients was 60 (range, 31-79) years and the male:female ratio, 66:40. Median distance of tumor from the anal verge was 6 (range, 1-11) cm. Pretreatment TNM stage, available in 104 patients, was cT3T4N0, n = 41; cT2N1, n = 9; cT3N1, n = 39; and cT4N1, n = 17. The median radiotherapy dose delivered was 50.4 (range, 40-56) Gy; 58 patients received 5-fluorouracil by continuous venous infusion, and

  19. Low-Dose Neoadjuvant External Beam Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Devisetty, Kiran; Kobayashi, Wendy; Suit, Herman D.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Hornicek, Francis J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: For soft tissue sarcoma, neoadjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to 50 Gy has the same local control (LC) and overall survival as postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) to 60 Gy, but with increased wound complications. We examined whether low-dose neoadjuvant EBRT would decrease acute toxicity while maintaining LC. Methods and Materials: From 1971 to 2008, 1,765 patients with nonmetastatic soft tissue sarcoma were treated with radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. We identified 42 patients treated with low-dose neoadjuvant EBRT (median, 20 Gy; range, 16-26) followed by surgical resection and PORT. PORT included EBRT (25 patients; median, 40 Gy; range, 20-56.2), brachytherapy (13 patients; median, 42 Gy; range, 26-50), and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) (4 patients; median, 12.5 Gy; range, 8-20). The median total dose was 63.3 Gy (range, 28-78.4). Results: Median follow-up was 36 months (range, 4-318). Severe acute wound complications were reported in 15 patients (36%) and correlated to PORT technique (16% EBRT, 69% brachytherapy, 50% IORT, p = 0.004). The 5-year LC was 73% and correlated to PORT technique (68% EBRT, 100% brachytherapy, 50% IORT, p = 0.03) and histology (p = 0.05), with a trend to improvement if >60 Gy (p = 0.10). The 5-year overall survival was 65% and correlated to extent of resection (p < 0.001) and margin status (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Despite using low-dose neoadjuvant EBRT, we report a high rate of severe acute wound complications that was strongly associated with brachytherapy. Modification of the brachytherapy technique may decrease acute toxicity while maintaining excellent local control. Further study must be conducted before recommending broader application.

  20. Lymph node extramedullary hematopoiesis in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Setia, Namrata; Otis, Christopher N

    2013-06-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) develops as a compensatory mechanism associated with hematologic processes but it may occur in association with chemotherapy. Three cases of EMH arising in axillary lymph nodes following neoadjuvant therapy for breast carcinoma are reported herein. Three women ranging in age from 41 to 47 years presented with unilateral breast masses measuring 0.6 to 4.0 cm in greatest dimension and were diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, grade III by core needle biopsies. Two of the tumors were triple negative and one was estrogen receptor positive. All patients subsequently received neoadjuvant therapy followed by lumpectomies. No residual carcinoma was identified in postchemotherapy breast resection specimens. One patient underwent a sentinel lymph node procedure, the second patient an axillary lymph node dissection, and the third patient had a core biopsy of an enlarged axillary lymph node. The patient that underwent axillary lymph node dissection had metastatic carcinoma in one of her lymph nodes. Foci of EMH consisting of myeloid, erythroid, and megakaryocytic precursors were present within the nodal parenchyma and/or subcapsular sinuses of axillary lymph nodes of all three cases. Megakaryocytes were immunoreactive with factor VIII, erythroid elements with Glycophorin and myeloid precursors with myeloperoxidase. With increasing use of neoadjuvant therapy for breast carcinoma, EMH within lymph nodes is more likely to be encountered. Hematopoietic precursors present in lymph nodes may potentially be misdiagnosed as metastatic tumor cells, particularly as lobular carcinoma or metaplastic carcinoma. Therefore, caution should be exercised when evaluating axillary lymph nodes in the clinical setting of neoadjuvant therapy for breast carcinoma.

  1. Systemic Therapies for Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer: The Role of Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Chemotherapy and the Use of Endocrine Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Dizon, Don S; Sikov, William M

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogenous disease, comprised of at least 3 major subtypes: hormone receptor-positive/HER2-(HR+), HER2+, and HR-/HER2-(triple negative) breast cancers. The medical management of each subype is distinct. In this article, we review contemporary data supporting the use of chemotherapy, endocrine therapy and biologic therapies, especially HER2-directed agents, in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting in patients with newly diagnosed nonmetastatic (stage I-III) breast cancer.

  2. Phase 1 Trial of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Before Prostatectomy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Quaranta, Brian P.; Pura, John A.; Lee, W.R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gerber, Leah; Haake, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Robertson, Cary N.; Polascik, Thomas J.; Moul, Judd W.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 1 study, the safety of neoadjuvant whole-pelvis radiation therapy (RT) administered immediately before radical prostatectomy in men with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve men enrolled and completed a phase 1 single-institution trial between 2006 and 2010. Eligibility required a previously untreated diagnosis of localized but high-risk prostate cancer. Median follow-up was 46 months (range, 14-74 months). Radiation therapy was dose-escalated in a 3 × 3 design with dose levels of 39.6, 45, 50.4, and 54 Gy. The pelvic lymph nodes were treated up to 45 Gy with any additional dose given to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Radical prostatectomy was performed 4-8 weeks after RT completion. Primary outcome measure was intraoperative and postoperative day-30 morbidity. Secondary measures included late morbidity and oncologic outcomes. Results: No intraoperative morbidity was seen. Chronic urinary grade 2+ toxicity occurred in 42%; 2 patients (17%) developed a symptomatic urethral stricture requiring dilation. Two-year actuarial biochemical recurrence-free survival was 67% (95% confidence interval 34%-86%). Patients with pT3 or positive surgical margin treated with neoadjuvant RT had a trend for improved biochemical recurrence-free survival compared with a historical cohort with similar adverse factors. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT is feasible with moderate urinary morbidity. However, oncologic outcomes do not seem to be substantially different from those with selective postoperative RT. If this multimodal approach is further evaluated in a phase 2 setting, 54 Gy should be used in combination with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy to improve biochemical outcomes.

  3. Focal Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation Improves Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidative Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sunil; Chadha, Awalpreet S.; Suh, Yelin; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Rao, Arvind; Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mahmood, Usama; Delclos, Marc E.; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Beddar, Sam; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Javle, Milind M.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Wolff, Robert A.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To review outcomes of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients treated with dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with curative intent. Methods and Materials A total of 200 patients with LAPC were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation between 2006 and 2014. Of these, 47 (24%) having tumors >1 cm from the luminal organs were selected for dose-escalated IMRT (biologically effective dose [BED] >70 Gy) using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, inspiration breath hold, and computed tomographic image guidance. Fractionation was optimized for coverage of gross tumor and luminal organ sparing. A 2- to 5-mm margin around the gross tumor volume was treated using a simultaneous integrated boost with a microscopic dose. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), local-regional and distant RFS, and time to local-regional and distant recurrence, calculated from start of chemoradiation, were the outcomes of interest. Results Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (BED = 59.47 Gy) with a concurrent capecitabine-based (86%) regimen. Patients who received BED >70 Gy had a superior OS (17.8 vs 15.0 months, P = .03), which was preserved throughout the follow-up period, with estimated OS rates at 2 years of 36% versus 19% and at 3 years of 31% versus 9% along with improved local-regional RFS (10.2 vs 6.2 months, P = .05) as compared with those receiving BED ≤70 Gy. Degree of gross tumor volume coverage did not seem to affect outcomes. No additional toxicity was observed in the high-dose group. Higher dose (BED) was the only predictor of improved OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Radiation dose escalation during consolidative chemoradiation therapy after induction chemotherapy for LAPC patients improves OS and local-regional RFS. PMID:26972648

  4. SU-F-R-55: Early Detection of Treatment Induced Bone Marrow Injury During Chemoradiation Therapy Using Quantitative CT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Song, Y; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Acute hematologic toxicity associated with bone marrow injury is a common complication of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pelvic malignancies. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using quantitative CT to detect bone marrow injury during CRT. Methods: Daily CTs were acquired during routine CT-guided radiation therapy using a CT-on-rails for 15 cervical cancer patients. All patients treated with a radiation dose of 45.0 to 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy/fraction along with chemotherapy. For each patient, the contours of bone marrow were generated in L4, L5 and sacrum on the first daily CT and then populated to other daily CTs by rigid registration using MIM (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) with manual editing if possible. A series of CT texture parameters, including Hunsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, entropy, energy, in bone marrow contours were calculated using MATLAB on each daily CT and were correlated with the completed blood counts (CBC) collected weekly for each patient. The correlations were analyzed with Pearson correlation tests. Results: For all patient data analyzed, mean HU in bone marrow decreased during CRT delivery. From the first to the last fraction the average mean HU reduction is 58.1 ± 13.6 HU (P<0.01). This decrease can be observed as early as after first 5 fractions and is strongly associated with the changes of most CBC quantities, such as the reductions of white and blood cell counts (r=0.97, P=0.001). The reduction of HU is spatially varied. Conclusion: Chemoradiation induced bone marrow injury can be detected during the delivery of CRT using quantitative CT. Chemoradiation results in reductions in mean HU, which are strongly associated with the change in the pretrial blood cell counts. Early detection of bone marrow injury with commonly available CT opens a door to improve bone marrow sparing, reducing risk of hematologic toxicity.

  5. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for endocrine sensitive breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Charehbili, A; Fontein, D B Y; Kroep, J R; Liefers, G J; Mieog, J S D; Nortier, J W R; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, studies investigating neoadjuvant therapies have been emerging, because of the additional benefits it provides in terms of facilitating less extensive surgery and the possibility of investigating tumor biological features and response. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) is, in general, considered to be a suitable option for hormone receptor (HR)-positive patients who are unfit for chemotherapy or surgery, and is increasingly being utilized to achieve tumor downsizing before surgery in postmenopausal women. Studies investigating NHT were reviewed for tumor response data. NHT demonstrated similar efficacy to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in HR-positive breast cancer patients. Clinical responses ranged from 13.5% to 100%, with treatment periods between 3 and 24 months. In studies comparing tamoxifen with aromatase inhibitors, the latter were superior in terms of tumor response and rates of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). In most studies with treatment durations longer than 3 months, tumor response rates increased. Therefore, longer durations of NHT are feasible and should be considered as an alternative to NCT in selected patients.

  6. Endocrine therapy as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer: selecting the best agents, the timing and duration of treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Jie; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2016-06-01

    Hormone receptor (HR) positive breast cancers represent the vast majority of breast cancers. Adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is highly effective and appropriate for nearly all women with HR positive tumors. Adjuvant tamoxifen (TAM) is a major endocrine treatment option, which has been found to be effective in both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients. Considerable evidence has been accrued of a benefit for ovarian ablation or suppression (OA/S) in premenopausal patients, for aromatase inhibitors (AIS) in postmenopausal patients, for the longer duration of adjuvant endocrine therapy and for the clinical utility of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Clinical practice guidelines should keep changing with developing evidence-based practice guidelines pertaining to breast cancer care. The present publication conducted a comprehensive systematic review of the literature addressing the use of endocrine therapy as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy for HR positive breast cancer, focusing on selecting the best agents for both premenopausal and postmenopausal patients, as well as the optimal duration of such treatment.

  7. Neo-adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy in gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Alberto; Lirosi, Maria C; D’Ugo, Domenico; Fico, Valeria; Ricci, Riccardo; Santullo, Francesco; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cananzi, Ferdinando CM; Persiani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, several clinical trials on neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy as a therapeutic approach for locally advanced gastric cancer have been performed. Even if more data are necessary to define the roles of these approaches, the results of preoperative treatments in the combined treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma are encouraging because this approach has led to a higher rate of curative surgical resection. Owing to the results of most recent randomized phase III studies, neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced resectable gastric cancer has satisfied the determination of level I evidence. Remaining concerns pertain to the choice of the optimal therapy regimen, strict patient selection by accurate pre-operative staging, standardization of surgical procedures, and valid criteria for response evaluation. New well-designed trials will be necessary to find the best therapeutic approach in pre-operative settings and the best way to combine old-generation chemotherapeutic drugs with new-generation molecules. PMID:26690252

  8. Predictors of mesorectal fascia invasion after gadolinium injection in rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; De Paoli, Luca; Angileri, Roberta; Ukmar, Maja; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-01-01

    To assess spectral presaturation inversion-recovery MRI sequence with gadolinium to identify predictors of mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy. Sixty-five patients underwent neoadjuvant concomitant radiation and chemotherapy and surgery. Magnetic resonance images were assessed by two radiologists. Linear (odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals: 19.33, 1.98-188.6) and reticular strands (odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals: 9.75, 1.45-67.77) reaching the MRF are predictors of MRF invasion. Linear or reticular mesorectal strands reaching the MRF detected at contrast-enhanced MRI represent a predictor of MRF invasion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rationale for and review of neoadjuvant therapy prior to radical prostatectomy for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKay, Rana R; Choueiri, Toni K; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2013-09-01

    Despite state of the art local therapy, a significant portion of men with high-risk prostate cancer develop progressive disease. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy prior to radical prostatectomy (RP) is an approach that can potentially maximize survival outcomes in patients with localized disease. This approach is under investigation with a wide array of agents and provides an opportunity to assess pathologic and biologic activity of novel treatments. The aim of this review is to explore the past and present role of neoadjuvant therapy prior to definitive therapy with RP in patients with high-risk localized or locally advanced disease. The results of neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), including use of newer agents such as abiraterone, are promising. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, primarily with docetaxel, with or without ADT has also demonstrated efficacy in men with high-risk disease. Other novel agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), clusterin, and the immune system are currently under investigation and have led to variable results in early clinical trials. Despite optimistic data, approval of neoadjuvant therapy prior to RP in patients with high-risk prostate cancer will depend on positive results from well designed phase III trials.

  10. Longitudinal Changes in Active Bone Marrow for Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Noticewala, Sonal S; Li, Nan; Williamson, Casey W; Hoh, Carl K; Shen, Hanjie; McHale, Michael T; Saenz, Cheryl C; Einck, John; Plaxe, Steven; Vaida, Florin; Yashar, Catheryn M; Mell, Loren K

    2017-03-15

    To quantify longitudinal changes in active bone marrow (ABM) distributions within unirradiated (extrapelvic) and irradiated (pelvic) bone marrow (BM) in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). We sampled 39 cervical cancer patients treated with CRT, of whom 25 were treated with concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) and 14 were treated with cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) plus gemcitabine (50-125 mg/m(2)) (C/G). Patients underwent (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging at baseline and 1.5 to 6.0 months after treatment. ABM was defined as the subvolume of bone with standardized uptake value (SUV) above the mean SUV of the total bone. The primary aim was to measure the compensatory response, defined as the change in the log of the ratio of extrapelvic versus pelvic ABM percentage from baseline to after treatment. We also quantified the change in the proportion of ABM and mean SUV in pelvic and extrapelvic BM using a 2-sided paired t test. We observed a significant increase in the overall extrapelvic compensatory response after CRT (0.381; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.312, 0.449) and separately in patients treated with cisplatin (0.429; 95% CI: 0.340, 0.517) and C/G (0.294; 95% CI: 0.186, 0.402). We observed a trend toward higher compensatory response in patients treated with cisplatin compared with C/G (P=.057). Pelvic ABM percentage was reduced after CRT both in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and in those receiving C/G (P<.001), whereas extrapelvic ABM percentage was increased in patients receiving cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV in pelvic structures was lower after CRT with both cisplatin (P<.001) and C/G (P<.001). The mean SUV appeared lower in extrapelvic structures after CRT in patients treated with C/G (P=.076) but not with cisplatin (P=.942). We also observed that older age and more intense chemotherapy regimens were correlated with a decreased compensatory

  11. Genetic changes of non-small cell lung cancer under neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warth, Arne; Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Penzel, Roland; Harms, Alexander; Duell, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir; Lindner, Michael; Schirmacher, Peter; Muley, Thomas; Dienemann, Hendrik; Fink, Ludger; Morresi-Hauf, Alicia; Pfarr, Nicole; Weichert, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Background Large scale sequencing efforts defined common molecular alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and revealed potentially druggable mutations. Yet, systematic data on the changes of the respective molecular profiles under standard therapy in NSCLC are limited. Results 14 out of 68 observed coding mutations (21%) and 6 out of 33 (18%) copy number variations (CNV) were lost or gained during therapy. Mutational and CNV changes clustered in 6/37 (16%) and 3/37 (8%) patients. Changes in clinically relevant mutations were rare but present in single cases for genes such as BRAF and PIK3CA. The type of radiochemotherapy but not the duration of therapy impacted on the frequency of mutational changes. Methods We established a lung cancer specific next-generation sequencing panel covering ~7500 hotspots of 41 genes frequently mutated in NSCLC and performed ultradeep multigene sequencing of 37 corresponding pre- and post-therapeutic formalin fixed paraffin-embedded specimens to discover mutational changes and copy number variations under neo-adjuvant radio- (RTX) and/or chemotherapy (CTX). Conclusion We unraveled changes in common driver gene candidates in NSCLC under neo-adjuvant therapy. Our data shed first light on the genetic changes of NSCLC under conventional therapy and might be taken into account when the relevance of sequential biopsy approaches is discussed. PMID:27105513

  12. Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy Using Spatial-Temporal {sup 18}F-FDG PET Features, Clinical Parameters, and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Shan; Chen, Wengen; Kligerman, Seth; Kim, Grace; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct predictive models using comprehensive tumor features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This study included 20 patients who underwent trimodality therapy (CRT + surgery) and underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) both before and after CRT. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (eg, standardized uptake value [SUV]{sub max}, tumor diameter); (2) clinical parameters (eg, TNM stage, histology) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, cross-validations being used to avoid model overfitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated by confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). With the use of spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications)—results that were significantly better than when conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone were used. For groups with many tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher

  13. Neoadjuvant Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Current Practice, Controversies, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Cesar Augusto; Camp, Melissa; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Harvey, Susan; Wright, Jean; Stearns, Vered

    2015-11-01

    Research in the fields of surgical, medical, and radiation oncology has changed the landscape of neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer, yet many areas of controversy still exist. When considering whether a patient is a candidate for neoadjuvant therapy, ideally the initial assessment should be multidisciplinary in nature and should include clinical, radiographic, and pathologic evaluation. Optimization of systemic therapy is dependent upon identifying the patient's breast cancer subtype; the best approach may include targeted agents, as well as the determination of eligibility for enrollment into clinical trials that incorporate novel therapeutics or predictive biomarkers. This article will review a variety of surgical and radiation-based strategies for management of early-stage breast cancer, including surgical options involving the breast and axilla, and the role of radiation based on response to systemic therapy. Key areas of controversy include the ideal systemic treatment for different breast cancer subtypes, the surgical and radiotherapeutic approaches for management of the axilla, and the role of pathologic response rates as a surrogate for survival in drug development.

  14. Pathologic Stage of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients Presenting as Resectable Cases After Neoadjuvant Therapy Did Not Predict the Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Fu, Jui-Ying; Wu, Ching-Feng; Liu, Yun-Hen; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2015-10-01

    According to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, treatment plans for nonsmall cell lung cancer are to be based on cancer stage. Cancer staging for patients with resectable disease has been based on pathologic stage instead of preoperative clinical stage. However, the possibility of occult mediastinal lymph node metastases could lead to discrepancy between clinical and pathologic stage. While multi-modality treatments may be beneficial for patients with locally advanced disease, most studies have been based on clinical stage. The aim of this study was to identify the beneficial impact of neoadjuvant therapy and the prognostic value of final pathologic stage in these patients. This study enrolled 530 lung cancer patients who received anatomic resection and mediastinal lymph node dissection at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from January 2005 through June 2011. All resected specimens were examined by pathologists. Postoperative adjuvant therapies were given according to NCCN guideline recommendations. The clinico-pathologic factors of these patients were collected and analyzed. Patients not receiving neoadjuvant therapy had a better probability of disease-free survival (P < 0.001) and overall survival (P = 0.0005), as well as a lower incidence of early relapse. Patients not receiving neoadjuvant therapy had a better disease-free survival rate in stages IA (P < 0.001), IB (P = 0.002), and IIB (P = 0.0117) from the point of view of final pathologic stage. Patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy may experience a higher incidence of early relapse. Neoadjuvant therapy did not show definite benefits in the disease-free and overall survival rates from the point of view of final pathologic stage. Pathologic stage of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients who presented with resectable disease after neoadjuvant therapy did not predict the prognosis.

  15. Use of sentinel lymph node biopsy to select patients for local–regional therapy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Erdahl, Lillian M.; Boughey, Judy C.

    2014-01-01

    Use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for axillary staging of patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been widely debated. Questions arise regarding the accuracy of sentinel lymph node biopsy in axillary staging for these patients and its use to determine further local–regional therapy, including surgery and radiation therapy. For patients who are clinically node-negative at presentation, sentinel lymph node biopsy enables accurate staging of the axilla after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and determination of which patients should go on to further axillary surgery and regional nodal radiation therapy. Importantly, performing axillary staging after completion of chemotherapy, rather than before chemotherapy, enables assessment of response to chemotherapy and the extent of residual disease. This information can assist the planning of adjuvant treatment. Recent data indicate that sentinel node biopsy can also be used to assess disease response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for patients with clinical N1 disease at presentation. PMID:24683440

  16. SU-E-J-268: Change of CT Number During the Course of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Liu, F; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been observed radiation can induce changes in CT number (CTN) inside tumor during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for several tumor sites including lung and head and neck, suggesting that the CTN change may be potentially used to assess RT response. In this study, we investigate the CTN changes inside tumor during the course of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT for 17 pancreatic head cancer patients using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 1.8 Gy per fraction. On each daily CT set, The contour of the pancreatic head, included in the treatment target, was generated by populating the pancreatic head contour from the planning CT or MRI using an auto-segmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary. The CTN at each voxel in the pancreatic head contour was extracted and the 3D distribution of the CTNs was processed using MATLAB. The mean value of CTN distribution was used to quantify the daily CTN change in the pancreatic head. Results: Reduction of CTN in pancreatic head was observed during the CRT delivery in 14 out the 17 (82%) patients studied. Although the average reduction is only 3.5 Houncefield Unit (HU), this change is significant (p<0.01). Among them, there are 7 patients who had a CTN drop larger than 5 HU, ranging from 6.0 to 11.8 HU. In contrast to this trend, CTN was increased in 3 patients. Conclusion: Measurable changes in the CT number in tumor target were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for the pancreas cancer patients, indicating this radiation-induced CTN change may be used to assess treatment response.

  17. Dynamics of circulating tumor cells in early breast cancer under neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    SERRANO, MARÍA JOSÉ; ROVIRA, PEDRO SÁNCHEZ; MARTÍNEZ-ZUBIAURRE, I.; RODRIGUEZ, MIGUEL DELGADO; FERNÁNDEZ, MÓNICA; LORENTE, JOSE A.

    2012-01-01

    At present, the majority of patients with breast cancer are diagnosed at early stages of disease development. However, a considerable number of such cases develop secondary malignancies after a relatively short period of time. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as a strong biomarker to predict disease recurrence in metastatic breast cancer. However, the prognostic significance is not clear in early breast cancer. We present results on CTC determination in peripheral blood in non-metastatic breast cancer patients in the context of neoadjuvant treatment. Twenty-six breast cancer patients, scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy, were enrolled in a prospective study, of which 24 were able to complete therapy. CTC assessment was performed by sorting out cytokeratin-positive cells from 10 ml of peripheral blood using immunomagnetic separation, followed by immunocytochemical characterization of cells. Seventeen blood samples out of 24 patients were CTC-positive when collected prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. No significant correlations were found between the presence of CTCs and lymph node status (p=0.1), histological type (p=0.802), stage (p=0.43) or overall survival (OS) (p=0.599). Thirteen CTC-positive samples were observed in blood samples collected after treatment. Univariate analyses revealed that the presence of CTCs was related to OS when the detection was positive both before and after treatment (p=0.023). CTCs can be a strong prognostic marker in early breast cancer. The persistence of CTCs before and after treatment can identify a subpopulation of patients with an increased risk of recurrence. PMID:23060920

  18. Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Therapy for HER2 Positive Disease.

    PubMed

    Chia, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Since the initial description of the HER2 proto-oncogene as a poor prognostic factor in breast cancer in 1987, to the first randomized trial of a monoclonal antibody directed against HER2 in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer published in 2001, to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2005 Annual Meeting in which we saw the unprecedented collective presentations demonstrating the dramatic benefit of trastuzumab in the adjuvant setting-the clinical landscape of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer has forever changed. More recently, there has been increasing use of preoperative chemotherapy and anti-HER2 targeted therapies in primary operable HER2 disease in the research domain and in clinical practice. In the next few years, we will see if dual adjuvant anti-HER2 antibody inhibition produces clinically significant improvements in outcome; understand if there is a role of small molecule inhibitors of the HER family of receptors either in combination or sequential to trastuzumab; further refine the relationship between pathologic complete response (pCR) and long-term clinical outcomes; and find predictive biomarkers to identify cohorts of patients that may need differential combinations and/or durations of anti-HER2 therapies.

  19. Quality of Life in a Prospective, Multicenter Phase 2 Trial of Neoadjuvant Full-Dose Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiation in Patients With Resectable or Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Pablo E.; Herman, Joseph M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Kim, Edward J.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie; Wei, Alice C.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the health-related quality of life (QOL) during and after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Participants of a prospective, phase 2 multi-institutional trial treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery completed QOL questionnaires (European Organization for Research and Treatment in Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire version 3.0 [EORTC-QLQ C30], EORTC-Pancreatic Cancer module [EORTC-PAN 26], and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic subscale [FACT-Hep]) at baseline, after 2 cycles of neoadjuvant therapy, after surgery, at 6 months from initiation of therapy, and at 6-month intervals for 2 years. Mean scores were compared with baseline. A change >10% was considered a minimal clinically important difference. Results: Of 71 participants in the trial, 55 were eligible for QOL analysis. Compliance ranged from 32% to 74%. The EORTC-QLQ C30 global QOL did not significantly decline after neoadjuvant therapy, whereas the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy global health measure showed a statistically, but not clinically significant decline (−8, P=.02). This was in parallel with deterioration in physical functioning (−14.1, P=.001), increase in diarrhea (+16.7, P=.044), and an improvement in pancreatic pain (−13, P=.01) as per EORTC-PAN 26. Because of poor patient compliance in the nonsurgical group, long-term analysis was performed only from surgically resected participants (n=36). Among those, global QOL returned to baseline levels after 6 months, remaining near baseline through the 24-month visit. Conclusions: The study regimen consisting of 2 cycles of neoadjuvant therapy was completed without a clinically significant QOL deterioration. A transient increase in gastrointestinal symptoms and a decrease in physical functioning were seen after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. In those patients who underwent surgical

  20. The impact of neoadjuvant hedgehog inhibitor therapy on the surgical treatment of extensive basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jessica A; Curtis, Heather L; Braue, Jonathan A; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Mendoza, Tania I; Messina, Jane L; Cruse, C Wayne; Smith, David J; Harrington, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Although hedgehog inhibitor therapy (HHIT) is offered as isolated medical treatment for extensive basal cell carcinoma (BCC), there is little evidence on the use of HHIT before definitive surgical intervention. In order to better define the utilization of HHIT for extensive BCC, we evaluated the impact of neoadjuvant HHIT on the subsequent surgical resection and reconstruction. An IRB-approved, retrospective chart review was performed of patients who received HHIT as initial treatment for extensive BCC. Patients who discontinued HHIT and underwent surgical resection were included. Evaluation included BCC tumor response to HHIT, operative data, pathological data, radiation requirements, and evidence of tumor recurrence. Six patients were identified with tumors of the face/scalp (n = 4), trunk (n = 1) and upper extremity (n = 1). Hedgehog inhibitor therapy continued until tumors became unresponsive (n = 3, mean = 71 weeks) or side effects became intolerable (n = 3, mean = 31 weeks). In each case, a less extensive surgery was performed than estimated before HHIT. In 3 cases, significant bone resection was avoided. All resected specimens contained BCC. Four specimens exhibited clear margins. Postoperative radiation was performed in cases with positive margins (n = 2), and 1 patient experienced local recurrence. Length of follow-up was 5.7 to 11.8 months (mean = 8.23 months). Although HHIT was not curative for extensive BCC, HHIT can decrease the morbidity of surgical treatment and increase the likelihood of curative resection. For patients with extensive BCC, a combined neoadjuvant use of HHIT and surgical treatment should be considered.

  1. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  2. Results of neoadjuvant therapy followed by esophagectomy for patients with locally advanced thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dong; Ma, Longfei; Ye, Ting; Pan, Yunjian; Shao, Longlong; Song, Zuodong; Jiang, Shujun

    2017-01-01

    Background For patients diagnosed with locally advanced esophageal cancer, neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery is the most common approach. However, randomized trials resulted in inconsistent conclusions. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the influence of neoadjuvant therapy on postoperative events and the influence on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Methods We retrospectively reviewed all of the patients underwent surgery following neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) during January 1st, 2013 and December 31st, 2015 in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC). Prognostic factors for DFS and OS were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of fifty patients were included. Regarding postoperative morbidities, pneumonia and leakage occurred in 9 (18.0%) and 6 (12.0%) patients, respectively. For the whole patients, the 1-, 2-, 3-year DFS and OS rates were 57.0%, 48.0%, 42.0% and 86.0%, 73.0%, 62.0%, respectively. Lung metastasis and mediastinal node involvement were the most common relapse patterns. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed ypTNM stage as an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS; while leakage was an independent prognostic factor for DFS. Conclusions Neoadjuvant therapy did not increase postoperative morbidities but did achieve favorable survival. The ypTNM stage was an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS. Long-term survival needs further investigation. PMID:28275480

  3. [Practical neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies for rectal cancer. How many patients are actually recruited in multimodality therapy concepts? An analysis of the Tumour Centre Schwerin].

    PubMed

    Sauer, J; Sobolewski, K; Dommisch, K

    2009-09-01

    For rectal cancer in UICC stage II or III, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or short-course radiotherapy is established to reduce the incidence of local relapses. It has been documented that the neoadjuvant therapy is superior to the adjuvant therapy. In spite of the formulation of therapeutic principles in guidelines, they are not consistently applied. The actual rate of application and the reasons for a change from the recommended treatment strategy have been investigated. The data of the tumour centre West Mecklenburg were analysed. Data concerning the type and stage of rectal cancer, multimodal treatment (surgery with or without neoadjuvant therapy or adjuvant therapy) and treatment according to the level of medical care of hospitals were recorded from 2000 to 2008. In addition, in our clinic prospectively collected data of patients with rectal cancer (September 2006 until December 2008) were used to find out the reasons for the denial of neoadjuvant therapy. During the observation period we detected 348 patients with rectal cancer in UICC stage II or III in the area of the tumour centre West Mecklenburg. 16 % of these patients were treated pre-operatively. An increase in the preoperative multimodal treatment from 3 % to 39 % was observed. Hospitals with higher provisions of medical care applied the multimodal treatment 4-fold more frequently during this period of time. 55 patients of our own clinic were found to be of UICC stage II or III. 6 patients were emergency cases. The carcinoma was found in the lower or middle third of the rectum in 38 of our patients. The endosonographical examination could not adequately show the tumour or was falsely negative in 16 of these patients. A neoadjuvant treatment was started for 58 % of the patients. Overall, 76 of patients with rectal carcinoma were treated adjuvant or neoadjuvant, 62 of them with a complete treatment scheme. The application of neoadjuvant treatment for rectal carcinoma in UICC stage II or III in West

  4. Adjuvant chemoradiation therapy with high-dose versus weekly cisplatin for resected, locally-advanced HPV/p16-positive and negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Jessica L; Lazim, Ahmed F; Walsh, Francis J; Foote, Robert L; Moore, Eric J; Okuno, Scott H; Olsen, Kerry D; Kasperbauer, Jan L; Price, Daniel L; Garces, Yolanda I; Ma, Daniel J; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Molina, Julian R; Garcia, Joaquin J; Price, Katharine A R

    2014-04-01

    Standard treatment for patients with poor-risk, resected head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is adjuvant radiation therapy combined with high-dose cisplatin. Many patients are treated with weekly cisplatin; it is not known whether weekly and high-dose cisplatin are equivalent. This study compares the outcomes of patients with locally-advanced HPV-negative HNSCC and HPV/p16-positive oropharynx HNSCC treated with adjuvant chemoradiation therapy with either high-dose or weekly cisplatin. Retrospective review of patients with Stage III/IV HNSCC who had surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy at Mayo Clinic, Rochester. HPV and/or p16 status was available for all oropharynx patients. 104 Patients (51 high-dose, 53 weekly) were analyzed. The 3-year overall survival was 84% and 75% for patients who received high dose and weekly cisplatin, respectively (p=0.30). The 3-year recurrence free survival was 71% and 74% in the high dose and weekly cisplatin group, respectively (p=0.95). Patients with HPV/p16-positive oropharynx cancer who received adjuvant chemoradiation therapy with high-dose and weekly cisplatin had three-year overall survival rates of 91% and 86% (p=0.56), and 3-year recurrence free survival of 84% and 82% (p=0.93). Extracapsular extension did not affect prognosis in either group. No significant survival difference was seen between patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with adjuvant chemoradiation therapy with high-dose or weekly cisplatin, although there was a trend for improved survival with high-dose cisplatin. Weekly cisplatin in the adjuvant setting may be a better treatment for patients with HPV-positive oropharynx cancer to preserve survival and minimize toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  6. Assessment of Residual Disease With Molecular Breast Imaging in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy: Association With Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Menes, Tehillah S; Golan, Orit; Vainer, Gilead; Lerman, Hedva; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Klausner, Joseph; Even-Sapir, Einat

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer is an ongoing challenge of breast imaging. This study evaluates the accuracy of a novel dedicated system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) composed of the new generation of cadmium zinc telluride detectors in assessing residual disease after neoadjuvant therapy in patients with breast cancer. Clinical data, imaging, surgical, and pathological findings of 51 women with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy were recorded. MBI findings were correlated with surgical pathology results. Accuracy of MBI in predicting complete pathological response and size of residual disease was assessed according to molecular subtypes. The size of the largest focus of uptake on MBI correlated with the largest dimension measured on pathology (r = 0.55; P < .001). This correlation was stronger for triple negative and HER2/neu positive subtypes (r = 0.92 and 0.62, respectively). Sixteen patients (31%) had complete pathological response. The sensitivity and specificity of MBI for detecting residual disease were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66-93) and 69% (95% CI, 42-88), respectively. For triple negative or HER2/neu positive disease the sensitivity and specificity were 88% (95% CI, 62-98) and 75% (95% CI, 43-93), respectively. The accuracy of MBI in assessing residual disease after neoadjuvant treatment might be related to the molecular subtype. Accuracy is highest in the triple negative and HER2/neu positive subtypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased expression of long non-coding RNA XIST predicts favorable prognosis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma subsequent to definitive chemoradiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Reiko; Miyagawa, Ryu; Yamashita, Hideomi; Morikawa, Teppei; Okuma, Kae; Fukayama, Masashi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The present retrospective study aimed to examine the association between the expression of long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and clinical prognosis in the pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples of cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients that underwent platinum-based chemoradiation therapy. Between 2001 and 2013, 49 consecutive patients with squamous cell cervical carcinoma were selected for the present study (median follow-up period, 44.1 months). The patients possessed an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage of IB1/IIA1 (with pelvic lymph node metastasis), IB2 or IIA2-IVA, and had been treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. The pretreatment FFPE tumor biopsies of the patients obtained diagnosis were used for analysis. Total RNAs were extracted from the FFPE tumor tissues and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine the expression level of lncRNAs. The expression level of X inactive-specific transcript (XIST) demonstrated a significant association with the overall survival rate (P=0.014). The 4-year overall survival rates were 87.1 and 54.4% in the high and low XIST expression groups, respectively. Since the expression of XIST is associated with the overall survival rate, this lncRNA has the potential to become a predictor for the prognosis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients that are treated with chemoradiation therapy. Additional studies are required to investigate the underlying mechanisms of XIST that are associated with prognosis. PMID:27899965

  8. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  9. Prognostic significance of IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrates following neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yakirevich, Evgeny; Lu, Shaolei; Allen, Danisha; Mangray, Shamlal; Fanion, Jacqueline R; Lombardo, Kara A; Safran, Howard; Resnick, Murray B

    2017-08-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) tissue following chemoradiotherapy (CRT) reflect alterations in the tumor immunoenvironment. The presence and role of plasma cells in this process are poorly understood. Our aim was to characterize the IgG4+ plasma cell population in EAC following CRT. Seventy-one esophagectomy specimens post-CRT were compared with a surgery-only group of 31 EACs. The distribution, density, and ratio of IgG4+ and IgG+ plasma cells were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with clinicopathologic features, treatment response, and survival. In the CRT group, the presence of higher numbers of IgG4+ (≥ median of 94/high-power field) and IgG+ (≥ median of 225/high-power field) plasma cells and increased IgG4+/IgG+ ratio (≥ median of 41%) within ulcers was associated with complete or near-complete treatment response (P = .0077, P = .0503, and P = .0063, respectively). Lower tumor grade, smaller tumor size, and higher levels of IgG4+ plasma cells in posttherapy ulcers significantly correlated with better overall survival, whereas pretherapy clinical stage, posttherapy pathologic stage, smaller tumor size, and lower tumor grade were associated with longer recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that both posttherapy pathologic stage and high IgG4+ plasma cells in ulcers were independent predictors of overall survival (P = .05 and P = .01), whereas only posttherapy pathologic stage was associated with recurrence-free survival (P < .01). This is the first study describing a dense IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate in EAC following CRT. The presence of increased IgG4+ plasma cells may be a novel reliable factor to predict prognosis of EAC patients following CRT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. SU-F-R-50: Radiation-Induced Changes in CT Number Histogram During Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Schott, D; Song, Y; Li, D; Hall, W; Erickson, B; Li, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In an effort of early assessment of treatment response, we investigate radiation induced changes in CT number histogram of GTV during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Diagnostic-quality CT data acquired daily during routine CT-guided CRT using a CT-on-rails for 20 pancreatic head cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 28 fractions. On each daily CT set, the contours of the pancreatic head and the spinal cord were delineated. The Hounsfiled Units (HU) histogram in these contourswere extracted and processed using MATLAB. Eight parameters of the histogram including the mean HU over all the voxels, peak position, volume, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis, energy, and entropy were calculated for each fraction. The significances were inspected using paired two-tailed t-test and the correlations were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation tests. Results: In general, HU histogram in pancreatic head (but not in spinal cord) changed during the CRT delivery. Changes from the first to the last fraction in mean HU in pancreatic head ranged from −13.4 to 3.7 HU with an average of −4.4 HU, which was significant (P<0.001). Among other quantities, the volume decreased, the skewness increased (less skewed), and the kurtosis decreased (less sharp) during the CRT delivery. The changes of mean HU, volume, skewness, and kurtosis became significant after two weeks of treatment. Patient pathological response status is associated with the changes of SD (ΔSD), i.e., ΔSD= 1.85 (average of 7 patients) for good reponse, −0.08 (average of 6 patients) for moderate and poor response. Conclusion: Significant changes in HU histogram and the histogram-based metrics (e.g., meam HU, skewness, and kurtosis) in tumor were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for pancreas cancer. These changes may be potentially used for early assessment of treatment response.

