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Sample records for neodymium silicates

  1. Extruded channel waveguides in a neodymium-doped lead-silicate glass for integrated optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairaj, Arshad K.; Feng, Xian; Hewak, Daniel W.

    2003-10-01

    We report on the development of channel waveguides in a lead-silicate glass through the extrusion technique. An extruded glass slab with four imbedded fibers each with core size of 8 by 2.5 μm in the horizontal and vertical directions was manufactured. These neodymium-doped channel waveguides were in single-mode operation at 808 nm and had attenuation of 0.1 dB cm-1 at 1.06 μm. The measured 4F3/2 lifetime of 488 μs and emission cross section of 2.5×10-20 cm2 were in good agreement with reported values. The integration of multiple glass variants into a single compact platform is presented as a manufacturing route for complex integrated optical waveguides.

  2. NEW ACTIVE MEDIA AND ELEMENTS OF LASER SYSTEMS: Influence of short-lived color centers on the lifetime of a metastable level of neodymium in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhibladze, M. I.; Lazarev, L. E.

    1987-11-01

    It was found that the short-lived color centers formed in neodymium-activated silicate glasses under the action of the violet part of the pump spectrum increased the lifetime of a neodymium metastable level by more than an order of magnitude in needle-shaped waveguide lasers. The highly efficient suppression of superradiance and a strong increase in the gain of the active element were due to stimulated decay of the color centers accompanying absorption of photons emitted by the neodymium.

  3. Large-mode-area single-mode-output Neodymium-doped silicate glass all-solid photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Chen, Danping; Qinling, Zhou; Hu, Lili

    2015-07-24

    We have demonstrated a 45 μm core diameter Neodymium-doped all-solid silicate glass photonic crystal fiber laser with a single mode laser output. The structure parameters and modes information of the fiber are both demonstrated by theoretical calculations using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and experimental measurements. Maximum 0.8 W output power limited by launched pump power has been generated in 1064 nm with laser beam quality factor M(2) 1.18.

  4. Large-mode-area single-mode-output Neodymium-doped silicate glass all-solid photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Chen, Danping; Qinling, Zhou; Hu, Lili

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a 45 μm core diameter Neodymium-doped all-solid silicate glass photonic crystal fiber laser with a single mode laser output. The structure parameters and modes information of the fiber are both demonstrated by theoretical calculations using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and experimental measurements. Maximum 0.8 W output power limited by launched pump power has been generated in 1064 nm with laser beam quality factor M2 1.18. PMID:26205850

  5. Post-eruptive alteration of silicic ignimbrites and lavas, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands - Strontium, neodymium, lead, and oxygen isotopic evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousens, Brian L.; Spera, Frank J.; Dobson, Patrick F.

    1993-01-01

    The isotopic composition of lavas from oceanic islands provides important information about the composition and evolution of the earth's mantle. Isotopic analyses of Miocene comenditic, pantelleritic, and trachyphonolitic ignimbrites and lavas from the Canary islands were performed. Results provide evidence for posteruptive mobility of Rb and Sr during low temperature postemplacement interaction with circulating ground water. Calculated Sr isotope ratios define a magmatic trend in the stratigraph section. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in hydrated vitrophyte and devitrified matrix separates indicate significant posteruptive interaction with meteoric water starting soon after deposition. This process extends patchily through the entire pyroclastic flow and may be ongoing. 87Sr/86Sr ratios determined by whole rock analysis of silicic rocks from oceanic islands are suspect and should not be incorporated into mantle tracer studies. Anorthoclase phenocrysts are resistant to these processes and may produce useful data.

  6. Post-eruptive alteration of silicic ignimbrites and lavas, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands: Strontium, neodymium, lead, and oxygen isotopic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Cousens, B.L. ); Spera, F.J. ); Dobson, P.F. )

    1993-02-01

    Isotopic analyses of Miocene comenditic, pantelleritic, and trachyphonolitic ignimbrites and lavas from Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, provide evidence for posteruptive mobility of Rb, Sr, and O. Calculated initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios in whole-rock samples from basaltic lavas and feldspar mineral separates from ignimbrites define a magmatic trend in the stratigraphic section, from ratios of 0.70340 at the base of the Mogan Formation to 0.70305 in the lower Fataga Formation. However, calculated apparent initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios in hydrated vitrophyre and devitrified matrix separates range from 0.7035 to 0.7090. [delta][sup 18]O ratios in basalts and feldspars vary little, from +5.7 to +6.1, yet range from +6.5 to +15.0 in the ignimbrite matrices. In contrast to the Sr and O isotope ratios, Pb and Nd isotope ratios are identical within analytical error in feldspars and their silicic ignimbrite matrices. Sequential leaching experiments and the oxygen data suggest that low-temperature, posteruptive interaction with meteoric water, perhaps containing a small seawater component, has modified Rb and Sr concentrations in the matrices, such that calculated apparent initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios are not those of the magmas when they were erupted. Mobilization of Rb and Sr must occur significantly after eurption. Nd and Pb isotope systems appear to be unaffected by this process. Therefore, [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios determined by whole rock analysis of silicic rocks from hotspot-type oceanic islands are suspect and should not be incorporated into mantle tracer studies, although analysis of phenocrysts may produce useful data. 40 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  8. Metals Fact Sheet: Neodymium

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    Neodymium was discovered in 1898 when it was separated from {open_quotes}dydimium,{close_quotes} a praseodymium-neodymium compound that was thought to be only one element. {open_quotes}Neodymium{close_quotes} is derived from the Greek words {open_quotes}neos{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}didymos,{close_quotes} which translates to {open_quotes}new twin.{close_quotes} This article discusses sources and applications of the element, and reviews world reserves and demands. Price trends in the commodity are also noted.

  9. Q-Switching in a Neodymium Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holgado, Warein; Sola, Inigo J.; Jarque, Enrique Conejero; Jarabo, Sebastian; Roso, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for advanced undergraduate or graduate laser-related classes to study the performance of a neodymium laser. In the experiment, the student has to build the neodymium laser using an open cavity. After that, the cavity losses are modulated with an optical chopper located inside, so the Q-switching regime is…

  10. Neodymium neutron cross section measurements.

    PubMed

    Barry, D P; Trbovich, M J; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Slovacek, R E; Leinweber, G; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J

    2005-01-01

    Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute LINAC using metallic neodymium samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m-long flight station with a 16-segment NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15 and 25 m flight stations with a 6Li glass scintillation detector. After the data were collected and reduced, resonance parameters were determined by simultaneously fitting the transmission and capture data with the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The resonance parameters for all naturally occurring neodymium isotopes lie within the energy range of 1.0-500 eV. The resulting resonance parameters were used to calculate the capture resonance integral with this energy region and were compared to calculations obtained when using the resonance parameters from ENDF-B/VI. The RPI parameters gave a resonance integral value of 32 +/- 0.5 b that is approximately 7% lower than that obtained with the ENDF-B/VI parameters. The current measurements significantly reduce the statistical uncertainties on the resonance parameters when compared with previously published parameters.

  11. Electrolysis of neodymium oxide. Final report for the period August 19, 1991 through February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K.T.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an electrolytic process for the continuous and economic production of neodymium alloys from neodymium oxide. The electrolysis of neodymium oxide continued to show promise for implementation as a low-cost process to produce high- quality neodymium or neodymium-iron alloy.

  12. Radio-Purification of Neodymium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, S.; Yeh, M.; Cumming, J. B.; Hahn, R. L.

    2011-04-27

    Organometallic liquid scintillator becomes one of the man detection mediums for neutrino experiment. Liquid-liquid extraction is the method of choice for loading metallic ions of interest into the organic solvents at BNL. High purity of all starting materials is essential for the optimization of synthesis. A newly developed 'self-scavenging' technique was applied to purify undesired radioisotopes from the starting metal compound and found to effectively remove thorium and such containments from the neodymium chloride for SNO+.

  13. Neodymium and strontium isotopic constraints on soil sources in Barbados, West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Lars E.; Banner, Jay L.

    1996-11-01

    Neodymium and strontium isotopic compositions and Sm/Nd ratios are used to constrain the sources of silicate-rich soils developed on uplifted Pleistocene coral-reef limestones on Barbados, West Indies. The geographic and geologic setting of Barbados facilitates the application of these tracers to the evaluation of the following soil sources: (1) Pleistocene reef limestone regolith, (2) Tertiary carbonate rocks, sandstones, and mudstones that are exposed in northeastern Barbados, (3) volcanic ash erupted from the Lesser Antilles arc, (4) Saharan dust transported by trade winds, and (5) fertilizer. The soils have ɛNd values that range from -6.6 to -1.9, 87Sr /86Sr values of 0.70890 to 0.71067, and Sm/Nd ratios of 0.223-0.260. The Pleistocene limestone component is the most significant source of Sr in the soils and a negligible source of Nd. Comparison of Sm and Nd concentrations and neodymium isotopic compositions of soil samples that are weathered to varying extents indicates that Sm and Nd are relatively unfractionated and retained in the soils during weathering. ɛNd and Sm/Nd variations in the soils, therefore, primarily reflect the compositions and proportions of the silicate sources. Mass balance calculations based on SmNd systematics require that the silicate soil components contain between 30-85% volcanic ash, with the remaining silicate fraction comprised of old, continentally-derived sediment. In contrast to Sm and Nd, Sr is mobilized and removed from the soils during weathering. Strontium from volcanic and carbonate sources is preferentially removed relative to continental silicate sources. The strontium isotopic compositions of the soils, therefore, reflect the combined effects of the degree of weathering and the compositions and proportions of the soil sources. Mass balance calculations indicate that at least 35-60% of the initial Sr in the soils has been removed by weathering. These results illustrate (1) the utility of radiogenic isotopes in

  14. Neodymium-142 evidence for Hadean mafic crust.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Jonathan; Carlson, Richard W; Francis, Don; Stevenson, Ross K

    2008-09-26

    Neodymium-142 data for rocks from the Nuvvuagittuq greenstone belt in northern Quebec, Canada, show that some rock types have lower 142Nd/144Nd ratios than the terrestrial standard (epsilon142Nd = -0.07 to -0.15). Within a mafic amphibolite unit, 142Nd/144Nd ratios correlate positively with Sm/Nd ratios and produce a 146Sm-142Nd isochron with an age of 4280(-81)(+53) million years. These rocks thus sample incompatible-element-enriched material formed shortly after Earth formation and may represent the oldest preserved crustal section on Earth.

  15. Neodymium nanoparticles: biosynthesis and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ascencio, J A; Canizal, G; Medina-Flores, A; Bejar, L; Tavera, L; Matamoros, H; Liu, H B

    2006-04-01

    Small metallic nanoparticles of neodymium are obtained by a facile route based on the biosynthesis and the pH conditions that demonstrate the possibility of obtaining particles of 1-8 nm. The size is controlled by synthesis conditions. Smaller clusters were obtained with pH = 5, while for pH = 10 evidences of nanorods productions are found and this opens the perspective to use this rare-earth element for zero and one dimensional based applications. Using transmission electron microscopy techniques, the size distribution and structure are studied. Density functional theory-based calculations allow the determination of the lowest energy configuration, which is based on the hexagonal bulk symmetry. Theoretical models are used to simulate the high resolution transmission electron microscopy to identify the experimental image, determining that the synthesized nanoparticles reach the lowest energy hexagonal configurations.

  16. Selective recognition of neodymium (III) using ion imprinted polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Paramesamangalam Gopi; Gladis, Joseph Mary; Rao, Talasila Prasada; Naidu, Gurijala Ramakrishna

    2005-01-01

    Neodymium (III) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) materials were prepared by the copolymerization of neodymium (III)-5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol-4-vinylpyridine ternary complex with styrene(monomer), divinyl benzene (crosslinking monomer) in the presence of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). The synthesis was carried out in 2-methoxy ethanol medium (porogen) and the resultant material was filtered, washed, dried and powdered to form unleached IIP particles. The imprint ion was removed by stirring the above particles with 50% (v/v) HCl for 6 h to obtain leached IIP particles with cavities in the polymer particles. Control polymer (CP) particles were similarly prepared without imprint ion, i.e. neodymium (III). CP, unleached and leached IIP particles were characterized by TLC, IR, microanalysis, XRD and UV-visible spectrophotometric studies. The preconcentration of 5-150 microg of neodymium (III) ions present in 500 ml of solution was possible with as little as 40 mg of neodymium (III) IIP particles in the pH range 7.5-8.0 with a detection limit of 50 ng/l. Five replicate determinations of 25 microg of neodymium (III) present in 500 ml of solution gave a mean absorbance of 0.120 with a relative standard deviation of 2.65%. The imprinting effect of IIP particles was noticed in all preconcentration and selectivity studies when compared with CP particles. Furthermore, the selectivity coefficients of neodymium (III) IIP particles were much higher compared with the reported separation factors for the best liquid-liquid extractants, viz. di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid and 2-ethylhexyl-ethylhexyl phosphonate. Kinetic and isotherm studies during rebinding of neodymium (III) onto IIP particles were also carried out.

  17. Neodymium YAG Lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-07-01

    Federally funded research reports on lasing of neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet are cited. Studies on design, fabrication, quantum efficiency, light pulses, stabilization, and testing are covered. Optical pumping, mode locking, frequency conversion, and modulation of these lasers are discussed. Laser applications such as optical communication, range finding, and tracking are included. Safety hazards and radiation damage related to neodymium YAG lasers are also covered. This updated bibliography contains 181 citations, 15 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  18. Boundary processes traced by neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeandel, C.; Lacan, F.

    2003-04-01

    Continental margins have been identified as preferential sites for removing of reactive elements from the ocean, on the base of U-series measurements (more specifically 231Pa/230Th). This process is called boundary scavenging (Bacon, 1988). Five years of neodymium isotopes data in water masses along the ocean margins (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Greenland-Scotland ridge and Labrador Sea) suggests that Nd is transferred from the sediments to the ocean but the reverse also occurs via the so-called boundary scavenging. These processes are only detectable by isotopic ratio measurements because they affect the isotopic signature of the water mass coming in contact with the margin, without changing its concentration. They can involve much higher fluxes than net input processes: for example, the modification of the AAIW signature along the Papua New Guinea slope involves exchange processes only (Lacan and Jeandel, 2001). Since we suspect that such processes not only affect the Nd oceanic chemistry but also the chemical fate of other reactive elements in the ocean, we suggest that the concept of boundary scavenging should be extended to "boundary exchange".

  19. Samarium-neodymium direct dating of fluorite mineralization.

    PubMed

    Chesley, J T; Halliday, A N; Scrivener, R C

    1991-05-17

    The direct dating of many styles of hydrothermal mineralization has proved difficult, limiting understanding of the geological processes that lead to crustal fluid flow and the formation of major ore deposits. The hydrothermal mineral fluorite (CaF(2)) displays large variations in rare earth element (REE) abundance and samarium/neodymium ratios within a single vein. Samarium-neodymium dating of fluorite from the classic granite-hosted tin deposits of southwest England demonstrates its use as a precise chronometer of mineralization. The concentrations of light rare earth elements (LREEs) in the fluorites are highly variable and suggest the coeval precipitation of an LREE-rich phase as the most likely cause of the extreme variation in samarium/neodymium ratios.

  20. New high-strength neodymium phosphate laser glass

    SciTech Connect

    Galagan, B I; Glushchenko, I N; Denker, B I; Kalachev, Yu L; Mikhailov, Viktor A; Sverchkov, S E; Shcherbakov, Ivan A; Kuleshov, N V

    2009-12-31

    A high-strength neodymium laser glass (SNLG) based on an alumoborophosphate composition is developed and synthesised; its physicochemical, spectral, luminescent, and lasing characteristics are studied. It is found that the chemical stability and thermal resistance of the new glass are considerably higher than the corresponding characteristics of known neodymium-doped phosphate laser glasses. Investigations of lasing upon longitudinal diode pumping showed that, due to the higher thermal resistance, the new glass allows one to obtain output powers twice as high as those of industrial GLS22 glass. (active media)

  1. Neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation. The role of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, L.B.; Nichols, D.A.; Katz, L.J.; Moster, M.R.; Poryzees, E.; Shields, J.A.; Spaeth, G.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Using a rabbit model we investigated the role of pigmentation of the ciliary body in obtaining ciliodestruction by neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation. There was marked destruction of the ciliary body in pigmented rabbit eyes, but no histologic effect was observed in albino rabbit eyes. These findings suggest that pigmentation of the ciliary body is important for obtaining the desired response from neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in rabbit eyes by our technique. Further study is necessary to define the role of pigmentation in human eyes in this treatment modality.

  2. Recycling potential of neodymium: the case of computer hard disk drives.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Benjamin; Kleijn, Rene; Kramer, Gert Jan

    2014-08-19

    Neodymium, one of the more critically scarce rare earth metals, is often used in sustainable technologies. In this study, we investigate the potential contribution of neodymium recycling to reducing scarcity in supply, with a case study on computer hard disk drives (HDDs). We first review the literature on neodymium production and recycling potential. From this review, we find that recycling of computer HDDs is currently the most feasible pathway toward large-scale recycling of neodymium, even though HDDs do not represent the largest application of neodymium. We then use a combination of dynamic modeling and empirical experiments to conclude that within the application of NdFeB magnets for HDDs, the potential for loop-closing is significant: up to 57% in 2017. However, compared to the total NdFeB production capacity, the recovery potential from HDDs is relatively small (in the 1-3% range). The distributed nature of neodymium poses a significant challenge for recycling of neodymium.

  3. Efficient wide-aperture neodymium glass rod amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Potemkin, A K; Zhurin, K A; Kirsanov, A V; Kopelovich, E A; Kuznetsov, M V; Kuz'min, A A; Flat, F A; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaikin, A A

    2011-06-30

    Amplifiers based on neodymium phosphate glass rods 60 - 100 mm in diameter are experimentally studied. The amplifiers are pumped by INP-16/250 tubular flash lamps placed in a universal pump cavity with a two-section mirror reflector. A compact high-voltage capacitive energy storage with a preionisation circuit was developed to supply the lamps. (lasers)

  4. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  5. Materials flow analysis of neodymium, status of rare earth metal in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Kang, Leeseung; Mishra, Chinmayee; Ahn, JoongWoo; Hong, Hyun Seon

    2015-11-01

    Materials flow analysis of neodymium, status of rare earth elements (REEs) in the Republic of Korea has been investigated. Information from various resources like the Korean Ministry of Environment, Korea international trade association, United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database and from individual industry were collected and analyzed for materials flow analysis of neodymium. Demand of neodymium in the Republic of Korea for the year 2010 was 409.5 tons out of which the majority of neodymium, i.e., 68.41% was consumed by domestic electronics industry followed by medical appliances manufacturing (13.36%). The Republic Korea is one of the biggest consumer and leading exporter of these industrial products, absolutely depends on import of neodymium, as the country is lacking natural resources. The Republic of Korea has imported 325.9 tons of neodymium permanent magnet and 79.5 tons of neodymium containing equipment parts mainly for electronics, medical appliances, and heavy/light vehicles manufacturing industry. Out of which 95.4 tons of neodymium permanent magnet get exported as an intermediate product and 140.6 tons of neodymium in the form of consumable products get exported. Worldwide the neodymium is at the high end of supply chain critical metal because of increasing demand, scarcity and irreplaceable for technological application. To bring back the neodymium to supply stream the recycling of end of life neodymium-bearing waste can be a feasible option. Out of total domestic consumption, only 21.9 tons of neodymium have been collected and subsequently recycled. From material flow analysis, the requirement for an efficient recycling system and element-wise material flow management for these REEs in the Republic of Korea were realized and recommended.

  6. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  7. Spectroscopic Properties of Neodymium and Erbium-Doped Magnesium Oxide Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7441 ● SEPT 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Spectroscopic Properties of Neodymium and Erbium-Doped Magnesium Oxide...Laboratory Spectroscopic Properties of Neodymium and Erbium-Doped Magnesium Oxide Ceramics by T Sanamyan and M Dubinskii Sensors and...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) Sep 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spectroscopic Properties of Neodymium

  8. Neodymium-YAG laser vitreolysis in sickle cell retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrisomalos, N.F.; Jampol, L.M.; Moriarty, B.J.; Serjeant, G.; Acheson, R.; Goldberg, M.F.

    1987-08-01

    Six patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy and vitreous bands were treated with the neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser to accomplish lysis of avascular traction bands or to clear the media in front of the macula. Transection of bands was possible in five of the six cases but in two of these the effect was only partial. Three cases were satisfactorily treated with the Nd-YAG laser application alone, two eventually required conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and one patient's condition stabilized despite failure of the treatment. Complications from the treatment occurred in three cases and included subretinal (choroidal) hemorrhage, preretinal hemorrhage, microperforation of a retinal vein, and focal areas of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium. Neodymium-YAG vitreolysis may be a useful modality in carefully selected patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy, but potentially sight-threatening complications may occur.

  9. Chromatographic separation of neodymium isotopes by using chemical exchange process.

    PubMed

    Ismail, I M; Ibrahim, M; Aly, H F; Nomura, M; Fujii, Y

    2011-05-20

    The neodymium isotope effects were investigated in Nd-malate ligand exchange system using the highly porous cation exchange resin SQS-6. The temperature of the chromatographic columns was kept constant at 50°C by temperature controlled water passed through the columns jackets. The separation coefficient of neodymium isotopes, ɛ's, was calculated from the isotopic ratios precisely measured by means of an ICP mass spectrometer equipped with nine collectors as ion detectors. The separation coefficient, ɛ×10(5), were calculated and found to be 1.4, 4.8, 5.4, 10.6, 16.8 and 20.2 for (143)Nd, (144)Nd, (145)Nd, (146)Nd, (148)Nd and (150)Nd, respectively.

  10. Dissociation of cerium(III) and neodymium(III) phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomova, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    The kinetics of dissociation of phthalocyanine complexes with cerium(III) and neodymium(III) (X)LnPc (X = Cl-, Br-, AcO-) under the action of acetic acid in ethanol with isolation of the macrocyclic ligand depending on the temperature was studied. The kinetic equations with the numerical values of rate constants, activation parameters, and the stoichiometric mechanisms with the limiting simple reaction between the nonionized AcOH molecule and (phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) in the axially coordinated ((X)LnPc, cerium complexes) or axially ionized ([(AcOH)LnPc]+X-, neodymium complexes) state were derived by solving the direct and inverse problems. As shown by a comparative analysis of quantitative kinetic data, the state is determined by the electronic structure of the metal cation and the mutual effect of the axial and equatorial ligands in the first coordination sphere.

  11. [Neodymium magnet injury causing nasal fracture: a case report].

    PubMed

    Aykan, Andaç; Güzey, Serbülent; Avşar, Sedat; Öztürk, Serdar

    2015-05-01

    In parallel with technological developments, small size but strong magnets are commonly used in modern devices. In terms of foreign body injuries, magnet injuries are quite rare. However, due to their unique characteristics, there are some difficulties in their management. The magnetic field generated by the magnet affects the surgical instruments and make treatment difficult. In this case report, a nasal injury due to neodymium magnet and our alternative approach for its management was reported.

  12. Comment on "Neodymium-142 evidence for Hadean mafic crust".

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Rasmus; Sharma, Mukul

    2009-07-17

    O'Neil et al. (Reports, 26 September 2008, p. 1828) presented neodymium-142 data for rocks from northern Quebec, Canada, and suggested that these rocks may represent the oldest preserved crustal section on Earth. We argue that the age of the rocks is based on a spurious correlation between rocks that are probably not co-genetic and negative (142)Nd anomalies that may be the result of an analytical artifact.

  13. Complexation of di-amides of dipicolinic acid with neodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Lapka, J.L.; Paulenova, A.

    2013-07-01

    Di-amides have undergone significant studies as possible ligands for use in the partitioning of trivalent minor actinides and lanthanides. The binding affinities of three isomeric ligands with neodymium in acetonitrile solution have been investigated. The stability constants of the metal-ligand complexes formed between different isomers of N,N'-diethyl-N,N'- ditolyl-di-picolinamide (EtTDPA) and trivalent neodymium in acetonitrile have been determined by spectrophotometric and calorimetric methods. Each isomer of EtTDPA has been found to be capable of forming three complexes with trivalent neodymium, Nd(EtTDPA), Nd(EtTDPA){sub 2}, and Nd(EtTDPA){sub 3}. Values from spectrophotometric and calorimetric titrations are within reasonable agreement with each other. The order of stability constants for each metal:ligand complex decreases in the order Et(m)TDPA > Et(p)TDPA > Et(o)TDPA. The obtained values are comparable to other di-amidic ligands obtained under similar system conditions and mirror previously obtained solvent extraction data for EtTDPA at low ionic strengths. (authors.

  14. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  15. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  16. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S; Ahmad, Mohammad I; Aly, Hisham F; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-03-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated.

  17. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S.; Ahmad, Mohammad I.; Aly, Hisham F.; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated. PMID:25685410

  18. Do foraminifera accurately record seawater neodymium isotope composition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivner, Adam; Skinner, Luke; Vance, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Palaeoclimate studies involving the reconstruction of past Atlantic meridional overturning circulation increasingly employ isotopes of neodymium (Nd), measured on a variety of sample media (Frank, 2002). In the open ocean, Nd isotopes are a conservative tracer of water mass mixing and are unaffected by biological and low-temperature fractionation processes (Piepgras and Wasserburg, 1987; Lacan and Jeandel, 2005). For decades, benthic foraminifera have been widely utilised in stable isotope and geochemical studies, but have only recently begun to be exploited as a widely distributed, high-resolution Nd isotope archive (Klevenz et al., 2008), potentially circumventing the difficulties associated with other methods used to recover past deep-water Nd isotopes (Klevenz et al., 2008; Rutberg et al., 2000; Tachikawa et al., 2004). Thus far, a single pilot study (Klevenz et al., 2008) has indicated that core-top sedimentary benthic foraminifera record a Nd isotope composition in agreement with the nearest available bottom seawater data, and has suggested that this archive is potentially useful on both millennial and million-year timescales. Here we present seawater and proximal core-top foraminifer Nd isotope data for samples recovered during the 2008 "RETRO" cruise of the Marion Dufresne. The foraminifer samples comprise a depth-transect spanning 3000m of the water column in the Angola Basin and permit a direct comparison between high-resolution water column and core-top foraminiferal Nd isotope data. We use these data to assess the reliability of both planktonic and benthic foraminifera as recorders of water column neodymium isotope composition. Frank, M., 2002. Radiogenic isotopes: Tracers of past ocean circulation and erosional input, Rev. Geophys., 40 (1), 1001, doi:10.1029/2000RG000094. Klevenz, V., Vance, D., Schmidt, D.N., and Mezger, K., 2008. Neodymium isotopes in benthic foraminifera: Core-top systematics and a down-core record from the Neogene south Atlantic

  19. Local immunity in treating skin melanoma by neodymium pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalik, Konstantin G.

    1997-06-01

    The number and correlation of skin stroma cells was studied on mice C57B1 with the subcutaneously transplanted melanoma B16 which was exposed to neodymium pulsed laser radiation. Within 1-5 days after the exposure the total number of the free skin stroma cells was found to increase in the periphery from the radiation epicenter and the number of lymphocytes, macrophages and leucocytes tended to grow. Lymphoid infiltration was also revealed in the preparations of the epithelized wound and cicatrix on the skin melanoma sites in the patients who had undergone pulsed laser radiation therapy.

  20. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  2. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  3. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  4. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  5. Magnetic behaviour of Neodymium-substituted strontium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Bilal Hamid; Want, Basharat

    2016-03-01

    Neodymium-substituted strontium hexaferrites, Sr1- x Nd x Fe12O19 ( x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20), have been successfully synthesized by using citrate precursor method. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The X-ray diffraction results show that the prepared samples are crystalline in nature and are of single phase with the space group P63/mmc. Transmission electron microscopy results show that the prepared sample is composed of fine nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm. The effect on magnetic behaviour of strontium hexaferrite with neodymium substitution was analysed by using first-order reversal curves (FORCs). FORC analysis was done in order to know the domain state of magnetization of the nanoparticles and the nature of magnetic interactions among the particles. FORC diagrams depict a single peak, suggesting that the substituted systems are formed of interacting nanoparticles.

  6. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  7. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  12. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  13. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in table salt...

  15. Origin of the Sudbury Complex by meteoritic impact: Neodymium isotopic evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faggart, B.E.; Basu, A.R.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1985-01-01

    Samarium-neodymium isotopic data on whole rocks and minerals of the Sudbury Complex in Canada gave an igneous crystallization age of 1840 ?? 21 ?? 106 years. The initial epsilon neodymium values for 15 whole rocks are similar to those for average upper continental crust, falling on the crustal trend of neodymium isotopic evolution as defined by shales. The rare earth element concentration patterns of Sudbury rocks are also similar to upper crustal averages. These data suggest that the Sudbury Complex formed from melts generated in the upper crust and are consistent with a meteoritic impact.

  16. Electrolytic production of neodymium without perfluorinated carbon compounds on the offgases

    DOEpatents

    Keller, Rudolf; Larimer, Kirk T.

    1998-01-01

    A method of producing neodymium in an electrolytic cell without formation of perfluorinated carbon gases (PFCs), the method comprising the steps of providing an electrolyte in the electrolytic cell and providing an anode in an anode region of the electrolyte and providing a cathode in a cathode region of the electrolytic cell. Dissolving an oxygen-containing neodymium compound in the electrolyte in the anode region and maintaining a more intense electrolyte circulation in the anode region than in the cathode region. Passing an electrolytic current between said anode and said cathode and depositing neodymium metal at the cathode, preventing the formation of perfluorinated carbon gases by limiting anode over voltage.

  17. Analysis of the structure and Mössbauer study of the neodymium substitution in the Sr-hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Juache, T. J.; Guerrero, A. L.; Cabal-Velarde, J. G.; Mirabal-García, M.; Palomares-Sánchez, S. A.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    This work reads on the obtainment of the strontium hexaferrite substituted with neodymium in its pure phase using the solid state reaction method. The solubility of neodymium on the strontium hexaferrite was investigated according with the formula Sr1-xNdxFe12O19, for x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25. Results indicate that neodymium is soluble in the hexaferrite until x=0.15. In samples with higher neodymium content there are traces of secondary phases. Analysis of magnetic and structural properties was performed in function of the neodymium content, always in its solubility range. From the structural properties, it was observed that the addition of a little neodymium quantity in the Sr-hexaferrite causes an important reduction of the unit cell volume. Also, magnetic properties are strongly linked to the structural behavior, in this case a trend to reduce the magnetization of the samples was detected when neodymium content increased, which can be explained in terms of fluctuations of the superexchange coupling conducted by the neodymium interactions with the structure. Mössbauer analysis was carried out in order to analyze the effects of the neodymium substitution on the hyperfine parameters, as well as to confirm the preferential site of the neodymium substitution in the Sr-hexaferrite.

  18. Segmental irradiation of the bladder with neodymium YAG laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McPhee, M.S.; Mador, D.R.; Tulip, J.; Ritchie, B.; Moore, R.; Lakey, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    The Neodymium YAG laser energy source can be readily adapted for cystoscopic use by some simple modifications of existing urologic equipment. Both the fiberoptic resectoscope and a deflecting cystourethroscope have been adapted for this purpose. Fixation of the fiber tip 1 cm. from the target and use of a divergent beam of 36 degrees allows the delivery of standardized dosage to a relatively large bladder tissue volume. Animal experiments involving 35 mongrel dogs established that repetitive overlapping doses of 200 joules ech can successfully treat a large area of bladder resulting in a full thickness bladder wall injury. This technique has been used in 4 high risk patients with infiltrating bladder cancer without adverse sequelae. The ability to reliably produce a full thickness lesion may give this modality a therapeutic advantage over conventional cautery techniques especially for the treatment of residual infiltrative carcinoma.

  19. A new contact neodymium: YAG laser for cyclophotocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Iwach, A.G.; Drake, M.V.; Hoskins, H.D. Jr.; Schuster, B.L.; Vassiliadis, A.; Crawford, J.B.; Hennings, D.R. )

    1991-06-01

    A newly developed compact (40 kg), self-contained contact Neodymium:YAG laser produces high-peak, high-energy (800 mJ/pulse), short (1.0 millisecond) pulses with 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy is delivered via a 320-microns cleaved quartz fiber optic probe. Cyclophotocoagulation was performed in five eyes of three medium-sized Dutch-pigmented rabbits. The eyes received exposures of 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy delivered ranged from 100 to 800 mJ/pulse. Histopathology revealed ciliary body disruption and hemorrhage with no damage to overlying sclera. When used for transscleral cyclodiathermy in the rabbit, the laser created significant ciliary body disruption with minimal scleral injury.

  20. Absolute isotopic composition and atomic weight of neodymium using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Motian; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Jun; Lu, Hai; Fang, Xiang; Guo, Chunhua; Li, Qiuli; Li, Chaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic mixtures prepared gravimetrically from highly enriched isotopes of neodymium in the form of oxides of well-defined purity were used to calibrate a thermal ionization mass spectrometer. A new error analysis was applied to calculate the final uncertainty of the atomic weight value. Measurements on natural neodymium samples yielded an absolute isotopic composition of 27.153(19) atomic percent (at.%) 142Nd, 12.173(18) at.% 143Nd, 23.798(12) at.% 144Nd, 8.293(7) at.% 145Nd, 17.189(17) at.% 146Nd, 5.756(8) at.% 148Nd, and 5.638(9) at.% 150Nd, and the atomic weight of neodymium as 144.2415(13), with uncertainties given on the basis of 95% confidence limits. No isotopic fractionation was found in terrestrial neodymium materials.

  1. Isotope enrichment by frequency-tripled temperature tuned neodymium laser photolysis of formaldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1977-01-01

    Enrichment of carbon, hydrogen and/or oxygen isotopes by means of isotopically selective photo-predissociation of formaldehyde is achieved by irradiation provided by a frequency-tripled, temperature tuned neodymium laser.

  2. Microscale Demonstration of the Paramagnetism of Liquid Oxygen with a Neodymium Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    A microscale classroom demonstration of the paramagnetic behavior of various samples of liquid oxygen with neodymium magnet is being presented. The experiment should be done with extreme caution, as liquid oxygen reacts violently with organic matters.

  3. Modification of neodymium-doped ZnO hybrid nanoparticles under mild hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradi, Behzad; Soga, K; Ananda, S; Somashekar, R; Byrappa, K

    2010-07-01

    The morphology and particle size of neodymium-doped ZnO hybrid nanoparticles were tailored through fabrication under mild hydrothermal conditions (T = 150-250 degrees C, P = autogeneous, t = 18 h) for the first time using two surface modifiers: caprylic acid and n-butylamine. Characterization of these nanoparticles was carried out using powder XRD, FTIR, SEM, zeta-potential analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results revealed that modification of ZnO nanoparticles using neodymium as a dopant and caprylic acid or n-butylamine as a surfactant could change the optical and physical properties of the surface-modified neodymium-doped ZnO hybrid nanoparticles. The work proved the efficiency of caprylic acid and n-butylamine as suitable surfactants for surface modification of neodymium-doped ZnO hybrid nanoparticles.

  4. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  5. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  6. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  7. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  8. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  9. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  10. Description of the traction characteristics of the neodymium compensators of the automatic vibration isolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.; Panchenko, Y. V.; Gurov, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the method of calculation of neodymium magnets was presented. The calculation of the neodymium magnets characteristics and stiffness correctors of the vibration isolator according to the requirements for vibration isolation devices with stiffness compensators was performed. This research has been performed with the support of the President scholarship for young scientists, order No. 184 of Ministry of education and science of the Russian Federation of the 10th of March 2015.

  11. Neodymium and strontium isotope evidence for crustal contamination of continental volcanics.

    PubMed

    Carter, S R; Evensen, N M; Hamilton, P J; O'nions, R K

    1978-11-17

    Combined neodymium and strontium isotope studies on Tertiary volcanics from northwest Scotland indicate that their parental mantle isotopic compositions have been substantially modified in many instances by contamination with the Precambrian continental crust through which they were erupted. The occurrence of samarium-neodymium and rubidium-strontium "pseudoisochrons" of different ages in these contaminated continental volcanics indicates that they are artifacts of the contamination processes and have no temporal significance with respect to mantle fractionation events.

  12. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  13. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  14. Tin in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparoni, Guido

    An experimental technique that uses Re metal capsules as containers for tin-bearing systems has been developed and successfully used in the study of the compositional dependence of SnO2 solubility in silicate melts. These experiments have been performed in the absence of an aqueous fluid phase and oxygen fugacity (fO2) has been established by the addition of tin-metal to SnO2. This approach solves three long-standing problems in the study of SnO 2 solubility in silicate melts: (1) Alloying of noble-metal crucibles and corrosion of ceramic crucibles is avoided; (2) fO 2 is established by direct contact of a metal-oxide oxygen buffer; (3) Gaseous SnO is not lost to the furnace atmosphere. The Re-capsule technique, combined with evacuated silica-tube experiments, has been applied to the study of the system SnO-SiO2 at pressures of 1 atm and 10 kbar. SnO2 solubilities of up to 95 wt% SnO are reported. The system SnO-SiO2 is found to be a pseudo-binary of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2-SiO2. A revised phase diagram for the system SnO-SiO2 at a pressure ≈1 atm is provided, and a new phase diagram for the system SnOSiO2 at a pressure = 10 kbar has been constructed. These results are used to suggest the topology of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2SiO2. The Re-capsule technique has also been applied to the study of the subaluminous haplogranite system (SiO2NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi 3O8) at T = 1100°C, P = 10 kbar and fO 2 at Sn°-SnO2. Solubilities span the range of 41 to 80 wt% SnO. In the haplogranite system, the solubility of SnO2 increases with the proportion of normative SiO2, and SnO is found to expand the stability field of SiO2. In the feldspar join, Na-based melts dissolve a larger proportion of SnO than K-based melts. This effect is lost as SiO2 is progressively added to the feldspar join. Small amounts of F (1 wt%) are found to increase the solubility of SnO 2 by an equivalent 15 wt% normative quartz as shown with the Spor Mountain rhyolite. A comparison of SnO2 solubilities

  15. Thermochemistry of Silicate Speciation in Aqueous Sodium Silicate Solutions: Ionization and Polymerization of Small Silicate Ion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-12

    reasonable success, but a number of simplifications were used. For instance, the polymerization equilibrium constants were assumed to be independent of...Another weakness lies in the functionality assumed for the ionization equilibrium constants . As will be discussed below, experimental data that the free...characterize silicate species in fairly complex alkaline silicate solutions and thereby to estimate a large number of equilibrium constants [27,28

  16. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  17. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  18. Diffusion kinetics of samarium and neodymium in garnet, and a method for determining cooling rates of rocks

    PubMed

    Ganguly; Tirone; Hervig

    1998-08-07

    Experimental determinations of the diffusion coefficients of samarium and neodymium in almandine garnet and theoretical considerations show that one cannot assign a sufficiently restricted range of closure temperature, TC, to the samarium-neodymium decay system in garnet for the purpose of constraining the cooling rate. However, it is shown that the samarium-neodymium cooling age of garnet can be used to calculate both cooling rate and TC if the temperature and age at the peak metamorphic conditions are known.

  19. Thermoluminescent sensitivity of single clad neodymium doped SiO2 optical fibres measured with 6 MeV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, M. A.; Hossain, I.; Hida, N.; Wagiran, H.

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the thermoluminescent sensitivity of neodymium doped SiO2 optical fibre with various dose ranges from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy by 6 MeV photon irradiations. The TL responses of the neodymium doped silica fibres are compared with available TLD-100 dosimeter in order to determine the suitability as a TL material. We found that the TLD-100 and neodymium doped silica fibre have a significant linear signal to dose relationship. Neodymium doped fibres sensitivity is approximately 11% of TLD-100.

  20. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in world river sediments revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon, G.; Toucanne, S.; Skonieczny, C.; André, L.; Bermell, S.; Cheron, S.; Dennielou, B.; Etoubleau, J.; Freslon, N.; Gauchery, T.; Germain, Y.; Jorry, S. J.; Ménot, G.; Monin, L.; Ponzevera, E.; Rouget, M.-L.; Tachikawa, K.; Barrat, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decades, rare earth elements (REE) and their radioactive isotopes have received tremendous attention in sedimentary geochemistry, as tracers for the geological history of the continental crust and provenance studies. In this study, we report on elemental concentrations and neodymium (Nd) isotopic compositions for a large number of sediments collected near the mouth of rivers worldwide, including some of the world's major rivers. Sediments were leached for removal of non-detrital components, and both clay and silt fractions were retained for separate geochemical analyses. Our aim was to re-examine, at the scale of a large systematic survey, whether or not REE and Nd isotopes could be fractionated during Earth surface processes. Our results confirmed earlier assumptions that river sediments do not generally exhibit any significant grain-size dependent Nd isotopic variability. Most sediments from rivers draining old cratonic areas, sedimentary systems and volcanic provinces displayed similar Nd isotopic signatures in both clay and silt fractions, with ΔεNd(clay-silt) < |1|. A subtle decoupling of Nd isotopes between clays and silts was identified however in a few major river systems (e.g. Nile, Mississippi, Fraser), with clays being systematically shifted towards more radiogenic values. This observation suggests that preferential weathering of volcanic and/or sedimentary rocks relative to more resistant lithologies may occur in river basins, possibly leading locally to Nd isotopic decoupling between different size fractions. Except for volcanogenic sediments, silt fractions generally displayed homogeneous REE concentrations, exhibiting relatively flat shale-normalized patterns. However, clay fractions were almost systematically characterized by a progressive enrichment from the heavy to the light REE and a positive europium (Eu) anomaly. In agreement with results from previous soil investigations, the observed REE fractionation between clays and silts

  1. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  2. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin

  3. Femtosecond diode-pumped mode-locked neodymium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubeček, Václav; Jelínek, Michal; Čech, Miroslav; Vyhlídal, David; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Qian, Xiaobo; Wang, Jingya; Xu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride-type crystals (CaF2, SrF2) doped with neodymium Nd3+ and codoped with buffer ions for breaking clusters of active ions and increasing fluorescence efficiency, present interesting alternative as laser active media for the diode-pumped mode-locked lasers. In comparison with widely used materials as Nd:YAG or Nd:YVO4, they have broad emission spectra as well as longer fluorescence lifetime, in comparison with Nd:glass, SrF2 and CaF2 have better thermal conductivity. In spite of the fact, that this thermal conductivity decreases with Nd3+ doping concentration, these crystals are alternative for the Nd:glass in subpicosecond mode-locked laser systems. In this paper we review the basic results reported recently on these active materials and in the second part we present our results achieved in low power diode pumped passively mode locked lasers with Nd,La:CaF2 and Nd,Y:SrF2 crystals. The pulses as short as 258 fs at wavelength of 1057 nm were obtained in the first case, while 5 ps long pulses at 1065 nm were generated from the second laser system.

  4. Dielectric and impedance spectroscopic studies of neodymium gallate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhya, Anup Pradhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    The AC electrical properties of a polycrystalline neodymium gallate, NdGaO3 (NGO), synthesized by the sol-gel method have been investigated by employing impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range from 323 K to 593 K. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic phase with Pbnm space group at room temperature. Two relaxation processes with different relaxation times are observed from the impedance as well as modulus spectroscopic measurements, which have been attributed to the grain and the grain boundary effects at different temperatures in NGO. The complex impedance data are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistance and a constant phase element in parallel. It has been observed that the value of the capacitance and the resistance associated with the grain boundary is higher than those associated with the grain. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity shows the negative temperature coefficient of resistance. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to follow the power law.

