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Sample records for neoformans capsular polysaccharide

  1. Synthesis of part structures of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype C capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; McCabe, Orla; Oscarson, Stefan

    2016-10-04

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. The development of a vaccine based on the capsular polysaccharide of C. neoformans is still an open challenge due to the heterogeneity of the capsular polysaccharide and the difficulty of identifying protective epitopes. Therefore, construction of structurally defined part structures of the C. neoformans GXM capsule is in great demand. Herein is presented the synthesis of a 3-O-naphthalenylmethyl protected trisaccharide thioglycoside building block which is present in C. neoformans serotype C polysaccharide. Its property as a donor in a glycosylation reaction with a model acceptor has been evaluated together with its behaviour as an acceptor following removal of the temporary protecting group. The heavily branched hexasaccharide was obtained in good yields and excellent α-selectivity. The frame shifted octasaccharide structural triad motif for serotype C was also prepared following the same building block strategy. For the first time this structural motif, which is the most substituted amongst the four C. neoformans serotypes, was prepared. Three synthesized C. neoformans serotype C fragments of varying size, from penta-up to octasaccharide, were deprotected and will be included in unique glycoarrays to further investigate the possibility to develop a synthetic vaccine against this pathogen.

  2. Latex agglutination: diagnose the early cryptococcus neoformans test of capsular polysaccharide antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanrong; Yuan, Xueqian; Zhang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the early diagnosis value of latex agglutination test in Cryptococcal meningitis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 112 patients with definite Cryptococcal meningitis and 26 patients with tubercular meningitis and virus meningitis were collected, latex agglutination test is adopted to detect Cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen. Then it was compared with fungal culture and direct microscopy method for evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis. The sensitivity of three methods including latex agglutination test, fungal culture and direct microscopy was 91.1%,69.6% and 73.2% respectively. The specificity of latex agglutination test was 96.0%, 100% and 100% respectively. That latex agglutination test to detect Cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen could be taken as the early diagnostic method of Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis.

  3. Differences in Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide structure influence assembly of alternative complement pathway C3 convertase on fungal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Washburn, R G; Bryant-Varela, B J; Julian, N C; Bennett, J E

    1991-01-01

    Binding of complement component C3 and Factor B to Cryptococcus neoformans serotypes A through D via the alternative complement pathway was measured in a system containing fresh nonimmune human serum. Serotypes B and C (C. neoformans var. gattii) bound approximately half as many molecules of both complement components as serotypes A and D (C. neoformans var. neoformans). In contrast, removal of xylosyl and glucuronyl side chains from the mannan main chain of capsular polysaccharide by the Smith degradation procedure resulted in binding of similar quantities of C3 to each of the four serotypes. We conclude that the relatively high degree of side chain substitution of capsular polysaccharide from C. neoformans variety gattii contributes to inefficient surface assembly of the alternative pathway C3 convertase. Inefficient binding of alternative pathway complement components to serotypes B and C may contribute to the relative difficulty in successfully treating infections caused by these organisms.

  4. Synthesis of oligosaccharides corresponding to structures found in capsular polysaccharides of Cryptococcus neoformans--II.

    PubMed

    Garegg, P J; Olsson, L; Oscarson, S

    1996-11-01

    Formula 1 depicts a generalized structure of the capsular polysaccharides of four serotypes of the opportunistic microorganism Cryptococcus neoformans, which appears as one of the major infections in the late stages of development of AIDS. Syntheses are now described of two tetrasaccharides with corresponding structures. These are methyl O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1-->3)-[O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->2)] -O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and methyl O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1-->3)-[O-beta-D-glucopyranosyluronic acid-(1-->2)]-O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside.

  5. A cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide mimotope prolongs the survival of mice with Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Fleuridor, R; Lees, A; Pirofski, L

    2001-01-15

    Defined Abs to the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) have been shown to be protective against experimental cryptococcosis. This suggests that if a vaccine could induce similar Abs it might protect against infection. However, the potential use of a GXM-based vaccine has been limited by evidence that GXM is a poor immunogen that can induce nonprotective and deleterious, as well as protective, Abs, and that the nature of GXM oligosaccharide epitopes that can elicit a protective response is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether a peptide surrogate for a GXM epitope could induce an Ab response to GXM in mice. The immunogenicity of peptide-protein conjugates produced by linking a peptide mimetic of GXM, P13, to either BSA, P13-BSA, or tetanus toxoid, P13-tetanus toxoid, was examined in BALB/c and CBA/n mice that received four s.c. injections of the conjugates at 14- to 30-day intervals. All mice immunized with conjugate produced IgM and IgG to P13 and GXM. Challenge of conjugate-immunized mice with C. neoformans revealed longer survival and lower serum GXM levels than control mice. These results indicate that 1) P13 is a GXM mimotope and 2) that it induced a protective response against C. neoformans in mice. P13 is the first reported mimotope of a C. neoformans Ag. Therefore, the P13 conjugates are vaccine candidates for C. neoformans and their efficacy in this study suggests that peptide mimotopes selected by protective Abs deserve further consideration as vaccine candidates for encapsulated pathogens.

  6. Killing of cryptococcus neoformans by Staphylococcus aureus: the role of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide in the fungal-bacteria interaction.

    PubMed

    Saito, Fumito; Ikeda, Reiko

    2005-11-01

    Microbes compete for the environmental niche which is their host. To investigate the effects of a pathogenic bacterium on invasion and colonization by a pathogenic yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans was co-cultured with Staphylococcus aureus. We found that the number of colony forming units of C. neoformans was decreased by Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, the viability of Candida albicans was not affected. Under the microscope, wild-type C. neoformans cells were shown to be surrounded by S. aureus, while cells of a capsuleless mutant of C. neoformans were not. C. neoformans was not killed when a membrane separated it from S. aureus in co-culture. Killing was confirmed by staining with cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride: S. aureus stained red, indicating viability, while C. neojormans did not stain, indicating lethality. The in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTR nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated cell death with fragmentation of DNA of C. neoformans. Capsular polysaccharide from C. neoformans inhibited the killing. Treatment of the crude polysaccharide with protease increased the inhibition. The protective activity resided in the glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) fraction, although the concentration required for the inhibition was high. These results suggest that S. aureus kills C. neoformans by a process that involves attachment to the cryptococcal capsule.

  7. Receptor-mediated clearance of Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Mansour, Michael K; Levitz, Stuart M

    2005-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) is shed during cryptococcosis and taken up by macrophages. The roles of the putative GXM receptors CD14, CD18, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), and TLR4 in GXM clearance from serum and deposition in the liver and spleen in receptor-deficient mice were studied. While alterations in the kinetics of GXM redistribution were seen in the mutant mice, none of the receptors was absolutely required for serum clearance or hepatosplenic accumulation.

  8. EDTA Inhibits Biofilm Formation, Extracellular Vesicular Secretion, and Shedding of the Capsular Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan by Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Emma J.; Wolf, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans can grow as a biofilm on a range of synthetic and prosthetic materials. Cryptococcal biofilm formation can complicate the placement of shunts used to relieve increased intracranial pressure in cryptococcal meningitis and can serve as a nidus for chronic infection. Biofilms are generally advantageous to pathogens in vivo, as they can confer resistance to antimicrobial compounds, including fluconazole and voriconazole in the case of C. neoformans. EDTA can inhibit biofilm formation by several microbes and enhances the susceptibility of biofilms to antifungal drugs. In this study, we evaluated the effect of sublethal concentrations of EDTA on the growth of cryptococcal biofilms. EDTA inhibited biofilm growth by C. neoformans, and the inhibition could be reversed by the addition of magnesium or calcium, implying that the inhibitory effect was by divalent cation starvation. EDTA also reduced the amount of the capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan shed into the biofilm matrix and decreased vesicular secretion from the cell, thus providing a potential mechanism for the inhibitory effect of this cation-chelating compound. Our data imply that the growth of C. neoformans biofilms requires the presence of divalent metals in the growth medium and suggest that cations are required for the export of materials needed for biofilm formation, possibly including extracellular vesicles. PMID:22941091

  9. Immunogenicity and efficacy of Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan peptide mimotope-protein conjugates in human immunoglobulin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Lees, Andrew; Belouski, Shelley Sims; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2004-01-01

    Peptide mimotopes of capsular polysaccharides have been proposed as antigens for vaccines against encapsulated pathogens. In this study, we determined the antibody response to and efficacy of P13, a peptide mimetic of the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), in mice that produce human antibodies. P13 was conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or diphtheria toxoid (DT) and administered subcutaneously in Alhydrogel with or without CpG to mice transgenic for human immunoglobulin loci (XenoMouse mice) and expressing either immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) (G2 mice) or IgG4 (G4 mice). Mice were vaccinated and revaccinated two or three times. The serum antibody responses of the mice to GXM and P13 and antibody idiotype expression were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that both P13-TT and P13-DT were antigenic, inducing a mimetic response to P13 in both G2 and G4 mice, and immunogenic, inducing a mimotope response including VH3 (idiotype)-positive antibodies to GXM in G2 but not G4 mice. CpG led to higher titers of IgG to P13 and GXM in P13-TT-vaccinated G2 mice. C. neoformans challenge of P13-protein conjugate-vaccinated and control G2 mice induced anamnestic IgG- and VH3-positive responses to GXM and was associated with a significantly decreased risk of death and a prolongation of survival in P13-DT-vaccinated mice compared to phosphate-buffered saline-treated or protein carrier-vaccinated mice. These findings reveal that P13 elicited a human antibody response with VH3 expression in human immunoglobulin transgenic mice that has been observed for human antibodies to GXM and support the concept that peptide mimotope-based vaccines may hold promise for the treatment of C. neoformans infections.

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharides form branched and complex filamentous networks viewed by high-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Glauber R de S; Fontes, Giselle N; Leão, Daniela; Rocha, Gustavo Miranda; Pontes, Bruno; Sant'Anna, Celso; de Souza, Wanderley; Frases, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Its main virulence factor is an extracellular polysaccharide capsule whose structure, assembly and dynamics remain poorly understood. In this study, we apply improved protocols for sample preparation and recently-developed scanning microscopy techniques to visualize the ultrastructure of the C. neoformans capsule at high-resolution (up to 1 nm) and improved structural preservation. Although most capsule structures in nature consist of linear polymers, we show here that the C. neoformans capsule is a 'microgel-like' structure composed of branched polysaccharides. Moreover, we imaged the capsule-to-cell wall link, which is formed by thin fibers that branch out of thicker capsule filaments, and have one end firmly embedded in the cell wall structure. Together, our findings provide compelling ultrastructural evidence for a branched and complex capsule conformation, which may have important implications for the biological activity of the capsule as a virulence factor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Binding of purified and radioiodinated capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A strains to capsule-free mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Small, J.M.; Mitchell, T.G.

    1986-12-01

    Strains 6, 15, 98, 110, and 145 of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A vary in capsule size, animal virulence, and susceptibility to in vitro phagocytosis. The isolated capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) differ in monosaccharide composition ratios and molecular size, as determined by gel filtration. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the binding of CPSs to capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans and to examine CPSs from these strains for differences in their ability to bind, to determine whether such differences might explain the variation in the pathobiology of these strains. CPSs were partially periodate oxidized, tyraminated, iodinated with /sup 125/I, and used in binding studies with two capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans, strain 602 and Cap59. Binding was specific for yeast species and for polysaccharide and was saturable, which is consistent with a receptor-mediated mechanism of attachment. Binding occurred rapidly and was only slowly reversible. Binding was also independent of pH from pH 5.5 to 8, of cation concentrations, and of competition by sugars up to 1.0 M concentrations. Only a portion of CPS was capable of binding, and strains varied in the extent to which their CPS bound. CPS-15-IV (peak IV was the major polysaccharide peak on DEAE-cellulose chromatography of CPS from strain 15) had the highest proportion of binding (40%), followed by CPS from strains 98, 6, 145, 110, and 15-III (peak III was an earlier eluting fraction of CPS from strain 15). The CPSs differed similarly in their ability to competitively inhibit binding. Treatment of CPS, but not yeast cells, with proteinase XIV abolished binding without altering the CPS gross structure. Treatment of yeast cells with proteases, heat, or formaldehyde did not alter binding, and both strain 602 and Cap59 bound CPS similarly. Binding to encapsulated yeast cells was minimal.

  12. A synthetic strategy to xylose-containing thioglycoside tri- and tetrasaccharide building blocks corresponding to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide structures.

    PubMed

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Ulc, Rebecca; Rydner, Lina; Oscarson, Stefan

    2015-06-21

    As part of an ongoing project aimed at developing vaccine candidates against Cryptococcus neoformans the preparation of tri- and tetrasaccharide thioglycoside building blocks, to be used in construction of structurally defined part structures of C. neoformans GXM capsular polysaccharide, was investigated. Using a naphthalenylmethyl (NAP) ether as a temporary protecting group and trichloroacetimidate donors in optimized glycosylations the target building blocks, ethyl 6-O-acetyl-2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→3)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)]-4,6-di-O-benzyl-1-thio-α-D-mannopyranoside (16) and ethyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-4,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→3)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyra-nosyl-(1→2)]-6-O-acetyl-4-O-benzyl-1-thio-α-D-mannopyranoside (21), were efficiently prepared. These synthesized thiosaccharide building blocks were then used as donors in high-yielding (~90%) DMTST promoted glycosylations to a spacer-containing acceptor to, after deprotection, afford GXM polysaccharide part structures ready for protein conjugation to give vaccine candidates. Also, the NAP groups in the building blocks were removed to obtain tri- and tetrasaccharide acceptors suitable for further elongation towards larger thiosaccharide building blocks.