  11. Neoadjuvant Therapy of DOF Regimen Plus Bevacizumab Can Increase Surgical Resection Ratein Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxun; Yao, Sheng; Li, Xiao-Song; Kang, Huan-Rong; Yao, Fang-Fang; Du, Nan

    2015-10-01

    Locally advanced gastric cancer (LAGC) is best treated with surgical resection. Bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has shown promising results in treating advanced gastric cancer. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using the docetaxel/oxaliplatin/5-FU (DOF) regimen and bevacizumab in LAGC patients.Eighty LAGC patients were randomized to receive DOF alone (n = 40) or DOF plus bevacizumab (n = 40) as neoadjuvant therapy before surgery. The lesions were evaluated at baseline and during treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were counted using the FISH test. Patients were followed up for 3 years to analyze the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS).The total response rate was significantly higher in the DOF plus bevacizumab group than the DOF group (65% vs 42.5%, P = 0.0436). The addition of bevacizumab significantly increased the surgical resection rate and the R0 resection rate (P < 0.05). The DOF plus bevacizumab group showed significantly greater reduction in CTC counts after neoadjuvant therapy in comparison with the DOF group (P = 0.0335). Although the DOF plus bevacizumab group had significantly improved DFS than the DOF group (15.2 months vs 12.3 months, P = 0.013), the 2 groups did not differ significantly in OS (17.6 ± 1.8 months vs 16.4 ± 1.9 months, P = 0.776. Cox proportional model analysis showed that number of metastatic lymph nodes, CTC reduction, R0 resection, and neoadjuvant therapy are independent prognostic factors for patients with LAGC.Neoadjuvant of DOF regimen plus bevacizumab can improve the R0 resection rate and DFS in LAGC. These beneficial effects might be associated with the reduction in CTC counts.

  12. Chemoradiation for gastric cancer: controversies, updates and novel techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fan, M; Hu, W

    2015-01-01

    The INT0116 trial established the role of adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) in the multidisciplinary approach to the management of locally advanced gastric cancer. However, whether adjuvant CRT is indispensable for patients undergoing D2 dissection remains undefined. The adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in stomach cancer (ARTIST) trial, which was designed to compare adjuvant chemotherapy to CRT, failed to demonstrate differences in disease-free and overall survival in the whole study group; however, subgroup analysis indicated that patients with lymph node metastasis may benefit from additional radiation. A follow-up ARTIST II trial is currently under way. The efficacy of adjuvant CRT remains controversial because of variation among studies in the inclusion criteria and treatment delivery methods; however, the identification of patients who would benefit from CRT is critical. Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy protect normal tissues via motion management and decreased radiation-induced toxicity and contribute to plan optimization. Further studies integrating clinical and molecular factors as well as neoadjuvant CRT are warranted. PMID:25827208

  13. Neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for resectable gastric cancer? A practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Craig C.; Maroun, Jean; Zuraw, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Objective To make recommendations on the use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy in addition to surgery in patients with resectable gastric cancer (T1–4, N1–2, M0). Options Neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatments compared with “curative” surgery alone. Outcomes Overall survival, disease-free survival, and adverse effects. Evidence The MEDLINE, CANCERLIT and Cochrane Library databases and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify randomized trials. Values Evidence was selected and reviewed by one member of the Cancer Care Ontario Practice Guidelines Initiative (CCOPGI) Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group and methodologists. A systematic review of the published literature was combined with a consensus process around the interpretation of the evidence in the context of conventional practice, to develop an evidence-based practice guideline. This report has been reviewed and approved by the Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group, comprising medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, a pathologist and 2 community representatives. Benefits, harms and costs When compared with surgery alone, at 3 years adjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been shown to increase overall survival by 9% (50% v. 41%, p = 0.005) and to improve relapse-free survival from 31% to 48% (p = 0.001). At 5 years, it has been shown to increase overall survival by 11.6% (40% v. 28.4%) and to improve relapse-free survival from 25% to 38% (p < 0.001). Treatment has been associated with toxic deaths in 1% of patients. The most frequent adverse effects (> grade 3 [Southwest Oncology Group toxicity scale] are hematologic (54%), gastrointestinal (33%), influenza-like (9%), infectious (6%) and neurologic (4%). The radiation fields used can possibly damage the left kidney, resulting in hypertension and other renal problems. Furthermore, this therapy could increase the demand on radiation resources. Physicians and patients should understand the tradeoffs between survival benefit

  14. Clinical potential for vitamin D as a neoadjuvant for photodynamic therapy of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Rollakanti, Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprising basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is the most common form of human cancer worldwide. Effective therapies include surgical excision, cryotherapy, and ionizing radiation, but all of these cause scarring. ALA-based PDT is a non-scarring modality used routinely for NMSC in Europe but not in the USA, primarily due to lingering uncertainties about efficacy. We have identified three agents (methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and vitamin D) that can be used as neoadjuvants, i.e., can be given as a pretreatment prior to ALA-PDT, to improve the efficacy of tumor killing in mouse models of NMSC. Vitamin D (VD3) is the most recent neoadjuvant on this list. In this presentation we make the case that VD3 may be superior to the other agents to improve results of ALA-PDT skin cancer treatment. The active form of VD3 (calcitriol) is available topically as a pharmaceutical grade cream or ointment (FDA-approved for psoriasis), and works well for boosting ALA-PDT tumor treatment in mouse models. For deep tumors not reachable by a topical route, calcitriol can be given systemically and is very effective, but carries a risk of causing hypercalcemia as a side effect. To circumvent this risk, we have conducted experiments with the natural dietary form of VD3 (cholecalciferol), and showed that this improves ALA-PDT efficacy almost to the same extent as calcitriol. Because cholecalciferol does not increase serum calcium levels, this represents a potentially extremely safe approach. Data in mouse models of BCC and SCC will be presented.

  15. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhugashvili, Maia; Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Escolar, Pedro Pablo; Calvo, Felipe; Vicente, Vicente; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  16. Role of genetic polymorphisms in NFKB-mediated inflammatory pathways in response to primary chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dzhugashvili, Maia; Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Escolar, Pedro Pablo; Calvo, Felipe; Vicente, Vicente; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression As Prognostic Marker in Patients With Anal Carcinoma Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Falk, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens of patients with anal cancer treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for EGFR was performed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of 103 patients with anal carcinoma. EGFR expression was correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics and with clinical endpoints, including local failure-free survival (LFFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: EGFR staining intensity was absent in 3%, weak in 23%, intermediate in 36% and intense in 38% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the level of EGFR staining was significantly correlated with CSS (absent/weak vs intermediate/intense expression: 5-year CSS, 70% vs 86%, P=.03). As a trend, this was also observed for DMFS (70% vs 86%, P=.06) and LFFS (70% vs 87%, P=.16). In multivariate analysis, N stage, tumor differentiation, and patients’ sex were independent prognostic factors for CSS, whereas EGFR expression only reached borderline significance (hazard ratio 2.75; P=.08). Conclusion: Our results suggest that elevated levels of pretreatment EGFR expression could be correlated with favorable clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with CRT. Further studies are warranted to elucidate how EGFR is involved in the response to CRT.

  18. Prognostic significance of survivin in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Il Yu, Jeong; Lee, Hyebin; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Yoon-La; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Cho, Yong Beom; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Won

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims This study is designed to investigate the expression of survivin and p53 in human rectal cancer tissues and analyze associations between expression and clinical outcomes in terms of disease recurrence and survival duration. Results During follow-up (median 119.0, range 6.6 to 161.3 months), tumor recurrence was detected in 50 patients (43.1%), and local recurrence developed as a first failure site in 13 patients (11.2%). Positive immunostaining of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was observed in about one quarter of patients, and about half of all patients had positive staining for p53. Both survivin and p53 were significant prognostic factors of disease-free survival in the univariate analyses, but only survivin remained a significant prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis. Methods We performed a retrospective study with 116 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT). Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies for survivin or p53, and their expression was analyzed using an individual score that combined the percentage of positive cells and staining intensity. Conclusions Overexpression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients was associated with a higher recurrence rate in rectal cancer patients treated with TME followed by postoperative CCRT. PMID:27391438

  19. Temporal Patterns of Fatigue Predict Pathologic Response in Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hee Chul; Janjan, Nora A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Lin, Edward H.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hundal, Mandeep; Zhang Yiqun; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether symptom burden before and during preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer predicts for pathologic tumor response. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T3/T4/N+ rectal cancers were treated on a Phase II trial using preoperative capecitabine and concomitant boost radiotherapy. Symptom burden was prospectively assessed before (baseline) and weekly during CRT by patient self-reported questionnaires, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Symptom scores according to tumor downstaging (TDS) were compared using Student's t tests. Logistic regression was used to determine whether symptom burden levels predicted for TDS. Lowess curves were plotted for symptom burden across time. Results: Among 51 patients evaluated for pathologic response, 26 patients (51%) had TDS. Fatigue, pain, and drowsiness were the most common symptoms. All symptoms increased progressively during treatment. Patients with TDS had lower MDASI fatigue scores at baseline and at completion (Week 5) of CRT (p = 0.03 for both) and lower levels of BFI 'usual fatigue' at baseline. Conclusion: Lower levels of fatigue at baseline and completion of CRT were significant predictors of pathologic tumor response gauged by TDS, suggesting that symptom burden may be a surrogate for tumor burden. The relationship between symptom burden and circulating cytokines merits evaluation to characterize the molecular basis of this phenomenon.

  20. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Adelstein, David J.

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  1. Prognostic Factors and Morbidities After Completion Surgery in Patients Undergoing Initial Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Touboul, Cyril; Uzan, Catherine; Mauguen, Audrey; Gouy, Sebastien; Rey, Annie; Pautier, Patricia; Lhommé, Catherine; Duvillard, Pierre; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors and morbidities of patients undergoing completion surgery for locally advanced-stage cervical cancer after initial chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Patients and Methods. Patients fulfilling the following inclusion criteria were studied: stage IB2–IVA cervical carcinoma, tumor initially confined to the pelvic cavity on conventional imaging, pelvic external radiation therapy with delivery of 45 Gy to the pelvic cavity and concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatin, 40 mg/m2 per week) followed by uterovaginal brachytherapy, and completion surgery after the end of radiation therapy including at least a hysterectomy. Results. One-hundred fifty patients treated in 1998–2007 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Prognostic factors for overall survival in the multivariate analysis were the presence and level of nodal spread (positive pelvic nodes alone: hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; positive para-aortic nodes: HR, 5.46; p < .001) and the presence and size of residual disease (RD) in the cervix (p = .02). Thirty-seven (25%) patients had 55 postoperative complications. The risk for complications was higher with a radical hysterectomy (p = .04) and the presence of cervical RD (p = .01). Conclusion. In this series, the presence and size of RD and histologic nodal involvement were the strongest prognostic factors. Such results suggest that the survival of patients treated using CRT for locally advanced cervical cancer could potentially be enhanced by improving the rate of complete response in the irradiated area (cervix or pelvic nodes) and by initially detecting patients with para-aortic spread so that treatment could be adapted in such patients. The morbidity of completion surgery is high in this context. PMID:20332143

  2. Current and emerging quantitative magnetic resonance imaging methods for assessing and predicting the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Richard G; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Weis, Jared A; Li, Xia; Dula, Adrienne N; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Smith, Seth A; Miga, Michael I; Abramson, Vandana G; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Reliable early assessment of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) would provide considerable benefit to patient care and ongoing research efforts, and demand for accurate and noninvasive early-response biomarkers is likely to increase. Response assessment techniques derived from quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hold great potential for integration into treatment algorithms and clinical trials. Quantitative MRI techniques already available for assessing breast cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy include lesion size measurement, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Emerging yet promising techniques include magnetization transfer MRI, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI, magnetic resonance elastography, and hyperpolarized MR. Translating and incorporating these techniques into the clinical setting will require close attention to statistical validation methods, standardization and reproducibility of technique, and scanning protocol design. PMID:23154619

  3. Comparison of neoadjuvant versus a surgery first approach for gastric and esophagogastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant worldwide health concern. While surgery is required for cure, all but the earliest of cancers will require multimodality therapy. Chemotherapy and chemoradiation in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings have shown to improve overall survival, but the sequencing of treatment is controversial. As healthcare expenses surge, it is increasingly important to impart value to these treatments. This review will look at the intersection of effective treatment and costs for gastric cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:296-303. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Increased Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy Among Rectal Cancer Patients Taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Zachary S.; Saha, Sandeep; Magnuson, William J.; Morris, Brett A.; Borkenhagen, Jenna F.; Ching, Alisa; Hirose, Gayle; McMurry, Vanesa; Francis, David M.; Harari, Paul M.; Chappell, Rick; Tsuji, Stuart; Ritter, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used antihypertensive medications that have been reported to affect aberrant angiogenesis and the dysregulated inflammatory response. Because of such mechanisms, it was hypothesized that these medications might affect the tumor response to neoadjuvant radiation in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS One hundred fifteen patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiation at the University of Wisconsin (UW) between 1999 and 2012 were identified. Univariate analyses were performed with anonymized patient data. In a second independent data set, 186 patients with rectal cancer who were treated with neoadjuvant radiation at the Queen’s Medical Center of the University of Hawaii (UH) between 1995 and 2010 were identified. These data were independently analyzed as before. Multivariate analyses were performed with aggregate data. RESULTS Among patients taking ACEIs/ARBs in the UW data set, a significant 3-fold increase in the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant therapy (52% vs 17%, P = .001) was observed. This finding was confirmed in the UH data set, in which a significant 2-fold–increased pCR rate (24% vs 12%, P = .03) was observed. Identified patient and treatment characteristics were otherwise balanced between patients taking and not taking ACEIs/ARBs. No significant effect was observed on pCR rates with other medications, including statins, metformin, and aspirin. Multivariate analyses of aggregate data identified ACEI/ARB use as a strong predictor of pCR (odds ratio, 4.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.06–7.82; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS The incidental use of ACEIs/ARBs among patients with rectal cancer is associated with a significantly increased rate of pCR after neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:27203227

  5. Adoption and impact of concurrent chemoradiation therapy for vaginal cancer: a National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) study.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Malolan S; Xu, Karen M; Lin, Jeff F; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Krivak, Thomas C; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-12-01

    Vaginal cancer is an uncommon entity for which concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) may be used based on small retrospective series and extrapolation from cervical cancer. We explored the adoption rate of CCRT and determined its impact on survival. Patients entered into the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) diagnosed with vaginal cancer from 1998 to 2011 who received definitive radiation therapy were included. Univariate/multivariable exploratory analyses of factors associated with CCRT were performed. Log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards modeling identified the contribution of CCRT on survival. Of the 13,689 patients identified, 8222 (60.1%) received radiation therapy. Of these, 3932 (47.8%) received CCRT and its use increased from 20.8% to 59.1% (1998-2011). Of the 23 patient, disease, facility, and treatment factors, 13 were significantly associated with patient outcomes and were entered into a binary logistic regression model. This evaluation revealed that younger age, larger tumor size, later year of diagnosis, higher facility volume, squamous histology, and higher stage (in order of increasing association) are independently associated with CCRT use. Median overall survival is longer with CCRT compared to radiation alone (56.2 vs. 41.2 months, p<0.0005). On multivariable analysis, younger age, higher facility volume, squamous histology, lower comorbidity score, CCRT, brachytherapy utilization and lower stage (in order of increasing association) are independently prognostic of improved survival. Use of CCRT for patients with vaginal cancer has increased and is associated with a significant improvement in survival in this large, national cohort. CCRT should be integrated into treatment guidelines for vaginal cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in head and neck cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Héliton S; Schluckebier, Luciene Fontes; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Small, Isabele A; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Rampini, Mariana P; Ferreira, Elza M S; Dias, Fernando L; Teich, Vanessa; Teich, Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a major event increasing treatment costs of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with chemoradiation (CRT). This study was designed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to prevent oral mucositis in HNSCC patients receiving CRT. From June 2007 to December 2010, 94 patients with HNSCC of nasopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx entered a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trial. CRT consisted of conventional radiotherapy (RT: 70.2 Gy, 1.8 Gy/d, 5 times/wk)+concurrent cisplatin (100mg/m2) every 3 weeks. An InGaAlP (660 nm-100 mW-4J/cm2) laser diode was used for LLLT. From the perspective of Brazil's public health care system (SUS), total costs were higher in Placebo Group (PG) than Laser Group (LG) for opioid use (LG=US$ 9.08, PG=US$ 44.28), gastrostomy feeding (LG=US$ 50.50, PG=US$ 129.86), and hospitalization (PG=US$ 77.03). In LG, the cost was higher for laser therapy only (US$ 1880.57). The total incremental cost associated with the use of LLLT was US$ 1689.00 per patient. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was US$ 4961.37 per grade 3-4 OM case prevented compared to no treatment. Our results indicate that morbidity was lower in the Laser Group and that LLLT was more cost-effective than placebo up to a threshold of at least US$ 5000 per mucositis case prevented. NCT01439724. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammatory Cytokines are Associated with the Development of Symptom Burden in Patients with NSCLC Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin Shelley; Shi, Qiuling; Williams, Loretta A.; Mao, Li; Cleeland, Charles S.; Komaki, Ritsuko R.; Mobley, Gary M.; Liao, Zhongxing

    2010-01-01

    Elevations in cancer treatment-induced circulating inflammatory cytokines may be partially responsible for the development of significant symptom burden (e.g., pain, fatigue, distress, disturbed sleep) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CXRT). Sixty-two patients undergoing CXRT for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) reported symptoms weekly for 15 weeks via the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Serum inflammatory cytokines were assessed weekly during therapy via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dynamic changes in cytokines and associated symptom profiles were estimated using mixed-effect models. MDASI symptom severity increased gradually as CXRT dose accumulated and peaked at week 8. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and serum soluble receptor 1 for tumor necrosis factor (sTNF-R1) increased significantly by week 8 (all p < .05). During CXRT, controlled for age, sex, race, body mass index, cancer recurrence, previous treatment status, total radiotherapy dose, and CXRT delivery technique, an increase in sTNF-R1 was significantly related to an increase in the mean score for all 15 MDASI symptoms (estimate, 1.74; SE, 0.69; p < .05) and to a larger radiation dose to normal lung volume (estimate, 1.77; SE, 0.71; p < .01); an increase in serum IL-6 was significantly related to increased mean severity for the five most severe symptoms (pain, fatigue, disturbed sleep, lack of appetite, sore throat) (estimate, 0.32; SE, 0.16; p < .05). These results suggest a role for over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines in significant worsening of symptoms in NSCLC patients undergoing CXRT, and warrant further study to identify biological targets for ameliorating treatment-related symptom burden. PMID:20353817

  8. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: An International Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Barriger, Robert B.; Rengan, Ramesh; Moreno, Marta; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Petris, Luigi; Stitt, Larry; Rodrigues, George

    2013-02-01

    Background: Radiation pneumonitis is a dose-limiting toxicity for patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 836 patients who underwent CCRT in Europe, North America, and Asia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (two-thirds vs one-third of patients). Factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis (grade {>=}2 by 1 of several scoring systems) or fatal pneumonitis were evaluated using logistic regression. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to define risk groups. Results: The median radiation therapy dose was 60 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.3 years. Most patients received concurrent cisplatin/etoposide (38%) or carboplatin/paclitaxel (26%). The overall rate of symptomatic pneumonitis was 29.8% (n=249), with fatal pneumonitis in 1.9% (n=16). In the training set, factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis were lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}) (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 per 1% increase, P=.008), and carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy (OR 3.33, P<.001), with a trend for age (OR 1.24 per decade, P=.09); the model remained predictive in the validation set with good discrimination in both datasets (c-statistic >0.65). On RPA, the highest risk of pneumonitis (>50%) was in patients >65 years of age receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. Predictors of fatal pneumonitis were daily dose >2 Gy, V{sub 20}, and lower-lobe tumor location. Conclusions: Several treatment-related risk factors predict the development of symptomatic pneumonitis, and elderly patients who undergo CCRT with carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy are at highest risk. Fatal pneumonitis, although uncommon, is related to dosimetric factors and tumor location.

  9. Inflammatory cytokines are associated with the development of symptom burden in patients with NSCLC undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin Shelley; Shi, Qiuling; Williams, Loretta A; Mao, Li; Cleeland, Charles S; Komaki, Ritsuko R; Mobley, Gary M; Liao, Zhongxing

    2010-08-01

    Elevations in cancer treatment-induced circulating inflammatory cytokines may be partially responsible for the development of significant symptom burden (e.g., pain, fatigue, distress, disturbed sleep) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CXRT). Sixty-two patients undergoing CXRT for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) reported symptoms weekly for 15 weeks via the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI). Serum inflammatory cytokines were assessed weekly during therapy via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dynamic changes in cytokines and associated symptom profiles were estimated using mixed-effect models. MDASI symptom severity increased gradually as CXRT dose accumulated and peaked at week 8. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and serum soluble receptor 1 for tumor necrosis factor (sTNF-R1) increased significantly by week 8 (all p<.05). During CXRT, controlled for age, sex, race, body mass index, cancer recurrence, previous treatment status, total radiotherapy dose, and CXRT delivery technique, an increase in sTNF-R1 was significantly related to an increase in the mean score for all 15 MDASI symptoms (estimate, 1.74; SE, 0.69; p<.05) and to a larger radiation dose to normal lung volume (estimate, 1.77; SE, 0.71; p<.01); an increase in serum IL-6 was significantly related to increased mean severity for the five most severe symptoms (pain, fatigue, disturbed sleep, lack of appetite, sore throat) (estimate, 0.32; SE, 0.16; p<.05). These results suggest a role for over-expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines in significant worsening of symptoms in NSCLC patients undergoing CXRT, and warrant further study to identify biological targets for ameliorating treatment-related symptom burden.

  10. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; Harari, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m2 and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [61Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging demonstrates measureable changes

  11. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  12. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin; Jain, Rakesh K.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRASG12D status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival. PMID:24867540

  13. Resection of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer without Regression of Arterial Encasement After Modern-Era Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Michael D; Rashid, M Farzan; Rosario, Vilma L; Schrope, Beth A; Steinman, Jonathan A; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Chabot, John A

    2017-09-11

    Modern-era systemic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) offers improved survival relative to historical regimens but not necessarily improved radiographic downstaging to allow more patients to undergo resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival, progression, and pathologic outcomes after resection of LAPC that did not regress from > 180 degrees arterial encasement after neoadjuvant therapy. Sixty-one LAPC patients were brought to the operating room after neoadjuvant therapy for NCCN-defined unresectable pancreatic cancer between 2012 and 2017. Pts were explored with intent of pancreatectomy and irreversible electroporation for margin extension; 5 (8%) had metastatic lesions on exploratory laparoscopy and were excluded from analyses. Imaging was re-examined to confirm LAPC prior to surgery. Data were analyzed from a prospective pancreatic cancer database. Patients had arterial involvement of the celiac axis (37.5%) and/or superior mesenteric artery (42.9%) and/or an extended length of the common hepatic (n = 44.6%) artery. Twenty-nine males and 27 females, median 65 years of age, received neoadjuvant gemcitabine-based (58.9%) or FOLFIRINOX (35.7%) chemotherapy and stereotactic body (42.9%) or intensity-modulated (51.8%) radiation therapy. Median months from initiation of neoadjuvant therapy to surgery was 7.5. Sixty-one percent underwent Whipple, 21% distal, and 18% modified Appleby procedures; 57% patients underwent venous reconstruction. Ninety-day mortality was 2%. An R0 margin was achieved in 80%, and 53% were N0. Median overall and progression-free survival was 18.5 (95%CI 12.27-32.33) and 8.5 months (95%CI 6.0-15.0), respectively. One- and 3-year survival from surgery was 68.5% (95%CI 53.0-79.7) and 39.0% (95%CI 23.7-53.8), respectively. With modern-era neoadjuvant therapy, R0 resections can be achieved in a majority of non-metastatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable disease based on cross

  14. Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gollins, S; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2016-02-01

    Improved surgical technique plus selective preoperative radiotherapy have decreased rectal cancer pelvic local recurrence from, historically, 25% down to about 5-10%. However, this improvement has not reduced distant metastatic relapse, which is the main cause of death and a key issue in rectal cancer management. The current standard is local pelvic treatment (surgery ± preoperative radiotherapy) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, depending on resection histology. For circumferential resection margin (CRM)-threatened cancer on baseline magnetic resonance imaging, downstaging long-course preoperative chemoradiation (LCPCRT) is generally used. However, for non-CRM-threatened disease, varying approaches are currently adopted in the UK, including straight to surgery, short-course preoperative radiotherapy and LCPCRT. Clinical trials are investigating intensification of concurrent chemoradiation. There is also increasing interest in investigating preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as a way of exposing micro-metastatic disease to full-dose systemic chemotherapy as early as possible and potentially reducing metastatic relapse. Phase II trials suggest that this strategy is feasible, with promising histological response and low rates of tumour progression during NAC. Phase III trials are needed to determine the benefit of NAC when added to standard therapy and also to determine if it can be used instead of neoadjuvant radiotherapy-based schedules. Although several measures of neoadjuvant treatment response assessment based on imaging or pathology are promising predictive biomarkers for long-term survival, none has been validated in prospective phase III studies. The phase III setting will enable this, also providing translational opportunities to examine molecular predictors of response and survival. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy and surgical rescue for locally advanced hepatoblastomas: 10 year single-center experience and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ayllon Teran, Dolores; Gómez Beltran, Oscar; Ciria Bru, Rubén; Mateos González, Elena; Peña Rosa, María José; Luque Molina, Antonio; López Cillero, Pedro; Briceño Delgado, Javier

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with long-term outcomes after multimodal management therapy. METHODS: An observational retrospective study was performed containing seven patients with hepatoblastoma (Hbl) treated in our institution, a tertiary referral center, from 2003 to 2011. Demographic, preoperative, surgical, and outcome variables were collected. A survival analysis and a review of the current literature related to combination neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection on Hbl were performed. RESULTS: The median age at surgery was 14.4 mo, with a male to female ratio of 4:3. Pretext staging at diagnosis was as follows: stage I, 4 cases; stage II, 2 patients; and stage III, 1 case. Mean pretreatment tumor volume was 735 cm3. Five out of seven patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy according to SIOPEL-3 or SIOPEL-6 protocols. Tumor volume and alpha-fetoprotein levels significantly dropped after neoadjuvant therapy. Surgical procedures performed included hemihepatectomies, segmentectomies and atypical resection. All patients received chemotherapy after surgery. Median postoperative hospital stay was 8 d. All patients were alive and disease-free after a median follow-up period of 23 mo. With regards to the literature review, seventeen articles were found that were related to our search. CONCLUSION: Our series shows how multimodal management of Hbl, exhaustive control and a meticulous surgical approach leads to almost 100% complete resection with optimal postoperative results. PMID:25110441

  16. Novel Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin C.; Ha, Ye J.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Choi, Eun Y.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jong H.; Kang, Tae W.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Yong S.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. Methods and Materials: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). Conclusion: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts.

  17. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  18. Chemoradiation Therapy for Potentially Resectable Gastric Cancer: Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Who Do Not Undergo Planned Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Das, Prajnan; Janjan, Nora A.; Badgwell, Brian D.; Phan, Alexandria T.; Delclos, Marc E.; Maru, Dipen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively analyzed treatment outcomes among resectable gastric cancer patients treated preoperatively with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) but rendered ineligible for planned surgery because of clinical deterioration or development of overt metastatic disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2004, 39 patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer received preoperative CRT but failed to undergo surgery. At baseline clinical staging, 33 (85%) patients had T3-T4 disease, and 27 (69%) patients had nodal involvement. Most patients received 45 Gy of radiotherapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients underwent induction chemotherapy before CRT. Actuarial times to local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The cause for surgical ineligibility was development of metastatic disease (28 patients, 72%; predominantly peritoneal, 18 patients), poor performance status (5 patients, 13%), patient/physician preference (4 patients, 10%), and treatment-related death (2 patients, 5%). With a median follow-up of 8 months (range, 1-95 months), actuarial 1-year LC, DC, and OS were 46%, 12%, and 36%, respectively. Median LC and OS were 11.0 and 10.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer treated with preoperative CRT are found to be ineligible for surgery principally because of peritoneal progression. Patients who are unable to undergo planned surgery have outcomes comparable to that of patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with chemotherapy alone. CRT provides durable LC for the majority of the remaining life of these patients.

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Ye J.; Kim, Chan W.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Jong H.; Choi, Eun K.; Kim, Yong S.; Kim, Jin C.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types.

  20. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kazumasa; Omura, Motoko; Hata, Masaharu; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Ogino, Ichiro; Kigasawa, Hisato; Adachi, Masataka; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  1. Performance of a Nomogram Predicting Disease-Specific Survival After an R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer in Patients Receiving Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, Johan L.; Coit, Daniel G.; Baser, Raymond E.; Gönen, Mithat; Goodman, Karyn A.; Brennan, Murray F.; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Boot, Henk; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The internationally validated Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) gastric carcinoma nomogram was based on patients who underwent curative (R0) gastrectomy, without any other therapy. The purpose of the current study was to assess the performance of this gastric cancer nomogram in patients who received chemoradiation therapy after an R0 resection for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: In a combined dataset of 76 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), and 63 patients from MSKCC, who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) after an R0 gastrectomy, the nomogram was validated by means of the concordance index (CI) and a calibration plot. Results: The concordance index for the nomogram was 0.64, which was lower than the CI of the nomogram for patients who received no adjuvant therapy (0.80). In the calibration plot, observed survival was approximately 20% higher than the nomogram-predicted survival for patients receiving postoperative CRT. Conclusions: The MSKCC gastric carcinoma nomogram significantly underpredicted survival for patients in the current study, suggesting an impact of postoperative CRT on survival in patients who underwent an R0 resection for gastric cancer, which has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. This analysis stresses the need for updating nomograms with the incorporation of multimodal strategies.

  2. Touch preparations for the intraoperative evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy have high false-negative rates in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Robin M; Shenk, Robert R; Thompson, Cheryl L; Gilmore, Hannah L

    2014-06-01

    The use of a touch preparation for intraoperative sentinel lymph node diagnosis has become a preferred method of many pathologists because of its reported high sensitivity and rapid turnaround time. However, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy many lymph nodes have significant treatment-related changes that may affect the diagnostic accuracy of the intraoperative evaluation. To determine the accuracy of touch preparation for the intraoperative diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma in the neoadjuvant setting. We reviewed retrospectively the results of intraoperative evaluations for 148 different sentinel lymph nodes from 63 patients who had undergone neoadjuvant chemotherapy for invasive breast cancer at our institution. The intraoperative touch preparation results were compared with the final pathology reports in conjunction with relevant clinical data. Use of touch preparation for the evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes intraoperatively after neoadjuvant therapy was associated with a low sensitivity of 38.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.4-54.5) but high specificity of 100% (95% CI, 96.5-100). There was no difference in sensitivity rates between cytopathologists and noncytopathologists in this cohort (P = .40). Patients with invasive lobular carcinoma and those who had a clinically positive axilla before the initiation of neoadjuvant therapy were the most likely to have a false-negative result at surgery. Intraoperative touch preparations should not be used alone for the evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer because of low overall sensitivity.