  5. Early tissue response to transscleral neodymium: YAG cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Blasini, M; Simmons, R; Shields, M B

    1990-06-01

    Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation was performed with a neodymium: YAG laser on five patients 24-72 hr before enucleation for a blind, painful eye. The thermal mode at 20 ms and a maximum offset between aiming and therapeutic beams were kept constant. Variable parameters evaluated were energy levels between 2 and 8 J and distance from the limbus of 0.5-3.0 mm. Because of the underlying distortion in three of the eyes, meaningful interpretation by light microscopic evaluation was possible only in the other two. This suggested that the early histologic hallmark of the procedure is similar to that previously observed in human autopsy eyes with ciliary epithelial damage and elevation from underlying tissue. In addition, fibrin and scant inflammatory cells were seen in the space between ciliary epithelium and stroma. Minimal damage was observed in the ciliary muscle. These findings suggest that direct damage to the ciliary epithelium is the most likely mechanism of reduced aqueous production by this cyclodestructive procedure. The findings also support the concept that an anterior placement of approximately 1.0-1.5 mm posterior to the limbus is most likely to damage the ciliary epithelium of the pars plicata.

  6. Defluoridation of water using neodymium-modified chitosan.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ruihua; Meng, Fanping; Zhang, Longjun; Ma, Dongdong; Wang, Mingli

    2009-06-15

    The water containing high fluoride ions could do harm to human and environment. In this work, the applicability of neodymium-modified chitosan as adsorbents for the removal of excess fluoride ions from water was studied. The effect of various physico-chemical parameters such as temperature (283-323 K), pH (5-9), adsorbent dose (0.2-2.0 g L(-1)), particle size (0.10-0.50mm) and the presence of co-anions (NO(3)(-), Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-)) on removal of fluoride ions were studied. The equilibrium sorption data were fitted reasonably well for Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum equilibrium sorption had found to be 11.411-22.380 mg g(-1). Sorption dynamics study revealed that the pseudo-second-order was suitable to describe the kinetics process of fluoride ions sorption onto the adsorbent with the initial sorption rate 1.70, 2.10 and 2.67 mg g(-1)min(-1) at 283, 303 and 323 K, and the sorption process was complex, both the boundary of liquid film and intra-particle diffusion contributed to the rate-determining step. The used adsorbents could be regenerated in 24h by 4 g L(-1) of sodium hydroxide.

  7. Effect Of Neodymium Substitution In Structural Characteristics Of Magnesium Ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Thankachan, Smitha; Binu, P. J.; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M.

    2011-10-20

    The effect of Nd{sup 3+} substitution on the structural properties of Magnesium ferrite was studied in the series MgNd{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4}, where x = 0 to 0.3 in steps of 0.05. The series was prepared by sol-gel technique which is one of the novel technique to prepare nanosized samples. Structural characterization was done using X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. XRD analysis reveals the prepared samples are single phasic till x = 0.2. From x0 = .25, a secondary phase of iron neodymium oxide appears along with the spinel phase. Particle size calculation shows the prepared samples are in the 9nm to 11 nm regime. Lattice parameter was found to increase with concentration of Nd. XRD and FTIR analysis confirmed spinel structure of the prepared samples. XRF result shows the expected composition of prepared samples. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant in the range 100 Hz--120MHz was also studied

  8. Dielectric properties of neodymium-modified PLZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płońska, M.; Adamczyk, M.

    2015-08-01

    Relaxor ferroelectrics or relaxors are a class of disordered single crystals and ceramic materials, of peculiar structure as well as properties. The commonly known examples of such materials are Pb(Mg,Nb)O3 (PMN) ceramics as well as single crystals. The second most extensively studied relaxor ceramics is lanthanum-doped lead zirconate-titanate, described as x/65/35 PLZT when lanthanum content is x = 6-10 at%. Throughout the last few decades, there has been an increasing interest in rare-earth-doped PLZT ceramics, because PLZT can be easily substituted with lanthanide elements for La3+ ions. For this reason, the present studies concern the changes in microstructure and crystal structure as well as in dielectric properties, caused by modification of 8/65/35 PLZT with neodymium dopant. Modification of this material with Nd3+ influences the microstructure, electrooptical and dielectric properties, whereas the changes in crystal structure are slight. It was also observed that the maximum value of dielectric properties decreases and moves to a low temperature. Described changes in physical properties are associated with the significant improvement of relaxor properties, characteristic for pure 8/65/35 PLZT ceramics.

  9. Transendoscopic neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation in horses.

    PubMed

    Tate, L P; Sweeney, C L; Cullen, J M; Corbett, W T; Newman, H C; Brown, T C; Ketner, M T

    1989-05-01

    A neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to study effects of applying laser irradiation transendoscopically to the corniculate process of the arytenoid cartilage in horses. Dosimetry was established initially in vitro in 10 corniculate cartilages that were irradiated and examined histologically to determine penetration depths at selected power settings. Eleven horses were given xylazine IV and butorphoral tartrate IV, and their left ventricle and corniculate process were irradiated. Six horses had left laryngeal hemiplegia and were euthanatized and necropsied 14 weeks after laser application and evaluation for upper airway stridor. Endoscopy was performed in the 5 other horses; they were euthanatized and necropsied at selected intervals to characterize the healing process. Healing was by second intention and was complete at 14 weeks. Two horses developed buds of granulation tissue along the laser incision, which resolved after a second laser application. Scar tissue formation resulted in left of midline displacement of the dorsal portion of the right corniculate process. The left ventricle healed without complications and was totally ablated. All horses had inspiratory stridor when exercised 14 weeks after laser irradiation.

  10. Power neodymium-glass amplifier of a repetitively pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Aleksandr V.; Gaganov, V. E.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Krotov, V. A.; Martynenko, S. P.; Pozdnyakov, E. V.; Solomatin, I. I.

    2011-11-01

    A neodymium-glass diode-pumped amplifier with a zigzag laser beam propagation through the active medium was elaborated; the amplifier is intended for operation in a repetitively pulsed laser. An amplifier unit with an aperture of 20 × 25 mm and a ~40-cm long active medium was put to a test. The energy of pump radiation amounts to 140 J at a wavelength of 806 nm for a pump duration of 550 μs. The energy parameters of the amplifier were experimentally determined: the small-signal gain per pass ~3.2, the linear gain ~0.031 cm-1 with a nonuniformity of its distribution over the aperture within 15%, the stored energy of 0.16 — 0.21 J cm-3. The wavefront distortions in the zigzag laser-beam propagation through the active element of the amplifier did not exceed 0.4λ (λ = 0.63 μm is the probing radiation wavelength).

  11. Phase equilibria in the neodymium-cadmium binary system.

    PubMed

    Skołyszewska-Kühberger, Barbara; Reichmann, Thomas L; Ipser, Herbert

    2014-09-05

    The equilibrium phase diagram of the neodymium-cadmium system has been established by thermal, metallographic and X-ray analysis based on a study of 70 alloys. The system contains three congruently melting intermetallic compounds, i.e. NdCd (1040 °C), NdCd2 (995 °C), Nd11Cd45 (855 °C), and four incongruently melting compounds NdCd3 (860 °C), Nd13Cd58 (740 °C), NdCd6 (655 °C) and NdCd11 (520 °C). Four eutectic reactions are found in this binary system, i.e. at ∼25 at.% Cd and 770 °C, at 58 at.% Cd and 955 °C, at 79 at.% Cd and 850 °C, and very close to pure Cd at 318 °C, as well as one eutectoid reaction at ∼15 at.% Cd and 500 °C. The solid solubility of Nd in Cd is negligible. Dilatometric curves were recorded for three Nd-Cd compositions up to 4 at.% Cd, to accurately determine phase transitions between the solid solutions of Cd in the low- and high-temperature modification of Nd.

  12. Laboratory and clinical experience with neodymium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1991, we have undertaken extensive laboratory and clinical studies of the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser for surgical treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Side-firing optical fibers which emit a divergent, relatively low energy density Nd:YAG laser beam produce coagulation necrosis of obstructing periurethral prostate tissue, followed by gradual dissolution and slough in the urinary stream. Laser-tissue interactions and Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for prostatectomy have been studied in canine and human prostate model systems, enhancing clinical application. Ongoing studies examine comparative Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for various beam configurations produced by available side-firing optical fibers and continue to refine operative technique. We have documented clinical outcomes of Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy in 230 consecutive patients treated with the UrolaseTM side-firing optical fiber. Nd:YAG laser coagulation the prostate produces a remarkably low acute morbidity profile, with no significant bleeding or fluid absorption. No postoperative incontinence has been produced. Serial assessments of voiding outcomes over more than 3 years of followup show objective and symptomatic improvement following Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy which is comparable to older but more morbid electrosurgical approaches. Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy is a safe, efficacious, durable and cost-effective treatment for BPH.

  13. Dielectric and impedance behavior of neodymium substituted strontium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Bilal Hamid; Samad, Rubiya; Want, Basharat

    2016-09-01

    In this study, dielectric behavior and complex impedance of neodymium (Nd) substituted strontium hexaferrite system: Sr1- x Nd x Fe12O19 ( x = 0.0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0. 20), synthesized by citrate precursor technique, have been evaluated as a function of applied frequency and temperature. Variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss with frequency shows the identical behavior for all the compositions. The value of dielectric constant increases with Nd doping. Relaxation process is observed in the composition x = 0.20, and the peaks in this composition shift toward the higher-frequency region as the temperature increases. The dielectric constants show temperature-independent behavior at low temperature, whereas at higher temperatures it increases for all the frequencies. The AC conductivity follows Jonscher's power law, showing that conduction mechanism is due to polaron hopping. Complex impedance as a function of composition and temperature is used to examine the role of grain and grain boundary in the prepared material. Cole-cole plot shows only one semicircle up to x = 0.15, while as for x = 0.20 two semicircles are observed. The conduction mechanism is explained on the basis of both grain and grain boundary.

  14. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.; Odinek, Judy G.

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  15. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  16. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  17. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  18. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  19. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  2. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  6. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  12. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  15. Electrolytic production of neodymium without perfluorinated carbon compounds on the offgases

    DOEpatents

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K.T.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for producing neodymium in an electrolytic cell without formation of perfluorinated carbon gases (PFCs), the method comprising the steps of providing an electrolyte in the electrolytic cell and providing an anode in an anode region of the electrolyte and providing a cathode in a cathode region of the electrolytic cell. Dissolving an oxygen-containing neodymium compound in the electrolyte in the anode region and maintaining a more intense electrolyte circulation in the anode region than in the cathode region. Passing an electrolytic current between said anode and said cathode and depositing neodymium metal at the cathode, preventing the formation of perfluorinated carbon gases by limiting anode over voltage. 4 figs.

  16. Lanthanum and neodymium solubility in simplified SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO high level waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kidari, Abdessamad; Bardez-Giboire, Isabelle

    2012-08-15

    Lanthanum and neodymium incorporation in simplified high level waste glasses has been investigated for SiO{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 3}Na{sub 2}OAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}CaO compositions quenched from 1200 degrees C, for varying La /(La + Nd) (atomic) and increasing rare-earth oxides contents. In this system and beyond the solubility limit, rare-earths (RE) elements are reported to form apatite phases with the general formula Ca{sub 2}RE{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}. In the current study, speciation of these trivalent RE{sup 3+} cations in both amorphous network and crystal phases was determined from X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption at 10 K, Raman spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. It appeared that RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility was higher for La -rich formulations than for Nd -rich ones and that an increase in the RE oxide content reduces the connectivity of the network building units through formation of non-bridging oxygens at the expense of the oxygen bridges. This depolymerization of the glass network did not affect neodymium environment which consisted in silicate tetrahedra. The composition of the apatite crystals was found to be affected by the La /(La + Nd) of the parent glass and deviation from the ideal composition (Ca{sub 2}RE{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}) occurred in the neodymium end of the system. It thus appears that both RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility and crystal composition are strongly dependent on the type and crystal chemistry of the RE elements. (authors)

  17. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in sedimentary organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freslon, Nicolas; Bayon, Germain; Toucanne, Samuel; Bermell, Sylvain; Bollinger, Claire; Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Germain, Yoan; Khripounoff, Alexis; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Rouget, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    We report rare earth element (REE) and neodymium (Nd) isotope data for the organic fraction of sediments collected from various depositional environments, i.e. rivers (n = 25), estuaries (n = 18), open-ocean settings (n = 15), and cold seeps (n = 12). Sedimentary organic matter (SOM) was extracted using a mixed hydrogen peroxide/nitric acid solution (20%-H2O2-0.02 M-HNO3), after removal of carbonate and oxy-hydroxide phases with dilute hydrochloric acid (0.25 M-HCl). A series of experimental tests indicate that extraction of sedimentary organic compounds using H2O2 may be complicated occasionally by partial dissolution of sulphide minerals and residual carbonates. However, this contamination is expected to be minor for REE because measured concentrations in H2O2 leachates are about two-orders of magnitude higher than in the above mentioned phases. The mean REE concentrations determined in the H2O2 leachates for samples from rivers, estuaries, coastal seas and open-ocean settings yield relatively similar levels, with ΣREE = 109 ± 86 ppm (mean ± s; n = 58). The organic fractions leached from cold seep sediments display even higher concentration levels (285 ± 150 ppm; mean ± s; n = 12). The H2O2 leachates for most sediments exhibit remarkably similar shale-normalized REE patterns, all characterized by a mid-REE enrichment compared to the other REE. This suggests that the distribution of REE in leached sedimentary organic phases is controlled primarily by biogeochemical processes, rather than by the composition of the source from which they derive (e.g. pore, river or sea-water). The Nd isotopic compositions for organic phases leached from river sediments are very similar to those for the corresponding detrital fractions. In contrast, the SOM extracted from marine sediments display εNd values that typically range between the εNd signatures for terrestrial organic matter (inferred from the analysis of the sedimentary detrital fractions) and marine organic matter

  18. Recent Progress in the Development of Neodymium Doped Ceramic Yttria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Edwards, Chris; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan; Wang, Chen-Chia; Kim, Joo-Soo; Hommerich, Uwe; Shukla, Vijay; Sadangi, Rajendra; Kear, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state lasers play a significant role in providing the technology necessary for active remote sensing of the atmosphere. Neodymium doped yttria (Nd:Y2O3) is considered to be an attractive material due to its possible lasing wavelengths of aprrox.914 nm and approx.946 nm for ozone profiling. These wavelengths when frequency tripled can generate UV light at approx.305 nm and approx.315 nm, which is particularly useful for ozone sensing using differential absorption lidar technique. For practical realization of space based UV transmitter technology, ceramic Nd:Y2O3 material is considered to possess great potential. A plasma melting and quenching method has been developed to produce Nd3+ doped powders for consolidation into Nd:Y2O3 ceramic laser materials. This far-from-equilibrium processing methodology allows higher levels of rare earth doping than can be achieved by equilibrium methods. The method comprises of two main steps: (a) plasma melting and quenching to generate dense, and homogeneous doped metastable powders, (b) pressure assisted consolidation of these powders by hot isostatic pressing to make dense nanocomposite ceramics. Using this process, several 1" x 1" ceramic cylinders have been produced. The infrared transmission of undoped Y2O3 ceramics was as high as approx.75% without anti-reflection coating. In the case of Nd:Y2O3 ceramics infrared transmission values of approx.50% were achieved. Furthermore, Nd:Y2O3 samples with dopant concentrations of up to approx.2 at. % were prepared without significant emission quenching.

  19. Preparation of yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium basic carbonate particles by homogeneous precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Akinc, M.; Sordelet, D. )

    1987-07-01

    Uniform yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium basic carbonate particles were prepared by homogeneous precipitation. Powders were characterized with respect to size, shape, crystal structure, and thermal decomposition behavior. Yttria precursor particles were spherical, monosized (0.4 {mu}m), and amorphous; whereas lanthana, neodymia, and ceria precursors were prismatic (ranging from 1 to 6 {mu}m in size) and crystalline. Crystal structure was found to be ancylite-type orthorhombic symmetry in all three cases. Upon heating in air, yttrium, lanthanum, and neodymium precursors underwent two-step decomposition to first form oxycarbonate and then oxide. Cerium hydroxycarbonate decomposed in a single step to form the oxide.

  20. Synthesis of neodymium hydroxide nanotubes and nanorods by soft chemical process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weidong; Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Haishui; Yang, Jianhui; Zhang, Hongjie

    2006-08-01

    A facile soft chemical approach using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as template is successfully designed for synthesis of neodymium hydroxide nanotubes. These nanotubes have an average outer diameter around 20 nm, inner diameter around 2 nm, and length ranging from 100 to 120 nm, high BET surface area of 495.71 m(2) g(-1). We also find that neodymium hydroxide nanorods would be obtained when CTAB absented in reaction system. The Nd(OH)3 nanorods might act as precursors that are converted into Nd2O3 nanorods through dehydration at 550 degrees C. The nanorods could exhibit upconversion emission characteristic under excitation of 591 nm at room temperature.

  1. Samarium-neodymium systematics in kimberlites and in the minerals of garnet lherzolite inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1979-01-01

    The initial ratios of neodymium-143 to neodymium-144 in kimberlites ranging in age between 90 ?? 106 to 1300 ?? 106 years from South Africa, India, and the United States are different from the corresponding ratios in the minerals of peridotite inclusions in the kimberlites but are identical to the ratios in the basaltic achondrite Juvinas at the times of emplacement of the respective kimberlite pipes. This correlation between the kimberlites and Juvinas, which represents the bulk chondritic earth in rare-earth elements, strongly indicates that the kimberlite's source in the mantle is chondritic in rare-earth elements and relatively primeval in composition. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  2. Samarium-neodymium systematics in kimberlites and in the minerals of garnet lherzolite inclusions.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Tatsumoto, M

    1979-07-27

    The initial ratios of neodymium-143 to neodymium-144 in kimberlites ranging in age between 90 x 10(6) to 1300 x 10(6) years from South Africa, India, and the United States are different from the corresponding ratios in the minerals of peridotite inclusions in the kimberlites but are identical to the ratios in the basaltic achondrite Juvinas at the times of emplacement of the respective kimberlite pipes. This correlation between the kimberlites and Juvinas, which represents the bulk chondritic earth in rare-earth elements, strongly indicates that the kimberlite's source in the mantle is chondritic in rare-earth elements and relatively primeval in composition.

  3. Cometary Silicates: Interstellar and Nebular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    Evidence for interstellar material in comets is deduced from IR spectra, insitu measurements of Halley, and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs). IR spectra of comets reveal the spectrally active minerals: amorphous carbon, amorphous silicates, and (in some comets) crystalline silicates. Evidence suggests amorphous silicates are of interstellar origin while crystalline silicates are of nebular origin. 10 microns spectra of comets and submicron amorphous silicate spherules in CP IDPs have shapes similar to lines-of-sight through the ISM. Thermal emission models of cometary IR spectra require Fe-bearing amorphous silicates. Fe-bearing amorphous silicates may be Fe-bearing crystalline silicates formed in AGB outflows that are amorphized through He+ ion bombardment in supernova shocks in the ISM. Crystalline silicates in comets, as revealed by IR spectra, and their apparent absence in the ISM, argues for their nebular origin. The high temperatures (less than l000 K) at which crystals form or are annealed occur in the inner nebula or in nebular shocks in the 5-10 AU region. Oxygen isotope studies of CP IDPs show by mass only 1 % of the silicate crystals are of AGB origin. Together this suggests crystalline silicates in comets are probably primitive grains from the early solar nebula.

  4. Variability of neodymium isotopes associated with planktonic foraminifera in the Pacific Ocean during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Bostock, Helen C.; Crowhurst, Simon; Rennie, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The deep Pacific Ocean holds the largest oceanic reservoir of carbon which may interchange with the atmosphere on climatologically important timescales. The circulation of the deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), however, is not well understood. Neodymium (Nd) isotopes of ferromanganese oxide coatings precipitated on planktonic foraminifera are a valuable proxy for deep ocean water mass reconstruction in paleoceanography. In this study, we present Nd isotope compositions (εNd) of planktonic foraminifera for the Holocene and the LGM obtained from 55 new sites widely distributed in the Pacific Ocean. The Holocene planktonic foraminiferal εNd results agree with the proximal seawater data, indicating that they provide a reliable record of modern bottom water Nd isotopes in the deep Pacific. There is a good correlation between foraminiferal εNd and seawater phosphate concentrations (R2 = 0.80), but poorer correlation with silicate (R2 = 0.37). Our interpretation is that the radiogenic Nd isotope is added to the deep open Pacific through particle release from the upper ocean during deep water mass advection and aging. The data thus also imply the Nd isotopes in the Pacific are not likely to be controlled by silicate cycling. In the North Pacific, the glacial Nd isotopic compositions are similar to the Holocene values, indicating that the Nd isotope composition of North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) remained constant (-3.5 to -4). During the LGM, the southwest Pacific cores throughout the water column show higher εNd corroborating previous studies which suggested a reduced inflow of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Pacific. However, the western equatorial Pacific deep water does not record a corresponding radiogenic excursion, implying reduced radiogenic boundary inputs during the LGM probably due to a shorter duration of seawater-particle interaction in a stronger glacial deep boundary current. A significant negative glacial εNd excursion is evident in

  5. Surface characterization of silicate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Cerruti, Marta

    2012-03-28

    The success of an implanted prosthetic material is determined by the early events occurring at the interface between the material and the body. These events depend on many surface properties, with the main ones including the surface's composition, porosity, roughness, topography, charge, functional groups and exposed area. This review will portray how our understanding of the surface reactivity of silicate bioceramics has emerged and evolved in the past four decades, owing to the adoption of many complementary surface characterization tools. The review is organized in sections dedicated to a specific surface property, each describing how the property influences the body's response to the material, and the tools that have been adopted to analyse it. The final section introduces the techniques that have yet to be applied extensively to silicate bioceramics, and the information that they could provide.

  6. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  7. Sulfide in the core and the composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition of the Earth is traditionally explained in terms of evolution from a solar-like composition, similar to that found in primitive 'chondritic' meteorites. It now appears, however, that the silicate Earth is not 'chondritic', but depleted in incompatible elements, including refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements. Either Earth lost material during planet-building due to collisional erosion or else internal differentiation processes produced a hidden reservoir deep in the early Earth. Sulfide in the core may provide a reservoir capable of balancing the composition of the silicate Earth. Recent experimental work suggests that the core contains a significant proportion of sulfide, added during the final stages of accretion and new data suggests that at high pressures sulfide can incorporate a substantial amount of refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements [1]. Pioneering work using the short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system strongly suggests that Earth's silicate mantle is non-chondritic [e.g. 2]. The drawback of such radiogenic isotope systems is that it is not possible to distinguish the fractionation of Sm/Nd that occurs during silicate melting from that occurring during the segregation of a sulfide-melt to form the core. Neodymium stable isotopes have the potential to provide just such a tracer of sulfide segregation, because there is a significant contrast in bonding environment between sulfide and silicate, where heavy isotopes should be preferentially incorporated into high force-constant bonds involving REE3+ (i.e. the silicate mantle). Preliminary data indicate that mantle rocks do indeed possess heavier 146Nd/144Nd values than chondritic meteorites, consistent with the removal of light Nd into sulfide in the core, driving the residual mantle to heavy values. Overall, our isotope and elemental data indicate that the rare earths and other incompatible elements are substantially incorporated into sulfide. While Nd Stable isotope

  8. Neodymium-rich precipitate phases in a high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Shang, Zhongxia

    2016-05-01

    Neodymium being considered as nitride forming element has been used in a design of advanced ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels for fossil fired power plants at service temperatures of 630 °C to 650 °C to effectively improve the creep strength of the steels. To fully understand the characteristics of neodymium precipitates in high-Cr FM steels, precipitate phases in an 11Cr FM steel with 0.03 wt% addition of Nd have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Three neodymium phases with a face-centered cubic crystal structure and different composition were observed in the steel. They consisted of neodymium carbonitride with an average lattice parameter of 1.0836 nm, Nd-rich carbonitride mainly containing Mn, and Nd-rich MN nitride mainly containing Mn and Co. Other three Nd-rich and Nd-containing phases, which appear to be Nd-Co-Cr/Nd-rich intermetallic compounds and Cr-Fe-rich nitride containing Nd, were also detected in the steel. Nd-relevant precipitates were found to be minor phases compared with M23C6 and Nb/V/Ta-rich MX phases in the steel. The content of Nd in other precipitate phases was very low. Most of added Nd is considered to be present as solid solution in the matrix of the steel.

  9. Demonstrating and Measuring Relative Molar Magnetic Susceptibility Using a Neodymium Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malerich, Charles; Ruff, Patricia K.; Bird, Aubrey

    2004-01-01

    An easy-to-see method for demonstrating and measuring the magnetic force between paramagnetic substance and a rare earth magnet is presented. The readily available trapezoid-shaped neodymium magnet and a low cost, easy-to-set-up, portable apparatus are used in the experiments.

  10. Neodymium as the main feature of permanent magnets from hard disk drives (HDDs).

    PubMed

    München, Daniel Dotto; Veit, Hugo Marcelo

    2017-03-01

    As a way to manage neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets wasted in end-of-life hard disk drives (HDDs), a waste characterization is needed prior to a recycling process. Due to their magnetic properties, NdFeB magnets are essential in technological applications nowadays, thus causing an increase in the industrial demand for rare earth metals. However, these metals have a short supply, since they are difficult to obtain from ores, creating a critical market. In this work, a study of the characterization of sintered neodymium-iron-boron magnets was undertaken by qualitatively and quantitatively uncovering the neodymium recovery potential from this type of electronic waste. From the collection and disassembly of hard disk drives, in which the magnet represents less than 3% of the total weight, an efficient demagnetization process was proceeded at 320°C. Then, the magnet was ground and screened for an X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, which showed the Nd2Fe14B tetragonal phase as the dominant constituent of the sample. An analysis was also carried out in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), where the magnet composition showed 21.5wt% of neodymium and 65.1wt% of iron, among other chemicals. This Nd content is higher than the one found in Nd ores, enhancing the recyclability and the importance of waste management.

  11. Neodymium YAG lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of neodymium yag lasers are discussed in approximately 267 citations. Laser materials and outputs, laser mode locking; crystal, fiber, and nonlinear optics, optical pumping communications, energy conversion efficiency, and laser applications are covered. Pulsed, continuous wave, solid state, Q switched, infrared, and dye lasers are included.

  12. Neodymium and hafnium boundary contributions to seawater along the West Antarctic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickli, Jörg; Gutjahr, Marcus; Vance, Derek; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Neodymium and hafnium isotopes and elemental concentrations (Sm, Nd, Hf, Zr) have been measured in three water column profiles south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in, and to the east of the Ross Sea, in conjunction with five bottom water samples from the Amundsen Sea Embayment.

  13. Neodymium YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) lasers. (Latest citations from the Inspec database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the properties and applications of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers. Applications include welding, soldering of printed circuit boards, medical applications, telecommunication systems, rangefinding, and optical pumping of high powered lasers.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Mechanisms of magma generation beneath hawaii and mid-ocean ridges: uranium/thorium and samarium/neodymium isotopic evidence.

    PubMed

    Sims, K W; Depaolo, D J; Murrell, M T; Baldridge, W S; Goldstein, S J; Clague, D A

    1995-01-27

    Measurements of uranium/thorium and samarium/neodymium isotopes and concentrations in a suite of Hawaiian basalts show that uranium/thorium fractionation varies systematically with samarium/neodymium fractionation and major-element composition; these correlations can be understood in terms of simple batch melting models with a garnet-bearing peridotite magma source and melt fractions of 0.25 to 6.5 percent. Midocean ridge basalts shows a systematic but much different relation between uranium/thorium fractionation and samarium/neodymium fractionation, which, although broadly consistent with melting of a garnet-bearing peridotite source, requires a more complex melting model.

  15. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure.

  16. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  17. Silicate stabilization studies in propylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1999-08-01

    In most North American and many European coolant formulations, the corrosion inhibition of heat-rejecting aluminum surfaces is provided by alkali metal silicates. But, their tendency towards polymerization, leading to gelation and/or precipitation, can reduce the effectiveness of a coolant. This paper presents the results of experiments which illustrate formulation-dependent behavior of inorganic silicate in propylene glycol compositions. Specific examples of the effects of glycol matrix, stabilizer type, and hard water on silicate stabilization are provided.

  18. Tailoring polymer properties with layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang

    Polymer layered silicate nanocomposites have found widespread applications in areas such as plastics, oil and gas production, biomedical, automotive and information storage, but their successful commercialization critically depends on consistent control over issues such as complete dispersion of layered silicate into the host polymer and optimal interaction between the layered silicates and the polymers. Polypropylene is a commercially important polymer but usually forms intercalated structures with organically modified layered silicate upon mixing, even it is pre-treated with compatibilizing agent such as maleic anhydride. In this work, layered silicate is well dispersed in ammonium modified polypropylene but does not provide sufficient reinforcement to the host polymer due to poor interactions. On the other hand, interactions between maleic anhydride modified polypropylene and layered silicate are fine tuned by using a small amount of maleic anhydride and mechanical strength of the resultant nanocomposites are significantly enhanced. In particular, the melt rheological properties of layered silicate nanocomposites with maleic anhydride functionalized polypropylene are contrasted to those based on ammonium-terminated polypropylene. While the maleic anhydride treated polypropylene based nanocomposites exhibit solid-like linear dynamic behavior, consistent with the formation of a long-lived percolated nanoparticle network, the single-end ammonium functionalized polypropylene based nanocomposites demonstrated liquid-like behavior at comparable montmorillonite concentrations. The differences in the linear viscoelasticity are attributed to the presence of bridging interaction in maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites, which facilitates formation of a long-lived silicate network mediated by physisorbed polymer chains. Further, the transient shear stress of the maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites in start-up of steady shear is a function of the shear

  19. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  20. Preparation of transparent neodymium-doped yttrium aluminate garnet (Nd:YAG) ceramics with the use of freeze granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajler, Anna; Węglarz, Helena; Sidorowicz, Agata; Zych, Łukasz; Nakielska, Magdalena; Jach, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the application of freeze granulation to the production of transparent neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet ceramics. Aqueous suspensions of aluminium oxide, yttrium oxide and neodymium oxide powders were prepared based on nanometric or submicronic powders which were either commercially available or prepared by precipitation. The relations between the composition of suspension, the properties of granulate and the final properties of ceramics (microstructure, optical transmission and emission spectra) were studied.

  1. High Pressure Response of Siliceous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    quartz, Starphire soda lime silicate glass, hydrated Starphire, BOROFLOAT borosilicate glass, an iron-containing soda lime silicate glass, opal (a hydrated... Opal (hydrated amorphous silica). .............................................................................. 10 2.7. ROBAX glass ceramic...spectrum as a function of stress for BOROFLOAT borosilicate glass. .......... 29 4.8. Raman spectrum as a function of stress for opal (hydrated

  2. High Pressure Response of Siliceous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    iron-containing soda lime silicate glass, opal (a hydrated silicate glass), ROBAX glass ceramic, and others were single crystal (α-quartz) and...10 2.6. Opal (hydrated amorphous silica...Raman spectrum as a function of stress for opal (hydrated silica) glass. ................... 29 4.9. Raman spectrum as a function of stress for

  3. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium...

  4. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  5. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules. PMID:27873810

  6. Solar nebula heterogeneity in p-process samarium and neodymium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Rasmus; Sharma, Mukul

    2006-11-03

    Bulk carbonaceous chondrites display a deficit of approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) in 144Sm with respect to other meteorites and terrestrial standards, leading to a decrease in their 142Nd/144Nd ratios by approximately 11 ppm. The data require that samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by the p process associated with photodisintegration reactions in supernovae were heterogeneously distributed in the solar nebula. Other samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by rapid neutron capture (r process) in supernovae and by slow neutron capture (s process) in red giants were homogeneously distributed. The supernovae sources supplying the p- and r-process nuclides to the solar nebula were thus disconnected or only weakly connected.

  7. Neodymium-doped nanoparticles for infrared fluorescence bioimaging: The role of the host

    SciTech Connect

    Rosal, Blanca del; Pérez-Delgado, Alberto; Rocha, Ueslen; Martín Rodríguez, Emma; Jaque, Daniel; Misiak, Małgorzata; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Vanetsev, Alexander S.; Orlovskii, Yurii; Jovanović, Dragana J.; Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Upendra Kumar, K.; Jacinto, Carlos; Navarro, Elizabeth; and others

    2015-10-14

    The spectroscopic properties of different infrared-emitting neodymium-doped nanoparticles (LaF{sub 3}:Nd{sup 3+}, SrF{sub 2}:Nd{sup 3+}, NaGdF{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, NaYF{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, KYF{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, GdVO{sub 4}: Nd{sup 3+}, and Nd:YAG) have been systematically analyzed. A comparison of the spectral shapes of both emission and absorption spectra is presented, from which the relevant role played by the host matrix is evidenced. The lack of a “universal” optimum system for infrared bioimaging is discussed, as the specific bioimaging application and the experimental setup for infrared imaging determine the neodymium-doped nanoparticle to be preferentially used in each case.

  8. Photocatalytic treatment of municipal wastewater using modified neodymium doped TiO(2) hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradi, Behzad; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A; Sakamoto, Naonori; Ananda, Sannaiah; Somashekar, Rudrappa; Row, Tagur N Guru; Byrappa, Kullaiah

    2010-08-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of municipal wastewater was investigated using reagent grade TiO(2) and modified neodymium doped TiO(2) hybrid nanoparticles. For the first time, surface modification of Nd(3 +) doped TiO(2) hybrid nanoparticles were carried out with n-butylamine as surface modifier under mild hydrothermal conditions. The modified nanoparticles obtained were characterized by Powder XRD, FTIR, DLS, TEM, BET surface area, zeta potential and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated better morphology, particle size distribution and low agglomeration of the nanoparticles synthesized. It was found that photodegradation of wastewater using surface modified neodymium doped TiO(2) nanoparticles was more compared to pure TiO(2), which can be attributed to the doping and modification with n-butylamine.

  9. Determination of some heavy metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry before coprecipitation with neodymium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Kizil, Nebiye

    2011-01-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of trace amounts of Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Fe(III), Co(II), and Mn(II) that combines flame atomic absorption spectrometry with neodymium hydroxide coprecipitation. The influences of analytical parameters (amount of neodymium, pH of the model solutions, etc.) that affect quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions were investigated. The effects of concomitant ions were also examined. The detection limits for analytes were found in the range of 0.2-3.3 microg/L. The validation of the presented procedure was controlled by analysis of certified reference materials (National Institute of Standards and Technology 1570a spinach leaves and TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water). The applications of the procedure were performed by the analysis of water, food, and herbal plants from Turkey.

  10. Stabilization of neodymium oxide nanoparticles via soft adsorption of charged polymers.

    PubMed

    Dorris, Annie; Sicard, Clémence; Chen, Mark C; McDonald, Arthur B; Barrett, Christopher J

    2011-09-01

    In this work, two synthetic polyelectrolytes, PSS and PAH, are employed as strong adsorbed surfactants to disperse and stabilize neodymium oxide nanoparticles. The acid-base equilibria of the oxide surfaces of the particles were investigated under different pH conditions in the absence and presence of polyelectrolytes, to optimize particle stabilization through enhancement of the effective repulsive surface charges. Surface charge amplification of a 3:5 ratio was achieved to permit improved particle transparency of 100-fold in visible wavelengths in neutral and acidic pH regimes, and a stable 10-fold surface charge amplification was achieved under basic pH conditions. The potential of polyelectrolytes as stabilizing agents for neodymium oxide NPs in large-scale particle physics experiments requiring extremely high optical transparency over long path length is evaluated based on optical absorbance and particle stability.

  11. Lattice thermal expansion and solubility limits of neodymium-doped ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinhua; Ke, Changming; Wu, Hongdan; Yu, Jishun; Wang, Jingran

    2016-11-01

    NdxCe1-xO2-0.5x (x=0-1.0) powders were prepared by reverse coprecipitation-calcination method and characterized by XRD. The crystal structure of product powders transformed from single fluorite structure to the complex of fluorite and C-type cubic structure, and finally to trigonal structure with the increase of x-value. An empirical equation simulating the lattice parameter of neodymium doped ceria was established based on the experimental data. The lattice parameters of the fluorite structure solid solutions increased with extensive adoption of Nd3+, and the heating temperature going up. The average thermal expansion coefficients of neodymium doped ceria with fluorite structure are higher than 13.5×10-6 °C-1 from room temperature to 1200 °C.

  12. Neodymium-doped nanoparticles for infrared fluorescence bioimaging: The role of the host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Rosal, Blanca; Pérez-Delgado, Alberto; Misiak, Małgorzata; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Vanetsev, Alexander S.; Orlovskii, Yurii; Jovanović, Dragana J.; Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Rocha, Ueslen; Upendra Kumar, K.; Jacinto, Carlos; Navarro, Elizabeth; Martín Rodríguez, Emma; Pedroni, Marco; Speghini, Adolfo; Hirata, Gustavo A.; Martín, I. R.; Jaque, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The spectroscopic properties of different infrared-emitting neodymium-doped nanoparticles (LaF3:Nd3+, SrF2:Nd3+, NaGdF4: Nd3+, NaYF4: Nd3+, KYF4: Nd3+, GdVO4: Nd3+, and Nd:YAG) have been systematically analyzed. A comparison of the spectral shapes of both emission and absorption spectra is presented, from which the relevant role played by the host matrix is evidenced. The lack of a "universal" optimum system for infrared bioimaging is discussed, as the specific bioimaging application and the experimental setup for infrared imaging determine the neodymium-doped nanoparticle to be preferentially used in each case.

  13. Sol-Gel Synthesis and Characterization of Neodymium-Ion Doped Nanostructured Titania Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    ABSTRACT Nd doped TiO2 nanostructured thin films were prepared by sol - gel technique on quartz and Si substrates using TiCl 4 precursor. As-deposited...making TiO2 nanostructured thin films on quartz substrates via sol - gel method. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of preparation...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012201 TITLE: Sol - Gel Synthesis and Characterization of Neodymium-Ion

  14. Development of a novel neodymium compound for in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Aita, Kazuki; Temma, Takashi; Kuge, Yuji; Saji, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We developed a novel fluorescent probe that contains the neodymium(III) complex moiety and fluorescein moiety. This probe can emit long-lived near-infrared luminescence derived from a Nd ion through excitation of the fluorescein moiety with visible light (lambda(ex) = 488 nm, lambda(em) = 880 nm, lifetime = 2.3 micros). These results indicate the possibility of the probe as a candidate for in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging.

  15. Neodymium(III) Complexation by Amino-Carbohydrates via a Ligand-Controlled Hydrolysis Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Chen, Yongsheng; Fulton, John L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2011-07-28

    Chelation of neodymium-III Nd(III) by D-glucosamine (DGA) and chitosan was investigated in solution at near-physiological pH and ionic strength. This research demonstrates the first example of the lanthanide ion heteroleptic hydroxo-carbohydrate complex in solution. It was demonstrated that DGA and chitosan suppressed formation of polynuclear Nd(III) species at elevated pH.

  16. X-ray radiometric determination of lanthanides (praseodymium, neodymium, and samarium) in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichev, A. T.; Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2011-04-01

    A procedure of the modified energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence method (X-ray radiometric analysis using a 241Am radionuclide source) was developed for the identification of praseodymium, neodymium, and samarium. The procedure is based on the exclusion of the disturbing effect of barium and lanthanum on the lines of praseodymium and neodymium, as well as the effect of lanthanum and cerium on the lines of samarium. On the basis of the new method, data were obtained on the geochemistry of three lanthanides in soils of the northern taiga. Praseodymium and neodymium were detected by the X-ray radiometric method even in podzols depleted of heavy metals. The method can detect samarium at the levels of the soil clarke and higher. Positive samarium (or, wider, rare-earth) anomalies can be expected in the soils located not far from the deposits of apatite-nephelines, loparites, and phosphorites and in the soils developed on alkaline granites and carbonate weathering crusts.

  17. Powerful neodymium laser radiation for the treatment of facial carcinoma: 5 year follow-up data.

    PubMed

    Moskalik, Konstantin; Kozlow, Alexander; Demin, Eugeny; Boiko, Ernest

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective non-comparative follow-up study was performed to evaluate the curative efficacy of powerful neodymium laser radiation (λ = 1,060 nm) for the treatment of 2,837 patients with 3,001 histologically confirmed facial skin carcinoma lesions of stages T1-2N0M0: 2,743 primary basal cell carcinomas (BCC), 172 recurrent limited basal cell carcinomas (RLBCC), and 86 primary squamous cells carcinomas (SCC). All patients were followed-up from 5 to 11 years (mean: 8.2 years; median: 7.0 years) after treatment. The overall recurrence rate (RR) after treatment with laser radiation of facial carcinomas was 2.5% of all irradiated tumours (mean: 13.4 months; median: 11.0 months). Patients with BCC treated by radiation with the pulsed Neodymium (Nd) laser developed RR in 2.2% of cases and patients treated with the Nd:YAG laser had RR of 3.1%. Recurrences following treatment for RLBCC, and those of SCC, after irradiation with the Nd laser appeared in 4.1% and 4.6% of patients, respectively. Neodymium laser radiation is a safe and effective means of treating facial carcinomas of stages T1-2N0M0 with good cosmetic results.

  18. Stability of the complexes of some lanthanides with coumarin derivatives. II. Neodymium(III)-acenocoumarol.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Manolov, Ilia; Radulova, Maritza

    2004-06-01

    A complex of neodymium(III) with 4-hydroxy-3[1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3-oxobutyl]-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one (acenocoumarol) was synthesized by mixing water solutions of neodymium(III) nitrate and the ligand (metal to ligand molar ratio of 1:3). The complex was characterized and identified by elemental analysis, conductivity, IR, 1H NMR and mass spectral data. DTA and TGA were applied to study the composition of the compound. Elemental and mass spectral analysis of the complex indicated the formation of a compound of the composition NdR3 x 6H2O, where R = C19H14NO6-) The reaction of neodymium(III) with acenocoumarol was studied in detail by the spectrophotometric method. The stepwise formation of three complexes, vis., NdR2+, NdR2+ and NdR3 was established in the pH region studied (pH 3.0-7.5). The equilibrium constants for 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 complexes were determined to be log K1 = 6.20 +/- 0.06; log K2 = 3.46 +/- 0.07 and log K2) = 2.58 +/- 0.05, respectively.