  13. Variable Region Identical IgA and IgE to Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Manifest Specificity Differences*

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Nakouzi, Antonio; Pohl, Mary Ann; Bowen, Anthony; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years several groups have shown that isotype switching from IgM to IgG to IgA can affect the affinity and specificity of antibodies sharing identical variable (V) regions. However, whether the same applies to IgE is unknown. In this study we compared the fine specificity of V region-identical IgE and IgA to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide and found that these differed in specificity from each other. The IgE and IgA paratopes were probed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 15N-labeled peptide mimetics of cryptococcal polysaccharide antigen (Ag). IgE was found to cleave the peptide at a much faster rate than V region-identical IgG subclasses and IgA, consistent with an altered paratope. Both IgE and IgA were opsonic for C. neoformans and protected against infection in mice. In summary, V-region expression in the context of the ϵ constant (C) region results in specificity changes that are greater than observed for comparable IgG subclasses. These results raise the possibility that expression of certain V regions in the context of α and ϵ C regions affects their function and contributes to the special properties of those isotypes. PMID:25778397

  14. Method for producing capsular polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  15. Synthesis of a Glucuronic Acid‐Containing Thioglycoside Trisaccharide Building Block and Its Use in the Assembly of Cryptococcus Neoformans Capsular Polysaccharide Fragments†

    PubMed Central

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Ulc, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As part of an ongoing project aimed at identifying protective capsular polysaccharide epitopes for the development of vaccine candidates against the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the synthesis and glycosylation properties of a naphthalenylmethyl (NAP) orthogonally protected trisaccharide thioglycoside, a common building block for construction of serotype B and C capsular polysaccharide structures, were investigated. Ethyl (benzyl 2,3,4‐tri‐O‐benzyl‐β‐d‐glucopyranosyl‐ uronate)‐(1→2)‐[2,3,4‐tri‐O‐benzyl‐β‐d‐xylopyranosyl‐(1→4)]‐6‐O‐benzyl‐3‐O‐(2‐naphthalenylmethyl)‐1‐thio‐α‐d‐mannopyranoside was prepared and used both as a donor and an acceptor in glycosylation reactions to obtain spacer equipped hexa‐ and heptasaccharide structures suitable either for continued elongation or for deprotection and printing onto a glycan array or conjugation to a carrier protein. The glycosylation reactions proceeded with high yields and α‐selectivity, proving the viability of the building block approach also for construction of 4‐O‐xylosyl‐containing C. neoformans CPS structures. PMID:27308199

  16. Monoclonal antibodies specific for immunorecessive epitopes of glucuronoxylomannan, the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans, reduce serotype bias in an immunoassay for cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed

    Percival, Ann; Thorkildson, Peter; Kozel, Thomas R

    2011-08-01

    Immunoassay for detection of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans, is an important tool for diagnosis of cryptococcosis. However, immunoassays that are based solely or in part on detection with polyclonal antibodies may show serotype bias in detection of GXM, particularly limited sensitivity for serotype C. In this study, we describe detection of GXM in an antigen capture sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that used a cocktail of two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). MAb F12D2 was previously produced by immunization with GXM that had been treated to remove O-acetyl groups, a major source of serotype specificity. MAb F12D2 has a high degree of reactivity with GXM of serotypes A, B, C, and D, but the reactivity with serotype D was less than was found with other MAbs. MAb 339 is highly reactive with GXM of serotypes A and D. Use of a combination of the two MAbs produced an immunoassay that had the best properties of both MAbs, including good reactivity with serotype C, which is an emerging threat in sub-Saharan Africa. These results suggest that next-generation immunoassays for diagnosis of cryptococcosis may be formulated by (i) use of immunization and hybridoma screening strategies that are designed to prospectively meet the needs of immunoassay performance and (ii) careful selection of MAbs that span the expected polysaccharide serotypes in the subject patient population.

  17. Biosynthesis of UDP-GlcA, a key metabolite for capsular polysaccharide synthesis in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase catalyses the conversion of UDP-glucose into UDP-GlcA, a critical precursor for glycan synthesis across evolution. We have cloned the gene encoding this important enzyme from the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. In this fungus, UDP-GlcA is required for the synthesis of capsule polysaccharides, which in turn are essential for virulence. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the 51.3-kDa recombinant protein from wild-type and five mutants was purified for analysis. The cryptococcal enzyme is strongly inhibited by UDP-xylose and NADH, has highest activity at pH 7.5 and demonstrates Km (app) values of 0.1 and 1.5 mM for NAD+ and UDP-glucose respectively. Its activity was significantly decreased by mutations in the putative sites of NAD+ and UDP-glucose binding. Unlike previously reported eukaryotic UDP-glucose dehydrogenases, which are hexamers, the cryptococcal enzyme is a dimer. PMID:15030319

  18. Capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans grows by enlargement of polysaccharide molecules.

    PubMed

    Frases, Susana; Pontes, Bruno; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Viana, Nathan B; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-27

    The human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has a distinctive polysaccharide (PS) capsule that enlarges during infection. The capsule is essential for virulence, but the mechanism for capsular growth is unknown. In the present study, we used dynamic light scattering (LS) analysis of capsular PS and optical tweezers (OT) to explore the architecture of the capsule. Analysis of capsular PS from cells with small and large capsules by dynamic LS revealed a linear correlation between PS effective diameter and microscopic capsular diameter. This result implied that capsule growth was achieved by the addition of molecules with larger effective diameter, such that some molecules can span the entire diameter of the capsule. Measurement of polystyrene bead penetration of C. neoformans capsules by using OT techniques revealed that the outer regions were penetrable, but not the inner regions. Our results provide a mechanism for capsular enlargement based on the axial lengthening of PS molecules and suggest a model for the architecture of a eukaryotic microbial capsule.

  19. CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE OF AZOTOBACTER AGILIS.

    PubMed

    COHEN, G H; JOHNSTONE, D B

    1964-12-01

    Cohen, Gary H. (University of Vermont, Burlington), and Donald B. Johnstone. Capsular polysaccharide of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 88:1695-1699. 1964.-Capsular polysaccharide from Azotobacter agilis strain 132 was recovered from washed cells by alkaline digestion. The polysaccharide was purified by centrifugation, repeated alcohol precipitation, Sevag deproteinization, and treatment with ribonuclease and charcoal-cellulose. Methods of isolation and purification appeared to provide a polymer showing no evidence of heterogeneity when examined by chemical and physical methods. Colorimetric, paper chromatographic, and enzymatic analyses on both intact and acid-hydrolyzed polysaccharide indicated that the polymer contained galactose and rhamnose at a molar ratio of approximately 1.0:0.7. A sialic acid-like component was also present in the polysaccharide. The study shows significant differences in the chemical composition of the extra-cellular polysaccharide of A. agilis and that of A. vinelandii. This adds further biochemical evidence for the right of these species to independent status.

  20. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  1. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide acetyltransferase, methods and compositions

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, David S [Stone Mountain, GA; Gudlavalleti, Seshu K [Kensington, MD; Tzeng, Yih-Ling [Atlanta, GA; Datta, Anup K [San Diego, CA; Carlson, Russell W [Athens, GA

    2011-02-08

    Provided are methods for recombinant production of an O-acetyltransferase and methods for acetylating capsular polysaccharides, especially those of a Serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis using the recombinant O-acetyltransferase, and immunogenic compositions comprising the acetylated capsular polysaccharide.

  2. Cellular immunity to Bacteroides fragilis capsular polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of Bacteroides fragilis has been shown to be important in the virulence of the organism. The capsular polysaccharide (CP) of B. fragilis has been extensively purified. Using a murine model of intraabdominal abscess formation, we have been able to demonstrate cellular immunity to the capsular polysaccharide of B. fragilis. Immunization of C57BL/10J mice with the CP over 5 wk prevents abscess formation when the mice are challenged with B. fragilis intraperitoneally. This immunity can be transferred to naive mice with spleen cells from immune animals. The immune cells bear Thy-1.2 and Ly- 2.2 antigens. The immune response has been shown to be antigen specific, but not H-2 restricted. The possibility that these immune cells are suppressor T cells is discussed. The experimental system presented provides a model for the examination of the cellular interactions responsible for abscess formation and the cellular response to bacterial pathogens. PMID:6174672

  3. CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE OF AZOTOBACTER AGILIS1

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gary H.; Johnstone, Donald B.

    1964-01-01

    Cohen, Gary H. (University of Vermont, Burlington), and Donald B. Johnstone. Capsular polysaccharide of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 88:1695–1699. 1964.—Capsular polysaccharide from Azotobacter agilis strain 132 was recovered from washed cells by alkaline digestion. The polysaccharide was purified by centrifugation, repeated alcohol precipitation, Sevag deproteinization, and treatment with ribonuclease and charcoal-cellulose. Methods of isolation and purification appeared to provide a polymer showing no evidence of heterogeneity when examined by chemical and physical methods. Colorimetric, paper chromatographic, and enzymatic analyses on both intact and acid-hydrolyzed polysaccharide indicated that the polymer contained galactose and rhamnose at a molar ratio of approximately 1.0:0.7. A sialic acid-like component was also present in the polysaccharide. The study shows significant differences in the chemical composition of the extra-cellular polysaccharide of A. agilis and that of A. vinelandii. This adds further biochemical evidence for the right of these species to independent status. Images PMID:14240959

  4. Immunogenic properties of Klebsiella pneumoniae type 2 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, A; Jouin, H; Fournier, J M

    1986-01-01

    The immunoprotective activity of Klebsiella pneumoniae K2 cell surface preparations and purified capsular polysaccharide was tested in mice. The 50% protective dose (PD50), expressed as capsular polysaccharide content, was 2 ng for cell surface preparations and 50 ng for purified capsular polysaccharide. Both preparations lost their immunoprotective activity after alkali treatment. Immune sera were raised in rabbits immunized with cell surface preparations. The precipitating and hemagglutinating capacity of these antisera was tested against either purified capsular polysaccharide or alkali-treated capsular polysaccharide. No difference was observed between the reactivity of the antisera against each antigen. The protective activity of these sera was tested on mice in passive transfer experiments, before and after absorption with either purified capsular polysaccharide or alkali-treated capsular polysaccharide. The sera lost their protective activity after absorption with purified capsular polysaccharide and after absorption with alkali-treated capsular polysaccharide. These experiments show that the difference in immunoprotective activity of cell surface preparations, purified capsular polysaccharide, and alkali-treated capsular polysaccharide is not due to a difference in their antigenic determinants. Cell surface preparations and purified capsular polysaccharide were fractionated by gel filtration on Sepharose 4B and by ultracentrifugation on cesium chloride density gradients. Three forms of capsular polysaccharide have been characterized. (i) A form of capsular polysaccharide with a very high protective activity (PD50 = 2 ng) that copurified with protein and lipopolysaccharide and was characterized by a low coefficient of distribution (Kd = 0.20) and a low density (1.5 to 1.6 g/cm3). (ii) A form of capsular polysaccharide with an intermediate protective activity (PD50 = 50 ng), contamined by less than 3% protein and 1% lipopolysaccharide, with a Kd of 0.35, and

  5. Antibody Binding to Cryptococcus neoformans Impairs Budding by Altering Capsular Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Radames J. B.; Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana; Nakouzi, Antonio S.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Viana, Nathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Abs to microbial capsules are critical for host defense against encapsulated pathogens, but very little is known about the effects of Ab binding on the capsule, apart from producing qualitative capsular reactions (“quellung” effects). A problem in studying Ab–capsule interactions is the lack of experimental methodology, given that capsules are fragile, highly hydrated structures. In this study, we pioneered the use of optical tweezers microscopy to study Ab–capsule interactions. Binding of protective mAbs to the capsule of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans impaired yeast budding by trapping newly emerging buds inside the parental capsule. This effect is due to profound mAb-mediated changes in capsular mechanical properties, demonstrated by a concentration-dependent increase in capsule stiffness. This increase involved mAb-mediated cross-linking of capsular polysaccharide molecules. These results provide new insights into Ab-mediated immunity, while suggesting a new nonclassical mechanism of Ab function, which may apply to other encapsulated pathogens. Our findings add to the growing body of evidence that Abs have direct antimicrobial functions independent of other components of the immune system. PMID:23233725

  6. Phospholipids Trigger Cryptococcus neoformans Capsular Enlargement during Interactions with Amoebae and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chrisman, Cara J.; Albuquerque, Patricia; Guimaraes, Allan J.; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    A remarkable aspect of the interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans with mammalian hosts is a consistent increase in capsule volume. Given that many aspects of the interaction of C. neoformans with macrophages are also observed with amoebae, we hypothesized that the capsule enlargement phenomenon also had a protozoan parallel. Incubation of C. neoformans with Acanthamoeba castellanii resulted in C. neoformans capsular enlargement. The phenomenon required contact between fungal and protozoan cells but did not require amoeba viability. Analysis of amoebae extracts showed that the likely stimuli for capsule enlargement were protozoan polar lipids. Extracts from macrophages and mammalian serum also triggered cryptococcal capsular enlargement. C. neoformans capsule enlargement required expression of fungal phospholipase B, but not phospholipase C. Purified phospholipids, in particular, phosphatidylcholine, and derived molecules triggered capsular enlargement with the subsequent formation of giant cells. These results implicate phospholipids as a trigger for both C. neoformans capsule enlargement in vivo and exopolysaccharide production. The observation that the incubation of C. neoformans with phospholipids led to the formation of giant cells provides the means to generate these enigmatic cells in vitro. Protozoan- or mammalian-derived polar lipids could represent a danger signal for C. neoformans that triggers capsular enlargement as a non-specific defense mechanism against potential predatory cells. Hence, phospholipids are the first host-derived molecules identified to trigger capsular enlargement. The parallels apparent in the capsular response of C. neoformans to both amoebae and macrophages provide additional support for the notion that certain aspects of cryptococcal virulence emerged as a consequence of environmental interactions with other microorganisms such as protists. PMID:21637814

  7. Capsular polysaccharide of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10.

    PubMed

    Lee, L; Cherniak, R

    1974-02-01

    A capsular polysaccharide was isolated from a strain of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10 type A by cold-water extraction of whole, heavily encapsulated cells. The water-soluble polymer was isolated by alcohol precipitation and purified by treatment with chloroform-butanol, cetytrimethylammonium bromide, and column gel permeation chromatography by using Bio-Gel A-5m agarose. The formation of a single precipitin line, when the isolated polysaccharide was reacted with its homologous antisera by double diffusion in gel, was considered a criterion of immunochemical purity. The purified polymer appeared as a single peak when eluted from diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex with a linear gradient of NaCl. The polysaccharide was composed of glucose, galactose, galactosamine, and iduronic acid in a molar ratio of 4.1:5.1.7:1, respectively. These constituents accounted for 83% of the dry weight. The polysaccharide appeared to have a molecular weight of 40,000 and exhibited aggregation up to 120,000. A trace of peptide material could not be removed during purification.

  8. Capsular Polysaccharide of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Cherniak, Robert

    1974-01-01

    A capsular polysaccharide was isolated from a strain of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10 type A by cold-water extraction of whole, heavily encapsulated cells. The water-soluble polymer was isolated by alcohol precipitation and purified by treatment with chloroform-butanol, cetytrimethylammonium bromide, and column gel permeation chromatography by using Bio-Gel A-5m agarose. The formation of a single precipitin line, when the isolated polysaccharide was reacted with its homologous antisera by double diffusion in gel, was considered a criterion of immunochemical purity. The purified polymer appeared as a single peak when eluted from diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex with a linear gradient of NaCl. The polysaccharide was composed of glucose, galactose, galactosamine, and iduronic acid in a molar ratio of 4.1:5.1.7:1, respectively. These constituents accounted for 83% of the dry weight. The polysaccharide appeared to have a molecular weight of 40,000 and exhibited aggregation up to 120,000. A trace of peptide material could not be removed during purification. PMID:4361293

  9. A novel capsular polysaccharide from Rhizobium rubi strain DSM 30149.

    PubMed

    De Castro, Cristina; Fregolino, Eleonora; Gargiulo, Valentina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2008-07-07

    Rhizobium rubi, strain DSM 30149, is a Gram negative phytopathogenic bacterium which produces a linear polysaccharide with the following repeating unit: This new structure was determined by spectroscopical and chemical methods. It presents similar lipophilic features reported for another strain of R. rubi. These contrast with features already known for capsular polysaccharide species from symbiontic members of the Rhizobiaceae family, namely highly anionic polymers.