  3. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  4. Selecting Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer for Neoadjuvant Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dewdney, Alice; Cunningham, David

    2013-01-01

    Rectal cancer remains a significant problem worldwide. Outcomes vary significantly according to the stage of disease and prognostic factors, including the distance of the tumor from the circumferential resection margin. Accurate staging, including high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, allows stratification of patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk disease; this information can be used to inform multidisciplinary team decisions regarding the role of neoadjuvant therapy. Both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation reduce the risk of local recurrence compared with surgery alone, but they have little impact on survival. Although there remains a need to reduce overtreatment of those patients at moderate risk, evaluation of intensified regimens for those with high-risk disease is still required to reduce distant failure rates and improve survival in these patients with an otherwise poor prognosis. PMID:23821325

  5. Histopathological regression of gastric adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Neves Filho, Eduardo Henrique Cunha; de Sant'Ana, Rosane Oliveira; Nunes, Luiz Vianney Saldanha Cidrão; Pires, Adriana Pinheiro Bezerra; da Cunha, Maria do Perpétuo Socorro Saldanha

    2017-02-01

    As the perioperative chemotherapy has been widely implemented on the management of gastric cancer patients, heterogeneity of clinical outcomes has been evidenced in parallel to different histopathological regression pattern of gastric cancer cells. Tumor histological response to preoperative therapy has been graded by various systems in order to categorize the amount of regressive changes induced by chemotherapy in relation to residual tumor. In this context, tumor regression grading (TRG) systems might provide important prognostic information as the variety of tumor response may imply on different clinical outcomes with impact in survival rates. Moreover, gastric cancer behavior varies enormously upon individual factors such as histological classification and tumor anatomic site of involvement that have been shown to affect the TRG interpretation. On the other hand, some studies have assessed the role of molecular markers as a predictor of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in terms of TRG. Thus, the aim of this review is to evaluate how TRG has been interpreted in gastric cancer, discuss their clinical and prognostic relevance and also address the molecular markers involved in this process.

  6. The Role of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Responding to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose G; White, Julia R

    2016-01-01

    When surgery is the first line of breast cancer treatment, numerous randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses have demonstrated that postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control and survival for many women with axillary lymph node-positive disease. In contrast, there are no randomized data regarding the use of PMRT in women who receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) first followed by mastectomy. This has led to controversy regarding which patient with breast cancer will benefit from PMRT after NAC, particularly in women with clinically node-positive axillary disease that responds well and is down staged to pathologically negative disease at surgery (ypN0). We review the current evidence on this topic, which forms the underlying basis for the ongoing phase III clinical trial-National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B51/RTOG 1304-that is examining the role of regional nodal irradiation in patients with clinical N1 disease that responds to NAC and becomes ypN0 at surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. BRACHYTHERAPY ALONE OR WITH NEOADJUVANT PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR AMELANOTIC CHOROIDAL MELANOMA: Functional Outcomes and Local Tumor Control.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Maria A; Laguardia, Michela; Tagliaferri, Luca; Scupola, Andrea; Villano, Antonio; Caputo, Carmela G; Pagliara, Monica M

    2016-11-01

    To compare visual outcomes and local tumor control between two groups of patients with amelanotic choroidal melanoma treated with brachytherapy alone, or neoadjuvant photodynamic therapy before brachytherapy. Patients diagnosed with amelanotic choroidal melanoma were recruited for the study and divided into two groups: brachytherapy alone (Group A) and photodynamic therapy preceding brachytherapy (Group B). Patients of both groups were selected to be comparable. Twenty-six patients with amelanotic choroidal melanoma were enrolled in the study. Within Group B, 1 month after photodynamic therapy, ultrasonography showed reduction of tumor height in 11 patients (73.4%). The mean doses of irradiation to macula and optic nerve, at baseline were 74.37 and 52.07 Gy, whereas after photodynamic therapy there was a decrease of 17.26% (P = 0.008) and 21.22% (P = 0.025), respectively. In terms of visual acuity, a mean decrease of 14 ETDRS letters and 5 ETDRS letters was observed at 24 months follow-up, in Groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.001). Photodynamic therapy as neoadjuvant therapy before brachytherapy reduces tumor thickness in 73.4% of cases. As a result, a decrease of radiation toxic effects on visual function could be obtained, without compromising disease control.

  8. Variations in positron emission tomography-computed tomography findings for patients receiving neoadjuvant and non-neoadjuvant therapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Kil; Moon, Seok Whan

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to predict locoregional lymph node (LN) metastases using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and investigate variations in PET-CT findings for patients receiving neoadjuvant (NT) and non-neoadjuvant (non-NT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Data from 578 consecutive patients from January 2010 to December 2015 who met this study inclusion criteria were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent curative and complete resections for NSCLC in a Korean hospital. We analyzed the associations between maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and pathological stage, compared disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), investigated relationships among SUVmax values, evaluated LN status and compared pathologically negative and positive LNs by SUVmax, and assessed the influence of neoadjuvant therapy on SUVmax. All LNs were analyzed separately for N1 and N2. Results (I) For non-NT, we found significantly positive associations between pathological stage and SUVmax (tumor, N1 LN, and N2 LN, all P<0.001). For NT, we found positive correlations between pathological stage and tumor and N2 LN SUVmax, except for N1 LN (tumor P=0.005, N1 LN P=0.981, N2 LN P=0.045); (II) for non-NT, the low SUVmax group had higher DFS and OS than the high SUVmax group (DFS: tumor SUVmax P<0.001, N1 LN SUVmax P=0.002, N2 LN SUVmax P=0.027; OS: tumor SUVmax P<0.001, N1 LN SUVmax P=0.006, N2 LN SUVmax P=0.006). For NT, the low SUVmax group had nonsignificantly higher DFS and OS than the high SUVmax group. When age, sex, and SUVmax were equal, pathological stages were significantly higher for NT than non-NT (P<0.001). Non-NT had significantly higher DFS (P=0.001) and OS (P=0.024) than NT; (III) for non-NT, tumor, N1 LN, and N2 SUVmax were positively associated (all P<0.001). For NT, tumor and N2 SUVmax (P<0.001), and N1 and N2 SUVmax (P=0.025) correlated positively; tumor and N1 LN SUVmax did not (P=0.911); (IV) for

  9. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changhoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Jin Ho; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  10. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Oberije, Cary; Belderbos, Jose; Dios, Núria Rodríguez de; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Barriger, R. Bryan; Moreno-Jiménez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Everitt, Sarah; Rengan, Ramesh; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Ruyck, Kim; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  11. Phase II open-label study of bevacizumab combined with neoadjuvant anthracycline and taxane therapy for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clavarezza, Matteo; Turazza, Monica; Aitini, Enrico; Saracchini, Silvana; Garrone, Ornella; Durando, Antonio; De Placido, Sabino; Bisagni, Giancarlo; Levaggi, Alessia; Bighin, Claudia; Restuccia, Eleonora; Scalamogna, Roberto; Galli, Anna; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2013-08-01

    Neoadjuvant anthracycline- and taxane-based chemotherapy is frequently administered in breast cancer. Pathological complete response (pCR) rates vary according to clinical disease stage and biology of breast cancer. The critical role of angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer, together with significantly improved efficacy when bevacizumab is combined with chemotherapy in the metastatic setting, provides a strong rationale for evaluating the integration of bevacizumab into neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens. A single-arm, multicentre, phase II, open-label study evaluated four 3-weekly cycles of FEC (5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m(2), epirubicin 90 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2)) followed by 12 cycles of weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)) in combination with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks as neoadjuvant therapy for HER2-negative stage III locally advanced or inflammatory breast carcinoma. The primary endpoint was pCR rate. Planned treatment was completed in 49 of the 56 enrolled patients. In the intent-to-treat population, the pCR rate was 21% and the clinical response rate was 59%. Breast-conserving surgery was achieved in 34% of patients. In the subgroup of 15 patients with triple-negative disease, the pCR rate was 47%. Grade 3 adverse events in ≥5% of patients were neutropenia, leucopenia, asthenia, and rash. One case each of hypertensive retinopathy and post-operative wound complication, both after treatment completion, were considered probably related to bevacizumab. There were no treatment-related deaths and no cardiac function abnormalities. This study indicates that FEC followed by weekly paclitaxel with bevacizumab is an active neoadjuvant regimen for locally advanced breast cancer, with no major safety concerns. NCT00559845. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High response rates to neoadjuvant platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer patients carrying germ-line BRCA mutation.

    PubMed

    Gorodnova, Tatiana V; Sokolenko, Anna P; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Yanus, Grigory A; Togo, Alexandr V; Maximov, Sergey Ya; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Preoperative therapy provides an advantage for clinical drug assessment, as it involves yet untreated patients and facilitates access to the post-treatment biological material. Testing for Slavic founder BRCA mutations was performed for 225 ovarian cancer (OC) patients, who were treated by platinum-based neoadjuvant therapy. 34 BRCA1 and 1 BRCA2 mutation carriers were identified. Complete clinical response was documented in 12/35 (34%) mutation carriers and 8/190 (4%) non-carriers (P = 0.000002). Histopathologic response was observed in 16/35 (46%) women with the germ-line mutation versus 42/169 (25%) patients with the wild-type genotype (P = 0.02). Somatic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for the remaining wild-type BRCA1 allele was detected only in 7/24 (29%) post-neoadjuvant therapy residual tumor tissues as compared to 9/11 (82%) BRCA1-associated OC, which were not exposed to systemic treatment before the surgery (P = 0.009). Furthermore, comparison of pre- and post-treatment tumor material obtained from the same patients revealed restoration of BRCA1 heterozygosity in 2 out of 3 sample pairs presenting with LOH at diagnosis. The obtained data confirm high sensitivity of BRCA-driven OC to platinating agents and provide evidence for a rapid selection of tumor cell clones without LOH during the course of therapy.

  13. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  14. Factors Predicting Effectiveness of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohkura, Yu; Ueno, Masaki; Iizuka, Toshiro; Haruta, Shusuke; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Udagawa, Harushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to elucidate pretreatment factors that can predict the outcome of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy (NAC(R)T) and help us choose treatment strategies appropriate for individual patients. Few studies have investigated whether clinical data obtainable before the treatment can predict the efficacy of NAC(R)T. Of 1540 patients treated for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) at our department between January 2000 and June 2014, those who underwent surgical resection of cStage II or more advanced ESCC after NAC(R)T (113 NACRT and 146 NACT patients) were enrolled in this study. Information all available before the treatment was analyzed to extract factors that can predict the effectiveness of NAC(R)T. NAC(R)T was considered effective when Grade 2 or greater treatment efficacy was achieved based on the histological grading system. NACRT was effective in 51 (45%) of 113 patients. The analysis of 35 pretreatment factors showed that female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.650; 1.181–11.236), absence of dyslipidemia (HR = 3.284; 1.341–8.041), and histologically poorly differentiated tumor (HR = 2.431; 1.052–5.619) were factors predicting NACRT effectiveness. On the other hand, NACT was effective in 21 (14%) of 146 patients. The analysis of pretreatment factors showed that absence of dyslipidemia (HR = 10.204; 1.302–83.33) and therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (HR = 2.097; 1.027–4.280) were factors predicting NACT effectiveness. The findings of this study investigating factors that could predict the outcome of NAC(R)T suggest that the prevalence of dyslipidemia influences the outcome of NAC(R)T for ESCC. PMID:27082598

  15. Post-mastectomy radiation therapy and overall survival after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Olga; Pesce, Catherine; Singh, Puneet; Miller, Megan; Tseng, Jennifer; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Winchester, David J; Yao, Katharine

    2017-01-13

    The role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy is unclear, especially in patients that have post-treatment tumor negative axillary nodes (ypN0). The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify women that had PMRT after NAC and mastectomy for clinically node positive (cN1-2) disease from 2004 to 2008. Median follow-up time was 69 months. 8,321 patients were included for analysis, and 6140 (65.6%) had cN1 disease and 2181 (23.3%) had cN2 disease. On adjusted survival analysis, PMRT was associated with an overall survival (OS) benefit in both patients with cN1 (5-yr OS 75.8% vs. 71.9%, P < 0.01) and cN2 (5-yr OS 69.2% vs. 58.6%, P < 0.01) disease. In the subgroup of patients that were ypN0 after NAC, there was no significant survival difference (P > 0.11) for PMRT compared to those patients who were not ypN0, except for patients with hormone-receptor negative tumors, who had improved OS with PMRT (HR 0.65, P < 0.01). PMRT is associated with improved OS in patients with cN1 and cN2 disease after NAC and mastectomy. However, in the subgroup of patients that were ypN0 after NAC, PMRT improved OS for hormone-receptor negative patients but not hormone-receptor positive patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Metastasized pancreatic carcinoma with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX therapy and R0 resection

    PubMed Central

    Schneitler, Sophie; Kröpil, Patric; Riemer, Jasmin; Antoch, Gerald; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Häussinger, Dieter; Graf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastasized carcinoma of the pancreas have a very poor prognosis, and long-term survival cannot be expected. This case report describes two patients with an initial diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, both with hepatic metastases and one with an additional peritoneal carcinomatosis. Initially, both patients were treated intravenously with the FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy regimen, consisting of 5-FU, folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Surprisingly, the FOLFIRINOX treatment resulted in complete resolution of the hepatic metastases in both patients, with no lesions detectable by computed tomography scan. Furthermore, treatment response included decreased diameter of the primary tumor in the tail of the pancreas and disappearance of the additional peritoneal carcinomatosis. Both patients were discussed by our multidisciplinary tumor board, which recommended surgical resections of the carcinoma. The R0 resection of the primary tumor was successful in both cases and, interestingly, the resected tissues showed no evidence of the hepatic metastases intraoperatively. In the first case, the patient received a postoperative 6-mo course of adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine. In the second case, the patient continued to receive the FOLFIRINOX regimen for an additional 6 mo postoperatively. At 12 mo after the operation, a nonresectable retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was detected in the first patient, whereas the second patient remained in complete remission at the time of this report (5 mo after the adjuvant therapy was discontinued). This case report is the first of its kind to describe two cases of hepatic metastatic pancreatic carcinoma that were resectable following treatment with FOLFIRINOX. Further studies are required to examine the role of FOLFIRINOX as a neoadjuvant treatment option in subgroups of patients with initially metastasized pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:26034375

  17. SU-C-207B-06: Comparison of Registration Methods for Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riyahi, S; Choi, W; Bhooshan, N; Tan, S; Zhang, H; Lu, W

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare linear and deformable registration methods for evaluation of tumor response to Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: Linear and multi-resolution BSpline deformable registration were performed on Pre-Post-CRT CT/PET images of 20 patients with esophageal cancer. For both registration methods, we registered CT using Mean Square Error (MSE) metric, however to register PET we used transformation obtained using Mutual Information (MI) from the same CT due to being multi-modality. Similarity of Warped-CT/PET was quantitatively evaluated using Normalized Mutual Information and plausibility of DF was assessed using inverse consistency Error. To evaluate tumor response four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) Conventional PET/CT e.g. SUV, diameter (2) Clinical parameters e.g. TNM stage, histology (3)spatial-temporal PET features that describe intensity, texture and geometry of tumor (4)all features combined. Dominant features were identified using 10-fold cross-validation and Support Vector Machine (SVM) was deployed for tumor response prediction while the accuracy was evaluated by ROC Area Under Curve (AUC). Results: Average and standard deviation of Normalized mutual information for deformable registration using MSE was 0.2±0.054 and for linear registration was 0.1±0.026, showing higher NMI for deformable registration. Likewise for MI metric, deformable registration had 0.13±0.035 comparing to linear counterpart with 0.12±0.037. Inverse consistency error for deformable registration for MSE metric was 4.65±2.49 and for linear was 1.32±2.3 showing smaller value for linear registration. The same conclusion was obtained for MI in terms of inverse consistency error. AUC for both linear and deformable registration was 1 showing no absolute difference in terms of response evaluation. Conclusion: Deformable registration showed better NMI comparing to linear registration, however inverse consistency of

  18. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  19. Both radical prostatectomy following treatment with neoadjuvant LHRH agonist and estramustine and radiotherapy following treatment with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy achieved favorable oncological outcome in high-risk prostate cancer: a propensity-score matching analysis.

    PubMed

    Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara; Yamamoto, Hayato; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Yoneyama, Tohru; Tobisawa, Yuki; Aoki, Masahiko; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2014-04-30

    To date, the different treatment modalities for high-risk prostate cancer (Pca) have not been compared in any sufficiently large-scale, prospective, randomized clinical trial. We used propensity-score matching analysis to compare the oncological outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer between patients treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and those treated with radiation therapy (RT). We studied 216 patients who received neoadjuvant therapy followed by RP (RP cohort) and 81 patients who received neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) followed by RT (RT cohort). The RP cohort received a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist and estramustine phosphate (280 mg/day) for 6 months prior to RP. The RT cohort received ADT for at least 6 months prior to RT using a 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique. The total radiation dose was 70 to 76 Gy administered at 2 Gy/fraction. Propensity-score matching identified 78 matched pairs of patients. The 3-year overall survival rates were 98.3% and 92.1% in the RP and RT groups, respectively (P=0.156). The 3-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rates were 86.4% and 89.4% in the RP and RT groups, respectively (P=0.878). Our study findings may suggest almost identical cancer control of RP and RT with appropriate neoadjuvant therapy in high-risk Pca. Therefore, issues of health-related quality of life may have an important impact on decision making in treatment of high-risk Pca.

  20. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  1. Esophageal Cancer: Role of Imaging in Primary Staging and Response Assessment Post Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Yvette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer have meant improved survival rates for patients with esophageal cancer. Accurate pretreatment and post-neoadjuvant treatment staging of esophageal cancer is essential for assessing operability and determining the optimum treatment plan. This article reviews the multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis, staging, and assessment of treatment response in esophageal cancer.

  2. Chemoradiation therapy using radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and nedaplatin, and intra-arterial infusion using carboplatin for locally advanced head and neck cancer - Phase II study.

    PubMed

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takesi; Furutani, Kazuhisa; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Daimon, Takasi

    2007-11-01

    To improve the treatment results for locally advanced head and neck cancer, chemoradiation therapy by radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and nedaplatin (NDP), and intra-arterial therapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) was performed. Thirty-two patients were entered into the study between July 1997 and August 2002. According to the TNM staging (1997), 14 patients had stage III lesions, and 19 patients had stage IV (M0) lesions. Alternating chemoradiotherapy was performed by the following regimen. Initially, systemic chemotherapy was administered, followed by 4 weeks of radiotherapy (36Gy/20 fractions; wide field irradiation) starting 2 days after chemotherapy, a second course of systemic chemotherapy 2 days after radiotherapy, and a second course of a reduced field radiotherapy (30Gy/15 fractions) 2 days after chemotherapy. Arterial injection therapy was administered in the latter half of radiotherapy after the end of the second course of systemic chemotherapy. For systemic chemotherapy, 5FU at 3500mg/m(2)/120h was intravenously administered for 5 days (Days 1-5), and NDP at 120mg/m(2)/6h was administered on Day 6. An intra-arterial agent using CBDCA was continuously infused by a portable electrical pump for 4 (to 6) weeks. The total dose of CBDCA was AUC 6 as established by Calvert's formula. The 5-year local control rate was 59%. The 5-year overall survival rate was 51%. There were no clinically significant adverse effects. Chemoradiation therapy by radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and intra-arterial chemotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer may be useful for improving treatment results.

  3. Prognostic significance of tumor budding in rectal cancer biopsies before neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ailín C; Gibbons, David; Hanly, Ann M; Hyland, John M P; O'Connell, P Ronan; Winter, Desmond C; Sheahan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Tumor budding is an increasingly important prognostic feature for pathologists to recognize. The aim of this study was to correlate intra-tumoral budding in pre-treatment rectal cancer biopsies with pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and with long-term outcome. Data from a prospectively maintained database were acquired from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Pre-treatment rectal biopsies were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of intra-tumoral budding. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors contributing to cancer-specific death, expressed as hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Of the 185 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, 89 patients met the eligibility criteria, of whom 18 (20%) exhibited budding in a pre-treatment tumor biopsy. Intra-tumoral budding predicted a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (higher ypT stage, P=0.032; lymph node involvement, P=0.018; lymphovascular invasion, P=0.004; and residual poorly differentiated tumors, P=0.005). No patient with intra-tumoral budding exhibited a tumor regression grade 1 or complete pathological response, providing a 100% specificity and positive predictive value for non-response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Intra-tumoral budding was associated with a lower disease-free 5-year survival rate (33 vs 78%, P<0.001), cancer-specific 5-year survival rate (61 vs 87%, P=0.021) and predicted cancer-specific death (hazard ratio 3.51, 95% confidence interval 1.03-11.93, P=0.040). Intra-tumoral budding at diagnosis of rectal cancer identifies those who will poorly respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and those with a poor prognosis.

  4. The 3-Hole Minimally Invasive Esophagectomy: A Safe Procedure Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Radiation.

    PubMed

    Spector, Rona; Zheng, Yifan; Yeap, Beow Y; Wee, Jon O; Lebenthal, Abraham; Swanson, Scott J; Marchosky, David E; Enzinger, Peter C; Mamon, Harvey J; Lerut, Antoon; Odze, Robert; Srivastava, Amitabh; Agoston, Agoston T; Tippayawang, Mingkhwan; Bueno, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Induction therapy followed by esophagectomy has become standard for treatment of intermediate-stage esophageal cancer in many centers. Herein we evaluate the feasibility and safety of the 3-hole minimally invasive esophagectomy (3HMIE) approach in patients who received induction radiation and chemotherapy. Between 2003 and 2012, the records of 119 consecutive patients with esophageal cancer who underwent 3HMIE were reviewed for perioperative complications and long-term outcomes. Comparison was made between procedures performed for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation and patients who were treated with only surgery. Of them, 78 patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation and 41 patients were treated with only surgery. Tumor locations were upper (2), middle (16), distal (64), and gastroesophageal junction (37). In all, 76 patients were at clinical stage IIA or above at presentation. Increased requirement for blood replacement in the induction therapy group was significant compared with the surgery-only group. Operative time, estimated blood loss, proximal and distal margin lengths, and length of stay were not significantly different between the cohorts. There was a 30-day perioperative death (0.8%), and this patient was from the surgery-only group. No conduit necrosis or need for diversion was recorded. Overall, 5-year survival was 62% among the 107 patients with early-stage esophageal cancer. 3HMIE is feasible with low mortality and acceptable morbidity even in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who received neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. Overall perioperative and survival outcomes are similar to or better than those reported in the published literature on esophagectomy after induction therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neoadjuvant transcatheter arterial chemoembolization does not provide survival benefit compared to curative therapy alone in single hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Ching-I; Huang, Chung-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Huang, Jee-Fu; Dai, Chia-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Yu, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2015-02-01

    The role of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) prior to curative therapy is still unclear. The aim of our study was to elucidate the survival of single hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and also to clarify whether TACE plus sequential curative therapy provides benefits in single HCC. A total of 470 patients with a diagnosis of single HCC between 2005 and 2010 were studied. The factors associated with clinical outcomes were analyzed. The outcomes between patients who underwent neoadjuvant TACE and those who did not were also compared. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates of all patients were 92.6%, 73.3%, and 59.6%, respectively. Child-Pugh class A [HR: 2.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.277-3.254, p = 0.003], very early stage Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) (HR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.021-4.025, p = 0.043), tumor size < 5 cm (HR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.115-2.751, p = 0.015), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level < 200 ng/mL (HR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.346-3.182, p = 0.001), and curative-based therapy (HR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.442-3.224, p < 0.001) were factors associated with better OS. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates of all the patients were 75.4%, 53.7%, and 36.3%, respectively. Only Child-Pugh class A (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.068-2.294, p = 0.022) and curative-based therapy (HR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.128-2.028, p = 0.006) were significantly associated with better DFS. Neoadjuvant TACE did not provide benefit compared with curative therapy alone in subgroup analysis. In conclusion, neoadjuvant TACE is not recommended in single HCC patients who may indicate for curative therapy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  7. Neoadjuvant Radiation Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Data From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Sherr, David L.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has been investigated in several trials as a strategy for downstaging locally advanced disease to resectability. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) vs. other treatments on long-term survival for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer in a large population-based sample group. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database (1994-2003) was queried for cases of surgically resected pancreatic cancer. Retrospective analysis was performed. The endpoint of the study was overall survival. Results: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we found that the median overall survival of patients receiving neoadjuvant RT was 23 months vs. 12 months with no RT and 17 months with adjuvant RT. Using Cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, stage, grade, and year of diagnosis), we found that neoadjuvant RT results in significantly higher rates of survival than other treatments (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.79; p = 0.001). Specifically comparing adjuvant with neoadjuvant RT, we found a significantly lower HR for death in patients receiving neoadjuvant RT rather than adjuvant RT (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.90; p = 0.03). Conclusions: This analysis of SEER data showed a survival benefit for the use of neoadjuvant RT over surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant RT in treating pancreatic cancer. Therapeutic strategies that use neoadjuvant RT should be further explored for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  8. Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    K. Dave, J. Eisenbrey, P. Machado, J. B. Liu, D. A. Merton , B. C. Cavanaugh, F. Forsberg. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring...Raichlen, J. B. Liu, C. Miller, J. M. Gonzalez, M. E. McDonald, D. A. Merton , D. Brown, V. Navarro. On the utility of subharmonic contrast...Cavanaugh, P. Machado, J. B. Liu, J. Eisenbrey, J. K. Dave, D. A. Merton . Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring neoadjuvant

  9. Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    J. Eisenbrey, P. Machado, J. B. Liu, D. A. Merton , B. C. Cavanaugh, F. Forsberg. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring interstitial...Raichlen, J. B. Liu, C. Miller, J. M. Gonzalez, M. E. McDonald, D. A. Merton , D. Brown, V. Navarro. On the utility of subharmonic contrast microbubble...Cavanaugh, P. Machado, J. B. Liu, J. Eisenbrey, J. K. Dave, D. A. Merton . Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  10. [Downstaging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer modifies the planned original surgery].

    PubMed

    Scutari, F; Tramutola, G; Morlino, A; Rossi, M T; Manzione, L; Rosati, G; Sopranzi, A

    2008-01-01

    Cancer of the rectum has been for more years burdened with a heavy rate of local relapse about 30%. The introduction of total meso-rectum excision has reduced the rate of up to 5-8%. Later more studies proved how the preoperative radiotherapy was able to reduce the rate of local relapse. The Authors introduce studies about downstaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer and discuss about their own series from 2005 to 2007.

  11. Phase I Study of Preoperative Short-Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Adams, Judith; Yeap, Beow; Winrich, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of 1 week of chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with localized resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the head were enrolled from May 2006 to September 2008. Patients received radiation with proton beam. In dose level 1, patients received 3 GyE x 10 (Week 1, Monday-Friday; Week 2, Monday-Friday). Patients in Dose Levels 2 to 4 received 5 GyE x 5 in progressively shortened schedules: level 2 (Week 1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; Week 2, Tuesday and Thursday), Level 3 (Week 1, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; Week 2, Monday), Level 4 (Week 1, Monday through Friday). Capecitabine was given as 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. Weeks 1 and 2 Monday through Friday for a total of 10 days in all dose levels. Surgery was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemotherapy for Dose Levels 1 to 3 and then after 1 to 3 weeks for Dose Level 4. Results: Three patients were treated at Dose Levels 1 to 3 and 6 patients at Dose Level 4, which was selected as the MTD. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. Grade 3 toxicity was noted in 4 patients (pain in 1; stent obstruction or infection in 3). Eleven patients underwent resection. Reasons for no resection were metastatic disease (3 patients) and unresectable tumor (1 patient). Mean postsurgical length of stay was 6 days (range, 5-10 days). No unexpected 30-day postoperative complications, including leak or obstruction, were found. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with 1 week of proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery is feasible. A Phase II study is underway.

  12. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  13. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Zecha, Judith A E M; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Nair, Raj G; Epstein, Joel B; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A; Milstein, Dan M J; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E; Schubert, Mark M; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved and dosimetric parameters may lead to the management of a broader range of complications associated with HNC treatment. This could enhance patient adherence to cancer therapy, and improve quality of life and treatment outcomes. The mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations for PBM have been reviewed in part 1. Part 2 discusses the head and neck treatment side effects for which PBM may prove to be effective. In addition, PBM parameters for each of these complications are suggested and future research directions are discussed. Narrative review and presentation of PBM parameters are based on current evidence and expert opinion. PBM may have potential applications in the management of a broad range of side effects of (chemo)radiation therapy (CRT) in patients being treated for HNC. For OM management, optimal PBM parameters identified were as follows: wavelength, typically between 633 and 685 nm or 780-830 nm; energy density, laser or light-emitting diode (LED) output between 10 and 150 mW; dose, 2-3 J (J/cm(2)), and no more than 6 J/cm(2) on the tissue surface treated; treatment schedule, two to three times a week up to daily; emission type, pulsed (<100 Hz); and route of delivery, intraorally and/or transcutaneously. To facilitate further studies, we propose potentially effective PBM parameters for prophylactic and therapeutic use in supportive care for dermatitis, dysphagia, dry mouth, dysgeusia, trismus, necrosis, lymphedema, and voice/speech alterations. PBM may have a role in supportive care for a broad range of complications associated with the treatment of HNC with CRT. The suggested PBM irradiation

  14. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols

    PubMed Central

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved and dosimetric parameters may lead to the management of a broader range of complications associated with HNC treatment. This could enhance patient adherence to cancer therapy, and improve quality of life and treatment outcomes. The mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations for PBM have been reviewed in part 1. Part 2 discusses the head and neck treatment side effects for which PBM may prove to be effective. In addition, PBM parameters for each of these complications are suggested and future research directions are discussed. Methods Narrative review and presentation of PBM parameters are based on current evidence and expert opinion. Results PBM may have potential applications in the management of a broad range of side effects of (chemo)radiation therapy (CRT) in patients being treated for HNC. For OM management, optimal PBM parameters identified were as follows: wavelength, typically between 633 and 685 nm or 780–830 nm; energy density, laser or light-emitting diode (LED) output between 10 and 150 mW; dose, 2–3 J (J/cm2), and no more than 6 J/cm2 on the tissue surface treated; treatment schedule, two to three times a week up to daily; emission type, pulsed (<100 Hz); and route of delivery, intraorally and/or transcutaneously. To facilitate further studies, we propose potentially effective PBM parameters for prophylactic and therapeutic use in supportive care for dermatitis, dysphagia, dry mouth, dysgeusia, trismus, necrosis, lymphedema, and voice/speech alterations. Conclusion PBM may have a role in supportive care for a broad range of complications associated with the treatment of HNC with CRT

  15. Development of a Ki-67-based clinical trial assay for neoadjuvant endocrine therapy response monitoring in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Rodrigo; DeSchryver, Katherine; Ma, Cynthia; Tao, Yu; Hoog, Jeremy; Cheang, Maggie; Crouch, Erika; Dahiya, Neha; Sanati, Souzan; Barnes, Michael; Sarian, Luis Otávio Zanatta; Olson, John; Allred, Donald Craig; Ellis, Matthew J

    2017-09-01

    The recent publication of the ACOSOG Z1031 trial results demonstrated that Ki-67 proliferation marker-based neoadjuvant endocrine therapy response monitoring could be used for tailoring the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in ER+HER2-negative breast cancer patients. In this paper, we describe the development of the Ki-67 clinical trial assay used for this study. Ki-67 assay assessment focused on reproducing a 2.7% Ki-67 cut-point (CP) required for calculating the Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index and a 10% CP for poor endocrine therapy response identification within the first month of neoadjuvant endocrine treatment. Image analysis was assessed to increase the efficiency of the scoring process. Clinical outcome concordance for two independent Ki-67 scores was the primary performance metric. Discordant scores led to a triage approach where cases with complex histological features that software algorithms could not resolve were flagged for visual point counting (17%). The final Ki-67 scoring approach was run on T1/2 N0 cases from the P024 and POL trials (N = 58). The percent positive agreement for the 2.7% CP was 87.5% (95% CI 61.7-98.5%); percent negative agreement 88.9% (95% CI: 65.3-98.6%). Minor discordance did not affect the ability to predict similar relapse-free outcomes (Log-Rank P = 0.044 and P = 0.055). The data for the 10% early triage CP in the POL trial were similar (N = 66), the percentage positive agreement was 100%, and percent negative agreement 93.55% (95% CI: 78.58-99.21%). The independent survival predictions were concordant (Log-rank P = 0.0001 and P = 0.01). We have developed an efficient and reproducible Ki-67 scoring system that was approved by the Clinical Trials Evaluation Program for NCI-supported neoadjuvant endocrine therapy trials. Using the methodology described here, investigators are able to identify a subgroup of patients with ER+HER2-negative breast cancer that can be safely managed without the need of adjuvant

  16. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cerne, Jasmina Z.; Munsell, Mark F.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J.; Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  17. Interim (18)F-FDG PET/CT During Chemoradiation Therapy in the Management of Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Cristina; Ronchi, Sara; Cremonesi, Marta; Gilardi, Laura; Travaini, Laura; Ferrari, Mahila; Alterio, Daniela; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Ciardo, Delia; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Grana, Chiara Maria

    2017-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality widely applied in oncology for tumor staging, volume delineation in radiation therapy planning, and therapy response assessment. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET combined with computed tomography plays a significant role in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients in the pretreatment setting to predict outcome and prognosis and after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) to assess tumor response. This review aims to evaluate the use of FDG PET acquired during CRT, ad interim FDG (FDGint), to identify tumor response at an early stage, modify the treatment plan if necessary, or set up alternative strategies to enhance the therapeutic ratio. Most of the studies confirmed the value of FDGint in predicting the response to CRT, whereas a few highlighted the poor predictive value of FDGint compared with FDG acquired 2 to 4 months after the end of CRT, which was well correlated with local and regional control and survival. Such findings deserve to be further analyzed in more homogeneous series with greater patient numbers according to the tumor site and CRT schedules. The best time to assess tumor response during radiation therapy remains a matter of debate, although 2 weeks seems most favorable, still providing the opportunity to adapt the treatment strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab.

    PubMed

    Gollamudi, Jahnavi; Parvani, Jenny G; Schiemann, William P; Vinayak, Shaveta

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2(+)) breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2(+) breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2(+) breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients.

  19. Neoadjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer: the clinical utility of pertuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Gollamudi, Jahnavi; Parvani, Jenny G; Schiemann, William P; Vinayak, Shaveta

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients harbor tumors that overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as ErbB2), a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. HER2 amplification and hyperactivation drive the growth and survival of breast cancers through the aberrant activation of proto-oncogenic signaling systems, particularly the Ras/MAP kinase and PI3K/AKT pathways. Although HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer was originally considered to be a highly aggressive form of the disease, the clinical landscape of HER2+ breast cancers has literally been transformed by the approval of anti-HER2 agents for adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Indeed, pertuzumab is a novel monoclonal antibody that functions as an anti-HER2 agent by targeting the extracellular dimerization domain of the HER2 receptor; it is also the first drug to receive an accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in neoadjuvant settings in early-stage HER2+ breast cancer. Here, we review the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to the pathophysiology of HER2 in breast cancer, as well as summarize the landmark preclinical and clinical findings underlying the approval and use of pertuzumab in the neoadjuvant setting. Finally, the molecular mechanisms operant in mediating resistance to anti-HER2 agents, and perhaps to pertuzumab as well, will be discussed, as will the anticipated clinical impact and future directions of pertuzumab in breast cancer patients. PMID:26937204

  20. Impact of neoadjuvant therapy in downstaging of lower rectal adenocarcinoma and the role of pelvic magnetic resonance in staging.