  19. Subtissue thermal sensing based on neodymium-doped LaF₃ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Uéslen; Jacinto da Silva, Carlos; Ferreira Silva, Wagner; Guedes, Ilde; Benayas, Antonio; Martínez Maestro, Laura; Acosta Elias, Mónica; Bovero, Enrico; van Veggel, Frank C J M; García Solé, José Antonio; Jaque, Daniel

    2013-02-26

    In this work, we report the multifunctional character of neodymium-doped LaF₃ core/shell nanoparticles. Because of the spectral overlap of the neodymium emission bands with the transparency windows of human tissues, these nanoparticles emerge as relevant subtissue optical probes. For neodymium contents optimizing the luminescence brightness of Nd³⁺:LaF₃ nanoparticles, subtissue penetration depths of several millimeters have been demonstrated. At the same time, it has been found that the infrared emission bands of Nd³⁺:LaF₃ nanoparticles show a remarkable thermal sensitivity, so that they can be advantageously used as luminescent nanothermometers for subtissue thermal sensing. This possibility has been demonstrated in this work: Nd³⁺:LaF₃ nanoparticles have been used to provide optical control over subtissue temperature in a single-beam plasmonic-mediated heating experiment. In this experiment, gold nanorods are used as nanoheaters while thermal reading is performed by the Nd³⁺:LaF₃ nanoparticles. The possibility of a real single-beam-controlled subtissue hyperthermia process is, therefore, pointed out.

  20. Separation of samarium and neodymium: a prerequisite for getting signals from nuclear synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maji, Samir; Lahiri, Susanta; Wierczinski, Birgit; Korschinek, Gunther

    2006-12-01

    (146)Sm (T(1/2) = 10(8) y) is a long-lived radionuclide which has been produced in significant amounts during burning in a supernova (SN). Detection of this SN produced long-lived radionuclide on Earth may be helpful for getting information on nuclear synthesis at the time of our solar system's formation. Only accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) can determine such minute traces of (146)Sm still expected in the Earth's crust. However, the villain of (146)Sm measurement through AMS is its naturally occurring stable isobar (146)Nd which is a million times more abundant than the trace amount of (146)Sm. Therefore an efficient method for the separation of samarium and neodymium is required to measure (146)Sm through AMS. A simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) based method for separation of samarium and neodymium has been developed using radiometric simulation. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) has been used as the organic reagent. A very high separation factor ( approximately 10(6)) can be achieved when a solution containing samarium and neodymium is reduced by hydroxylamine hydrochloride followed by extraction with 0.1% HDEHP diluted in cyclohexane from 0.025 M HCl solution.

  1. Neodymium isotopic composition and concentration in the western North Atlantic Ocean: Results from the GEOTRACES GA02 section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Myriam; van de Flierdt, Tina; Crocket, Kirsty; Rehkämper, Mark; Kreissig, Katharina; Coles, Barry; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Steinfeldt, Reiner

    2016-03-01

    The neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition of seawater is commonly used as a proxy to study past changes in the thermohaline circulation. The modern database for such reconstructions is however poor and the understanding of the underlying processes is incomplete. Here we present new observational data for Nd isotopes and concentrations from twelve seawater depth profiles, which follow the flow path of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) from its formation region in the North Atlantic to the northern equatorial Atlantic. Samples were collected during two cruises constituting the northern part of the Dutch GEOTRACES transect GA02 in 2010. The results show that the different water masses in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean, which ultimately constitute NADW, have the following Nd isotope characteristics: Upper Labrador Sea Water (ULSW), εNd = -14.2 ± 0.3; Labrador Sea Water (LSW), εNd = -13.7 ± 0.9; Northeast Atlantic Deep Water (NEADW), εNd = -12.5 ± 0.6; Northwest Atlantic Bottom Water (NWABW), εNd = -11.8 ± 1.4. In the subtropics, where these source water masses have mixed to form NADW, which is exported to the global ocean, upper-NADW is characterised by εNd values of -13.2 ± 1.0 (2sd) and lower-NADW exhibits values of εNd = -12.4 ± 0.4 (2sd). While both signatures overlap within error, the signature for lower-NADW is significantly more radiogenic than the traditionally used value for NADW (εNd = -13.5) due to the dominance of source waters from the Nordic Seas (NWABW and NEADW). Comparison between the concentration profiles and the corresponding Nd isotope profiles with other water mass properties such as salinity, silicate concentrations, neutral densities and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentration provides novel insights into the geochemical cycle of Nd and reveals that different processes are necessary to account for the observed Nd characteristics in the subpolar and subtropical gyres and throughout the vertical water column. While our data set

  2. Cytotoxic activity of new neodymium (III) complexes of bis-coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Manolov, Ilia; Momekov, Georgi

    2004-09-01

    Complexes of neodymium (III) with bis-coumarins: 3,3'-benzylidene-bis(4-hydroxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one); bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-piridin-2-yl-methane; bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-piridin-4-yl-methane; bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-methane were synthesized by reaction of neodymium (III) salt and the ligands, in amounts equal to metal:ligand molar ratio of 1:2. The complexes were prepared by adding an aqueous solution of neodymium (III) salt to an aqueous solution of the ligand subsequently raising the pH of the mixture gradually to ca. 5.0 by adding dilute solution of sodium hydroxide. The neodymium (III) complexes with bis-coumarins were characterized by different physicochemical methods-elemental analysis, IR-, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR-spectroscopies and mass-spectral data. The spectral data of neodymium (III) complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectra of the free ligands. This analysis showed that in the Nd (III) complexes the ligands coordinated to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups. On the basis of the nu(C=O) red shift observed, participation of the carbonyl groups in the coordination to the metal ion was also suggested. Cytotoxic screening by MTT assay was carried out. The complexes were tested on HL-60, HL-60/Dox and SKW-3 cell lines. The overall results from the preliminary screening program revealed that all of the new Nd (III) complexes reach 50% inhibition of the malignant cells proliferation and thus could be considered as biologically active. On the basis of the IC(50) values obtained compounds Nd(L(1))(OH).H(2)O and Nd(L(3))(OH).2H(2)O were found to exert superior activity in comparison to the remaining complexes.

  3. Laser processing of siliceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzner, Michael; Lenk, Andreas; Wiedemann, Guenter R.; Hauptmann, Jan; Weiss, Hans J.; Ruemenapp, Thomas; Morgenthal, Lothar; Beyer, Eckhard

    2000-08-01

    Laser processing of siliceous materials becomes increasingly important. Analogous to the laser processing of conventional materials there are applications in the fields of cleaning, surface processing, cutting, etc. The present paper concerns the state of the art and new applications: (1) Laser cleaning of natural stone surfaces. The good disability allows restoration work to be carried out conveniently, as for example the complete removal of crusts or the removal to such degree that moisture is not trapped beneath. (2) Non-slip finish of polished natural stone surfaces: The excellent focusing of laser beams on spots as small as 100 micrometer and below can be exploited to produce macroscopically invisible structures on the surfaces of different materials. This permits microscopically small craters and lentil shaped depressions to be generated on the stone surface. Therefore it is possible to provide a non-slip finish to polished natural stone surfaces without noticeably impairing the gloss. (3) Concrete cutting: In Europe, and particularly in Germany, there is a growing demand for redevelopment of concrete apartment buildings, involving the removal of non-bearing walls and the cutting of openings. The temporal relocation of residents due to the noise and moisture from the use of diamond tools could be avoided by applying a laser cutting technology. With a 3 kW-Nd-YAG-laser, 70 mm concrete can be cut with rates up to 25 mm/min.

  4. Organically modified silicate aerogels, ``Aeromosils``

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.J.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Rubio-Alonso, F.

    1996-12-31

    Aerogels derived from sol-gel oxides such as silica have become quite scientifically popular because of their extremely low densities, high surface areas, and their interesting optical, dielectric, thermal and acoustic properties. However, their commercial applicability has thus far been rather limited, due in great part to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. In prior work by the research group, modifying silicate gel structures with flexible, organic containing polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane imparted significant compliance (even rubbery behavior) and hydrophobicity. These materials have been referred to as Ormosils. This study expounds on the current effort to extend these desirable properties to aerogels, and in-so-doing, creating novel ``Aeromosils``. Reactive incorporation of hydroxy-terminal polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into silica sol-gels was made using both acid and two-step acid/base catalyzed processes. Aerogels were derived by employing the supercritical CO{sub 2} technique. Analyses of microstructure were made using nitrogen adsorption (BET surface area and pore size distribution), and some mechanical strengths were derived from tensile strength testing. Interesting Aeromosil properties obtained include optical transparency, surface areas of up to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g, rubberiness, and better strength than corresponding silica aerogels with elongations at break exceeding 5% in some cases.

  5. Improved alkali-metal/silicate binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of inorganic binders utilizes potassium or sodium oxide/silicate dispersion and employs high mole ratio of silicon dioxide to alkali-metal binder. Binders are stable, inexpensive, extremely water resistant, and easy to apply.

  6. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  7. Peralkaline silicic volcanic rocks in northwestern nevada.

    PubMed

    Noble, D C; Chipman, D W; Giles, D L

    1968-06-21

    Late Tertiary silicic ashflow tuffs and lavas peralkaline in chemical character (atomic Na + K greater than Al), mainly comendites, occur over wide areas in northwestern Nevada and appear to be widespread in southeastern Oregon. Such peralkaline rocks-which are not uncommon in the western United States-and other chemically unusual silicic rocks are found near the margins rather than toward the center of the Great Basin.

  8. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  9. Interpreting the 10 micron Astronomical Silicate Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowey, Janet E.

    1998-11-01

    10micron spectra of silicate dust in the diffuse medium towards Cyg OB2 no. 12 and towards field and embedded objects in the Taurus Molecular Cloud (TMC) were obtained with CGS3 at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). Cold molecular-cloud silicates are sampled in quiescent lines of sight towards the field stars Taurus-Elias 16 and Elias 13, whilst observations of the embedded young stellar objects HL Tau, Taurus-Elias 7 (Haro6-10) and Elias 18 also include emission from heated dust. To obtain the foreground silicate absorption profiles, featureless continua are estimated using smoothed astronomical and laboratory silicate emissivities. TMC field stars and Cyg OB2 no. 12 are modelled as photospheres reddened by foreground continuum and silicate extinction. Dust emission in the non-photospheric continua of HL Tau and Elias 7 (Haro6-10) is distinguished from foreground silicate absorption using a 10micron disk model, based on the IR-submm model of T Tauri stars by Adams, Lada & Shu (1988), with terms added to represent the foreground continuum and silicate extinction. The absorption profiles of HL Tau and Elias 7 are similar to that of the field star Elias 16. Fitted temperature indices of 0.43 (HL Tau) and 0.33 (Elias 7) agree with Boss' (1996) theoretical models of the 200-300K region, but are lower than those of IR-submm disks (0.5-0.61; Mannings & Emerson 1994); the modelled 10micron emission of HL Tau is optically thin, that of Elias 7 is optically thick. A preliminary arcsecond-resolution determination of the 10micron emissivity near θ1 Ori D in the Trapezium region of Orion and a range of emission temperatures (225-310K) are derived from observations by T. L. Hayward; this Ney-Allen emissivity is 0.6micron narrower than the Trapezium emissivity obtained by Forrest et al. (1975) with a large aperture. Published interstellar grain models, elemental abundances and laboratory studies of Solar System silicates (IDPs, GEMS and meteorites), the 10micron

  10. Neodymium-doped phosphate fiber lasers with an all-solid microstructured inner cladding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang; Zhou, Qinling; Yu, Chunlei; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2012-06-15

    We report on high-power fiber lasers based on index-guiding, all-solid neodymium-doped (Nd-doped) phosphate photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a hexagonal-shaped inner cladding. The optimum fiber laser with a 36 cm length active fiber, generated up to 7.92 W output power at 1053 nm, which benefited from a high absorption coefficient for pump power due to its noncircular inner cladding. The guiding properties of the all-solid PCF were also investigated. A stable mode with a donut-shaped profile and a power-dependent laser beam quality have been observed experimentally and analyzed.

  11. [Some effects of the neodymium ion on the cell wall structure of Staphyloccocus aruea].

    PubMed

    Huo, Guang Hua; Zhang, Dong Yan; Zhang, Tong

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this research is to study the effect of neodymium ion on the cell wall structure of Staphyloccocus aruea using transmission electron microscope, amino acid analyzer, infrared absorption spectrometry (IR). Experimental results show that Nd3+ can change the shape and the structure of the cell wall of Staphyloccocus aruea NdCl3 with lower concentration than the bacteriostatic concentration can help to synthesize the cell wall structure of Staphyloccocus aruea. Nd3+ with higher concentration than the bacteriostatic concentration can break the peptide bond and the hydrogen bond so as to break the net structure in the peptideoglycan cell.

  12. Neodymium and lead isotope evidence for enriched early Archean crust in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowring, Samuel A.; Housh, Todd B.; Isachsen, Clark E.; Podosek, Frank A.; King, Janet E.

    1989-01-01

    Neodymium and lead isotope measurements and uranium-lead zircon geochronology from Archaean gneisses of the Slave Province in the Northwest Territories of Canada are reported. The gneisses contain zircons with cores older than 3.842 Gyr and an epsilon(Nd) (3.7 Gyr) of - 4.8. This is the oldest reported chondritic model age for a terrestrial sample and provides evidence for strongly enriched pre-3.8-Gyr crust, a reservoir complementary to the depleted mantle already in existence by 3.8 Gyr before the present.

  13. Laser amplifier based on a neodymium glass rod 150 mm in diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Shaykin, A A; Fokin, A P; Soloviev, A A; Kuzmin, A A; Shaikin, I A; Burdonov, K F; Khazanov, E A; Charukhchev, A V

    2014-05-30

    A unique large-aperture neodymium glass rod amplifier is experimentally studied. The small-signal gain distribution is measured at different pump energies. The aperture-averaged gain is found to be 2.3. The stored energy (500 J), the maximum possible pump pulse repetition rate, and the depolarisation in a single pulse and in a series of pulses with a repetition rate of one pulse per five minutes are calculated based on the investigations performed. It is shown that the use of this amplifier at the exit of the existing laser can increase the output pulse energy from 300 to 600 J. (lasers)

  14. Neodymium neutron transmission and capture measurements and development of a new transmission detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Devin P.

    Neodymium is a 235U fission product and is important in reactor neutronic calculations. The aim of this thesis is to improve upon the existing neutron cross section data of neodymium. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute LINAC using metallic neodymium samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a 16-segment Nal multiplicity detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15-m and 25-m flight stations, respectively, with 6Li glass scintillation detectors. After the data were collected and reduced, resonance parameters were determined by simultaneously fitting the transmission and capture data with the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The resonance parameters for all naturally occurring neodymium isotopes were deduced within the energy range of 1.0 eV to 500 eV. The resulting resonance parameters were used to calculate the capture resonance integral with this energy region and were compared to calculations obtained when using the resonance parameters from ENDF-B/VI. The RPI parameters gave a resonance integral value of 32 +/- 1 barns that is approximately 7% lower than that obtained with the ENDF-B/VI parameters. The current measurements significantly reduce the statistical uncertainties on the resonance parameters when compared with previously published parameters. This thesis also explains the resolution function in detail and discusses its importance when fitting experimental data to extract resonance parameters. More accurate resolution function parameters were determined for epithermal transmission and capture measurements by fitting well known resonances in Uranium-238. Improved transmission bare-bounce target in-beam photomultiplier tube (PMT) resolution function parameters were found and compared to those used previously at the RPI LINAC and a marked improvement in the quality of the fits is shown. In addition

  15. Effect of reactor radiation on the operation of a neodymium inorganic liquid laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrovol'skii, A F; Kabakov, D V; Seregin, A A; Seregina, E A; Tikhonov, G V

    2009-02-28

    The radiation parameters of a neodymium liquid laser based on phosphorus oxychloride are measured upon irradiation of the laser medium by neutrons and gamma-rays from a BARS-6 two-zone reactor. This irradiation increases the laser energy by 20%-30% compared to the laser energy in the absence of irradiation. The lasing threshold is observed to decrease with increasing the irradiation dose. In the case of simultaneous optical and nuclear pumping of the laser medium, the free-running regime of laser operation converts to the regime of high-power pulses. (lasers)

  16. Bi-phasic titanium dioxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen and neodymium for enhanced photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Virginia; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul D.; McGettrick, James D.; Watson, Trystan; Charbonneau, Cecile; O'Brien, Paul; Barron, Andrew R.; Dunnill, Charles W.

    2015-10-01

    Bi-phasic or multi-phasic composite nanoparticles for use in photocatalysis have been produced by a new synthetic approach. Sol-gel methods are used to deposit multiple layers of active material onto soluble substrates. In this work, a layer of rutile (TiO2) was deposited onto sodium chloride pellets followed by an annealing step and a layer of anatase. After dissolving the substrate, bi-phasic nanoparticles containing half anatase and half rutile TiO2; with ``Janus-like'' characteristics are obtained. Nitrogen and neodymium doping of the materials were observed to enhance the photocatalytic properties both under UV and white light irradiation. The unique advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to systematically dope separate sides of the nanoparticles. Nitrogen doping was found to be most effective on the anatase side of the nanoparticle while neodymium was found to be most effective on the rutile side. Rhodamine B dye was effectively photodegraded by co-doped particles under white light.Bi-phasic or multi-phasic composite nanoparticles for use in photocatalysis have been produced by a new synthetic approach. Sol-gel methods are used to deposit multiple layers of active material onto soluble substrates. In this work, a layer of rutile (TiO2) was deposited onto sodium chloride pellets followed by an annealing step and a layer of anatase. After dissolving the substrate, bi-phasic nanoparticles containing half anatase and half rutile TiO2; with ``Janus-like'' characteristics are obtained. Nitrogen and neodymium doping of the materials were observed to enhance the photocatalytic properties both under UV and white light irradiation. The unique advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to systematically dope separate sides of the nanoparticles. Nitrogen doping was found to be most effective on the anatase side of the nanoparticle while neodymium was found to be most effective on the rutile side. Rhodamine B dye was effectively photodegraded by co

  17. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  18. Sustained Residence Times for Miocene Silicic Magmas of the Yellowstone Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, H. E.; Nash, B. P.

    2001-12-01

    The length of time over which large volume silicic magmas may persist in the crust is poorly constrained, and recent estimates have ranged from a few tens of thousands of years to over 1.0 myr. Compositional relationships among the ten eruptive units of the 12.7 - 10.5 Ma Cougar Point Tuff suggest that a common, long-lived reservoir for these magmas persisted throughout the 2.2 myr explosive phase of the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center along the track of the Yellowstone hotspot. Low crystal content and high temperatures (usually greater than 900 degrees C) indicate that the magmas were close to their liquidi. Evidence for the persistence of several discrete magma volumes in the reservoir is contained in multiple compositional modes of glass in basal fallout tuffs and in the recurrence of identical sets of mineral compositional modes in successive eruptions. Multiple modes of glass composition are a common feature in many explosive eruptions of the Yellowstone hotspot. In the Cougar Point Tuff, recurrence intervals of identical modes of glass and pyroxene range from 0.3 to 1.1 Ma, and suggest residence times of similar duration. Pyroxene thermometry indicates that compositionally distinct liquids erupted in the same event differed in temperature by 25-70 degrees C. Eruption ages, pyroxene and glass compositions, magma temperatures, and isotopic ratios for the Cougar Point Tuff are consistent with a long-lived, dynamically evolving magma reservoir that was chemically and thermally zoned in a step-wise fashion, and composed of multiple discrete compositional layers. A continental hotspot, where heat is supplied continually to the lower crust by advection of basalt from the mantle, is the optimum tectonic setting for sustaining silicic melts near their liquidi for extended durations. Neodymium isotopic ratios in the Cougar Point Tuff increase systematically with successive eruptions (eNd -8.5 to -6.6), and record a substantial and increasing mantle contribution to the

  19. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  20. Selective Leaching Process for Neodymium Recovery from Scrap Nd-Fe-B Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Yu-Jung; Liao, Ching-Hua; Popuri, Srinivasa R.; Tsai, Shang-Lin; Hung, Chi-En

    2013-12-01

    Neodymium-iron-boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets were most widely applied to permanent magnetic products in the world due to their high magnetic force. The increasing growth of scrap Nd-Fe-B magnets resulted in disposal problems and the reduction of neodymium (Nd) valuable resources. In this study, we developed a simple hydrometallurgical precipitation process with pH adjustment to separate and recover Nd 100 pct recovery from scrap Nd-Fe-B magnets. Several physical and chemical methods such as demagnetization, grinding, screening, and leaching processes were also adopted to investigate the recovery of Nd and other metals from scrap Nd-Fe-B magnets. The leaching process was carried out with four leaching reagents such as NaOH, HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4. Batch studies were also conducted to optimize the leaching operating conditions with respect to leaching time, concentration of leaching reagent, temperature, and solid/liquid ratio for both HCl and H2SO4 leaching reagents. Nd was successfully separated and recovered with 75.41 wt pct from optimized H2SO4 leaching solution through precipitation. Further, the purity and weight percentage of the obtained Nd product was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis. An X-ray diffraction (XRD) study confirmed the obtained product of Nd was in the form of NdOOH and Nd(OH)3.

  1. Azo calix[4]arene based neodymium(III)-selective PVC membrane sensor.

    PubMed

    Menon, Shobhana K; Modi, Nishith R; Patel, Bhargav; Patel, Manishkumar B

    2011-02-15

    We found that the PVC membrane, containing azo calix[4]arene is a suitable ionophore, exhibited a Nernstian response for neodymium (Nd(3+)) ions (with slope of 19.8±0.2 mV decade(-1) for the triply charged ion) over a wide linear range of 4.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-1) mol L(-1) with a detection limit 1.0×10(-8) mol L(-1), a relatively fast response time, in the whole concentration range (<10 s), and a considerable life time at least for four months in the pH range of 4.0-8.0. Furthermore, the electrode revealed high selectivity with respect to all the common alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions, including the members of the lanthanide family other than Nd(3+). Concerning its applications, it was effectively employed for the determination of neodymium ions in industrial waste water as well as in lake water.

  2. Neodymium doped hydroxyapatite theranostic nanoplatforms for colon specific drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Paul, Willi; Vineeth, V M; Komeri, Remya; Jayabalan, Muthu; Sharma, Chandra P

    2016-09-01

    Theranostic nanoplatforms integrate therapeutic payloads with diagnostic agents, and help monitor therapeutic response. In this regard, stimuli responsive nanoplatforms further favour combinatorial therapeutic approach that can considerably improve efficacy and specificity of treatment. Herein, we present the engineering of a smart theranostic nanoplatform based on neodymium doped hydroxyapatite (HAN). The presence of neodymium endows the HAN nanoplatforms with near-infrared fluorescence capability. These HAN nanoparticles were then subsequently modified with alginic acid (HANA) to confer pH responsiveness to the synthesized nanoplatforms delivering them to the colon after oral administration. These nanoplatforms possessing optimum size, needle shaped morphology and negative zeta potential, are conducive to cellular internalization. On excitation at 410nm they exhibit near infrared emission at 670nm unraveling their theranostic capabilities. Cytotoxic effects systematically assessed using MTT and live dead assays reveal excellent viability. Raman microscopic imaging technique used to visualize uptake in HeLa cells demonstrate increased uptake from 4 to 16h, with growing cluster size and localization in the cytoplasm. Moreover the concomitant presence of alginic acid manifested advantages of augmented loading and pH dependent release profiles of the model drug, 4 acetyl salicylic acid (4ASA). We could thus establish a theranostic system for early tumour detection, targeted tumour therapy and monitoring of colon cancer that can be administered via the oral route.

  3. Spectroscopic properties of neodymium(III)-containing polyoxometalates in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    But, Slawomir; Lis, Stefan; Deun, Rik Van; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N; Görller-Walrand, Christiane; Binnemans, Koen

    2005-11-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the neodymium(III)-containing polyoxometalates (POMs) [Nd(PW(11)O(39))(2)](11-), [Nd(PMo(2)W(9)O(39))(2)](11-), [Nd(PMo(4)W(7)O(39))(2)](11-), [Nd(PMo(6)W(5)O(39))(2)](11-), [Nd(SiMo(2)W(9)O(39))(2)](13-), [Nd(P(2)W(17)O(61))(2)](17-), [NdW(10)O(36)](9-), [NdP(5)W(30)O(110)](12-) and [NdAs(4)W(40)O(140)](25-) are described. Absorption spectra of aqueous solutions of the complexes have been recorded and the transition intensities are parameterised in terms of the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters Omega(lambda) (lambda=2, 4, 6). Marked differences were found between the luminescence lifetimes of the complexes of the type Nd(POM) and those of the type Nd(POM)(2), due to a better shielding of the neodymium(III) ions from the bulk water molecules in the latter type of complexes.

  4. Simulation of the Magnetic Characteristics and Properties of the Neodymium Compensator of the Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.; Gurov, M. G.; Panchenko, Y. V.

    2016-08-01

    This research is devoted to consideration of the possibility to use the software ELCUT for development of the magnetic compensator of the stiffness based on neodymium magnets. The software represents precision enough apparatus to solve the issues of the magnetostatic. The solution of these issues is the most important phase at the stage of the designing and calculation of the magnetic compensator of the stiffness, so as at the beginning we need to find the traction force of the interaction between magnet and magnetic materials to provide necessary falling traction characteristic of the compensator. In this paper the simulated models of the neodymium magnets are shown; the view of the field are calculated, the plots of the distribution and directions of the magnetic field strength and induction vectors are presented. Results, which were obtained during of the simulation, further will be used for designing and creation of the magnetic compensator of the stiffness based on supermagnets. Research & Development is under the scholarship of the President of Russian Federation, order №184 from 10th of March 2015.

  5. Antineoplastic activity of new lanthanide (cerium, lanthanum and neodymium) complex compounds.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Kostova, Raina; Momekov, Georgi; Trendafilova, Natasha; Karaivanova, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    Cerium (III), lanthanum (III) and neodymium (III) complexes with 3,3'-benzylidenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin] were synthesized in view of their application as cytotoxic agents. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical methods: elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and IR spectroscopy. The spectra of the complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectrum of the free ligand. The vibrational analysis showed that in the complexes the ligand coordinated to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups; however, participation of the carbonyl groups in the coordination to the metal ion was also suggested. The evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of the novel lanthanide complexes on HL-60 myeloid cells revealed that they are potent cytotoxic agents. The cerium complex was found to exhibit superior activity in comparison to the lanthanum and neodymium coordination compounds, the latter being the least active. Our data give us reason to conclude that the newly synthesized lanthanide complexes should be submitted to further more detailed pharmacological and toxicological evaluation.

  6. Investigation of Carboxylic Acid-Neodymium Conversion Films on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiufang; Liu, Zhe; Lin, Lili; Jin, Guo; Wang, Haidou; Xu, Binshi

    2015-01-01

    The new carboxylic acid-neodymium anhydrous conversion films were successfully prepared and applied on the AZ91D magnesium alloy surface by taking absolute ethyl alcohol as solvent and four kinds of soluble carboxylic acid as activators. The corrosion resistance of the coating was measured by potentiodynamic polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution in pH 7.0. The morphology, structure, and constituents of the coating were observed by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersivespectrum, x-ray photoelectron spectrum, and Fourier infrared spectrometer. Results show that corrosion resistance properties of samples coated with four different anhydrous conversion films were improved obviously. The corrosion potential increased, corrosion current density decreased, and polarization resistance increased. Among these four kinds of conversion films the one added with phytic exhibits the best corrosion resistant property. The mechanism of anhydrous-neodymium conversion film formation is also analyzed in this paper. It reveals that the gadolinium conversion coating is mainly composed of stable Nd2O3, MgO, Mg(OH)2, and carboxylate of Nd. And that the sample surface is rich in organic functional groups.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of ytterbium silicate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongfei; Gao, Yanfeng; Liu, Yun; Luo, Hongjie

    2010-02-15

    A simple, low-cost hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize 20-nm-diameter single-crystalline ytterbium silicate (Yb(2)Si(2)O(7) and Yb(2)SiO(5)) nanoparticles at 200 degrees C. This is nearly 1000 degrees C lower than that for the typical sol-gel route to ytterbium silicate powders. Obtained powders showed very low thermal conductivity, a suitable thermal expansion coefficient, and excellent thermal/structural stability, suggesting a potential application to environmental and thermal barrier coatings. Special focus was placed on assessing the hydrothermal reaction mechanism for particle formation.

  8. Mafic silicates in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Iron-bearing olivines and pyroxenes occurring in Orgueil may represent a separate population distinct from the magnesian varieties previously reported. Compositions of these iron-bearing silicates are inconsistent with an origin by direct equilibrium condensation in the nebula. Such an origin is more plausible for the magnesian silicates, but lacks conclusive evidence. An extra-solar system origin for either mafic population is possible, though similarly lacking in evidence. About 15% of the olivines, randomly distributed with respect to iron content, retain particle track evidence of a precompaction irradiation.

  9. Reaction of silicate minerals to form tetramethoxysilane.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Larry N; Schattenmann, Florian J; Jordan, Tracey M; Carnahan, James C; Flanagan, William P; Wroczynski, Ronald J; Lemmon, John P; Anostario, Joseph M; Othon, Michelle A

    2002-05-06

    Several silicon dioxide sources were used as reagents in the base-mediated reaction with dimethyl carbonate (DMC) to make tetramethoxysilane (Q'). Several commercially available diatomaceous earth materials were investigated. High throughput screening was employed to explore over 200 silicate rocks and minerals as alternative silicon dioxide sources for formation of Q' from DMC and base. Amorphous silicon dioxide materials are effective reagents for the Q' forming reaction. Effective silicon dioxide sources in addition to the diatomaceous earth materials include opal and various synthetic silicates (Li, Co, and Ca).

  10. Development of a Reliable Analytical Method for Liquid Anion-Exchange Extraction and Separation of Neodymium(III)

    PubMed Central

    Kokare, Balasaheb N.; Kamble, Ganesh S.; Sargar, Balasaheb M.; Anuse, Mansing A.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) from succinate media (0.06 M) has been studied at pH 6.0 with the solution of 0.1 M of N-n-octylaniline in xylene when equilibrium is maintained for 5 min. The back-extraction of neodymium(III) has been performed by using 0.1 M HClO4. The effect of various parameters, such as pH, equilibrium time, extractant concentration, stripping agents, organic diluents, and aqueous to organic volume ratio on the extraction of neodymium(III) has been studied. On the basis of slope analysis, the stoichiometry of the extracted species was determined as 1 : 1 : 2 [RR′NH2+Nd(succinate)2−](org). The method is free from interference of large number cations and anions. The method was used for the selective extraction of neodymium(III) from its binary mixture with U(VI), Zr(IV), Nb(V), La(III), Th(IV), Ce(IV), and Y(III). The proposed method is selective and was successfully applied to the synthetic mixtures to show the practical utility of the extractant. PMID:22701373

  11. Development of a reliable analytical method for liquid anion-exchange extraction and separation of neodymium(III).

    PubMed

    Kokare, Balasaheb N; Kamble, Ganesh S; Sargar, Balasaheb M; Anuse, Mansing A

    2012-01-01

    The liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) from succinate media (0.06 M) has been studied at pH 6.0 with the solution of 0.1 M of N-n-octylaniline in xylene when equilibrium is maintained for 5 min. The back-extraction of neodymium(III) has been performed by using 0.1 M HClO₄. The effect of various parameters, such as pH, equilibrium time, extractant concentration, stripping agents, organic diluents, and aqueous to organic volume ratio on the extraction of neodymium(III) has been studied. On the basis of slope analysis, the stoichiometry of the extracted species was determined as 1 : 1 : 2 [RR'NH₂⁺Nd(succinate)₂⁻](org). The method is free from interference of large number cations and anions. The method was used for the selective extraction of neodymium(III) from its binary mixture with U(VI), Zr(IV), Nb(V), La(III), Th(IV), Ce(IV), and Y(III). The proposed method is selective and was successfully applied to the synthetic mixtures to show the practical utility of the extractant.

  12. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Dopant penetration studies through Hf silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo-Lopez, M. A.; Visokay, M. R.; Chambers, J. J.; Bevan, M. J.; LiFatou, A.; Colombo, L.; Kim, M. J.; Gnade, B. E.; Wallace, R. M.

    2005-02-01

    We present a study of the penetration of B, P, and As through Hf silicate (HfSixOy) and the effect of N incorporation in Hf silicate (HfSixOyNz) on dopant penetration from doped polycrystalline silicon capping layers. The extent of penetration through Hf silicate was found to be dependent upon the thermal annealing budget for each dopant investigated as follows: B(T⩾950°C/60s), P(T⩾1000°C/20s), and As (T⩾1050°C/60s). We propose that the enhanced diffusion observed for these dopants in HfSixOy, compared with that of SiO2 films, is related to grain boundary formation resulting from HfSixOy film crystallization. We also find that, as in the case of SiO2, N incorporation inhibits dopant (B, P, and As) diffusion through the Hf silicate and thus penetration into the underlying Si substrate. Only B penetration is clearly observed through HfSiON films for anneals at 1050 °C for durations of 10 s or longer. The calculated B diffusivity through the HfSixOyNz layer is D0=5.2×10-15cm2/s.

  14. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  15. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  16. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  17. Thermoset polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    Nanocomposites are formed when phase mixing occurs on a nanometer length scale. Due to the improved phase morphology and interfacial properties, nanocomposites exhibit mechanical properties superior to conventional composites. Toyota researchers first demonstrated that organoclay could be exfoliated in a nylon-6 matrix to greatly improve the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymer, which has resulted in a practical application in the automobile industry. A great deal of research has been conducted on organic-inorganic hybrid composites in which smectite clays are used as reinforcement agents. However, little work has been devoted to derivatives of other layered inorganic solids. In the present work, the first examples of organic polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites have been prepared by formation of a cured epoxy polymer network in the presence of organo cation exchange forms of magadiite. The exfoliation of silicate nanolayers in the epoxy matrix was achieved by in-situ intragallery polymerization during the thermosetting process. In general, the tensile properties, solvent resistance, barrier properties and chemical stability of the polymer matrix are greatly improved by the embedded silicate nanolayers when the matrix is flexible (sub-ambient Tg). The improvement of properties are dependent on the silicate loading, the degree of nanolayer separation and interfacial properties. Interestingly, the exfoliation also affects the polymer elasticity in a favorable way. The mechanism leading to nanocomposite formation is proposed. One exfoliated epoxy-magadiite nanocomposite/composition possessed unique transparent optical properties. The exfoliation chemistry was successfully extended to the other members of the layered silicic acid family. A new approach also was developed to prepare thermoset epoxy polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites in which curing agents can be directly intercalated into the intragallery without the need for alkylammonium ions

  18. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  19. Silicate Dust in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanxia; Li, Aigen; Hao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hypothesizes that all AGNs are surrounded by an anisotropic dust torus and are essentially the same objects but viewed from different angles. However, little is known about the dust that plays a central role in the unification theory. There are suggestions that the AGN dust extinction law appreciably differs from that of the Galaxy. Also, the silicate emission features observed in type 1 AGNs appear anomalous (i.e., their peak wavelengths and widths differ considerably from that of the Galaxy). In this work, we explore the dust properties of 147 AGNs of various types at redshifts z≲ 0.5, with special attention paid to 93 AGNs that exhibit the 9.7 and 18 μm silicate emission features. We model their silicate emission spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find that 60/93 of the observed spectra can be well explained with “astronomical silicate,” while the remaining sources favor amorphous olivine or pyroxene. Most notably, all sources require the dust to be micron-sized (with a typical size of ∼1.5 ± 0.1 μm), much larger than submicron-sized Galactic interstellar grains, implying a flat or “gray” extinction law for AGNs. We also find that, while the 9.7 μm emission feature arises predominantly from warm silicate dust of temperature T ∼ 270 K, the ∼5–8 μm continuum emission is mostly from carbon dust of T ∼ 640 K. Finally, the correlations between the dust properties (e.g., mass, temperature) and the AGN properties (e.g., luminosity, black hole mass) have also been investigated.

  20. High chloride content calcium silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojing; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2017-03-08

    Chloride is known to volatilize from silicate glass melts and until now, only a limited number of studies on oxychloride silicate glasses have been reported. In this paper we have synthesized silicate glasses that retain large amounts of CaCl2. The CaCl2 has been added to the calcium metasilicate composition (CaO·SiO2). Glasses were produced via a melt quench route and an average of 70% of the chloride was retained after melting. Up to 31.6 mol% CaCl2 has been successfully incorporated into these silicate glasses without the occurrence of crystallization. (29)Si MAS-NMR spectra showed the silicon being present mainly as a Q(2) silicate species. This suggests that chloride formed Cl-Ca(n) species, rather than Si-Cl bonds. Upon increasing the CaCl2 content, the Tg reduced markedly from 782 °C to 370 °C. Glass density and glass crystallization temperature decreased linearly with an increase in the CaCl2 content. However, both linear regressions revealed a breakpoint at a CaCl2 content just below 20 mol%. This might be attributed to a significant change in the structure and is also correlated with the nature of the crystallizing phases formed upon heat treatment. The glasses with less than 19.2 mol% CaCl2 crystallized to wollastonite, whilst the compositions with CaCl2 content equal to or greater than 19.2 mol% are thought to crystallize to CaCl2. In practice, the crystallization of CaCl2 could not occur until the crystallization temperature fell below the melting point of CaCl2. The implications of the results along with the high chloride retention are discussed.

  1. 77 FR 21676 - Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Silicic Acid, Sodium Salt etc.; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY: Environmental... requirement of a tolerance for residues of Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with... residues of Silicic acid, sodium salt, reaction products with chlorotrimethylsilane and iso-propyl...

  2. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  3. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  4. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  5. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  6. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  7. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  8. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  10. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  12. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  19. Investigation on microstructure and martensitic transformation of neodymium-added NiTi shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maashaa, Dovchinvanchig; Dorj, Ulzii-Orshikh; Lee, Malrey; Lee, Min Hi; Zhao, Chunwang; Dashjav, Munguntsetseg; Woo, Seon-Mi

    2016-10-01

    The effect of rare earth element neodymium (Nd) addition on the microstructure and martensitic transformation behavior of Ni50Ti50-xNdx (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 at.%) shape memory alloy was investigated by scanning electronic microscope, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that the microstructure of Ni-Ti-Nd ternary alloy consists of NiNd phase, NiTi2 and the NiTi matrix. A one-step martensitic transformation is observed in the alloys. The martensitic transformation temperature Ms increases sharply increasing 0.1-0.7 at.% Nd content is added.

  20. Calf thymus DNA binding studies of the new neodymium-naproxen complex.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ruina; Xu, Guiqing; Jiang, Xiaoying; Ge, Yao; Xue, Zaikun; Cui, Fengling

    2012-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with UV absorption spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the interaction between the neodymium-naproxen complex (Nd-NAP) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA). The experimental results showed that Nd-NAP intercalated with the ctDNA base pairs. Analysis of fluorescence quenching data of Nd-NAP by ctDNA at different temperatures using a Stern-Volmer equation revealed that dynamic and static quenching occurred simultaneously. The binding constants and the number of binding sites at 293 and 310 K were obtained as 2.904 × 10(4) L mol(-1), 1.172 and 2.432 × 10(4) L mol(-1), 1.143, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS calculated at different temperatures indicated that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force were the main binding forces.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet field emission lamp consisting of neodymium ion doped lutetium fluoride thin film as phosphor.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Yusop, Mohd Zamri; Tanemura, Masaki; Ono, Shingo; Nagami, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa; Yokota, Yuui; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) field emission lamp was developed by using a neodymium ion doped lutetium fluoride (Nd(3+) : LuF3) thin film as solid-state phosphor and carbon nanofiber field electron emitters. The thin film was synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and incorporated into the lamp. The cathodoluminescence spectra of the lamp showed multiple emission peaks at 180, 225, and 255 nm. These emission spectra were in good agreement with the spectra reported for the Nd(3+) : LuF3 crystal. Moreover, application of an acceleration voltage effectively increased the emission intensity. These results contribute to the performance enhancement of the lamp operating in the VUV region.

  2. Heavy metals chromium and neodymium reduced phosphorylation level of heat shock protein 27 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Xue; Su, Zhijian; Zou, Ping; Hu, Hao; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Heavy metals may exert their acute and chronic effects on the human skin through stress signals. In the present study, 2DE-based proteomics was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to heavy metals, chromium and neodymium, and 10 proteins with altered expression were identified. Among these proteins, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) was up-regulated significantly and the up-regulation was validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, the mRNA expression level of HSP27 markedly increased as detected by quantitative PCR. More interestingly, the ratio of phosphorylated HSP27 and total HSP27 significantly decreased in keratinocytes treated with the heavy metals. These findings suggested that heavy metals reduced the phosphorylation level of HSP27, and that the ratio of p-HSP27 and HSP27 may represent a potential marker or additional endpoint for the hazard assessment of skin irritation caused by chemical products.

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Field Emission Lamp Consisting of Neodymium Ion Doped Lutetium Fluoride Thin Film as Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Yusop, Mohd Zamri; Tanemura, Masaki; Nagami, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa; Yokota, Yuui; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) field emission lamp was developed by using a neodymium ion doped lutetium fluoride (Nd3+ : LuF3) thin film as solid-state phosphor and carbon nanofiber field electron emitters. The thin film was synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and incorporated into the lamp. The cathodoluminescence spectra of the lamp showed multiple emission peaks at 180, 225, and 255 nm. These emission spectra were in good agreement with the spectra reported for the Nd3+ : LuF3 crystal. Moreover, application of an acceleration voltage effectively increased the emission intensity. These results contribute to the performance enhancement of the lamp operating in the VUV region. PMID:25302320

  4. Extraction chromatography of neodymium by an organophosphorous extractant supported on various polymeric resins

    SciTech Connect

    Takigawa, D.Y.

    1993-04-01

    Fifteen resins coated with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethyl phosphonate (CMP) were studied for their extraction of neodymium (Nd) in 4.0 and 7.0 M nitric acid. Resin properties, such as chemical composition and physical morphology, which can influence Nd extraction as well as subsequent resin regeneration (Nd stripping), were identified. Hydrophilic or polar resins coated with CMP efficiently extracted the Nd. Resins initially washed free of residual monomer and solvent before CMP coating outperformed their untreated counterparts. The macroporous styrene-divinylbenzene hydrophobic resins that were high in surface area were less effective supports compared with hydrophilic microporous Aurorez, polybenzimidazole (PBI) and macroporous Amberlite polyacrylic resins. Only one resin, Duolite C-467, showed no measurable improvement in Nd extraction with CMP coating. CMP-coated Aurorez PBI, a microporous and hydrophilic polymeric resin with an average surface area, showed the best overall efficiency for Nd removal and resin regeneration.

  5. Defect characterization in neodymium doped thallium indium disulfide crystals by thermoluminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delice, S.; Gasanly, N. M.

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of defect centers in neodymium doped TlInS2 single crystals have been investigated in virtue of thermoluminescence measurements carried out at low temperatures (10-300 K) with various heating rates between 0.4 and 1.2 K s-1. One glow peak was detected with peak maximum temperature of 26 K at a rate of 0.4 K s-1. The observed glow peak was analyzed using three points and heating rate methods. The analysis results revealed the presence of one trap level with activation energy of 14 meV. Three points method showed that mixed order of kinetic dominates the trapping level. Shift of peak maximum temperature to higher values and decrease in TL intensity were observed as the heating rate was increased progressively. Distribution of traps was demonstrated using an experimental method based on illumination temperature varying between 10 and 14 K.

  6. Influence of neodymium concentration on excitation and emission properties of Nd doped gallium oxide nanocrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A.; Banski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Lecerf, C.; Marie, P.; Cardin, J.; Portier, X.