  10. Antibiofilm Activity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 5 Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Karwacki, Michael T.; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Bendaoud, Meriem; Izano, Era A.; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Inzana, Thomas J.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free extracts isolated from colony biofilms of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, but not by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 itself, in a 96-well microtiter plate assay. Physical and chemical analyses indicated that the antibiofilm activity in the extract was due to high-molecular-weight polysaccharide. Extracts isolated from a mutant strain deficient in the production of serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide did not exhibit antibiofilm activity. A plasmid harboring the serotype 5 capsule genes restored the antibiofilm activity in the mutant extract. Purified serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide also exhibited antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts did not inhibit S. aureus growth, but did inhibit S. aureus intercellular adhesion and binding of S. aureus cells to stainless steel surfaces. Furthermore, polystyrene surfaces coated with A. pleuropneumoniae wild-type extracts, but not with capsule-mutant extracts, resisted S. aureus biofilm formation. Our findings suggest that the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsule inhibits cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions of other bacteria. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit broad-spectrum, nonbiocidal antibiofilm activity. Future studies on these antibiofilm polysaccharides may uncover novel functions for bacterial polysaccharides in nature, and may lead to the development of new classes of antibiofilm agents for industrial and clinical applications. PMID:23691104

  11. Masquerading microbial pathogens: Capsular polysaccharides mimic host-tissue molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Brady F.; Englaender, Jacob A.; He, Wenqin; Kasper, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Koffas, Mattheos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogens bearing capsular polysaccharides identical to mammalian glycans benefit from an additional level of protection from host immune response. The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria portends an impending post-antibiotic age, characterized by diminishing efficacy of common antibiotics and routine application of multifaceted, complementary therapeutic approaches to treat bacterial infections, particularly multidrug-resistant organisms. The first line of defense for most bacterial pathogens consists of a physical and immunological barrier known as the capsule, commonly composed of a viscous layer of carbohydrates that are covalently bound to the cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria or often to lipids of the outer membrane in many Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are a diverse class of high molecular weight polysaccharides contributing to virulence of many human pathogens in the gut, respiratory tree, urinary tract, and other host tissues, by hiding cell-surface components that might otherwise elicit host immune response. This review highlights capsular polysaccharides that are structurally identical or similar to polysaccharides found in mammalian tissues, including polysialic acid and glycosaminoglycan capsules hyaluronan, heparosan, and chondroitin. Such non-immunogenic coatings render pathogens insensitive to certain immune responses, effectively increasing residence time in host tissues and enabling pathologically relevant population densities to be reached. Biosynthetic pathways and capsular involvement in immune system evasion are described providing a basis for potential therapies aimed at supplementing or replacing antibiotic treatment. PMID:24372337

  12. Finite-element model of interaction between fungal polysaccharide and monoclonal antibody in the capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rakesh, Vineet; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Zaragoza, Oscar; Bryan, Ruth; Wong, Kevin; Datta, Ashim; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Many microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi possess so-called capsules made of polysaccharides which protect these microorganisms from environmental insults and host immune defenses. The polysaccharide capsule of C. neoformans, a human pathogenic yeast, is capable of self assembly, composed mostly of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), a polysaccharide with molecular weight of approximately 2,000,000 Da and has several layers with different densities. The objective of this study was to model pore-hindered diffusion and binding of the GXM-specific antibody within the C. neoformans capsule. Using the finite element method (FEM), we created a model which represents the in vivo binding of GXM-specific antibody to a C. neoformans cell taking into account the intravenous infusion time of antibody, antibody diffusion through capsular pores, and Michaelis-Menten kinetics of antibody binding to capsular GXM. The model predicted rapid diffusion of antibody to all regions of the capsule where pore size was greater than the Stokes diameter of the antibody. Binding occurred primarily at intermediate regions of the capsule. The GXM concentration in each capsular region was the principal determinant of the steady-state antibody-GXM complex concentration, while the forward binding rate constant influenced the rate of complex formation in each region. The concentration profiles predicted by the model closely matched experimental immunofluorescence data. Inclusion of different antibody isotypes (IgG, IgA and IgM) into the modeling algorithm resulted in similar complex formation in outer capsular regions, but different depth of binding at inner regions. These results have implications for the development of new antibody-based therapies. PMID:18588334

  13. Evidence for Branching in Cryptococcal Capsular Polysaccharides and Consequences on its Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Radames J.B.; Frases, Susana; Guimaräes, Allan J.; Rivera, Johanna; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a common cause of life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals. Its major virulence determinant is the polysaccharide (PS) capsule. An unsolved problem in cryptococcal biology is whether the PSs composing the capsule are linear or complex branched polymers, as well as the implications of this structural composition in pathogenesis. In this study we approached the problem by combining static and dynamic light scattering, viscosity analysis, and high-resolution microscopy and correlated the findings with biological properties. Analysis of the dependence of capsular PS molecular mass and the radius of gyration provided strong evidence against a simple linear PS configuration. Shape factors calculated from light scattering measurements in solution revealed values consistent with polymer branching. Furthermore, viscosity measurements provided complementary evidence for structural branching. Electron microscopy showed PS spherical-like structures similar to other branched PS. Finally, we show that the capacity of capsular PS to interfere in complement-mediated phagocytosis, inhibit nitric oxide production by macrophage-like cells, protect against reactive oxygen species, antibody reactivity and half-life in serum were influenced by the degree of branching, providing evidence for the notion that PS branching is an important parameter in determining the biological activity of C. neoformans PS. PMID:21208301

  14. Evidence for branching in cryptococcal capsular polysaccharides and consequences on its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Radames J B; Frases, Susana; Guimaräes, Allan J; Rivera, Johanna; Casadevall, Arturo

    2011-02-01

    The encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a common cause of life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals. Its major virulence determinant is the polysaccharide (PS) capsule. An unsolved problem in cryptococcal biology is whether the PSs composing the capsule are linear or complex branched polymers, as well as the implications of this structural composition in pathogenesis. In this study we approached the problem by combining static and dynamic light scattering, viscosity analysis, and high-resolution microscopy and correlated the findings with biological properties. Analysis of the dependence of capsular PS molecular mass and the radius of gyration provided strong evidence against a simple linear PS configuration. Shape factors calculated from light scattering measurements in solution revealed values consistent with polymer branching. Furthermore, viscosity measurements provided complementary evidence for structural branching. Electron microscopy showed PS spherical-like structures similar to other branched PS. Finally, we show that the capacity of capsular PS to interfere in complement-mediated phagocytosis, inhibit nitric oxide production by macrophage-like cells, protect against reactive oxygen species, antibody reactivity and half-life in serum were influenced by the degree of branching, providing evidence for the notion that PS branching is an important parameter in determining the biological activity of C. neoformans PS.

  15. Genetic analysis of capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene clusters in 79 capsular types of Klebsiella spp.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi-Jiun; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Chen, Chun-Tang; Chen, Yi-Yin; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Wu, Meng-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town

    2015-10-23

    A total of 79 capsular types have been reported in Klebsiella spp., whereas capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) regions were available in only 22 types. Due to the limitations of serotyping, complete repertoire of cps will be helpful for capsular genotyping. We therefore resolved the rest 57 cps and conducted comparative analysis. Clustering results of 1,515 predicted proteins from cps loci categorized proteins which share similarity into homology groups (HGs) revealing that 77 Wzy polymerases were classified into 56 HGs, which indicate the high specificity of wzy between different types. Accordingly, wzy-based capsular genotyping could differentiate capsule types except for those lacking wzy (K29 and K50), those sharing identical wzy (K22 vs. K37); and should be carefully applied in those exhibited high similarity (K12 vs. K41, K2 vs. K13, K74 vs. K80, K79 vs. KN1 and K30 vs. K69). Comparison of CPS structures in several capsular types that shared similarity in their gene contents implies possible functions of glycosyltransferases. Therefore, our results provide complete set of cps in various types of Klebsiella spp., which enable the understandings of relationship between genes and CPS structures and are useful for identification of documented or new capsular types.

  16. Genetic analysis of capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene clusters in 79 capsular types of Klebsiella spp

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi-Jiun; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Chen, Chun-Tang; Chen, Yi-Yin; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Wu, Meng-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town

    2015-01-01

    A total of 79 capsular types have been reported in Klebsiella spp., whereas capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) regions were available in only 22 types. Due to the limitations of serotyping, complete repertoire of cps will be helpful for capsular genotyping. We therefore resolved the rest 57 cps and conducted comparative analysis. Clustering results of 1,515 predicted proteins from cps loci categorized proteins which share similarity into homology groups (HGs) revealing that 77 Wzy polymerases were classified into 56 HGs, which indicate the high specificity of wzy between different types. Accordingly, wzy-based capsular genotyping could differentiate capsule types except for those lacking wzy (K29 and K50), those sharing identical wzy (K22 vs. K37); and should be carefully applied in those exhibited high similarity (K12 vs. K41, K2 vs. K13, K74 vs. K80, K79 vs. KN1 and K30 vs. K69). Comparison of CPS structures in several capsular types that shared similarity in their gene contents implies possible functions of glycosyltransferases. Therefore, our results provide complete set of cps in various types of Klebsiella spp., which enable the understandings of relationship between genes and CPS structures and are useful for identification of documented or new capsular types. PMID:26493302

  17. Roles of Lipooligosaccharide and Capsular Polysaccharide in Antimicrobial Resistance and Natural Transformation of Campylobacter jejuni

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives: To investigate the roles of surface polysaccharides, such as capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and lipooligosaccharide (LOS), in modulating natural transformation and antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter jejuni. Methods: A series of C. jejuni mutants, which are defective in either CPS ...

  18. Genetics of Capsular Polysaccharides and Cell Envelope (Glyco)lipids

    PubMed Central

    Daffé, Mamadou; Crick, Dean C.; Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This chapter summarizes what is currently known of the structures, physiological roles, involvement in pathogenicity and biogenesis of a variety of non-covalently bound cell envelope lipids and glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other Mycobacterium species. Topics addressed in this chapter include phospholipids; phosphatidylinositol mannosides; triglycerides; isoprenoids and related compounds (polyprenyl phosphate, menaquinones, carotenoids, non-carotenoid cyclic isoprenoids); acyltrehaloses (lipooligosaccharides, trehalose mono- and di-mycolates, sulfolipids, di- and poly-acyltrehaloses); mannosyl-beta-1-phosphomycoketides; glycopeptidolipids; phthiocerol dimycocerosates, para-hydroxybenzoic acids and phenolic glycolipids; mycobactins; mycolactones; and capsular polysaccharides. PMID:25485178

  19. Production of Capsular Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 14 and Its Purification by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Norma; Fraguas, Laura Franco; Texeira, Esther; Massaldi, Hugo; Batista-Viera, Francisco; Ferreira, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient method for producing the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae by fermentation on tryptic soy broth and purification of this compound by using immobilized soybean lectin as an affinity adsorbent. In principle, the same strategy can be used to produce purified capsular polysaccharides from other streptococcal serotypes by selecting the appropriate lectin adsorbents. PMID:11157270

  20. Production of capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 and its purification by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N; Fraguas, L F; Texeira, E; Massaldi, H; Batista-Viera, F; Ferreira, F

    2001-02-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient method for producing the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae by fermentation on tryptic soy broth and purification of this compound by using immobilized soybean lectin as an affinity adsorbent. In principle, the same strategy can be used to produce purified capsular polysaccharides from other streptococcal serotypes by selecting the appropriate lectin adsorbents.

  1. A Monoclonal Antibody to Cryptococcus neoformans Glucuronoxylomannan Manifests Hydrolytic Activity for Both Peptides and Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Anthony; Wear, Maggie P; Cordero, Radames J B; Oscarson, Stefan; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-01-13

    Studies in the 1980s first showed that some natural antibodies were "catalytic" and able to hydrolyze peptide or phosphodiester bonds in antigens. Many naturally occurring catalytic antibodies have since been isolated from human sera and associated with positive and negative outcomes in autoimmune disease and infection. The function and prevalence of these antibodies, however, remain unclear. A previous study suggested that the 18B7 monoclonal antibody against glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major component of the Cryptococcus neoformans polysaccharide capsule, hydrolyzed a peptide antigen mimetic. Using mass spectrometry and Förster resonance energy transfer techniques, we confirm and characterize the hydrolytic activity of 18B7 against peptide mimetics and show that 18B7 is able to hydrolyze an oligosaccharide substrate, providing the first example of a naturally occurring catalytic antibody for polysaccharides. Additionally, we show that the catalytic 18B7 antibody increases release of capsular polysaccharide from fungal cells. A serine protease inhibitor blocked peptide and oligosaccharide hydrolysis by 18B7, and a putative serine protease-like active site was identified in the light chain variable region of the antibody. An algorithm was developed to detect similar sites present in unique antibody structures in the Protein Data Bank. The putative site was found in 14 of 63 (22.2%) catalytic antibody structures and 119 of 1602 (7.4%) antibodies with no annotation of catalytic activity. The ability of many antibodies to cleave antigen, albeit slowly, supports the notion that this activity is an important immunoglobulin function in host defense. The discovery of GXM hydrolytic activity suggests new therapeutic possibilities for polysaccharide-binding antibodies.

  2. Purification, characterization and immunological properties of the capsular polysaccharide of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype T15: its identity with the K62 (K2ab) capsular polysaccharide of Escherichia coli and the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup H.

    PubMed

    Adlam, C; Knights, J M; Mugridge, A; Lindon, J C; Williams, J M; Beesley, J E

    1985-08-01

    Capsular polysaccharide from two strains of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype T15 was purified and characterized by chemical analysis and NMR spectroscopy. The polymer, a teichoic acid, proved to be very similar in structure to the capsular polysaccharide of P. haemolytica serotype T4 and identical to the previously described K62 (K2ab) capsular polysaccharide of Escherichia coli, and the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serotype H, i.e. ----(2-glycerol-3)----(phosphate)----(4-alpha-D-galactopyranose -1)---- with partial O-acetylation on the galactose residues. Electron microscopy with Protein A-gold labelled antisera showed that the polysaccharide was peripherally located on the surface of all three organisms. Chemical removal of O-acetyl groups from the polysaccharide yielded a structure identical to that previously described for E. coli K2 (K2a). Both O-acetylated and de-O-acetylated P. haemolytica T15 polymers, when absorbed on to sheep erythrocytes in passive haemagglutination assays, yielded identical antibody titres with sera raised against P. haemolytica T15, E. coli K2 or N. meningitidis H whole cells. De-O-acetylation of the Pasteurella polysaccharide influenced its precipitability with immune sera, but this could not be related to the absence of O-acetyl groups because the non-acetylated E. coli K2 polymer readily precipitated with a line of 'identity' with the acetylated P. haemolytica T15 polymer.