    PubMed

    Magri, Karina Dagre; Bin, Fang Chia; Formiga, Fernanda Bellotti; Manzione, Thiago da Silveira; Gomes, Caroline Merci Caliari de Neves; Candelári, Paulo de Azeredo Passos; Ortiz, Jorge Alberto; Klug, Wilmar Artur; Mandia, José; Capelhuchnik, Peretz

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the effect of neoadjuvant therapy on the stage (TNM) of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and validate the use of MRI as a method of determining locoregional stage. we conducted a retrospective study of 157 patients with lower rectum adenocarcinoma, whom we divided into two groups: Group 1, 81 patients (52%) who had undergone surgical treatment initially, with the purpose to analyze the accuracy of locoregional staging by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging throug the comparison of radiological findings with pathological ones; Group 2, 76 patients (48%), who had been submitted to neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy and radiation) prior to definitive surgical treatment, so as to evaluate its effects on the stage by comparing clinical and radiological findings with pathology. In group 1, the accuracy of determining tumor depth (T) and lymph node involvement (N) was 91.4% and 82.7%, respectively. In group 2, neoadjuvant therapy decreased the T stage, N stage and TNM stage in 51.3%, 21% and 48.4% of cases, respectively. neoadjuvant therapy in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma is effective in decreasing disease stage, and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging is effective for locoregional staging. avaliar o efeito da terapia neoadjuvante, nos pacientes portadores de adenocarcinoma de reto, sobre o estádio (TNM) e validar o emprego da ressonância magnética como método de determinação do estádio locorregional. estudo retrospectivo de 157 pacientes com diagnóstico de adenocarcinoma de reto baixo, que foram divididos em dois grupos: Grupo 1, 81 pacientes (52%), submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico de princípio, cuja finalidade foi analisar a acurácia da determinação do estádio locorregional pela ressonância magnética da pelve, através da comparação entre os achados radiológicos e os achados anatomopatológicos; Grupo 2, 76 pacientes (48%), encaminhados à terapia neoadjuvante (quimioterapia e radioterapia), antes do tratamento cirúrgico definitivo

  1. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer Patients: An Intraindividual Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Koehler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Results: Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Conclusions: Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences.

  2. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  3. Helical tomotherapy versus conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients: an intraindividual comparison.

    PubMed

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Köhler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Carboxylesterase 2 as a Determinant of Response to Irinotecan and Neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX Therapy in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Capello, Michela; Lee, Minhee; Wang, Hong; Babel, Ingrid; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin; Tian, Weihua; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serine hydrolases (SHs) are among the largest classes of enzymes in humans and play crucial role in many pathophysiological processes of cancer. We have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis to assess the differential expression and cellular localization of SHs, which uncovered distinctive expression of Carboxylesterase 2 (CES2), the most efficient carboxyl esterase in activating the prodrug irinotecan into SN-38, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We therefore assessed the extent of heterogeneity in CES2 expression in PDAC and its potential relevance to irinotecan based therapy. Methods: CES2 expression in PDAC and paired nontumor tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CES2 activity was assessed by monitoring the hydrolysis of the substrate p-NPA and correlated with irinotecan IC50 values by means of Pearson’s correlation. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were applied to assess the association between overall survival and CES2 expression in patients who underwent neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Statistically significant overexpression of CES2, both at the mRNA and protein levels, was observed in PDAC compared with paired nontumor tissue (P < .001), with 48 of 118 (40.7%) tumors exhibiting high CES2 expression. CES2 activity in 11 PDAC cell lines was inversely correlated with irinotecan IC50 values (R = -0.68, P = .02). High CES2 expression in tumor tissue was associated with longer overall survival in resectable and borderline resectable patients who underwent neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX treatment (hazard ratio = 0.14, 95% confidence interval = 0.04 to 0.51, P = .02). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CES2 expression and activity, by mediating the intratumoral activation of irinotecan, is a contributor to FOLFIRINOX sensitivity in pancreatic cancer and CES2 assessment may define a subset of patients likely to respond to irinotecan based therapy. PMID:26025324

  5. International preoperative rectal cancer management: staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and impact of multidisciplinary teams.

    PubMed

    Augestad, Knut M; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Stulberg, Jonah; Reynolds, Harry; Senagore, Anthony; Champagne, Brad; Heriot, Alexander G; Leblanc, Fabien; Delaney, Conor P

    2010-11-01

    Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates. One hundred seventy-three international colorectal centers were invited to participate in a survey of preoperative management of rectal cancer. One hundred twenty-three (71%) responded, with a majority of respondents from North America, Europe, and Asia. Ninety-three percent have more than 5 years' experience with rectal cancer surgery. Fifty-five percent use CT scan, 35% MRI, 29% ERUS, 12% digital rectal examination and 1% PET scan in all RC cases. Seventy-four percent consider threatened circumferential margin (CRM) an indication for neoadjuvant treatment. Ninety-two percent prefer 5-FU-based long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). A significant difference in practice exists between the US and non-US surgeons: poor histological differentiation as an indication for CRT (25% vs. 7.0%, p = 0.008), CRT for stage II and III rectal cancer (92% vs. 43%, p = 0.0001), MRI for all RC patients (20% vs. 42%, p = 0.03), and ERUS for all RC patients (43% vs. 21%, p = 0.01). Multidisciplinary team meetings significantly influence decisions for MRI (RR = 3.62), neoadjuvant treatment (threatened CRM, RR = 5.67, stage II + III RR = 2.98), quality of pathology report (RR = 4.85), and sphincter-saving surgery (RR = 3.81). There was little consensus on staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and preoperative management of rectal cancer. Regular multidisciplinary team meetings influence decisions about neoadjuvant treatment and staging methods.

  6. DNA Repair Biomarkers Predict Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Brian M.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Weaver, David T.; Mak, Raymond H.; Fidias, Panagiotis; Wain, John; Choi, Noah C.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection for esophageal cancer has improved clinical outcomes in some trials. Pathologic complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant therapy is associated with better clinical outcome in these patients, but only 22% to 40% of patients achieve pCR. Because both chemotherapy and radiotherapy act by inducing DNA damage, we analyzed proteins selected from multiple DNA repair pathways, using quantitative immunohistochemistry coupled with a digital pathology platform, as possible biomarkers of treatment response and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We identified 79 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between October 1994 and September 2002, with biopsy tissue available, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital and used their archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy samples to create tissue microarrays (TMA). TMA sections were stained using antibodies against proteins in various DNA repair pathways including XPF, FANCD2, PAR, MLH1, PARP1, and phosphorylated MAPKAP kinase 2 (pMK2). Stained TMA slides were evaluated using machine-based image analysis, and scoring incorporated both the intensity and the quantity of positive tumor nuclei. Biomarker scores and clinical data were assessed for correlations with clinical outcome. Results: Higher scores for MLH1 (p = 0.018) and lower scores for FANCD2 (p = 0.037) were associated with pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation on multivariable analysis. Staining of MLH1, PARP1, XPF, and PAR was associated with recurrence-free survival, and staining of PARP1 and FANCD2 was associated with overall survival on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: DNA repair proteins analyzed by immunohistochemistry may be useful as predictive markers for response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. These results are hypothesis generating and need

  7. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, Christopher H.; Eng, Cathy; Feig, Barry W.; Das, Prajnan; Skibber, John M.; Chang, George J.; Wolff, Robert A.; Krishnan, Sunil; Hamilton, Stanley; Janjan, Nora A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ellis, Lee M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We designed this Phase II trial to assess the efficacy and safety of the addition of bevacizumab to concurrent neoadjuvant capecitabine-based chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Between April 2004 and December 2007, 25 patients with clinically staged T3N1 (n = 20) or T3N0 (n = 5) rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks), bevacizumab every 2 weeks (3 doses of 5 mg/kg), and capecitabine (900 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily only on days of radiation), followed by surgical resection a median of 7.3 weeks later. Results: Procedures included abdominoperineal resection (APR; 6 patients), proctectomy with coloanal anastamosis (8 patients), low anterior resection (10 patients), and local excision (1 patient). Eight (32%) of 25 patients had a pathologic complete response, and 6 (24%) of 25 had <10% viable tumor cells in the specimen. No patient had Grade 3 hand-foot syndrome, gastrointestinal toxicity, or significant hematologic toxicity. Three wound complications required surgical intervention (one coloanal anastamostic dehiscence requiring completion APR and two perineal wound dehiscences after initial APR). Five minor complications occurred that resolved without operative intervention. With a median follow-up of 22.7 months (range, 4.5-32.4 months), all patients were alive; one patient has had a recurrence in the pelvis (2-year actuarial rate, 6.2%) and 3 had distant recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemoradiation resulted in encouraging pathologic complete response without an increase in acute toxicity. The impact of bevacizumab on perineal wound and anastamotic healing due to concurrent bevacizumab requires further study.

  8. Benefits and Disadvantages of Neoadjuvant Radiochemotherapy (RCT) in the Multimodal Therapy of Squamous Esophageal Cancer (ESC).

    PubMed

    Hanna, Adrian; Birla, Rodica; Iosif, Cristina; Boeriu, Marius; Constantinoiu, Silviu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant RCT in multimodal therapyof ESC. Between 1998-2014 221 patients were treated with ESC, 85 of whom received neoadjuvant RCT. For these we have made imaging and pathologic assessment of response using RECIST and MANDARD criteria and statistical data were interpreted in terms of the factors that influence the response. Also, they were evaluated statistical correlations between RCT and resectability, postoperative morbidity, mortality and long-term survival. 45 patients were imagistic responders and 34 underwent surgery, 40 non-responders of which 14 underwent surgery. Of the 48 surgical patients with preoperative RCT, histopathological evaluation showed that 32 were pathological responders and 16 non responders. There were performed statistical analyzes of correlations between RCT and resectability, stage, location of ESC, morbidity, mortality and survival. RCT increase resectability, improves survival and maximum duration of survival, more in responders than in nonresponders and does not affect postoperative complications and postoperative mortality, nor among the responders or nonresponders. Imaging evaluation result of the response to RCT overestimate responders. Celsius.

  9. Refining pathological evaluation of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Fergus; Nolan, Luke; Bateman, Adrian C; Byrne, James P; Kelly, Jamie J; Bailey, Ian S; Sharland, Donna M; Rees, Charlotte N; Iveson, Timothy J; Underwood, Tim J; Bateman, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess tumour regression grade (TRG) and lymph node downstaging to help define patients who benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: Two hundred and eighteen consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus or gastro-esophageal junction treated with surgery alone or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery between 2005 and 2011 at a single institution were reviewed. Triplet neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of platinum, fluoropyrimidine and anthracycline was considered for operable patients (World Health Organization performance status ≤ 2) with clinical stage T2-4 N0-1. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) was assessed using TRG, as described by Mandard et al. In addition lymph node downstaging was also assessed. Lymph node downstaging was defined by cN1 at diagnosis: assessed radiologically (computed tomography, positron emission tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography), then pathologically recorded as N0 after surgery; ypN0 if NAC given prior to surgery, or pN0 if surgery alone. Patients were followed up for 5 years post surgery. Recurrence was defined radiologically, with or without pathological confirmation. An association was examined between t TRG and lymph node downstaging with disease free survival (DFS) and a comprehensive range of clinicopathological characteristics. RESULTS: Two hundred and eighteen patients underwent esophageal resection during the study interval with a mean follow up of 3 years (median follow up: 2.552, 95%CI: 2.022-3.081). There was a 1.8% (n = 4) inpatient mortality rate. One hundred and thirty-six (62.4%) patients received NAC, with 74.3% (n = 101) of patients demonstrating some signs of pathological tumour regression (TRG 1-4) and 5.9% (n = 8) having a complete pathological response. Forty four point one percent (n = 60) had downstaging of their nodal disease (cN1 to ypN0), compared to only 15.9% (n = 13) that underwent surgery alone (pre-operatively overstaged: cN1 to pN0), (P < 0.0001). Response to

  10. Inflammation, Apoptosis, and Necrosis Induced by Neoadjuvant Fas Ligand Gene Therapy Improves Survival of Dogs With Spontaneous Bone Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Modiano, Jaime F; Bellgrau, Donald; Cutter, Gary R; Lana, Susan E; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Ehrhart, EJ; Wilke, Vicki L; Charles, J Brad; Munson, Sibyl; Scott, Milcah C; Pozniak, John; Carlson, Cathy S; Schaack, Jerome; Duke, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) gene therapy for cancer has shown promise in rodents; however, its efficacy in higher mammals remains unknown. Here, we used intratumoral FasL gene therapy delivered in an adenovirus vector (Ad-FasL) as neoadjuvant to standard of care in 56 dogs with osteosarcoma. Tumors from treated dogs had greater inflammation, necrosis, apoptosis, and fibrosis at day 10 (amputation) compared to pretreatment biopsies or to tumors from dogs that did not receive Ad-FasL. Survival improvement was apparent in dogs with inflammation or lymphocyte-infiltration scores >1 (in a 3-point scale), as well as in dogs that had apoptosis scores in the top 50th percentile (determined by cleaved caspase-3). Survival was no different than that expected from standard of care alone in dogs with inflammation scores ≤1 or apoptosis scores in the bottom 50th percentile. Reduced Fas expression by tumor cells was associated with prognostically advantageous inflammation, and this was seen only in dogs that received Ad-FasL. Together, the data suggest that Ad-FasL gene therapy improves survival in a subset of large animals with naturally occurring tumors, and that at least in some tumor types like osteosarcoma, it is most effective when tumor cells fail to express Fas. PMID:22850679

  11. SU-D-207B-07: Development of a CT-Radiomics Based Early Response Prediction Model During Delivery of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klawikowski, S; Christian, J; Schott, D; Zhang, M; Li, X

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pilot study developing a CT-texture based model for early assessment of treatment response during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily CT data acquired for 24 pancreatic head cancer patients using CT-on-rails, during the routine CT-guided CRT delivery with a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, were analyzed. The pancreas head was contoured on each daily CT. Texture analysis was performed within the pancreas head contour using a research tool (IBEX). Over 1300 texture metrics including: grey level co-occurrence, run-length, histogram, neighborhood intensity difference, and geometrical shape features were calculated for each daily CT. Metric-trend information was established by finding the best fit of either a linear, quadratic, or exponential function for each metric value verses accumulated dose. Thus all the daily CT texture information was consolidated into a best-fit trend type for a given patient and texture metric. Linear correlation was performed between the patient histological response vector (good, medium, poor) and all combinations of 23 patient subgroups (statistical jackknife) determining which metrics were most correlated to response and repeatedly reliable across most patients. Control correlations against CT scanner, reconstruction kernel, and gated/nongated CT images were also calculated. Euclidean distance measure was used to group/sort patient vectors based on the data of these trend-response metrics. Results: We found four specific trend-metrics (Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1InverseDiffMomentNorm, Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1InverseDiffNorm, Gray Level Coocurence Matrix311-1 Homogeneity2, and Intensity Direct Local StdMean) that were highly correlated with patient response and repeatedly reliable. Our four trend-metric model successfully ordered our pilot response dataset (p=0.00070). We found no significant correlation to our control parameters: gating (p=0.7717), scanner (p

  12. Predicting the Response of Breast Cancer to Neoadjuvant Therapy Using a Mechanically Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jared A.; Miga, Michael I.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Li, Xia; Abramson, Vandana; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Pendyala, Praveen; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    While there is considerable data on the use of mathematical modeling to describe tumor growth and response to therapy, previous approaches are often not of the form that can be easily applied to clinical data to generate testable predictions in individual patients. Thus, there is a clear need to develop and apply clinically-relevant oncological models that are amenable to available patient data and yet retain the most salient features of response prediction. In this study we show how a biomechanical model of tumor growth can be initialized and constrained by serial patient-specific magnetic resonance imaging data, obtained at two time points early in the course of therapy (before initiation and following one cycle of therapy), to predict the response for individual patients with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant therapy. Using our mechanics coupled modeling approach, we are able to predict, after the first cycle of therapy, breast cancer patients that would eventually achieve a complete pathological response and those who would not, with receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87, sensitivity of 92%, and specificity of 84%. Our approach significantly outperformed the AUCs achieved by standard (i.e., not mechanically coupled)reaction-diffusion predictive modeling (0.75), simple analysis of the tumor cellularity estimated from imaging data (0.73), and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST; 0.71). Thus, we show the potential for mathematical model prediction for use as a prognostic indicator of response to therapy. The work indicates the considerable promise of image-driven biophysical modeling for predictive frameworks within therapeutic applications. PMID:26333809

  13. A Decision Aid for Women Considering Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Operable Invasive Breast Cancer: Development and Protocol of a Phase II Evaluation Study (ANZ1301 DOMINO).

    PubMed

    Zdenkowski, Nicholas; Butow, Phyllis; Hutchings, Elizabeth; Douglas, Charles; Coll, Joseph R; Boyle, Frances M

    2016-05-20

    Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is offered to selected women with large and/or highly proliferative operable breast cancers. This option adds further complexity to an already complex breast cancer treatment decision tree. Patient decision aids are an established method of increasing patient involvement and knowledge while decreasing decisional conflict. There is currently no decision aid available for women considering neoadjuvant systemic therapy. We aimed to develop a decision aid for women diagnosed with operable breast cancer and considered suitable for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, and the protocol for a multicenter pre-post study evaluating the acceptability and feasibility of the decision aid. The decision aid was developed through literature review, expert advisory panel, adherence to the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, and iterative review. The protocol for evaluation of the decision aid consists of the following: eligible women will undertake a series of questionnaires prior to and after using the decision aid. The primary endpoint is decision aid acceptability to patients and investigators and the feasibility of use. Secondary endpoints include change in decisional conflict, participant knowledge, and information involvement preference. Feasibility is defined as the proportion of eligible participants who use the decision aid to help inform their treatment decision. This study has recruited 29 out of a planned 50 participants at four Australian sites. A 12-month recruitment period is expected with a further 12-months follow-up. The decision aid has the potential to allow patients with operable breast cancer, who have been offered neoadjuvant systemic therapy, decreased decisional conflict, and greater involvement in the decision. If this study finds that an online decision aid is feasible and acceptable, it will be made widely available for routine clinical practice. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614001267640; http

  14. Combined chemoradiation therapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin for organ preservation in muscle-invasive bladder cancer: long-term results of a phase 1 trial.

    PubMed

    Azria, David; Riou, Olivier; Rebillard, Xavier; Thezenas, Simon; Thuret, Rodolphe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane

    2014-03-15

    Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer-A value-based proposition.

    PubMed

    Massarweh, Nader N; Artinyan, Avo; Chang, George J

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade, the use of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation has been an integral part of the care of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, emerging data are beginning to challenge the current treatment paradigm of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation followed by radical resection and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy. Going forward, the challenge will be to identify patients for whom radiation can be safely omitted and those for whom it can potentially provide added oncologic value. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:304-310. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Using the 21-gene assay from core needle biopsies to choose neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer: A multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Bear, Harry D; Wan, Wen; Robidoux, André; Rubin, Peter; Limentani, Steven; White, Richard L; Granfortuna, James; Hopkins, Judith O; Oldham, Dwight; Rodriguez, Angel; Sing, Amy P

    2017-06-01

    We hypothesized that the Oncotype Dx(®) 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) could guide neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) to facilitate breast conserving surgery (BCS) for hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancers. This study enrolled patients with HR+, HER2-negative, invasive breast cancers not suitable for BCS (size ≥ 2 cm). Core needle biopsy blocks were tested. For tumors with RS < 11, patients received hormonal therapy (NHT); patients with RS > 25 tumors received chemotherapy (NCT); patients with RS 11-25 were randomized to NHT or NCT. Primary endpoint was whether 1/3 or more of randomized patients refused assigned treatment. Sixty-four patients were enrolled. Of 33 patients with RS 11-25, 5 (15%) refused assignment to NCT. This was significantly lower than the 33% target (binomial test, P = 0.0292). Results for clinical outcomes (according to treatment received for 55 subjects) included successful BCS for 75% of tumors with RS < 11 receiving NHT, 72% for RS 11-25 receiving NHT, 64% for RS 11-25 receiving NCT, and 57% for RS > 25 receiving NCT. Using the RS to guide NST is feasible. These results suggest that for patients with RS < 25 NHT is a potentially effective strategy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Effects of Body Mass Index on Complications and Survival Outcomes in Patients with Cervical Carcinoma Undergoing Curative Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kizer, Nora T.; Thaker, Premal H.; Gao, Feng; Zighelboim, Israel; Powell, Matthew A.; Rader, Janet S.; Mutch, David G.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of body mass index (BMI) on treatment outcomes for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma undergoing definitive chemoradiation is unclear. Methods This study cohort included all cervical carcinoma patients (n = 404) with stage IB1 and positive lymph nodes or stage ≥ IB2 treated at our facility from January 1998 to January 2008. Mean follow-up time was 47.2 months. BMI was calculated using the National Institute of Health online calculator. BMI categories were created according to the World Health Organization classification system. Primary outcomes were overall survival, disease free survival, and complication rate. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared using Cox proportional hazard models. Results On multivariate analysis, when compared to normal weight subjects (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), a BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 was associated with decreased overall survival (HR 2.37, 95% CI 1.28 - 4.38, p<0.01). The 5-year overall survivals were 33%, 60%, and 68% for a BMI < 18.5 kg/m2, BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2, and a BMI > 24.9 kg/m2 respectively. A BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 was associated with increased risk for grade 3 or 4 complications when compared to patients with a BMI > 24.9 kg/m2 (radiation enteritis: 16.7% vs. 13.6 % p= 0.03, fistula: 11.1% vs. 8.8% p= 0.05, bowel obstruction 33.3% vs. 4.4% p< 0.001, lymphedema: 5.6% vs. 1.2% p=0.02). Conclusions Underweight patients (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2) with locally advanced cervical cancer have diminished overall survival and more complications than normal weight and obese patients. PMID:20945318

  18. Pretreatment weight status and weight loss among head and neck cancer patients receiving definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy: implications for nutrition integrated treatment pathways

    PubMed Central

    Myrick, Elizabeth; McCloskey, Susan A.; Gupta, Vishal; Reid, Mary E.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Cohan, David; Arshad, Hassan; Rigual, Nestor R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Sullivan, Maureen; Warren, Graham W.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to examine the effect of pretreatment weight status on loco-regional progression for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) after receiving definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods In an expanded cohort of 140 patients, we retrospectively reviewed weight status and loco-regional progression of SCCHN patients treated with CCRT between 2004 and 2010. Results Pretreatment ideal body weight percentage (IBW%) was statistically significantly different for patients with disease progression than for those without progression (p=0.02) but was not an independent predictor of progression. Median pretreatment IBW% was 118 (72–193) for the progression-free group and was 101.5 (73–163) for the group with progression. Both groups suffered clinically severe weight loss of approximately 9 % from baseline to end treatment. Conclusions Pretreatment weight status, a very crude indicator of nutrition status, may have prognostic value in patients with SCCHN undergoing definitive CCRT. Inadequate nutritional status in these patients has been associated with poor clinical outcomes and decreased quality of life. Based on this report and others, the best next steps include routine validated malnutrition screening and the testing of evidence-based nutrition care protocols with the goals of minimizing weight loss and improvement of quality of life. PMID:23743980

  19. A Study of Zoledronic Acid as Neo-Adjuvant, Perioperative Therapy in Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Dominic E; Porembka, Matthew R; Panni, Roheena Z; Mitchem, Jonathan B; Belt, Brian A; Plambeck-Suess, Stacey M; Lin, Goldie; Denardo, David G; Fields, Ryan C; Hawkins, William G; Strasberg, Steven M; Lockhart, A Craig; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Goedegebuure, Simon Peter; Linehan, David C

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by abundant granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC = CD45(+)/Lin(-)/CD33(+)/CD11b(+)/CD15(+)), which infiltrate tumors and suppress anti-tumor immunity. We have previously demonstrated in a murine model of PDAC that zoledronic acid (ZA) depletes G-MDSC resulting in decreased tumor growth and improved survival. We report here the results of a phase 1 clinical trial (NCT00892242) using ZA as neo-adjuvant, perioperative therapy in patients with non-metastatic, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Eligible PDAC patients received ZA (4mg) IV 2 weeks prior to surgery. Patients then received 2 additional doses of ZA 4 weeks apart. Blood and bone marrow were obtained from patients prior to treatment with ZA and 3 months after surgery for analysis of G-MDSC by flow cytometry. Twenty-three patients received pre-operative ZA with at least 6 months of follow-up Only 15 PDAC patients had non-metastatic PDAC, which was amenable to resection. ZA was well tolerated, and all adverse events were grade 1 or 2. The most common adverse events were fatigue, abdominal pain/discomfort, anorexia, and arthralgia. Of resected PDAC patients treated with ZA, 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) was 85.7% and 33.3%, respectively, with a median OS of 18 months. This group had a 1- and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) of 26.9% and 8.9%, respectively, with a median PFS of 12 months. The prevalence of G-MDSC was unchanged in the blood and bone marrow of PDAC patients pre- and post-treatment with ZA. ZA is safe and well tolerated as neo-adjuvant, peri-operative therapy in PDAC patients. In this small study, we did not observe a difference in OS or PFS compared to historical controls. Also, there was no difference in the prevalence of G-MDSC in the blood and bone marrow of PDAC patients pre- and post-treatment with ZA.

  20. Meta-Analysis for the Therapeutic Effect of Neoadjuvant Therapy in Resectable Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yusen; Liu, Min; Yun, Xiaojing; Wang, Dongmei; Bai, Yuhuan; Zhang, Guizhi; Ji, Bei; Jing, Changchun

    2016-12-24

    We aimed to review the therapeutic effects of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT), chemotherapy (NCT), and radiotherapy (NRT) on patients with resectable Esophageal cancer (EsC) by comparison with surgery alone (SA). PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane were searched for eligible studies published up to March 2015. Cochrane reviews were used for quality assessment. Eight primary outcomes were analyzed. Risk ratios (RRs)/ hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using the random- or fixed- effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Chi-square-based Q statistic and the I (2) test. Publication bias was examined by the Begg's funnel plot. Totally 24 articles including 4718 EsC cases were eligible for this meta-analysis. The quality of the literatures was relatively high. Significant difference was found in five-year survival rate (RR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.17-1.79, P < 0.01) between patients treated with NCT and SA, while the eight enrolled primary outcomes were all statistically different between NCRT and SA, and significant difference was identified in three-year survival between NCRT and NCT (RR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.14-1.60, P < 0.01). No obvious publication bias was observed. NCRT and NCT provide an obvious benefit for EsC treatment over SA, and NCRT possesses a clear advantage compared with NCT.

  1. Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Planned to Undergo Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Choi, Seo Hee; Lee, Youngin; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jeong Youp; Song, Si Young; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of coregistered {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in detecting radiographically occult distant metastasis (DM) at staging in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to study whether FDG-PET parameters can predict relatively long-term survival in patients who are more likely to benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: From our institutional database, we identified 388 LAPC patients with M0 on conventional computed tomography (CT) who were planned to undergo CRT. Coregistered FDG-PET staging was offered to all patients, and follow-up FDG-PET was used at the clinical discretion of the physician. Results: FDG-PET detected unsuspected CT-occult DM in 33% of all 388 patients and allowed them to receive systemic therapy immediately. The remaining 260 patients (PET-M0) underwent CRT selectively as an initial treatment. Early DM arose in 13.1% of 260 patients, and the 1-year estimated locoregional recurrence rate was 5.4%. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.6 and 9.3 months, respectively, at a median follow-up time of 32.3 months (range, 10-99.1 months). Patients with a baseline standardized uptake value (SUV) <3.5 and/or SUV decline ≥60% had significantly better OS and PFS than those having none, even after adjustment for all potential confounding variables (all P<.001). Conclusions: FDG-PET can detect radiographically occult DM at staging in one-third of patients and spare them from the potentially toxic therapy. Additionally, FDG-PET parameters including baseline SUV and SUV changes may serve as useful clinical markers for predicting the prognosis in LAPC patients.

  2. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  3. Effect of overall treatment time on outcomes after concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma: Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) experience

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell; Hsu Chuanchieh; Komaki, Ritsuko; Sause, William T.; Swann, R. Suzanne; Langer, Corey J.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Curran, Walter J.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether overall treatment time affects outcomes after definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed from 3 prospective Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials (RTOG 91-06, 92-04, and 94-10) in which immediate concurrent chemoradiation (cisplatin-based) was the primary therapy for good-performance status Stage III (and selected inoperable Stage II) NSCLC. 'Short' overall treatment time (per protocol) was defined as completing treatment within 5 days of plan; other patients were considered to have had 'prolonged' treatment time (protocol violation); treatment time was also analyzed as a continuous variable in a multivariate model. Actuarial analysis was performed for overall survival, progression-free survival, freedom from local-regional progression, and toxicity. Results: A total of 474 patients were analyzed. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.1 years. Treatment time was delivered per protocol in 387 (82%), whereas 87 patients (18%) had a prolonged treatment time. Long treatment time was significantly associated with severe acute esophagitis. Median survival was slightly better in patients completing treatment on time (19.5 months vs. 14.8 months), but this did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.15) in the univariate analysis. However, in the multivariate analysis of treatment time as a continuous variable, prolonged treatment time was significantly associated with poorer survival (p = 0.02), indicating a 2% increase in the risk of death for each day of prolongation in therapy. Histology (squamous fared worse) and performance status were also significant in the multivariate model. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis demonstrates a correlation between prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment time and survival in patients with locally advanced NSCLC, even when concurrent chemotherapy is used. Further study of novel radiation

  4. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Cem; Mertsoylu, Hüseyin; Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  5. Health-related quality of life and psychological distress during neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole to determine endocrine responsiveness in postmenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taira, Naruto; Iwata, Hiroji; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Sakai, Takehiko; Higaki, Kenji; Kihara, Kiyohiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    Trials of adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer have shown that aromatase inhibitors have little impact on global health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but have significant effects on patient-reported endocrine symptoms (ESs). There are few studies of HRQoL and psychological distress during preoperative endocrine therapy performed to determine endocrine responsiveness. The NEOS trial is a multicenter, phase 3 randomized controlled trial in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The primary aim of the trial was to evaluate the need for adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with clinical T1c-T2N0M0, hormone receptor-positive tumors who responded to neoadjuvant letrozole (LET) administered for 24-28 weeks before surgery. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival and the secondary endpoints included adverse events, HRQoL, and cost-effectiveness. In a HRQoL sub-study, subjects were assessed at baseline and 4 and 16 weeks after starting neoadjuvant LET, using the functional assessment of cancer therapy-breast and its ES subscale, and the hospital anxiety and depression scale. HRQoL and psychosocial distress were analyzed in the uncontrolled phase during 24-28 weeks of neoadjuvant LET therapy in the NEOS trial. From May 16, 2008, to December 14, 2011, 503 patients were recruited into the HRQoL sub-study. The full analysis set included 497 patients with a mean age of 63-years old. The questionnaire response rates at enrollment and 4 and 16 weeks were 94.4, 90.7, and 89.1 %, respectively. There were no significant changes in the FACT-G or B-trial outcome index over time, but the social and family well-being score and the ES subscale deteriorated significantly, and the number of patients with clinically significant hot flush increased significantly. Anxiety, depression, and emotional well-being improved significantly after neoadjuvant LET. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with LET had no impact on global HRQoL, but did influence endocrine

  6. Monitoring the response to neoadjuvant hormone therapy for locally advanced breast cancer using three-dimensional time-resolved optical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enfield, Louise; Cantanhede, Gabriel; Douek, Michael; Ramalingam, Vernie; Purushotham, Arnie; Hebden, Jem; Gibson, Adam

    2013-05-01

    Optical mammography is a functional imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to produce three-dimensional breast images of tissue oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration. It has been used to monitor the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. We present the first results on monitoring tumor response to hormone therapy using optical mammography. We present three case studies from postmenopausal women treated with neoadjuvant hormone therapy for locally advanced breast cancer. The women were scanned before starting treatment, once during treatment, and then before surgery. Changes in physiological and optical properties within the tumor and in the rest of the breast were evaluated. At the time of surgery, two patients partially responded to treatment and one did not respond. The patients that partially responded on ultrasound revealed a corresponding recovery to normal in the hemoglobin concentration images, whereas the nonresponder indicated an increase in hemoglobin concentration in the tumor compared to her pretreatment images. These case studies suggest that optical imaging of the breast during neoadjuvant hormone treatment can provide potentially valuable information, and that physiological changes within the tumor can be seen in response to treatment.

  7. PIK3CA Mutations Are Associated With Decreased Benefit to Neoadjuvant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Targeted Therapies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Ian J.; Nuciforo, Paolo; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Bosma, Astrid J.; Eidtmann, Holger; Holmes, Eileen; Sotiriou, Christos; Fumagalli, Debora; Jimenez, Jose; Aura, Claudia; Prudkin, Ludmila; Díaz-Delgado, Maria Carmen; de la Peña, Lorena; Loi, Sherene; Ellis, Catherine; Schultz, Nikolaus; de Azambuja, Evandro; Harbeck, Nadia; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine; Bernards, René; Baselga, José

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether mutations in the gene encoding the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) correlates with response to neoadjuvant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –targeted therapies in patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Baseline tissue biopsies were available from patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer who were enrolled onto the Neoadjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization trial (NeoALTTO). Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified using mass spectrometry–based genotyping. Results PIK3CA mutations were identified in 23% of HER2-positive breast tumors, and these mutations were associated with poorer outcome in all of the treatment arms. Patients treated with a combination of trastuzumab and lapatinib who had wild-type PIK3CA obtained a total pathologic complete response (pCR) rate of 53.1%, which decreased to 28.6% in patients with tumors that carried PIK3CA activating mutations (P = .012). Conclusion Activating mutations in PIK3CA predicted poor pCR in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapies that target HER2. Consequently, the combination of anti-HER2 agents and PI3K inhibitors is being investigated. PMID:25559818

  8. The role of mammographic calcification in the neoadjuvant therapy of breast cancer imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-jie; Chen, Canming; Gu, Yajia; Di, Genhong; Wu, Jiong; Liu, Guangyu; Shao, ZhiMin

    2014-01-01

    Investigate the patterns of mammographically detected calcifications before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) to determine their value for efficacy evaluation and surgical decision making. 187 patients with malignant mammographic calcifications were followed to record the appearances and changes in the calcifications and to analyze their responses to NACT. Patients with calcifications had higher rates of hormonal receptor (HR) positive tumors (74.3% versus 64.6%) and HER2 positive tumors (51.3% versus 33.4%, p = 0.004) and a similar pathologic complete response (pCR) rate compared to patients without calcifications (35.4% versus 29.8%). After NACT, the range of calcification decreased in 40% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 52.5%; the calcification density decreased in 15% of patients, increased in 7.5% and remained stable in 77.5%; none of these change patterns were related to tumor response rate. No significant correlation was observed between the calcification appearance (morphology, distribution, range, diameter or density) and tumor subtypes or pCR rates. Among patients with malignant calcifications, 54 showed calcifications alone, 40 occurred with an architectural distortion (AD) and 93 with a mass. Calcifications were observed inside the tumor in 44% of patients and outside in 56%, with similar pCR rates and patterns of change. Calcification appearance did not clearly change after NACT, and calcification patterns were not related to pCR rate, suggesting that mammogram may not accurate to evaluate tumor response changes. Microcalcifications visible after NACT is essential for determining the extent of excision, patients with calcifications that occurred outside of the mass still had the opportunity for breast conservation.