    2010-09-15

    Gallium oxide and more particularly {beta}-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix is an excellent material for new generation of devices electrically or optically driven as it is known as the widest band gap transparent conductive oxide. In this paper, the optical properties of neodymium doped gallium oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering have been analyzed. The influence of the Nd ions concentration on the excitation/emission mechanisms of Nd ions and the role of gallium oxide matrix have been investigated. The grain size reduction into gallium oxide films have been observed when concentration of Nd increases. It has been found for all samples that the charge transfer is the main excitation mechanism for Nd ions where defect states play an important role as intermediate states. As a consequence Nd emission efficiency increases with temperature giving rise to most intensive emission at 1087 nm at room temperature.

  7. Influence of neodymium concentration on excitation and emission properties of Nd doped gallium oxide nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Banski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Lecerf, C.; Marie, P.; Cardin, J.; Portier, X.

    2010-09-01

    Gallium oxide and more particularly β-Ga2O3 matrix is an excellent material for new generation of devices electrically or optically driven as it is known as the widest band gap transparent conductive oxide. In this paper, the optical properties of neodymium doped gallium oxide films grown by magnetron sputtering have been analyzed. The influence of the Nd ions concentration on the excitation/emission mechanisms of Nd ions and the role of gallium oxide matrix have been investigated. The grain size reduction into gallium oxide films have been observed when concentration of Nd increases. It has been found for all samples that the charge transfer is the main excitation mechanism for Nd ions where defect states play an important role as intermediate states. As a consequence Nd emission efficiency increases with temperature giving rise to most intensive emission at 1087 nm at room temperature.

  8. Current status and future outlook for bonded neodymium permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, J. J.

    1997-04-01

    Bonded neodymium magnets can provide significant size and weight reduction and/or performance enhancement over sintered and, particularly, bonded ferrite permanent magnets and, moreover, provide these benefits at reasonable cost. Primarily for these reasons, these bonded magnets are now used in a wide and growing range of computer peripheral, office automation, and consumer electronic applications and now constitute the fastest growing segment of the permanent magnet market. The current status of these materials will be reviewed. Included is a brief overview of the manufacture of these magnetically isotropic magnets and a discussion of their unique properties and features from the perspective of both bonded magnet producer and user. Major applications are discussed as are some of the factors that will drive the market for these materials in the future. New technical developments, including the status and outlook for anisotropic bonded materials, high remanance isotropic materials and high temperature bonded magnets will also be discussed.

  9. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  10. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  11. Effect of corrosion products (neodymium iron boron) on oral fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Evans, R D; McDonald, F

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of the corrosion products of neodymium iron boron (Nd2Fe14B) magnets are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the types of corrosion product and to evaluate the effect of the corrosion products (CP) of Nd2Fe14B magnets on the proliferation of human oral mucosal fibroblasts. Uncoated Nd2Fe14B magnets were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 6 months and the corrosion products collected. 100 microL of a cell suspension (human oral mucosal fibroblasts [14 x 10(4) cells/mL]) was aliquoted into 72 wells of a 96-well plate, the remaining plates receiving culture medium only. After 12 h incubation at 37 degrees C, each well then received 100 microL of either (A) culture medium, (B) 100% CP, (C) 50% CP, or (D) 0% CP. The plates were reincubated at 37 degrees C for a further 48, 96, or 144 h. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed using the methylene blue uptake/elution technique. The compounds in the corrosion product were examined using quantitative X-ray analysis. Statistical analysis (ANOVA, Bonferroni's test 0.05, SAS v 6.04), showed that at each time point, the cell numbers in groups B, C, and D were significantly lower than group A. Within groups B, C, and D no significant differences were found, despite the suggestion of a dose response effect. Fibroblast proliferation in the presence of corrosion products was significantly lower than with culture medium. Fibroblast proliferation did occur in the presence of 0, 50, and 100% CP. The actual corrosion products appeared to be salts of iron but 3.2% (+/- 0.6) of neodymium chloride (NdCl3) was found.

  12. The photocatalytic and antibacterial activities of neodymium and iodine doped TiO(2) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuefeng; Yang, Lu; Liu, Peng; Li, Xi; Shen, Jian

    2010-08-01

    A series of photocatalysts were synthesized by neodymium and iodine doped TiO(2). The characteristics of neodymium and iodine doped TiO(2) were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). In the synthesis process, Nd:I:TiO(2) with different doping content (molar ratios) calcined at different temperature was designed. After the photocatalysts were synthesized under different condition, they were compared with each other by photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB). The most efficient catalyst to degrade MB was Nd combined with I doped TiO(2) with molar ratio of 5:10:100 calcined at 400 degrees C. It is anatase crystal and the average size of crystallites was about 6.0 nm. It has absorption spectrometry in the visible light range of 400-550 nm. In addition, compared with pure TiO(2), the doped catalyst also has intense absorption at 528, 587, 683, 750, 808, and 881 nm. The catalytic efficiency was tested by monitoring the photocatalytic degradation, and detriment of MB and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The antibacterial activities were studied by Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The results showed that the optimum doping contents was Nd:I:TiO(2)=5:10:100 (molar ratio) calcined at 400 degrees C, and the synthesized catalyst could inhibit E. coli and S. aureus through damaging their outer membrane (even deteriorated completely) by the irradiation of visible light.

  13. Neodymium in the oceans: a global database, a regional comparison and implications for palaeoceanographic research

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Alexander M.; Lambelet, Myriam; Little, Susan H.; Stichel, Torben; Wilson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition of seawater has been used extensively to reconstruct ocean circulation on a variety of time scales. However, dissolved neodymium concentrations and isotopes do not always behave conservatively, and quantitative deconvolution of this non-conservative component can be used to detect trace metal inputs and isotopic exchange at ocean–sediment interfaces. In order to facilitate such comparisons for historical datasets, we here provide an extended global database for Nd isotopes and concentrations in the context of hydrography and nutrients. Since 2010, combined datasets for a large range of trace elements and isotopes are collected on international GEOTRACES section cruises, alongside classical nutrient and hydrography measurements. Here, we take a first step towards exploiting these datasets by comparing high-resolution Nd sections for the western and eastern North Atlantic in the context of hydrography, nutrients and aluminium (Al) concentrations. Evaluating those data in tracer–tracer space reveals that North Atlantic seawater Nd isotopes and concentrations generally follow the patterns of advection, as do Al concentrations. Deviations from water mass mixing are observed locally, associated with the addition or removal of trace metals in benthic nepheloid layers, exchange with ocean margins (i.e. boundary exchange) and/or exchange with particulate phases (i.e. reversible scavenging). We emphasize that the complexity of some of the new datasets cautions against a quantitative interpretation of individual palaeo Nd isotope records, and indicates the importance of spatial reconstructions for a more balanced approach to deciphering past ocean changes. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry’.

  14. Neodymium isotopic characterization of Ross Sea Bottom Water and its advection through the southern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Chandranath; Pahnke, Katharina; Frank, Martin; Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Since the inception of the international GEOTRACES program, studies investigating the distribution of trace elements and their isotopes in the global ocean have significantly increased. In spite of this large-scale effort, the distribution of neodymium isotopes (143Nd/144Nd, εNd) and concentrations ([Nd]) in the high latitude South Pacific is still understudied, specifically north of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF). Here we report dissolved Nd isotopes and concentrations from 11 vertical water column profiles from the South Pacific between South America and New Zealand and across the Antarctic frontal system. Results confirm that Ross Sea Bottom Water (RSBW) is represented by an εNd value of ∼ - 7, and for the first time show that these Nd characteristics can be traced into the Southeast Pacific until progressive mixing with ambient Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) dilutes this signal north of the APF. That is, εNd behaves conservatively in RSBW, opening a path for studies of past RSBW behavior. Neodymium concentrations show low surface concentrations and a linear increase with depth north of the APF. South of the APF, surface [Nd] is high and increases with depth but remains almost constant below ∼1000 m. This vertical and spatial [Nd] pattern follows the southward shoaling density surfaces of the Southern Ocean and hence suggests supply of Nd to the upper ocean through upwelling of Nd-rich deep water. Low particle abundance due to reduced opal production and seasonal sea ice cover likely contributes to the maintenance of the high upper ocean [Nd] south of the APF. This suggests a dominant lateral transport component on [Nd] and a reduced vertical control on Nd concentrations in the South Pacific south of the APF.

  15. Neodymium in the oceans: a global database, a regional comparison and implications for palaeoceanographic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Flierdt, Tina; Griffiths, Alexander M.; Lambelet, Myriam; Little, Susan H.; Stichel, Torben; Wilson, David J.

    2016-11-01

    The neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition of seawater has been used extensively to reconstruct ocean circulation on a variety of time scales. However, dissolved neodymium concentrations and isotopes do not always behave conservatively, and quantitative deconvolution of this non-conservative component can be used to detect trace metal inputs and isotopic exchange at ocean-sediment interfaces. In order to facilitate such comparisons for historical datasets, we here provide an extended global database for Nd isotopes and concentrations in the context of hydrography and nutrients. Since 2010, combined datasets for a large range of trace elements and isotopes are collected on international GEOTRACES section cruises, alongside classical nutrient and hydrography measurements. Here, we take a first step towards exploiting these datasets by comparing high-resolution Nd sections for the western and eastern North Atlantic in the context of hydrography, nutrients and aluminium (Al) concentrations. Evaluating those data in tracer-tracer space reveals that North Atlantic seawater Nd isotopes and concentrations generally follow the patterns of advection, as do Al concentrations. Deviations from water mass mixing are observed locally, associated with the addition or removal of trace metals in benthic nepheloid layers, exchange with ocean margins (i.e. boundary exchange) and/or exchange with particulate phases (i.e. reversible scavenging). We emphasize that the complexity of some of the new datasets cautions against a quantitative interpretation of individual palaeo Nd isotope records, and indicates the importance of spatial reconstructions for a more balanced approach to deciphering past ocean changes. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  16. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of neodymium in the eastern Indian Ocean and Indonesian straits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeandel, Catherine; Thouron, Danièle; Fieux, Michèle

    1998-08-01

    Four profiles of Nd concentration and isotopic composition were determined at two stations in the eastern Indian Ocean along a north/south section between Bali and Port-Hedland and at two others in the Timor and Sumba straits. Neodymium concentrations increase with depth, between 7.2 pmol/L at the surface to 41.7 pmol/L close to the bottom. The ɛ Nd of the different water masses along the section are -7.2 ± 0.2 for the Indian Bottom Waters and -6.1 ± 0.2 for the Indian Deep Waters. The intermediate and thermocline waters are less radiogenic at st-10 than at st-20 (-5.3 ± 0.3 and -3.6 ± 0.2, respectively). In the Timor Passage and Sumba Strait, ɛ Nd of the Indonesian waters is -4.1 ± 0.2 and that of the North Indian Intermediate Waters is -2.6 ± 0.3. These distinct isotopic signals constrain the origins of the different water masses sampled in the eastern Indian Ocean. They fix the limit of the nonradiogenic Antarctic and Indian contributions to the southern part of the section whereas the northern part is influenced by radiogenic Indonesian flows. In addition, the neodymium isotopic composition suggests that in the north, deep waters are influenced by a radiogenic component originating from the Sunda Arch Slope flowing deeper than 1200 m, which was not documented previously. Mixing calculations assess the conservativity of ɛ Nd on the scale of an oceanic basin. The origin of the surprising radiogenic signal of the NIIW is discussed and could result from a remobilization of Nd sediment-hosted on the Java shelf, requiring important dissolved/particulate exchange processes. Such processes, occurring in specific areas, could play an important role in the world ocean Nd budget.

  17. Final report on the safety assessment of potassium silicate, sodium metasilicate, and sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    Potassium Silicate, Sodium Metasilicate, and Sodium Silicate combine metal cations with silica to form inorganic salts used as corrosion inhibitors in cosmetics. Sodium Metasilicate also functions as a chelating agent and Sodium Silicate as a buffering and pH adjuster. Sodium Metasilicate is currently used in 168 formulations at concentrations ranging from 13% to 18%. Sodium Silicate is currently used in 24 formulations at concentrations ranging from 0.3% to 55%. Potassium Silicate and Sodium Silicate have been reported as being used in industrial cleaners and detergents. Sodium Metasilicate is a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) food ingredient. Aqueous solutions of Sodium Silicate species are a part of a chemical continuum of silicates based on an equilibrium of alkali, water, and silica. pH determines the solubility of silica and, together with concentration, determines the degree of polymerization. Sodium Silicate administered orally is readily absorbed from the alimentary canal and excreted in the urine. The toxicity of these silicates has been related to the molar ratio of SiO2/Na2O and the concentration being used. The Sodium Metasilicate acute oral LD50 ranged from 847 mg/kg in male rats to 1349.3 mg/kg in female rats and from 770 mg/kg in female mice to 820 mg/kg in male mice. Gross lesions of variable severity were found in the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, larynx, lungs, and kidneys of dogs receiving 0.25 g/kg or more of a commercial detergent containing Sodium Metasilicate; similar lesions were also seen in pigs administered the same detergent and dose. Male rats orally administered 464 mg/kg of a 20% solution containing either 2.0 or 2.4 to 1.0 ratio of sodium oxide showed no signs of toxicity, whereas doses of 1000 and 2150 mg/kg produced gasping, dypsnea, and acute depression. Dogs fed 2.4 g/kg/day of Sodium Silicate for 4 weeks had gross renal lesions but no impairment of renal function. Dermal irritation of Potassium Silicate, Sodium

  18. Photoemission study of cerium silicate model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Tomáš; Matolín, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of silicon with cerium oxide was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using two model systems CeOx/Si(1 1 1) and Si/CeO2(1 1 1)/Cu(1 1 1) which can be used for fundamental studies in the field of microelectronics and heterogeneous catalysis. The interaction was found to be strong and lead to a formation of cerium silicate films of the proposed stoichiometry Ce4.67Si3O13. Their maximum thickness was limited by diffusion of silicon. Beside silicate other compounds were growing on the surface - SiO2, Si2O, Si, and CeO2. The assignment of the formed species is based on the interpretation of photoemission spectra involving the measurements of various reference O/Si and Sisbnd O/Cu systems.

  19. Conductimetric determination of decomposition of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroeger, C.; Lieck, K.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a procedure is given to detect decomposition of silicate systems in the liquid state by conductivity measurements. Onset of decomposition can be determined from the temperature curves of resistances measured on two pairs of electrodes, one above the other. Degree of decomposition can be estimated from temperature and concentration dependency of conductivity of phase boundaries. This procedure was tested with systems PbO-B2O3 and PbO-B2O3-SiO2.

  20. Polymorphism in silicate-postperovskite reviewed (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, O. D.

    2010-12-01

    Early on in the examination of postperovskite(ppv)-type magnesium metasilicate it had been debated if this potential deep mantle mineral can be subject to further structural transformation as function of composition, pressure, and temperature within the range of conditions in the lower mantle. MgSiO3-perovskite accommodates minor elements through local lattice distortions by tilt of the corner-sharing octahedral framework. The CaIrO3-type ppv structure does not seem to possess a similar mechanism of local relaxation of lattice strain. Instead minor elements may rather be accommodated by periodic kinks in this layered structure (1). This kinking-mechanism allows for generating a plethora of polymorphs similar in structure and free energy (1,2). However, the elastic properties of ppv may be strongly affected by this type of structural modification. While structural analogues of silicate-ppv exhibit this type of polymorphism (3,4) previous attempts to examine polymorphism in silicate-ppv remained suggestive (2,5). This is mostly owed to the severe constraints imposed on powder diffraction studies conducted under the extreme conditions of stability of MgSiO3-ppv. Here I present new results on silicate-ppv based on different experimental strategies which shed more light on this complex yet important issue of structural modifications in minor-element bearing silicate-ppv. (1) Oganov et al. Nature 438, 1142 (2005);(2) Tschauner et al. Am. Min. 93, 533 (2008); (3) Shirako et al. Phys. Chem. Min. 36, 455 (2009); Yakovlev et al. J. Sol. Stat. Chem. 182, 1545 (2009) Work supported through NNSA Cooperative Agreement DOE-FC88-01NV14049

  1. Biodegradable Polyester/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    compatible with the polymer [5-9]. In this paper we report the synthesis and properties of both PLA and PHB nanocomposites with different nanoclays...hydroxy polyester, polylactide (PLA) and fl-hydroxy polyester, polyhydroxybutyrate ( PHB ) with layered silicates have been successfully prepared by melt...extrusion of PLA and PHB with organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) and fluoromica. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are improved

  2. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) by choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate in the ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide.

    PubMed

    Onghena, Bieke; Jacobs, Jeroen; Van Meervelt, Luc; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-08-14

    The ionic liquid choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Chol][Tf2N], was used for the extraction of neodymium(III), in combination with choline hexafluoroacetylacetonate, [Chol][hfac], as the extractant. The binary mixture of [Chol][Tf2N] and water shows temperature-dependent phase behavior, with an upper critical solution temperature of 72 °C. A novel extraction technique, homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction (HLLE), was applied to this solvent system. HLLE is based on the use of thermomorphic solvent mixtures and has the advantage of forming a homogeneous phase during mixing. Extraction is not kinetically hindered by an interface and the extraction equilibrium is reached faster than in the case of heterogeneous mixing in conventional solvent extraction. Several extraction parameters were studied for the extraction of neodymium(III) with [Chol][hfac]: temperature, pH, extractant concentration and loading of the ionic liquid phase. A speciation study was performed to determine the stoichiometry of the extracted neodymium(III) complex and a plausible extraction mechanism is proposed. Neodymium is extracted as a tetrakis hexafluoroacetylacetonate complex with one choline cation as counter ion. The crystal structure of the extracted complex showed the presence of a coordination bond between the choline counter ion and the neodymium(III) center, resulting in a coordination number of nine. The stripping of the loaded neodymium and the influence of acid and extractant concentrations on the phase behavior of the [Chol][Tf2N]-H2O system were investigated.

  3. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  4. Water and the density of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richet, Pascal; Whittington, Alan; Holtz, François; Behrens, Harald; Ohlhorst, Susanne; Wilke, Max

    A review of published and newly measured densities for 40 hydrous silicate glasses indicates that the room-temperature partial molar volume of water is 12.0+/-0.5cm3/mol. This value holds for simple or mineral compositions as well as for complex natural glasses, from rhyolite to tephrite compositions, prepared up to 10-20kbar pressures and containing up to 7wt% H2O. This volume does not vary either with the molar volume of the water-free silicate phase, with its degree of polymerization or with water speciation. Over a wide range of compositions, this constant value implies that the volume change for the reaction between hydroxyl ions and molecular water is zero and that, at least in glasses, speciation does not depend on pressure. Consistent with data from Ochs and Lange (1997, 1999), systematics in volume expansion for SiO2-M2O systems (M=H, Li, Na, K) suggests that the partial molar thermal expansion coefficient of H2O is about 4× 10-5 K-1 in silicate glasses.

  5. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pengfei; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  6. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    PubMed

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation.

  7. Low-loss channel optical waveguide fabrication in Nd(3+)-doped silicate glasses by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Ling; Han, Peigao; Shi, Meng; Yao, Yicun; Hu, Bing; Wang, Mingwei; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2011-11-21

    Optical waveguides were fabricated in neodymium-doped silicate glass by using a low-repetition-rate (1 kHz) femtosecond laser inscription. Two different types of waveguide structure are fabricated. In the first, guiding occurs in the focal spot. In the second, guiding occurs in the region between the two filaments. The near-field intensity distribution, propagation loss, index profile reconstruction, and calculation of the modal intensity distribution by the beam propagation method of these waveguides are presented. On the basis of near-field intensity distribution of the light guided through the waveguides and the propagation loss measurement, the optimum writing conditions such as the pulse energy and scan velocity were determined. The waveguide written with 2.2 µJ pulse energy and 50 µm/s scan velocity shows strong guidance at 632.8 nm, with an index contrast of 7 × 10(-4) and a propagation loss of ~0.8 dB/cm.

  8. Silicate release from glass for pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Denise; Bortoluzzi, Fabiana; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Ramirez, Adrian Gustavo

    2008-05-01

    Glass is made of polymeric silica and other minor components, which are necessary for turning the silica into a material more easily moldable and resistant to temperature changes. Glass containers for pharmaceutical usage are classified according to their resistance to a chemical attack, a test carried out in the presence of water and heat. The test is designed to show the released alkalinity, a variable dependent on the amount of sodium oxide, one of the minor components added to the glass mass. In this work, the release of silica from glass by action of constituents from pharmaceutical formulations was investigated. The study included products used in large volumes and usually stored in glass containers. Solutions of amino acids, electrolytes, glucose, oligoelements and others such as heparin and sodium bicarbonate were individually stored in glass containers and heated at 121 degrees C for 30min, as in the water attack test. The test was also carried out only with water, where the pH varied from 2 to 12. The released silicate was measured either by photometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, depending on the nature of the sample. The results showed that silicate is released during the heating cycle even if the contact is with pure water only. The pH exerts a considerable influence on the release, being that the higher the pH, the higher the silica dissolved. An elevated pH, however, is not the only factor responsible for silica dissolution. While in the solutions of NaCl, KCl, Mg Cl2 and ZnSO4 and in most of the amino acids, the concentration of silicate was as high as in pure water (0.1-1.0mg Si/L). In the solutions of sodium acetate, bicarbonate and gluconate, its concentration was much higher, over 30mg Si/L. These results were confirmed by the analysis of commercial products, where in solutions of amino acids the level of silicate ranged from 0.14 to 0.19mg Si/L. On the other hand, calcium gluconate, sodium bicarbonate and potassium phosphate presented

  9. Bioaccumulation of cerium and neodymium by Bacillus cereus isolated from rare earth environments of Chavara and Manavalakurichi, India.

    PubMed

    Challaraj Emmanuel, E S; Vignesh, V; Anandkumar, B; Maruthamuthu, S

    2011-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are among the common minerals in the Rare earth environment that are very precious and also enhance soil properties. The aim of this present study is to evaluate the accumulation of REEs by bacterial isolates of rare earth environment. Morphological and biochemical characterization were done for 37 bacterial isolates and also molecular studies were carried out using 16S rRNA sequencing method. The assessment of REEs composition in soil samples of Chavara and Manavalakurichi analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed the abundance of Cerium and Neodymium among lanthanides. The bioaccumulation study of rare earth elements by Bacillus cereus were accomplished employing FT-IR spectrum and ICP-OES analysis. The significant accumulation of rare earth elements especially Cerium and Neodymium was noticed in Bacillus cereus isolated from rare earth environment.

  10. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  11. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  12. Variations in the neodymium and strontium isotopic composition and REE content of molluscan shells from the Cretaceous Western Interior seaway

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, S.G.; Kyser, T.K. )

    1993-08-01

    Rare earth element concentrations, [epsilon][sub ND](T) values, and strontium isotopic compositions of mollusc shells were used to trace variations in the neodymium and strontium isotopic composition of the epicontinental Late Cretaceous Western Interior seaway of North America. Rare earth element patterns are different in aragonite and calcite produced by the molluscs endemic to the seaway, indicating that either mineralogical control or possibly scavenging by organic films associated with the different phases of biogenic carbonate resulted in differential partitioning of the REEs from seawater during shell formation. The biogenic carbonate also may contain REEs associated with Fe-flocs trapped in the shells during growth, but these flocs cannot result in different REE patterns of aragonite and calcite produced by the molluscs. The neodymium isotopic composition of the Western Interior seaway is inferred to have varied 13 [epsilon]-units over 20 My as a result of incursions of seawater from the Arctic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, river influx from tectonically active terranes, benthic diagenetic fluxes, and volcanic ash falls. Ash from a variety of volcanic centers in western North America was significant in producing rapid and marked changes in [sup 143]Nd/[sup 144]Nd ratios of the seaway, and abrupt regional variations in neodymium isotopic composition of the seaway make the construction of an accurate neodymium isotope evolution curve difficult for this basin. Strontium isotopic compositions of the mollusc shells indicate the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratio of the Western Interior seaway was generally similar to contemporaneous oceans, although, periodically, the basin had strontium isotopic compositions distinct from contemporaneous seawater. 58 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, A A; Kulagin, O V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A

    2013-07-31

    A compact neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a record-high pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz (pulse duration 30 ns) is developed. Thermally induced phase distortions are compensated using wave phase conjugation. The integral depolarisation of radiation is decreased to 0.4% by using linear compensation schemes. The second harmonic of laser radiation can be used for pumping Ti : sapphire multipetawatt complexes. (letters)

  14. Supported neodymium catalysts for isoprene and rac-β-butyrolactone polymerization: modulation of reactivity by controlled grafting.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Michael; Brulé, Emilie; Vitorino, Marta J; Ajellal, Noureddine; Robert, Carine; Gauvin, Régis M; Thomas, Christophe M

    2011-01-17

    A series of hybrid materials, bearing neodymium silylamide initiating groups, have been shown to mediate isoprene polymerization when combined with alkyl aluminum activators [methylaluminoxane, AlEt(2)Cl, Al(iBu)(3)]. The surface species nature and relative distribution were correlated with isoprene polymerization activity and selectivity. This approach to stereocontrol modulation has been extended to racemic β-butyrolactone isoselective ring opening polymerization.

  15. Evaluating United States and world consumption of neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium in final products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Matthew

    This paper develops scenarios of future rare-earth-magnet metal (neodymium, dysprosium, terbium, and praseodymium) consumption in the permanent magnets used in wind turbines and hybrid electric vehicles. The scenarios start with naive base-case scenarios for growth in wind-turbine and hybrid-electric-vehicle sales over the period 2011 to 2020, using historical data for each good. These naive scenarios assume that future growth follows time trends in historical data and does not depend on any exogenous variable. Specifically, growth of each technological market follows historical time trends, and the amount of rare earths used per unit of technology remains fixed. The chosen reference year is 2010. Implied consumptions of the rare earth magnet metals are calculated from these scenarios. Assumptions are made for the material composition of permanent magnets, the market share of permanent-magnet wind turbines and vehicles, and magnet weight per unit of technology. Different scenarios estimate how changes in factors like the material composition of magnets, growth of the economy, and the price of a substitute could affect future consumption. Each scenario presents a different method for reducing rare earth consumption and could be interpreted as potential policy choices. In 2010, the consumption (metric tons, rare-earth-oxide equivalent) of each rare-earth-magnet metal was as follows. Total neodymium consumption in the world for both technologies was 995 tons; dysprosium consumption was 133 tons; terbium consumption was 50 tons; praseodymium consumption was zero tons. The base scenario for wind turbines shows there could be strong, exponential growth in the global wind turbine market. New U.S. sales of hybrid vehicles would decline (in line with the current economic recession) while non-U.S. sales increase through 2020. There would be an overall increase in the total amount of magnetic rare earths consumed in the world. Total consumption of each rare earth in the short

  16. Adsorption of β-carotene on modified magnesium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Guo, Ning; Fu, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Modified flocculation magnesium silicate is prepared by a hydrothermal process at 120°C for 18 h after adding Al2(SO4)3 into the magnesium silicate gel. Compared with standard magnesium silicate with 328.116 m2 g-1 surface area, this modified magnesium silicate has a bigger BET surface area of 536.803 m2 g-1 and a lower interlayer water content. Modified magnesium silicate exhibits high β-carotene adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity of 364.96 mg g-1. It is shown that when suspended in organic solvent, this material can be used effectively for carotenoid separation. Furthermore, our results suggest that modified magnesium silicate may be a promising candidate as an absorbent in the decoloring of oil.

  17. The interplay between particulate and dissolved neodymium in the Western North Atlantic: First insights and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stichel, T.; Kretschmer, S.; Lambelet, M.; van de Flierdt, T.; Rutgers van der Loeff, M.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; Gerringa, L. J.; De Baar, H. J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved neodymium (Nd) isotopes (expressed as ɛNd) have been widely used as a water mass tracer to reconstruct paleo ocean circulation. However, the marine geochemical cycle of Nd is not well understood. Unclear input mechanisms, scarcity of available data, and observed decoupling between dissolved ɛNd and Nd concentration patterns ([Nd]) are only a few of the unresolved issues. The latter is often referred to as the Nd paradox(e.g. Goldstein and Hemming 2003). Here we revisit this paradox with an unprecedented data set on particulate Nd isotope and concentration data from five stations along the Dutch GEOTRACES transect GA02 in the western North and equatorial Atlantic Ocean (cruises 64PE319 and 64PE321 from April to July 2010). Particulates were collected with in-situ pumps on 0.8 µm Supor filters and subjected to a total digestion procedure in the home laboratory. The particulates collected farthest north (Irminger Sea and Labrador Sea) show a strong affinity to the nearby land masses in their Nd isotope composition: Very negative values (ɛNd ≈-20) are observed in the Labrador Sea, which is surrounded by old continental rocks. More positive values of up to ɛNd ≈-4 are found east of Greenland probably derived from the Nansen Fjord Formation's basaltic rocks. In these two areas the particulate ɛNd is offset from dissolved Nd isotopes by up to 7.7 ɛ-units, but reveals a similar vertical distribution. Further downstream of the flow path of the North Atlantic Deep Water, dissolved and particulate Nd isotopic compositions in the water column seem to merge and become indistinguishable from one another south of Bermuda (BATS station). This seems to indicate that particulate and dissolved fractions exchange with increasing distance from source regions and age of water masses. Neodymium concentrations in particulates [pNd] are low (KD<5%) and invariant. However, most stations show a significant increase in [pNd] close to the seafloor, where [pNd] nearly

  18. Experiments of water formation on warm silicates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-10

    When dust grains have a higher temperature than they would have in dense clouds, and when H, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} have a negligible residence time on grains, the formation of water should still be possible via the hydrogenation of OH and Eley-Rideal-type reactions. We determined that the OH desorption energy from an amorphous silicate surface is at least 143 meV (1656 K). This is 400 K higher than the value previously used in chemical models of the interstellar medium and is possibly as high as 410 meV (4760 K). This extends the temperature range for the efficient formation of water on grains from about 30 K to at least 50 K, and possibly over 100 K. We do not find evidence that water molecules leave the surface upon formation. Instead, through a thermal programmed desorption experiment, we find that water formed on the surface of an amorphous silicate desorbs at around 160 K. We also measured the cross-sections for the reaction of H and D with an O{sub 3} layer on an amorphous silicate surface at 50 K. The values of the cross-sections, σ{sub H} = 1.6 ± 0.27 Å{sup 2} and σ{sub D} = 0.94 ± 0.09 Å{sup 2}, respectively, are smaller than the size of an O{sub 3} molecule, suggesting the reaction mechanism is more likely Eley-Rideal than hot-atom. Information obtained through these experiments should help theorists evaluate the relative contribution of water formation on warm grains versus in the gas phase.

  19. Modeling Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R -1 2 -3 0 Multiscale Modeling of the Structure of Material Modeling Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium - Silicate -Hydrate...Nanomechanical Behavior of Calcium - Silicate -Hydrate Mei Qiang Chandler and John F. Peters Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer...DEM) was used to model the nanomechanical behavior of Calcium - Silicate -Hydrate (C-S-H). The inter- particle forces consist of the traditional friction

  20. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  1. Lithium metaborate flux in silicate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingamells, C.O.

    1970-01-01

    Lithium metaborate is an effective flux for silicates and other rock-forming minerals. The glass resulting from fusion is mechanically strong, reasonably nonhygroscopic, and is readily soluble in dilute acids. These characteristics lead to its use in X-ray spectrography and in methods which require whole-rock solutions, such as atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Difficulties have been encountered in the use of such techniques : a high-quality reagent has been difficult to obtain ; fusion conditions must be rather closely controlled; graphite crucibles used in the fusions need special treatment. Methods for overcoming these difficulties are outlined. Selected procedures for various instrumental methods of analysis are described. ?? 1970.

  2. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  3. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  4. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  5. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, D.

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  6. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A. |; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  7. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  8. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales. PMID:26364882

  9. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Silicate mineralogy at the surface of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft has revealed geochemical diversity across Mercury's volcanic crust. Near-infrared to ultraviolet spectra and images have provided evidence for the Fe2+-poor nature of silicate minerals, magnesium sulfide minerals in hollows and a darkening component attributed to graphite, but existing spectral data is insufficient to build a mineralogical map for the planet. Here we investigate the mineralogical variability of silicates in Mercury's crust using crystallization experiments on magmas with compositions and under reducing conditions expected for Mercury. We find a common crystallization sequence consisting of olivine, plagioclase, pyroxenes and tridymite for all magmas tested. Depending on the cooling rate, we suggest that lavas on Mercury are either fully crystallized or made of a glassy matrix with phenocrysts. Combining the experimental results with geochemical mapping, we can identify several mineralogical provinces: the Northern Volcanic Plains and Smooth Plains, dominated by plagioclase, the High-Mg province, strongly dominated by forsterite, and the Intermediate Plains, comprised of forsterite, plagioclase and enstatite. This implies a temporal evolution of the mineralogy from the oldest lavas, dominated by mafic minerals, to the youngest lavas, dominated by plagioclase, consistent with progressive shallowing and decreasing degree of mantle melting over time.

  11. Planar waveguides in neodymium-doped calcium niobium gallium garnet crystals produced by proton implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Xiao, Liu; Meng, Chen; Li-Li, Fu; Rui-Lin, Zheng; Hai-Tao, Guo; Zhi-Guang, Zhou; Wei-Nan, Li; She-Bao, Lin; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the fabrication and optical properties of a planar waveguide in a neodymium-doped calcium niobium gallium garnet (Nd:CNGG) crystal are reported. The waveguide is produced by proton (H+) implantation at 480 keV and a fluence of 1.0×1017 ions/cm2. The prism-coupling measurement is performed to obtain the dark mode of the waveguide at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The reflectivity calculation method (RCM) is used to reconstruct the refractive index profile. The finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) is employed to calculate the guided mode profile of the waveguide. The stopping and range of ions in matter 2010 (SRIM 2010) code is used to simulate the damage profile induced by the ion implantation. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that the waveguide can confine the light propagation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11405041, 61405240, 61077070, 61177086, 51002181, and 61177084), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation for New Teachers of Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (NUPTSF) (Grant No. NY214159), and the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. ZSF0401).

  12. Laser treatment of a neodymium magnet and analysis of surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Rizwan, M.; Kassas, M.

    2016-08-01

    Laser treatment of neodymium magnet (Nd2Fe14B) surface is carried out under the high pressure nitrogen assisting gas. A thin carbon film containing 12% WC carbide particles with 400 nm sizes are formed at the surface prior to the laser treatment process. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the laser treated layer are examined using the analytical tools. The corrosion resistance of the laser treated surface is analyzed incorporating the potentiodynamic tests carried out in 0.05 M NaCl+0.1 M H2SO4 solution. The friction coefficient of the laser treated surface is measured using the micro-scratch tester. The wetting characteristics of the treated surface are assessed incorporating the sessile water drop measurements. It is found that a dense layer consisting of fine size grains and WC particles is formed in the surface region of the laser treated layer. Corrosion resistance of the surface improves significantly after the laser treatment process. Friction coefficient of laser treated surface is lower than that of the as received surface. Laser treatment results in superhydrophobic characteristics at the substrate surface. The formation of hematite and grain size variation in the treated layer slightly lowers the magnetic strength of the laser treated workpiece.

  13. Efficient graphene Q switching and mode locking of 1.34 μm neodymium lasers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Long; Li, Xian-Lei; He, Jing-Liang; Hao, Xiao-Peng; Yang, Ying; Wu, Yong-Zhong; Liu, Shan-De; Zhang, Bai-Tao

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that few-layered graphene sheets used as a saturable absorber can provide efficient Q-switching and mode-locking modulation in 1.34 μm Nd:GdVO(4) bulk lasers. The minimum Q-switched pulses were 450 ns for 260 mW average power, 43 kHz repetition rate, and 2.5 μJ pulse energy. For the mode-locked laser, an average power of 1.29 W was achieved with 11 ps pulse duration and 13 nJ pulse energy. To our knowledge, this average power is the highest yet obtained from a graphene mode-locked laser, and the corresponding optical-optical efficiency of 23% is the best result among 1.3 μm neodymium mode-locked lasers. The quality factor M(2) of the Q-switched beam was 1.4 and 1.6 in the horizontal and longitudinal planes, respectively, and the M(2) of the mode-locked beam reached 1.1 and 1.0. These results clearly indicate the advantages of few-layered graphene as a saturable absorber.

  14. Near-infrared electroluminescence at room temperature from neodymium-doped gallium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Joo Han; Holloway, Paul H.

    2004-09-06

    Strong near-infrared (NIR) electroluminescence (EL) at room temperature from neodymium (Nd)-doped gallium nitride (GaN) thin films is reported. The Nd-doped GaN films were grown by radio-frequency planar magnetron cosputtering of separate GaN and metallic Nd targets in a pure nitrogen ambient. X-ray diffraction data did not identify the presence of any secondary phases and revealed that the Nd-doped GaN films had a highly textured wurtzite crystal structure with the c-axis normal to the surface of the film. The EL devices were fabricated with a thin-film multilayered structure of Al/Nd-doped GaN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}/indium-tin oxide and tested at room temperate. Three distinct NIR EL emission peaks were observed from the devices at 905, 1082, and 1364 nm, arising from the radiative relaxation of the {sup 4}F{sub 3sol2} excited-state energy level to the {sup 4}I{sub 9sol2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11sol2}, and {sup 4}I{sub 13sol2} levels of the Nd{sup 3+} ion, respectively. The threshold voltage for all the three emission peaks was {approx}150 V. The external power efficiency of the fabricated EL devices was {approx}1x10{sup -5} measured at 40 V above the threshold voltage.

  15. Mineralogy of the mid-ocean-ridge basalt source from neodymium isotopic composition of abyssal peridotites.

    PubMed

    Salters, Vincent J M; Dick, Henry J B

    2002-07-04

    Inferring the melting process at mid-ocean ridges, and the physical conditions under which melting takes place, usually relies on the assumption of compositional similarity between all mid-ocean-ridge basalt sources. Models of mantle melting therefore tend to be restricted to those that consider the presence of only one lithology in the mantle, peridotite. Evidence from xenoliths and peridotite massifs show that after peridotite, pyroxenite and eclogite are the most abundant rock types in the mantle. But at mid-ocean ridges, where most of the melting takes place, and in ophiolites, pyroxenite is rarely found. Here we present neodymium isotopic compositions of abyssal peridotites to investigate whether peridotite can indeed be the sole source for mid-ocean-ridge basalts. By comparing the isotopic compositions of basalts and peridotites at two segments of the southwest Indian ridge, we show that a component other than peridotite is required to explain the low end of the (143)Nd/(144)Nd variations of the basalts. This component is likely to have a lower melting temperature than peridotite, such as pyroxenite or eclogite, which could explain why it is not observed at mid-ocean ridges.

  16. Constraints on ocean circulation at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum from neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, April N.; Haley, Brian A.; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Frank, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Global warming during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ˜ 55 million years ago (Ma) coincided with a massive release of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system, as indicated by carbon isotopic data. Previous studies have argued for a role of changing ocean circulation, possibly as a trigger or response to climatic changes. We use neodymium (Nd) isotopic data to reconstruct short high-resolution records of deep-water circulation across the PETM. These records are derived by reductively leaching sediments from seven globally distributed sites to reconstruct past deep-ocean circulation across the PETM. The Nd data for the leachates are interpreted to be consistent with previous studies that have used fish teeth Nd isotopes and benthic foraminiferal δ13C to constrain regions of convection. There is some evidence from combining Nd isotope and δ13C records that the three major ocean basins may not have had substantial exchanges of deep waters. If the isotopic data are interpreted within this framework, then the observed pattern may be explained if the strength of overturning in each basin varied distinctly over the PETM, resulting in differences in deep-water aging gradients between basins. Results are consistent with published interpretations from proxy data and model simulations that suggest modulation of overturning circulation had an important role for initiation and recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system associated with the PETM.

  17. Neodymium(III) Complexes of Dialkylphosphoric and Dialkylphosphonic Acids Relevant to Liquid-Liquid Extraction Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Krause, Jeanette A.; Sweet, Lucas E.

    2016-01-27

    The complexes formed during the extraction of neodymium(III) into hydrophobic solvents containing acidic organophosphorus extractants were probed by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, visible spectrophotometry, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the compound Nd(DMP)3 (1, DMP = dimethyl phosphate) revealed a polymeric arrangement in which each Nd(III) center is surrounded by six DMP oxygen atoms in a pseudo-octahedral environment. Adjacent Nd(III) ions are bridged by (MeO)2POO– anions, forming the polymeric network. The diffuse reflectance visible spectrum of 1 is nearly identical to that of the solid that is formed when an n-dodecane solution of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HA) is saturated with Nd(III), indicating a similar coordination environment around the Nd center in the NdA3 solid. The visible spectrum of the HA solution fully loaded with Nd(III) is very similar to that of the NdA3 material, both displaying hypersensitive bands characteristic of an pseudo-octahedral coordination environment around Nd. These spectral characteristics persisted across a wide range of organic Nd concentrations, suggesting that the pseudo-octahedral coordination environment is maintained from dilute to saturated conditions.

  18. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  19. Interference of neodymium magnets with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ryf, Salome; Wolber, Thomas; Duru, Firat; Luechinger, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Permanent magnets may interfere with the function of cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets have become widely available in recent years and are incorporated in various articles of daily life. We conducted an in-vitro study to evaluate the ability of NdFeB magnets for home and office use to cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs. The magnetic fields of ten NdFeB magnets of different size and shape were measured at increasing distances beginning from the surface until a field-strength (B-field) value of 0.5 mT was reached. Furthermore, for each magnet the distance was determined at which a sample pacemaker switched from magnet mode to normal mode. Depending on the size and remanence of individual magnets, a B-field value of 0.5 mT was found at distances ranging from 1.5 cm to 30 cm and a value of 1 mT at distances from 1 cm to 22 cm. The pacemaker behavior was influenced at distances from 1 cm to 24 cm. NdFeB magnets for home and office use may cause interference with cardiac pacemakers and ICDs at distances up to 24 centimeters. Patient education and product declarations should include information about the risk associated with these magnets.