  3. Vaccination with peptide mimotopes produces antibodies recognizing bacterial capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Zhang, Qibo; Sales, Debra; Bianco, Albert Edward; Craig, Alister

    2010-09-07

    A phage display peptide library was screened using a panel of antibodies to the capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus agalactiae and Neisseria meningitidis. Mimotopes NPDHPRVPTFMA (2-8), LIPFHKHPHHRG (3-2) and EQEIFTNITDRV (G3) showing the highest binding capacity and strongest ELISA reaction were selected for immunization experiments. These mimotopes were either synthesised as oligodeoxynucleotides for DNA immunization or MAP (multiple antigen peptide) for peptide immunization. Mimotope-DNA vaccination, particularly for G3, induced antibodies recognizing a number of target bacteria. This response was seen after the second boost injection and was significantly enhanced by the 3rd boost injection with a Th1-associated profile, which was dominated by IgG2a, followed by IgG1. Mimotope-MAP immunization also produced strong humoral immune responses to the bacteria. Antibodies from G3 DNA immunization reacted with the surface molecules of S. agalactiae, N. meningitidis and Escherichia coli K5 shown by indirect immunofluorescence staining, indicating a possible localization to the bacterial capsule. Antibodies produced both from DNA/MAP immunization reacted with purified bacterial capsular polysaccharides by ELISA and were of high avidity. We have further characterized peptide G3 by a 'tiling path' study to examine the effect of changing individual residues in the peptide in raising antibodies, which showed that the EIFTN motif in G3 was important in generating antibodies to several capsulated bacteria. We conclude that mimotope immunization with DNA or MAP potentially induces strong antibody responses against encapsulated bacteria. It is suggested that the antibody targets are polysaccharides, and these antibodies may cross react at least among closely related species of bacteria.

  4. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  5. Gas-chromatographic screening of capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Bryn, K; Frøholm, L O; Holten, E; Bøvre, K

    1983-06-01

    Thirteen systemic strains, i e strains isolated from systemic infections, and 77 carrier isolates of Neisseria meningitidis were serogrouped by agglutination and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) of phenol extracts. For systemic strains the sugar patterns were in accordance with their group-specific capsular polysaccharides (CPS). Some carrier isolates revealed unexpected GC profiles. Upon immunological retesting with new sera, GC results were generally confirmed. Occasional isolates initially serogrouped as B or Y completely lacked neuraminic acid. Some non-groupable isolates were shown by ultracentrifugation and GC to have significant amounts of this sugar likely to originate from CPS of known composition or from unknown polysaccharides. One such originally non-groupable isolate showed a weak agglutination reaction specifically with group B antiserum when reexamined. Generally, carrier isolates had lower amounts of CPS than systemic strains of the same group. Five successive isolates from one carrier were first serogrouped as X, Z or non-groupable, but they had high amounts of galactosamine and 2-keto-3-deoxy octonate, sugars characterizing CPS of serogroup 29E. These isolates were confirmed by agglutination with recently available group 29E antiserum to be of this serogroup, which has not been reported before in Norway. Ultracentrifugation revealed the presence of unknown polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose or glucosamine, but further purification of these polymers is required to determine their composition and immunological importance.

  6. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii: Separate Varietal Status for Cryptococcus neoformans Serotype A Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Franzot, Sarah P.; Salkin, Ira F.; Casadevall, Arturo

    1999-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans presently includes isolates which have been determined by the immunologic reactivity of their capsular polysaccharides to be serotype A and those which have been determined to be serotype D. However, recent analyses of the URA5 sequences and DNA fingerprinting patterns suggest significant genetic differences between the two serotypes. Therefore, we propose to recognize these genotypic distinctions, as well as previously reported phenotypic differences, by restricting C. neoformans var. neoformans to isolates which are serotype D and describing a new variety, C. neoformans var. grubii, for serotype A isolates. PMID:9986871

  7. Nonencapsulated Variant of Cryptococcus neoformans I. Virulence Studies and Characterization of Soluble Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Thomas R.; Cazin, John

    1971-01-01

    A weakly virulent nonencapsulated variant of Cryptococcus neoformans is described. The chemical structure and antigenicity of the soluble polysaccharides produced by the variant strain and a typical virulent strain were compared. The soluble polysaccharides produced by both strains were composed of the same constituent monosaccharides; however, the virulent strain produced a polysaccharide having a greater uronic acid content and a larger molecular size than that of the variant strain. Soluble polysaccharides from the two strains are not closely related immunologically. Soluble polysaccharide obtained from the virulent strain did not affect persistence of the variant strain in mice. PMID:16557967

  8. Overproduction of Type 8 Capsular Polysaccharide Augments Staphylococcus aureus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia Y.

    2002-01-01

    Type 8 capsular polysaccharide (CP8) is the most prevalent capsule type in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. However, its role in virulence has not been clearly defined. CP8 strains such as strain Becker produce a small amount of capsule on their surface in vitro. In contrast, CP1 strains such as strain M produce a large amount of capsule, which has been shown to be an important antiphagocytic virulence factor. The cap8 and cap1 operons, required for the synthesis of CP8 and CP1, respectively, have been cloned and sequenced. To test whether CP8 contributes to the pathogenesis of S. aureus, we replaced the weak native promoter of the cap8 operon in strain Becker with the strong constitutive promoter of the cap1 operon of strain M. The resultant strain, CYL770, synthesized cap8-specific mRNA at a level about sevenfold higher than that in the parent strain. Remarkably, the CYL770 strain produced about 80-fold more CP8. In a mouse infection model of bacteremia, the CP8-overproducing strain persisted longer in the bloodstream, the liver, and the spleen in mice than the parent strain. In addition, strain CYL770 was more resistant to ospsonophagocytosis in vitro by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results indicate that CP8 is an antiphagocytic virulence factor of S. aureus. PMID:12065477

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of a conjugate vaccine containing a peptide mimotope of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausik; Lees, Andrew; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2008-08-01

    Vaccination with P13, a peptide mimotope of the cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), has been shown to confer protection against a subsequent lethal Cryptococcus neoformans challenge. In this study, we sought to investigate whether P13-based vaccines could be effective in an already-established infection. To address this question, we developed a systemic chronic cryptococcal infection model. We vaccinated chronically infected mice with P13-protein conjugates and monitored their survival. Compared to the controls, the conjugates prolonged the survival of chronically infected mice. The degree of protection was a function of the mouse strain (BALB/c or C57BL/6), the carrier protein (tetanus toxoid or diphtheria toxoid), and the route of infection (intraperitoneal or intravenous). Serum GXM levels were correlated with the day of death, but the correlation was driven by the carrier protein and mouse strain. The passive transfer of heat-treated sera from P13 conjugate-vaccinated mice conferred protection to naïve BALB/c mice, indicating that antibody immunity could contribute to protection. The measurement of peripheral blood cytokine (gamma interferon [IFN-gamma], interleukin-10 [IL-10], and IL-6) gene expression showed that P13 conjugate-vaccinated BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice mounted a strong Th2 (IL-10)-like response relative to the Th1 (IFN-gamma)-like response, with the degree depending on the mouse strain and carrier protein. Taken together, our data suggest that a vaccine could hold promise in the setting of chronic cryptococcosis, and that vaccine efficacy could depend on immunomodulation and augmentation of the natural immune response of the host.

  10. Maternal group B streptococcal immunization: capsular polysaccharide (CPS)-based vaccines and their implications on prevention.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Jussara K; De Carvalho, Newton S; Botelho, Ana C N; Fracalanzza, Sérgio E L; Madeira, Humberto M F; Dalla-Costa, Libera M

    2011-05-12

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) capsular polysaccharide (CPS)-based conjugate vaccine, which includes types Ia, Ib, II, III, and V, could potentially prevent neonatal, pediatric, adult, and pregnancy-associated diseases. However, since GBS CPS types included in that vaccine are prevalent serotypes found in North America and Europe, it may not provide the necessary protection for individuals in countries in which other capsular types have been found.

  11. Pneumococcus with the "6E" cps Locus Produces Serotype 6B Capsular Polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert L; Geno, K Aaron; Saad, Jamil S; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-04-01

    Genetic studies of serogroup 6 isolates ofStreptococcus pneumoniaeidentified putative serotype 6E. Although its capsular polysaccharide structure has not been elucidated, putative serotype 6E is described in an increasing number of studies as a potentially new serotype. We show here that SPEC6B, which is widely used as a target strain for serotype 6B opsonophagocytosis assays, has the genetic features of the putative serotype 6E but produces capsular polysaccharide identical to 6B capsular polysaccharide as determined by one-dimensional (1D) and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Thus, putative serotype 6E is a mere genetic variant of serotype 6B. Also, SPEC6B is appropriate as a target strain for serotype 6B opsonophagocytosis assays. This example illustrates the difficulties of assigning new bacterial serotypes based on genetic findings alone.

  12. Structure of the capsular polysaccharide of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10 determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheng, S; Cherniak, R

    1997-12-01

    The complete primary structure of the type-specific capsular polysaccharide of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10 was determined. The polysaccharide was isolated from C. perfringens Hobbs 10 by cold-water extraction of whole, heavily encapsulated cells. The polysaccharide was purified, by ethanol precipitation, deproteination, selective precipitation with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, ion-exchange chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. The polysaccharide was comprised of D-glucose, D-galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, and iduronic acid, in molar ratios of 2:2:1:1. Sequence and linkage assignments of the glycosyl residues were obtained by NMR spectroscopy, specifically by the combination of two-dimensional homonuclear DQF-COSY, TQF-COSY and TOCSY, heteronuclear ¿1H, 13C¿ single-quantum coherence (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) experiments. The capsular polysaccharide of C. perfringens Hobbs 10 is a polymer composed of a hexasaccharide repeating unit with the following structure: [formula: see text] This structure is novel among bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides, and it is only the second of many serotypically distinct capsular polysaccharides of C. perfringens to be described.

  13. Immunochemical characterization of the capsular polysaccharide of Azospirillum irakense KBC1.

    PubMed

    Fedonenko, Yulia P; Burygin, Gennady L; Popova, Irina A; Sigida, Elena N; Surkina, Alina K; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A

    2013-08-01

    The repeating unit structure of Azospirillum irakense KBC1 capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was established and was found to be identical to that of the O polysaccharide of A. irakense KBC1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The antigenic heterogeneity of the LPS and the CPS was shown to be related to differences in the macromolecular organization of these glycopolymers. After an immune response activation, R-form CPS molecules were found to be predominant.

  14. Structural analysis of the capsular polysaccharide from Campylobacter jejuni RM1221

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete genome of Campylobacter jejuni strain RM1221 (Penner serotype HS:53) was reported recently and contains a novel capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis locus. Cell surface carbohydrates such as CPS are known to be important for bacterial survival and often contribute to pathogenesis....

  15. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species: Genetic and Antigenic Similarities to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong; Tettelin, Hervé; Kilian, Mogens

    2016-11-15

    Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule production distinguishes S. pneumoniae from closely related commensals of the mitis group streptococci. Based on antigenic and genetic analyses of 187 mitis group streptococci, including 90 recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae, we demonstrated capsule production by the Wzy/Wzx pathway in 74% of 66 S. mitis strains and in virtually all tested strains of S. oralis (subspecies oralis, dentisani, and tigurinus) and S. infantis Additional analyses of genomes of S. cristatus, S. parasanguinis, S. australis, S. sanguinis, S. gordonii, S. anginosus, S. intermedius, and S. constellatus revealed complete capsular biosynthesis (cps) loci in all strains tested. Truncated cps loci were detected in three strains of S. pseudopneumoniae, in 26% of S. mitis strains, and in a single S. oralis strain. The level of sequence identities of cps locus genes confirmed that the structural polymorphism of capsular polysaccharides in S. pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae raises concerns about potential misidentifications in addition to important questions concerning the consequences for vaccination and host-parasite relationships both for the commensals and for the pathogen. Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is among the principal virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is the basis for successful vaccines against infections caused by this important pathogen. Contrasting with previous

  16. Unusual galactofuranose modification of a capsule polysaccharide in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Christian; Skowyra, Michael L; Liu, Hong; Klutts, J Stacey; Wang, Zhirui; Williams, Matthew; Srikanta, Deepa; Beverley, Stephen M; Azadi, Parastoo; Doering, Tamara L

    2013-04-19

    Galactofuranose (Galf) is the five-membered ring form of galactose. Although it is absent from mammalian glycans, it occurs as a structural and antigenic component of important cell surface molecules in a variety of microbes, ranging from bacteria to parasites and fungi. One such organism is Cryptococcus neoformans, a pathogenic yeast that causes lethal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals, particularly AIDS patients. C. neoformans is unique among fungal pathogens in bearing a complex polysaccharide capsule, a critical virulence factor reported to include Galf. Notably, how Galf modification contributes to the structure and function of the cryptococcal capsule is not known. We have determined that Galf is β1,2-linked to an unusual tetrasubstituted galactopyranose of the glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal) capsule polysaccharide. This discovery fills a longstanding gap in our understanding of a major polymer of the cryptococcal capsule. We also engineered a C. neoformans strain that lacks UDP-galactopyranose mutase; this enzyme forms UDP-Galf, the nucleotide sugar donor required for Galf addition. Mutase activity was required for the incorporation of Galf into glucuronoxylomannogalactan but was dispensable for vegetative growth, cell integrity, and virulence in a mouse model.

  17. Surface polysaccharide of Moraxella non-liquefaciens identical to Neisseria meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide. A chemical and immunological investigation.

    PubMed

    Bøvre, K; Bryn, K; Closs, O; Hagen, N; Frøholm, L O

    1983-06-01

    In whole cell preparations of 27 nonmucoid strains of Moraxella nonliquefaciens neuraminic acid was detected by gas chromatography (GC) in 16 (59%) of the strains. Seven neuraminic-acid-containing strains were tested for agglutination with diagnostic group-specific meningococcal antisera produced in rabbits, and all were positive with group B serum. Counter-immunoelectrophoresis of bacterial suspensions of the three strains with the strongest reaction with such anti-group B serum gave distinct precipitation lines. When tested by double immunodiffusion in agarose with monoclonal antibody to meningococcal group B polysaccharide, suspension of a strain of M nonliquefaciens gave identity reaction with a strain of Neisseria meningitidis, and reacted even more strongly than the latter. Phenol extracts of M nonliquefaciens strains generally contained higher amounts of neuraminic acid than N meningitidis group B strains. Neuraminic-acid-containing polysaccharides of M nonliquefaciens strains sedimented more slowly by ultra-centrifugation than the group-specific B polysaccharide of N meningitidis strains. They also reacted more strongly with a monoclonal anti-group B antiserum than did N meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide in an antibody binding inhibition test (solid phase radioimmunoassay). Immunological reactivity of the polysaccharides of both species was lost if extraction was performed with unbuffered phenol at 68 degrees C, instead of with neutral phenol at 4 degrees C. The results show that several strains of M nonliquefaciens, often inhabiting the human nose, have high levels of a surface polysaccharide chemically and immunologically closely similar to N meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide. The cross-reactivity may have immunological implications for meningococcal disease.