  9. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women with large and locally advanced breast cancer: chemoresistance and prediction of response to drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Chuthapisith, S; Eremin, J M; El-Sheemy, M; Eremin, O

    2006-08-01

    Patients with large and locally advanced breast cancer (LLABC) present with a therapeutic challenge and undergo multimodality treatment. Many such patients receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) prior to surgery. However, a number of these patients do not respond well to NAC and only a percentage (usually less than 30%) obtains a complete or optimal response. A range of mechanisms are believed to be involved in this chemoresistance, including ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter overexpression, dysregulation of apoptosis and possibly increased numbers of cancer stem cells. The chemoresistant processes may be due to more than one mechanism. The ability to predict a response to NAC would be beneficial, targeting expensive and toxic drug treatment to those likely to respond and providing a therapeutic strategy for further post-operative chemotherapy. Currently, many biomarkers have been studied with a view to establishing a predictor of response. However, no single biomarker appears to be effective. Genomics is a novel biotechnological process which is being used to predict response to drug therapy; this work is currently at an early stage of development

  10. Performance and Practice Guideline for the Use of Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy in the Management of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dennis; Colfry, A; Czerniecki, Brian; Dickson-Witmer, Diana; Francisco Espinel, C; Feldman, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Kristalyn; Greenup, Rachel; Herrmann, Virginia; Kuerer, Henry; Malik, Manmeet; Manahan, Eric; O'Neill, Jennifer; Patel, Mita; Sebastian, Molly; Wheeler, Amanda; Kass, Rena

    2015-10-01

    The American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) sought to provide an evidence-based guideline on the use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) in the management of clinical stage II and III invasive breast cancer. A comprehensive nonsystematic review was performed of selected peer-reviewed literature published since 2000. The Education Committee of the ASBrS convened to develop guideline recommendations. A performance and practice guideline was prepared to outline the baseline assessment and perioperative management of patients with clinical stage II-III breast cancer under consideration for NST. Preoperative or NST is emerging as an important initial strategy for the management of invasive breast cancer. From the surgeon's perspective, the primary goal of NST is to increase the resectability of locally advanced breast cancer, increase the feasibility of breast-conserving surgery and sentinel node biopsy, and decrease surgical morbidity. To ensure optimal patient selection and efficient patient care, the guideline recommends: (1) baseline breast and axillary imaging; (2) minimally invasive biopsies of breast and axillary lesions; (3) determination of tumor biomarkers; (4) systemic staging; (5) care coordination, including referrals to medical oncology, radiation oncology, plastic surgery, social work, and genetic counseling, if indicated; (6) initiation of NST; (7) post-NST breast and axillary imaging; and (8) decision for surgery based on extent of disease at presentation, patient choice, clinical response to NST, and genetic testing results, if performed.

  11. Feasibility of Neoadjuvant Ad-REIC Gene Therapy in Patients with High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Kumon, Hiromi; Sasaki, Katsumi; Ariyoshi, Yuichi; Sadahira, Takuya; Araki, Motoo; Ebara, Shin; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2015-12-01

    In a phase I/IIa study of in situ gene therapy using an adenovirus vector carrying the human REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC), we assessed the inhibitory effects of cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP), in patients with high risk localized prostate cancer (PCa). After completing the therapeutic interventions with initially planned three escalating doses of 1.0 × 10(10) , 1.0 × 10(11) , and 1.0 × 10(12) viral particles (VP) in 1.0-1.2 mL (n = 3, 3, and 6), an additional higher dose of 3.0 × 10(12) VP in 3.6 mL (n = 6) was further studied. Patients with recurrence probability of 35% or more within 5 years after RP as calculated by Kattan's nomogram, were enrolled. They received two ultrasound-guided intratumoral injections at 2-week intervals, followed by RP 6 weeks after the second injection. Based on the findings of MRI and biopsy mapping, as a rule, one track injection to the most prominent cancer area was given to initial 12 patients and 3 track injections to multiple cancer areas in additional 6 patients. As compared to the former group, biochemical recurrence-free survival of the latter showed a significantly favorable outcome. Neoadjuvant Ad-REIC, mediating simultaneous induction of cancer selective apoptosis and augmentation of antitumor immunity, is a feasible approach in preventing cancer recurrence after RP. (199).

  12. Dose-dependent change in biomarkers during neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with fulvestrant: results from NEWEST, a randomized Phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kuter, Irene; Gee, Julia M W; Hegg, Roberto; Singer, Christian F; Badwe, Rajendra A; Lowe, Elizabeth S; Emeribe, Ugochi A; Anderson, Elizabeth; Sapunar, Francisco; Finlay, Pauline; Nicholson, Robert I; Bines, José; Harbeck, Nadia

    2012-05-01

    NEWEST (Neoadjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Women with Estrogen-Sensitive Tumors) is the first study to compare biological and clinical activity of fulvestrant 500 versus 250 mg in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting. We hypothesized that fulvestrant 500 mg may be superior to 250 mg in blocking estrogen receptor (ER) signaling and growth. A multicenter, randomized, open-label, Phase II study was performed to compare fulvestrant 500 mg (500 mg/month plus 500 mg on day 14 of month 1) versus fulvestrant 250 mg/month for 16 weeks prior to surgery in postmenopausal women with ER+ locally advanced breast cancer. Core biopsies at baseline, week 4, and surgery were assessed for biomarker changes. Primary endpoint: change in Ki67 labeling index (LI) from baseline to week 4 determined by automated computer imaging system (ACIS). Secondary endpoints: ER protein expression and function; progesterone receptor (PgR) expression; tumor response; tolerability. ER and PgR were examined retrospectively using the H score method. A total of 211 patients were randomized (fulvestrant 500 mg: n = 109; 250 mg: n = 102). At week 4, fulvestrant 500 mg resulted in greater reduction of Ki67 LI and ER expression versus 250 mg (-78.8 vs. -47.4% [p < 0.0001] and -25.0 vs. -13.5% [p = 0.0002], respectively [ACIS]); PgR suppression was not significantly different (-22.7 vs. -17.6; p = 0.5677). However, H score detected even greater suppression of ER (-50.3 vs. -13.7%; p < 0.0001) and greater PgR suppression (-80.5 vs. -46.3%; p = 0.0018) for fulvestrant 500 versus 250 mg. At week 16, tumor response rates were 22.9 and 20.6% for fulvestrant 500 and 250 mg, respectively, with considerable decline in all markers by both ACIS and H score. No detrimental effects on endometrial thickness or bone markers and no new safety concerns were identified. This provides the first evidence of greater biological activity for fulvestrant 500 versus 250 mg in depleting ER expression, function, and growth.

  13. Nuclear NF-κB Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Michel, Yvonne; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  14. A Phase 1/2 Study of Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Using Docetaxel, Nedaplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DNF-R) for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Okagawa, Yutaka; Osuga, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Hori, Masakazu; Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Takayama, Tetsuji; Kato, Junji

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patient survival in esophageal cancer (EC) remains poor. The purpose of this study was to investigate a regimen of definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) that exerts good local control of EC. We performed a phase 1/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of CRT with docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DNF-R). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients presented with stage IB to IV EC. Patients received 2 cycles of docetaxel (20, 30, or 40 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 and 8 and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5 and 8 to 12, every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy (59.4 Gy/33 fractions). The recommended dose (RD) was determined using a 3 + 3 design. Results: In the phase 1 study, the dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The RD of docetaxel was determined to be 20 mg/m{sup 2}. In the phase 2 study, grade 3 to 4 acute toxicities included neutropenia (42.8%), febrile neutropenia (7.14%), thrombocytopenia (17.9%), and esophagitis (21.4%). Grade 3 to 4 late radiation toxicity included esophagostenosis (10.7%). The complete response rate was 82.1% (95% confidence interval: 67.9-96.3%). Both the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 41.2 months. Conclusions: DNF-R showed good tolerability and strong antitumor activity, suggesting that it is a potentially effective therapeutic regimen for EC.

  15. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Selek, Ugur

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  16. [Letrozole vs. tamoxifen as neoadjuvant therapy for postmenopausal patients with hormone-dependent locally-advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Novoa Vargas, Arturo; Font López, Karla C; Amador, Denys Delgado

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that Letrozole (aromatase inhibitor) and tamoxifen (selective modulator of estrogen receptors) are effective in the treatment of postmenopausal women with locally advanced tumors, stage III and hormone dependent. To present display the complete clinical answer incidence and the complete pathological answer with the use of induction hormonotherapy. Put-analysis in 40 patients with breast cancer, to chanalicular infiltrated, eligible were treated in a prospective study, to double blind person, using per os: letrozol, 2.5 mg; tamoxifen, 20 mg, known widely like selective modulator of estrogen receivers; oral route, during 36 consecutive months. Reports at the beginning were taken, subsequent to 3, 6 and 12 months to evaluate the frequency of complete respond. The patients, who did not show answer neoadjuvant therapy, were put under treatment with radiotherapy. The patients who showed good partial pathological respond, or clinical partial respond, went candidates to radical mastectomy. According to the protocol of the study, the patients subsequent to surgery who showed partial pathological respond or complete pathological respond, continued adjuvant handling adyuvant therapy by 2 years consecutive or until the presence of progression of the disease. It was used like statistical method Chi2, with p of Table cloth to evaluate the differences. During a period of 3 years, january of the 2003 to january of the 2005, 2 groups of patients, 40 studied altogether; the age average was of 65,5 years, with a rank of 55 to 75 years with breast cancer, stages: IIA to IIIB. Without complete respond 25% of the group with tamoxifen; 20% with letrozol Those patients happened to radiotherapy. The collateral effects of the use of hormonotherapy with letrozol appeared in a 55% and with the use of tamoxifen in a 60% of the patients with breast cancer (p = 0.5). They did not respond to neoadyuvant therapy (hormonal receptors < to 30%): with letrozol 19% of them

  17. Escalated radiation dose alone vs. concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancers: results from phase II randomized study.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Reena; Mohandas, K M; Shukla, P J; Shrikhande, S V; Mahantshetty, U; Chopra, S; Goel, M; Mehta, S; Patil, P; Ramadwar, M; Deodhar, K; Arya, S; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2013-07-01

    This trial was undertaken to compare the rates of resectability between patients treated with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation vs. boosted radiotherapy alone. Patients with clinically unresectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to pelvis (45 Gy) with concurrent oral Capecitabine (CRT group; Arm 1) or EBRT to pelvis (45 Gy) alone followed by 20 Gy dose of localized radiotherapy boost to the primary tumor site (RT with boost group, Arm 2). All patients were assessed for resectability after 6 weeks by clinical examination and by CT scan and those deemed resectable underwent surgery. A total of 90 patients were randomized, 46 to Arm 1 and 44 to Arm 2. Eighty seven patients (44 in Arm 1 and 41 in Arm 2) completed the prescribed treatment protocol. Overall resectability rate was low in both the groups; R0 resection was achieved in 20 (43 %) patients in Arm 1 vs. 15 (34 %) in Arm 2. Adverse factors that significantly affected the resectability rate in both the groups were extension of tumor to pelvic bones and signet ring cell pathology. Complete pathological response was seen in 7 and 11 %, respectively. There was greater morbidity such as wound infection and delayed wound healing in Arm 2 (16 vs. 40 %; p = 0.03). Escalated radiation dose without chemotherapy does not achieve higher complete (R0) tumor resectability in locally advanced inoperable rectal cancers, compared to concurrent chemoradiation.

  18. Robotic versus laparoscopic surgery for mid or low rectal cancer in male patients after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy: comparison of short-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Serin, Kursat Rahmi; Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Batman, Burçin; Ay, Serden; Kapran, Yersu; Saglam, Sezer; Asoglu, Oktar

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to compare short-term outcomes of robotic and laparoscopic sphincter-saving total mesorectal excision (TME) in male patients with mid-low rectal cancer (RC) after neadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). The study was conducted as a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database, and we analyzed 14 robotic and 65 laparoscopic sphincter saving TME (R-TME and L-TME, respectively) performed by one surgeon between 2005 and 2013. Patient characteristics, perioperative recovery, postoperative complications and and pathology results were compared between the two groups. The patient characteristics did not differ significantly between the two groups. Median operating time was longer in the R-TME than in the L-TME group (182 min versus 140 min). Only two conversions occurred in the L-TME group. No difference was found between groups regarding perioperative recovery and postoperative complication rates. The median number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in the RTME than in the L-TME group (32 versus 23, p = 0.008). The median circumferential margin (CRM) was 10 mm in the R-TME group, 6.5 mm in the L-TME group (p = 0.047. The median distal resection margin (DRM) was 27.5 mm in the R-TME, 15 mm in the L-TME group (p = 0.014). Macroscopic grading of the specimen in the R-TME group was complete in all patients. In the L-TME group, grading was complete in 52 (80%) and incomplete in 13 (20%) cases (p = 0.109). R-TME is a safe and feasible procedure that facilitates performing of TME in male patients with mid-low RC after NCRT.

  19. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-04-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is an established standard for resectable muscle-invasive bladder cancer, a disease with a pattern of predominantly distant and early recurrences. Pathologic complete remission appears to be an intermediate surrogate for survival when employing combination chemotherapy. Moreover, baseline host and tumor tissue studies may enable the discovery of biomarkers predictive of activity. The neoadjuvant setting also provides a window of opportunity to evaluate novel biologic agents or rational combinations of biologic agents to obtain a signal of biologic activity. The residual tumor after neoadjuvant therapy may be exploited to study the mechanism of action and resistance. Cisplatin-ineligible patients warrant the evaluation of tolerable neoadjuvant regimens. Given that bladder cancer is characterized by initial localized presentation in the vast majority of cases, the paradigm of neoadjuvant therapy may expedite the development of novel systemic agents.

  20. A Patient with a Large Gastric Tumor and Protein-Losing Gastroenteropathy Successfully Treated with Neoadjuvant TS-1 Combined with CDDP Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yuichi; Shibata, Ryosuke; Satou, Keisuke; Yamana, Ippei; Maki, Kenji; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer with protein-losing gastroenteropathy is relatively rare worldwide. The most important problem for the treatment of these patients is their low nutritional status and protein level, which can cause severe postoperative complications. We report a 49-year-old Japanese female with a large gastric tumor and protein-losing gastroenteropathy successfully treated with neoadjuvant TS-1 combined with CDDP therapy. She had a type 5 tumor with partially cauliflower-like appearance. Her blood chemistry revealed low serum total protein (3.3 g/dl) and low albumin (1.7 g/dl). She was additionally diagnosed with protein-losing gastroenteropathy based on 99mTc-human serum albumin scintigraphy. Initial neoadjuvant chemotherapy decreased the size of the tumor and led to a marked improvement in her serum protein levels. She then underwent a total gastrectomy and lymph node dissection (D2) with a combined resection of the spleen and gallbladder. Therefore, neoadjuvant chemotherapy may provide a safe treatment before definitive surgery for gastric cancer with protein-losing gastroenteropathy. PMID:25722665

  1. Combining antiangiogenic therapy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy increases treatment efficacy in stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer without increasing adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Su, Yanjun; You, Jian; Gong, Liqun; Zhang, Zhenfa; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Zhenqing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Changli

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of combining Endostar antiangiogenic therapy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IIIA (N2) NSCLC, we conducted a randomized, controlled, open-label clinical study of 30 NSCLC patients. Patients were randomly assigned to the test or control groups, which received either two cycles of an NP neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen combined with Endostar or the NP regimen alone, respectively, at a 2:1 ratio. Efficacy was assessed after 3 weeks, and surgical resection occurred within 4 weeks, in the 26 patients who successfully completed treatment. While total response rates (RR) and clinical benefit rates (CBR) did not differ between the experimental groups, total tumor regression rates (TRR) were higher in the test group than in the control group. Median DFS and OS also did not differ between the test and control groups. Clinical perioperative indicators, including intraoperative blood loss, number of dissected lymph node groups, duration of postoperative indwelling catheter use, and time to postoperative discharge, were comparable in the test and control groups. Finally, hematological and non-hematological toxicities and postoperative pathological indicators, including down-staging ratio, complete resection ratio, and metastatic lymph node ratio, also did not differ between the groups. Overall, combining Endostar with NP neoadjuvant chemotherapy increased therapeutic efficacy without increasing adverse effects in stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC patients. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT02497118). PMID:27566586

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging: a potential tool in assessing the addition of hyperthermia to neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, Oana I; Thrall, Donald E; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The poor overall survival for patients with locally advanced breast cancers has led over the past decade to the introduction of numerous neoadjuvant combined therapy regimens to down-stage the disease before surgery. At the same time, more evidence suggests the need for treatment individualisation with a wide variety of new targets for cancer therapeutics and also multi modality therapies. In this context, early determination of whether the patient will fail to respond can enable the use of alternative therapies that can be more beneficial. The purpose of this review is to examine the potential role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in early prediction of treatment response and prognosis of overall survival in locally advanced breast cancer patients enrolled on multi modality therapy trials that include hyperthermia. The material is organised with a review of dynamic contrast (DCE)-MRI and diffusion weighted (DW)-MRI for characterisation of phenomenological parameters of tumour physiology and their potential role in estimating therapy response. Most of the work published in this field has focused on responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens alone, so the emphasis will be there, however the available data that involves the addition of hyperthermia to the regimen will be discussed The review will also include future directions that include the potential use of MRI imaging techniques in establishing the role of hyperthermia alone in modifying breast tumour microenvironment, together with specific challenges related to performing such studies.

  3. Pathological complete response after cisplatin neoadjuvant therapy is associated with the downregulation of DNA repair genes in BRCA1-associated triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Rys, Janusz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2016-10-18

    Pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is considered a suitable surrogate marker of treatment efficacy in patients with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pCR as a result of such treatment remain obscure. Using real-time PCR arrays we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in the main mechanisms of DNA repair in 43 pretreatment biopsies of BRCA1-associated TNBCs exhibiting pCR and no pathological complete response (non-pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin. Altogether, 25 genes were significantly differentially expressed between tumors exhibiting pCR and non-pCR, and these genes were downregulated in the pCR group compared to the non-pCR group. A difference in expression level greater than 1.5-fold was detected for nine genes: MGMT, ERCC4, FANCB, UBA1, XRCC5, XPA, XPC, PARP3, and RPA1. The non-homologous end joining and nucleotide excision repair pathways of DNA repair showed the most significant relevance. Expression profile of DNA repair genes associated with pCR was different in the node-positive (20 genes with fold change >1.5) and node-negative (only 3 genes) subgroups. Although BRCA1 germline mutations are the principal defects in BRCA1-associated TNBC, our results indicate that the additional downregulation of other genes engaged in major pathways of DNA repair may play a decisive role in the pathological response of these tumors to cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The results suggest that patients with node-positive BRCA1-associated TNBCs that do not exhibit pCR after cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be candidates for subsequent therapy with PARP inhibitors, whereas UBA1 may be a potential therapeutic target in node-negative subgroup.

  4. Neoadjuvant therapy and mini-invasive total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: feasibility and outcome analysis from a single institution prospectively collected data base.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Federica; Mandalà, Mario; Maglione, Valeria; Berretta, Laura; Mariani, Narciso; Rossi, Maura; Piovano, Pier Luigi; Drago, Domenico; Summa, Massimo; Franzone, Paola; Musante, Francesco; Spinoglio, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma improves local control and represents the standard for locally advanced disease. Laparoscopic and robotic total mesorectal excision has been increasingly adopted. It provides magnified visualization of the pelvic cavity, thereby facilitating the mesorectal dissection. Consecutive patients with locally advanced/ultralow rectal adenocarcinoma received neoadjuvant treatment and mini-invasive total mesorectal excision at our center. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records by using a prospectively collected data base and focusing on feasibility, tumor response and treatment outcomes. In a 13-year period, 117 rectal adenocarcinoma patients (80 males and 37 females) received neoadjuvant treatment and mini-invasive total mesorectal excision. Median age at diagnosis was 67 years; pre-treatment stage was I in 10 (9%); IIA in 58 (50%); IIC in 5 (4%); IIIA in 10 (9%); IIIB in 31 (26%) and IV in 3 (2%) patients. All patients received external beam radiation therapy, 79 (67%) combined with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. One-hundred and three patients underwent laparoscopic surgery and 14 robotic surgery. Overall, 90 patients (77%) had anterior resection and 27 (23%) had abdominoperineal resection. Down-staging was obtained in 70 patients (66%). No major intraoperative nor delayed surgical complications were observed. At a median follow up of 52 months, 8 patients (7%) had a local relapse, 7 of them along with distant relapse, and 16 (14%) had distant relapse. The 5-year relapse-free survival was 76.5%. Our data suggest that in a community hospital mini-invasive surgery after neoadjuvant treatment is feasible in real clinical practice and achieves consistent results in term of disease control rate.

  5. Therapy of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Replicative Adenovirus Expressing Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 and Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Lacey R.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Zhang, Wenyue; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have demonstrated efficacy of targeted therapy combined with radiotherapy in HNSCC. We hypothesized that a combination treatment including a replicating adenovirus armed with tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), radiation, and Cisplatin will augment treatment response and reduce tumor growth in vivo of HNSCC xenografts. Design Both single-agent (TIMP-2 virus, radiation, and Cisplatin) and the combination therapies were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The efficacy of both single agent and combination therapies in vivo was determined by monitoring of tumor growth and immunohistochemistry. Results Treatment with replicative Ad-TIMP-2 virus and radiation decreased cell viability in vitro and resulted in an additional anti-angiogenic response in vivo. Tumor response rates to treatment with replicative Ad-TIMP-2, radiation, Cisplatin, or combination therapies ranged from limited inhibition of tumor growth of the single-agent therapy to a statistically significant additive anti-tumor response with the combination therapies. Replicative Ad-TIMP-2 + radiation + Cisplatin in the SCC1 nude mice demonstrated the greatest response rates in tumor growth and angiogenesis. Conclusions Combination Ad-TIMP-2 gene therapy with radiation and the triple treatment group resulted in an augmented therapeutic response. This is the first report of the potential benefits of combining radiation and MMP inhibitor treatment. PMID:18846112

  6. Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma of the Skin Treated with Wide Local Excision and Chemoradiation Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Theresa M.; Miles, Edward F.; Mitchell, Allen O.

    2012-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the skin (LELCS) is a rare cutaneous neoplasm microscopically similar to undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma. It is typically nonaggressive and is treated with wide local excision. However, we present a case of a patient with a regional recurrence and more aggressive LELCS with perineural invasion and positive margins for which he was treated with wide local excision followed by chemoradiation. We discuss the use of chemoradiation for this patient and review the literature, specifically pertaining to treatment of more aggressive cases of LELCS. PMID:23133769

  7. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  8. Assessment of treatment response during chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer based on quantitative radiomic analysis of daily CTs: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojian; Oshima, Kiyoko; Schott, Diane; Wu, Hui; Hall, William; Song, Yingqiu; Tao, Yalan; Li, Dingjie; Zheng, Cheng; Knechtges, Paul; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2017-01-01

    In an effort for early assessment of treatment response, we investigate radiation induced changes in quantitative CT features of tumor during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Diagnostic-quality CT data acquired daily during routine CT-guided CRT using a CT-on-rails for 20 pancreatic head cancer patients were analyzed. On each daily CT, the pancreatic head, the spinal cord and the aorta were delineated and the histograms of CT number (CTN) in these contours were extracted. Eight histogram-based radiomic metrics including the mean CTN (MCTN), peak position, volume, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis, energy and entropy were calculated for each fraction. Paired t-test was used to check the significance of the change of specific metric at specific time. GEE model was used to test the association between changes of metrics over time for different pathology responses. In general, CTN histogram in the pancreatic head (but not in spinal cord) changed during the CRT delivery. Changes from the 1st to the 26th fraction in MCTN ranged from -15.8 to 3.9 HU with an average of -4.7 HU (p<0.001). Meanwhile the volume decreased, the skewness increased (less skewed), and the kurtosis decreased (less peaked). The changes of MCTN, volume, skewness, and kurtosis became significant after two weeks of treatment. Patient pathological response is associated with the changes of MCTN, SD, and skewness. In cases of good response, patients tend to have large reductions in MCTN and skewness, and large increases in SD and kurtosis. Significant changes in CT radiomic features, such as the MCTN, skewness, and kurtosis in tumor were observed during the course of CRT for pancreas cancer based on quantitative analysis of daily CTs. These changes may be potentially used for early assessment of treatment response and stratification for therapeutic intensification.

  9. Association of Pathologic Complete Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer With Long-Term Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Broglio, Kristine R; Quintana, Melanie; Foster, Margaret; Olinger, Melissa; McGlothlin, Anna; Berry, Scott M; Boileau, Jean-François; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Chia, Stephen; Dent, Susan; Gelmon, Karen; Paterson, Alexander; Rayson, Daniel; Berry, Donald A

    2016-06-01

    The expense and lengthy follow-up periods for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of adjuvant systemic therapy in breast cancer make them impractical and even impossible to conduct. Randomized clinical trials of neoadjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer may help resolve this dilemma. To assess the utility of pathologic complete response (pCR) for neoadjuvant drug development in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 [also referred to as ERBB2])-positive breast cancer. We searched MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), CENTRAL (Wiley), and Northern Light Life Sciences Conference Abstracts (Ovid) in December 2014. Searches combined terms for "breast cancer" and "neoadjuvant therapy," with no limit on publication date. Cohort studies and RCTs were selected that met following criteria: stages I to III HER2-positive breast cancer, neoadjuvant therapy, and reports of both pCR and an event-free survival (EFS)-type outcome. The initial search identified 2614 publications, of which 38 studies met the selection criteria. Two authors independently screened each study for inclusion and extracted the data. Data were analyzed using Bayesian hierarchical models. Event-free survival and overall survival (OS) hazard ratios (HRs) for pCR vs non-pCR. For RCTs, main outcome measures were treatment benefits in pCR and the corresponding treatment HRs for EFS and OS. A total of 36 studies with EFS by pCR status representing 5768 patients with HER2-positive breast cancer were included in the patient-level analysis. Overall, the improvement in EFS for pCR vs non-pCR was substantial: HR, 0.37 (95% probability interval [PI], 0.32-0.43). This association was greater for patients with hormone receptor-negative disease (HR, 0.29 [95% PI, 0.24-0.36]) than hormone receptor-positive disease (HR, 0.52 [95% PI, 0.40-0.66]). In RCTs, the R2 correlations between odds ratios for pCR and HRs were 0.63 for EFS and 0.29 for OS. Based on absolute treatment improvements in pCR rate, predicted HRs for EFS

  10. MRI for Assessing Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using DCE-MR and DW-MR Data Sets: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mario; Fusco, Roberta; Catalano, Orlando; Sansone, Mario; Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate MRI for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), we have compared magnetic resonance volumetry based on DCE-MRI (V(DCE)) and on DWI (V(DWI)) scans with conventional T2-weighted volumetry (V(C)) in LARC patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-nine patients with LARC underwent MR examination before and after neoadjuvant therapy. A manual segmentation was performed on DCE-MR postcontrast images, on DWI (b-value 800 s/mm2), and on conventional T2-weighted images by two radiologists. DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weigthed volumetric changes before and after treatment were evaluated. Nonparametric sample tests, interobserver agreement, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) were performed. Diagnostic performance linked to DCE-MRI volumetric change was superior to T2-w and DW-MRI volumetric changes performance (specificity 86%, sensitivity 93%, and accuracy 93%). Area Under ROC (AUC) of V(DCE) was greater than AUCs of V(C) and V(DWI) resulting in an increase of 15.6% and 11.1%, respectively. Interobserver agreement between two radiologists was 0.977, 0.864, and 0.756 for V(C), V(DCE), and V(DWI), respectively. V(DCE) seems to be a promising tool for therapy response assessment in LARC. Further studies on large series of patients are needed to refine technique and evaluate its potential value. PMID:26413528

  11. Cost-effectiveness and clinical efficacy of biliary stents in patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Timothy B; Spangler, Chad C; Byanova, Katerina L; Ripple, Gregory H; Rockacy, Matthew J; Levenick, John M; Smith, Kerrington D; Colacchio, Thomas A; Barth, Richard J; Zaki, Bassem I; Tsapakos, Michael J; Gordon, Stuart R

    2016-09-01

    The optimal type of stent for the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with curative intent is unknown. We performed a prospective trial comparing 3 types of biliary stents-fully covered self-expandable metal (fcSEMS), uncovered self-expandable metal (uSEMS), and plastic-to determine which best optimized cost-effectiveness and important clinical outcomes. In this prospective randomized trial, consecutive patients with malignant biliary obstruction from newly diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were to start neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy were randomized to receive fcSEMSs, uSEMSs, or plastic stents during the index ERCP. The primary outcomes were time to stent occlusion, attempted surgical resection, or death after the initiation of neoadjuvant therapy, and the secondary outcomes were total patient costs associated with the stent, including the index ERCP cost, downstream hospitalization cost due to stent occlusion, and the cost associated with procedural adverse event. Fifty-four patients were randomized and reached the primary end point: 16 in the fcSEMS group, 17 in the uSEMS group, and 21 in the plastic stent group. No baseline demographic or tumor characteristic differences were noted among the groups. The fcSEMSs had a longer time to stent occlusion compared with uSEMSs and plastic stents (220 vs 74 and 76 days, P < .01), although the groups had equivalent rates of stent occlusion, attempted surgical resection, and death. Although SEMS placement cost more during the index ERCP (uSEMS = $24,874 and fcSEMS = $22,729 vs plastic = $18,701; P < .01), they resulted in higher procedural AE costs per patient (uSEMS = $5522 and fcSEMS = $12,701 vs plastic = $0; P < .01). Conversely, plastic stents resulted in an $11,458 hospitalization cost per patient due to stent occlusion compared with $2301 for uSEMSs and $0 for fcSEMSs (P < .01). In a prospective trial

  12. Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    3, pp. S13, 2010. 11 F. Forsberg. The holy grail : ultrasound microbubbles for therapy. J Ultrasound Med, vol 29, no 3, pp. S17, 2010. F...San Diego, CA, USA.  Noninvasive cardiac subharmonic pressure estimation in vivo.  The holy grail : ultrasound microbubbles for therapy May...DFD.LR.1, 2010. A. Katiyar, K. Sarkar, F.Forsberg. Subharmonic response from ultrasound contrast microbubbles for noninvasive blood pressure

  13. Oncologic safety of breast conserving surgery after tumour downsizing by neoadjuvant therapy: a retrospective single centre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fitzal, F; Riedl, O; Mittlböck, M; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Jakesz, R; Gnant, M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse local recurrence rates in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) comparing mastecomized (MX) patients with those undergoing breast conserving therapy (BCT). Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery after nCT (3xCMF or 3-6xED) between 1995 and 2007 at our department were retrospectively analysed. The median follow up was 60 months for 308 patients. Patients who were downsized from MX to BCT with partial or complete response (n = 104) had a similar local recurrence free survival (LRFS) compared to patients who did not experience successful downsizing (n = 67) and finally undergoing MX (LRFS MX-BCT 81% vs. MX-MX 91%; P = 0.79). Uni- and multivariate analyses demonstrated that BCT itself was not an independent prognostic factor for a worse LRFS (P = 0.07 and 0.14). After no pathologic change or progressive disease the risk of local recurrence was increased in patients undergoing BCT (MX-BCT; n = 6 LRFS 66%) compared with MX (n = 44; LRFS 90%; P = 0.04). Overall survival in general was better for the BCT group (n = 197) compared with MX group (n = 111) regardless of clinical response (92% vs. 72%; P < 0.0001). Breast conservation, nodal negativity and low or medium grade histology were prognostic factors for an improved OS (P = 0.02, 0.01, 0.004). In conclusion, our study suggests that BCT is oncologically safe after tumour downsizing by nCT in patients primarily scheduled for mastectomy. These patients, however, should not be treated with breast conservation in the absence of any proven response after nCT.

  14. The use of molecular breast imaging to assess response in women undergoing neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Boughey, Judy C; Hruska, Carrie B; Chen, Beiyun; Rhodes, Deborah J; Tortorelli, Cindy L; Maxwell, Robert W; Cha, Stephen S; O'Connor, Michael K

    2012-04-01

    To report our findings from a prospective pilot study evaluating the accuracy of molecular breast imaging (MBI) in assessing tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for breast cancer. Twenty patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who were scheduled to receive NT underwent MBI before beginning and after completing NT before surgery. MBI was performed using a dual-detector cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera system mounted on a modified mammography gantry after patients had received an intravenous injection of 20 mCi of 99mTc sestamibi. Tumor extent was measured on MBI, and tumor-to-background (T/B) ratios of radiotracer uptake were determined through region-of-interest analysis. Pathologic measurement of tumor size was used as a standard and compared with post-NT tumor size derived from MBI. Three patients in whom post-NT MBI could not be performed because of scheduling problems were excluded from analysis. Eighteen cancers were diagnosed in 17 patients. A correlation coefficient of r = 0.681 (P = 0.002) was found between MBI and residual tumor size. The average T/B ratio on MBI decreased from a pretreatment value of 3.0 to a posttreatment value of 1.4. The relative decrease in T/B ratio did not appear to be predictive of response. Measurements of tumor size by MBI and T/B ratios are limited in their predictive value regarding the pathologic extent of residual disease in women treated with NT for breast cancer. Alternate tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals should be evaluated to provide information to improve planning and monitoring of breast cancer treatment.