  20. Osmium and neodymium isotopic constraints on the temporal and spatial evolution of Siberian flood basalt sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horan, M.F.; Walker, R.J.; Fedorenko, V.A.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    Picrites from the Gudchikhinsky suite, the oldest rocks examined, have ??Os of +5.3 to +6.1 and ??Nd of +3.7 to +4.0. The osmium and neodymium isotopic compositions of these rocks are similar to some modern ocean-island basalts (OIB), consistent with their derivation from an mantle plume. Picrites from the stratigraphically higher Tuklonsky suite have similar ??Os of +3.4 to +6.5, but ??Nd of -0.9 to -2.6. The similar ??Os, but lower ??Nd , suggest that some magmas from the same OIB-type, mantle source were contaminated by lithospheric components. A differentiated ankaramite flow, associated with the top of the stratigraphically higher Morongovsky suite, has ??Os of +9.8 to +10.2 and ??Nd of +1.3 to +1.4. The higher ??Os may indicate that the plume source was heterogeneous with respect to osmium isotopic composition, consistent with osmium isotopic measurements in rocks from other plume sources. Mg-rich, alkaline rocks (meymechites) from the Guli area that erupted much nearer the end of the flood-basalt event have ??Os of -1.2 to -2.6 and ??Nd of +3.7 to +4.9. These rocks were probably produced by low degrees of partial melting of mantle after the main stages of flood-basalt production. -from Authors

  1. Rhenium-osmium and samarium-neodymium isotopic systematics of the stillwater complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, D.D.; Morgan, J.W.; Walker, R.J.; Shirey, S.B.; Carlson, R.W.; Zientek, M.L.; Koski, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Isotopic data for the Stillwater Complex, Montana , which formed about 2700 Ma (million years ago), were obtained to evaluate the role of magma mixing in the formation of strategic platinum-group element (PGE) ore deposits. Neodymium and osmium isotopic data indicate that the intrusion formed from at least two geochemically distinct magmas. Ultramafic affinity (U-type) magmas had initial ??Nd of -0.8 to -3.2 and a chondritic initial 187Os/186Os ratio of ???0.88, whereas anorthositic affinity (A-type) magmas had ??Nd of -0.7 to +1.7 and an initial 187Os/186Os ratio of ???1.13. These data suggest that U-type magmas were derived from a lithospheric mantle source containing recycled crustal materials whereas A-type magmas originated either by crustal contamination of basaltic magmas or by partial melting of basalt in the lower crust. The Nd and Os isotopic data also suggest that Os, and probably the other PGEs in ore horizons such as the J-M Reef, was derived from A-type magmas. The Nd and Os isotopic heterogeneity observed in rocks below the J-M Reef also suggests that A-type magmas were injected into the Stillwater U-type magma chamber at several stages during the development of the Ultramafic series.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of alkali modified zinc-tellurite glasses doped with neodymium.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, R; Babu, S Surendra; Jayasankar, C K

    2010-09-15

    Neodymium doped zinc-tellurite glasses of composition TeO(2)-ZnO-Na(2)O-Li(2)O have been prepared and characterized for their thermal, structural and optical properties. Differential thermal analysis revealed reasonably good forming tendency of the glass composition. FTIR spectra were used to analyze the functional groups present in the glass. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were derived from the absorption spectrum and used to calculate the radiative lifetime, branching ratio and stimulated emission cross-section for (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(9/2, 11/2, 13/2) transitions. The quantum efficiency of the (4)F(3/2) level is comparable to the typical values obtained for the Nd(2)O(3)-doped glasses. The decay properties for higher concentration of Nd(2)O(3) were analyzed using Inokuti-Hirayama model to investigate the non-radiative relaxation of the (4)F(3/2) emitting level. The experimental values of branching ratio and saturation intensity of (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(11/2) transition and calculated spectroscopic quality factor indicate the favourable lasing action in these glasses.

  3. Analysis of a 10 megawatt space-based solar-pumped neodymium laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurweg, U. H.

    1984-01-01

    A ten megawatt solar-pumped continuous liquid laser system for space applications is examined. It is found that a single inflatable mirror of 434 m diameter used in conjunction with a conical secondary concentrator is sufficient to side pump a liquid neodymium lasant in an annular tube of 6 m length and 1 m outer and 0.8 m inner diameter. About one fourth of intercepted radiation converging on the laser tube is absorbed and one fifth of this radiation is effective in populating the upper levels. The liquid lasant is flowed through the annular laser cavity at 1.9 m/s and is cooled via a heat exchanger and a large radiator surface comparable in size to the concentrating mirror. The power density of incident light within the lasant of approximately 68 watt/cu cm required for cw operation is exceeded in the present annular configuration. Total system weight corresponds to 20,500 kg and is thus capable of being transported to near Earth orbit by a single shuttle flight.

  4. Power scaling of diode-pumped neodymium yttrium aluminum borate laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the efficient diode-pumped operation of a neodymium yttrium aluminum borate (NYAB) laser at 531.5 nm using two 1-W diode-laser arrays for the pump. With 1380 mW of CW power incident on the crystal, as much as 51 mW of 532.5-nm laser radiation was obtained with the unoptimized cavity. The corresponding optical-to-optical conversion efficiency was 3.7 percent. A plot of the output 531.5 nm vs incident 807 nm pump power is shown. The crystal output power was critically dependent on the rotational and translational adjustment of the NYAB crystal inside the cavity. It is suggested that a crystal cut at the exact phase matching angle, placed in a cavity with proper optimal reflection and transmission mirror coatings, and pumped at proper wavelength can result in higher output power. Thus, the NYAB output power approaches that of a CW intracavity frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser.

  5. High-mobility thin film transistors with neodymium-substituted indium oxide active layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenguo; Lan, Linfeng Xiao, Peng; Sun, Sheng; Li, Yuzhi; Song, Wei; Gao, Peixiong; Wang, Lei; Ning, Honglong; Peng, Junbiao

    2015-09-14

    Thin-film transistors (TFTs) with neodymium-substituted indium oxide (InNdO) channel layer were demonstrated. The structural properties of the InNdO films as a function of annealing temperature have been analyzed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The InNdO thin films showed polycrystalline nature when annealed at 450 °C with a lattice parameter (cubic cell) of 10.255 Å, which is larger than the cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film (10.117 Å). The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that no Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters were found in the InNdO film, implying that Nd was incorporated into the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} lattice. The InNdO TFTs annealed at 450 °C exhibited more excellent electrical properties with a high mobility of 20.4 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and better electric bias stability compared to those annealed at 300 °C, which was attributed to the reduction of the scattering centers and/or charge traps due to the decrease of the |Nd3d{sub 5/2}{sup 5}4f{sup 4}O2p{sup −1}〉 electron configuration.

  6. Highly efficient neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser end pumped by a semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    In recent experiments, 80-mW CW power in a single mode has been achieved from a neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser with only 1 W of electrical power input to a single semiconductor laser array pump. This corresponds to an overall efficiency of 8 percent, the highest reported CW efficiency for a Nd:YAG laser. A tightly focused semiconductor laser end pump configuration is used to achieve high pumping intensities (on the order of 1 kW/sq cm), which in turn causes the photon to photon conversion efficiency to approach the quantum efficiency (76 percent for Nd:YAG at 1.06 microns pumped at 0.810 micron). This is achieved despite the dual-lobed nature of the pump. Through the use of simple beam-combining schemes (e.g., polarization coupling and multireflection point pumping), output powers over 1 W and overall electrical to optical efficiencies as high as 10 percent are expected.

  7. Bleb reduction using combined photodisruptive and photocoagulative neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Harsh; Dangda, Sonal

    2016-01-01

    This case report aims to highlight the role of photodisruptive neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) (1064 nm) laser in the treatment of bleb dysesthesia, which occurs in overhanging blebs or with perilimbal spread. Although treatment of such dysesthetic blebs with laser photocoagulation has been previously described, cases where the height of bleb precludes laser penetration, desired effect might not be seen. We herein describe a technique using a combination of photocoagulative (532 nm) and photodisruptive (1064 nm) Nd:YAG laser for a high bleb migrating nasally and inferiorly along the limbus in a 64-year-old female, causing hypotony and consequent macular edema. Successful reduction could be achieved within a week of treatment. By 6 weeks, intraocular pressure improved to 8 mmHg, macular edema subsided, and visual acuity improved to 6/6. Although surgical procedures to correct bleb dysesthesia are available, laser procedures being quick outpatient modalities are more comfortable for the patients. PMID:28112138

  8. Neodymium doped fluoroindogallate glasses as highly-sensitive luminescent non-contact thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Luiz A. O.; Souza, Adelmo S.; Carlos, Luís D.; Malta, Oscar L.

    2017-01-01

    Trivalent neodymium (Nd3+) can be used as high performance temperature luminescent ion sensor, namely in the near infrared spectral region. The disadvantage presented in the use of this ion is that transitions from thermally coupled levels show very different emission intensities. In order to solve this critical problem we propose to use Nd3+-doped fluoroindogallate glasses with low phonon cutoff energy (500 cm-1) as the active medium. By using a dopant concentration that minimizes losses due to cross relaxation processes and detecting the emissions of the thermally coupled levels with a R928 photomultiplier, without correction response for the wavelength dependence of the intensity, we have succeeded in getting the highest relative thermal sensitivities so far observed, 2.5%ṡK-1 and 7.4%ṡK-1, for the 4F5/2 → 4I9/2/4F3/2 → 4I9/2 and 4F7/2 → 4I9/2/4F3/2 → 4I9/2 intensity ratios, respectively at 288 K.

  9. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  10. PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL DERIVATIVES OF THE TRIVALENT LANTHANIDE ELEMENTS (NEODYMIUM, SAMARIUM, AND YTTERBIUM)

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, T. Don; Andersen, R.A.

    1980-07-01

    The anionic complexes of the type (ML{sub x})(Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}M'Cl{sub 2}, where M is lithium or sodium, L is diethyl ether or N,N,-N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethylethylenediamine, and M{prime} is neodymium, samarium, or ytterbium, have been prepared from the metal trichlorides and the pentamethylcyclopentadienide anion. The neutral species (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}NdCl(THF), (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}NdN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, and (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCl(THF) have also been prepared. The mono-ring derivatives (Na(OEt{sub 2}){sub 2})((C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})NdCl{sub 3}) and (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5})Nd(N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2} are also described.

  11. Optical constants determination of neodymium and gadolinium in the 3-nm to 100-nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Windt, D. L.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Seely, J. F.

    2006-08-01

    The optical constants (n, k) of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction N = n+ik = 1-δ+ik of Nd (Neodymium) and Gd (Gadolinium) are determined in the wavelength range of 3 nm to 100 nm by the transmittance method using synchrotron radiation. Nd and Gd films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 180 nm were fabricated on Si photodiodes (which served as the coating substrates as well as the detectors) and capped with Si layers to protect these reactive rare earth elements from oxidation. The imaginary part (k) obtained directly from the transmittance measurement is used in the derivation of the real part (δ) of the complex index of refraction N through the Kramers- Kronig integral. The measured optical constants are used in the design of currently developed Nd- and Gd-based multilayers for solar imaging applications. Our results on Nd and Gd optical constants and the reflectance of some Nd- and Gd-based multilayers are presented.

  12. Rapid neodymium release to marine waters from lithogenic sediments in the Amazon estuary

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Tristan C. C.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Chmeleff, Jérôme; van Beek, Pieter; Souhaut, Marc; Boaventura, Geraldo; Seyler, Patrick; Jeandel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations and neodymium isotopic composition (ɛNd) are tracers for ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. Although models suggest that REE release from lithogenic sediment in river discharge may dominate all other REE inputs to the oceans, the occurrence, mechanisms and magnitude of such a source are still debated. Here we present the first simultaneous observations of dissolved (<0.45 μm), colloidal and particulate REE and ɛNd in the Amazon estuary. A sharp drop in dissolved REE in the low-salinity zone is driven by coagulation of colloidal matter. At mid-salinities, total dissolved REE levels slightly increase, while ɛNd values are shifted from the dissolved Nd river endmember (−8.9) to values typical of river suspended matter (−10.6). Combining a Nd isotope mass balance with apparent radium isotope ages of estuarine waters suggests a rapid (3 weeks) and globally significant Nd release by dissolution of lithogenic suspended sediments. PMID:26158849

  13. Application of neodymium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates.

    PubMed

    Krajkó, Judit; Varga, Zsolt; Yalcintas, Ezgi; Wallenius, Maria; Mayer, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    A novel procedure has been developed for the measurement of (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratio in various uranium-bearing materials, such as uranium ores and ore concentrates (UOC) in order to evaluate the usefulness and applicability of variations of (143)Nd/(144)Nd isotope ratio for provenance assessment in nuclear forensics. Neodymium was separated and pre-concentrated by extraction chromatography and then the isotope ratios were measured by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The method was validated by the measurement of standard reference materials (La Jolla, JB-2 and BCR-2) and the applicability of the procedure was demonstrated by the analysis of uranium samples of world-wide origin. The investigated samples show distinct (143)Nd/(144)Nd ratio depending on the ore type, deposit age and Sm/Nd ratio. Together with other characteristics of the material in question, the Nd isotope ratio is a promising signature for nuclear forensics and suggests being indicative of the source material, the uranium ore.

  14. Sensitization of neodymium ion luminescence by chromium ions in a Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 5/O/sub 12/ crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, E.V.; Il'ichev, N.N.; Laptev, V.V.; Malyutin, A.A.; Ostroumov, V.G.; Pashinin, P.P.; Shcherbakov, I.A.

    1982-03-01

    An investigation is reported of the spectral, luminescence, and lasing properties of a Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 5/O/sub 12/ crystal activated with chromium and neodymium ions. The high efficiency of the energy transfer process from chromium to neodymium ions is demonstrated. For example, the probability of an elementary Cr/sup 3 +/--Nd/sup 3 +/ interaction event in a Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 5/O/sub 12/ crystal was 12 times higher than that in a Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/ crystal. It was found that sensitization of neodymium ion luminescence by chromium ions can increase severalfold the energy characteristics of cw and pulsed neodymium lasers. An investigation of the free-lasing parameters shows that the ultimate differential lasing efficiency of neodymium in a Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Cr:Nd crystal is 3.6 times higher than that for a YAG:Nd crystal under comparable conditions.

  15. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  16. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in iron meteorites display an astonishing chemical and mineralogical variety, ranging from chondritic to highly fractionated, silica- and alkali-rich assemblages. In spite of this, their origin is commonly considered to be a simple one: mixing of silicates, fractionated or unfractionated, with metal. The latter had to be liquid in order to accommodate the former in a pore-free way which all models accomplish by assuming shock melting. II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions, including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. They also pose a formidable conundrum: young silicates are enclosed by very old metal. This and many other incompatibilities between models and reality forced the formulation of an alternative genetic model for irons. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  17. Immobilisation of fully sulfonated polyaniline on nanostructured calcium silicate.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, Thomas; Dominis, Anton; McFarlane, Andrew J; Johnston, James H; Richardson, Michael J; Kane-Maguire, Leon A P; Wallace, Gordon G

    2007-12-01

    Up to 7.4% (w/w) of the sulfonated polyaniline, poly(2-methoxyaniline-5-sulfonic acid) (PMAS) can be absorbed onto nanostructured calcium silicates. Spectroscopic and leaching studies on the novel PMAS-silicate nanocomposites obtained indicate that attachment of the PMAS occurs via electrostatic binding of PMAS sulfonate groups to Ca2+ sites on the silicates. The surface area and pore volume of the nanocomposites are comparable to those of pure silicate and increase the surface area of the PMAS polymer by several orders of magnitude. The PMAS emeraldine salt in the nanocomposites retains its chemical reactivity, being readily oxidised and reduced to its pernigraniline and leucoemeraldine forms, respectively. The conductivity of the composite is comparable to that of the pure PMAS, several orders of magnitude higher than that of dried nanostructured calcium silicate.

  18. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  19. Laboratory Studies on Silicates Relevant for the Physics of TNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, John Robert; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Baratta, Giuseppe; Mennella, Vito; Colangeli, Luigi

    2003-06-01

    Silicates are one of the principal components present in Solar System objects. Silicates evolve in space modifying their physical properties according to the astronomical environments they go through. To characterise the nature of TNOs in the framework of the formation and evolution of the Solar System, experiments on structural transitions of silicates have been performed in the laboratory to simulate some of the processing suffered by the dust. The infrared spectral properties of possible silicate candidates thought to be present in TNOs have been studied. The results of thermal annealing of amorphous silicates and amorphisation of crystalline forsterite (pure-Mg olivine) by ion irradiation are presented. The observable properties of TNOs surfaces are inferred.

  20. The identification of crystalline olivine in cometary silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; Ryan, Eileen V.

    1989-01-01

    An intermediate-resolution spectrum of the 8-13 micron region in comet Halley is obtained which shows a prominent silicate emission feature with structure not observed before in other comets or in interstellar silicates. The presence of a strong 11.3 micron peak reported by Bregman and coworkers is confirmed, and evidence is found for additional structure in the band. By comparison with spectra of interplanetary dust particles and laboratory silicates, it is concluded that small crystalline olivine particles are a major component of the silicates in this comet; other silicates (e.g., amorphous or hydrated) must also be present. The identification of crystalline olivine in this part of the spectrum is supported by the observation of four peaks in 20-50 micron airborne spectra of this comet which have also been attributed to olivine.

  1. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  2. Organics Synthesized Using Iron-Grain Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. M.; Cody, G. D.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2003-01-01

    We use Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) synthesis to produce hydrocarbons by hydrogenating carbon monoxide via catalytic reactions. The products of these reactions have been studied using 'natural' catalysts and calculations of the efficiency of FTT synthesis in the Solar Nebula suggest that these types of reactions could make significant contributions to the composition of material near three AU. We coat Fe-silicate grains with organic material using FTT synthesis to simulate the chemistry in the early Solar Nebula. In our experimental setup, we roughly model a nebular environment where grains are successively transported from hot to cold regions of the nebula. In other words, the starting gases and FTT products are continuously circulated through the grains at high temperature with intervals of cooling. Organics generated in this manner could represent the carbonaceous material incorporated in comets and meteorites. We analyze the resulting organics and present the results.

  3. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  4. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, Mari L.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 Si.sub.4 O.sub.13 pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs.sub.2 O and TiO.sub.2 loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO.sub.2 and Cs.sub.2 that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass.

  5. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, M.L.

    1997-01-07

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 13} pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass. 10 figs.

  6. Visible absorption spectra of the 4f electron transitions of neodymium, praseodymium, holmium and erbium complexes with fleroxacin and their analytical application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naixing; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Xiuqin; Si, Zhikun; Bai, Haitao; Tian, Cong

    2002-05-01

    The absorption spectra of the 4f electron transitions of neodymium, praseodymium, holmium and erbium complexes with fleroxacin in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride were studied by normal and derivative spectrophotometry. Their molar absorptivity at the maximum absorption bands are about 5.3 (at 571 nm) times greater for neodymium, 2.8 (at 483 nm) times greater for praseodymium, 12.6 (at 448.5 nm) times greater for holmium and 9.7 (at 519 nm) times greater for erbium than those in the absence of complexing agents. The second-derivative spectrum is used both to eliminate the interference from other rare earths and to improve the sensitivity. Beer's law is obeyed from 3.0 - 70 microg ml(-1) for neodymium and holmium, from 6.0 - 70 microg ml(-1) for erbium, and from 12.0 - 70 microg ml(-1) for praseodymium. The relative standard deviations are 1.9% and 1.5% for 7.5 microg ml(-1) of neodymium and holmium, and 2.1% and 1.6% for 15.0 microg ml(-1) of praseodymium and erbium, respectively. Their detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio = 2) are 3.2 microg ml(-1), 1.3 microg ml(-1), (1.1) microg ml(-1) and 2.5 microg ml(-1) for praseodymium, neodymium, holmium and erbium, respectively. A new system for the simultaneous determinations of the praseodymium, neodymium, holmium and erbium in rare earth mixtures with good accuracy and selectivity is proposed.

  7. A water-ethanol mixed-solution hydrothermal route to silicates nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xun . E-mail: wangxun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhuang Jing; Peng Qing; Li Yadong . E-mail: ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2005-07-15

    In this manuscript, series of silicates nanowires, such as calcium silicate, strontium silicate, barium silicate, zinc silicate and cadmium silicate, etc., have been successfully prepared from a water-ethanol mixed solution system through a hydrothermal synthetic way. The formation process of these silicates nanowires has been studied in detail. Due to their rich sources and possible novel properties from reduced dimensionalities, we believe that the synthesis of these silicates nanowires may bring some new opportunity in the solid state chemistry and nanoscience and technology fields, etc.

  8. Past Hydrological Variability in the Congo Basin inferred from Neodymium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon, G.

    2015-12-01

    Major events of vegetation changes and soil erosion occurred in Central Africa during the last few millennia, at a time when the first farmers settled in the rainforest. The palaeoclimatic context in which these environmental changes took place still remains poorly constrained. Improving our knowledge on the drivers of past hydrological variability in Central Africa is important to further evaluate the relative role of climate versus humans in shaping late Holocene African landscapes. In this study, we have used neodymium (Nd) isotopes in a marine sediment core to reconstruct the composition of the sediment load exported from the Congo Basin during the Holocene. Core KZR23 was recovered at 2200 m water depth from within the Congo submarine canyon and is characterized by high sedimentation rates (about 2m/kyr), thereby allowing reconstruction of past river sediment discharge at an unprecedented high temporal resolution. A suite of river particulate samples collected from the main tributaries within the Congo watershed was analyzed in order to tag each major sub-basin with the characteristic geochemical and Nd isotopic signatures of its source region. In parallel, an annual series of suspended particles sampled on a monthly basis at the Congo River ORE-HYBAM station (Brazzaville) was also analyzed to characterize the seasonality of sediment provenance in relation with present hydrological cycle. Using Nd isotopes as tracers for sediment provenance together and other proxy data for past erosion, vegetation and rainfall patterns (i.e. bulk sediment radiocarbon data, pollens, biomarkers, compound-specific isotope analyses), we will provide a more comprehensive picture of past hydrological variability in the Congo Basin for the Holocene period.

  9. A spectrophotometric study of neodymium(III) complexation in chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdisov, Art A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    The formation constants of neodymium complexes in chloride solutions have been determined spectrophotometrically at temperatures of 25 to 250°C and a pressure of 50 bars. The simple ion, Nd 3+, is dominant at 25°C, whereas NdCl 2+ and NdCl 2+ are the dominant species at elevated temperatures. Equilibrium constants were calculated for the following reactions: Nd 3+ + Cl - = NdCl 2+ β 1, Nd 3+ + 2 · Cl - = NdCl +2 β 2. The values of β 1 were found to be identical within experimental error to the values reported by Gammons et al. (1996) but substantially different from those proposed by Stepanchikova and Kolonin (1999). The values of β 2 obtained in this study agree relatively well with those of Gammons et al. (1996); differences are greatest at intermediate temperature and reach a maximum of one half an order of magnitude at 200°C. Theoretical estimates of β 1 and β 2 by Haas et al. (1995) using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state predict lower stability of NdCl 2+ and NdCl 2+ at temperatures above 150°C than determined in this study. A new fit to the HKF equation of state is therefore proposed, which yields values for β 1 and β 2 similar to those obtained experimentally. Using the formation constants reported in this study, we predict that typical seafloor hydrothermal vent fluids will contain a maximum concentration of Nd of ˜2 ppb. This value is several orders of magnitude lower than would be required to explain the levels of Nd mobility commonly reported for seafloor hydrothermal systems and suggests that other ligands may be more important than Cl in transporting rare earth elements in the Earth's crust.

  10. A spectrophotometric study of neodymium(III) complexation in sulfate solutions at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdisov, Art. A.; Reukov, V. V.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2006-02-01

    The formation constants of neodymium complexes in sulfate solutions have been determined spectrophotometrically at temperatures of 30-250 °C and a pressure of 100 bars. The dominant species in the solution are NdSO 4+ and Nd(SO 4) 2-, with the latter complex being more important at higher temperature. Equilibrium constants were calculated for the following reactions: Nd+SO4=NdSO4,β1; Nd+2·SO4=Nd(SO4)2,β2; NdSO4+SO4=Nd(SO4)2,Ks. The values of β1 and β2, were determined for 30 and 100 °C, whereas for higher temperatures it was only possible to determine the stepwise formation constant Ks. The values of the formation constants obtained in this study for 30 and 100 °C are in excellent agreement with those predicted theoretically by Wood [Wood, S.A., 1990b. The aqueous geochemistry of the rare-earth elements and yttrium. 2. Theoretical predictions of speciation in hydrothermal solutions to 350 °C at saturation water vapor pressure. Chem. Geol.88 (1-2), 99-125] and Haas et al. [Haas, J.R., Shock, E.L., Sassani, D.C., 1995. Rare earth elements in hydrothermal sysytems: estimates of standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous complexes of the rare earth elements at high pressures and temperatures. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta59 (21), 4329-4350], and those for the stepwise formation constant ( Ks) agree reasonably well with the predictions of Wood (1990b).

  11. Neodymium isotopic composition of intermediate and deep waters in the glacial southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Taryn L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; McCave, I. Nick

    2013-12-01

    Neodymium (Nd) isotopes, tracers of deep water mass source and mixing, were measured on sedimentary planktic foraminifera with authigenic coatings from a depth-transect of cores (1400-4800 m) from Chatham Rise in the southwest Pacific, over the past 30 ka. We observe deglacial variations in the Nd isotopic composition, which showed an average glacial composition of ɛNd=-5.0 (1σ; ±0.3n=4) for cores sites below 3200 mbsl. No significant deglacial variation was observed in the Nd isotopic composition of intermediate depth waters (1400 mbsl), in contrast with benthic foraminifera δC13 data. The deglacial ɛNd shift of CDW in the southwest Pacific is consistent with changes observed in the deep South Atlantic and Equatorial Indian Ocean, but ɛNd values are offset by ˜1ɛNd-unit to more radiogenic values throughout the deglacial records, likely due to admixture of a Nd isotope signal which was modified in the Southern Ocean or Pacific, perhaps by boundary exchange. However, this modification did not overprint the deglacial Nd isotope change. The consistent deglacial evolution of ɛNd in the South Atlantic, Equatorial Indian and southwest Pacific CDW, is evidence for the connection of CDW during the glacial, and propagation of diminished North Atlantic Deep Water export to the glacial Southern Ocean. In contrast, spatial heterogeneities in the benthic foraminifera δC13 of CDW have been observed in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific basins of the deep glacial Southern Ocean. The Nd isotope data implies a well-connected deep Southern Ocean, which transported waters from the Atlantic to the Indian and Pacific oceans, during the glacial. This suggests that basin-scale variability in the glacial δC13 composition of CDW was unrelated to circulation changes.

  12. Neodymium associated with foraminiferal carbonate as a recorder of seawater isotopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Bayon, Germain

    2014-03-01

    Neodymium isotopic ratios in marine environments have been used as a tracer of water masses and exchange processes between dissolved and particulate phases. The interest in this tracer has been growing with improvement of our knowledge on its chemical behaviour in the modern ocean and the identification of sedimentary phases that preserve past seawater ɛNd values. In the last few decades the Nd isotopic composition measured on Fe-Mn crusts, sediment leachates, bulk carbonate fraction, corals and fish teeth have been increasingly interpreted in the context of understanding the role of the ocean in paleoclimate changes. In particular, calcareous foraminiferal tests (shells) have acquired increasing attention as an archive of seawater Nd isotopic signatures, because it allows continuous high-resolution records to be measured and directly compared to other proxies including stable isotopes and trace metals. The main challenge of interpreting the Nd isotopic composition of foraminifera is determining the origin of the Nd preserved within them. In this review, we present an overview of methodological progress including that of bulk foraminifera and microanalyses within foraminiferal tests, as well as geochemical meaning of extracted Nd concentrations and isotopic compositions. The growing body of evidence suggests that Nd isotopic signatures of sedimentary planktonic foraminifera correspond to bottom water values rather than surface water ones. The Nd-rich phases associated with sedimentary foraminifera are adhesive nano-scale particles of Mn and Fe oxides and hydroxides, and Mn-rich carbonates formed within layers of foraminiferal calcite. Mechanical cleaning to remove clay minerals is likely to be sufficient in most cases to reconstruct past bottom water circulations. Unresolved issues include the potential influence of pore water Nd on ɛNd values extracted from sedimentary foraminiferal tests under different sedimentalogical and oceanographic conditions.

  13. Development of an empirical kinetic model for sonocatalytic process using neodymium doped zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Vahid, Behrouz; Saadi, Shabnam; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-03-01

    The degradation of Acid Blue 92 (AB92) solution was investigated using a sonocatalytic process with pure and neodymium (Nd)-doped ZnO nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The 1% Nd-doped ZnO nanoparticles demonstrated the highest sonocatalytic activity for the treatment of AB92 (10 mg/L) with a degradation efficiency (DE%) of 86.20% compared to pure ZnO (62.92%) and sonication (45.73%) after 150 min. The results reveal that the sonocatalytic degradation followed pseudo-first order kinetics. An empirical kinetic model was developed using nonlinear regression analysis to estimate the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kapp) as a function of the operational parameters, including the initial dye concentration (5-25 mg/L), doped-catalyst dosage (0.25-1 g/L), ultrasonic power (150-400 W), and dopant content (1-6% mol). The results from the kinetic model were consistent with the experimental results (R(2)=0.990). Moreover, DE% increases with addition of potassium periodate, peroxydisulfate, and hydrogen peroxide as radical enhancers by generating more free radicals. However, the addition of chloride, carbonate, sulfate, and t-butanol as radical scavengers declines DE%. Suitable reusability of the doped sonocatalyst was proven for several consecutive runs. Some of the produced intermediates were also detected by GC-MS analysis. The phytotoxicity test using Lemna minor (L. minor) plant confirmed the considerable toxicity removal of the AB92 solution after treatment process.

  14. Effect of neodymium substitution on structural and ferroelectric properties of BNT ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Vijayeta; Dwivedi, R.K.; Thakur, O.P.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • First time, we synthesized (Bi{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}){sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} system by semi wet technique. • Grain size reduced with doping and Nd acts as an inhibitor in the grain growth. • Specimen with x = 0.02 exhibits excellent ferroelectric properties at RT. • P–E loops show the co-existence of polar and non polar regions around ‘T{sub d}’. - Abstract: Polycrystalline specimens of (Bi{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}){sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (BNNT) ceramic system with compositions x ≤ 0.04 were synthesized by semi-wet technique using ethylene glycol precursor. Structural and electrical properties were investigated in detail to observe the effect of neodymium (Nd) substitution in BNT system. XRD patterns for all the specimens showed single phase formation with rhombohedral structure. Field emission scanning electron micrographs (FE-SEM) revealed that the grain growth was inhibited significantly with Nd content. The temperature dependence behaviour of dielectric constant revealed that the depolarisation temperature ‘T{sub d}’ decreases whereas temperature of maximum dielectric constant ‘T{sub m}’ increases with Nd concentration. The piezoelectric charge coefficient (d{sub 33}) showed maxima at x = 0.02 and well defined ferroelectric behaviour was observed for all the samples.

  15. Electrochemical properties of dual phase neodymium-doped ceria alkali carbonate composite electrolytes in intermediate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Tae; Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Ka-Young; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Song, Sun-Ju; Park, Byoungnam; Park, Jun-Young

    2015-02-01

    Composite electrolyte materials composed of neodymium-doped ceria (Nd0.2Ce0.8O1.9; NDC) and (Li-0.5Na)2CO3 are investigated to understand the unique behaviors of their multi-ionic conduction. In the intermediate temperature, the NDC-based carbonate composite electrolytes exhibit a much higher conductivity compared to pure NDC. It has been claimed that the oxide ions are transported in the doped-ceria phase via oxygen vacancies and the protons are conducted through the second carbonate phase, thereby resulting in an enhanced ionic conductivity. However, it has not been experimentally demonstrated if the proton conduction within the carbonate phase aided in improving the conductivity of oxygen ions in the composite system. Hence, the primary objective of this work is to cultivate a deeper insight into the conduction property of these composites as an attempt to clarify the ionic transport phenomenon responsible for enhanced conductivity. Electrical conductivities of NDC and NDC/carbonate materials are investigated as a function of oxygen partial pressure and vapor pressure of water to understand transport properties of composite electrolytes. The ionic and electronic transference numbers of composite electrolytes are measured by the oxygen- and hydrogen-concentration cells containing water. The dominant charge carriers are identified quantitatively through the analysis of the partial conductivity of proton, oxygen ions, and electrons (holes). Understanding the transport properties and transference numbers of composite electrolytes can contribute to the development of commercial solid oxide fuel cells, which can be done by reducing the operating temperature using a highly ionic conductive NDC/carbonate composite electrolyte at the intermediate temperature.

  16. High resolution neodymium characterization along the Mediterranean Sea margins: implications for ɛNd modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Arsouze, Thomas; Jeandel, Catherine; Revillon, Sidonie

    2016-04-01

    An extensive compilation of published neodymium (Nd) concentrations and isotopic compositions (ɛNd) was realized in order to establish a new database and a map (using a high resolution geological map of the area) of the distribution of these parameters for all the Mediterranean margins. Data were extracted from different kinds of samples: river solid discharge deposited on the shelf, sedimentary material collected on the margin or geological material outcropping above or close to a margin. Additional analyses of surface sediments were done, in order to improve this dataset in key areas (e.g Sicilian strait). The Mediterranean margin Nd isotopic signatures vary from non-radiogenic values around the Gulf of Lions, (ɛNd values -11) to radiogenic values around the Aegean and the Levantine sub-basins up to +6. Using a high resolution regional oceanic model (1/12° of horizontal resolution), ɛNd distribution was simulated for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. The high resolution of the model provides the opportunity to study in more details the processes governing the Nd isotope distribution in the marine environment. This work highlights that a significant interannual variability of ɛNd distribution in seawater could occur. In particular, important hydrological events such as the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT), associated with deep water formed in the Aegean sub-basin, could induce a shift in Nd IC at intermediate depths that could be noticeable in the Western part of the basin. This highlights that the temporal and geographical variations of ɛNd could represent an interesting insight of Nd as a quasi-conservative tracer of water masses in the Mediterranean Sea, in particular in the context of paleo-oceanographic applications, i.e. to explore if EMT-type signatures occurred in the past (Roether et al., 2014, Gacic et al., 2011).

  17. Clinical efficacy of the dual-pulsed Q-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser: Comparison with conservative mode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook; Lee, Mi Hye; Chang, Sung Eun; Yun, Woo Jin; Won, Chong Hyun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

    2013-12-01

    The quality (Q)-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser is one of the first non-ablative lasers to be used for facial resurfacing and photorejuvenation. Recently, the method of low-fluence Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers known as 'laser toning' has been used for non-ablative skin rejuvenation and for the treatment of melasma in Asian countries. We report our experience of using a novel Q-switched Nd:YAG laser that was operated as a dual pulse at half fluence and 140-μs intervals compared with conservative mode laser.

  18. Cerium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes as scavengers of X/XO-derived superoxide radical.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Traykova, Maria

    2006-09-01

    The cerium (III) and neodymium (III) complexes with 3,3'-benzylidenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin] were synthesized and characterized by different analytical and spectral methods. The synthesis of these complexes is taken into consideration with cytotoxic screening and study of their antioxidant effect. Their cytotoxicity toward cancerous cell cultures correlated with the weakness of the coordinative bond between the cation and organic ligand and with the capability to scavenge superoxide radicals as well. On the basis of the data reported by us earlier and our new results, it was proposed that cerium (III) complex with 3,3'-benzylidenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin] might induce intracellular acidification along with control over the extracellular oxidative stress.

  19. Acute effects of anti-inflammatory drugs on neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser-induced uveitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Millichamp, N J; Dziezyc, J; Rohde, B H; Chiou, G C; Smith, W B

    1991-08-01

    Dogs were treated with flunixin meglumine, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; L-651,896, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor; and matrine, a herbal anti-inflammatory drug. Acute inflammation was induced in the eyes by disruption of the anterior lens capsule, using a neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. Intraocular pressure, pupil diameter, and eicosanoid production in the aqueous humor were measured. Statistically significant effects were seen in the eyes of flunixin meglumine-treated dogs where mydriasis was maintained and aqueous prostaglandin E2 concentration was reduced.

  20. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  1. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  2. Layer silicates in a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; MacKinnon, I. D. R.

    1985-11-01

    Analytical electron microscopy on individual grains from a portion of a chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (aggregate W7029C1 from the NASA Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection) shows that layer silicates compose 50 percent of the silicate fraction examined. These layer silicates can be classified into two distinct crystallochemical groups: (1) fine-grained, polycrystalline smectite minerals; and (2) well-ordered, single crystals of kaolinite and Mg-poor talc. The layer silicates in this portion of sample W7029(asterisk)A are dissimilar to those described in other chondritic porous aggregates. The predominant layer silicate assemblage in W7029(asterisk)A indicates that heating of the aggregate during atmospheric entry was brief and probably to a temperature less than 300 C. Comparison with terrestrial phyllosilicate occurrences suggests that some layer silicates in aggregate W7029(asterisk)A may have been formed by alteratiton from preexisting silicate minerals at low temperatures (less than 25 C) after aggregate formation.

  3. On the Stabilization of Ribose by Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Horton, Scott R.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Šponer, Jiří; Šponer, Judit E.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    The RNA-world theory hypothesizes that early Earth life was based on the RNA molecule. However, the notion that ribose, the sugar in RNA, is unstable still casts a serious doubt over this theory. Recently, it has been found that the silicate-mediated formose reaction facilitates the stabilization of ribose. Using accurate quantum chemical calculations, we determined the relative stability of the silicate complexes of arabinose, lyxose, ribose, and xylose with the intent to determine which would form predominantly from a formose-like reaction. Five stereoisomers were investigated for each complex. The stereoisomers of 2:1 ribose-silicate are the more stable ones, to the extent that the least stable of these is even more stable than the most stable stereoisomer of the other 2:1 sugar-silicate complexes. Thus, thermodynamically, a formose-like reaction in the presence of silicate minerals should preferentially form the silicate complex of ribose over the silicate complex of arabinose, lyxose, and xylose.

  4. Characterization of chitin-metal silicates as binding superdisintegrants.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Iyad; Daraghmeh, Nidal; Al-Remawi, Mayyas; Leharne, Stephen A; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Badwan, Adnan

    2009-12-01

    When chitin is used in pharmaceutical formulations, processing of chitin with metal silicates is advantageous, from both an industrial and pharmaceutical perspective, compared to processing using silicon dioxide. Unlike the use of acidic and basic reagents for the industrial preparation of chitin-silica particles, coprecipitation of metal silicates is dependent upon a simple replacement reaction between sodium silicate and metal chlorides. When coprecipitated onto chitin particles, aluminum, magnesium, or calcium silicates result in nonhygroscopic, highly compactable/disintegrable compacts. Disintegration and hardness parameters for coprocessed chitin compacts were investigated and found to be independent of the particle size. Capillary action appears to be the major contributor to both water uptake and the driving force for disintegration of compacts. The good compaction and compression properties shown by the chitin-metal silicates were found to be strongly dependent upon the type of metal silicate coprecipitated onto chitin. In addition, the inherent binding and disintegration abilities of chitin-metal silicates are useful in pharmaceutical applications when poorly compressible and/or highly nonpolar drugs need to be formulated.

  5. Reagentless and calibrationless silicate measurement in oceanic waters.

    PubMed

    Giraud, William; Lesven, Ludovic; Jońca, Justyna; Barus, Carole; Gourdal, Margaux; Thouron, Danièle; Garçon, Véronique; Comtat, Maurice

    2012-08-15

    Determination of silicate concentration in seawater without addition of liquid reagents was the key prerequisite for developing an autonomous in situ electrochemical silicate sensor (Lacombe et al., 2007) [11]. The present challenge is to address the issue of calibrationless determination. To achieve such an objective, we chose chronoamperometry performed successively on planar microelectrode (ME) and ultramicroelectrode (UME) among the various possibilities. This analytical method allows estimating simultaneously the diffusion coefficient and the concentration of the studied species. Results obtained with ferrocyanide are in excellent agreement with values of the imposed concentration and diffusion coefficient found in the literature. For the silicate reagentless method, successive chronoamperometric measurements have been performed using a pair of gold disk electrodes for both UME and ME. Our calibrationless method was tested with different concentrations of silicate in artificial seawater from 55 to 140×10(-6) mol L(-1). The average value obtained for the diffusion coefficient of the silicomolybdic complex is 2.2±0.4×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), consistent with diffusion coefficient values of molecules in liquid media. Good results were observed when comparing known concentration of silicate with experimentally derived ones. Further work is underway to explore silicate determination within the lower range of oceanic silicate concentration, down to 0.1×10(-6) mol L(-1).

  6. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  7. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  8. Microstructures of Rare Silicate Stardust from Nova and Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S

    2011-01-01

    Most silicate stardust analyzed in the laboratory and observed around stellar environments derives from O-rich red giant and AGB stars [1,2]. Supernova (SN) silicates and oxides are comparatively rare, and fewer than 10 grains from no-va or binary star systems have been identified to date. Very little is known about dust formation in these stellar environments. Mineralogical studies of only three O-rich SN [3-5] and no nova grains have been performed. Here we report the microstructure and chemical makeup of two SN silicates and one nova grain.

  9. Magnetic fabric interpretation complicated by inclusions in mafic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagroix, France; Borradaile, Graham J.

    2000-10-01

    The expected relationships between anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and crystal symmetry of mafic silicates are disturbed by the presence of magnetite inclusions. Measurements of AMS, anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence (AARM) and theoretically predicted bulk susceptibilities from chemical composition all favour the exercise of great caution in the interpretation of preferred orientation distributions of silicates from a rock's AMS. These results pertain mainly to the mafic silicates of lower crustal rocks (pyroxene, orthopyroxene, amphibole) and some of their low-grade metamorphic alterations (serpentine, epidote).

  10. Thermally responsive aqueous silicate mixtures and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Vinson, E.F.

    1987-02-03

    A method is described of plugging or sealing a zone in a subterranean formation comprising: (a) contacting the zone with an aqueous silicate composition consisting essentially of (i) an aqueous solution containing an alkali metal silicate; and, (ii) a thermally responsive gelation activator selected from the group consisting of lactose, dextrose, fructose, galactose, mannose, mantose, xylose and mixtures thereof; and (b) activating the gelation activator in response to a thermal change in the composition within the formation whereby the silicate composition is caused to form a gel in the zone.

  11. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, S.; Drake, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    Metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle (Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al. 1997). The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. In this work, we investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid. Experiments were performed in the Experimental Geochemistry Laboratory at the University of Arizona utilizing a non-end loaded piston cylinder apparatus with a barium carbonate pressure medium. Starting materials were created by combining the mafic and silicic compositions of Jaeger and Drake (2000) with Fe powder (~25 wt% of the total mixture) to achieve metal saturation. Small amounts of W, Ge, Ga2O3 and NiO powder (less than 2 wt% each) were also added to the starting compositions. The experiments were contained in a graphite capsule and performed with temperature and pressure fixed at 1400ºC and 1.5 GPa. Experimental run products were analyzed with the University of Arizona Cameca SX50 electron microprobe with four wavelength dispersive spectrometers and a PAP ZAF correction program. All experiments in our set are saturated with metal and silicate liquid, indicating that oxygen fugacity is below IW. Several of the runs also contain a gallium-rich spinel as an additional saturating phase. Quench phases are also present in the silicate liquid in all runs. The experimentally produced liquids have nbo/t values (calculated using the method of Mills, 1993) that range from 1.10 to 2.97. These values are higher than those calculated for the liquids in the Jaeger and Drake (2000) study. The higher nbo/t values are due to uptake of Fe by the melt. The initial silicate

  12. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  13. Synthesis and thermal stability studies of a series of metastable Dion–Jacobson double-layered neodymium-niobate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Josepha, Elisha A.; Farooq, Sara; Mitchell, Cinnamon M.; Wiley, John B.