  18. Purification of capsular polysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pato, Tânia Pinheiro; Barbosa, Antonio de Pádua R; da Silva Junior, José Godinho

    2006-03-07

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C capsular polysaccharide (MenCPS) is an important antigen against meningococcal infection. This paper describes a new purification methodology employing liquid chromatography that resulted in a polysaccharide showing the characteristics recommended by the World Health Organization for vaccine purposes. In this method, steps of the traditional procedure that yield low recovery and use toxic materials were modified. The present process consists in the following steps: (1) continuous flow centrifugation of the culture for removal of the cells; (2) supernatant concentration by tangential filtration (100 kDa cutoff); (3) addition of 0.5% DOC, heating to 55 degrees C during 30 min and tangential filtration (100 kDa cutoff); (4) anion exchange chromatography (Source 15Q) and (5) size exclusion chromatography (Sepharose CL-4B). The polysaccharide C fraction obtained in that way was dialyzed and freeze-dried. The structural identity of the polysaccharide was demonstrated by (1)H-NMR spectrometry.

  19. Structural characterization of an all-aminosugar-containing capsular polysaccharide from Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H.

    PubMed

    Casillo, Angela; Ståhle, Jonas; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Mitchell, Daniel E; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Gibson, Matthew I; Marino, Gennaro; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Widmalm, Göran; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, Maria M

    2017-02-04

    Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from Arctic marine sediments, is considered a model to study the adaptation to cold environments. Recently, we demonstrated that C. psychrerythraea 34H produces two different extracellular polysaccharides, a capsular polysaccharide and a medium released polysaccharide, which confer cryoprotection to the bacterium. In this study, we report the structure of an additional capsular polysaccharide produced by Colwellia grown at a different temperature. The structure was determined using chemical methods, and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The results showed a trisaccharide repeating unit made up of only amino-sugar residues: N-acetyl-galactosamine, 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-glucose (bacillosamine), and 2-acetamido-2-deoxyglucuronic acid with the following structure: →4)-β-D-GlcpNAcA-(1 →3)-β-D-QuipNAc4NAc-(1 →3)-β-D-GalpNAc-(1 →. The 3D model, generated in accordance with (1)H,(1)H-NOE NMR correlations and consisting of ten repeating units, shows a helical structure. In contrast with the other extracellular polysaccharides produced from Colwellia at 4 °C, this molecule displays only a low ice recrystallization inhibition activity.

  20. [Efficacy of the meningococcal vaccine from Group C capsular polysaccharide].

    PubMed

    González Enríquez, J; García Comas, L; Alcaide Jiménez, J F; Sáenz Calvo, A; Conde Olasagasti, J

    1997-01-01

    This report is a systematic review of the effect intensity and duration of the immune response to meningococcal serogroup C vaccine. The vaccine safety, efficacy and effectiveness are also analyzed. MEDLINE literature search in the period 1970-1996. Meningoccocal polysaccharide vaccine clinical trials and human prospective studies were specifically searched. Quality of the retrieved studies were analyzed. Information available was integrated. Group C meningoccal polysaccharide vaccine is a safe product. Its efficacy is over 85% among adults and children over 5 years old. 70% (CI 95%: 5-91%) under 5 years old, and 55% among children 2-3 years old. The vaccine is not effective under 2 years. The duration of protective antibody levels decrease with age. The proportion of vaccinated children effectively protected one year after vaccination is low. Vaccination does not affect the immune response to ulterior revaccination. Group C meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is indicated in adults and children over 2 years old to protect them from meningococcal disease due to group C when exposed to high risk of infection. The outbreaks control is the main indication for the use of this vaccine. Routine immunization in not outbreak situation is not recommended due to the small vaccine protection in children under 2 years old, the limited efficacy in children under 5, and the short duration of the immunity in children.

  1. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species: Genetic and Antigenic Similarities to Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B.; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong; Tettelin, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule production distinguishes S. pneumoniae from closely related commensals of the mitis group streptococci. Based on antigenic and genetic analyses of 187 mitis group streptococci, including 90 recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae, we demonstrated capsule production by the Wzy/Wzx pathway in 74% of 66 S. mitis strains and in virtually all tested strains of S. oralis (subspecies oralis, dentisani, and tigurinus) and S. infantis. Additional analyses of genomes of S. cristatus, S. parasanguinis, S. australis, S. sanguinis, S. gordonii, S. anginosus, S. intermedius, and S. constellatus revealed complete capsular biosynthesis (cps) loci in all strains tested. Truncated cps loci were detected in three strains of S. pseudopneumoniae, in 26% of S. mitis strains, and in a single S. oralis strain. The level of sequence identities of cps locus genes confirmed that the structural polymorphism of capsular polysaccharides in S. pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae raises concerns about potential misidentifications in addition to important questions concerning the consequences for vaccination and host-parasite relationships both for the commensals and for the pathogen. PMID:27935839

  2. Intracellular Fate of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Tacker, J. R.; Farhi, F.; Bulmer, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Human peripheral leukocytes were found to engulf and kill cells of Cryptococcus neoformans. Fewer encapsulated than nonencapsulated cells met this fate, since cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide inhibited phagocytosis. During 10 to 12 hr of incubation of nonencapsulated cells in human serum, sufficient polysaccharide was produced to inhibit phagocytosis by 50%. The polysaccharide inhibitor was found in the sera of four patients with cryptococcosis, but not on the surfaces of their leukocytes. Additional experiments indicated that serum is not essential for effective phagocytosis. However, normal human serum contains anticryptococcal activity which is not inhibited by capsular material. Preliminary findings indicate that the phagocytic index of a patient with cryptococcosis may be correlated with the severity of his disease. PMID:4569916

  3. Effects of light wavelengths on extracellular and capsular polysaccharide production by Nostoc flagelliforme.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei-pei; Sun, Ying; Jia, Shi-ru; Zhong, Cheng; Tan, Zhi-lei

    2014-05-25

    The influences of different wavelengths of light (red 660nm, yellow 590nm, green 520nm, blue 460nm, purple 400nm) and white light on extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production by Nostoc flagelliforme in liquid culture were demonstrated in this study. The results showed that, compared with white light, red and blue lights significantly increased both EPS and CPS production while yellow light reduced their production; purple and green lights stimulated EPS production but inhibited CPS formation. Nine constituent monosaccharides and one uronic acid were detected in both EPS and CPS, and their ratios showed significant differences among treatment with different light wavelengths. However, the advanced structure of EPS and CPS from various light conditions did not present obvious difference through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction characterization. These findings establish a basis for development of high-yielding polysaccharide production process and understanding their regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High affinity mimotope of the polysaccharide capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans identified from an evolutionary phage peptide library.

    PubMed

    Beenhouwer, David O; May, Rena J; Valadon, Philippe; Scharff, Matthew D

    2002-12-15

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes a life-threatening meningoencephalitis in a significant percentage of AIDS patients. Mice immunized with a glycoconjugate vaccine composed of the glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) component of the cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) produce Abs that, based on the epitope recognized, can be either protective or nonprotective. Since nonprotective Abs block the efficacy of protective Abs, we are interested in developing a vaccine that would focus the immune response specifically to protective epitopes. Previously, we screened a phage display library with 2H1, a protective anti-GXM mAb, and isolated PA1, a representative peptide that had a K(d) of 295 nM for 2H1. Mice immunized with PA1 conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin developed high anti-peptide (1/13,000), but low anti-GXM (maximum, 1/200) titers. We now report our efforts to improve this vaccine by screening a sublibrary with six random amino acids added to either end of the PA1 motif to identify higher affinity peptides. P206.1, a peptide isolated from this sublibrary, had 80-fold higher affinity for 2H1 (K(d) = 3.7 nM) than PA1. P206.1 bound protective, but not nonprotective, anti-GXM Abs. Mice immunized with P206.1 conjugated to various carriers did not mount an Ab response to GXM despite developing high anti-peptide titers. However, mice primed with GXM-TT and boosted with P206.1-TT developed significant anti-GXM titers (maximum, 1/180,000). This latter immunization scheme focused the immune response on protective epitopes, since only 2-5% of these titers were directed against nonprotective de-O-acetylated GXM epitopes compared with 20-60% in animals primed and boosted with GXM-TT.

  5. Capsular polysaccharide of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the causative agent of swine erysipelas, and its modification with phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Harada, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Ono, Hiroshi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Miyamoto, Toru; Eguchi, Masahiro; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    The capsule has been implicated in the virulence of the swine pathogen Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a rod-shaped, intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that has a unique phylogenetic position in the phylum Firmicutes and is a close relative of Mollicutes (mycoplasma species). In this study, we analyzed the genetic locus and composition of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of the Fujisawa strain of E. rhusiopathiae. Genome analysis of the Fujisawa strain revealed that the genetic locus for capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) is located next to an lic operon, which is involved in the incorporation and expression of phosphorylcholine (PCho). Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that cps and lic are transcribed as a single mRNA, indicating that the loci form an operon. Using the cell surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) ER21 as a probe, the capsular materials were isolated from the Fujisawa strain by hot water extraction and treatment with DNase, RNase, pronase, and N-acetylmuramidase SG, followed by anion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The materials were then analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The CPS of E. rhusiopathiae is heterogeneous and consists of the major monosaccharides galacturonic acid, galactose, mannose, glucose, arabinose, xylose, and N-acetylglucosamine and some minor monosaccharides containing ribose, rhamnose, and N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, the capsule is modified by PCho, which comigrates with the capsular materials, as determined by Western immunoblotting, and colocalizes on the cell surface, as determined by immunogold electron microscopy. Virulence testing of PCho-defective mutants in mice demonstrated that PCho is critical for the virulence of this organism.

  6. Capsular Polysaccharide of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the Causative Agent of Swine Erysipelas, and Its Modification with Phosphorylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fang; Harada, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Ono, Hiroshi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Miyamoto, Toru; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The capsule has been implicated in the virulence of the swine pathogen Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a rod-shaped, intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that has a unique phylogenetic position in the phylum Firmicutes and is a close relative of Mollicutes (mycoplasma species). In this study, we analyzed the genetic locus and composition of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of the Fujisawa strain of E. rhusiopathiae. Genome analysis of the Fujisawa strain revealed that the genetic locus for capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) is located next to an lic operon, which is involved in the incorporation and expression of phosphorylcholine (PCho). Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that cps and lic are transcribed as a single mRNA, indicating that the loci form an operon. Using the cell surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) ER21 as a probe, the capsular materials were isolated from the Fujisawa strain by hot water extraction and treatment with DNase, RNase, pronase, and N-acetylmuramidase SG, followed by anion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The materials were then analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The CPS of E. rhusiopathiae is heterogeneous and consists of the major monosaccharides galacturonic acid, galactose, mannose, glucose, arabinose, xylose, and N-acetylglucosamine and some minor monosaccharides containing ribose, rhamnose, and N-acetylgalactosamine. In addition, the capsule is modified by PCho, which comigrates with the capsular materials, as determined by Western immunoblotting, and colocalizes on the cell surface, as determined by immunogold electron microscopy. Virulence testing of PCho-defective mutants in mice demonstrated that PCho is critical for the virulence of this organism. PMID:22949554

  7. Purification and characterisation of anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide IgG immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Parker, Antony R; Lock, Emma; Iftikhar, Asma; Barber, Richard; Stubbs, Phil D; Harding, Stephen; Wallis, Gregg L F

    2017-01-01

    The production of reference materials for quantifying pneumococcal antibody concentrations relies upon large scale vaccination. An alternative simple, reproducible protocol has been developed for the affinity purification of 23 serotype anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PCP) IgG immunoglobulins. The purification protocol utilised IgG fractionation, capsular polysaccharide (CPS) adsorption, and affinity chromatography using Pneumovax®-Sepharose. Purification efficiency and method reproducibility were assessed by comparison of 4 batches of anti-PCP IgG. Immunoglobulin composition was determined using nephelometry and functionality was evaluated using VaccZyme™ ELISAs. Anti-PCP IgG preparations were ≥95% pure by SDS-PAGE analysis with no contaminating IgA or IgM immunoglobulins or IgG antigen specific antibodies towards haemophilus influenzae b, diphtheria toxoid or tetanus toxoid. The predominant IgG subclass in the preparation was IgG2. This novel purification procedure produced highly specific anti-PCP IgG preparations that compared well to both Lot 89SF and 007sp international serum standards and could be used as an alternative method for the production of reference materials. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CUTANEOUS REACTIONS IN RABBITS TO THE TYPE-SPECIFIC CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF PNEUMOCOCCUS

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Thomas; Tillett, William S.

    1931-01-01

    The injection of the type-specific capsular polysaccharides of Pneumococcus Types I, II and III into the skin of rabbits, actively or passively immunized to one of these types of Pneumococcus, elicits a type-specific cutaneous reaction. The form of reaction resembles that described by Arthus. The reaction is produced only when type-specific precipitins for the homologous polysaccharide are demonstrable in the blood of the rabbit. In 84 per cent of actively immunized rabbits, the serum of which contained type-specific precipitins, a reaction was elicited. A positive result was obtained in 100 per cent of rabbits passively immunized with antipneumococcus horse serum whereas, attempts passively to transfer reactivity from immune rabbit to normal rabbit were unsuccessful. The recipients, in the latter group, possessed no demonstrable circulating type-specific precipitins. The reaction produced by specific capsular carbohydrates is always associated with a well grounded type-specific immunity. A brief summary of the relation of hypersensitiveness and immunity to pneumococcus is given. PMID:19869942

  9. Trapped translocation intermediates establish the route for export of capsular polysaccharides across Escherichia coli outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Nicholas N; Mainprize, Iain L; Hampton, Lauren; Jones, Michelle L; Naismith, James H; Whitfield, Chris

    2014-06-03

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is designed to exclude potentially harmful molecules. This property presents a challenge for bacteria that must secrete proteins and large glycoconjugates to grow, divide, and persist. Proteins involved in trafficking such molecules have been identified, but their precise roles are often unresolved due to the difficulty in capturing "snapshots" during the export pathway. Wza is the prototype for the large family of OM polysaccharide export proteins. In Escherichia coli, Wza is essential for the assembly of a capsule, a protective surface coat composed of long-chain polysaccharides. Wza creates an octameric α-helical channel spanning the OM, but the bulk of the protein exists as a large periplasmic structure enclosing an extensive lumen. Residues within the lumen of Wza were targeted for site-specific incorporation of the UV photo-cross-linkable unnatural amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine. Using this in vivo photo-cross-linking strategy, we were able to trap polysaccharide translocation intermediates within the lumen of Wza, providing the first unequivocal evidence to our knowledge that nascent capsular polysaccharide chains exit the cell through the Wza portal.

  10. HPAEC-PAD method for the analysis of alkaline hydrolyzates of Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    de Haan, Alex; van der Put, Robert M F; Beurret, Michel

    2013-09-01

    A gradient method has been devised for the rapid analysis of alkaline hydrolyzates of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). As compared with published procedures, peak shape and sensitivity were significantly improved with this approach, analysis time was short and there was little interference from impurities. The limits of detection and quantification were established with a purified reference polysaccharide. We propose this method as a practical alternative for the analysis of minute amounts of Hib polysaccharide, which can be lower than with the conventional approaches.