  15. Successful (neo)adjuvant BRAF-targeted therapy in a patient with locally advanced BRAF V600E mutant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Seremet, Teofila; Lienard, Danielle; Suppa, Mariano; Trepant, Anne-Laure; Rorive, Sandrine; Woff, Erwin; Cuylits, Nicolas; Jansen, Yanina; Schreuer, Max; Del Marmol, Véronique; Neyns, Bart

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced metastasized melanoma is challenging because there is no level 1 evidence to guide clinical decision-making. Moreover, the treatment options available fail to improve overall survival and are associated with considerable morbidity. Here, we show that systemic treatment with BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib substituted by dual BRAF/MEK inhibition (dabrafenib and trametinib) before surgery can offer the potential to cure the initially difficult or inoperable melanoma. A 62-year-old woman was diagnosed with an AJCC stage IIIB melanoma harboring the BRAF V600E mutation after a complete initial evaluation. Clinically, the patient presented a large primary lesion that was surrounded by ∼25 secondary epidermotropic lesions both satellite and 'in transit' with a diameter between 1 and 6 mm. Following multidisciplinary consultation, the patient was started on 960 mg twice-daily vemurafenib, which was stopped and resumed at 720 mg twice daily, and finally substituted with the combination dabrafenib and trametinib to reduce the persistent side effects. Successive clinical examinations had shown a progressive reduction in the thickness of the melanoma lesions. After about 5 months of therapy, surgery was performed and the histopathological analysis showed an almost complete regression of tumor cells. The treatment with dabrafenib/trametinib was continued only 3 months after surgery and stopped at the patient's request. The patient currently remains in complete remission at 8 months after surgery. The case presented here supports the use of neoadjuvant treatment with BRAF inhibitors in advanced 'in transit' melanoma. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging post Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer in the NEONAB trial.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin; Mukaro, Violet; Tobler, Robert; Asher, Rebecca; Gibbs, Emma; West, Linda; Giuffre, Bruno; Baron-Hay, Sally; Khasraw, Mustafa

    2017-09-04

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) accuracy after neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) for breast cancer varies according to hormone receptor (HR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type-2 (HER2) subtype and Ki67 proliferation index. Whether MRI accuracy varies by genomic signatures is unknown. We examined accuracy of MRI in the NEONAB trial (Clinicaltrials.gov #: NCT01830244). Patients with stage II-III breast cancer received sequential epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and nab-paclitaxel and trastuzumab if HER2+. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated to assess utility of preoperative MRI to predict pathological complete response (pCR). Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between MRI and pathological assessment of residual disease. MRI correctly predicted pCR in 64.1% of the cohort. Sensitivity and specificity were 52% and 78%, PPV 73% and NPV 58%. MRI predicted pCR most accurately in HER2-positive patients; sensitivity 58%, specificity 100%, PPV 100% and NPV 38%. MRI had higher PPV and NPV in tumours with Ki67 ≥ 15% than tumours with Ki67 < 15%, 75% versus 50% and 57.5% versus 50% respectively. In this study, MRI underestimated residual tumour size by 1.65mm (limits of agreement: 43.07mm-39.77mm). MRI appears more accurate for predicting pCR in HER2+ disease than other subtypes and in cancers with Ki67 ≥15% compared to those with Ki67 <15%. Accuracy of MRI in our HR+, RS ≥ 25 cohort is comparable to previous reports of unselected HR+ disease. MRI post-NST should be interpreted in conjunction with HER2 status and Ki67 index of the primary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. A Decision Aid for Women Considering Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Operable Invasive Breast Cancer: Development and Protocol of a Phase II Evaluation Study (ANZ1301 DOMINO)

    PubMed Central

    Butow, Phyllis; Hutchings, Elizabeth; Douglas, Charles; Coll, Joseph R; Boyle, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is offered to selected women with large and/or highly proliferative operable breast cancers. This option adds further complexity to an already complex breast cancer treatment decision tree. Patient decision aids are an established method of increasing patient involvement and knowledge while decreasing decisional conflict. There is currently no decision aid available for women considering neoadjuvant systemic therapy. Objective We aimed to develop a decision aid for women diagnosed with operable breast cancer and considered suitable for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, and the protocol for a multicenter pre-post study evaluating the acceptability and feasibility of the decision aid. Methods The decision aid was developed through literature review, expert advisory panel, adherence to the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, and iterative review. The protocol for evaluation of the decision aid consists of the following: eligible women will undertake a series of questionnaires prior to and after using the decision aid. The primary endpoint is decision aid acceptability to patients and investigators and the feasibility of use. Secondary endpoints include change in decisional conflict, participant knowledge, and information involvement preference. Feasibility is defined as the proportion of eligible participants who use the decision aid to help inform their treatment decision. Results This study has recruited 29 out of a planned 50 participants at four Australian sites. A 12-month recruitment period is expected with a further 12-months follow-up. Conclusions The decision aid has the potential to allow patients with operable breast cancer, who have been offered neoadjuvant systemic therapy, decreased decisional conflict, and greater involvement in the decision. If this study finds that an online decision aid is feasible and acceptable, it will be made widely available for routine clinical practice. Trial Registration

  18. Predictive value of initial FDG-PET features for treatment response and survival in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemo-radiation therapy using a random forest classifier

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Su; Modzelewski, Romain; Pineau, Pascal; Vauclin, Sébastien; Gouel, Pierrick; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Vera, Pierre; Gardin, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In oncology, texture features extracted from positron emission tomography with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose images (FDG-PET) are of increasing interest for predictive and prognostic studies, leading to several tens of features per tumor. To select the best features, the use of a random forest (RF) classifier was investigated. Methods Sixty-five patients with an esophageal cancer treated with a combined chemo-radiation therapy were retrospectively included. All patients underwent a pretreatment whole-body FDG-PET. The patients were followed for 3 years after the end of the treatment. The response assessment was performed 1 month after the end of the therapy. Patients were classified as complete responders and non-complete responders. Sixty-one features were extracted from medical records and PET images. First, Spearman’s analysis was performed to eliminate correlated features. Then, the best predictive and prognostic subsets of features were selected using a RF algorithm. These results were compared to those obtained by a Mann-Whitney U test (predictive study) and a univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis (prognostic study). Results Among the 61 initial features, 28 were not correlated. From these 28 features, the best subset of complementary features found using the RF classifier to predict response was composed of 2 features: metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and homogeneity from the co-occurrence matrix. The corresponding predictive value (AUC = 0.836 ± 0.105, Se = 82 ± 9%, Sp = 91 ± 12%) was higher than the best predictive results found using the Mann-Whitney test: busyness from the gray level difference matrix (P < 0.0001, AUC = 0.810, Se = 66%, Sp = 88%). The best prognostic subset found using RF was composed of 3 features: MTV and 2 clinical features (WHO status and nutritional risk index) (AUC = 0.822 ± 0.059, Se = 79 ± 9%, Sp = 95 ± 6%), while no feature was significantly prognostic according to the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Conclusions The RF classifier can

  19. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, Salma K.; Kim, Sinae; Haider, Syed A.; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Alson; Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph; Langenfeld, John; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  20. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy With Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DCF-R) in Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial (KDOG 0501-P2)

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Komori, Shouko; Tanabe, Satoshi; Katada, Chikatoshi; Azuma, Mizutomo; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Sasaki, Tohru; Ishido, Kenji; Katada, Natsuya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A previous phase 1 study suggested that definitive chemoradiation therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF-R) is tolerable and active in patients with advanced esophageal cancer (AEC). This phase 2 study was designed to confirm the efficacy and toxicity of DCF-R in AEC. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated thoracic AEC who had T4 tumors or M1 lymph node metastasis (M1 LYM), or both, received intravenous infusions of docetaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5, every 2 weeks, plus concurrent radiation. The total radiation dose was initially 61.2 Gy but was lowered to multiple-field irradiation with 50.4 Gy to decrease esophagitis and late toxicity. Consequently, the number of cycles of DCF administered during radiation therapy was reduced from 4 to 3. The primary endpoint was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate. Results: Characteristics of the 42 subjects were: median age, 62 years; performance status, 0 in 14, 1 in 25, 2 in 3; TNM classification, T4M0 in 20, non-T4M1LYM in 12, T4M1LYM in 10; total scheduled radiation dose: 61.2 Gy in 12, 50.4 Gy in 30. The cCR rate was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.3%-67.5%) overall, 33.3% in the 61.2-Gy group, and 60.0% in the 50.4-Gy group. The median progression-free survival was 11.1 months, and the median survival was 29.0 months with a survival rate of 43.9% at 3 years. Grade 3 or higher major toxicity consisted of leukopenia (71.4%), neutropenia (57.2%), anemia (16.7%), febrile neutropenia (38.1%), anorexia (31.0%), and esophagitis (28.6%). Conclusions: DCF-R frequently caused myelosuppression and esophagitis but was highly active and suggested to be a promising regimen in AEC. On the basis of efficacy and safety, a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy is recommended for further studies of DCF-R.

  1. A Proof-Of-Principle Study of Epigenetic Therapy Added to Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin Cyclophosphamide for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    González-Fierro, Aurora; de la Cruz-Hernández, Erick; Revilla-Vázquez, Alma; Chávez-Blanco, Alma; Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; Pérez-Cárdenas, Enrique; Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Bargallo, Enrique; Villarreal, Patricia; Ramírez, Teresa; Vela, Teresa; Candelaria, Myrna; Camargo, Maria F.; Robles, Elizabeth; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    Background Aberrant DNA methylation and histone deacetylation participate in cancer development and progression; hence, their reversal by inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone deacetylases (HDACs) is at present undergoing clinical testing in cancer therapy. As epigenetic alterations are common to breast cancer, in this proof-of-concept study demethylating hydralazine, plus the HDAC inhibitor magnesium valproate, were added to neoadjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in locally advanced breast cancer to assess their safety and biological efficacy. Methodology This was a single-arm interventional trial on breast cancer patients (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00395655). After signing informed consent, patients were typed for acetylator phenotype and then treated with hydralazine at 182 mg for rapid-, or 83 mg for slow-acetylators, and magnesium valproate at 30 mg/kg, starting from day –7 until chemotherapy ended, the latter consisting of four cycles of doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 every 21 days. Core-needle biopsies were taken from primary breast tumors at diagnosis and at day 8 of treatment with hydralazine and valproate. Main Findings 16 patients were included and received treatment as planned. All were evaluated for clinical response and toxicity and 15 for pathological response. Treatment was well-tolerated. The most common toxicity was drowsiness grades 1–2. Five (31%) patients had clinical CR and eight (50%) PR for an ORR of 81%. No patient progressed. One of 15 operated patients (6.6%) had pathological CR and 70% had residual disease <3 cm. There was a statistically significant decrease in global 5mC content and HDAC activity. Hydralazine and magnesium valproate up- and down-regulated at least 3-fold, 1,091 and 89 genes, respectively. Conclusions Hydralazine and magnesium valproate produce DNA demethylation, HDAC inhibition, and gene reactivation in primary tumors. Doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide treatment is safe, well

  2. Chemoradiation therapy using cyclopamine-loaded liquid-lipid nanoparticles and lutetium-177-labeled core-crosslinked polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    You, Jian; Zhao, Jun; Wen, Xiaoxia; Wu, Chunhui; Huang, Qian; Guan, Fada; Wu, Richard; Liang, Dong; Li, Chun

    2015-03-28

    Cyclopamine (CPA), a potent inhibitor of the Hedgehog pathway, has produced promising anticancer results in a number of preclinical studies. CPA has also been found to enhance tumor response to radiation therapy. However, CPA is water insoluble. A drug delivery system suitable for systemic administration of CPA is needed before CPA can be considered for clinical translation. We hypothesized that CPA solubilized in a liquid-lipid nanoparticle system (CPA-LLP) for intravenous injection would have desirable pharmacokinetic properties and increased anticancer efficacy. We further hypothesized that CPA-LLP would enhance the response of tumor cells to targeted radiotherapy delivered selectively through intratumoral injection of lutetium-177 bound to core-crosslinked polymeric micelles (CCPM-(177)Lu). We tested the combination therapy in 4T1 murine breast cancer and Miapaca-2 human pancreatic adenocarcinoma models. The results showed that CPA-LLP had higher antitumor cytotoxicity than free CPA (IC50 values [mean±SEM]: 2.7±0.2μM vs. 11.3±1.2μM against 4T1 cells; 1.8±0.2 vs. 17.1±1.26μM against Miapaca-2 cells; p<0.0001). In both cell lines, CPA-LLP resulted in significantly lower clonogenicity than free CPA (p<0.05). Moreover, in both cell lines, CPA-LLP significantly enhanced the cell response to CCPM-(177)Lu radiotherapy as measured by clonogenic assay (p<0.05). In 4T1 and Miapaca-2 mouse xenograft models, the combination of CPA-LLP and CCPM-(177)Lu delayed tumor growth more than either monotherapy did alone. In the 4T1 tumor model, tumor size at 16days after treatment was significantly smaller with the combination therapy than with all the other treatments. In the Miapaca-2 model, the combination therapy resulted in the highest rate of mouse survival and prevented tumor relapse. In conclusion, the combination of CPA-LLP and CCPM-(177)Lu was an effective strategy for treating breast and pancreatic cancer and deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2015

  3. High Level of Progesteron Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC 1) in Tissue of Breast Cancer Patients is Associated with Worse Response to Anthracycline-Based Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Willibald, Marina; Wurster, Isabel; Meisner, Christoph; Vogel, Ulrich; Seeger, Harald; Mueck, Alfred O; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2017-08-01

    PGRMC1 is known to be highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and is associated with chemoresistance in breast cancer cells. However, its role in breast cancer signaling is not fully understood yet. In the present study, the expression status of PGRMC1 and its phosphorylated version (pPGRMC1) in breast cancer tissue and surrounding stroma before and after neoadjuvant therapy was examined to find a possible association to therapy response. Tissue biopsies of 69 breast cancer patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression levels of PGRMC1 and pPGRMC1. Expression status of PGRMC1 and pPGRMC1 in tumor tissue was compared with expression status of progesterone receptor (PR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), total estrogen receptor β (ERβ), ERβ1, ERβ2, the proliferation marker Ki-67, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). Correlations were calculated for expression of PGRMC1 and pPGRMC1 before and after neoadjuvant-therapy. PGRMC1 and pPGRMC1 were highly abundant in every breast cancer tissue sample. Considerably lower signals were detected in surrounding tissue. Further, PGRMC1 and pPGRMC1 abundance was found to correlate with ERβ expression. A lower level of pPGRMC1 could be found in post-therapy surgical specimens compared to specimens before treatment. Interestingly, patients with high PGRMC1 tumor levels showed worse response to anthracycline-based therapy as patients with lower PGRMC1 levels. These new findings demonstrate that PGRMC1 might play an important role in progression and therapy resistance of human breast tumors and could offer an interesting target for anticancer therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Nanocrystalline silver dressing and subatmospheric pressure therapy following neoadjuvant radiation therapy and surgical excision of a feline injection site sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Woods, Samantha; de Castro Marques, Ana I; Renwick, Mala G; Argyle, Sally A; Yool, Donald A

    2012-03-01

    CLINICAL SUMMARY: This is the first clinical report of use of a combination of nanocrystalline silver and subatmospheric pressure therapy to treat a resistant wound infection, following tumour removal and radiation therapy, in a difficult-to-manage surgical site in a cat. The therapy was well tolerated and the authors suggest it is a valid treatment protocol for management of non-healing or infected wounds in the cat.

  5. Factors Predictive of Protracted Course of Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated with Definitive Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dominello, Michael; Morris, Robert; Miller, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a benefit to completing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for cervical cancer within 56 days. However, many patients experience delays due to missed radiation treatments that prolong the overall course of therapy. In order to improve patient care, we performed a quality improvement project to determine factors predictive of protracted treatment and develop strategies to enable timely treatment completion. Methods  Seventy-one patients treated for cervical cancer with CRT were identified. Medical records were reviewed to gather demographic, clinical, and treatment data. Prolonged treatment was defined as >56 days per the American Brachytherapy Society guidelines. The following variables were evaluated using paired t-tests and univariate logistic regression: demographics, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation technique, use of a boost, time to stent placement, time to first brachytherapy (BT), and genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Results The median treatment length for all patients was 59 days. Factors associated with prolonged treatment were time to cervical stent placement (p=0.001), delay ≥2 days between final external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and initial BT (p=0.0195), any grade GU toxicity (p=0.0007), or GI toxicity (p=0.0002), and the presence of a boost (p=0.0006). Age, stage, and IMRT versus conventional technique were not associated with protracted treatment. Conclusion  In this series of patients, acute toxicity, increased time to cervical stent placement, and time to first BT treatment were associated with prolonged treatment time. The patients who completed treatment in ≤56 days had a lower average time to cervical stent placement, 27 versus 31 days. Our results suggest that cervical stent placement during week four of treatment can enhance patient care and improve outcomes.  PMID:27182472

  6. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Zecha, Judith A E M; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E; Nair, Raj G; Epstein, Joel B; Sonis, Stephen T; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A; Milstein, Dan M J; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E; Schubert, Mark M; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. This study is a narrative non-systematic review. We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck complications of HNC treatment. Although

  7. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. Methods This study is a narrative non-systematic review. Results We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Conclusion Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck

  8. Complete Remission of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Paragastric Carcinoma After "Neoadjuvant" Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthias C; Uhrhan, Klara; Fischer, Thomas; Schmitz, Stephan; Markiefka, Birgid; Drzezga, Alexander; Stippel, Dirk

    2015-08-01

    A 48-year-old man presenting with upper abdominal pain was diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumor after biopsy of a paragastric mass with multiple liver metastases. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed intense uptake in the paragastric tumor and in multiple liver metastases not allowing primary surgery. Two cycles with cumulative 14.6 GBq (177)Lu-DOTATATE were given resulting in a considerable improvement. Subsequent surgery resulted in a complete remission as demonstrated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. Usually, peptide receptor radionuclide (PRRT) therapy is considered a palliative treatment. Few patients demonstrate a very favorable response allowing resection of the primary tumor after downstaging metastatic disease burden.

  9. Therapeutic strategies for localized prostate cancer I: surgery, ultrasound, adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M I; Crawford, E D; Gleave, M E; Lynch, J; Mulhall, J P; Pummer, K; Vallancien, G

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, because of the introduction and widespread availability of prostate-specific antigen determinations, carcinoma of the prostate that is localized and potentially curable has been diagnosed in an increasing number of men. Advances in surgical management with preservation of the neurovascular bundles, in addition to hormone therapy, have added to the success and improved quality of life of patients undergoing treatment. New forms of treatment (including laparoscopic prostatectomy and high-intensity focused ultrasound) are advances that are continuing to be developed and that may have a significant role in the management of this disease. With further investigation and technologic advancement, it is anticipated that more and more men with localized disease will be identified and cured, with preservation of sexual and urinary function.

  10. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, Corinne M.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Pintilie, Melania; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Milosevic, Michael; Craighead, Peter S.; Clarke, Blaise; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Fyles, Anthony W.; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  11. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Response as Assessed by Sequential {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography During Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Heerim; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic role of metabolic response by the use of serial sets of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cervical cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients who were treated with CCRT between February 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed. Three sequential PET/CT images were acquired for each patient: pre-CCRT, during-CCRT at 4 weeks of CCRT, and 1 month post-CCRT PET/CT. Metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively. The percentage changes in the maximum values of standardized uptake value (ΔSUV{sub max}%) from the PET/CT images acquired pre-CCRT and during-CCRT were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict complete response (CR) on the post-CCRT PET/CT and to identify the best cutoff value. Prognostic factors of progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Results: During-CCRT PET/CT showed that 8 patients (13%) had CR, and the other 52 patients (87%) had partial response (PR). On the post-CCRT PET/CT, 43 patients (73%) had CR, 12 patients (20%) had PR, and 4 patients (7%) had progressive disease. The average SUV{sub max} in primary tumors was 16.3 (range, 6.4-53.0) on the pre-CCRT PET/CT images and 5.3 (range, 0-19.4) on the during-CCRT PET/CT images. According to ROC curve analysis, ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict CR response on post-CCRT PET/CT (P<.001, cutoff value of 59.7%). In all patients, the PFS rate was 71.9% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis showed that ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% (P=.045) and CR response on the post-CCRT PET/CT (P=.012) were statistically significant predictors of PFS. Conclusion: Metabolic responses on the during-CCRT images at 4 weeks of treatment and 1-month post-CCRT PET/CT images may predict treatment outcomes in patients with cervical cancer. ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% at 4 weeks of CCRT may predict CR response

  12. [Quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images during chemoradiation therapy for cancer of the cervix uteri: Prognostic role of pretreatment diffusion coefficient values].

    PubMed

    Kharuzhyk, S A

    2015-01-01

    to carry out a quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI) in cancer of the cervix uteri (CCU) and to estimate the possibility of using pretreatment measured diffusion coefficient (MDC) to predict chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The investigation prospectively enrolled 46 women with morphologically verified Stages IB-IVB CCU. All the women underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic organs before and after treatment. A semiautomatic method was used to determine tumor signal intensity (SI) on DWI at b 1000 s/mm2 (SI b1000) and tumor MDC. The reproducibility of MDC measurements was assessed in 16 randomly selected women. The investigators compared the pretreatment quantitative DWI measures in complete and incomplete regression (CR and IR) groups and the presence and absence of tumor progression during a follow-up. An association of MDC with progression-free and overall survivals (PFS and OS) was determined in the patients. A semiautomatic tumor segmentation framework could determine the pretreatment quantitative DMI measures with minimal time spent and high reproducibility. The mean tumor MDC was 0.82 +/- 0.14 x 10(-3) mm2/s. CR and IR were established in 28 and 18 women, respectively. The MDC < or = 0.83 x 10(-3) mm2/s predicted CR with a sensitivity of 64.3% and a specificity of 77.8% (p=0.007). The median follow-up was 47 months (range, 3-82 months). With the MDC < or = 0.86 x 10(-3) mm2/s, 5-year PFS was 74.1% versus 42.1% with a higher MDC (p=0.023) and 5-year OS was 70.4 and 40.6%, respectively (p=0.021). The survival difference was insignificant in relation to the degree of tumor regression. The pretreatment IS at b1000 was of no prognostic value. The pretreatment tumor MDC may serve as a biomarker for predicting the efficiency of CRT for CCU.

  13. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W; Kang, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  14. Sequential and Concurrent Chemoradiation: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Chau, Nicole G; Haddad, Robert I

    2015-12-01

    Most patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer have locally advanced disease. Sequential and concurrent chemoradiation are standard, nonsurgical, curative-intent treatment options. Controversy remains regarding the superiority of one approach to another. Definitive management strategies are evolving with increasing efforts to pursue deintensification of therapy for low-risk patients, and to pursue therapeutic intensification for high-risk patients. Both sequential therapy and concurrent chemoradiation play important roles in shaping treatment paradigms because both approaches may be used to investigate deintensification or intensification strategies. This article examines the latest evidence and state-of-the-art approaches, highlighting ongoing controversies and future directions.

  15. Survival impact of neoadjuvant therapy in resected pancreatic cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study involving 18,332 patients from the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Mirkin, Katelin A; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Wong, Joyce

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a dismal prognosis, with surgical resection and adjuvant therapy offering the only hope for long-term survival. Recently, neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) has been employed to optimize outcomes. This study evaluates the impact of NAT in resected pancreatic cancer. Patients with clinically staged I-III resected carcinoma of the pancreas who underwent at least NAT or surgery first in the 2003-2011 National Cancer Data Base were included. Univariate statistics were used to compare characteristics between treatment groups. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models were also performed. 1736 patients who underwent NAT, 6706 patients who underwent surgical resection alone, and 9890 patients who underwent surgical resection followed by adjuvant therapy were studied. In patients with clinical stage I disease, adjuvant therapy was associated with similar median survival to NAT, which was greater than surgery alone (24.9, 24.8, and 18.3 months, respectively, p < 0.0001). However, in stage II, NAT offered improved median survival over adjuvant therapy, which was greater than surgery alone (21.78, 20.63, and 12.1 months, respectively, p < 0.0001). In stage III disease, NAT had better median survival relative to other groups (22.6, 14.6, and 8.7 months, respectively, p < 0.0001). In multivariate survival analysis, patients who received NAT had a 33% lower hazard of mortality up to 5 years as compared to surgical resection alone (p < 0.0001). Neoadjuvant therapy in advanced stage pancreatic cancer is associated with a survival benefit, perhaps related to a selection bias. In early stage pancreatic cancer, NAT is associated with similar survival. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, John G.; Gillham, Charles M.; Dunne, Mary T.; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Finn, Marie A.; Cannon, Mairin E.; Taylor, Judy C.; O'Shea, Carmel M.; Buckney, Steven J.; Thirion, Pierre G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. Results: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  17. Pretreatment nutritional status and locoregional failure of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Platek, Mary E; Reid, Mary E; Wilding, Gregory E; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R; Hicks, Wesley L; Popat, Saurin R; Warren, Graham W; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L; Khan, Mohamed K; Loree, Thom R; Singh, Anurag K

    2011-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p < .01), pretreatment hemoglobin (p = .04), and treatment duration (p < .01) were significant predictors of failure. On multivariate analysis, pretreatment %IBW (p = .04) and treatment time (p < .01) remained statistically significant. Although treatment time is an accepted risk factor for failure, differences in outcome for patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pretreatment %IBW should be examined further. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. PRETREATMENT NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND LOCOREGIONAL FAILURE IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER UNDERGOING DEFINITIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Platek, Mary E.; Reid, Mary E.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rigual, Nestor R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Popat, Saurin R.; Warren, Graham W.; Sullivan, Maureen; Thorstad, Wade L.; Khan, Mohamed K.; Loree, Thom R.; Singh, Anurag K.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine if markers of nutritional status predict for locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 78 patients with SCCHN who received definitive CCRT. We compared patient factors, tumor characteristics, and nutritional status indicators between patients with and without locoregional failure. Results Fifteen of 78 patients (19%) experienced locoregional failure. Median follow-up for live patients was 38 months. On univariate analysis, pretreatment percentage of ideal body weight (%IBW) (p < .01), pretreatment hemoglobin (p = .04), and treatment duration (p < .01) were significant predictors of failure. On multivariate analysis, pretreatment %IBW (p = .04) and treatment time (p < .01) remained statistically significant. Conclusions Although treatment time is an accepted risk factor for failure, differences in outcome for patients with head and neck cancer undergoing definitive CCRT based on pre-treatment %IBW should be examined further. PMID:21990220

  19. Role of histological regression grade after two neoadjuvant approaches with or without radiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin-Romano, Patricia; Sola, Jose J; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A; Chopitea, Ana; Iragorri, Yohana; Martínez-Regueira, Fernando; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Arbea, Leire; Subtil, Jose C; Cano, David; Ceniceros, Lucia; Legaspi, Jairo; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-09-06

    The degree of histopathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced gastric cancer (GC) is a key determinant of patients' long-term outcome. We aimed to assess the pattern of histopathological regression after two neoadjuvant approaches and its impact on survival times. Regression grade of the primary tumour (Becker criteria) and the degree of nodal response by a 4-point scale (grades A-D) were assessed. Grade A-true negative lymph nodes (LNs); grade B and C-infiltrated LNs with any or little evidence of nodal response; and grade D-complete pathological response in a previously infiltrated LN. A favourable pathological response was defined as Becker Ia-b and grade D. From 2004 to 2014, 80 patients with GC (cT3-4/N+ by CT-scan/EUS) were treated with either preoperative chemotherapy (ChT, n=34) or chemoradiation (CRT, n=46). Patients in the CRT group had a higher likelihood of achieving a Becker Ia-b response (58 vs 32%, P=0.001), a grade D nodal regression (30 vs 6%, P=0.009) and a favourable pathological response (23 vs 3%; P=0.019). Patients with a grade D nodal response had a longer 5-year PFS and OS compared with those with a grade B or C response. Patients with a baseline negative LN status had similar outcomes irrespective of the preoperative therapy received (5-year OS; ChT vs CRT, 58 vs 51%, P=0.92). Preoperative chemoradiation increases the likelihood of achieving favourable histopathological features that correlate with a 5-year OS>70% in GC patients.

  20. Cost Effectiveness and Clinical Efficacy of Biliary Stents in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Timothy B.; Spangler, Chad C.; Byanova, Katerina L.; Ripple, Gregory H.; Rockacy, Matthew J.; Levenick, John M.; Smith, Kerrington D.; Colacchio, Thomas A.; Barth, Richard J.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Tsapakos, Michael J.; Gordon, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS The optimal type of stent for the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with curative intent is not known. We performed a prospective trial comparing 3 types of biliary stents—fully covered self-expandable metal stents (fcSEMSs), uncovered self-expandable metal stents (uSEMSs), and plastic stents—to determine which best optimized cost effectiveness and important clinical outcomes. METHODS In this prospective, randomized trial, consecutive patients with malignant biliary obstruction from newly diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were to start neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy were randomized to receive fcSEMSs, uSEMSs, or plastic stents during index ERCP. The primary outcomes were time to stent occlusion, attempted surgical resection, or death after the initiation of neoadjuvant therapy and the secondary outcomes were total patient costs associated with the stent, including the index ERCP cost, downstream hospitalization cost due to stent occlusion, and the cost associated with procedural adverse event. RESULTS A total of 54 patients were randomized and reached the primary endpoint; 16 patients in the fcSEMS group, 17 in the uSEMS group, and 21 in the plastic group. No baseline demographic or tumor characteristic differences were noted between groups. fcSEMSs had a longer time to stent occlusion compared with uSEMSs and plastic stents (219 vs. 88 and 75 days, p<0.01), although the groups had equivalent rates of stent occlusion, attempted surgical resection, and death. Although SEMS placement cost more during index ERCP (uSEMS = $24,874 and fcSEMS = $22,729 vs plastic = $18,701, p <0.01), they resulted in higher procedural adverse event costs per patient (uSEMS $5521 and fcSEMS=$12,701 vs plastic = $0, p<0.01). Conversely, plastic stents resulted in a $11,458 hospitalization cost per patient due to stent occlusion, compared with $2301 for uSEMSs and $0

  1. Multicentre cohort study to define and validate pathological assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy in oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noble, F; Lloyd, M A; Turkington, R; Griffiths, E; O'Donovan, M; O'Neill, J R; Mercer, S; Parsons, S L; Fitzgerald, R C; Underwood, T J

    2017-09-25

    This multicentre cohort study sought to define a robust pathological indicator of clinically meaningful response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oesophageal adenocarcinoma. A questionnaire was distributed to 11 UK upper gastrointestinal cancer centres to determine the use of assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Records of consecutive patients undergoing oesophagogastric resection at seven centres between January 2000 and December 2013 were reviewed. Pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was assessed using the Mandard Tumour Regression Grade (TRG) and lymph node downstaging. TRG (8 of 11 centres) was the most widely used system to assess response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, but there was discordance on how it was used in practice. Of 1392 patients, 1293 had TRG assessment; data were available for clinical and pathological nodal status (cN and pN) in 981 patients, and TRG, cN and pN in 885. There was a significant difference in survival between responders (TRG 1-2; median overall survival (OS) not reached) and non-responders (TRG 3-5; median OS 2·22 (95 per cent c.i. 1·94 to 2·51) years; P < 0·001); the hazard ratio was 2·46 (95 per cent c.i. 1·22 to 4·95; P = 0·012). Among local non-responders, the presence of lymph node downstaging was associated with significantly improved OS compared with that of patients without lymph node downstaging (median OS not reached versus 1·92 (1·68 to 2·16) years; P < 0·001). A clinically meaningful local response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was restricted to the small minority of patients (14·8 per cent) with TRG 1-2. Among local non-responders, a subset of patients (21·3 per cent) derived benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy by lymph node downstaging and their survival mirrored that of local responders. © 2017 The Authors. BJS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

  2. Microarray profiling of mononuclear peripheral blood cells identifies novel candidate genes related to chemoradiation response in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palma, Pablo; Cuadros, Marta; Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Olmedo, Carmen; Cano, Carlos; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Blanco, Armando; Bueno, Pablo; Ferrón, J Antonio; Medina, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation significantly improves oncological outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. However there is no effective method of predicting tumor response to chemoradiation in these patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells have emerged recently as pathology markers of cancer and other diseases, making possible their use as therapy predictors. Furthermore, the importance of the immune response in radiosensivity of solid organs led us to hypothesized that microarray gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells could identify patients with response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Thirty five 35 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were recruited initially to perform the study. Peripheral blood samples were obtained before neaodjuvant treatment. RNA was extracted and purified to obtain cDNA and cRNA for hybridization of microarrays included in Human WG CodeLink bioarrays. Quantitative real time PCR was used to validate microarray experiment data. Results were correlated with pathological response, according to Mandard´s criteria and final UICC Stage (patients with tumor regression grade 1-2 and downstaging being defined as responders and patients with grade 3-5 and no downstaging as non-responders). Twenty seven out of 35 patients were finally included in the study. We performed a multiple t-test using Significance Analysis of Microarrays, to find those genes differing significantly in expression, between responders (n = 11) and non-responders (n = 16) to CRT. The differently expressed genes were: BC 035656.1, CIR, PRDM2, CAPG, FALZ, HLA-DPB2, NUPL2, and ZFP36. The measurement of FALZ (p = 0.029) gene expression level determined by qRT-PCR, showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. Gene expression profiling reveals novel genes in peripheral blood samples of mononuclear cells that could predict responders and non-responders to chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced

  3. Intermediate-fraction neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Tiancheng; Gu, Jin; Li, Ming; Du, Changzheng

    2013-04-01

    In China, standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy has not been well accepted, not only because of financial constraints but also because of the poorly-tolerated long duration of the regimen. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of a modified neoadjuvant radiation regimen on the prognosis of rectal cancer patients in China. This was a nonrandomized cohort study evaluating outcomes of patients who chose to undergo preoperative radiotherapy compared with those who chose not to undergo preoperative radiotherapy (controls). The study was carried out in Peking University Cancer Hospital, a tertiary care cancer center in China. Records of patients with locally advanced, mid-to-low rectal cancer who underwent total mesorectal excision at Peking University Cancer Hospital from 2001 through 2005 were analyzed in this study. Patients who chose preoperative radiotherapy received a total dose of 30 Gy delivered in 10 once-daily fractions of 3.0 Gy each, with at least a 14-day delay of surgery after delivery of the last fraction. Tumor downstaging was evaluated. Local recurrence, distant metastases, and disease-free and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 101 patients accepted and 162 patients declined the modified preoperative radiotherapy regimen. Of the 101 patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy, 5 (5%) had a complete response, and 50 (50%) achieved TNM downstaging. The local recurrence rate was 5% with preoperative radiotherapy and 18% in the control groups (p = 0.02). Within the preoperative radiotherapy group, 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were significantly higher in patients with T-, N-, or TNM-downstaging than in patients without downstaging. Evaluation of literature reports indicated that clinical safety and effectiveness of the modified protocol are comparable to results of standard neoadjuvant procedures. The allocation to study groups was not randomized, and patient self-selection may

  4. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  5. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  6. First FDA approval of neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer: pertuzumab for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Wedam, Suparna; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui; Tilley, Amy; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard; Cortazar, Patricia

    2014-11-01

    On September 30, 2013, the FDA granted accelerated approval to pertuzumab (Perjecta; Genentech, Inc.) for use in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel as neoadjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive, locally advanced, inflammatory, or early-stage breast cancer (either greater than 2 cm in diameter or node positive) as part of a complete treatment regimen for early breast cancer. The approval was based in part on a randomized multicenter trial in the indicated population that allocated 417 patients to neoadjuvant treatment with trastuzumab-docetaxel (TD), pertuzumab-trastuzumab-docetaxel (PTD), pertuzumab-trastuzumab, or pertuzumab-docetaxel. PTD was administered preoperatively every 3 weeks for four cycles. Following surgery patients received three cycles of 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide every 3 weeks and trastuzumab every 3 weeks to complete 1 year of therapy. The pathologic complete response rates by the FDA-preferred definition [absence of invasive cancer in the breast and lymph nodes (ypT0/is ypN0)] were 39.3% and 21.5% in the PTD and the TD arms, respectively (P = 0.0063). The most common adverse reactions with PTD were alopecia, diarrhea, nausea, and neutropenia. This approval was based on the totality of evidence, particularly improved survival in the metastatic breast cancer trial, and a fully accrued confirmatory trial.