    2014-08-15

    The Dion–Jacobson double-layered perovskite, RbNdNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}, is used as a precursor to synthesize the series ANdNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=H, Li, Na, K, NH{sub 4}, Ag), and (MCl)NdNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Mn, Fe, Cu) through ion-exchange reactions ≤400 °C. Thermal stability studies indicated that most of these compounds are metastable. A combination of X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal analysis were used to determine various low temperature decomposition pathways; these pathways were very dependent on the interlayer species. Overall the ANdNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} series was found to be less stable than the corresponding lanthanides, ALaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: A new series of topochemically-prepared metastable neodymium-containing layered perovskites are studied. - Highlights: • A series of new layered neodymium containing perovskites were synthesized by ion exchange. • Products were studied by variable temperature X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. • Most of the series are metastable showing exothermic transitions on decomposition. • The Nd compounds are less stable due to the smaller size of the Nd relative to La.

  14. Assessment of optical path length in tissue using neodymium and water absorptions for application to near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nighswander-Rempel, Stephen P; Kupriyanov, Valery V; Shaw, R Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of blood oxygen saturation using near-IR spectroscopy is made difficult by uncertainties in both the absolute value and the wavelength dependence of the optical path length. We introduce a novel means of assessing the wavelength dependence of path length, exploiting the relative intensities of several absorptions exhibited by an exogenous contrast agent (neodymium). Combined with a previously described method that exploits endogenous water absorptions, the described technique estimates the absolute path length at several wavelengths throughout the visible/near-IR range of interest. Isolated rat hearts (n = 11) are perfused separately with Krebs-Henseleit buffer (KHB) and a KHB solution to which neodymium had been added, and visible/near-IR spectra are acquired using an optical probe made up of emission and collection fibers in concentric rings of diameters 1 and 3 mm, respectively. Relative optical path lengths at 520, 580, 679, 740, 800, 870, and 975 nm are 0.41+/-0.13, 0.49+/-0.21, 0.90+/-0.09, 0.94+/-0.01, 1.00, 0.84+/-0.01, and 0.78+/-0.08, respectively. The absolute path length at 975 nm is estimated to be 3.8+/-0.6 mm, based on the intensity of the water absorptions and the known tissue water concentration. These results are strictly valid only for the experimental geometry applied here.

  15. Global flows of critical metals necessary for low-carbon technologies: the case of neodymium, cobalt, and platinum.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Kondo, Yasushi; Suh, Sangwon; Shigetomi, Yosuke; Oshita, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    This study, encompassing 231 countries and regions, quantifies the global transfer of three critical metals (neodymium, cobalt, and platinum) considered vital for low-carbon technologies by means of material flow analysis (MFA), using trade data (BACI) and the metal contents of trade commodities, resolving the optimization problem to ensure the material balance of the metals within each country and region. The study shows that in 2005 international trade led to global flows of 18.6 kt of neodymium, 154 kt of cobalt, and 402 t of platinum and identifies the main commodities and top 50 bilateral trade links embodying these metals. To explore the issue of consumption efficiency, the flows were characterized according to the technological level of each country or region and divided into three types: green ("efficient use"), yellow ("moderately efficient use"), and red ("inefficient use"). On this basis, the shares of green, yellow, and red flows in the aggregate global flow of Nd were found to be 1.2%, 98%, and 1.2%, respectively. For Co, the respective figures are 53%, 28%, and 19%, and for Pt 15%, 84%, and 0.87%. Furthermore, a simple indicator focusing on the composition of the three colored flows for each commodity was developed to identify trade commodities that should be prioritized for urgent technical improvement to reduce wasteful use of the metals. Based on the indicator, we discuss logical, strategic identification of the responsibilities and roles of the countries involved in the global flows.

  16. Efficient Recovery of Neodymium in Acidic System by Free-Standing Dual-Template Docking Oriented Ionic Imprinted Mesoporous Films.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xudong; Zhang, Fusheng; Liu, Enli; Xu, Xuechao; Yan, Yongsheng

    2017-01-11

    Neodymium (Nd) is critical component of sintered neodymium magnets. Separation of Nd from consumer magnets has attracted a widespread attention. In this paper, we presented free-standing ionic imprinted mesoporous film materials for facile and highly efficient targeted separation of Nd from permanent magnets by dual-template docking oriented ionic imprinting (DTD-OII) method. DTD-OII is based on dual-template docking oriented molecular imprinting. Compared with conventional imprinting, this novel strategy does not need extra steps, but significantly advance imprinted efficiency. With optimization of functional monomer, our free-standing dual-template docking oriented ionic imprinted mesoporous films exhibit excellent adsorption of Nd by solid-liquid extraction. The Nd adsorption capacity for optimized films was 34.98 mg g(-1) under pH = 3.0. The distribution coefficient of Nd was 636 mL g(-1), which indicates films possess significantly selectivity of Nd. In addition, efficient dual-template docking oriented ionic imprinting makes films demonstrating an outstanding of reusability by cycle test, which appreciating their potential for industrial application.

  17. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates.

  18. Electrochemical extraction of neodymium by co-reduction with aluminum in LiCl-KCl molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong-De; Xu, Yan-Lu; Zhang, Mi-Lin; Xue, Yun; Han, Wei; Huang, Ying; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Zhi-Jian

    2013-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Nd(III) ions in LiCl-KCl and LiCl-KCl-AlCl3 melts on a Mo electrode at 723 K was studied by various electrochemical techniques. The results showed that Nd(III) ions are reduced to Nd(0) through two consecutive steps, and the underpotential deposition of neodymium on pre-deposited Al electrode formed two kinds of Al-Nd intermetallic compounds in LiCl-KCl-AlCl3 solutions. The electrochemical extraction of neodymium was carried out in LiCl-KCl-AlCl3 melts on a Mo electrode at 873 K by potentiostatic and galvanostatic electrolysis. The extraction efficiency was 99.25% after potentiostatic electrolysis for 30 h. Al-Li-Nd bulk alloy was obtained by galvanostatic electrolysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) suggested that Al2Nd and Al3Nd phases were formed in Al-Li-Nd alloy. The microstructure and micro-zone chemical analysis of Al-Li-Nd alloy were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), respectively.

  19. Cathodic processes of neodymium(iii) in LiF-NdF3-Nd2O3 melts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Liu, Xiaolong; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Shizhe; Li, Bing

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry are applied to characterize the cathode processes of neodymium ions on a W electrode in LiF-NdF3 melts with or without the metal Nd. The results indicate that neodymium ions in the LiF-NdF3 (2 wt%) melt are reduced in two steps, i.e. Nd(3+) → Nd(2+) and Nd(2+) → Nd(0), corresponding to starting reduction potentials of 0.35 V vs. Li(+)/Li and 0.1 V vs. Li(+)/Li, respectively. The Nd(3+) → Nd(2+) process is controlled by mass transfer and the Nd(2+) → Nd(0) process is controlled by both an interfacial step and mass transfer. But in the LiF-NdF3 melt with excess metal Nd equilibrium, the kinetics of the above two processes are controlled by mass transfer. After potentiostatic electrolysis at 0.35 V in the LiF-NdF3-Nd2O3 melt NdF2 is formed on the Mo cathode, and metallic Nd is obtained by potentiostatic electrolysis at 0.1 V in the LiF-NdF3-Nd2O3-Nd melt, which validates the above electrochemical reduction results.

  20. The di- and tricalcium silicate dissolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, L.; Nonat, A.; Perrey, D.

    2013-05-15

    In this study, a specially designed reactor connected to an ICP spectrometer enabled the careful determination of the dissolution rates of C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S and CaO, respectively, over a broad range of concentration of calcium and silicates under conditions devoid of C–S–H. The kinetic laws, bridging the dissolution rates and the undersaturations, were obtained after extrapolation of rate zero allowing the estimation of the true experimental solubility products of C{sub 3}S (K{sub sp} = 9.6 · 10{sup −23}), C{sub 2}S (K{sub sp} = 4.3 · 10{sup −18}) and CaO (K{sub sp} = 9.17 · 10{sup −6}). The latter are then compared to the solubilities calculated from the enthalpies of formation. We propose that the observed deviations result from the protonation of the unsaturated oxygen atoms present at the surface of these minerals. Hydration rates measured in cement pastes or in C{sub 3}S pastes are in excellent agreement with the kinetic law found in this study for C{sub 3}S under conditions undersaturated with respect to C–S–H.

  1. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  2. Silicate Urolithiasis during Long-Term Treatment with Zonisamide

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Satoru; Nose, Yorito; Sato, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Teruaki; Takaya, Kanami; Homma, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Silicate urinary calculi are rare in humans, with an incidence of 0.2% of all urinary calculi. Most cases were related to excess ingestion of silicate, typically by taking magnesium trisilicate as an antacid for peptic ulcers over a long period of time; however, there also existed unrelated cases, whose mechanism of development remains unclear. On the other hand, zonisamide, a newer antiepileptic drug, is one of the important causing agents of iatrogenic urinary stones in patients with epilepsy. The supposed mechanism is that zonisamide induces urine alkalinization and then promotes crystallization of urine components such as calcium phosphate by inhibition of carbonate dehydratase in renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we report a case of silicate urolithiasis during long-term treatment with zonisamide without magnesium trisilicate intake and discuss the etiology of the disease by examining the silicate concentration in his urine. PMID:23935637

  3. Metal-silicate catalysts: Single site, mesoporous systems without templates

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Craig E.; Sharp, Katherine; Albert, Austin A; Abbott, Joshua; Peretich, Michael E; Fulvio, Pasquale; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Donohoe, Bryon S.

    2015-06-01

    The textural properties of a family of silicate and mixed metal-silicate materials prepared by a nonaqueous sol-gel reaction involving the cubic silicate Si8O20(SnMe3)8 and metal chlorides MCl4 (M = Si, Ti, Zr) cross-linking reagents are described. Nitrogen adsorption isotherm data is presented and surface area and pore size distribution analyses for several examples of these materials are developed and correlated with the ratio of cross-linking reagent and the cubic silicate building block at the time of synthesis. Significant surface area and pore size distributions that shift to higher pore diameters are observed as the ratio of cross-linking reagent-to-cubic building block increases. A simple strategy for simultaneously controlling the porosity of these matrices while homogeneously dispersing identical metal centers on their surfaces for next generation catalysts is described.

  4. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    PubMed

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  5. Reactivity and applications of layered silicates and layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Thangaraj; Inayat, Alexandra; Schwieger, Wilhelm

    2014-07-21

    Layered materials, such as layered sodium silicates and layered double hydroxides (LDHs), are well-known for their remarkable adsorption, intercalation and swelling properties. Their tunable interlayers offer an interesting avenue for the fabrication of pillared nanoporous materials, organic-inorganic hybrid materials and catalysts or catalyst supports. This perspective article provides a summary of the reactivity and applications of layered materials including aluminium-free layered sodium silicates (kanemite, ilerite (RUB-18 or octosilicate) and magadiite) and layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Recent developments in the use of layered sodium silicates as precursors for the preparation of various porous, functional and catalytic materials including zeolites, mesoporous materials, pillared layered silicates, organic-inorganic nanocomposites and synthesis of highly dispersed nanoparticles supported on silica are reviewed in detail. Along this perspective, we have attempted to illustrate the reactivity and transformational potential of LDHs in order to deduce the main differences and similarities between these two types of layered materials.

  6. Relationship Between Carbon and Silicates in Cometary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Salge, T.; Brearley, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    An ultracarbonaceous IDP fragment is analysed with combined high spatial resolution SEM-EDX and H, C, O isotope mapping to investigate the relationship between the organic matter matrix and the small silicate grains contained within.

  7. Neodymium diffusion in orthopyroxene: Experimental studies and applications to geological and planetary problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Jennifer; Ganguly, Jibamitra; Hervig, Richard; Dohmen, Ralf; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2011-08-01

    resetting of the Sm-Nd mineral age by an "impulsive disturbance" [Prinzhoffer A, Papanastassiou D.A, Wasserburg G.J., 1992. Samarium-neodymium evolution of meteorites. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 56, 797-815].

  8. Neodymium isotopes in biogenic carbonates: reliable archives of ɛNd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, P.; Goldstein, S. L.; Taviani, M.; Frank, N.; McCulloch, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    Neodymium isotope (143Nd/144Nd) compositions from dispersed authigenic ferromanganese oxide fraction in marine sediments, ferromanganese crusts, foraminiferal shells and fossil fish teeth are employed to trace provenance and water mass mixing in the past, having the advantage of not being fractionated by biological processes in the water column. In the modern ocean the different water masses ultimately derive their ɛNd values through continental weathering, erosion and particle-seawater interactions. This geochemical tracer has been only recently applied to scleractinian deep-water coral skeletons sourced from various sites and depths in the Atlantic ocean. Aragonitic corals can be precisely dated by U-series, potentially providing century-long records of intermediate and bathyal zone variability at sub-decadal resolution. Motivated by these recent findings we have investigated the Nd isotopic compositions of living specimens of various calcifying organisms collected in two key locations of the Mediterranean Sea and in the Southern Ocean. In particular, we analyzed several specimens of the aragonitic deep-water corals Desmophyllum dianthus, Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata, Flabellum impensum, the temperate coral Cladocora caespitosa, the calcitic gorgonian coral Corallium rubrum, the bivalves Glans aculeata and Karnekampia bruei and the polychate Serpula vermicularis. Most of the samples were retrieved from the Strait of Sicily and the Southern Adriatic Sea at different water depths. Ten seawater samples from three new profiles in the Mediterranean were also collected at the same locations and depths, offering a unique opportunity to compare the Nd isotopic composition of biogenic carbonates directly with the surrounding ambient seawater. The Mediterranean Sea is particularly suited for this comparison exercise since it is characterized by water masses displaying a large range of ɛNd values, from -10.5 in the Western Mediterranean to -4.8 in the Eastern

  9. From the subtropics to the equator in the Southwest Pacific: Continental material fluxes quantified using neodymium data along modeled thermocline water pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Mélanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Cravatte, Sophie

    2014-06-01

    The southwestern tropical Pacific, part of a major pathway for waters feeding the Equatorial Undercurrent, is a region of important geochemical enrichment through land-ocean boundary exchange. Here we develop an original method based on the coupling between dynamical modeling and geochemical tracer data to identify regions of enrichment along the water pathways from the subtropics to the equator, and to allow a refined quantification of continental material fluxes. Neodymium data are interpreted with the help of modeled Lagrangian trajectories of an Ocean General Circulation Model. We reveal that upper and lower thermocline waters have different pathways together with different geochemical evolutions. The upper thermocline waters entering the Solomon Sea mainly originate from the central subtropical gyre, enter the Coral Sea in the North Vanuatu Jet and likely receive radiogenic neodymium from the basaltic island margins encountered along their route. The lower thermocline waters entering the Solomon Sea mainly originate from northeast of New Zealand and enter the Coral Sea in the North Caledonian Jet. Depletion of their neodymium content likely occurs when flowing along the Australian and Papua coasts. Downstream from the Solomon Sea, waters flowing along the Papua New Guinea margins near the Sepik river mouth become surprisingly depleted in their neodymium content in the upper thermocline while enriched in the lower thermocline. This coupled approach is proposed as strong support to interpret the origin of the equatorial Pacific natural fertilization through a better understanding of the circulation, important objectives of the international GEOTRACES and SPICE programs, respectively.

  10. Enantiomeric NMR signal separation behavior and mechanism of samarium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes with (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinate.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Okano, Masaru; Kidani, Takahiro

    2017-04-12

    Enantiomeric (1) H and (13) C NMR signal separation behaviors of various α-amino acids and DL-tartarate were investigated by using the samarium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes with (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinate as chiral shift reagents. A relatively smaller concentration ratio of the lanthanide(III) complex to substrates was suitable for the neodymium(III) complex compared with the samarium(III) one, striking a balance between relatively greater signal separation and broadening. To clarify the difference in the signal separation behavior, the chemical shifts of β-protons for fully bound D- and L-alanine (δb (D) and δb (L)) and their adduct formation constants (Ks) were obtained for both metal complexes. Preference for D-alanine was similarly observed for both complexes, while it was revealed that the difference between the δb (D) and δb (L) values is the significant factor to determine the enantiomeric signal separation. The neodymium(III) and samarium(III) complexes can be used complementarily for higher and smaller concentration ranges of substrates, respectively, because the neodymium(III) complex gives the larger difference between the δb (D) and δb (L) values with greater signal broadening compared to the samarium(III) complex.

  11. Processing and Properties of Chemically Derived Calcium Silicate Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-27

    1991 Air Force Grant No. AFOSR-88-0184 Prepared for AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ELECTRONIC AND MATERIAL SCIENCES DIRECTORATE Principal...Heiland, Processing and Properties of Chemically Derived Calcium Silicate Cement. Master of Science , Solid State Science , The Pennsylvania State...University, May 1990. Appendix IV Kelly Markowski, A Fundamental Study of the Surface Chemistry of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Bachelor of Science Thesis

  12. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  13. The application of silicon and silicates in dentistry: a review.

    PubMed

    Lührs, A-K; Geurtsen, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Silicates and silicate-based compounds are frequently used materials in dentistry. One of their major applications is their use as fillers in different dental filling materials such as glass-ionomer cements, compomers, composites, and adhesive systems. In these materials, the fillers react with acids during the setting process or they improve the mechanical properties by increasing physical resistance, thermal expansion coefficient and radiopacity in acrylic filling materials. They also reduce polymerization shrinkage, and increase esthetics as well as handling properties. Furthermore, silicates are used for the tribochemical silication of different surfaces such as ceramics or alloys. The silicate layer formed in this process is the chemical basis for silanes that form a bond between this layer and the organic composite matrix. It also provides a micromechanical bond between the surface of the material and the composite matrix. Silicates are also a component of dental ceramics, which are frequently used in dentistry, for instance for veneers, inlays, and onlays, for denture teeth, and for full-ceramic crowns or as crown veneering materials.

  14. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  15. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of P, Ga, and W at High Pressures and Temperatures: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Edward; Drake, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The distinctive pattern of element concentrations in the upper mantle provides essential evidence in our attempts to understand the accretion and differentiation of the Earth (e.g., Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al., 1997; Wanke 1981). Core formation is best investigated through use of metal/silicate partition coefficients for siderophile elements. The variables influencing partition coefficients are temperature, pressure, the major element compositions of the silicate and metal phases, and oxygen fugacity. Examples of studies investigating the effects of these variables on partitioning behavior are: composition of the metal phase by Capobianco et al. (1999) and Righter et al. (1997); silicate melt composition by Watson (1976), Walter and Thibault (1995), Hillgren et al. (1996), Jana and Walker (1997), and Jaeger and Drake (2000); and oxygen fugacity by Capobianco et al. (1999), and Walter and Thibault (1995). Here we address the relative influences of silicate melt composition, pressure and temperature.

  16. Effect of silicate structure on thermodynamic properties of calcium silicate melts: Quantitative analysis of Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyun

    2013-05-01

    The distribution of silicate anionic species (Qn units, n=0, 1, 2, 3) and the chemical speciation of oxygen in CaO-SiO2-MO (M=Mn and Mg) slags were investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, the thermochemical properties were evaluated using a concentration of free oxygen and a degree of polymerization. A good linear relationship was obtained between sulfide capacity and concentration of free oxygen in the CaO-SiO2 (-MnO) melts at 1500 to 1600 °C. However, even though there was more abundant free oxygen in the CaO-SiO2-MgO system than in the CaO-SiO2 system, the sulfide capacity of the former was lower than the latter, indicating that the sulfur dissolution behavior in the silicate melts cannot be simply explained by the content of free oxygen, because the composition dependency of the stability ratio of oxygen and sulfide ions should be taken into account. The excess free energy of CaO, MgO and MnO linearly decreased as the ln (Q3/Q2) increased. The effect of the degree of polymerization on the excess free energy of mixing of MgO-containing slag was larger than that of MnO-containing slag, which was explained by the difference of the ionization potential between Mn2+ and Mg2+ ions.

  17. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  18. Comment on "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains"

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Ishii, H

    2007-09-27

    In the paper entitled 'The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains' (A & A, 462, 667-676 (2007)), Min et al. explore non-spherical grain shape and composition in modeling the interstellar 10 and 20 {micro}m extinction features. This progression towards more realistic models is vitally important to enabling valid comparisons between dust observations and laboratory measurements. Min et al. proceed to compare their model results with GEMS (glass with embedded metals and sulfides) from IDPs (interplanetary dust particles) and to discuss the nature and origin of GEMS. Specifically, they evaluate the hypothesis of Bradley (1994) that GEMS are interstellar (IS) amorphous silicates. From a comparison of the mineralogy, chemical compositions, and infrared (IR) spectral properties of GEMS with their modeling results, Min et al. conclude: 'GEMS are, in general, not unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM'. This conclusion is based, however, on erroneous and incomplete GEMS data. It is important to clarify first that Bradley (1994) never proposed that GEMS are unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM, nor did he suggest that individual subnanogram mass GEMS are a representative sampling of the enormous mass of silicates in the diffuse ISM. Bradley (1994) simply showed that GEMS properties are consistent with those of IS amorphous silicates. It is widely accepted that circumstellar outflows are important sources of IS silicates, and whether GEMS are processed or not, the circumstellar heritage of some has been rigorously confirmed through measurements of non-solar oxygen (O) isotope abundances (Messenger et al., 2003; Floss et al., 2006). Keller et al. (2000) assert that even GEMS without detectable O isotope anomalies are probably also extrasolar IS silicates because they are embedded in carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H isotopic composition. (Much of the silicate dust in the ISM may be isotopically homogenized (Zhukovska et al., 2007)). Recent

  19. Neodymium and carbon isotopic fingerprints of warm Pliocene circulation throughout the deep Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesselman, C. R.; Scher, H. D.; Dowsett, H. J.; Robinson, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The mid-Piacenzian age of the Pliocene is the most recent interval in Earth's history to sustain global warmth within the range predicted for the 21st century. To understand this interval, the USGS PRISM Project has developed a reconstruction of global conditions at 3.264-3.025 Ma, which includes a significant North Atlantic warm SST anomaly coupled with increased evaporation. Warm anomalies are also detected in the deep ocean as far as 46°S, suggesting that enhanced meridional overturning circulation may have been responsible for more southerly penetration of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). However, deep temperature proxies are not diagnostic of water mass, and some coupled model simulations predict transient decreases in NADW production in the 21st century, presenting a contrasting picture of future climate. We present a new multi-proxy synthesis of Atlantic deep ocean circulation during the PRISM interval, using the neodymium isotopic composition (ɛNd) of fossil fish teeth as a proxy for water mass source and the δ13C of benthic foraminifera as a proxy for water mass age. This reconstruction utilizes both new and previously published data from 11 DSDP and ODP sites in the North Atlantic (Site 610) and along depth transects from equatorial Ceara Rise, southern mid-latitude Walvis Ridge, and south Atlantic Meteor Rise/Agulhas Ridge. Published data from ferromanganese crusts constrain Pliocene Antarctic deep waters at ~ ɛNd = -8, distinct from the less radiogenic ɛNd = -11.5 that characterizes Pliocene northern component water (NCW). These values fingerprint northern and southern sources throughout the Atlantic basin. Pliocene fish teeth from Site 610 (2400 m water depth) and from four Ceara Rise sites (3000-4300 m) preserve distinctly North Atlantic ɛNd. When averaged across the PRISM interval, mean values for these five sites range from ɛNd = -10.97 to -10.25, and the Pliocene depth transect closely mirrors the structure of the modern column, indicating

  20. Dislocation of polyfocal full-optics accommodative intraocular lens after neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet capsulotomy in vitrectomized eye.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Tae; Kim, Yu Cheol

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of dislocation of WIOL-CF® polyfocal full-optics intraocular lens (IOL) after neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser capsulotomy in the vitrectomized eye. At 22 months before the dislocation of the IOL, a 55-year-old male patient underwent phacoemulsification with WIOL-CF® IOL implantation in a local clinic and 10 months after the cataract surgery the patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy, endolaser photocoagulation and 14% C 3 F 8 gas tamponade for the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. At 9 months after the vitrectomy, the patient visited our clinic for a sudden decrease of vision after Nd: YAG capsulotomy in the local clinic. On fundus examination, the dislocated IOL was identified and the Nd: YAG capsulotomy site and the larger break, which is suspected to have been a route of the dislocation were observed in the posterior capsule.

  1. From electrocautery, balloon dilatation, neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to argon plasma coagulation and cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Edward M.; Lee, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant advancement in the development/application of therapeutics in thoracic diseases. Ablation methods using heat or cold energy in the airway is safe and effective for treating complex airway disorders including malignant and non-malignant central airway obstruction (CAO) without limiting the impact of future definitive therapy. Timely and efficient use of endobronchial ablative therapies combined with mechanical debridement or stent placement results in immediate relief of dyspnea for CAO. Therapeutic modalities reviewed in this article including electrocautery, balloon dilation (BD), neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and cryotherapy are often combined to achieve the desired results. This review aims to provide a clinically oriented review of these technologies in the modern era of interventional pulmonology (IP). PMID:26807284

  2. Thermo-optic characterization of neodymium/nickel doped silica glasses prepared via sol-gel route.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Ancy; Kumar, B Rajesh; Basheer, N Shemeena; Kumari, B Syamala; Paulose, P I; Kurian, Achamma; George, Sajan D

    2012-12-01

    Intrinsic as well as rare earth (Neodymium) doped silica glasses with various molar ratio of dopant and a metallic (Nickel) co-dopant is prepared via sol-gel route. The structural characterization of the sample is carried out using X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The influence of dopant and doping concentration on the optical properties of silica matrix is investigated via UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. Effect of dopant on thermal effusivity value of the host matrix is carried out by laser induced open cell photoacoustic technique. Analysis of the results showed that doping affect the thermal effusivity value and results are interpreted in terms of structural modification of the lattice and phonon assisted heat transport mechanism.

  3. Value analysis of neodymium content in shredder feed: toward enabling the feasibility of rare earth magnet recycling.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M Dhammika; Darcy, Julia W; Apelian, Diran; Emmert, Marion H

    2014-06-17

    In order to facilitate the development of recycling technologies for rare earth magnets from postconsumer products, we present herein an analysis of the neodymium (Nd) content in shredder scrap. This waste stream has been chosen on the basis of current business practices for the recycling of steel, aluminum, and copper from cars and household appliances, which contain significant amounts of rare earth magnets. Using approximations based on literature data, we have calculated the average Nd content in the ferrous shredder product stream to be between 0.13 and 0.29 kg per ton of ferrous scrap. A value analysis considering rare earth metal prices between 2002 and 2013 provides values between $1.32 and $145 per ton of ferrous scrap for this material, if recoverable as pure Nd metal. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the content and value of other rare earths (Pr, Dy, Tb).

  4. Structure of fluorite-like compound based on Nd₅Mo₃O₁₆ with lead partly substituting for neodymium.

    PubMed

    Antipin, Alexander M; Sorokina, Natalia I; Alekseeva, Olga A; Kuskova, Alexandra N; Kharitonova, Elena P; Orlova, Ekaterina I; Voronkova, Valentina I

    2015-04-01

    A single crystal of Nd5Mo3O16 with lead partly substituting for neodymium, which has a fluorite-like structure, was studied by precision X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission microscopy and EDX microanalysis. The crystal structure is determined in the space group Pn3¯n. It was found that the Pb atoms substitute in part for Nd atoms in the structure and are located in the vicinity of Nd2 positions. Partial substitutions of Mo cations for Nd positions and of Nd for Mo positions in crystals of the Ln5Mo3O16 oxide family are corroborated by X-ray diffraction for the first time. The first experimental verification of the location of an additional oxygen ion in the voids abutting MoO4 tetrahedra was obtained.

  5. Effects of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation on endometrium and on endometrial cysts in six mares.

    PubMed

    Blikslager, A T; Tate, L P; Weinstock, D

    1993-01-01

    Effects of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation on equine endometrium were evaluated in vitro and in six mares with endometrial cysts. The Nd:YAG laser was applied to six endometrial sites, in each of five uterine specimens, with power densities of 5659 to 33,954 J/cm2. Depth of tissue ablation was measured and graded on histologic sections of the tissue lesions. Power density had a significant effect on the depth of tissue ablation (p < .001). Grade 3 lesions (full-thickness ablation of the endometrium) were created with energy densities of 16,977 to 33,954 J/cm2. Six mares had endometrial cysts treated by photoablation. Two of the four mares that were reproductively sound but barren, despite appropriate breeding, produced foals after treatment. One mare remained reproductively unsound after treatment, and another mare that was treated postpartum was bred successfully.

  6. Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect in Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet on Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Substrate Prepared by MOD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.; Kuwahara, A.; Sueyasu, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Liu, Q.; Lou, G.; Kishimoto, K.; Koyanagi, T.

    Bi-substituted Neodymium Iron Garnet (Nd3-xBixFe5O12, Bi:NIG) thin films with the Bi composition x=0-1.0 are prepared on both the (001) and (111) oriented gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates by a metal organic decomposition method. Crystalline qualities and magnetic properties of these films are examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effects (LSSEs) are investigated by means of the inverse spin Hall effect in a Pt film. The increase of LSSE voltage in Bi:NIG(x=0-1.0)/Pt bilayers on GGG(001) is observed with the increase of Bi composition. In the case of GGG(111), the LSSE voltage for Bi:NIG(x=1.0) is also larger than that for NIG.

  7. Robustness of fossil fish teeth for seawater neodymium isotope reconstructions under variable redox conditions in an ancient shallow marine setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Claire E.; van de Flierdt, Tina; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Röhl, Ursula; Hammond, Samantha J.

    2016-03-01

    Fossil fish teeth from pelagic open ocean settings are considered a robust archive for preserving the neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition of ancient seawater. However, using fossil fish teeth as an archive to reconstruct seawater Nd isotopic compositions in different sedimentary redox environments and in terrigenous-dominated, shallow marine settings is less proven. To address these uncertainties, fish tooth and sediment samples from a middle Eocene section deposited proximal to the East Antarctic margin at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1356 were analyzed for major and trace element geochemistry, and Nd isotopes. Major and trace element analyses of the sediments reveal changing redox conditions throughout deposition in a shallow marine environment. However, variations in the Nd isotopic composition and rare earth element (REE) patterns of the associated fish teeth do not correspond to redox changes in the sediments. REE patterns in fish teeth at Site U1356 carry a typical mid-REE-enriched signature. However, a consistently positive Ce anomaly marks a deviation from a pure authigenic origin of REEs to the fish tooth. Neodymium isotopic compositions of cleaned and uncleaned fish teeth fall between modern seawater and local sediments and hence could be authigenic in nature, but could also be influenced by sedimentary fluxes. We conclude that the fossil fish tooth Nd isotope proxy is not sensitive to moderate changes in pore water oxygenation. However, combined studies on sediments, pore waters, fish teeth, and seawater are needed to fully understand processes driving the reconstructed signature from shallow marine sections in proximity to continental sources.

  8. Neodymium isotope analyses after combined extraction of actinide and lanthanide elements from seawater and deep-sea coral aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struve, Torben; van de Flierdt, Tina; Robinson, Laura F.; Bradtmiller, Louisa I.; Hines, Sophia K.; Adkins, Jess F.; Lambelet, Myriam; Crocket, Kirsty C.; Kreissig, Katharina; Coles, Barry; Auro, Maureen E.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopes of the actinide elements protactinium (Pa), thorium (Th), and uranium (U), and the lanthanide element neodymium (Nd) are often used as complementary tracers of modern and past oceanic processes. The extraction of such elements from low abundance matrices, such as seawater and carbonate, is however labor-intensive and requires significant amounts of sample material. We here present a combined method for the extraction of Pa, Th, and Nd from 5 to 10 L seawater samples, and of U, Th, and Nd from <1 g carbonate samples. Neodymium is collected in the respective wash fractions of Pa-Th and U-Th anion exchange chromatographies. Regardless of the original sample matrix, Nd is extracted during a two-stage ion chromatography, followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) analysis as NdO+. Using this combined procedure, we obtained results for Nd isotopic compositions on two GEOTRACES consensus samples from Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS), which are within error identical to results for separately sampled and processed dedicated Nd samples (ɛNd = -9.20 ± 0.21 and -13.11 ± 0.21 for 15 and 2000 m water depths, respectively; intercalibration results from 14 laboratories: ɛNd = -9.19 ± 0.57 and -13.14 ± 0.57). Furthermore, Nd isotope results for an in-house coral reference material are identical within analytical uncertainty for dedicated Nd chemistry and after collection of Nd from U-Th anion exchange chromatography. Our procedure does not require major adaptations to independently used ion exchange chromatographies for U-Pa-Th and Nd, and can hence be readily implemented for a wide range of applications.

  9. Influence of the Central American Seaway and Drake Passage on ocean circulation and neodymium isotopes: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Patrik L.; Stocker, Thomas F.; Rempfer, Johannes; Ritz, Stefan P.

    2014-12-01

    The sensitivity of the neodymium isotopic composition (ɛNd) to tectonic rearrangements of seaways is investigated using an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity. The shoaling and closure of the Central American Seaway (CAS) is simulated, as well as the opening and deepening of Drake Passage (DP). Multiple series of equilibrium simulations with various intermediate depths are performed for both seaways, providing insight into ɛNd and circulation responses to progressive throughflow evolutions. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these responses to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the neodymium boundary source is examined. Modeled ɛNd changes are compared to sediment core and ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crust data. The model results indicate that the North Atlantic ɛNd response to the CAS shoaling is highly dependent on the AMOC state, i.e., on the AMOC strength before the shoaling to shallow depths (preclosure). Three scenarios based on different AMOC forcings are discussed, of which the model-data agreement favors a shallow preclosure (Miocene) AMOC (˜6 Sv). The DP opening causes a rather complex circulation response, resulting in an initial South Atlantic ɛNd decrease preceding a larger increase. This feature may be specific to our model setup, which induces a vigorous CAS throughflow that is strongly anticorrelated to the DP throughflow. In freshwater experiments following the DP deepening, ODP Site 1090 is mainly influenced by AMOC and DP throughflow changes, while ODP Site 689 is more strongly influenced by Southern Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation and CAS throughflow changes. The boundary source uncertainty is largest for shallow seaways and at shallow sites.

  10. Global Flows of Critical Metals Necessary for Low-Carbon Technologies: The Case of Neodymium, Cobalt, and Platinum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study, encompassing 231 countries and regions, quantifies the global transfer of three critical metals (neodymium, cobalt, and platinum) considered vital for low-carbon technologies by means of material flow analysis (MFA), using trade data (BACI) and the metal contents of trade commodities, resolving the optimization problem to ensure the material balance of the metals within each country and region. The study shows that in 2005 international trade led to global flows of 18.6 kt of neodymium, 154 kt of cobalt, and 402 t of platinum and identifies the main commodities and top 50 bilateral trade links embodying these metals. To explore the issue of consumption efficiency, the flows were characterized according to the technological level of each country or region and divided into three types: green (“efficient use”), yellow (“moderately efficient use”), and red (“inefficient use”). On this basis, the shares of green, yellow, and red flows in the aggregate global flow of Nd were found to be 1.2%, 98%, and 1.2%, respectively. For Co, the respective figures are 53%, 28%, and 19%, and for Pt 15%, 84%, and 0.87%. Furthermore, a simple indicator focusing on the composition of the three colored flows for each commodity was developed to identify trade commodities that should be prioritized for urgent technical improvement to reduce wasteful use of the metals. Based on the indicator, we discuss logical, strategic identification of the responsibilities and roles of the countries involved in the global flows. PMID:24387330

  11. Thermodynamic Features of the Complexation of Neodymium(III) and Americium(III) by Lactate in Trifluoromethanesulfonate Media.

    SciTech Connect

    Peter R. Zalupski; Leigh R. Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2010-10-01

    The protonation of lactate has been studied in a variety of electrolyte solutions using microcalorimetry to reveal a distinct medium influence imposed on the thermochemistry of the investigated equilibrium. The thermochemistry of lactate protonation, when studied directly in 1.0 M sodium lactate, agreed well with the studies performed in trifluoromethanesulfonate (triflate). This thermodynamic agreement suggests that the physical chemistry of lactate in the solutions applicable to the TALSPEAK process – a solvent extraction method for separating trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides within the scope of used nuclear fuel processing efforts – may be simulated in triflate solutions. Potentiometry, spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry have been subsequently used to study the thermodynamic features of neodymium and americium complexation by lactate using triflate as a strong background electrolyte. Three successive mononuclear lactate complexes were identified for Nd(III) and Am(III). The stability constants for neodymium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.01, log ß2 = 4.66 ± 0.02 and log ß3 = 5.6 ± 0.1, and for americium, log ß1 = 2.60 ± 0.06, log ß2 = 4.7 ± 0.1 and log ß3 = 6.2 ± 0.2, were found to closely agree with the thermodynamic studies reported in sodium perchlorate solutions. Consequently, the thermodynamic medium effect, imposed on the TALSPEAK-related solution equilibria by the presence of strong background electrolytes such as NaClO4 and NaNO3, do not significantly impact the speciation in solution.

  12. Behavior of Np(VII, VI, V) in Silicate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Yusov, A B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2004-11-30

    Spectrophotometric methods were used to investigate the properties of neptunium(VII), (VI), and (V) in silicate solution. The transition of cationic neptunium(VII) to anionic species in non-complexing environments proceeds in the range of ?? 5.5 to 7.5. In the presence of carbonate, this transition occurs at ?? 10.0 to 11.5 and in silicate solutions at ?? 10.5-12.0. These findings show that cationic neptunium(VII) forms complexes with both carbonate and silicate and that the silicate complex is stronger than that of the carbonate. The competition of complex formation reactions for neptunium(VI) with carbonate and silicate and on the known complex stability constant of NpO2(CO3)34- allowed the NpO2SiO3 complex stability constant, log ? = 16.5, to be estimated. Determination of the formation constant of Np(V) complexes with SiO32- was not possible using similar methods.

  13. Properties of cometary crystalline silicate before and after perihelion passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline silicate is sometimes observed in comets as an 11.3-micron resonant emission feature, and may be used for probing the early solar nebula. Because the formation of the crystalline silicate requires high temperature, they are thought to be born from amorphous silicate at the inner region, and then transported toward the outer regions where comets were born. This transportation can produce the difference in the crystalline fraction in the cometary silicate dust between two dynamical types of comets, Oort-cloud comets (OCs) and Ecliptic comets (ECs), due to the different heliocentric distances of their birth places. The study of peak wavelengths in crystalline features is important to investigate the conditions of the crystalline silicate formation as well. Thus far, we don't have enough OC samples, while we have observed several ECs. Fortunately, we can observe three comets in this semester. In particular, C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a bright sungrazing comet, and we might expect possible splitting and exposing of pristine materials inside the nucleus after its perihelion passage. Observations at pre- and post-perihelion provide us precious information on the dust evolution of the comet. The comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), along with two other comets, is an unparalleled target for this study.

  14. Preparation and Insulation Properties of Epoxy-Layered Silicate Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takahiro; Sawa, Fumio; Ozaki, Tamon; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshio; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo

    Recent rapid progress in nanotechnology has focused research and development efforts on new high performance materials. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials such as nylon-layered silicate nanocomposites have attracted special interest and various studies continue to be conducted on thermoplastic resins. In this study, we found out the best organic modifier of layered silicate that contributed to an affinity for epoxy resin (thermosetting resin), and succeeded in creating an intercalated-type epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposite. This nanocomposite realized some improvements by the addition of 5 or 6 weight percentage of organically modified layered silicates, which have 20oC higher thermal resistance, 60% higher fracture toughness, 19% higher flexural strength and 10% higher insulation breakdown strength than these of an epoxy resin without layered silicate fillers. An electrical treeing growth was observed in the nanocomposite. The electrical treeing progress with many branches in the nanocomposite seemed to result in an increase in the insulation breakdown strength. These results suggest the possibility of practical use as an insulating material in heavy apparatuses.

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Protein Crystals on Fluorinated Layered Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  16. Amorphous to crystalline transition of magnesium silicate and silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, D.; Jäger, C.; Henning, Th.; Dorschne, J.; Mutschke, H.

    2000-11-01

    Amorphous magnesium silicate and silica nanoparticles (smoke) have been transformed into the crystalline state by the process of thermal annealing. It has been shown that the magnesium silicate smoke evolves into crystalline forsterite (c- Mg2SiO4), tridymite (a crystalline modification of SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) according to the initial Mg/Si-ratio of the smoke. Crystallization took place within a few hours for the Mg2SiO4 smoke and within one day for the MgSiO3 smoke. Amorphous silica nanoparticles have been annealed at 1220 K and are characterized by distinctly lower rates of thermal evolution compared to the magnesium silicates. Silica changed into cristobalite and tridymite.

  17. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  18. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  19. Origin of silicic magma in Iceland revealed by Th isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmarsson, O.; Condomines, M. ); Hemond, C. ); Fourcade, S. ); Oskarsson, N. )

    1991-06-01

    Th, Sr, Nd, and O isotopes have been determined in a suite of volcanic rocks from Hekla and in a few samples from Askja and Krafla volcanic centers in Iceland. Although {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios are nearly the same for all compositions at Hekla, the ({sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th) ratios differ and thus clearly show that the silicic rocks cannot be derived from fractional crystallization of a more primitive magma. Similar results are obtained for the Krafla and Askja volcanic centers, where the {delta}{sup 18}O values are much lower in the silicic magma than in the mafic magma. These data suggest that large volumes of silicic rocks in central volcanoes of the neovolcanic zones in Iceland are produced by partial melting of the underlying crust.

  20. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  1. Structural chemistry of anhydrous sodium silicates - a review.

    PubMed

    Kahlenberg, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Sodium silicates are of considerable importance for many fields of inorganic chemistry and applied mineralogy, being either raw materials for synthesis or already finished products. In addition to their industrial relevance they have also been studied intensively because of their interesting physico-chemical properties including high ion-exchange capacity and selectivity or two-dimensional sodium diffusion and conductivity. Furthermore, the structural chemistry of crystalline sodium silicates offers the crystallographer challenging tasks such as polytypism, polymorphism, temperature and/or pressure-dependent phase transitions, pseudo-symmetry, complex twinning phenomena as well as incommensurately modulated structures. Many of these structural problems have been solved only recently, although in some cases they have been known for several decades. This article will provide an overview on the structurally characterized sodium silicates and their fascinating crystallochemical characteristics.