  11. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Hiroya; SUEYOSHI, Masuo

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence determination and analysis of the cps gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15 revealed the presence of three open reading frames, designated as cps15ABC genes. At the protein level, Cps15A and Cps15B showed considerably high homology to CpsA (67.0 to 68.7%) and CpsB (31.7 to 36.8%), respectively, of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, revealing the common genetic organization of the cps among serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. However, Cps15C showed no homology to any proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes, indicating that cps15C may be specific to serotype 15. This study will provide the basic molecular knowledge necessary for the development of diagnostics and a vaccine for A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 15. PMID:25502540

  12. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroya; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide sequence determination and analysis of the cps gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15 revealed the presence of three open reading frames, designated as cps15ABC genes. At the protein level, Cps15A and Cps15B showed considerably high homology to CpsA (67.0 to 68.7%) and CpsB (31.7 to 36.8%), respectively, of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, revealing the common genetic organization of the cps among serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. However, Cps15C showed no homology to any proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes, indicating that cps15C may be specific to serotype 15. This study will provide the basic molecular knowledge necessary for the development of diagnostics and a vaccine for A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 15.

  13. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Winter, Sebastian E; Hastey, Christine J; Wilson, R Paul; Heinrich, Volkmar; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  14. Genomic acquisition of a capsular polysaccharide virulence cluster by non-pathogenic Burkholderia isolates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia thailandensis is a non-pathogenic environmental saprophyte closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of the often fatal animal and human disease melioidosis. To study B. thailandensis genomic variation, we profiled 50 isolates using a pan-genome microarray comprising genomic elements from 28 Burkholderia strains and species. Results Of 39 genomic regions variably present across the B. thailandensis strains, 13 regions corresponded to known genomic islands, while 26 regions were novel. Variant B. thailandensis isolates exhibited isolated acquisition of a capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis gene cluster (B. pseudomallei-like capsular polysaccharide) closely resembling a similar cluster in B. pseudomallei that is essential for virulence in mammals; presence of this cluster was confirmed by whole genome sequencing of a representative variant strain (B. thailandensis E555). Both whole-genome microarray and multi-locus sequence typing analysis revealed that the variant strains formed part of a phylogenetic subgroup distinct from the ancestral B. thailandensis population and were associated with atypical isolation sources when compared to the majority of previously described B. thailandensis strains. In functional assays, B. thailandensis E555 exhibited several B. pseudomallei-like phenotypes, including colony wrinkling, resistance to human complement binding, and intracellular macrophage survival. However, in murine infection assays, B. thailandensis E555 did not exhibit enhanced virulence relative to other B. thailandensis strains, suggesting that additional factors are required to successfully colonize and infect mammals. Conclusions The discovery of such novel variant strains demonstrates how unbiased genomic surveys of non-pathogenic isolates can reveal insights into the development and emergence of new pathogenic species. PMID:20799932

  15. A peptide mimotope of type 8 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide induces a protective immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Ulrike K; Lees, Andrew; Steinitz, Michael; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2005-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and a rising patient population at risk for infection due to impaired immunity underscore the importance of vaccination against pneumococci. However, available capsular polysaccharide vaccines are often poorly immunogenic in patients at risk for pneumococcal disease. The goal of this study was to explore the potential of peptide mimotopes to function as alternative vaccine antigens to elicit a type-specific antibody response to pneumococci. We used a human monoclonal immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody (NAD) to type 8 Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (type 8 PS) to screen a phage display library, and the phage PUB1 displaying the peptide FHLPYNHNWFAL was selected after three rounds of biopanning. Inhibition studies with phage-displayed peptide or the peptide PUB1 and type 8 PS showed that PUB1 is a mimetic of type 8 PS. PUB1 conjugated to tetanus toxoid (PUB1-TT) induced a type 8 PS-specific antibody response in BALB/c mice, further defining it as a mimotope of type 8 PS. The administration of immune sera obtained from PUB1-TT-immunized mice earlier (days 14 and 21) and later (days 87 and 100) after primary and reimmunization resulted in a highly significant prolongation of the survival of naive mice after pneumococcal challenge compared to controls. The survival of PUB1-TT-immunized mice was also prolonged after pneumococcal challenge nearly 4 months after primary immunization. The efficacy of PUB1-TT-induced immune sera provides proof of principle that a mimotope-induced antibody response can protect against pneumococci and suggests that peptide mimotopes selected by type-specific human antibodies could hold promise as immunogens for pneumococci.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Type-Specific Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Streptococcus agalactiae Type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shin; Miyake, Katsuhide; Koike, Yoichi; Watanabe, Masaki; Machida, Yuichi; Ohta, Michio; Iijima, Shinji

    1999-01-01

    The type-specific capsular polysaccharide (CP) of a group B streptococcus, Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia, is a high-molecular-weight polymer consisting of the pentasaccharide repeating unit 4)-[α-d-NeupNAc-(2→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→3)]-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-Glcp-(1. Here, cloning, sequencing, and transcription of the type Ia-specific capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes and functional analysis of these gene products are described. A 26-kb DNA fragment containing 18 complete open reading frames (ORFs) was cloned. These ORFs were designated cpsIaA to cpsIaL, neu (neuraminic acid synthesis gene) A to D, orf1 and ung (uracil DNA glycosylase). The cps gene products of S. agalactiae type Ia were homologous to proteins involved in CP synthesis of S. agalactiae type III and S. pneumoniae serotype 14. Unlike the cps gene cluster of S. pneumoniae serotype 14, transcription of this operon may start from cpsIaA, cpsIaE, and orf1 because putative promoter sequences were found in front of these genes. Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension analyses supported this hypothesis. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were two transcriptional terminators in the 3′ end of this operon (downstream of orf1 and ung). The functions of CpsIaE, CpsIaG, CpsIaI, and CpsIaJ were examined by glycosyltransferase assay by using the gene products expressed in Escherichia coli JM109 harboring plasmids containing various S. agalactiae type Ia cps gene fragments. Enzyme assays suggested that the gene products of cpsIaE, cpsIaG, cpsIaI, and cpsIaJ are putative glucosyltransferase, β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, and β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, respectively. PMID:10464185

  17. Cryptococcal xylosyltransferase 1 (Cxt1p) from Cryptococcus neoformans plays a direct role in the synthesis of capsule polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Klutts, J Stacey; Doering, Tamara L

    2008-05-23

    The opportunistic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans causes serious disease in humans and expresses a prominent polysaccharide capsule that is required for its virulence. Little is known about how this capsule is synthesized. We previously identified a beta1,2-xylosyltransferase (Cxt1p) with in vitro enzymatic activity appropriate for involvement in capsule synthesis. Here, we investigate C. neoformans strains in which the corresponding gene has been deleted (cxt1Delta). Loss of CXT1 does not affect in vitro growth of the mutant cells or the general morphology of their capsules. However, NMR structural analysis of the two main capsule polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and galactoxylomannan (GalXM), showed that both were missing beta1,2-xylose residues. There was an approximately 30% reduction in the abundance of this residue in GXM in mutant compared with wild-type strains, and mutant GalXM was almost completely devoid of beta1,2-linked xylose. The GalXM from the mutant strain was also missing a beta1,3-linked xylose residue. Furthermore, deletion of CXT1 led to attenuation of cryptococcal growth in a mouse model of infection, suggesting that the affected xylose residues are important for normal host-pathogen interactions. Cxt1p is the first glycosyltransferase with a defined role in C. neoformans capsule biosynthesis, and cxt1Delta is the only strain identified to date with structural alterations of the capsule polysaccharide GalXM.

  18. Isolation of a Bacteriophage Specific for a New Capsular Type of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Characterization of Its Polysaccharide Depolymerase

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Wang, Jin-Town

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the major pathogens causing hospital-acquired multidrug-resistant infections. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is an important virulence factor of K. pneumoniae. With 78 capsular types discovered thus far, an association between capsular type and the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae has been observed. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate an initially non-typeable K. pneumoniae UTI isolate NTUH-K1790N, the cps gene region was sequenced. By NTUH-K1790N cps-PCR genotyping, serotyping and determination using a newly isolated capsular type-specific bacteriophage, we found that NTUH-K1790N and three other isolates Ca0507, Ca0421 and C1975 possessed a new capsular type, which we named KN2. Analysis of a KN2 CPS− mutant confirmed the role of capsule as the target recognized by the antiserum and the phage. A newly described lytic phage specific for KN2 K. pneumoniae, named 0507-KN2-1, was isolated and characterized using transmission electron microscopy. Whole-genome sequencing of 0507-KN2-1 revealed a 159 991 bp double-stranded DNA genome with a G+C content of 46.7% and at least 154 open reading frames. Based on its morphological and genomic characteristics, 0507-KN2-1 was classified as a member of the Myoviridae phage family. Further analysis of this phage revealed a 3738-bp gene encoding a putative polysaccharide depolymerase. A recombinant form of this protein was produced and assayed to confirm its enzymatic activity and specificity to KN2 capsular polysaccharides. KN2 K. pneumoniae strains exhibited greater sensitivity to this depolymerase than these did to the cognate phage, as determined by spot analysis. Conclusions/Significance Here we report that a group of clinical strains possess a novel Klebsiella capsular type. We identified a KN2-specific phage and its polysaccharide depolymerase, which could be used for efficient capsular typing. The lytic phage and depolymerase also have potential as alternative

  19. Crystal structure of the capsular polysaccharide synthesizing protein CapE of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanner, Martin E; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2013-06-11

    Enzymes synthesizing the bacterial CP (capsular polysaccharide) are attractive antimicrobial targets. However, we lack critical information about the structure and mechanism of many of them. In an effort to reduce that gap, we have determined three different crystal structures of the enzyme CapE of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The structure reveals that CapE is a member of the SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) super-family of proteins. CapE assembles in a hexameric complex stabilized by three major contact surfaces between protein subunits. Turnover of substrate and/or coenzyme induces major conformational changes at the contact interface between protein subunits, and a displacement of the substrate-binding domain with respect to the Rossmann domain. A novel dynamic element that we called the latch is essential for remodelling of the protein-protein interface. Structural and primary sequence alignment identifies a group of SDR proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis that share the two salient features of CapE: the mobile loop (latch) and a distinctive catalytic site (MxxxK). The relevance of these structural elements was evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis.

  20. Evidence for covalent attachment of phospholipid to the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, J S; Doelling, V W; Graveline, J F; McCoy, D W

    1985-01-01

    Cells of Haemophilus influenzae type b were grown in a liquid medium containing [3H]palmitate or [14C]ribose or both for two generations of exponential growth. Radiolabeled type-specific capsular polysaccharide, polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP), was purified from the culture supernatant by Cetavlon precipitation, ethanol fractionation, and hydroxylapatite and Sepharose 4B chromatography. The doubly labeled ( [3H]palmitate and [14C]ribose) PRP preparation was found to coelute in a single peak from a Sepharose 4B column, suggesting that both precursors were incorporated into the purified PRP. A singly labeled ( [3H]palmitate) purified PRP preparation was found to be quantitatively immune precipitated by human serum containing antibody against PRP. The radioactivity of this preparation could not be dissociated from PRP by treatment with chloroform-methanol, 6 M urea, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or Zwittergent. Only after acid, alkaline, or phospholipase A2 treatment of PRP labeled with [3H]palmitate or [3H]palmitate and [14C]ribose followed by chloroform-methanol extraction could most of the 3H-radioactivity be recovered in the organic phase. The chloroform-soluble acid-hydrolyzed or phospholipase A2-treated product was identified as palmitic acid after thin-layer chromatography. These results strongly suggest that a phospholipid moiety is covalently associated with the H. influenzae type b polysaccharide PRP. Images PMID:3926752

  1. Bacterial capsular polysaccharide prevents the onset of asthma through T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jenny L; Jones, Mark B; Cobb, Brian A

    2015-04-01

    Over the last four decades, increases in the incidence of immune-mediated diseases in the Western world have been linked to changes in microbial exposure. It is becoming increasingly clear that the normal microbiota in the gut can profoundly alter susceptibility to a wide range of diseases, such as asthma, in which immune homeostasis is disrupted, yet the mechanisms governing this microbial influence remains poorly defined. In this study, we show that gastrointestinal exposure to PSA, a capsular polysaccharide derived from the commensal bacterium Bacteroides fragilis, significantly limits susceptibility to the induction of experimental asthma. We report that direct treatment of mice with PSA generates protection from asthma, and this effect can be given to a naïve recipient by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells from PSA-exposed mice. Remarkably, we found that these PSA-induced T cells are not canonical FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, but that they potently inhibit both Th1 and Th2 models of asthma in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These findings reveal that bacterial polysaccharides link the microbiota with the peripheral immune system by activating CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells upon exposure in the gut, and they facilitate resistance to unnecessary inflammatory responses via the production of IL-10. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Evidence for covalent attachment of phospholipid to the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, J.S.; Doelling, V.W.; Graveline, J.F.; McCoy, D.W.

    1985-08-01

    Cells of Haemophilus influenzae type b were grown in a liquid medium containing (TH)palmitate or ( UC)ribose or both for two generations of exponential growth. Radiolabeled type-specific capsular polysaccharide, polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP), was purified from the culture supernatant by Cetavlon precipitation, ethanol fractionation, and hydroxylapatite and Sepharose 4B chromatography. The doubly labeled ( (TH)palmitate and ( UC)ribose) PRP preparation was found to coelute in a single peak from a Sepharose 4B column, suggesting that both precursors were incorporated into the purified PRP. A singly labeled ( (TH)palmitate) purified PRP preparation was found to be quantitatively immune precipitated by human serum containing antibody against PRP. Only after acid, alkaline, or phospholipase A2 treatment of PRP labeled with (TH)palmitate or (TH)palmitate and ( UC)ribose followed by chloroform-methanol extraction could most of the TH-radioactivity be recovered in the organic phase. The chloroform-soluble acid-hydrolyzed or phospholipase A2-treated product was identified as palmitic acid after thin-layer chromatography. These results strongly suggest that a phospholipid moiety is covalently associated with the H. influenzae type b polysaccharide PRP.