  7. Intense Androgen-Deprivation Therapy With Abiraterone Acetate Plus Leuprolide Acetate in Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results of a Randomized Phase II Neoadjuvant Study

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Montgomery, Bruce; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Bubley, Glenn J.; Richie, Jerome P.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Sanda, Martin G.; Davis, John W.; Loda, Massimo; True, Lawrence D.; Troncoso, Patricia; Ye, Huihui; Lis, Rosina T.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Balk, Steven P.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Penning, Trevor M.; Nelson, Peter S.; Xie, Wanling; Jiang, Zhenyang; Haqq, Christopher M.; Tamae, Daniel; Tran, NamPhuong; Peng, Weimin; Kheoh, Thian; Molina, Arturo; Kantoff, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cure rates for localized high-risk prostate cancers (PCa) and some intermediate-risk PCa are frequently suboptimal with local therapy. Outcomes are improved by concomitant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with radiation therapy, but not by concomitant ADT with surgery. Luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa; leuprolide acetate) does not reduce serum androgens as effectively as abiraterone acetate (AA), a prodrug of abiraterone, a CYP17 inhibitor that lowers serum testosterone (< 1 ng/dL) and improves survival in metastatic PCa. The possibility that greater androgen suppression in patients with localized high-risk PCa will result in improved clinical outcomes makes paramount the reassessment of neoadjuvant ADT with more robust androgen suppression. Patients and Methods A neoadjuvant randomized phase II trial of LHRHa with AA was conducted in patients with localized high-risk PCa (N = 58). For the first 12 weeks, patients were randomly assigned to LHRHa versus LHRHa plus AA. After a research prostate biopsy, all patients received 12 additional weeks of LHRHa plus AA followed by prostatectomy. Results The levels of intraprostatic androgens from 12-week prostate biopsies, including the primary end point (dihydrotestosterone/testosterone), were significantly lower (dehydroepiandrosterone, Δ4-androstene-3,17-dione, dihydrotestosterone, all P < .001; testosterone, P < .05) with LHRHa plus AA compared with LHRHa alone. Prostatectomy pathologic staging demonstrated a low incidence of complete responses and minimal residual disease, with residual T3- or lymph node–positive disease in the majority. Conclusion LHRHa plus AA treatment suppresses tissue androgens more effectively than LHRHa alone. Intensive intratumoral androgen suppression with LHRHa plus AA before prostatectomy for localized high-risk PCa may reduce tumor burden. PMID:25311217

  8. External Beam Radiation Therapy or Brachytherapy With or Without Short-course Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter, Prospective Study of Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Gay, Hiram A; Sanda, Martin G; Liu, Jingxia; Wu, Ningying; Hamstra, Daniel A; Wei, John T; Dunn, Rodney L; Klein, Eric A; Sandler, Howard M; Saigal, Christopher S; Litwin, Mark S; Kuban, Deborah A; Hembroff, Larry; Regan, Meredith M; Chang, Peter; Michalski, Jeff M

    2017-06-01

    The long-term effects of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) with radiation therapy on participant-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) have not been characterized in prospective multicenter studies. We evaluated HRQOL for 2 years among participants undergoing radiation therapy (RT) with or without NADT for newly diagnosed, early-stage prostate cancer. We analyzed longitudinal cohort data from the Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium to ascertain the HRQOL trajectory of men receiving NADT with external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy. HRQOL was measured using the expanded prostate cancer index composite 26-item questionnaire at 2, 6, 12, and 24 months after the initiation of NADT. We used the χ(2) or Fisher exact test to compare the shift in percentages between groups that did or did not receive NADT. Analyses were conducted at the 2-sided 5% significance level. For subjects receiving EBRT, questions regarding the ability to have an erection, ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, frequency of erections, ability to function sexually, and lack of energy were in a significantly worse dichotomized category for the patients receiving NADT. Comparing the baseline versus 24-month outcomes, 24%, 23%, and 30% of participants receiving EBRT plus NADT shifted to the worse dichotomized category for the ability to reach an orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually compared with 14%, 13%, and 16% in the EBRT group, respectively. Compared with baseline, at 2 years, participants receiving NADT plus EBRT compared with EBRT alone had worse HRQOL, as measured by the ability to reach orgasm, quality of erections, and ability to function sexually. However, no difference was found in the ability to have an erection, frequency of erections, overall sexual function, hot flashes, breast tenderness/enlargement, depression, lack of energy, or change in body weight. The improved

  9. Cross-sectional imaging to evaluate the extent of regional nodal disease in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tara L; Glazebrook, Katrina N; Murphy, Brittany L; Viers, Lyndsay D; Hieken, Tina J

    2017-04-01

    Cross-sectional imaging often is performed in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) and may identify level III axillary and extra-axillary nodal disease. Our aim was to investigate associations of radiologic nodal staging with pathological N (pN) stage at operation and to explore how this might aid surgical and radiotherapy treatment planning. With IRB approval, we reviewed pre-treatment breast MRI, PET/CT, and CT imaging and clinicopathologic data on 348 breast cancer patients with imaging available for review undergoing NST followed by operation at our institution 1/2008-9/2013. We defined abnormal lymph node findings on MRI, CT, and PET/CT to include cortical thickening, FDG-avidity and loss of fatty hilum. Patients were assigned a radiologic nodal (rN) stage based on imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 10.1 software RESULTS: Pre-NST imaging included axillary ultrasound in 338 patients (97%), breast MRI in 305 (88%) and PET/CT or CT in 215 (62%). 213 patients (61%) were biopsy-proven axillary lymph node-positive (LN+) pre-treatment. cT stage was T1 in 9%, T2 in 49%, T3 in 29%, T4 in 12%; median tumor size was 4cm. Pre-treatment rN stage across all the patients was rN0 in 86 (25%), rN1 in 173 (50%), and rN3 in 89 (26%). rN3 disease included level III axillary, supraclavicular and suspicious internal mammary lymph nodes in 47 (53%), 32 (37%) and 45 (52%), respectively. Of patients LN+ at diagnosis, 78 (37%) were rN3. After NST, 162 patients (47%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 3 (5.9±0.4) positive lymph nodes including 128 of 213 (60%) LN+ at diagnosis. Pre-NST rN stage correlated with the likelihood and extent of axillary disease at operation, p=0.002. Fifty four of 89 rN3 patients (61%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 5 (8±1) positive nodes. rN3 patients had larger nodal metastases (median 9 vs 6mm) and more frequent extranodal extension (61% vs 43%) than

  10. Short- and Long-Term Quality of Life and Bowel Function in Patients With MRI-Defined, High-Risk, Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With an Intensified Neoadjuvant Strategy in the Randomized Phase 2 EXPERT-C Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Sclafani, Francesco; Peckitt, Clare; Cunningham, David; Tait, Diana; Giralt, Jordi; Glimelius, Bengt; Keränen, Susana Roselló; Bateman, Andrew; Hickish, Tamas; Tabernero, Josep; Thomas, Janet; Brown, Gina; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian

    2015-10-01

    Objective: Intensified preoperative treatments have been increasingly investigated in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but limited data are available for the impact of these regimens on quality of life (QoL) and bowel function (BF). We assessed these outcome measures in EXPERT-C, a randomized phase 2 trial of neoadjuvant capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (CAPOX), followed by chemoradiation therapy (CRT), total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant CAPOX with or without cetuximab in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk LARC. Methods and Materials: QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. Bowel incontinence was assessed using the modified Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire. Results: Compared to baseline, QoL scores during preoperative treatment were better for symptoms associated with the primary tumor in the rectum (blood and mucus in stool, constipation, diarrhea, stool frequency, buttock pain) but worse for global health status, role functioning, and symptoms related to the specific safety profile of each treatment modality. During follow-up, improved emotional functioning and lessened anxiety and insomnia were observed, but deterioration of body image, increased urinary incontinence, less sexual interest (men), and increased impotence and dyspareunia were observed. Cetuximab was associated with a deterioration of global health status during neoadjuvant chemotherapy but did not have any long-term detrimental effect. An improvement in bowel continence was observed after preoperative treatment and 3 years after sphincter-sparing surgery. Conclusions: Intensifying neoadjuvant treatment by administering induction systemic chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy improves tumor-related symptoms and does not appear to have a significantly detrimental effect on QoL and BF, in both the short and the long term.

  11. Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham; Crook, Juanita; Jones, Stuart; Malone, Shawn; Bowen, Julie; Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

  12. Phase I study of neoadjuvant accelerated short course radiation therapy with photons and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wo, Jennifer Y; Mamon, Harvey J; Ferrone, Cristina R; Ryan, David P; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Tseng, Yolanda D; Napolitano, Brian N; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Swanson, Richard S; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-01-01

    In this phase I study, we sought to determine the feasibility and tolerability of neoadjuvant short course radiotherapy (SC-CRT) delivered with photon RT with concurrent capecitabine for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Ten patients with localized, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled from December 2009 to August 2011. In dose level I, patients received 3 Gy × 10. In dose level 2, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (every other day). In dose level 3, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (consecutive days). Capecitabine was given during weeks 1 and 2. Surgery was performed 1-3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. With an intended accrual of 12 patients, the study was closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Compared to the companion phase I proton study, patients treated with photons had increased intraoperative RT fibrosis reported by surgeons (27% vs. 63%). Among those undergoing a Whipple resection, increased RT fibrosis translated to an increased mean OR time of 69 min. Dosimetric comparison revealed significantly increased low dose exposure to organs at risk for patients treated with photon RT. This phase I experience evaluating the tolerability of neoadjuvant SC-CRT with photon RT closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A microRNA signature associated with pathological complete response to novel neoadjuvant therapy regimen in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Vazquez, Raúl; Ruiz-García, Erika; Meneses García, Abelardo; Astudillo-de la Vega, Horacio; Lara-Medina, Fernando; Alvarado-Miranda, Alberto; Maldonado-Martínez, Héctor; González-Barrios, Juan A; Campos-Parra, Alma D; Rodríguez Cuevas, Sergio; Marchat, Laurence A; López-Camarillo, César

    2017-06-01

    clinical response in triple-negative breast cancer patients with pathological complete response to neoadjuvant therapy.

  14. Restaging oesophageal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy with (18)F-FDG PET-CT: identifying interval metastases and predicting incurable disease at surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlay, John M; Gillies, Richard S; Franklin, James M; Teoh, Eugene J; Jones, Greg E; di Carlo, Sara; Gleeson, Fergus V; Maynard, Nicholas D; Bradley, Kevin M; Middleton, Mark R

    2016-10-01

    It is unknown whether restaging oesophageal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT for disease progression. We aimed to determine this and stratify risk. This was a retrospective study of patients staged before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) by (18)F-FDG PET-CT and restaged with CT or PET-CT in a single centre (2006-2014). Three hundred and eighty-three patients were restaged (103 CT, 280 PET-CT). Incurable disease was detected by CT in 3 (2.91 %) and PET-CT in 17 (6.07 %). Despite restaging unsuspected incurable disease was encountered at surgery in 34/336 patients (10.1 %). PET-CT was more sensitive than CT (p = 0.005, McNemar's test). A new classification of FDG-avid nodal stage (mN) before NAC (plus tumour FDG-avid length) predicted subsequent progression, independent of conventional nodal stage. The presence of FDG-avid nodes after NAC and an impassable tumour stratified risk of incurable disease at surgery into high (75.0 %; both risk factors), medium (22.4 %; either), and low risk (3.87 %; neither) groups (p < 0.001). Decision theory supported restaging PET-CT. PET-CT is more sensitive than CT for detecting interval progression; however, it is insufficient in at least higher risk patients. mN stage and response (mNR) plus primary tumour characteristics can stratify this risk simply. • Restaging (18) F-FDG-PET-CT after neoadjuvant chemotherapy identifies metastases in 6 % of patients • Restaging (18) F-FDG-PET-CT is more sensitive than CT for detecting interval progression • Despite this, at surgery 10 % of patients had unsuspected incurable disease • New concepts (FDG-avid nodal stage and response) plus tumour impassability stratify risk • Higher risk (if not all) patients may benefit from additional restaging modalities.

  15. Prognostic Significance of Serum and Urinary Neopterin Concentrations in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma Treated with Chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Zezulová, Michaela; Bartoušková, Marie; Hlídková, Eva; Juráňová, Jarmila; Červinková, Barbora; Kasalová, Eva; Adam, Tomáš; Krčmová, Lenka Kujovská; Solichová, Dagmar; Cwiertka, Karel; Vrána, David; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the prognostic significance of serum and urinary neopterin concentrations in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma treated with (chemo)radiation. Urinary and serum neopterin and peripheral blood cell count were determined in 49 patients with rectal carcinoma before the start of (chemo)radiation. Neopterin concentrations exhibited a significant inverse correlation with hemoglobin and positive correlation with leukocyte count, platelet count and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio. Increased serum neopterin concentration was associated with significantly inferior relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival. However, a significant association was observed only in 28 patients treated in the neoadjuvant setting. Although increased urinary neopterin was also associated with inferior RFS and overall survival, this was not statistically significant. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was also associated with poor prognosis. The data presented herein indicate a prognostic significance of serum neopterin concentrations in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Short-course radiation versus long-course chemoradiation for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Rödel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The 2 broad approaches to preoperative therapy for rectal cancer are chemoradiation and short-course radiation. The outcomes of these 2 approaches reported in nonrandomized trials are not comparable because patients selected for treatment with short-course radiotherapy included those with cT1-3 disease, whereas patients selected for chemoradiation included those with T3 and/or N+ disease. However, more recent trials of short-course radiation have included patients with cT3 and/or N+ disease who also underwent sequential or postoperative chemotherapy, allowing a more relevant comparison with chemoradiation. This article compares the 2 preoperative approaches and addresses their emerging roles.

  17. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Cao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoting; Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng; Calaguas, Miriam J.C.; Reyes, Rey H. de los; Cho, Chul-Koo; Dung, To Anh; Supriana, Nana; Erawati, Dyah; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  18. Pathological complete response in invasive breast cancer treated by skin sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy: Comparison between immunohistochemical subtypes.

    PubMed

    Barrou, J; Bannier, M; Cohen, M; Lambaudie, E; Gonçalves, A; Bertrand, P; Buttarelli, M; Opinel, P; Sterkers, N; Tallet, A; Zinzindohoué, C; Houvenaeghel, G

    2017-04-01

    Even if neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and oncoplastic techniques have increased the breast conserving surgery rate, mastectomy is still a standard for multifocal or extensive breast cancers (BC). In the prospect of increasing breast reconstruction, an alternative therapeutic protocol was developed combining NACT with neoadjuvant radiation therapy (NART), followed by mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). The oncological safety of this therapeutic plan still needs further exploration. We assessed pathological complete response (pCR) as a surrogate endpoint for disease free survival. Between 2010 and 2016, 103 patients undergoing mastectomy after NACT and NART were recruited. After CT and RT were administrated, a completion mastectomy with IBR by latissimus dorsi flap was achieved 6 to 8 weeks later. pCR was defined by the absence of residual invasive disease in both nodes and breast. Histologic response was analyzed for each immunohistochemical subset. pCR was obtained for 53.4% of the patients. This pCR rate was higher in hormonal receptor negative (HER2 and triple negative) patients when compared to luminal tumours (69.7% vs 45.7%, p=0.023). The pCR rate found in this study is higher than those published in studies analyzing NACT (12.5%-27.1%). This can be explained by the combination of anthracycline and taxane, the use of trastuzumab when HER2 was overexpressed but also by RT associated to NACT. Inverting the sequence protocol for BC, requiring both CT and RT, allows more IBR without diminishing pCR and should therefore be considered as an acceptable therapeutic option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neoadjuvant gemcitabine, docetaxel, and capecitabine followed by gemcitabine and capecitabine/radiation therapy and surgery in locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sherman, William H; Chu, Kyung; Chabot, John; Allendorf, John; Schrope, Beth Ann; Hecht, Elizabeth; Jin, Brian; Leung, David; Remotti, Helen; Addeo, Gisella; Postolov, Inna; Tsai, Wei; Fine, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to assess toxicity, resectability, and survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients presenting with locally advanced, unresectable disease treated with neoadjuvant gemcitabine, docetaxel, and capecitabine (GTX) and gemcitabine and capecitabine (GX)/radiation therapy (RT). All patients presenting to the Pancreas Center were evaluated for eligibility. Forty-five patients (mean age, 64 years; range, 44-83 years)-34 patients deemed unresectable because of arterial involvement and 11 patients deemed unresectable because of extensive venous involvement-were treated with 6 cycles of GTX. Those with arterial involvement were treated with GX/RT after chemotherapy. The GTX and GX/RT treatments were tolerated with the expected drug-related toxicities. There were no bowel perforations, cases of pancreatitis, or delayed strictures. Among those with arterial involvement, 29 underwent subsequent resection, with 20 (69%) achieving R0 resections. All 11 patients with venous-only involvement underwent resection, with 8 achieving R0 resections and 3 achieving complete pathologic responses. For the arterial arm, the 1-year survival rate was 71% (24 of 34 patients), and the median survival was 29 months (95% confidence interval, 21-38 months). Thirteen patients (38%) have not relapsed (range, 5-49+ months). For the venous arm, the median survival has not been reached at more than 42 months. Six patients (55%) in the venous arm did not experience recurrence (range, 6.2-42+ months). GTX plus GX/RT is an effective neoadjuvant regimen that can be safely administered to patients up to at least the age of 83 years. It is associated with a high response rate, a high rate of R0 resections, and prolonged overall survival. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  20. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  1. [A case of small cell carcinoma in the urinary bladder responding to gemcitabine/cisplatin combination therapy as neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shirato, Akitomi; Shimamoto, Kenji; Ozawa, Akira; Tanji, Nozomu; Yokoyama, Masayoshi

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. A 79-year-old man with the chief complaints of macrohematuria and pollakisuria was admitted to our hospital. Cystoscopy and computed tomography (CT) revealed a non-papillary broad-based bladder tumor. Histological diagnosis was small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, and he underwent 3 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy including gemcitabine and cisplatin with a preoperative diagnosis of cT3bN0M0. After the chemotherapy, cystoscopy and CT showed complete remission. Total cystectomy with ileal conduit was performed following 3 courses of chemotherapy. Microscopic examination revealed that the small cell carcinoma had disappeared and the converted squamous cell carcinoma remained only in a small part of the specimens. The patient was carefully followed for 10 months after operation, with no tumor recurrence.

  2. NEOCENT: a randomised feasibility and translational study comparing neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with chemotherapy in ER-rich postmenopausal primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Cleator, S; Kilburn, L S; Kim, S B; Ahn, S-H; Beresford, M; Gong, G; Mansi, J; Mallon, E; Reed, S; Mousa, K; Fallowfield, L; Cheang, M; Morden, J; Page, K; Guttery, D S; Rghebi, B; Primrose, L; Shaw, J A; Thompson, A M; Bliss, J M; Coombes, R C

    2014-12-01

    Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy for women with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive early breast cancer (BC). We aimed to assess feasibility of recruiting patients to a study comparing chemotherapy versus endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women with ER-rich primary BC, and response as well as translational endpoints were assessed. Patients requiring neoadjuvant therapy were randomised to chemotherapy: 6 × 3-weekly cycles FE₁₀₀C or endocrine therapy: letrozole 2.5 mg, daily for 18-23 weeks. Primary endpoints were recruitment feasibility and tissue collection. Secondary endpoints included clinical, radiological and pathological response rates, quality of life and translational endpoints. 63/80 patients approached were eligible, of those 44 (70, 95% CI 57-81) were randomised. 12 (54.5, 95% CI 32.2-75.6) chemotherapy patients showed radiological objective response compared with 13 (59.1, 95% CI 36.4-79.3) letrozole patients. Compared with baseline, mean Ki-67 levels fell in both groups at days 2-4 and at surgery [fold change: 0.24 (95% CI 0.12-0.51) and 0.24; (95% CI 0.15-0.37), respectively]. Plasma total cfDNA levels rose from baseline to week 8 [fold change: chemotherapy 2.10 (95% CI 1.47-3.00), letrozole 1.47(95% CI 0.98-2.20)], and were maintained at surgery in the chemotherapy group [chemotherapy 2.63; 95% CI 1.56-4.41), letrozole 0.95 (95% CI 0.71-1.26)]. An increase in plasma let-7a miRNA was seen at surgery for patients with objective radiological response to chemotherapy. Recruitment and tissue collection endpoints were met; however, a larger trial was deemed unfeasible due to slow accrual. Both regimens were equally efficacious. Dynamic changes were seen in Ki-67 and circulating biomarkers in both groups with increases in cfDNA and let-7a miRNA persisting until surgery for chemotherapy patients.

  3. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer: Effects on cancer tissue and novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Hidehiro; Makino, Isamu; Ohbatake, Yoshinao; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2017-06-01

    Chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer has diversified following the addition of more treatment regimens; however, in spite of this, pancreatic cancer remains a fatal disease. Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (NAC) or neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NACRT) has been developed and implemented. For patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), a number of clinical trials have been conducted; NACRT was demonstrated to improve resectability, R0 resection rate, overall survival rate, disease-free survival rate and even an LAPC and BRPC survival advantage over NAC. However, from the knowledge obtained from resected specimens following preoperative treatment, residual pancreatic cancer tissues following NAC are rich in chemoresistant cancer stem-like cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers. Conversely, metformin, angiotensin receptor blocker, statins and low-dose paclitaxel are well-known as drugs that inhibit EMT, which is associated with cancer stem cell-like characteristics. Although clinical effectiveness is unlikely to be achieved using one of these as an anticancer agent, it is reasonable to use these drugs for patients with comorbidities in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, gemcitabine (GEM) affects antitumor immunity by stimulating the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A on the surface of cancer cells to enhance the cytotoxicity of natural killer cells. Considering EMT and antitumor immunity, there is a possibility that GEM and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel therapy is the most suitable regimen for treating pancreatic cancer. However, even as preoperative treatment progresses, R0 resection is the most important factor for the long-term survival of pancreatic cancer patients.

  4. Results of Neoadjuvant Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for T1-T2 N0 Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arezzo, Alberto; Arolfo, Simone; Allaix, Marco Ettore; Munoz, Fernando; Cassoni, Paola; Monagheddu, Chiara; Ricardi, Umberto; Ciccone, Giovannino; Morino, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the short-term outcomes of neoadjuvant short-course radiation therapy (SCRT) followed by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) for T1-T2 N0 extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Recent studies suggest that neoadjuvant radiation therapy followed by TEM is safe and has results similar to those with abdominal rectal resection for the treatment of extraperitoneal early rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We planned a prospective pilot study including 25 consecutive patients with extraperitoneal T1-T2 N0 M0 rectal adenocarcinoma undergoing SCRT followed by TEM 4 to 10 weeks later (SCRT-TEM). Safety, efficacy, and acceptability of this treatment modality were compared with historical groups of patients with similar rectal cancer stage and treated with long-course radiation therapy (LCRT) followed by TEM (LCRT-TEM), TEM alone, or laparoscopic rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) at our institution. Results: The study was interrupted after 14 patients underwent SCRT of 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by TEM. Median time between SCRT and TEM was 7 weeks (range: 4-10 weeks). Although no preoperative complications occurred, rectal suture dehiscence was observed in 7 patients (50%) at 4 weeks follow-up, associated with an enterocutaneous fistula in the sacral area in 2 cases. One patient required a colostomy. Quality of life at 1-month follow-up, according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 survey score, was significantly worse in SCRT-TEM patients than in LCRT-TEM patients (P=.0277) or TEM patients (P=.0004), whereas no differences were observed with TME patients (P=.604). At a median follow-up of 10 months (range: 6-26 months), we observed 1 (7%) local recurrence at 6 months that was treated with abdominoperineal resection. Conclusions: SCRT followed by TEM for T1-T2 N0 rectal cancer is burdened by a high rate of painful dehiscence of the suture line and enterocutaneous

  5. Application of low-level laser radiation in children's oncology with complications caused by chemoradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakirev, S. A.; Gusev, L. I.; Grabovschiner, A. A.; Khristoforov, V. N.; Ivanova, J. V.; Shyshkova, E. I.

    1999-12-01

    The present work is based on a 12 month clinical observation period of 155 patients aged from 6 months to 15 years with multiple complications after chemoradiant treatment of hemoblastos and solid tumors. The application of Magnetic Infrared Laser therapy for different complications caused by chemoradiation treatment of children's malignant tumors is an entirely new method and for the first time has been tried in children's oncology.

  6. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Hu, Chen; Macdonald, David R.; Lesser, Glenn J.; Coons, Stephen W.; Brachman, David G.; Ryu, Samuel; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Liu, Junfeng; Chakravarti, Arnab; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  7. Comparison of risk of local-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conservation therapy for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation stratified according to a prognostic index score

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Chen, Allen M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: We previously developed a prognostic index that stratified patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy into groups with different risks for local-regional recurrence (LRR). The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of LRR as a function of prognostic index score for patients treated with BCT or mastectomy plus radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 815 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Patients were assigned an index score from 0 to 4 and given 1 point for the presence of each factor: clinical N2 to N3 disease, lymphovascular invasion, pathologic size >2 cm, and multifocal residual disease. Results: The 10-year LRR rates were very low and similar between the mastectomy and BCT groups for patients with an index score of 0 or 1. For patients with a score of 2, LRR trended lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (12% vs. 28%, p = 0.28). For patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was significantly lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (19% vs. 61%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: This analysis suggests that BCT can provide excellent local-regional treatment for the vast majority of patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For the few patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was >60% after BCT and was <20% with mastectomy. If these findings are confirmed in larger randomized studies, the prognostic index may be useful in helping to select the type of surgical treatment for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation.

  8. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  9. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended.

  10. Patterns of self-reported symptoms in pancreatic cancer patients receiving chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Chan, Wenyaw; Abbruzzese, James L; Xiong, Henry Q; Ho, Linus; Evans, Douglas B; Varadhachary, Gauri; Bhat, Samrat; Wolff, Robert A; Crane, Christopher

    2007-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease characterized by multiple disease-related symptoms. Chemoradiation therapy is a standard of treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Although shown to prolong survival, there is little information about treatment-related symptoms or the palliative benefits of chemoradiation. We assessed symptoms of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemoradiation to determine the prevalence, and co-occurrence, of symptoms and to identify the extent to which symptoms interfered with function. Forty-eight patients were treated with chemoradiation on a Phase I protocol. Patients received radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions), capecitabine (median dose 825 mg/m(2) twice daily), and bevacizumab (2.5-10 mg/kg). Symptom severity and its interference with function were prospectively assessed (at presentation, during, and after chemoradiation) in 43 consenting patients using the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory. Results showed that 95% of patients reported at least one of the 13 symptoms assessed at presentation. The most commonly reported symptoms of moderate to severe (>or=5 on a 0-10 scale) intensity at presentation were lack of appetite (24%), pain (19%), fatigue (19%), and sleep disturbance (10%). We observed an increase in patients reporting moderate to severe fatigue, nausea, and sleep disturbance during chemoradiation. McNemar tests for paired binary observations showed the proportion of patients reporting moderate to severe symptoms significantly (P<0.001) decreased after chemoradiation at 94 days follow-up (lack of appetite=7%, pain=7%, fatigue=13%, sleep disturbance=7%). This study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of symptom assessment in chemoradiation protocols. Future studies with larger cohorts are needed to further characterize multiple symptoms associated with chemoradiation.

  11. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-01-01

    or even molecular imaging. These shortcomings probably explain our current relative lack of success in the arena of combining these agents with chemoradiation. PMID:23997939

  12. The status of targeted agents in the setting of neoadjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hadaki, Maher; Harrison, Mark

    2013-09-01

    even molecular imaging. These shortcomings probably explain our current relative lack of success in the arena of combining these agents with chemoradiation.

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity.

  14. High efficacy of cisplatin neoadjuvant therapy in a prospective series of patients carrying BRCA1 germ-line mutation.

    PubMed

    Moiseyenko, Vladimir M; Dolmatov, Georgiy D; Moiseyenko, Fedor V; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Volkov, Nikita M; Chubenko, Vyacheslav A; Abduloeva, Nuriniso Kh; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Sokolenko, Anna P; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-04-01

    Development of malignancies in BRCA1 germ-line mutation carriers usually involves somatic inactivation of the remaining BRCA1 allele. This feature leads to a tumor-specific deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair and underlies pronounced sensitivity of BRCA1-driven cancers to cisplatin. BRCA1-specific activity of cisplatin has been repeatedly demonstrated in cell culture and animal experiments; however, corresponding clinical evidence remains limited. We applied neoadjuvant monotherapy by cisplatin (75-100 mg/m(2), 4-6 cycles) to six breast cancer patients carrying BRCA1 5382insC mutation. Pronounced reduction in tumor size was observed in all treated women. Three patients (T2N0M0, T4N2M0 and T4N2M0) showed pathologic complete response, two women (T4N0M0 and T2N1M0) had partial pathologic response, and one woman (T3N2M0) declined surgery. This study and available literature data suggest that cisplatin is a preferable option for systemic treatment of BRCA1-related hereditary breast cancer.

  15. Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01

    SciTech Connect

    Mydin, Aminudin R.; Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A.; Armstrong, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

  16. Imaging in evaluation of response to neoadjuvant breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, L; Balu-Maestro, C; Leclère, J

    2005-01-01

    The role of imaging for patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer is not only to evaluate the therapeutic response in terms of tumour shrinkage, but also to predict the histological response to chemotherapy, which is correlated to survival. Surgery and histopathological analysis after neoadjuvant therapy allow for an objective assessment of the accuracy of imaging techniques in evaluating response. The aim of this study is to compare the value of the different conventional and functional imaging techniques for determining response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer treatment. PMID:16154816

  17. [Phase II clinical trial of neoadjuvant therapy with carboplatin plus paclitaxel for locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-yue; Zhang, Pin; Zhang, Bai-lin; Wang, Xiang; Xu, Xiao-zhou; Zheng, Shan; Wang, Jia-yu; Cai, Rui-gang; Yuan, Peng; Ma, Fei; Fan, Ying; Xu, Bing-he

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy, safety and survival of combination of carboplatin plus paclitaxel as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for patients with locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and explore an optimal regimen for TNBC. Patients with core needle biopsy confirmed pathological diagnosis of IIA ∼ IIIC invasive breast cancer, negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 by immunohistochemistry, and with indication for NACT were eligible in this study. The biopsy tumor tissues were tested for CK5/6, CK14, EGFR and Ki67. The patients received paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) on day 1, carboplatin at an area under the curve 5 mg×min/ml on day 2 of every 21 days. The clinical response was evaluated every 2 cycles according to Standard RECIST 1.0 criteria and surgery was done after four to six cycles. Pathological complete remission (pCR) was defined if absence of invasive tumor in the breast and axillary lymph nodes samples or residual carcinoma in situ only. Overall, thirty-one patients were enrolled from January 2008 to November 2010. The median age was 51 years and 83.9% of the patients were diagnosed as stage IIB to IIIC diseases. 30 Patients completed chemotherapy as planed while one patient changed regimen due to paclitaxel allergy. Twenty-eight patients could be evaluated for clinical efficacy, of which CR, PR, SD, PD were achieved in 4, 20, 3 and 1 women, respectively. The objective response rate was 85.7%. The expression rate of CK5/6, CK14 and EGFR were 88.9% (24/27), 59.3% (16/27) and 63% (17/27), respectively. Among 27 patients who received modified radical mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery, 11 patients obtained pCR, with a pCR rate of 40.7% (95%CI 22.2% - 59.3%). Five of six CK5/6- and CK14-positive patients achieved pCR. All the 31 patients could be evaluated for toxicity according to the NCI-CTC v3.0 criteria. The major toxicities were neutropenia (93.5%), vomiting (45.2%) and ALT/AST increase (32.3%), and grade 3

  18. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy leads to immediate impairment of vitality/hormonal and sexual quality of life: results of a multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gay, Hiram Alberto; Michalski, Jeff M; Hamstra, Daniel A; Wei, John T; Dunn, Rodney L; Klein, Eric A; Sandler, Howard M; Saigal, Chris; Litwin, Mark; Kuban, Deborah; Hembroff, Larry; Chang, Peter; Sanda, Martin G

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the immediate effects of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for newly diagnosed prostate cancer. The Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment Consortium is a prospective multi-institutional study. HRQOL is measured with the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 questionnaire. Differences in patient-reported HRQOL were observed between pretreatment and 2 months after NADT start (and before definitive RT) with significant differences evaluated by paired t test. From among 450 patients who completed the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 before and 2 months after NADT start, 71 received NADT before proceeding with definitive RT. Patients receiving NADT experienced significant impairment in vitality/hormonal (P <.0001) and sexual (P <.0001) HRQOL after NADT initiation. The mean ± standard deviation vitality/hormonal score fell from an average of 94.1 ± 9.7 before NADT to 78.7 ± 16.3 two months after NADT initiation; and sexual HRQOL fell from a mean of 51.7 ± 31.1 pretreatment to 32.3 ± 26.1 after NADT initiation. Both these HRQOL domain changes exceeded the thresholds for clinical significance. Patients receiving NADT also experienced a significant impairment in urinary continence (P = .024), although this difference did not meet the criteria for clinical significance. In this analysis, patients receiving NADT experience significant impairment in sexual and vitality/hormonal HRQOL even before starting definitive RT. The significant effect of this therapy on HRQOL needs to be considered before initiating NADT in men where there is no clear evidence of clinical benefit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  20. Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer in BRCA Mutation Carriers and Noncarriers: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Banu; Bayraktar, Soley; Liu, Diane D.; Gutierrez Barrera, Angelica M.; Atchley, Deann; Pusztai, Lajos; Litton, Jennifer Keating; Valero, Vicente; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Albarracin, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate and relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy (NST) in patients with breast cancer with and without deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Patients and Methods A total of 317 women who underwent BRCA genetic testing and were treated with NST for breast cancer between 1997 and 2009 were included in the study. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate RFS and OS rates. Logistic regression models were fit to determine the associations between BRCA status, pCR, and survival. Results Fifty-seven (18%) and 23 (7%) patients had BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Twenty-six (46%) of 57 BRCA1 carriers achieved a pCR, compared with three (13%) of 23 BRCA2 carriers and 53 (22%) of 237 BRCA noncarriers (P < .001). In the multivariate logistic model, BRCA1 status (odds ratio [OR] = 3.16; 95% CI, 1.55 to 6.42; P = .002), estrogen receptor (ER) negativity (OR = 1.96; 95% CI:1.05 to 3.65; P = .03) and concurrent trastuzumab use (OR = 4.18; 95% CI, 2.04 to 8.57; P < .001) remained as independent significant predictors for a pCR. At a median follow-up of 3.2 years, 69 patients (22%) experienced a disease recurrence or death. No significant differences were noted in survival outcomes with respect to BRCA status and type of NST received. However, among BRCA1 carriers, patients who achieved a pCR had better 5-year RFS (P = .001) and OS (P = .01) rates than patients who did not. Conclusion BRCA1 status and ER negativity are independently associated with higher pCR rates in patients with breast cancer. Overall prognosis of breast cancer in BRCA carriers is similar to sporadic breast cancers. PMID:21900106

  1. Outcome and Salvage Surgery Following "Watch and Wait" for Rectal Cancer after Neoadjuvant Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kong, Joseph C; Guerra, Glen R; Warrier, Satish K; Ramsay, Robert G; Heriot, Alexander G

    2017-03-01

    Currently there is no reliable test to predict pathological complete response following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, there is increasing interest in using clinical complete response as a surrogate marker, allowing a subset of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to be allocated into a "watch and wait" pathway. Little is known about the oncological safety of the "watch and wait" approach or the rate of salvage surgery in cases of tumor regrowth. This information is critical for the implementation of this approach. The aim of this study is to assess the rate of salvage surgery and associated oncological outcomes for patients who develop a tumor regrowth with the "watch and wait" approach. Relevant studies were identified through PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar search. A systematic review was undertaken of studies assessing patients selected for the "watch and wait" approach according to PRISMA guidelines. The associated tumor regrowth, salvage surgery, and disease-free and overall survival rates were assessed. Five retrospective and 4 prospective observational studies were included into the analysis, with a total of 370 patients in the "watch and wait" group, of which 256 (69.2%) had persistent clinical complete response. Of those who had tumor regrowth, salvage surgery was possible in 83.8%. There was no difference in overall survival and disease-free survival between patients who received immediate surgery and the "watch and wait" group. The limitations of this study include its retrospective nature and small sample size. Furthermore, there is significant heterogeneity between study protocols, including the short median follow-up, given that tumor regrowth and distant metastasis may manifest at a later time point. The majority of patients with tumor regrowth can be salvaged with definite surgery after "watch and wait." However, there is insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions on the oncological safety of this approach

  2. Disentangling the aneuploidy and senescence paradoxes: a study of triploid breast cancers non-responsive to neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, B I; Salmina, K; Eglitis, J; Huna, A; Grjunberga, V; Erenpreisa, J

    2016-04-01

    Aneuploid cells should have a reduced proliferation rate due to difficulty in proceeding through mitosis. However, contrary to this, high aneuploidy is associated with aggressive tumour growth and poor survival prognosis, in particular in triploid breast cancer. A further paradox revolves around the observation that, while cell senescence should inhibit proliferation, the senescence marker p16INK4a correlates with poor treatment outcome in patients with a very aggressive triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC). In this study, we aim to pour light on the possible relationship of these conundrums with polyploidy of tumour cells. We performed detailed analysis of DNA histogram profiles in diagnostic core biopsies of 30 cases of operable breast cancer and found that near triploidy in TNBC and other forms correlated with weak or no response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) as scored by Miller-Payne index. Polyploid cells in operation samples from tumours that were non-responsive to NAC treatment were Ki67 and CD44 positive. In addition, polyploid cells were positive for markers of embryonic stemness (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) and senescence (p16INK4a). The relationship patterns between p16INK4a and NANOG were heterogeneous, with predominantly mutually exclusive expression but also synergistic and intermediate variants in the same samples. We conclude that the aneuploidy and senescence paradoxes can be explained by the mutual platform of polyploidy, conferring genomic and epigenetic instability as a survival advantage. Such cells are able to bypass aneuploidy restrictions of conventional mitosis and overcome the barrier of senescence by a shift to self-renewal, resulting in progression of cancer.