  2. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lunar volcanic processes were dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits have long been suspected on the basis of spectral anomalies (red spots), landform morphologies, and the occurrence of minor granitic components in Apollo sample suites [e.g., 1-5]. The LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) measured thermal emission signatures considered diagnostic of highly silicic rocks in several red spot areas [6,7], within the Marius domes [8], and from the Compton-Belkovich feature on the lunar farside [9]. The present study focuses on the Lassell massif red spot (14.73°S, 350.97°E) located in northeastern Mare Nubium near the center of Alphonsus A crater. Here we use Diviner coverage co-projected with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images [10] and digital elevation models to characterize the Lassell massif geomorphology and composition. Localized Diviner signatures indicating relatively high silica contents correlate with spatially distinct morphologic features across the Lassell massif. These features include sub-kilometer scale deposits with clear superposing relationships between units of different silica concentrations. The zone with the strongest signal corresponds to the southern half of the massif and the Lassell G and K depressions (formerly thought to be impact craters [11]). These steep-walled pits lack any obvious raised rims or ejecta blankets that would identify them as impact craters; they are likely explosive volcanic vents or collapse calderas. This silica-rich area is contained within the historic red spot area [4], but does not appear to fully overlap with it, implying compositionally distinct deposits originating from the same source region. Low-reflectance deposits, exposed by impact craters and mass wasting across the massif, suggest either basaltic pyroclastics or minor late-stage extrusion of basaltic lavas through vents

  3. Formation of Magnesium Silicates is Limited around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, J. A., III

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) grains could be produced in the hydrogen dominant gas outflow from evolved stars in addition to amorphous oxide minerals. Astronomical observations have shown the existence of abundant silicate grains around evolved stars and we have long realized that most of the silicate grains are amorphous, based on the observed infrared features. Only high mass loss stars show the feature attributed to magnesium-rich crystalline silicate about 10-20 % respect to total silicates, so far. The lower degree of crystallinity observed in silicates formed in outflows of lower mass-loss-rate stars might be caused by the formation of magnesium silicide in this relatively hydrogen-rich environment. As a result of predominant distribution of magnesium into the silicide, the composition of interstellar amorphous silicates could be magnesium poor compared with silicon. Indeed, the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition (Floss et al. 2006; Keller & Messenger 2007). Infrared observations suggest that there is little or no crystalline forsterite in interstellar environments while there is an abundance of crystalline forsterite in our Solar System. If the forsterite is a result of the oxidation of interstellar magnesium silicide, then it is clear both why crystalline forsterite is stoichiometric olivine and why the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition. In addition, it may also explain why the chemical composition of olivine is iron poor. Unfortunately, magnesium silicide has never been detected via astronomical observation or in the analysis of primitive meteorites. I would suggest that future analysis of meteorites and theoretical calculations could confirm the possibility of the formation of magnesium silicide grains around evolved stars.

  4. MG Isotopic Measurement of FIB-Isolated Presolar Silicate Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, A.; Ito, M.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of presolar oxide and silicate grains are ascribed to origins in low-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars based on their O isotopic ratios. However, a minor population of these grains (< 10%) has O isotopic ratios incompatible with these sources. Two principle alternative sources are higher-than-solar metallicity (Z) stars or, more likely, supernovae (SN) [1-3]. These rare (Group 4) grains [3] are characterized by enrichments in O-18, and typically also enrichments in O-17. An even rarer subset of grains with extremely large enrichments in O-17 and smaller depletions in O-18 were suggested to come from binary star systems [2]. To establish the origins of these isotopically unusual grains, it is necessary to examine isotopic systems in addition to O. Presolar silicates offer several elements diagnostic of their stellar sources and nuclear processes, including O, Si, Mg, Fe and Ca. However, the database for minor element isotopic compositions in silicates is seriously lacking. To date only two silicate grains have been analyzed for Mg [4] or Fe [5]. One major complicating factor is their small size (average 230 nm), which greatly limits the number of measurements that can be performed on any one grain and makes it more difficult to obtain statistically relevant data. This problem is compounded because the grains are identified among isotopically solar silicates, which contribute a diluting signal in isotopic measurements [1]. Thus, relatively small isotopic anomalies are missed due to this dilution effect. By applying focused ion beam (FIB) milling, we obtain undiluted Mg isotopic ratios of isolated rare presolar silicate grains to investigate their sources.

  5. Discovery of ancient silicate stardust in a meteorite.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ann N; Zinner, Ernst

    2004-03-05

    We have discovered nine presolar silicate grains from the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Their anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions indicate formation in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Two grains are identified as pyroxene, two as olivine, one as a glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS), and one as an Al-rich silicate. One grain is enriched in 26Mg, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of 26Al and provides information about mixing processes in the parent star. This discovery opens new means for studying stellar processes and conditions in various solar system environments.

  6. Crystalline silicates and hydrocarbon-conversion processes employing same

    SciTech Connect

    Kouwenhoven, H.W.; Stork, W.H.

    1980-12-09

    Novel crystalline silicates which in dehydrated form have the composition in terms of moles of the oxides: (1.0 +- 3)(R)2/no.(AFe/sub 2/O/sub 3/.BAl/sub 2/O/sub 3/ . CGa/sub 2/O/sub 3/ . Y(DSiO/sub 2/ . EGeO/sub 2/)), wherein R one or more mono- or bivalent cations and A, B, C, D, E, Y and N are as defined hereinafter are disclosed. The thermally stable silicates are suitably employed as extracting agents, drying agents, ion exchange agents, catalysts and catalyst carriers.

  7. An Equation of State for Silicate Melts Under Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Karato, S.

    2011-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at elevated pressures and temperatures (i.e., equation of state) is critical to our understanding of melting processes such as the generation and differentiation of silicate melts in Earth and is a key parameter to the thermodynamic and dynamic models of melting at high pressures. In the past, equations of state of silicate melts were often treated in analogy with that of crystalline solids for which the change in internal energy due to the change in inter-atomic distance plays an important role. However, liquids are different from solids in their ability to change structures, which implies the importance of entropy contribution to compression in addition to the internal energy contribution. This results in the distinct compressional properties of liquids such as (1) Liquids have much smaller bulk moduli than solids and do not follow the Birch's law of corresponding state (the relationship between bulk modulus and density) as opposed to solids; (2) The Grüneisen parameter increases with increasing pressure for (non-metallic) liquids but decreases for solids. In this work, we propose a new equation of state for multi-component silicate melts based on the hard sphere mixture model of a liquid to account for the role of entropic contribution. We assign a hard sphere for each cation species that moves in the liquid except for the volume occupied by other spheres. The geometrical arrangements of these spheres give the entropic contribution to compression, while the Columbic attraction between the spheres and the uniformly distributed oxygen background provides the internal energy contribution to compression. We calibrate the equation of state for the SiO2-Al2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO 5-component melts. The effective size of a hard sphere for each component is determined. The temperature and volume dependencies of sphere diameters are also included in the model in order to explain the melt density data at high pressures. We have also investigated the

  8. The Ice and Silicate Spectral Features for Dust Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    The optical properties of inhomogeneous aggregates of dust particles are calculated. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) is applied to the calculation of light scattering by the dust aggregates. The mixtures of ices and silicates are considered. The IR profiles near ice and silicate spectral features (3 micron and 10 micron) are constructed. The influence of grain topology, chemical composition and porosity have been investigated. The comparison of exact results for inhomogeneous aggregate and the effective medium theory (the rules of Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman) is made.

  9. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  10. EVIDENCE THAT POLYWATER IS A COLLOIDAL SILICATE SOL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study was made of the ’anomalous’ condensation of water and its conversion to ’ polywater ’ in glass and silica capillaries. The condensate was...to contain significant amounts of silicon and sodium. These results suggest that the unusual properties of ’ polywater ’ may be due to the presence of...silica or silicate. It is further shown that, since alkaline silicate solutions can absorb CO2, the infrared spectra of ’ polywater ’ may actually be due, in part, to bicarbonate ion. (Author)

  11. Polymerization of silicate on hematite surfaces and its influence on arsenic sorption.

    PubMed

    Christl, Iso; Brechbühl, Yves; Graf, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2012-12-18

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides are important sorbents for arsenic in soils, sediments, and water treatment systems, but their long-term potential for arsenic retention may be diminished by the formation of polymeric silicate on their surfaces. To study these interactions, we first investigated the sorption of silicate to colloidal hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) in short-term (48 h) and long-term (210 days) batch experiments. The polymerization of silicate on the hematite surface was monitored by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The pH dependence of silicate sorption exhibited a maximum between pH 9.0 and 9.5. The condensation of silicate on hematite surfaces adsorbed from monomeric silicate solutions steadily continued over the 210 day period, whereby surface polymerization was slower at pH 3 than at pH 6. The effect of silicate surface polymerization on arsenate and arsenite sorption was studied by use of hematite pre-equilibrated with silicate for different time periods of up to 210 days. The competitive effect of silicate on arsenate and arsenite sorption increased with increasing silicate pre-equilibration time. Only under strongly acidic conditions (pH 3), where silicate sorption was weakest and surface polymerization was slowest, was arsenate and arsenite sorption not affected by the presence of silicate. We conclude that the long-term exposure to dissolved silicate can decrease the potential of natural iron (oxyhydr)oxides for adsorbing inorganic arsenic.

  12. Nano neodymium oxide induces massive vacuolization and autophagic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Lisong; Feng, Chao; Wen, Long-Ping

    2005-11-11

    Neodymium, a rare earth element, was known to exhibit cytotoxic effects and induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells. Here we show that nano-sized neodymium oxide (Nano Nd2O3) induced massive vacuolization and cell death in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells at micromolar equivalent concentration range. Cell death elicited by Nano Nd2O3 was not due to apoptosis and caspases were not involved. Electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed extensive autophagy in the cytoplasm of the cells treated by Nano Nd2O3. Autophagy induced by Nano Nd2O3 was accompanied by S-phase cell cycle arrest, mild disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Bafilomycin A1, but not 3-MA, induced apoptosis while inhibiting autophagy. Our results revealed a novel biological function for Nano Nd2O3 and may have implications for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  13. Ablative fractionated erbium:YAG laser for the treatment of ice pick alar scars due to neodymium:YAG laser burns.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Babcock, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a case of ice pick scars forming in the nasal alar grooves of a patient who was treated with a 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for facial telangiectasias. Treatment options for these types of scars are reviewed and specifically we report the success of an ablative fractionated 2940-nm erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser.

  14. Aqueous-phase quantitative NMR determination of amino acid enantiomer ratio by 13C-NMR using chiral neodymium shift reagent.

    PubMed

    Florini, Nicola; Faglioni, Francesco; Zucchi, Claudia; Caglioti, Luciano; Pályi, Gyula

    2010-05-01

    A neodymium-(S)-PDTA (PDTA = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis[(hydroxycarbonyl)methyl]-1,2-diaminopropane) complex was found exceptionally useful in the quantitative determination of enantiomer ratios of water-soluble natural amino acids by (13)C-NMR. The method is demonstrated on mixtures of L- and D-enantiomers of various amino acids. The interactions of the chiral shift reagent with the amino acid molecules were rationalized by molecular orbital calculations.

  15. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  16. High Abundance of Silicate Stardust from Supernovae in the QUE 99177 Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, P.; Leitner, J.; Kodolányi, J.

    2016-08-01

    Our work on QUE 99177 is an extension of our previous work on Acfer 094 and suggests that the abundance of silicate stardust from supernovae is relatively high (30% by number) among the smallest presolar silicate grains.

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANIC/INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS - SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicate Technology Corporation's (STC's) technology for treating hazardous waste utilizes silicate compounds to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents in contaminated soils and sludges. STC has developed two groups of reagents: SOILSORB HM for treating wastes with inorgan...

  18. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  19. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with in-column fiber-optic laser-induced fluorescence detection for the rapid separation of neodymium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Changming; Jiang, Tao; Han, Jun; Lv, Kai; Hu, Sheng; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, in-column fiber-optic (ICFO) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection technique is coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) for the rapid separation of neodymium for the first time. The effects of buffer concentration, buffer pH, and separation voltage on the CE behaviors, including electrophoretic efficiency and detection sensitivity, are investigated in detail. Under the optimal condition determined in this study (15 mM borate buffer, pH 10.50, separation voltage 24 kV), neodymium could be separated effectively from the neighboring lanthanides (praseodymium and samarium) within several minutes, and the limit of detection for neodymium is estimated to be at the ppt level. The ICFO-LIF-CE system assembled in this study exhibits unique performance characteristics such as low cost and flexibility. Meanwhile, the separation efficiency and detection sensitivity of the assembled CE system are comparable to or somewhat better than those obtained in the previous traditional CE systems, indicating the potential of the assembled CE system for practical applications in the fields of spent nuclear fuel analysis, nuclear waste disposal/treatment, and nuclear forensics.

  20. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  1. Comparative FeNi and Silicate Chronology in Portales Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    Re-Os and U-Pb data on Portales Valley suggest an early formation for the metal and silicates. These two chronometers and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd require a young disturbance. This is inconsistent with the 39 Ar-40 Ar age and in need of clarification.

  2. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  3. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  4. Strong anisotropy of ferroelectricity in lead-free bismuth silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Daehee; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Itoh, Mitsuru; Shin, Hyunjung; Kim, Sung Wng; Kim, Yunseok

    2015-07-01

    Bismuth silicate (Bi2SiO5) was recently suggested as a potential silicate based lead-free ferroelectric material. Here, we show the existence of ferroelectricity and explore the strong anisotropy of local ferroelectricity using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Domain structures are reconstructed using angle-resolved PFM. Furthermore, piezoresponse hysteresis loops and piezoelectric coefficients are spatially investigated at the nanoscale. The obtained results confirm the existence of ferroelectricity with strong c-axis polarization. These results could provide basic information on the anisotropic ferroelectricity in Bi2SiO5 and furthermore suggest its considerable potential for lead-free ferroelectric applications with silicon technologies.Bismuth silicate (Bi2SiO5) was recently suggested as a potential silicate based lead-free ferroelectric material. Here, we show the existence of ferroelectricity and explore the strong anisotropy of local ferroelectricity using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Domain structures are reconstructed using angle-resolved PFM. Furthermore, piezoresponse hysteresis loops and piezoelectric coefficients are spatially investigated at the nanoscale. The obtained results confirm the existence of ferroelectricity with strong c-axis polarization. These results could provide basic information on the anisotropic ferroelectricity in Bi2SiO5 and furthermore suggest its considerable potential for lead-free ferroelectric applications with silicon technologies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03161c

  5. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of silicate traces in hemodialysis solutions.

    PubMed

    Raggi, M A; Sabbioni, C; Mandrioli, R; Zini, Q; Varani, G

    1999-06-01

    Reliable methods for the analysis of silicon are of great importance, because it seems that the silicate anion can reduce aluminum bioavailability in patients undergoing dialysis. Thus, a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of silicate traces in dialysis solutions. The method is based on the reaction between silicate ions and excess ammonium molybdate reagent to give a yellow silico-molybdic complex. This complex is then reduced to the heteropoly blue compound by means of ascorbic acid. Absorbance values are measured at 830 nm, and are stable for more than 2 h. A good linearity was obtained up to 300 ng ml(-1) of silicon concentration. The accuracy and the precision of the method were good; relative standard deviation values of 2% intraday and of 3.9% interday for six replicates on 40 ng ml(-1) standard silicate solutions were found. Results of the analysis of some commercial hemodialysis solution samples, obtained by means of the 'standard additions' method, are provided.

  7. Efficient nucleation of stardust silicates via heteromolecular homogeneous condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumans, T. P. M.; Bromley, Stefan T.

    2012-03-01

    Dust particles, ubiquitous throughout the Universe, continuously evolve in processes closely entangled with the stellar life cycle. Dust nucleates in outflows of dying stars and is heavily processed in the journey through the interstellar medium, until it is finally subsumed in a next-generation star or its surrounding planetary system. Although the formation of silicates has been studied experimentally and theoretically for decades, the stardust nucleation process in the condensation zone of oxygen-rich stellar outflows still remains mysterious. These silicates are mostly ternary oxides consisting of O, Mg and Si, which cannot nucleate directly from gaseous monomers. Previous work has suggested that silicates form on nucleation seeds consisting of low-abundant elements or from addition of metals to SiO-nuclei. However, our extensive computational study of the thermodynamic properties of a large number of clusters shows that pure SiO nucleation is unfeasible, while heteromolecular nucleation of Mg, SiO and H2O is a plausible mechanism to form magnesium silicates under stellar outflow conditions.

  8. Fate of silicate minerals in a peat bog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Philip C.; Siegel, Donald I.; Hillier, Barbara M.; Glaser, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of silicate weathering in a Minnesota mire indicates that quartz and aluminosilicates rapidly dissolve in anoxic, organic-rich, neutral- pH environments. Vertical profiles of pH, dissolved silicon, and major cations were obtained at a raised bog and a spring fen and compared. Profiles of readily extractable silicon, diatom abundance, ash mineralogy, and silicate surface texture were determined from peat cores collected at each site.In the bog, normally a recharge mound, dissolved silicon increases with depth as pH increases, exceeding the background silicon concentration by a factor of two. Silicate grain surfaces, including quartz, are chemically etched at this location, despite being in contact with pore water at neutral pH with dissolved silicon well above the equilibrium solubility of quartz. The increasing silica concentrations at circum-neutral pH are consistent with a system where silicate solubility is influenced by silica-organic-acid complexes. Silica-organic-acid complexes therefore may be the cause of the almost complete absence of diatoms in decomposed peat and contribute to the formation of silica-depleted underclays commonly found beneath coal.

  9. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  10. Ubiquitous high-FeO silicates in enstatite chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusby, David; Scott, Edward R. D.; Keil, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    SEM and EMPA were used to determine the mineral contents of four EH3 chondrites. All four showed the dominant enstatite peak, Fs 0-5, with 4-8 percent of FeO-rich pyroxene with Fs 5-20. Among the 542 objects found to contain high-FeO silicates, 18 were chondrules, 381 were rimmed or unrimmed grains, and 143 were aggregates. The high-FeO silicates in these objects are very largely pyroxene with Fs 5-23. Large grains of both FeO-rich and FeO-poor silicates were found to be present in the FeO-rich chondrules. This fact, together with the absence of clasts of FeO-rich chondritic material in the EH3 chondrites, suggests that FeO-rich grains were introduced before or during chondrule formation. It is concluded that FeO-rich and FeO-poor silicates were both present in the nebular region where E chondrites originated.

  11. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  12. Electron stimulated hydroxylation of a metal supported silicate film.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Emmez, Emre; Pan, Qiushi; Yang, Bing; Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E; Sterrer, Martin; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Goikoetxea, Itziar; Wlodarczyk, Radoslaw; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-02-07

    Water adsorption on a double-layer silicate film was studied by using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Under vacuum conditions, small amounts of silanols (Si-OH) could only be formed upon deposition of an ice-like (amorphous solid water, ASW) film and subsequent heating to room temperature. Silanol coverage is considerably enhanced by low-energy electron irradiation of an ASW pre-covered silicate film. The degree of hydroxylation can be tuned by the irradiation parameters (beam energy, exposure) and the ASW film thickness. The results are consistent with a generally accepted picture that hydroxylation occurs through hydrolysis of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds in the silica network. Calculations using density functional theory show that this may happen on Si-O-Si bonds, which are either parallel (i.e., in the topmost silicate layer) or vertical to the film surface (i.e., connecting two silicate layers). In the latter case, the mechanism may additionally involve the reaction with a metal support underneath. The observed vibrational spectra are dominated by terminal silanol groups (ν(OD) band at 2763 cm(-1)) formed by hydrolysis of vertical Si-O-Si linkages. Film dehydroxylation fully occurs only upon heating to very high temperatures (∼ 1200 K) and is accompanied by substantial film restructuring, and even film dewetting upon cycling hydroxylation/dehydroxylation treatment.

  13. Effect of antioxidants and silicates on peroxides in povidone.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Rao, Venkatramana M; Desai, Divyakant S

    2012-01-01

    Reactive peroxides in povidone often lead to degradation of oxidation-labile drugs. To reduce peroxide concentration in povidone, the roles of storage conditions, antioxidants, and silicates were investigated. Povidone alone and its physical mixtures with ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, sodium sulfite, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were stored at 25 °C and 40 °C, at 11%, 32%, and 50% relative humidity. In addition, povidone solution in methanol was equilibrated with silicates (silica gel and molecular sieves), followed by solvent evaporation to recover povidone powder. Peroxide concentrations in povidone were measured. The concentration of peroxides in povidone increased under very-low-humidity storage conditions. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, and sodium sulfite reduced the peroxide concentration in povidone, whereas BHA and BHT did not. Water solubility appeared to determine the effectiveness of antioxidants. Also, some silicates significantly reduced peroxide concentration in povidone without affecting its functionality as a tablet binder. Porosity of silicates was critical to their ability to reduce the peroxide concentration in povidone. A combination of these approaches can reduce the initial peroxide concentration in povidone and minimize peroxide growth under routine storage conditions.

  14. Mercury-like Planets: Separating Metals and Silicates by Photophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Trieloff, M.; Rauer, H.; Kuepper, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particles at the inner edge of protoplanetary disks are embedded in gas and are illuminated by starlight. This leads to photophoretic forces which - acting best on low thermal conductivity particles - push silicates outward. Metal grains remain behind and get separated from the silicates. If planetesimal formation is set on top of this separation an outward migrating edge will naturally lead to a metal-silicate gradient. Metal rich bodies like Mercury will form close to the star and metal poor bodies will be located further outward. This is consistent with chondrites being mostly metal poor and it is consistent with the smallest rocky planets CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b - found close to their host star - being Mercury-like. In contrast to high temperature processing photophoresis does not change the abundance of volatile elements. We started to model the particle transport in the transition region between the optical thin disk gap and the optical thick outer protoplanetary disk. Also, first drop tower experiments have been carried out to quantify the strength of the photophoretic force on silicate grains.

  15. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  16. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  17. A randomized controlled trial of peeling and aspiration of Elschnig pearls and neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Sharma, Shiv Kumar; Kaur, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare surgical peeling and aspiration and neodymium yttrium garnet laser capsulotomy for pearl form of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). METHODS A prospective, randomized, double blind, study was done at Rotary Eye Hospital, Maranda, Palampur, India, Santosh Medical College Hospital, Ghaziabad, India and Laser Eye Clinic, Noida India. Consecutive patients with pearl form of PCO following surgery, phacoemulsification, manual small incision cataract surgery and conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) for age related cataract, were randomized to have peeling and aspiration or neodymium yttrium garnet laser capsulotomy. Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), intra-operative and post-operative complications were compared. RESULTS A total of 634 patients participated in the study, and 314 (49.5%) patients were randomized to surgical peeling and aspiration group and 320 (50.5%) to the Nd:YAG laser group. The mean pre-procedural logMAR CDVA in peeling and neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser group was 0.80±0.25 and 0.86±0.22, respectively. The mean final CDVA in peeling group (0.22±0.23) was comparable to Nd:YAG group (0.24±0.28; t test, P=0.240). There was a significant improvement in vision after both the procedures (P<0.001). A slightly higher percentage of patients in Nd:YAG laser group (283/88.3%) than in peeling group (262/83.4%) had a CDVA of 0.5 (20/63) or better at 9mo (P<0.001). On the contrary, patients having CDVA worse than 1.00 (20/200) was also significantly higher in Nd:YAG laser group as compared to peeling group (25/7.7% vs 15/4.7%, respectively). On application of ANCOVA, there was less than 0.001% risk that PCO thickness and total laser energy had no effect on rate of complications in Nd:YAG laser group and less than 0.001 % risk that PCO thickness had no effect on complications in peeling group respectively. Sum of square analysis suggests that in the Nd:YAG laser group, thick PCO had a stronger impact on

  18. Synthesis and structure of nanocrystalline mixed Ce–Yb silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Małecka, Małgorzata A. Kępiński, Leszek

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New method of synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed lanthanide silicates is proposed. • Formation of A-type (Ce{sub 1−y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} in well dispersed Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)}–SiO{sub 2} system. • Formation of Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33−y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} in agglomerated Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)}–SiO{sub 2} system. - Abstract: This work presents results of studies on synthesis and structure of mixed, nanocrystalline Ce–Yb silicates. Using TEM, XRD and FTIR we showed that heat treatment of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)} (x = 0.3, 0.5) mixed oxide supported on amorphous silica in reducing atmosphere, results in formation of Ce–Yb mixed silicates. Dispersion of the oxide on the silica surface and thus a local lanthanide/Si atomic ratio determines the stoichiometry of the silicate. Oxide crystallites uniformly dispersed on the silica surface transformed into A-(Ce{sub 1−y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} disilicate, while the agglomerated nanoparticles converted into Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33−y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} oxyapatite silicate as an intermediate phase.

  19. X-ray spectral diagnostics of synthetic lanthanide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. N.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Goettlicher, J.; Taroev, V. K.; Kashaev, A. A.; Suvorova, L. F.; Tauson, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Potassium and rare-earth (Eu, Sm, Yb, Ce) silicate and aluminosilicate crystals are hydrothermally synthesized under isothermal conditions at 500°C and a pressure of 100 MPa. The chemical and structural formulas of the synthesized compounds HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] · 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], and K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24] are determined. In addition, a synthesis product with Eu, in which the dominant phase is assumed to be K3Eu3+[Si6O15] · 2H2O, is studied. The oxidation state of lanthanides in the silicates under study is determined based on X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The Eu L 3-, Sm L 3-, Yb L 3-, and Ce L 3-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the studied silicates and reference samples are recorded using a Rigaku R-XAS laboratory spectrometer. As reference samples, Eu2+S, Eu3+F3, Eu 2 3+ O3, Sm 2 3+ O3, Yb 2 3+ O3, Yb3+F3, Yb3+Cl3, Ce 2 3+ O3, and Ce4+O2 are used. Comparison of the absorption edge energies of lanthanide silicates and reference samples shows that Eu, Sm, Yb, and Ce in all the samples studied are in the oxidation state 3+. The synthesized silicates will supplement our knowledge of possible rare-earth minerals existing in hydrothermal systems, which is important for analyzing the distribution spectra of rare elements, which are widely used for diagnostics of geochemical processes and determination of sources of ore materials.

  20. Laboratory Analysis of Silicate Stardust Grains of Diverse Stellar Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Silicate dust is ubiquitous in a multitude of environments across the cosmos, including evolved oxygen-rich stars, interstellar space, protoplanetary disks, comets, and asteroids. The identification of bona fide silicate stardust grains in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, and dust returned from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft has revolutionized the study of stars, interstellar space, and the history of dust in the Galaxy. These stardust grains have exotic isotopic compositions that are records of nucleosynthetic processes that occurred in the depths of their now extinct parent stars. Moreover, the chemical compositions and mineralogies of silicate stardust are consequences of the physical and chemical nature of the stellar condensation environment, as well as secondary alteration processes that can occur in interstellar space, the solar nebula, and on the asteroid or comet parent body in which they were incorporated. In this talk I will discuss our use of advanced nano-scale instrumentation in the laboratory to conduct coordinated isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of silicate stardust grains from AGB stars, supernovae, and novae. By analyzing the isotopic compositions of multiple elements in individual grains, we have been able to constrain their stellar sources, explore stellar nucleosynthetic and mixing processes, and Galactic chemical evolution. Through our mineralogical studies, we have found these presolar silicate grains to have wide-ranging chemical and mineral characteristics. This diversity is the result of primary condensation characteristics and in some cases secondary features imparted by alteration in space and in our Solar System. The laboratory analysis of actual samples of stars directly complements astronomical observations and astrophysical models and offers an unprecedented level of detail into the lifecycles of dust in the Galaxy.

  1. Metal/Silicate Partitioning at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G.; Campbell, A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of siderophile elements during metal-silicate segregation, and their resulting distributions provide insight into core formation processes. Determination of partition coefficients allows the calculation of element distributions that can be compared to established values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Moderately siderophile elements, including W, are particularly useful in constraining core formation conditions because they are sensitive to variations in T, P, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silicate composition. To constrain the effect of pressure on W metal/silicate partitioning, we performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures using a multi anvil press (MAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center and laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LHDAC) at the University of Maryland. Starting materials consisted of natural peridotite mixed with Fe and W metals. Pressure conditions in the MAP experiments ranged from 10 to 16 GPa at 2400 K. Pressures in the LHDAC experiments ranged from 26 to 58 GPa, and peak temperatures ranged up to 5000 K. LHDAC experimental run products were sectioned by focused ion beam (FIB) at NASA JSC. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients for W were calculated from element abundances determined by microprobe analyses, and corrected to a common fO2 condition of IW-2 assuming +4 valence for W. Within analytical uncertainties, W partitioning shows a flat trend with increasing pressure from 10 to 16 GPa. At higher pressures, W becomes more siderophile, with an increase in partition coefficient of approximately 0.5 log units.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of silicate glasses and their surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xianglong

    1999-12-01

    The bulk and surface structures of vitreous silica and silicate glasses have been modeled using the molecular dynamics technique. An extensive preliminary study, on the influences of different potential models and of different simulation approaches on the final bulk and surface structures, concludes that good result can be obtained using the constant volume simulation with a modified pair-wise potential from van Beest and coworkers, together with alkali-oxygen potential models developed in this study. Glass structures with the reliability factors, Rchi of 7.2% for vitreous silica and 5.6% for sodium silicate have been achieved. The environments of O, Si and Na in silicate glasses have been thoroughly examined. Considerable similarities in local structures exist between crystalline and the simulated glass structures. It is found that our simulated glasses more resemble high-pressured experimental glasses, which is implied by the existence of fivefold silicon species. Based on bulk structures studied, glass surfaces were created by a fracture process. It is speculated that surface defect concentrations depend on the topological characteristics of the network structure, and are essential for the viability of surfaces. Analysis of local structures for difference species implies that the sodium silicate surfaces resemble more the Na-rich regions in the bulk structures. An efficient algorithm for finding primitive rings in a topological network has been developed. Analysis using this algorithm shows that reconstruction of Na-rich regions occurs on extending simulation size, demonstrating simulation size influence on modeled glass structures. Finally, our detailed analysis of Si-O-Si bond angle distributions demonstrates that vitreous silica glass has a broader Si-O-Si BAD, whilst sodium silicate glasses favor narrower distributions.

  3. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  4. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  14. Seawater-derived neodymium isotope records in the Chukchi Sea, western Arctic Ocean during Holocene: implications for oceanographic circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Borom; Nam, Seung-Il; Huh, Youngsook; Lee, Mi Jung

    2015-04-01

    Changes in oceanographic circulation in the Artic have a large influence on the global oceanic and climate system of the Earth through the geological times. In particular, freshwater input from the North Pacific to the western Arctic Ocean affects the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) after the opening of the Bering Strait. Seawater-derived neodymium isotope in marine sediments has been used as a proxy to trace the origin of water masses and oceanic circulation system. The global average residence time of Nd is shorter than the global ocean mixing time and dissolved Nd in seawater behaves quasi-conservatively. In the modern Arctic Ocean, the Nd isotope distribution is dominated by Atlantic source water, although the circum-Arctic riverine discharge and Pacific-derived waters also have noticeable impacts. In this study, we investigated seawater-derived neodymium isotope records from a sediment core recovered from the Chukchi Sea to understand the changes in hydrograhic circulation of the western Arctic during the Holocene. A gravity core, ARA02B 01A, was collected on the northern shelf of the Chukchi Sea (73°37.8939'N, 166°30.9838'W, ca. 111 m in water depth) during the RV Araon expedition in 2011. To obtain seawater-derived Nd records, we extracted Fe-Mn oxide coatings as an authigenic fraction from bulk sediments by leaching with acid-reducing solution after removing carbonate by leaching with acetic acid. Our preliminary results might show a general pattern of increasing radiogenic ɛNd values through Holocene intervals. Therefore, it implies that ɛNd results may be related with variations in the intensity of Bering Strait inflow during the last ~9.31 ka BP. The radiogenic trend was strongly pronounced from the late Holocene (ɛNd -7.23; ca. 8.84 ka BP) to the middle Holocene (ɛNd -4.78; ca. 6.18 ka BP) and vaguely during the middle Holocene. After 4.13 ka BP, ɛNd values were increased again from -4.86 to -4.03 at 0.57 ka BP. But 87Sr/86Sr

  15. Constraints on the neodymium (Nd) oceanic cycle in the Mediterranean Sea using a high resolution coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Jeandel, Catherine; Dutay, Jean-claude; Arsouze, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neodymium isotopic composition (Nd IC) is a tracer of oceanic circulation and lithogenic inputs to the ocean. An extensive compilation of published Nd isotopic values was realized in order to establish a database and a map of ɛNd and Nd concentrations characterizing all the Mediterranean margins. This was built based on different kinds of samples: riverine solid discharge deposited on the shelf, sedimentary material collected along the margins and geological material above or close to an oceanic margin (following Jeandel et al., 2007). The margin Nd isotopic signatures vary from non-radiogenic values around the Gulf of Lions (Nd IC values between -11.5 and -10), to radiogenic values around the Aegean and the Levantine sub-basins (Nd IC up to +6). Such West-East variation was also observed in the seawater data, which are becoming more radiogenic along the eastward circulation in the Mediterranean Sea (Tachikawa et al., 2004). The Nd budget proposed by these authors raised the hypothesis that the exchange of Nd along the margins could play a significant role in driving the oceanic distribution of this tracer. On a more global scale, it was further demonstrated and modelled that dissolved/particulate exchanges between continental margin sediments and open ocean (termed boundary exchange, BE), could be the dominant source-sink terms that determine the distribution of neodymium isotopes in the global ocean (Lacan and Jeandel, 2005a, Arsouze et al 2009). But this global scale study with it low-resolution configuration ORCA2 (2° of horizontal resolution) could not resolve many local and regional-scale features Our purpose is to test this hypothesis for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea by using a high resolution regional coupled model (1/12° of horizontal resolution). In a first approach we considered that boundary exchange is the only term governing Nd distribution in the Mediterranean Sea (other sources have been neglected). This aimed to validate the "Boundary

  16. Barium and Neodymium Isotope Heterogeneities in Early Solar System Materials: Applications to Planetary Reservoir Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranen, M. C.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2005-12-01

    Heavy element isotopic heterogeneities in early Solar System materials may exist as a result of both incomplete mixing of pre-solar nucleosynthetic components in the Solar Nebula leading to different ratios of p-, r- and s-process isotopes in bulk planetary materials as well as heterogeneities caused by the decay of now extinct nuclides. Boyet and Carlson (2005) reported a difference in 142Nd/144Nd between Earths mantle and chondrites of about 20-30 ppm. Assuming that this difference was due to decay of 146Sm and that the Earth and chondrites formed with identical 146Sm/144Sm they inferred the formation of a deep enriched silicate layer (D'' ?) in the Earth that formed within the first 30 Myr of Solar System history. We have obtained a similar difference in 142Nd/144Nd between Earth and chondrites. However, we are now testing their interpretation with Ba isotope measurements of various chondrites. Barium is an ideal element for testing the origin of small isotopic anomalies because it has two isotopes (134 and 136) derived only from the s-process as well as three isotopes (135,137 and 138) derived from both the r- and s-process with 135Ba possibly having a contribution from the decay of now extinct 135Cs. Six chondrites: Allende (CV3), Peace River (L6), Murchison (CM2), Grady (H3.7), Guarena (H6), and Bruderheim (L6) were measured for Ba isotopic composition with a new generation TIMS instrument (a GV ISOPROBE-T). A terrestrial andesite, AGV-1, was also processed for use as our reference standard. Preliminary results indicate widespread heterogeneity in the fractionation corrected 137Ba/136Ba ratio between different meteorites and our terrestrial standard, as high as 25 ppm. Smaller anomalies are also seen in 134Ba/136Ba. These anomalies are likely caused by slight differences in the mixing proportions of r- and s-process Ba in Earth and chondrites. This calls into question whether or not the differences seen in 142Nd/144Nd are truly caused by early differentiation

  17. Effect of silicate module of water glass on rheological parameters of poly(sodium acrylate)/sodium silicate hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastalska-Popiawska, J.; Izak, P.

    2017-01-01

    The poly(sodium acrylate)/sodium silicate hydrogels were synthesized in the presence of sodium thiosulphate and potassium persulphate as the redox initiators and N,N’-methylene-bisacrylamide as the cross-linking monomer. 20 wt% aqueous solution of sodium acrylate was polymerized together with water glass with different silicate modules (M) from 1.74 to 2.29, in three mass ratio of the monomer solution to the water glass 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2. Such obtained hybrid composites were rheologically tested using the oscillation method. It allowed to designate the crossover point during polymerization, as well as to define the viscoelastic properties of the casted hydrogel samples one week after the reaction. The obtained results of the oscillation measurements showed that cross-linking reaction proceeds very quickly and the lower the silicate module is, the process starts faster. After the completion of the reaction the silicate-polymer hydrogels are strongly elastic materials and the highest elasticity characterizes systems with the mass ratio 1:2, i.e. with the highest water glass content.

  18. Immiscible silicate liquids and phosphoran olivine in Netschaëvo IIE silicate: Analogue for planetesimal core-mantle boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Roosbroek, Nadia; Hamann, Christopher; McKibbin, Seann; Greshake, Ansgar; Wirth, Richard; Pittarello, Lidia; Hecht, Lutz; Claeys, Philippe; Debaille, Vinciane

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated a piece of the Netschaëvo IIE iron meteorite containing a silicate inclusion by means of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Netschaëvo contains chondrule-bearing clasts and impact melt rock clasts were also recently found. The examined inclusion belongs to the latter and is characterized by a porphyritic texture dominated by clusters of coarse-grained olivine and pyroxene, set in a fine-grained groundmass that consists of new crystals of olivine and a hyaline matrix. This matrix material has a quasi-basaltic composition in the inner part of the inclusion, whereas the edge of the inclusion has a lower SiO2 concentration and is enriched in MgO, P2O5, CaO, and FeO. Close to the metal host, the inclusion also contains euhedral Mg-chromite crystals and small (<2 μm), Si-rich globules. A TEM foil was cut from this glassy, silico-phosphate material. It shows that the material consists of elongated olivine crystallites containing up to 14 wt% P2O5, amorphous material, and interstitial Cl-apatite crystals. The Si-rich silicate glass globules show a second population of Fe-rich silicate glass droplets, indicating they formed by silicate liquid immiscibility. Together with the presence of phosphoran olivine and quenched Cl-apatite, these textures suggest rapid cooling and quenching as a consequence of an impact event. Moreover, the enrichment of phosphorus in the silicate inclusion close to the metal host (phosphoran olivine and Cl-apatite) indicates that phosphorus re-partitioned from the metal into the silicate phase upon cooling. This probably also took place in pallasite meteorites that contain late-crystallizing phases rich in phosphorus. Accordingly, our findings suggest that oxidation of phosphorus might be a general process in core-mantle environments, bearing on our understanding of planetesimal evolution. Thus, the Netschaëvo sample serves as a natural planetesimal core-mantle boundary experiment

  19. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K), the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel), silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide), and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4) in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation)-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources. PMID:23298332

  20. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy.

    PubMed

    Jurkić, Lela Munjas; Cepanec, Ivica; Pavelić, Sandra Kraljević; Pavelić, Krešimir

    2013-01-08

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K), the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel), silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide), and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4) in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation)-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  1. Mid-IR water and silicate relation in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, S.; Bremer, J.; Kamp, I.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Lahuis, F.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aresu, G.; Spaans, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Mid-IR water lines from protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars have a detection rate of 50%. Models have identified multiple physical properties of disks such as dust-to-gas mass ratio, dust size power law distribution, disk gas mass, disk inner radius, and disk scale height as potential explanations for the current detection rate. Aims: In this study, we aim to break degeneracies through constraints obtained from observations. We search for a connection between mid-IR water line fluxes and the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. Methods: We analyze observed water line fluxes from three blends at 15.17, 17.22 and 29.85 μm published earlier and compute the 10 μm silicate feature strength from Spitzer spectra to search for possible trends. We use a series of published ProDiMo thermo-chemical models, to explore disk dust and gas properties, and also the effects of different central stars. In addition, we produced two standard models with different dust opacity functions, and one with a parametric prescription for the dust settling. Results: Our series of models that vary properties of the grain size distribution suggest that mid-IR water emission anticorrelates with the strength of the 10 μm silicate feature. The models also show that the increasing stellar bolometric luminosity simultaneously enhance the strength of this dust feature and the water lines fluxes. No correlation is found between the observed mid-IR water lines and the 10 μm silicate strength. Two-thirds of the targets in our sample show crystalline dust features, and the disks are mainly flaring. Our sample shows the same difference in the peak strength between amorphous and crystalline silicates that was noted in earlier studies, but our models do not support this intrinsic difference in silicate peak strength. Individual properties of our models are not able to reproduce the most extreme observations, suggesting that more complex dust properties (e.g., vertically changing) are

  2. Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A.; Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby; Provis, John L.; Rose, Volker

    2010-06-15

    Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

  3. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  4. Fluorescence and DNA-binding properties of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2011-09-01

    The binding of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline, [M(phen) 2Cl 3·OH 2] (M = Nd ( 1), Pr ( 2)), to DNA has been investigated by absorption, emission, and viscosity measurements. The complexes show absorption decreasing in charge transfer band, fluorescence decrement when bound to DNA. The binding constant Kb has been determined by absorption measurement for both complexes and found to be (6.76 ± 0.12) × 10 4 for 1 and (1.83 ± 0.15) × 10 4 M -1, for 2. The fluorescence of [M(phen) 2Cl 3·OH 2] (M = Nd ( 1), Pr ( 2)) has been studied in detail. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that DNA has the strong ability to quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of Nd(III) and Pr(III) complexes through the static quenching procedure. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant Kb and the Stern-Volmer constant kSV are determined. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H°) and entropy change (Δ S°), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Van't Hoff equation. The experimental data suggest that the complexes bind to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Major groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [M(phen) 2Cl 3·OH 2] (M = Nd ( 1), Pr ( 2)) with DNA.

  5. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, R. S.; Harris, I. R.; Walton, A.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets.

  6. Properties of cerium-zirconium mixed oxides partially substituted by neodymium: Comparison with Zr-Ce-Pr-O ternary oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Mikulova, Jana; Rossignol, Sylvie . E-mail: Sylvie.rossignol@univ-poitiers.fr; Gerard, Francois; Mesnard, Danielle; Kappenstein, Charles; Duprez, Daniel

    2006-08-15

    CeO{sub 2} doped with praseodymium, neodymium and/or zirconium atoms were prepared by coprecipitation and by the sol-gel method. Structural properties were investigated by in situ XRD and Raman spectroscopy while oxygen storage capacity (OSC) was measured by transient CO oxidation. All the compounds, except pure Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, have a fluorite-type structure as well as a Raman band at 560 cm{sup -1} characteristic of the oxygen vacancies involving non-stoichiometric oxides. The lattice parameter under hydrogen, being dependent on the temperature, revealed two reduction mechanisms: one at a low temperature at the surface and another at a high temperature in the bulk. Ce-Nd binary oxides show a strong tendency towards crystallite aggregation, which reduces accessibility to gases and OSC properties. Zirconium improves the thermal resistance to sintering of both Ce-Nd and Ce-Pr oxides. The Zr-Ce-Pr-O followed by Zr-Ce-Nd-O compounds displaying high oxygen mobility at a low temperature, appear to be very promising for practical applications such as OSC materials. - Graphical abstract: Variation of oxygen vacancies under hydrogen on ternary oxides.

  7. Dynamic photopatterning of cells in situ by Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium ortho-vanadate laser.

    PubMed

    Deka, Gitanjal; Okano, Kazunori; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Cellular micropattering has been increasingly adopted in quantitative biological experiments. A Q-switched pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium ortho-vanadate (Nd∶YVO4) laser directed in-situ microfabrication technique for cell patterning is presented. A platform is designed uniquely to achieve laser ablation. The platform is comprised of thin gold coating over a glass surface that functions as a thermal transducer and is over-layered by a cell repellant polymer layer. Micropatterns are engraved on the platform, subsequently exposing specific cell adhesive micro-domains by ablating the gold-polymer coating photothermally. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach is applicable under culture conditions, viable toward cells, and has a higher engraving speed. Possible uses in arraying isolated single cells on the platform are also shown. Additionally, based on those micro-patterns, dynamic cellular morphological changes and migrational speed in response to geometrical barriers are studied to demonstrate the potential applications of the proposed approach. Our results further demonstrate that cells in narrower geometry had elongated shapes and higher migrational speed than those in wider geometry. Importantly, the proposed approach will provide a valuable reference for efforts to study single cell dynamics and cellular migration related processes for areas such as cell division, wound healing, and cancer invasion.