  3. Highly Dynamic Genomic Loci Drive the Synthesis of Two Types of Capsular or Secreted Polysaccharides within the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Tardy, Florence; Poumarat, François; Citti, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are all ruminant pathogens. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Previous studies have strongly suggested a role for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides polysaccharides in pathogenicity. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted EPS was recently characterized as a β(1→6)-galactofuranose homopolymer (galactan) identical to the capsular product. Here, we extended the characterization of secreted polysaccharides to all other members of the M. mycoides cluster: M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum, M. leachii, and M. mycoides subsp. capri (including the LC and Capri serovars). Extracted EPS was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, resulting in the identification of a homopolymer of β(1→2)-glucopyranose (glucan) in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii. Monoclonal antibodies specific for this glucan and for the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted galactan were used to detect the two polysaccharides. While M. mycoides subsp. capri strains of serovar LC produced only capsular galactan, no polysaccharide could be detected in strains of serovar Capri. All strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii produced glucan CPS and EPS, whereas glucan production and localization varied among M. capricolum subsp. capricolum strains. Genes associated with polysaccharide synthesis and forming a biosynthetic pathway were predicted in all cluster members. These genes were organized in clusters within two loci representing genetic variability hot spots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some of these genes, notably galE and glf, were acquired via horizontal gene transfer. These findings call for a reassessment of the specificity of the serological tests based on mycoplasma polysaccharides. PMID:25398856

  4. Immune suppression induced by Vi capsular polysaccharide is overcome by Vi-DT conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Kothari, Sudeep; Kim, Deok Ryun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Kothari, Neha; Lee, Eugene; Park, Tai Hyun; Carbis, Rodney

    2012-02-01

    The influence pre-exposure of mice to Vi capsular polysaccharide, purified from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi, on the subsequent immune response induced by a Vi-diphtheria toxoid (Vi-DT) conjugate was evaluated. Vi induced low anti Vi IgG titers with the dominant subclass being IgG3. The Vi-DT conjugate induced high titers of anti Vi IgG with the dominant subclass being IgG1 but with considerable quantities of IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. Priming of mice with Vi suppressed the response to a subsequent dose of conjugate and the suppression was overcome by a second dose of conjugate. Priming with conjugate prevented suppression of the anti Vi response and subsequent dosing with Vi raised titers back to previous levels but did not boost to new higher levels. The anti DT IgG response to one dose of conjugate was relatively strong and protracted and continued to rise for 12 weeks, compared to the response to one dose of DT which was poor and peaked at two weeks. The prolonged anti DT response was most likely due to the slow release of DT from the conjugate lattice as it degrades within the mouse resulting in a continuous stimulation of the immune response. The presence of increasing amounts of un-conjugated Vi, up to 50%, administered with the conjugate resulted in increasingly higher levels of both anti Vi and anti DT. Larger amounts of un-conjugated Vi inhibited the anti Vi response. These findings have implications for vaccine quality and a limit for un-conjugated polysaccharide should not exceed 50% and from a vaccine program perspective if the results presented here translate to humans then a Vi conjugate, once it becomes available, should replace Vi polysaccharide vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines utilizing new fragmentation and conjugation technologies.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, A; Källenius, G; Svenson, S B

    2000-03-17

    There is a global urgent need for a new efficient and inexpensive vaccine to combat pneumococcal disease, which should also be affordable in developing countries. In view of this need a simple low-cost technique to prepare such a vaccine was developed. The preparation of serotype 14 and 23F pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PnPS)-protein conjugates to be included in a forthcoming multivalent PnPS conjugate vaccine is described. Commercial lots of PnPSs produced according to Good Manufacturing Practice from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 14 (PS14) and 23F (PS23F) were partially depolymerized by sonication or irradiation in an electron beam accelerator. The PnPS fragments were conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) using a recently developed conjugation chemistry. The application of these new simple, efficient and inexpensive fragmentation and conjugation technologies allowed the synthesis of several PnPS-protein conjugates containing PnPS fragments of preselected sizes and differing in the degree of substitution. The PS14TT and PS23FTT conjugate vaccine candidates were characterized chemically and their immunogenicity was evaluated in rabbits and mice. All PnPS conjugate vaccines, unlike the corresponding plain polysaccharides, produced high IgG titres in both animal species. The PS14TT conjugates tended to be more immunogenic than the PS23FTT conjugates. The immune response to the PS14TT conjugates, but not to the PS23FTT conjugates, was related to the size of the conjugated polysaccharide hapten. Both types of conjugates elicited strong booster effects upon secondary immunizations, resulting in high IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b titres.

  6. Use of an Inhibition Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Quantification of Capsular Polysaccharide or Proteins in Vaccines▿

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Thomas J.; Champion, Anna

    2007-01-01

    An inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described for quantification of capsular polysaccharide or proteins in vaccines and other samples containing whole cells or extracts of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The assay can be used to quantify any antigen that can be purified and for which highly specific antibodies are not available. The assay can be carried out by any laboratory capable of performing an ELISA. PMID:17267591

  7. Polysaccharides of the genus Bacillus cross-reactive with the capsular polysaccharides of Diplococcus pneumoniae type 3, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and Neisseria meningitidis group A.

    PubMed

    Myerowitz, R L; Gordon, R E; Robbins, J B

    1973-12-01

    We studied 174 strains of the genus Bacillus for cross-reacting antigens to the capsular polysaccharides of groups A and C meningococcus, types I and III pneumococcus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. Cross-reactions were detected by immunodiffusion in agarose gel by using type-specific antisera and confirmed by absorption and inhibition experiments. Of 20 Bacillus pumilis strains, six had an antigen cross-reacting with group A meningococcal polysaccharide. Other cross-reactions included one strain of B. pumilis with H. influenzae type b, one of B. cereus var. mycoides with pneumococcus type III, and one of B. alvei with both type b and SIII polysaccharides. These cross-reacting antigens are polysaccharides of vegetative cells and may be extracellular in location. Because these bacilli have antigens cross-reacting with the virulence factors of pyogenic bacteria, they may, as normal flora, be an antigenic stimulus for "natural" serum anti-capsular antibodies to the type b Haemophilus and group A meningococcus polysaccharides.

  8. Polysaccharides of the Genus Bacillus Cross-Reactive with the Capsular Polysaccharides of Diplococcus pneumoniae Type III, Haemophilus influenzae Type b, and Neisseria meningitidis Group A

    PubMed Central

    Myerowitz, Richard L.; Gordon, Ruth E.; Robbins, John B.

    1973-01-01

    We studied 174 strains of the genus Bacillus for cross-reacting antigens to the capsular polysaccharides of groups A and C meningococcus, types I and III pneumococcus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. Cross-reactions were detected by immunodiffusion in agarose gel by using type-specific antisera and confirmed by absorption and inhibition experiments. Of 20 Bacillus pumilis strains, six had an antigen cross-reacting with group A meningococcal polysaccharide. Other cross-reactions included one strain of B. pumilis with H. influenzae type b, one of B. cereus var. mycoides with pneumococcus type III, and one of B. alvei with both type b and SIII polysaccharides. These cross-reacting antigens are polysaccharides of vegetative cells and may be extracellular in location. Because these bacilli have antigens cross-reacting with the virulence factors of pyogenic bacteria, they may, as normal flora, be an antigenic stimulus for “natural” serum anti-capsular antibodies to the type b Haemophilus and group A meningococcus polysaccharides. Images PMID:4150383

  9. Anti-Biofilm Activity: A Function of Klebsiella pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos Goncalves, Marina; Delattre, Cédric; Balestrino, Damien; Charbonnel, Nicolas; Elboutachfaiti, Redouan; Wadouachi, Anne; Badel, Stéphanie; Bernardi, Thierry; Michaud, Philippe; Forestier, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Competition and cooperation phenomena occur within highly interactive biofilm communities and several non-biocides molecules produced by microorganisms have been described as impairing biofilm formation. In this study, we investigated the anti-biofilm capacities of an ubiquitous and biofilm producing bacterium, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Cell-free supernatant from K. pneumoniae planktonic cultures showed anti-biofilm effects on most Gram positive bacteria tested but also encompassed some Gram negative bacilli. The anti-biofilm non-bactericidal activity was further investigated on Staphylococcus epidermidis, by determining the biofilm biomass, microscopic observations and agglutination measurement through a magnetic bead-mediated agglutination test. Cell-free extracts from K. pneumoniae biofilm (supernatant and acellular matrix) also showed an influence, although to a lesser extend. Chemical analyses indicated that the active molecule was a high molecular weight polysaccharide composed of five monosaccharides: galactose, glucose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid and glucosamine and the main following sugar linkage residues [→2)-α-l-Rhap-(1→]; [→4)-α-l-Rhap-(1→]; [α-d-Galp-(1→]; [→2,3)-α-d-Galp-(1→]; [→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→] and, [→4)-β-d-GlcAp-(1→]. Characterization of this molecule indicated that this component was more likely capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and precoating of abiotic surfaces with CPS extracts from different serotypes impaired the bacteria-surface interactions. Thus the CPS of Klebsiella would exhibit a pleiotropic activity during biofilm formation, both stimulating the initial adhesion and maturation steps as previously described, but also repelling potential competitors. PMID:24932475

  10. Two capsular polysaccharides enable Bacillus cereus G9241 to cause anthrax-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, So-Young; Budzik, Jonathan M.; Garufi, Gabriella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacillus cereus G9241 causes an anthrax-like respiratory illness in humans, however the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not known. Genome sequencing identified two putative virulence plasmids proposed to provide for anthrax toxin (pBCXO1) and/or capsule expression (pBC218). We report here that B. cereus G9241 causes anthrax-like disease in immune-competent mice, which is dependent on each of the two virulence plasmids. pBCXO1 encodes pagA1, the homolog of anthrax protective antigen, as well as hasACB, providing for hyaluronic acid capsule formation, two traits that each contribute to disease pathogenesis. pBC218 harbors bpsX-H, Bacillus cereus exo-polysaccharide, which produce a second capsule. During infection, B. cereus G9241 elaborates both hasACB and bpsX-H capsules, which together are essential for the establishment of anthrax-like disease and the resistance of bacilli to phagocytosis. A single nucleotide deletion causes premature termination of hasA translation in B. anthracis, which is known to escape phagocytic killing by its pXO2 encoded poly-D-γ-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule. Thus, multiple different gene clusters endow pathogenic bacilli with capsular material, provide for escape from innate host immune responses and aid in establishing the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease. PMID:21371137

  11. Two capsular polysaccharides enable Bacillus cereus G9241 to cause anthrax-like disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, So-Young; Budzik, Jonathan M; Garufi, Gabriella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-04-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 causes an anthrax-like respiratory illness in humans; however, the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not known. Genome sequencing identified two putative virulence plasmids proposed to provide for anthrax toxin (pBCXO1) and/or capsule expression (pBC218). We report here that B. cereus G9241 causes anthrax-like disease in immune-competent mice, which is dependent on each of the two virulence plasmids. pBCXO1 encodes pagA1, the homologue of anthrax protective antigen, as well as hasACB, providing for hyaluronic acid capsule formation, two traits that each contribute to disease pathogenesis. pBC218 harbours bpsX-H, B. cereus exo-polysaccharide, which produce a second capsule. During infection, B. cereus G9241 elaborates both hasACB and bpsX-H capsules, which together are essential for the establishment of anthrax-like disease and the resistance of bacilli to phagocytosis. A single nucleotide deletion causes premature termination of hasA translation in Bacillus anthracis, which is known to escape phagocytic killing by its pXO2 encoded poly-d-γ-glutamic acid (PDGA) capsule. Thus, multiple different gene clusters endow pathogenic bacilli with capsular material, provide for escape from innate host immune responses and aid in establishing the pathogenesis of anthrax-like disease.

  12. Agglutination by anti-capsular polysaccharide antibody is associated with protection against experimental human pneumococcal carriage

    PubMed Central

    Reiné, J; Zangari, T; Owugha, JT; Pennington, SH; Gritzfeld, JF; Wright, AD; Collins, AM; van Selm, S; de Jonge, MI; Gordon, SB; Weiser, JN; Ferreira, DM

    2016-01-01

    The ability of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) to decrease transmission by blocking the acquisition of colonization has been attributed to herd immunity. We describe the role of mucosal IgG to capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in mediating protection from carriage, translating our findings from a murine model to humans. We used a flow-cytometric assay to quantify antibody-mediated agglutination demonstrating that hyperimmune sera generated against an unencapsulated mutant was poorly agglutinating. Passive immunization with this antiserum was ineffective to block acquisition of colonization compared to agglutinating antisera raised against the encapsulated parent strain. In the human challenge model samples were collected from PCV and control vaccinated adults. In PCV-vaccinated subjects IgG levels to CPS were increased in serum and nasal wash (NW). IgG to the inoculated strain CPS dropped in NW samples after inoculation suggesting its sequestration by colonizing pneumococci. In post-vaccination NW samples pneumococci were heavily agglutinated compared to pre-vaccination samples in subjects protected against carriage. Our results indicate that pneumococcal agglutination mediated by CPS specific antibodies is a key mechanism of protection against acquisition of carriage. Capsule may be the only vaccine target that can elicit strong agglutinating antibody responses, leading to protection against carriage acquisition and generation of herd immunity. PMID:27579859

  13. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    The genetic organization of the gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 has been determined. The DNA region for the CPS biosynthesis of serotype 14 (cps14) comprised 9 open reading frames, designated as cps14AB1B2B3CDEFG genes, encoding Cps14A to Cps14G protein, respectively. Cps14A was similar to CpsA of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12; the Cps14B1 and Cps14B2 were similar to CpsB of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, suggesting that CPS structure of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 would belong to Group I including A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. Surprisingly, the overall nucleotide sequence, deduced amino acid sequence, and the genetic organization of the cps14 were nearly identical to those of Actinobacillus suis. This study will provide the molecular basic knowledge for development of diagnostics and vaccine of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14. PMID:25648373

  14. The genetic organization of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis region of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroya

    2015-05-01

    The genetic organization of the gene involved in the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 has been determined. The DNA region for the CPS biosynthesis of serotype 14 (cps14) comprised 9 open reading frames, designated as cps14AB1B2B3CDEFG genes, encoding Cps14A to Cps14G protein, respectively. Cps14A was similar to CpsA of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12; the Cps14B1 and Cps14B2 were similar to CpsB of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4 and 12, suggesting that CPS structure of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14 would belong to Group I including A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 4, 12 and 15. Surprisingly, the overall nucleotide sequence, deduced amino acid sequence, and the genetic organization of the cps14 were nearly identical to those of Actinobacillus suis. This study will provide the molecular basic knowledge for development of diagnostics and vaccine of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 14.

  15. Diverse Intestinal Bacteria Contain Putative Zwitterionic Capsular Polysaccharides with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Neff, C Preston; Rhodes, Matthew E; Arnolds, Kathleen L; Collins, Colm B; Donnelly, Jody; Nusbacher, Nichole; Jedlicka, Paul; Schneider, Jennifer M; McCarter, Martin D; Shaffer, Michael; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Palmer, Brent E; Lozupone, Catherine A

    2016-10-12

    Zwitterionic capsular polysaccharides (ZPSs) are bacterial products that modulate T cells, including inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10-secreting T regulatory cells (Tregs). However, only a few diverse bacteria are known to modulate the host immune system via ZPS. We present a genomic screen for bacteria encoding ZPS molecules. We identify diverse host-associated bacteria, including commensals and pathogens with known anti-inflammatory properties, with the capacity to produce ZPSs. Human mononuclear cells stimulated with lysates from putative ZPS-producing bacteria induce significantly greater IL-10 production and higher proportions of Tregs than lysates from non-ZPS-encoding relatives or a commensal strain of Bacteroides cellulosilyticus in which a putative ZPS biosynthetic operon was genetically disrupted. Similarly, wild-type B. cellulosilyticus DSM 14838, but not a close relative lacking a putative ZPS, attenuated experimental colitis in mice. Collectively, this screen identifies bacterial strains that may use ZPSs to interact with the host as well as those with potential probiotic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of the capsular polysaccharide as a virulence factor for Streptococcus suis serotype 14.