  3. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Azria, David; Riou, Olivier; Rebillard, Xavier; Thezenas, Simon; Thuret, Rodolphe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  4. Pharmacometabolomics study identifies circulating spermidine and tryptophan as potential biomarkers associated with the complete pathological response to trastuzumab-paclitaxel neoadjuvant therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miolo, Gianmaria; Muraro, Elena; Caruso, Donatella; Crivellari, Diana; Ash, Anthony; Scalone, Simona; Lombardi, Davide; Rizzolio, Flavio; Giordano, Antonio; Corona, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Defining biomarkers that predict therapeutic effects and adverse events is a crucial mandate to guide patient selection for personalized cancer treatments. In the present study, we applied a pharmacometabolomics approach to identify biomarkers potentially associated with pathological complete response to trastuzumab-paclitaxel neoadjuvant therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer patients. Based on histological response the 34 patients enrolled in the study were subdivided into two groups: good responders (n = 15) and poor responders (n = 19). The pre-treatment serum targeted metabolomics profile of all patients were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and the differences in the metabolomics profile between the two groups was investigated by multivariate partial least squares discrimination analysis. The most relevant metabolites that differentiate the two groups of patients were spermidine and tryptophan. The Good responders showed higher levels of spermidine and lower amounts of tryptophan compared with the poor responders (p < 0.001, q < 0.05). The serum level of these two metabolites identified patients who achieved a pathological complete response with a sensitivity of 90% [0.79–1.00] and a specificity of 0.87% [0.67–1.00]. These preliminary results support the role played by the individual patients' metabolism in determining the response to cancer treatments and may be a useful tool to select patients that are more likely to benefit from the trastuzumab-paclitaxel treatment. PMID:27223427

  5. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Howard Huaihan . E-mail: hpai@bccancer.bc.ca; Ludgate, Charles; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Agranovich, Alex; Berthelet, Eric; Duncan, Graeme; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Kwan, Winkle; Lim, Jan; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival.

  6. The Role of Dual-Time Combined 18-Fluorideoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography in the Staging and Restaging Workup of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer, Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Capirci, Carlo Rubello, Domenico; Pasini, Felice; Galeotti, Fabrizio; Bianchini, Enzo; Del Favero, Giuseppe; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Crepaldi, Giorgio; Rampin, Lucia; Facci, Enzo; Gava, Marcello; Banti, Elena; Marano, Gianfranco

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) staging and, after preoperative chemo-radiation therapy (CRT), restaging workup could be useful to tailor therapeutic approaches. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG-PET) is a promising tool for monitoring the effect of antitumor therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the possible role of dual time sequential FDG-PET scans in the staging and restaging workup of LARC. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled. CRT consisted of external-beam intensified radiotherapy (concurrent boost), with concomitant chemotherapy PVI 5-FU (300mg/m{sup 2}/day) followed 8-10 weeks later by surgery. All patients underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT before and 5-6 weeks later after the completion of CRT. Measurements of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}), and percentage of SUV{sub max} difference (Response Index = RI) between pre- and post-CRT [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET scans were evaluated. Results: Six of 87 patients were excluded due to protocol deviation. Following CRT, 40/81 patients (49%) were classified as responders according to Mandard's criteria (TRG1-2). The mean pre-CRT SUV{sub max} was significantly higher than post-CRT (15.8, vs 5.9; p < 0.001). The mean RI was significantly higher in responders than in nonresponder patients (71.3% vs 38%; p = 0.0038). Using a RI cut-off of 65% for defining response to therapy, the following parameters have been obtained: 84.5% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 81.4% positive predictive value, 84.2% negative predictive value, and 81% overall accuracy. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential role of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in the restaging workup after preoperative CRT in LARC. RI seems the best predictor to identify CRT response.

  7. Phase 1 adaptive dose-finding study of neoadjuvant gemcitabine combined with radiation therapy for patients with high-risk extremity and trunk soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tseng, William W; Zhou, Shouhao; To, Christina A; Thall, Peter F; Lazar, Alexander J; Pollock, Raphael E; Lin, Patrick P; Cormier, Janice N; Lewis, Valerae O; Feig, Barry W; Hunt, Kelly K; Ballo, Matthew T; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Pisters, Peter W T

    2015-10-15

    This study was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine given concurrently with preoperative, fixed-dose external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for patients with resectable, high-risk extremity and trunk soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, 22, 29, 43, and 50 with EBRT (50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks). The gemcitabine MTD was determined with a toxicity severity weight method (TSWM) incorporating 6 toxicity types. The TSWM is a Bayesian procedure that choses each cohort's dose to have a posterior mean total toxicity burden closest to a predetermined clinician-defined target. Clinicopathologic and outcome data were also collected. Thirty-six patients completed the study. According to the TSWM, the gemcitabine MTD was 700 mg/m(2). At this dose level, 4 patients (24%) experienced grade 4 toxicity; no toxicity-related deaths occurred. All tumors were resected with microscopically negative margins. Pathologic responses of >90% tumor necrosis were achieved in 17 patients (47%); 14 (39%) had complete responses. With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 85%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. The TSWM combines data from qualitatively different toxicities and can be used to determine the MTD for a drug given as part of a multimodality treatment. Neoadjuvant gemcitabine plus radiation therapy is feasible and safe in patients with high-risk extremity and trunk STS. Major pathologic responses can be achieved, and after complete resection, long-term clinical outcomes are encouraging. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  8. Functional genetic polymorphisms in the aromatase gene CYP19 vary the response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liewei; Ellsworth, Katarzyna A; Moon, Irene; Pelleymounter, Linda L; Eckloff, Bruce W; Martin, Yvette N; Fridley, Brooke L; Jenkins, Gregory D; Batzler, Anthony; Suman, Vera J; Ravi, Saranya; Dixon, J Michael; Miller, William R; Wieben, Eric D; Buzdar, Aman; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Ingle, James N

    2010-01-01

    Aromatase (CYP19) is a critical enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis and aromatase inhibitors (AI) are employed widely for endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CYP19 gene may alter the effectiveness of AI therapy in the neoadjuvant setting. Genomic DNA was obtained for sequencing from 52 women pre-AI and post-AI treatment in this setting. Additionally, genomic DNA obtained from 82 samples of breast cancer and 19 samples of normal breast tissue was subjected to resequencing. No differences in CYP19 sequence were observed between tumor and germ-line DNA in the same patient. A total of 48 SNPs were identified including 4 novel SNPs when compared with previous resequencing data. For genotype-phenotype association studies, we determined the levels of aromatase activity, estrone, estradiol, and tumor size in patients pre-AI and post-AI treatment. We defined two tightly linked SNPs (rs6493497 and rs7176005 in the 5'-flanking region of CYP19 exon 1.1) that were significantly associated with a greater change in aromatase activity after AI treatment. In a follow-up study of 200 women with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with adjuvant anastrozole, these same two SNPs were also associated with higher plasma estradiol levels in patients pre-AI and post-AI treatment. Electrophoretic mobility shift and reporter gene assays confirmed likely functional effects of these two SNPs on transcription of CYP19. Our findings indicate that two common genetic polymorphisms in the aromatase gene CYP19 vary the response of breast cancer patients to aromatase inhibitors.

  9. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Locally Advanced Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-wu; Lin, Hui-ming; Lu, Xing-rong; Huang, Ying; Xu, Zong-bin; Huang, Sheng-hui; Wang, Xiao-jie

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To compare the surgical and oncological outcomes of rectal mucinous adenocarcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone. Methods. A total of 167 locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery alone between 2008 and 2014 were matched using propensity score; the surgical and oncological outcomes were compared. Results. Ninety-six patients were matched. Postoperative morbidity was similar between groups. Sphincter preservation rate was higher in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (79.2% versus 60.4%, P = 0.045), especially for tumors ≥ 3 cm but ≤5 cm from the anal verge (75.0% versus 44.0%, P = 0.036). With a median follow-up of 54.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate (neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone: 79.6% versus 67.1%; P = 0.599) and disease-free survival rate (75.6% versus 64.2%; P = 0.888) were similar. The 5-year local recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (7.7% versus 26.0%, P = 0.036), while no difference was observed in distant metastasis. A poor response to chemoradiation was associated with higher local recurrence (P = 0.037). Conclusions. Compared with surgery alone, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was found to increase the sphincter preservation rate and reduce local recurrence, thus being beneficial for locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28400820

  10. Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Assessed Tumor Response for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Long-Course Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Fayaz, Mohamed Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Fathallah, Wael Moftah; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; Abozlouf, Sadeq; George, Thomas; Samir, Suzanne Mona

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the predictive and prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed tumor response after long-course neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods This study included 79 patients who had T3 or T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. MRI-assessed tumor regression grade (mrTRG) was assessed in 64 patients. MRIs were reviewed by the study radiologist. Surgical and pathologic reports for those who underwent surgery were reviewed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated. Progression during therapy, local relapse, metastasis, and death resulting from the tumor were classified as events. Statistical significance was calculated. Results In 11 patients, the tumor completely disappeared on MRI; that is, it had an mrTRG of 1. All but one patient, who chose deferred surgery, had a complete pathologic response (pCR), with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. Of the 20 patients who had an mrTRG of 2 on MRI, six had a pCR. mrTRG 3, mrTRG 4, and mrTRG 5 were detected in 24, six, and three patients, respectively, of whom only one patient had a pCR. The 2-year DFS was 77%. The mrTRG was significant for DFS. The 2-year DFS was 88% for patients with a good response versus 66% for those with a poor response (P = .046). Conclusion MRI-assessed complete tumor response was strongly correlated with pCR and, therefore, can be used as a surrogate marker to predict absence of viable tumor cells. Our results can be used to implement use of mrTRGs in larger prospective correlative studies as a tool to select patients for whom deferred surgery may be appropriate. Also, those with a poor response may be offered further treatment options before definitive surgery. PMID:28717704

  11. Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Assessed Tumor Response for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Long-Course Chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Mohamed Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Fathallah, Wael Moftah; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; El-Sherify, Mustafa Shawki; Abozlouf, Sadeq; George, Thomas; Samir, Suzanne Mona

    2016-08-01

    To study the predictive and prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assessed tumor response after long-course neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. This study included 79 patients who had T3 or T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. MRI-assessed tumor regression grade (mrTRG) was assessed in 64 patients. MRIs were reviewed by the study radiologist. Surgical and pathologic reports for those who underwent surgery were reviewed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated. Progression during therapy, local relapse, metastasis, and death resulting from the tumor were classified as events. Statistical significance was calculated. In 11 patients, the tumor completely disappeared on MRI; that is, it had an mrTRG of 1. All but one patient, who chose deferred surgery, had a complete pathologic response (pCR), with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. Of the 20 patients who had an mrTRG of 2 on MRI, six had a pCR. mrTRG 3, mrTRG 4, and mrTRG 5 were detected in 24, six, and three patients, respectively, of whom only one patient had a pCR. The 2-year DFS was 77%. The mrTRG was significant for DFS. The 2-year DFS was 88% for patients with a good response versus 66% for those with a poor response (P = .046). MRI-assessed complete tumor response was strongly correlated with pCR and, therefore, can be used as a surrogate marker to predict absence of viable tumor cells. Our results can be used to implement use of mrTRGs in larger prospective correlative studies as a tool to select patients for whom deferred surgery may be appropriate. Also, those with a poor response may be offered further treatment options before definitive surgery.

  12. Apolipoprotein C-II Is a Potential Serum Biomarker as a Prognostic Factor of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer After Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harima, Yoko; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kanno, Shohei; Shiga, Toshiko; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine pretreatment serum protein levels for generally applicable measurement to predict chemoradiation treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (CC). Methods and Materials: In a screening study, measurements were conducted twice. At first, 6 serum samples from CC patients (3 with no evidence of disease [NED] and 3 with cancer-caused death [CD]) and 2 from healthy controls were tested. Next, 12 serum samples from different CC patients (8 NED, 4 CD) and 4 from healthy controls were examined. Subsequently, 28 different CC patients (18 NED, 10 CD) and 9 controls were analyzed in the validation study. Protein chips were treated with the sample sera, and the serum protein pattern was detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Then, single MS-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and tandem MS (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification methods, were used to identify protein corresponding to the detected peak. And then, turbidimetric assay was used to measure the levels of a protein that indicated the best match with this peptide peak. Results: The same peak 8918 m/z was identified in both screening studies. Neither the screening study nor the validation study had significant differences in the appearance of this peak in the controls and NED. However, the intensity of the peak in CD was significantly lower than that of controls and NED in both pilot studies (P=.02, P=.04) and validation study (P=.01, P=.001). The protein indicated the best match with this peptide peak at 8918 m/z was identified as apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) using PMF and MS/MS methods. Turbidimetric assay showed that the mean serum levels of ApoC-II tended to decrease in CD group when compared with NED group (P=.078). Conclusion: ApoC-II could be used as a biomarker for detection in predicting and estimating the radiation treatment outcome of patients with CC.

  13. Chemoradiation for rectal cancer: rationale, approaches, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2010-10-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment of cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These controversies include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation, as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  15. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Elicin, Olgun; Callaway, Sharon; Prior, John O.; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Herrera, Fernanda G.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  16. Patterns of Care and Clinical Outcomes of First-Line Trastuzumab-Based Therapy in HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Relapsing After (Neo)Adjuvant Trastuzumab: An Italian Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Arlindo R.; Poggio, Francesca; Puglisi, Fabio; Bernardo, Antonio; Montemurro, Filippo; Poletto, Elena; Pozzi, Emma; Rossi, Valentina; Risi, Emanuela; Lai, Antonella; Zanardi, Elisa; Sini, Valentina; Ziliani, Serena; Minuti, Gabriele; Mura, Silvia; Grasso, Donatella; Fontana, Andrea; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Background. We evaluated the patterns of care and clinical outcomes of metastatic breast cancer patients treated with first-line trastuzumab-based therapy after previous (neo)adjuvant trastuzumab. Materials and Methods. A total of 416 consecutive, HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients who had received first-line trastuzumab-based therapy were identified at 14 Italian centers. A total of 113 patients had presented with de novo stage IV disease and were analyzed separately. Dichotomous clinical outcomes were analyzed using logistic regression and time-to-event outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. Results. In the 202 trastuzumab-naïve patients and 101 patients with previous trastuzumab exposure, we observed the following outcomes, respectively: overall response rate, 69.9% versus 61.3% (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.62; p = .131), clinical benefit rate, 79.1% versus 72.5% (adjusted OR, 0.73; p = .370), median progression-free survival (PFS), 16.1 months versus 12.0 months (adjusted hazards ratio [HR], 1.33; p = .045), and median overall survival (OS), 52.2 months versus 48.2 months (adjusted HR, 1.18; p = .404). Patients with a trastuzumab-free interval (TFI) <6 months, visceral involvement, and hormone receptor-negative disease showed a worse OS compared with patients with a TFI of ≥6 months (29.5 vs. 48.3 months; p = .331), nonvisceral involvement (48.0 vs. 60.3 months; p = .270), and hormone receptor-positive disease (39.8 vs. 58.6 months; p = .003), respectively. Conclusion. Despite the inferior median PFS, trastuzumab-based therapy was an effective first-line treatment for patients relapsing after (neo)adjuvant trastuzumab. Previous trastuzumab exposure and the respective TFI, type of first site of disease relapse, and hormone receptor status should be considered in the choice of the best first-line treatment option for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. Implications for Practice: A paucity of data is available outlining the

  17. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  18. Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 represents a marker of response to neoadjuvant therapy in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Ching-Wei D; Balachandran, Aparna; Ahmad, Mediha; Lee, Jeffrey E; Krishnan, Sunil; Wang, Huamin; Crane, Christopher H; Wolff, Robert A; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Pisters, Peter W T; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Fleming, Jason B; Katz, Matthew H G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 levels and outcome in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy (NT). Methods This study included all patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, a serum CA 19-9 level of ≥40 U/ml and bilirubin of ≤2 mg/dl, in whom NT was initiated at one institution between 2001 and 2010. The study evaluated the associations between pre- and post-NT CA 19-9, resection and overall survival. Results Among 141 eligible patients, CA 19-9 declined during NT in 116. Following NT, 84 of 141 (60%) patients underwent resection. For post-NT resection, the positive predictive value of a decline and the negative predictive value of an increase in CA 19-9 were 70% and 88%, respectively. The normalization of CA 19-9 (post-NT <40 U/ml) was associated with longer median overall survival among both non-resected (15 months versus 11 months; P = 0.022) and resected (38 months versus 26 months; P = 0.020) patients. Factors independently associated with shorter overall survival were no resection [hazard ratio (HR) 3.86, P < 0.001] and failure to normalize CA 19-9 (HR 2.13, P = 0.001). Conclusions The serum CA 19-9 level represents a dynamic preoperative marker of tumour biology and response to NT, and provides prognostic information in both non-resected and resected patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:23991810

  19. A Phase I study of weekly intravenous oxaliplatin in combination with oral daily capecitabine and radiation therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. . E-mail: marwan.fakih@roswellpark.org; Rajput, Ashwani; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Smith, Judy L.; Lawrence, David D.; Rustum, Youcef M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of neoadjuvant capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiation therapy (RT) in Stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Capecitabine was given orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given i.v. once weekly x 5 (for 5 weeks) starting the first day of RT. RT was given daily except on weekends and holidays at 1.8 Gy per fraction x 28. Escalation for capecitabine or oxaliplatin was to occur in cohorts of three patients until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined. Endorectal tumor biopsy samples were obtained before and on Day 3 of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled on this study. Two of 6 patients at dose level (DL) 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally (p.o.) given twice daily (b.i.d.); oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) had a dose-limiting diarrhea. One of 6 patients at DL (-)1 (capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., b.i.d.; oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) experienced-dose-limiting diarrhea. Three of 11 patients who underwent resection had a complete pathologic response. No remarkable variations in rectal tumor biologic endpoints were noted on Day 3 of treatment in comparison to baseline. However, a higher apotosis index was observed at baseline and on Day 3 in complete pathologic responders (no statistical analysis performed). Conclusions: Capecitabine 725 mg/m{sup 2} p.o., twice daily in combination with oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/week and RT 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions is the recommended dose for future studies.

  20. Neoadjuvant strategies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Polistina, Francesco; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Ambrosino, Giovanni; Frego, Mauro

    2014-07-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of cancer death in Western countries, the only chance for long term survival is an R0 surgical resection that is feasible in about 10%-20% of all cases. Five years cumulative survival is less than 5% and rises to 25% for radically resected patients. About 40% has locally advanced in PC either borderline resectable (BRPC) or unresectable locally advanced (LAPC). Since LAPC and BRPC have been recognized as a particular form of PC neoadjuvant therapy (NT) has increasingly became a valid treatment option. The aim of NT is to reach local control of disease but, also, it is recognized to convert about 40% of LAPC patients to R0 resectability, thus providing a significant improvement of prognosis for responding patients. Once R0 resection is achieved, survival is comparable to that of early stage PCs treated by upfront surgery. Thus it is crucial to look for a proper patient selection. Neoadjuvant strategies are multiples and include neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT), and the association of nCT with radiotherapy (nCRT) given as either a combination of a radio sensitizing drug as gemcitabine or capecitabine or and concomitant irradiation or as upfront nCT followed by nRT associated to a radio sensitizing drug. This latter seem to be most promising as it may select patients who do not go on disease progression during initial treatment and seem to have a better prognosis. The clinical relevance of nCRT may be enhanced by the application of higher active protocols as FOLFIRINOX.

  1. Neoadjuvant strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polistina, Francesco; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Ambrosino, Giovanni; Frego, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of cancer death in Western countries, the only chance for long term survival is an R0 surgical resection that is feasible in about 10%-20% of all cases. Five years cumulative survival is less than 5% and rises to 25% for radically resected patients. About 40% has locally advanced in PC either borderline resectable (BRPC) or unresectable locally advanced (LAPC). Since LAPC and BRPC have been recognized as a particular form of PC neoadjuvant therapy (NT) has increasingly became a valid treatment option. The aim of NT is to reach local control of disease but, also, it is recognized to convert about 40% of LAPC patients to R0 resectability, thus providing a significant improvement of prognosis for responding patients. Once R0 resection is achieved, survival is comparable to that of early stage PCs treated by upfront surgery. Thus it is crucial to look for a proper patient selection. Neoadjuvant strategies are multiples and include neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT), and the association of nCT with radiotherapy (nCRT) given as either a combination of a radio sensitizing drug as gemcitabine or capecitabine or and concomitant irradiation or as upfront nCT followed by nRT associated to a radio sensitizing drug. This latter seem to be most promising as it may select patients who do not go on disease progression during initial treatment and seem to have a better prognosis. The clinical relevance of nCRT may be enhanced by the application of higher active protocols as FOLFIRINOX. PMID:25071332

  2. Signet ring cells in esophageal adenocarcinoma predict poor response to preoperative chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viren R; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Correa, Arlene M; Agarwal, Atin; Rashid, Asif; Bhutani, Manoop S; Lin, Steven H; Ajani, Jaffer A; Swisher, Stephen G; Maru, Dipen M

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the significance of signet ring cell histology to predict response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Two groups of patients with locoregional esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgery were studied: those with signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (n = 85) and a reference group (n = 638) with usual and other types of adenocarcinoma. Surgical specimens were reviewed for degree of pathologic response and pathologic stage. Cox regression models were used to assess the effects of clinicopathologic variables on survival. Tumors from patients in the signet ring cell group had a lower rate of complete pathologic response (9% versus 26%, p < 0.001) and more frequent positive margins (24% versus 10%, p < 0.001) compared with tumors from the reference group. Median overall survival (22 versus 48 months, p = 0.003) and disease-free survival (16 versus 35 months, p = 0.007) were shorter in the signet ring cell group than in the reference group. Signet ring cell histology and high pathologic stage were significant predictors of decreased overall survival and disease-free survival. Survival durations for patients whose resected specimens showed downstaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiation did not significantly differ from survival durations of patients whose specimens did not show downstaging in the signet ring cell group, unlike the reference group. Signet ring cell histology on pretreatment biopsy predicts a decreased likelihood of complete pathologic response and survival for patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with preoperative chemoradiation and surgery. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Naoto T; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the advantage of converting unresectable breast tumors to resectable tumors and allowing more conservative surgery in some mastectomy candidates. Chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, which are recommended in the adjuvant setting, are also considered in the neoadjuvant setting. Here, we review studies of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with breast cancer. PubMed and conference or congress proceedings were searched for clinical studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov for ongoing trials of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant agent in breast cancer. Twenty studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant setting were identified. In addition to reviewing key efficacy and safety data, we discuss how each trial assessed response, focusing on pathologic complete response and residual cancer burden scoring. Safety profiles are also reviewed. nab-Paclitaxel demonstrated antitumor activity and an acceptable safety profile in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Ongoing and future trials will further evaluate preoperative nab-paclitaxel in breast cancer, including in combination with many novel immunological targeted therapies.

  4. Short-term clinicopathological outcome of neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy comprising complete androgen blockade, followed by treatment with docetaxel and estramustine phosphate before radical prostatectomy in Japanese patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess the outcome of neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy comprising complete androgen blockade followed by treatment with docetaxel and estramustine phosphate before radical prostatectomy in Japanese patients with a high risk of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Methods Complete androgen blockade followed by 6 cycles of docetaxel (30 mg/m2) with estramustine phosphate (560 mg) were given to 18 PCa patients before radical prostatectomy. Subsequently, the clinical and pathological outcomes were analyzed. Results No patients had severe adverse events during chemohormonal therapy, and hence they were treated with radical prostatectomy. Two patients (11.1%) achieved pathological complete response. Surgical margins were negative in all patients. At a median follow-up of 18 months, 14 patients (77.8%) were disease-free without PSA recurrence. All 4 patients with PSA recurrence had pathologic T3b or T4 disease and 3 of these 4 patients had pathologic N1 disease. Conclusion We found that neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy with complete androgen blockade followed by treatment with docetaxel and estramustine phosphate before radical prostatectomy was safe, feasible, and associated with favorable pathological outcomes in patients with a high risk of localized PCa. PMID:22214417

  5. Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Symptom Burden in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Proton or Photon Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin Shelley; Shi, Qiuling; Williams, Loretta A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.; Lin, Steven H.; Chang, Joe Y.; O'Reilly, Michael S.; Bokhari, Raza H.; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Cleeland, Charles S.; Liao, Zhongxing

    2016-01-01

    Context Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), and proton-beam therapy (PBT) are chemoradiotherapy modalities for treating locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although therapy is carefully planned to maximize treatment benefit while minimizing risk for adverse side effects, most patients develop radiation-induced symptom burden. Objectives To demonstrate the M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI)’s ability to detect fine differences in symptom development among these modalities. Methods This was a longitudinal observational study. Patients with unresectable primary or recurrent NSCLC (n=82) underwent either 3DCRT, IMRT, or PBT. Patients rated MDASI symptoms weekly for up to 12 weeks. We used mixed-effect modeling to estimate development of symptoms and functional interference. Results The PBT group received a significantly higher radiation target dose than did the IMRT and 3DCRT groups (P<0.001). Fatigue was the most severe symptom over time for all groups. Controlling for patient and clinical factors (age, sex, race, cancer stage, performance status, body mass index, previous cancer therapy, total radiation dose), we found that pain, as a major esophagitis-related symptom, increased more during therapy (P=0.019) and decreased more after (P=0.013) therapy in the 3DCRT and IMRT groups than in the PBT group. Compared with the PBT group, the 3DCRT and IMRT groups reported greater decrease in systemic symptoms (fatigue, drowsiness, lack of appetite, disturbed sleep) after therapy (P=0.016). Conclusion Patients receiving PBT reported significantly less severe symptoms than did patients receiving IMRT or 3DCRT. These results should be confirmed in a randomized study with comparable tumor burden among therapies. PMID:26891607

  6. Neoadjuvant therapy for treatment of breast cancer: the way forward, or simply a convenient option for patients?

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    The complexity of managing early stage breast cancer is well known. Optimal treatment is increasingly multidisciplinary and in the modern era informed by sophisticated molecular tools to help select and guide therapy. Major phase III trials have determined that the order of systemic therapy relative to surgery does not influence important endpoints such as event free survival and overall survival (OS), but questions remain as to how best to utilize these most essential services. For example, there is still uncertainty regarding the ideal timing, intensity, and duration of proposed therapy. For treating physicians, evidence based standardization of these practices is both possible and critically important. Optimization of care will increasingly rely on well-designed studies that have addressed the choice as well as the timing of the steps involved in multidisciplinary breast cancer treatment. Understanding when factors under the oncologist’s control will influence outcome, cost and convenience is essential in the era of quality and value-based medical decision making. The timing of surgery before or after chemotherapy for breast cancer is one such factor. Investigators are to be commended for addressing these questions, which may generate additional hypotheses concerning the biology of metastasis and the nature of recurrence. PMID:28210563

  7. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem; Pehlivan, Berrin; Selek, Ugur

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  8. Regional Lymph Node Uptake of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Predicts Local-Regional Failure of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235

    PubMed Central

    Markovina, Stephanie; Duan, Fenghai; Snyder, Bradley S.; Siegel, Barry A.; Machtay, Mitchell; Bradley, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235 demonstrated that standardized uptake value (SUV) on post-treatment [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) correlates with survival in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This secondary analysis determines if SUV of regional lymph nodes (RLNs) on post-treatment FDG-PET correlates with patient outcomes. Methods and Materials Included for analysis were patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy using radiation doses ≥60 Gy, with identifiable FDG-avid RLNs (distinct from primary tumor) on pre-treatment FDG-PET, and post-treatment FDG-PET data. ACRIN Core Laboratory SUV measurements were used. Event time was calculated from the date of post-treatment FDG-PET. Local-regional failure was defined as failure within the treated RT volume and reported by the treating institution. Statistical analyses included Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank test), and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Results Of 234 trial-eligible patients, 139 (59%) had uptake in both primary tumor and RLNs on pre-treatment FDG-PET, and had SUV data from post-treatment FDG-PET. Maximum SUV was greater for primary tumor than for RLNs before treatment (p<0.001), but not different post-treatment (p=0.320). Post-treatment SUV of RLNs was not associated with overall survival. However, elevated post-treatment SUV of RLNs, both the absolute value and the percent residual activity compared to the pre-treatment SUV, were associated with inferior local-regional control (p<0.001). Conclusions High residual metabolic activity in RLNs on post-treatment FDG-PET is associated with worse local-regional control. Based on these data, future trials evaluating a radiotherapy boost should consider inclusion of both primary tumor and FDG-avid RLNs in the boost volume to maximize local-regional control. PMID:26461002

  9. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m(2) on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Correlation Among Six Biologic Factors (p53, p21{sup WAF1}, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2) and Clinical Outcomes After Curative Chemoradiation Therapy in Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Murakami, Naoya; Asari, Takao; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The expressions of six cell-cycle-associated proteins were analyzed in cervical squamous cell carcinomas in correlation in a search for prognostic correlations in tumors treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (cCRT). Methods and Materials: The expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, molecular immunology borstel-1 (MIB-1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Bcl-2 were studied using an immunohistochemical method in 57 cases of cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with cCRT. Patients received cCRT between 1998 and 2005. The mean patient age was 61 years (range, 27-82 years). The number of patients with Stage II, III, and IVA disease was 18, 29, and 10, respectively. Results: The number of patients with tumors positive for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2 was 26, 24, 49, 26, 13, and 11, respectively; no significant correlation was noted. The 5-year overall survival rates of HER2-positive and -negative patients was 76% vs. 44%, which was of borderline significance (p = 0.0675). No significant correlation was noted between overall survival and expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2. No correlation was observed between local control and expression of any of the proteins. Conclusion: Expression of HER2 protein had a weak impact of borderline significance on overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with cCRT. However, no clinical associations could be established for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2 protein expressions.

  11. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant

  12. Weekly paclitaxel and concurrent pazopanib following doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy for HER-negative locally advanced breast cancer: NSABP Foundation FB-6, a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Tan, A R; Johannes, H; Rastogi, P; Jacobs, S A; Robidoux, A; Flynn, P J; Thirlwell, M P; Fehrenbacher, L; Stella, P J; Goel, R; Julian, T B; Provencher, L; Bury, M J; Bhatt, K; Geyer, C E; Swain, S M; Mamounas, E P; Wolmark, N

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter single-arm phase II study evaluated the addition of pazopanib to concurrent weekly paclitaxel following doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy in human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-negative locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Patients with HER2-negative stage III breast cancer were treated with doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) for four cycles every 3 weeks followed by weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days for four cycles concurrently with pazopanib 800 mg orally daily prior to surgery. Post-operatively, pazopanib was given daily for 6 months. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) in the breast and lymph nodes. Between July 2009 and March 2011, 101 patients with stage IIIA-C HER2-negative breast cancer were enrolled. The pCR rate in evaluable patients who initiated paclitaxel and pazopanib was 17 % (16/93). The pCR rate was 9 % (6/67) in hormone receptor-positive tumors and 38 % (10/26) in triple-negative tumors. Pre-operative pazopanib was completed in only 39 % of patients. The most frequent grade 3 and 4 adverse events during paclitaxel and pazopanib were neutropenia (27 %), diarrhea (5 %), ALT and AST elevations (each 5 %), and hypertension (5 %). Although the pCR rate of paclitaxel and pazopanib following AC chemotherapy given as neoadjuvant therapy in women with LABC met the pre-specified criteria for activity, there was substantial toxicity, which led to a high discontinuation rate of pazopanib. The combination does not appear to warrant further evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting for breast cancer.

  13. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy may predict response in HER2-negative, but not in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Mo, Miao; Bao, Xiao; Zhang, Yingjian; Liu, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Daoying

    2015-10-06

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the ability of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer, and to investigate whether timing of the scan and trastuzumab treatment influence the accuracy of pCR prediction in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer patients. We treated 81 locally advanced breast cancer patients with four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). HER2-negative breast cancer patients received NAC alone, while HER2-positive breast cancer patients received NAC plus trastuzumab. (18)FDG PET/CT scans were scheduled at baseline and after the second cycle of NAC. Axillary lymph node (ALN) dissection was performed after the last cycle of neoadjuvant therapy. Relative changes in standardized uptake values (SUV) between the two PET/CT scans (ΔSUV) in primary tumors and ALN metastases were calculated. There were 75 patients with 150 PET/CT scans in the final analysis, including 41 HER2-negative and 34 HER2-positive cases. In the HER2-negative group, the ΔSUV predicted overall and ALN pCR; the receiver operating characteristics-areas under curve (ROC-AUC) were 0.87 and 0.80 (P = 0.0014 and 0.031, respectively) and the negative predictive values were 94% and 89% respectively. However, in the HER2-positive group, ΔSUV could predict neither overall nor ALN pCR; the ROC-AUCs were only 0.56 and 0.53, with P = 0.53 and 0.84, respectively. Hence, the ΔSUV after two cycles of neoadjuvant therapy could predict pCR in HER2-negative patients treated with NAC alone, but not in HER2-positive patients treated with NAC plus trastuzumab.

  14. Neoadjuvant treatment intensification or adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma rectum: The optimum treatment approach remains unresolved.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Haresh, K P; Rath, G K

    2015-12-01

    Rectal carcinoma [RC] is often managed with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision (TME). Efforts are being made to improve outcome by intensifying the preoperative treatment. However, the optimum therapy remains unclear. There is ongoing controversy regarding the optimum radiation dose, chemotherapy regimen and schedule. In addition there exists growing disagreement regarding the role of adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant radiation or chemoradiation. We reviewed the recent land mark trials to find a road map in the management of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Preoperative short course radiotherapy has long been proven to improve local disease control. The initial trials with long course chemoradiotherapy, comparing short course radiotherapy have shown to increase local control and pathological complete response rates. Since then treatment intensification of this neoadjuvant schedule has been tried by many researchers. But initial results of these treatment intensification trials, show no significant benefit and are associated with increased toxicity. There is an unmet need to stratify patients depending on risk to assign them to long course chemoradiotherapy or short course radiotherap