  8. The stable and water-soluble neodymium-doped lanthanide fluoride nanoparticles for near infrared probing of copper ion.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fang-Min; Wang, He-Fang

    2012-09-15

    Neodymium (Nd(3+)) doped nanomaterials exhibited the unique near infrared (NIR) luminescence properties. However, the application of Nd-doped nanomaterials to chemosensors was rarely explored. Herein, the water-soluble 2-aminoethyl dihydrogen phosphate stabilized Nd-doped LaF(3) (ADP-Nd-LaF(3)) nanoparticles were explored as the NIR probe for chemosensors. The NIR emission intensity at 1061 nm of ADP-Nd-LaF(3) nanoparticles kept stable in the aqueous solution of various pH and coexisting of most common metal ions except copper ion, consequently, the ADP-Nd-LaF(3) nanoparticles were developed as a high selective NIR probe for Cu(II). The NIR emission of ADP-Nd-LaF(3) exhibits a linear quenching response to Cu(II) in the range 5-100 μM, with a detection limit of 0.8 μM. The precision of eleven replicate detections of 5 μM Cu(II) was 0.5% (RSD). The recovery of spiked Cu(II) in human urine and waste water samples ranged from 102 to 109%. The possible mechanism of Cu(II)-induced fluorescence quenching of ADP-Nd-LaF(3) nanoparticles was also discussed.

  9. Effect of U on the electronic properties of neodymium gallate (NdGaO3): theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Reshak, Ali Hussain; Piasecki, M; Auluck, S; Kityk, I V; Khenata, R; Andriyevsky, B; Cobet, C; Esser, N; Majchrowski, A; Swirkowicz, M; Diduszko, R; Szyrski, W

    2009-11-19

    We have performed a density functional calculation for the centrosymmetric neodymium gallate using a full-potential linear augmented plane wave method with the LDA and LDA+U exchange correlation. In particular, we explored the influence of U on the band dispersion and optical transitions. Our calculations show that U = 0.55 Ry gives the best agreement with our ellipsometry data taken in the VUV spectral range with a synchrotron source. Our LDA+U (U = 0.55) calculation shows that the valence band maximum (VBM) is located at T and the conduction band minimum (CBM) is located at the center of the Brillouin zone, resulting in a wide indirect energy band gap of about 3.8 eV in excellent agreement with our experiment. The partial density of states show that the upper valence band originates predominantly from Nd-f and O-p states, with a small admixture of Nd-s/p and Ga-p B-p states, while the lower conduction band prevailingly originates from the Nd-f and Nd-d terms with a small contribution of O-p-Ga-s/p states. The Nd-f states in the upper valence band and lower conduction band have a significant influence on the energy band gap dispersion which is illustrated by our calculations. The calculated frequency dependent optical properties show a small positive uniaxial anisotropy.

  10. The influence of pH and temperature on the aqueous geochemistry of neodymium in near surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Cetiner, Ziya S

    2009-04-01

    Geochemical calculations were employed for the solubility and speciation of neodymium in a model soil solution as a function of pH. The calculations were based on the recently determined stability constants for Nd and solubility product for the Nd end-member of mineral monazite (NdPO(4)). Simulations were carried out at near neutral pH (pH 6.0 to pH 7.5) and 25 degrees C at the atmospheric CO(2) partial pressure. Additional calculations were also performed to assess Nd mobility at the extreme temperature conditions (300 degrees C) at neutral pH. Our results suggest that relatively dilute (Ionic Strength, I = 0.1), low-temperature waters may transport very small quantities of rare earth elements and actinides to the surficial environment at near neutral pH conditions. Evidently, higher temperature or extreme fluid composition may have a greater potential for mobilization of these elements. The results are pertinent to researchers interested in engineering applications for the precipitation of Nd and surrogate actinides from aqueous nuclear wastes.

  11. Effects of lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium on the nuclei and mitochondria of hepatocytes: accumulation and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peili; Li, Jianxin; Zhang, Shuhua; Chen, Chunxia; Han, Ying; Liu, Na; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Man; Yu, Qiuhong; Liu, Yuting; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contents of lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), and neodymium (Nd) that accumulate in nuclei and mitochondria isolated from the liver and their corresponding potential oxidative damage effects on nuclei and mitochondria. Five-week-old male imprinting control region (ICR) mice were exposed to chlorides of La, Ce, or Nd by oral gavage with one of three doses: 10, 20, or 40 mg/kgBW/day for 6 weeks. The concentrations of administered elements in hepatocyte nuclei and mitochondria were determined with inductively coupled plasma-mass (ICP-MS) spectrometry. The accumulation of La, Ce, and Nd in hepatocyte nuclei and mitochondria gradually increased in a dose-dependent manner with exposure to the elements, although the concentrations of La, Ce, and Nd in hepatocyte mitochondria were lower than those in their counterpart nuclei. In hepatocyte nuclei, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities decreased, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased. In hepatocyte mitochondria, SOD, CAT, and GPx activities and GSH levels were significantly decreased, and MDA levels were significantly increased. These results suggest that La, Ce, and Nd presumably enter hepatocytes and mainly accumulate in the nuclei and induce oxidative damage in hepatic nuclei and mitochondria.

  12. A simple and fast preparation of neodymium-substituted nanocrystalline Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, Marcos A.; Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong-Ki

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Synthesis of Mn{sub 2−x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 3} with mixed morphology -- Abstract: Neodymium (Nd) ions were substituted for manganese in the crystal lattice of synthetic Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, via oxidation of Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in basic solution at room temperature. Doping of Nd into the lattice structure of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been reported for the first time, which resulted in materials with new composition, morphology and optical properties. The synthesized materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, XPS and TOF-SIMS. Light (2.6%) Nd doping resulted in a mixture of rods, plates and small sheets, while heavy (8.9%) Nd doping resulted in rods, large sheets and large single crystals. The effect of structural doping of Nd ions into Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} resulted in a red shift in the absorbance.

  13. Fluorescence and DNA-binding properties of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2011-09-01

    The binding of neodymium(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline, [M(phen)2Cl3·OH2] (M=Nd (1), Pr (2)), to DNA has been investigated by absorption, emission, and viscosity measurements. The complexes show absorption decreasing in charge transfer band, fluorescence decrement when bound to DNA. The binding constant Kb has been determined by absorption measurement for both complexes and found to be (6.76±0.12)×10(4) for 1 and (1.83±0.15)×10(4)M(-1), for 2. The fluorescence of [M(phen)2Cl3·OH2] (M=Nd (1), Pr (2)) has been studied in detail. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that DNA has the strong ability to quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of Nd(III) and Pr(III) complexes through the static quenching procedure. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant Kb and the Stern-Volmer constant kSV are determined. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Van't Hoff equation. The experimental data suggest that the complexes bind to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Major groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [M(phen)2Cl3·OH2] (M=Nd (1), Pr (2)) with DNA.

  14. Irradiation of the posterior ocular segment with the neodymium-YAG laser in its free-running mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fankhauser, F.; Kwasniewska, S.; van der Zypen, E.

    1985-09-01

    A neodymium-YAG laser, operating in its free-running mode with pulse durations of 10 to 20 ms, was used to treat 63 cases of choroidal and retinal diseases. These cases included diabetic background retinopathies, thrombosis of the central retinal vein or branch retinal vein, neovascular membranes under the pigment epithelium, and retinal breaks or degenerations of the peripheral retina. Because the number of diabetic retinopathies (24) and their average follow-up time (25.5 months) are insufficient for the evaluation of irradiation effects, no definite statement as to the merits of this energy modality in such cases can be made. The irradiation of infarcted retina was followed by extensive atrophy of the involved area. No secondary glaucoma was observed during a follow-up period of 16.4 months. The irradiation in four cases of neovascular subretinal membranes was followed by disappearance of the membranes. However, relapse later occurred in all four cases. The irradiation of eight retinal breaks resulted in solid scar tissue. Two choroidal melanomas were destroyed and did not recur during a follow-up period of 22 months.

  15. Neodymium:YAG laser damage on silicone intraocular lenses. A comparison of lesions on explanted lenses and experimentally produced lesions.

    PubMed

    Newland, T J; Auffarth, G U; Wesendahl, T A; Apple, D J

    1994-09-01

    In this study we examined 17 explanted silicone intraocular lenses (IOLs) (two one-piece, 15 three-piece) that had evidence of neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser damage. The majority of lenses (47.1%) had been explanted because of persistent pigment deposits and chronic inflammation. Decentration or IOL dislocation had occurred with 29.4% of lenses. All 17 patients had had Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulectomy, anterior surface polishing, or both; treatments ranged from one to 13 times. By both clinical and gross examination, the laser lesions appeared dark. This was misinterpreted by some opthalmologists as pigment deposits and some patients had additional Nd:YAG laser treatment, which increased the severity of the laser damage. The mean depth of laser damage on the IOLs was 143 +/- 113.4 microns. It was between 51 and 175 microns in approximately 61.0% and deeper than 300 microns (maximum 660 microns) in 9.3%. We compared the explanted IOLs with silicone IOLs that were experimentally damaged using standard power levels from 0.3 to 3.0 mJ and different focal areas. The appearance of the experimentally induced laser burns was equivalent to that on the explanted IOLs, especially the dark laser pits. Since the laser lesions may resemble pigment deposits on slitlamp examination, we recommend careful examination of patients prior to planned laser therapy.

  16. IN SITU INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF FREE-FLYING SILICATE DURING CONDENSATION IN THE LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2015-04-20

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  17. Calc-silicate mineralization in active geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed study of calc-silicate mineral zones and coexisting phase relations in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system were used as examples for thermodynamic evaluation of phase relations among minerals of variable composition and to calculate the chemical characteristics of hydrothermal solutions compatible with the observed calc-silicate assemblages. In general there is a close correlation between calculated and observed fluid compositions. Calculated fugacities of O{sub 2} at about 320{degrees}C in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system are about five orders of magnitude less than that at the nearby Salton Sea geothermal system. This observation is consistent with the occurrence of Fe{sup 3+} rich epidotes in the latter system and the presence of prehnite at Cerro Prieto.

  18. Osmium Solubility in Silicate Melts: New Efforts and New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Walker, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper, Borisov and Palme reported the first experimental results on the partitioning of Os between metal (Ni-rich OsNi alloys) and silicate melt of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at 1400 C and 1 atm total pressure and and at function of O2 from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -12) atm. Experiments were done by equilibrating OsNi metal loops with silicate melt. Metal and glass were analyzed separately by INAA. D(sup 0s) ranged from 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7), which is inconsistent with core/ mantle equilibrium for HSEs and favors the late veneer hypothesis. Unfortunately, there was practically no function of O2 dependence of Os partitioning, and the scatter of experimental results was quite serious, so the formation of Os nuggets was suspected. This new set of experiments was specifically designed to avoid of at least minimize the nugget problem

  19. Carbon and silicate dust formation in V1280 Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Sako, S.; Oanaka, T.; Nozawa, T.; Kimura, Y.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Shimonishi, T.; Usui, F.; Takahashi, H.; Ohsawa, R.; Arai, A.; Uemura, M.; Nagayama, T.; Koo, B.-C.; Kozasa, T.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the temporal evolution of the infrared emission from the dusty nova V1280 Sco over 2000 days from the outburst. We have revealed that the infrared spectral energy distributions at 1272, 1616 and 1947 days are explained by the emissions produced by amorphous carbon dust of mass (6.6-8.7) × 10-8 Mʘ with a representative grain size of 0.01 µm and astronomical silicate dust of mass (3.4-4.3) × 10-7 Mʘ with a representative grain size of 0.3-0.5 µm. Both of carbon and silicate dust travel farther away from the white dwarf without an apparent mass evolution throughout those later epochs.

  20. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5×10-8 m2/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 ×1017 Pa s/m4 with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template. PMID:26629907

  1. Enzyme-Mimicking properties of silicates and other minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.

    The adsorptive and/or catalytic properties of clays, silicates in general, and other minerals are well known. More recently, their probable role in prebiotic syntheses of bio-organic compounds has become a matter of record. We demonstrate that, in addition to their role in de novo formation of important biomolecules, clays, micas, fibrous silicates and other minerals mimick the activities of contemporary enzymes including oxidases, esterases, phosphatases and glucosidases. The existence of such capabilities in substances likely to be represented on the surfaces of Earth-like planets may offer a challenge to the technology and design of remote life detection systems which must then distinguish between bona fide biological chemistry and mineral-base pseudometabolism. It also raises questions about the importance of mineral surfaces in post-mortem transformations of organic metabolites in our own biosphere.

  2. Inorganic phosphors in lead-silicate glass for white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonorov, N. V.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Aseev, V. A.; Bibik, A. Yu.; Nekrasova, Ya. A.; Tuzova, Yu. V.; Novogran, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    Luminescent composites of the "phosphor-in-glass" type, based on a highly reflective lead-silicate matrix and fine-grained powders of YAG:Ce3+ and SiAlON:Eu2+ crystals, are developed and synthesized. Phosphor and glass powders are sintered at a temperature of 550°C to obtain phosphor samples for white LEDs. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction and luminescence spectroscopy. The dependence of the light quantum yield on the SiAlON:Eu2+ content in the samples is investigated. A breadboard of a white LED is designed using a phosphor-in-glass composite based on lead-silicate glass with a low glasstransition temperature. The total emission spectra of a blue LED and glass-based composites are measured. The possibility of generating warm white light by choosing an appropriate composition is demonstrated.

  3. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    PubMed Central

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  4. Analysis of the Barrier Properties of Polyimide-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Johnston, J. Chris; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Silverman, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was organically modified and dispersed into a thermoplastic (BPADA-BAPP) and a thermosetting (PMR-15) polyimide matrix. The barrier properties of the neat resins and the nanocomposites were evaluated. Reductions in gas permeability and water absorption were observed in thermoplastic polyimide nanocomposites. The thermosetting polyimide showed a reduction in weight loss during isothermal aging at 288 C. Carbon fabric (T650-35, 8 HS, 8 ply) composites were prepared using both the BPADE-BAPP and PMR-15 based nanocomposites. Dispersion of the layered silicate in the BPADA-BAPP matrix reduced helium permeability by up to 70 percent. The PMR-15/ silicate nanocomposite matrix had an increase in thermal oxidative stability of up to 25 percent.

  5. Reprobing the mechanism of negative thermal expansion in siliceous faujasite

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, Martin P.; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Lucas, T. C. A.; Hriljac, Joseph Anthony

    2016-02-11

    A combination of Rietveld refinement and PDF analysis of total neutron scattering data are used to provide further insight into the negative thermal expansion mechanism of siliceous faujasite. The negative thermal expansion mechanism of siliceous faujasite is attributed to the transverse vibrations of bridging oxygen atoms resulting in the coupled librations of the SiO4 tetrahedra. The constituent SiO4 tetrahedra are revealed to expand in size with temperature which is a behaviour that has not been determined directly previously and they are also shown to undergo some distortion as temperature is increased. However, these distortions are not distinct enough in any geometric manner for the average behaviour of the SiO4 tetrahedra not to be considered as that of a rigid units. The work further displays the benefits of using total scattering experiments to unveil the finer details of dynamic thermomechanical processes within crystalline materials.

  6. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  7. Metal silicate mixtures - Spectral properties and applications to asteroid taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Smith, Dorian G. W.; Lambert, Richard St. J.; Gaffey, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of combinations of olivine, orthopyroxene, and iron meteorite metal are experimentally studied, and the obtained variations in spectral properties are used to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the assemblages. The presence of metal most noticeably affects band area ratios, peak-to-peak and peak-to-minimum reflectance ratios, and band widths. Band width and band areas are useful for determining metal abundance in olivine and metal and orthopyroxene and metal assemblages, respectively. Mafic silicate grain size variations are best determined using band depth criteria. Band centers are most useful for determining mafic silicate composition. An application of these parameters to the S-class asteroid Flora is presented.

  8. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  9. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  10. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sara; Erlandsson, Per G; Robinson, Nathaniel D

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5 × 10(-8) m(2)/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 × 10(17) Pa s/m(4) with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template.

  11. Reprobing the mechanism of negative thermal expansion in siliceous faujasite

    DOE PAGES

    Attfield, Martin P.; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; ...

    2016-02-11

    A combination of Rietveld refinement and PDF analysis of total neutron scattering data are used to provide further insight into the negative thermal expansion mechanism of siliceous faujasite. The negative thermal expansion mechanism of siliceous faujasite is attributed to the transverse vibrations of bridging oxygen atoms resulting in the coupled librations of the SiO4 tetrahedra. The constituent SiO4 tetrahedra are revealed to expand in size with temperature which is a behaviour that has not been determined directly previously and they are also shown to undergo some distortion as temperature is increased. However, these distortions are not distinct enough in anymore » geometric manner for the average behaviour of the SiO4 tetrahedra not to be considered as that of a rigid units. The work further displays the benefits of using total scattering experiments to unveil the finer details of dynamic thermomechanical processes within crystalline materials.« less

  12. EXAFS studies of uranium sorption on layer-silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Viani, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    The local structure of uranium sorbed on mineral surfaces was investigated by uranium L{sub 3}-edge EXAFS. Solutions of uranyl chloride, UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, were exposed to vermiculite, an expansible layer silicate mineral, under conditions which favor sorption by either cation exchange or surface complexation. EXAFS of the resulting mineral samples indicates a larger distortion of the uranyl equatorial shell for cation exchange, possibly due to steric effects of interlayer sorption. The uranyl U-O axial bond distance is greater for surface complexation than for ion exchange. Uranyl sorption on talc and pyrophyllite, layer silicate minerals with essentially no cation-exchange capacity, gives results which generally support the trends for surface complexation on vermiculite.

  13. The solubility of gold in silicate melts: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of oxygen fugacity and temperature on the solubility of Au in silicate melts were determined. Pd-Au alloys were equilibrated with silicate of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at different T-fO2 conditions. The behavior of Au was found to be similar to that of Pd reported recently. Au solubilities for alloys with 30 to 40 at. percent Au decrease at 1400 C from 12 ppm in air to 160 ppb at a log fO2 = -8.7. The slope of the log(Me-solubility) vs. log(fO2) curve is close to 1/4 for Au and the simultaneously determined Pd suggesting a formal valence of Au and Pd of 1+. Near the IW buffer Pd and Au solubilities become even less dependent on fO2 perhaps reflecting the presence of some metallic Au and Pd.

  14. Effect of mechanical treatment on the silicate lattice of kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulumyan, N. H.; Papakhchyan, L. R.; Isahakyan, A. R.; Beglaryan, H. A.; Aloyan, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and chemical analysis have been used to investigate the effect of mechanical treatment on the crystalline lattice of kaolinite. It was established that mechanical treatment leads to amorphization of the mineral and the release of hydroxyl water, but the continuity of kaolinite's silicate lattice remains intact despite certain deformations, and the phase transformations of the mineral thus occur without any noticeable change in temperature.

  15. Rapid determination of nanogram amounts of tellurium in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A hydride-generation flameless atomic-absorption technique is used to determine as little as 5 ng g-1 tellurium in 0.25 g of silicate rock. After acid decomposition of the sample, tellurium hydride is generated with sodium borohydride and the vapor passed directly to a resistance-heated quartz cell mounted in an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. Analyses of 11 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are presented. ?? 1976.

  16. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  17. Optical properties of silicates in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamy, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Near-normal incidence reflectance measurements in the interval 1026-1640 A were performed on four silicates already studied in the visible and infrared. A Kramers-Kronig analysis of these data is used to calculate the complex index of refraction m = n - ik. New transmission measurements improve the determination of k in the interval 2500-4500 A, except for andesite, which is more opaque than had been previously observed.

  18. Silicate versus trace mineral susceptibility in metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham; MacKenzie, Allan; Jensen, Eleanor

    1990-06-01

    Rates of change of magnetic susceptibility during leaching can characterize the presence of certain common types of magnetic minerals in metamorphic rocks. In this study the results of leaching are confirmed by mineral separation, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microchemical analysis under SEM. Leaching curves provide a simple, rapid way of determining the relative roles of oxides, sulfides, and silicates in carrying the susceptibility in metamorphic rocks.

  19. Electrochemical Studies on Silicate and Bicarbonate Ions for Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorich, Michael E.; Lamb, Joshua; Chandra, Dhanesh; Daemen, Jaak; Rebak, Raul B.

    2010-10-01

    Several types of carbon and high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels are being considered for use in the underground reinforcement of the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository. In this study, potentiodynamic polarization under reducing conditions was used to determine the corrosion rates (CRs) and passivity behavior of AISI 4340 steel using different combinations of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), in both pure water (PW) and simulated seawater (SW, 3.5 pct NaCl). These experiments were carried out to examine the potential inhibiting properties of the silicate or bicarbonate ions on the surface of the steel. The addition of sodium silicate to solution reduced the observed CR at room temperature to 19 μm/y at 0.005 M concentration and 7 μm/y at 0.025 M concentration in PW. The addition of sodium bicarbonate increased the CR from 84 μm/y (C = 0.1 M) to 455 μm/y (C = 1 M). These same behaviors were also observed at higher temperatures.

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION BY MECHANOCHEMICAL CARBONATION OF MINERAL SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Nelson

    2004-04-01

    The University of Utah and the University of Idaho investigated the carbonation of silicate minerals by mechanochemical processing. This method uses intense grinding, and has the potential of being much less expensive than other methods of mineral sequestration. Tests were conducted in three types of grinding devices. In these tests, natural and synthetic silicate compounds were ground for varying times in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. A significant change takes place in the lizardite variety of serpentine after 15 to 20 minutes of intense grinding in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of lizardite thus treated was much different than that of the untreated mineral. This spectrum could not be identified as that of any natural or synthetic material. Laboratory analyses showed that small amounts of carbon are fixed by grinding lizardite, forsterite, and wollastonite (all naturally-occurring minerals), and synthetic magnesium silicate, in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. It was thus concluded that further investigation was warranted, and a follow-up proposal was submitted to the Department of Energy under solicitation number.

  1. Evolution of peralkaline silicic complexes: Lessons from the extrusive rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Ray

    2012-11-01

    Young (< 1 Ma) volcanic complexes in the Kenya Rift Valley are used to outline recent progress in our understanding of how peralkaline silicic systems evolve. Such systems are all to some degree unique, varying in their structural development, the interplay of petrogenetic complexes, and the range of lithologies. Peralkaline silicic reservoirs vary greatly in size and form (even beneath volcanoes of roughly similar size) but all are basalt-driven, in that basaltic magma is the fundamental source of heat and volatiles in the magmatic system. Fractional crystallisation of basaltic magma is the dominant differentiation mechanism but important contributions are made by magma mixing, remobilisation of crystal mushes and feldspar resorption, exsolution of carbonate phases and various volatile-magma interactions. Peralkaline silicic magmas are water-rich (> 4 wt.%) and the rhyolitic varieties evolve to temperatures < 800 °C at oxygen fugacities largely within the range ∆FMQ 0 to - 1. They can be categorised as of cold-wet-reduced type. Low viscosities (< 104-106 Pa s) result in rapid growth of volcanic edifices, highly efficient crystal-melt separation and the ubiquitous development of compositionally zoned caps to reservoirs. No peralkaline equivalent of the monotonous intermediate ignimbrites found in some calc-alkaline systems has yet been found.

  2. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Lidia, S.; Anders, A.; Kwan, J.

    2009-04-21

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E< 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target[1]. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  3. Structure and dynamics of iron doped and undoped silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Cristiane N.; Meneses, Domingos D. S.; Echegut, Patrick; Lecomte, Emmanuel

    2010-03-01

    The optical properties of common silicate glass compositions are well known at room temperature. However, their radiative properties and structural evolution of these glasses with temperature are still largely unexplored. In this work we have measured the emissivity of a set of iron doped and undoped silicate and borosilicate glasses over an unprecedented temperature (up to 1700 K) and spectral range (40 -- 20000 cm-1). This was achieved by means of a home-made apparatus composed of a CO2 laser as the heat source, a black-body reference and two spectrometers. The optical functions were assessed using a dielectric function model [1], and the structure and dynamics of the glassy network, as well the absorption of iron species in different redox states were evidenced. We believe that these new data will help to understand the heat transfer in molten silicates. [4pt] [1] D. D. S. Meneses, G. Gruener, M. Malki, and P. Echegut, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 351, 124 (2005)

  4. Identifying the crystal graveyards remaining after large silicic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Sarah E.; Deering, Chad D.; Bachmann, Olivier; Huber, Christian; Gutiérrez, Francisco J.

    2014-10-01

    The formation of crystal-poor high-silica rhyolite via extraction of interstitial melt from an upper crustal mush predicts the complementary formation of large amounts of (typically unerupted) silicic cumulates. However, identification of these cumulates remains controversial. One hindrance to our ability to identify them is a lack of clear predictions for complementary chemical signatures between extracted melts and their residues. To address this discrepancy, we present a generalized geochemical model tracking the evolution of trace elements in a magma reservoir concurrently experiencing crystallization and extraction of interstitial melt. Our method uses a numerical solution rather than analytical, thereby allowing for various dependencies between crystallinity, partition coefficients for variably compatible and/or incompatible elements, and melt extraction efficiency. Results reveal unambiguous fractionation signatures for the extracted melts, while those signatures are muted for their cumulate counterparts. Our model is first applied to a well-constrained example (Searchlight pluton, USA), and provides a good fit to geochemical data. We then extrapolate our results to understanding the relationship between volcanic and plutonic silicic suites on a global scale. Utilizing the NAVDAT database to identify crystal accumulation or depletion signatures for each suite, we suggest that many large granitoids are indeed silicic cumulates, although their crystal accumulation signature is expected to be subtle.

  5. Grasslands, silicate weathering and diatoms: Cause and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.K. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Diatoms are silica-limited, photosynthetic, single-celled eukaryotes that today occupy a wide variety of habitats both in freshwater and marine environments. Ultimately the silica they use is derived from the weathering of silicates on land. Although marine diatoms first appear in the Jurassic, the fossil record shows a remarkable correlation between the Mid-Miocene appearance of widespread grasslands and the drastic increase in diatom-rich deposits in freshwater, as well as in marine environments throughout the world. Grasses actively weather silicates, accumulating soluble silica into their leaves. Decomposing grasses release this soluble silica into the soil from whence it is transported into lakes and oceans and made available to diatoms. Grasses also probably increased chemical weathering, and hence the release of soluble silica, in previously weakly vegetated semi-arid areas. Increased weathering of silicates also led to cooler climates as evidenced by the Mid-Miocene [delta][sup 18]O record. The author suggests that the Tertiary expansion of grasslands is responsible for the explosive increase in diversity and abundance of diatoms in the oceans and freshwaters of the Mid-Miocene.

  6. Laboratory studies of actinide metal-silicate fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Actinide and Sm partition coefficients between silicate melt and several metallic phases have been measured. Under reducing conditions Si, Th, U and Pu can be reduced to metals from silicate melts and alloyed with a platinum-gold alloy. U and Pu enter a molten Pt-Si alloy with roughly equal affinity but U strongly partitions into the solid Pt. Th behaves qualitatively the same as Pu but is much less readily reduced than U, and Sm appears to remain unreduced. Experiments with Fe metal have shown that the partition coefficients of the actinides between Fe and silicate liquid are extremely low, suggesting a very low actinide concentration in planetary cores. Experiments show that platinum metals can efficiently fractionate actinides and fractionate actinides from lanthanides and this process may be relevant to the condensation behavior of these elements from the solar nebula. Pt-metal grains in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions appear to be U-poor, although the sub-class of Zr-bearing Pt metals may have high U contents.

  7. Contrasting siliceous replacement mineralization, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Ilchik, R.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Seedorff, C.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Fine-grained siliceous replacement of carbonate-bearing rocks (jasperoid) occurs in most mineral districts in east-central Nevada. In most of these occurrences, jasperoid contains Au and(or) Ag and little or no base metals, although concentrations and ratios vary significantly. Broadly, two end-members are distinguished: (1) silicification as an intermediate- to late-stage part of complex alteration associated with igneous centers, and (2) jasperoids lacking other associated alteration and having few or no associated igneous rocks. Within this region, siliceous replacements are found with all metallic ([+-] magmatic) suites. No single factor in these occurrences relates the distribution, metal contents, fluid geochemistry, igneous rocks and associated alteration. Summarizing these characteristics: geochemical and fluid inclusion evidence shows that fluids in igneous-related jasperoids can be high-salinity magmatic (Ely), low-salinity magmatic (McCullough Butte), or metoric (Ward). Fluids in igneous-poor systems are low-salinity, exchanged meteoric waters from which a minor magmatic component can not be excluded. At this level of detail, the best predictor of Ag:Au are the district-scale alteration characteristics. Siliceous replacement takes place in many kinds systems and probably requires no more than a cooling, mildly acidic hydrothermal fluid. Metal suites, other fluid characteristics, and geological environment all need to be considered in evaluating the significance of any jasperoid.

  8. Method 366.0 Determination of Dissolved Silicate in Estuarine and Coastal Watersby Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for the determination of dissolved silicate concentration in estuarine and coastal waters. The dissolved silicate is mainly in the form of silicic acid, H SiO , in estuarine and 4 4 coastal waters. All soluble silicate, including colloidal silici...

  9. Investigation of synthesized Be-bearing silicate glass as laboratory reference sample at X-ray electron probe microanalysis of silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerova, Olga Yu.; Mikhailov, Mikhail A.; Demina, Tamara V.

    2017-01-01

    The article discusses estimates of the stability and homogeneity in Be-Mg-Al-silicate glass produced by the authors and its applicability as a laboratory reference sample for X-ray electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of Be-bearing silicate matters: crystals and quenching melt (glasses), silicates and oxides. The results were obtained using Superprobe-733 and Superprobe JXA-8200 (JEOL Ltd, Japan) devices. The sample homogeneity was studied on macro (10-100 μm) and micro (1-10 μm) levels and was evaluated by the scheme of dispersion analysis. The applicability of Be-bearing silicate glass as a reference sample for Mg, Al, Si determinations was tested on the international certified reference glasses and laboratory reference samples of minerals with a known composition. The obtained experimental metrological characteristics correspond to the "applied geochemistry" type of analysis (second category) and suggest that Be-bearing silicate glass is appropriate as a laboratory reference sample for EPMA of Be-bearing silicate matters, silicates and oxides. Using Be-Mg-Al-silicate glass as a reference sample we obtained satisfactory data on the composition of both some minerals including cordierite and beryllium cordierite, beryllium indialite, beryl and metastable phases (chrysoberyl, compounds with structure of β-quartz and petalite).

  10. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  11. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  12. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  13. Silicate sulfidation and chemical differences between enstatite chondrites and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S. W.; Petaev, M. I.; Buseck, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic similarity between the Earth-Moon system and enstatite chondrites (ECs) led to the idea that ECs were Earth's building blocks [1-3]. However, compared to Earth's mantle, ECs have low Fe0/Fe ratios, are enriched in volatile elements, and depleted in refractory lithophile elements and Mg [4]. Therefore, deriving Earth composition from ECs requires a loss of volatiles during or prior to accretion and sequestering a large fraction of Si in the deep Earth. Alternatively, the isotopic similarity between the Earth and ECs is explained by their formation from a common precursor that experienced different evolutionary paths resulting in the chemical difference [4]. The vestiges of such a precursor are still present in the unequilibrated ECs as FeO-rich silicates with O isotopic compositions identical to bulk ECs and Earth [5]. Conversion of such a precursor into the characteristic EC mineral assemblage requires high-temperature processing in an H-poor environment with high fS2 and fO2 close to that of the classic solar nebula [6], consistent with redox conditions inferred from Ti4+/Ti3+ ratios in EC pyroxene [7]. Under such conditions reaction of FeO-rich silicates with S-rich gas results in their replacement by the assemblage of FeO-poor silicates; Fe, Mg, Ca sulfides; free silica; and Si-bearing Fe,Ni metal alloy. The progressive sulfidation of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules results in loss of Mg and addition of Fe, Mn, S, Na, K and, perhaps, other volatiles [6]. At the advanced stages of silicate sulfidation recorded in the metal-sulfide nodules [8], a portion of Si is reduced and dissolved in the Fe,Ni metal. This process is known to fractionate Si isotopes [9,10] and would explain the differences between the ECs and Earth's mantle [11]. The sulfidation of silicates also produces porous S-rich silica, a peculiar phase observed so far only in the ECs. It consists of a sinewy SiO2-rich framework enclosing numerous vesicles filled with beam

  14. Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotopes in the Maloin Ranch Pluton, Wyoming: Implications for the origin of evolved rocks at anorthosite margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, A.; Hanson, G.N. ); Frost, C.D. ); Geist, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotopic data are used in this study to investigate the origin of chemically evolved rocks in the Maloin Ranch Pluton, a composite body that borders and intrudes the Laramie Anorthosite. In the Maloin Ranch Pluton, these include ferrodiorite at the base of the intrusion, overalain progressively by fine-grained monzonite, monzosyenite, and porphyritic granite. Biotite gabbro and fine-grained granitic dikes are present locally at various levels of this sequence. The origin of the evolved rocks and their possible relation to associated anorthositic bodies has been much debated. In the Maloin Ranch Pluton, each rock type has distinct isotopic characteristics which, together with trace-element data previously reported, suggest different source characteristics for each member. Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for Maloin Ranch ferrodiorite and Laramie anorthositic rocks show considerable overlap, consistent with a comagmatic relation. Biotite gabbro is chemically and isotopically the most primitive rock type in the Maloin Ranch Pluton. The data suggest that biotite gabbro has a mantle source, but has undergone extensive fractionation in the crust. The authors' results suggest that the remainder (and bulk) of the intrusion formed by partial melting of the lower crust due to the emplacement of the Laramie Anorthosite. Trace-element and isotopic characteristics of the fine-grained monzonite are explained by partial melting of mantle-dervied lower crust, added to the margin of the Archean Wyoming craton at about 1.8 Ga. Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotope data for Maloin Ranch monzosyenite and porphyritic granite also suggest a lower crustal source.

  15. Theoretical and spectroscopic evidence for coordination ability of 3,3'-benzylidenedi-4-hydroxycoumarin. New neodymium (III) complex and its cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Trendafilova, Natasha; Momekov, Georgi

    2005-02-01

    Theoretical and spectroscopic studies of 3,3'-benzylidenedi-4-hydroxycoumarin (bhc) have been performed. B3LYP/6-31G* calculations reproduced the experimental molecular structure of bhc and showed two O-H...O asymmetrical intramolecular hydrogen bonds with O...O distances 2.638 and 2.696 A. The calculated Fukui functions and Molecular Electrostatic Potential for bhc and its deprotonated form, bhc(2-), predicted that the most probable reactive sites for electrophilic attack and hydrogen bonds are the carbonyl oxygens, followed by the hydroxyl oxygens. The coordination ability of 3,3'-benzylidenedi-4-hydroxycoumarin has been proved in a complexation reaction with neodymium (III) ion. The new neodymium (III) complex of bhc was studied by elemental analyses, conductivity and other physical properties, mass spectra, (1)H, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy. The data obtained are in agreement with the metal:ligand ratio of 1:1, and the formula Nd(bhc(2-))(OH)(H(2)O), where bhc(2-)=C(25)H(14)O(6)(2-). The vibrational analysis of the neodymium (III) complex, free bhc, and its monomeric building block, 4-hydroxycoumarin, showed that in the Nd(III) complex the ligand coordinates to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups. The participation of both carbonyl groups in coordination to the metal ion was confirmed by the significant shift of nu(C=O) to lower wavenumber. The evaluation of the cytotoxic activity of the new Nd(III) complex on SKW-3 and HL-60/Dox cells revealed, that it is a potent cytotoxic agent and should be subset further to more detailed pharmacological and toxicological study.

  16. Evaluation of the 4I11/2 terminal level lifetime for several neodymium-doped laser crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeau, Camille

    1995-04-25

    All models of lasing action require knowledge of the physical parameters involved, of which many can be measured or estimated. The value of the terminal level lifetime is an important parameter in modeling many high power laser systems since the terminal level lifetime can have a substantial impact on the extraction efficiency of the system. However, the values of the terminal level lifetimes for a number of important laser materials such as ND:YAG and ND:YLF are not well known. The terminal level lifetime, a measure of the time it takes for the population to drain out of the terminal (lower) lasing level, has values that can range from picoseconds to microseconds depending on the host medium, thus making it difficult to construct one definitive experiment for all materials. Until recently, many of the direct measurements of the terminal level lifetime employed complex energy extraction or gain recovery methods coupled with a numerical model which often resulted in large uncertainties in the measured lifetimes. In this report we demonstrate a novel and more accurate approach which employs a pump-probe technique to measure the terminal level lifetime of 16 neodymium-doped materials. An alternative yet indirect method, which is based on the ``Energy Gap Law,`` is to measure the nonradiative lifetime of another transition which has the same energy gap as the transition of the terminal level lifetime. Employing this simpler approach, we measured the lifetime for 30 neodymium-doped materials. We show for the first time a direct comparison between the two methods and determine that the indirect method can be used to infer the terminal level lifetime within a factor of two for most neodymium-doped glasses and crystals.

  17. Liquid-liquid extraction of neodymium(III) by dialkylphosphate ionic liquids from acidic medium: the importance of the ionic liquid cation.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Kotlarska, Justyna; Dehaen, Wim; Binnemans, Koen

    2013-10-21

    The ionic liquids 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, [C6mim][DEHP], 1-hexyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, [C6mpyr][DEHP], and tetrabutylammonium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, [N4444][DEHP], were prepared and characterized using (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The extraction behavior of neodymium(iii) from nitrate medium by these ionic liquids, diluted with the room temperature ionic liquids 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C6mim][NTf2], 1-hexyl-3-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C6mpyr][NTf2], and tributylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], was studied. The distribution ratio of neodymium(iii) was measured as a function of various parameters, such as pH, concentration of the ionic liquid extractant, nature of diluents, concentration of ionic liquid cations and nitrate anions in the aqueous phase. The extraction behavior was compared with that obtained for a solution of the molecular extractant bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEHPA) in an ionic liquid diluent. The extraction of neodymium(iii) in the ionic liquids [C6mim][DEHP] and [C6mpyr][DEHP] showed markedly different extraction properties in comparison with that of the quaternary ammonium analogue [N4444][DEHP], especially concerning the pH dependence of the extraction process. These results show that the extraction process can be tuned by the selection of the ionic liquid cation. The extraction experiments also included the trivalent rare-earth ions lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), praseodymium(iii), ytterbium(iii) and yttrium(iii). Studies of the stripping behavior and the reusability of the ionic liquids were carried out, which indicate that the ionic liquids can be reused with no loss in activity.

  18. Improved evidence for the existence of an intermediate phase during hydration of tricalcium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Bellmann, Frank; Damidot, Denis; Moeser, Bernd; Skibsted, Jorgen

    2010-06-15

    Tricalcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) with a very small particle size of approximately 50 nm has been prepared and hydrated for a very short time (5 min) by two different modes in a paste experiment, using a water/solid-ratio of 1.20, and by hydration as a suspension employing a water/solid-ratio of 4000. A phase containing uncondensed silicate monomers close to hydrogen atoms (either hydroxyl groups or water molecules) was formed in both experiments. This phase is distinct from anhydrous tricalcium silicate and from the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase, commonly identified as the hydration product of tricalcium silicate. In the paste experiment, approximately 79% of silicon atoms were present in the hydrated phase containing silicate monomers as determined from {sup 29}Sileft brace{sup 1}Hright brace CP/MAS NMR. This result is used to show that the hydrated silicate monomers are part of a separate phase and that they cannot be attributed to a hydroxylated surface of tricalcium silicate after contact with water. The phase containing hydrated silicate monomers is metastable with respect to the C-S-H phase since it transforms into the latter in a half saturated calcium hydroxide solution. These data is used to emphasize that the hydration of tricalcium silicate proceeds in two consecutive steps. In the first reaction, an intermediate phase containing hydrated silicate monomers is formed which is subsequently transformed into C-S-H as the final hydration product in the second step. The introduction of an intermediate phase in calculations of the early hydration of tricalcium silicate can explain the presence of the induction period. It is shown that heterogeneous nucleation on appropriate crystal surfaces is able to reduce the length of the induction period and thus to accelerate the reaction of tricalcium silicate with water.

  19. Sparkle/PM3 Parameters for the Modeling of Neodymium(III), Promethium(III), and Samarium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2007-07-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to neodymium(III), promethium(III), and samarium(III) complexes. The unsigned mean error, for all Sparkle/PM3 interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.074 Å for Nd(III); 0.057 Å for Pm(III); and 0.075 Å for Sm(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.076 Å, 0.059 Å, and 0.075 Å, respectively, indicating they are all comparable models. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective potential calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Hence, the choice of which model to utilize will depend on the assessment of the effect of either AM1 or PM3 on the quantum chemical description of the organic ligands. Finally, we present a preliminary attempt to verify the geometry prediction consistency of Sparkle/PM3. Since lanthanide complexes are usually flexible, we randomly generated 200 different input geometries for the samarium complex QIPQOV which were then fully optimized by Sparkle/PM3. A trend appeared in that, on average, the lower the total energy of the local minima found, the lower the unsigned mean errors, and the higher the accuracy of the model. These preliminary results do indicate that attempting to find, with Sparkle/PM3, a global minimum for the geometry of a given complex, with the understanding that it will tend to be closer to the experimental geometry, appears to be warranted. Therefore, the sparkle model is seemingly a trustworthy semiempirical quantum chemical model for the prediction of lanthanide complexes geometries.

  20. Combined Intralesional Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet Laser and Intratumoral Ligation as Curative Treatment for Craniofacial Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Rojvachiranonda, Nond; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Mahatumarat, Charan

    2016-03-01

    Craniofacial arteriovenous malformation (AVM), although very rare, has been a very difficult problem to treat especially when it is large and involves important structures. Surgical resection often results in unacceptable complications but still not curative. At our institution, treatment by combined intralesional neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser and intratumoral ligation has been successful in venous malformation. This minimally invasive technique was then applied to more challenging AVM on the head and neck. Disease control was studied using clinical parameters and magnetic resonance imaging.Four patients with moderate-to-severe (Schobinger 2-4) craniofacial AVM were treated by this technique from 2001 to 2011. Patient age ranged from 2 to 51 years (mean: 25 years). After 2 to 4 treatments and follow-up period of 1456 days, 3 (75%) were cured. One of them was infant with huge mass and secondary pulmonary hypertension. Clinical cure was achieved after 3 treatments without residual cardiovascular compromise. The other patient (25%) had cheek mass with intraorbital involvement. The authors did not treat periorbital lesion so as to avoid triggering intraorbital spreading. The rest of the cheek lesion was clinically and radiologically cured.Laser energy setting, ablative technique, and skin cooling are the main factors determining the success. Individualized laser settings and properly set endpoints can increase treatment effectiveness in shorter period. In conclusion, this minimally invasive technique was successful in curing AVM without complication. With more clinical study and development of soft tissue monitoring tools, it is possible that intralesional laser could become the treatment of choice for all cutaneous AVM.