    PubMed

    Roy, David; Auger, Jean-Philippe; Segura, Mariela; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Okura, Masatoshi; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and a zoonotic agent causing meningitis and septicemia. Although serotype 2 is the most virulent type, serotype 14 is emerging, and understanding of its pathogenesis is limited. To study the role of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of serotype 14 as a virulence factor, we constructed knockout mutants devoid of either cps14B, a highly conserved regulatory gene, or neu14C, a gene coding for uridine diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase, which is involved in sialic acid synthesis. The mutants showed total loss of the CPS with coagglutination assays and electron microscopy. Phagocytosis assays showed high susceptibility of mutant Δcps14B. An in vivo murine model was used to demonstrate attenuated virulence of this non-encapsulated mutant. Despite the difference in the CPS composition of different serotypes, this study has demonstrated for the first time that the CPS of a serotype other than 2 is also an important antiphagocytic factor and a critical virulence factor.

  17. Identification of a Group 1-Like Capsular Polysaccharide Operon for Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Anita C.; Powell, Jan L.; Kaper, James B.; Morris, J. Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Virulence of Vibrio vulnificus correlates with changes in colony morphology that are indicative of a reversible phase variation for expression of capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Encapsulated variants are virulent with opaque colonies, whereas phase variants with reduced CPS expression are attenuated and are translucent. Using TnphoA mutagenesis, we identified a V. vulnificus CPS locus, which included an upstream ops element, a wza gene (wzaVv), and several open reading frames with homology to CPS biosynthetic genes. This genetic organization is characteristic of group 1 CPS operons. The wza gene product is required for transport of CPS to the cell surface in Escherichia coli. Polar transposon mutations in wzaVv eliminated expression of downstream biosynthetic genes, confirming operon structure. On the other hand, nonpolar inactivation of wzaVv was specific for CPS transport, did not alter CPS biosynthesis, and could be complemented in trans. Southern analysis of CPS phase variants revealed deletions or rearrangements at this locus. A survey of environmental isolates indicated a correlation between deletions in wzaVv and loss of virulent phenotype, suggesting a genetic mechanism for CPS phase variation. Full virulence in mice required surface expression of CPS and supported the essential role of capsule in the pathogenesis of V. vulnificus. PMID:11598064

  18. O-METHYL PHOSPHORAMIDATE MODIFICATIONS ON THE CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI ARE INVOLVED IN SERUM RESISTANCE, INFECTION, AND INSECTICIDAL ACTIVITY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported cause of bacterial foodborne illness in North America. C. jejuni decorates its surface polysaccharides with a variety of variable phosphorylated structures, including O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modifications on the capsular polysaccharide. Alt...

  19. Reduction of Streptococcus pneumoniae Colonization and Dissemination by a Nonopsonic Capsular Polysaccharide Antibody.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Christopher R; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2016-02-02

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization of the nasopharynx (NP) is a prerequisite for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The marked reduction in IPD that followed the routine use of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has been linked to reduced NP colonization with vaccine-included serotypes (STs), with the caveat that PCVs are less effective against pneumonia than against IPD. Although PCV-elicited opsonic antibodies that enhance phagocytic killing of the homologous ST are considered a key correlate of PCV-mediated protection, recent studies question this relationship for some STs, including ST3. Studies with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS) of ST3 (PPS3) have shown that nonopsonic, as well as opsonic, antibodies can each protect mice against pneumonia and sepsis, but the effect of these types of MAbs on NP colonization is unknown. In this study, we determined the effects of protective opsonic and nonopsonic PPS3 MAbs on ST3 NP colonization in mice. Our results show that a nonopsonic MAb reduced early NP colonization and prevented ST3 dissemination to the lungs and blood, but an opsonic MAb did not. Moreover, the opsonic MAb induced a proinflammatory NP cytokine response, but the nonopsonic MAb had an antiinflammatory effect. The effect of the nonopsonic MAb on colonization did not require its Fc region, but its antiinflammatory effect did. Our findings challenge the paradigm that opsonic MAbs are required to prevent NP colonization and suggest that further studies of the activity of nonopsonic antibodies could advance our understanding of mechanisms of PCV efficacy and provide novel correlates of protection. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have markedly reduced the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Vaccine-elicited pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) antibodies that enhance in vitro phagocyte killing of vaccine-included serotypes (STs) (opsonic antibodies) have been considered

  20. Nonopsonic binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to complement receptor type 3 is mediated by capsular polysaccharides and is strain dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Cywes, C; Hoppe, H C; Daffé, M; Ehlers, M R

    1997-01-01

    The choice of host cell receptor and the mechanism of binding (opsonic versus nonopsonic) may influence the intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have identified two substrains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, designated H37Rv-CC and -HH, that differed in their modes of binding to complement receptor type 3 (CR3) expressed in transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-Mac-1) cells: H37Rv-CC bound nonopsonically, whereas H37Rv-HH bound only after opsonization in fresh serum. H37Rv-CC also bound nonopsonically to untransfected CHO cells, whereas H37Rv-HH binding was enhanced by serum and was mediated by the 1D1 antigen, a bacterial adhesin previously identified as a polar phosphatidylinositol mannoside. H37Rv-CC and -HH had identical IS6110 DNA fingerprint patterns. Of five M. tuberculosis clinical isolates examined, four displayed the same binding phenotype as H37Rv-CC, as did the Erdman strain, whereas one isolate, as well as Mycobacterium smegmatis, behaved like H37Rv-HH. Nonopsonic binding of H37Rv-CC to CHO cell-expressed CR3 was apparently to the beta-glucan lectin site, as it was cation independent and inhibited by laminarin (seaweed beta-glucan) and N-acetylglucosamine; laminarin also inhibited the binding of H37Rv-CC to monocyte-derived macrophages. Further, binding of H37Rv-CC to CHO-Mac-1 cells was inhibited by prior agitation of bacteria with glass beads (which strips outer capsular polysaccharides) and by preincubation with amyloglucosidase, as well as by the presence of capsular D-glucan and D-mannan from M. tuberculosis Erdman, but not by Erdman D-arabino-D-mannan, yeast mannan, or capsular components from H37Rv-HH. Analysis of capsular carbohydrates revealed that H37Rv-CC expressed 5-fold more glucose and 2.5-fold more arabinose and mannose than H37Rv-HH. Flow cytometric detection of surface epitopes indicated that H37Rv-CC displayed twofold less surface-exposed phosphatidylinositol mannoside and bound complement C3 less efficiently than H37Rv

  1. Characterization of the structure and biological functions of a capsular polysaccharide produced by Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunny; Kelley, Kathryn A; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Solinga, Robert; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Misawa, Yoshiki; Lee, Jean C

    2010-09-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women. S. saprophyticus strain ATCC 15305 carries two staphylococcal cassette chromosome genetic elements, SCC(15305RM) and SCC(15305cap). The SCC(15305cap) element carries 13 open reading frames (ORFs) involved in capsular polysaccharide (CP) biosynthesis, and its G+C content (26.7%) is lower than the average G+C content (33.2%) for the whole genome. S. saprophyticus strain ATCC 15305 capD, capL, and capK (capD(Ssp), capL(Ssp), and capK(Ssp)) are homologous to genes encoding UDP-FucNAc biosynthesis, and gtaB and capI(Ssp) show homology to genes involved in UDP-glucuronic acid synthesis. S. saprophyticus ATCC 15305 CP, visualized by immunoelectron microscopy, was extracted and purified using anionic-exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Analysis of the purified CP by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas-liquid chromatography revealed two types of branched tetrasaccharide repeating units composed of the following: -4)-beta-Glc-(1-3)-Sug-(1-4)-beta-GlcA-(1- | beta-GlcNAc-(1-2) Sug represents two stereoisomers of 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-hexos-4-ulose residues, one of which has an arabino configuration. The encapsulated ATCC 15305 strain was resistant to complement-mediated opsonophagocytic killing by human neutrophils, whereas the acapsular mutant C1 was susceptible. None of 14 clinical isolates reacted with antibodies to the ATCC 15305 CP. However, 11 of the 14 S. saprophyticus isolates were phenotypically encapsulated based on their resistance to complement-mediated opsonophagocytic killing and their failure to hemagglutinate when cultivated aerobically. Ten of the 14 clinical strains carried homologues of the conserved staphylococcal capD gene or the S. saprophyticus gtaB gene, or both. Our results suggest that some strains of S. saprophyticus are encapsulated and that more than one capsular serotype exists.

  2. Polysaccharides, mimotopes and vaccines for fungal and encapsulated pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pirofski, L A

    2001-09-01

    Vaccination is a rational alternative to treatment for Cryptococcus neoformans infections, as these infections are currently intractable in immunocompromised (including HIV-infected) individuals. Vaccines composed of the cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the key C. neoformans virulence factor, elicit protective antibodies in mice, although deleterious antibodies can also be induced. By contrast, polysaccharides are poor immunogens in HIV-infected humans and others with B-cell defects. Peptide mimotopes of GXM can induce protective immunity to C. neoformans in mice, however, our knowledge of the mechanisms of mimotope-induced protection is incomplete and further work is needed if polysaccharide- or mimotope-based vaccines are to be used to manage C. neoformans infection.

  3. Study of various presentation forms for a peptide mimetic of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Garay, Hilda; Menéndez, Tamara; Cruz-Leal, Yoelys; Coizeau, Edelgis; Noda, Jesus; Morera, Vivian; Guillén, Gerardo; Albericio, Fernando; Reyes, Osvaldo

    2011-01-19

    The formulation of a broadly protective vaccine to prevent the serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) disease is still an unmet medical need. We have previously reported the induction of bactericidal and protective antibodies against MenB after immunization of mice with a phage-displayed peptide named 4 L-5. This peptide mimics a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) epitope in MenB. With the aim of developing vaccine formulations that could be used in humans, we evaluate in this study various forms of presentation to the immune system of the 4 L-5 sequence, based on synthetic peptides. We synthesized the following: (i) a linear 4 L-5 peptide, (ii) a multiple antigen peptide containing four copies of the 4 L-5 sequence (named MAP), which was then dimerized, and the product named dimeric MAP, and (iii) a second multiple antigen peptide, in this case with two copies of the 4 L-5 sequence and a copy of a T-helper cell epitope of tetanus toxoid, which was then dimerized and the product named MAP-TT. The linear peptide, the MAP, and the dimeric MAP were conjugated to the carrier protein P64K by different conjugation methods. Plain antigens and antigens coupled to P64K were used to immunize BALB/c mice. Of those variants that gave immunogenic results, MAP-TT rendered the highest levels of specific antipeptide IgG antibodies and serum bactericidal activity. These results can find application in the development of meningococcal vaccine candidates and in peptide-based vaccines strategies.

  4. In vivo Distribution and Clearance of Purified Capsular Polysaccharide from Burkholderia pseudomallei in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Nualnoi, Teerapat; Kirosingh, Adam; Pandit, Sujata G.; Thorkildson, Peter; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.; AuCoin, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infection prominent in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. The “gold standard” for melioidosis diagnosis is bacterial isolation, which takes several days to complete. The resulting delay in diagnosis leads to delayed treatments, which could result in death. In an attempt to develop better methods for early diagnosis of melioidosis, B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was identified as an important diagnostic biomarker. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay utilizing CPS-specific monoclonal antibody was developed and tested in endemic regions worldwide. However, the in vivo fate and clearance of CPS has never been thoroughly investigated. Here, we injected mice with purified CPS intravenously and determined CPS concentrations in serum, urine, and major organs at various intervals. The results indicate that CPS is predominantly eliminated through urine and no CPS accumulation occurs in the major organs. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that intact CPS was excreted through urine. To understand how a large molecule like CPS was eliminated without degradation, a 3-dimenational structure of CPS was modeled. The predicted CPS structure has a rod-like shape with a small diameter that could allow it to flow through the glomerulus of the kidney. CPS clearance was determined using exponential decay models and the corrected Akaike Information Criterion. The results show that CPS has a relatively short serum half-life of 2.9 to 4.4 hours. Therefore, the presence of CPS in the serum and/or urine suggests active melioidosis infection and provides a marker to monitor treatment of melioidosis. PMID:27941991

  5. In vivo Distribution and Clearance of Purified Capsular Polysaccharide from Burkholderia pseudomallei in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Nualnoi, Teerapat; Kirosingh, Adam; Pandit, Sujata G; Thorkildson, Peter; Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; AuCoin, David P

    2016-12-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infection prominent in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. The "gold standard" for melioidosis diagnosis is bacterial isolation, which takes several days to complete. The resulting delay in diagnosis leads to delayed treatments, which could result in death. In an attempt to develop better methods for early diagnosis of melioidosis, B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was identified as an important diagnostic biomarker. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay utilizing CPS-specific monoclonal antibody was developed and tested in endemic regions worldwide. However, the in vivo fate and clearance of CPS has never been thoroughly investigated. Here, we injected mice with purified CPS intravenously and determined CPS concentrations in serum, urine, and major organs at various intervals. The results indicate that CPS is predominantly eliminated through urine and no CPS accumulation occurs in the major organs. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that intact CPS was excreted through urine. To understand how a large molecule like CPS was eliminated without degradation, a 3-dimenational structure of CPS was modeled. The predicted CPS structure has a rod-like shape with a small diameter that could allow it to flow through the glomerulus of the kidney. CPS clearance was determined using exponential decay models and the corrected Akaike Information Criterion. The results show that CPS has a relatively short serum half-life of 2.9 to 4.4 hours. Therefore, the presence of CPS in the serum and/or urine suggests active melioidosis infection and provides a marker to monitor treatment of melioidosis.

  6. RmpA Regulation of Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43▿

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H. Y.; Chen, Y. S.; Wu, C. Y.; Chang, H. Y.; Lai, Y. C.; Peng, H. L.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the large virulence plasmid pLVPK in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43 revealed the presence of another mucoid factor encoding gene rmpA besides rmpA2. Promoter activity measurement indicated that the deletion of rmpA reduced K2 capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis, resulting in decreased colony mucoidy and virulence in mice. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid carrying rmpA restored CPS production in the rmpA or rmpA2 mutant but not in the rcsB mutant. Transformation of the rmpA deletion mutant with an rcsB-carrying plasmid also failed to enhance CPS production, suggesting that a cooperation of RmpA with RcsB is required for regulatory activity. This was further corroborated by the demonstration of in vivo interaction between RmpA and RcsB using two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation analysis. A putative Fur binding box was only found at the 5′ noncoding region of rmpA. The promoter activity analysis indicated that the deletion of fur increased the rmpA promoter activity. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we further demonstrated that Fur exerts its regulatory activity by binding directly to the promoter. As a result, the fur deletion mutant exhibited an increase in colony mucoidy, CPS production, and virulence in mice. In summary, our results suggested that RmpA activates CPS biosynthesis in K. pneumoniae CG43 via an RcsB-dependent manner. The expression of rmpA is regulated by the availability of iron and is negatively controlled by Fur. PMID:20382770

  7. Effectiveness of Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine among children: a cluster randomized trial in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Imran; Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Ochiai, R Leon; Habib, Mohammad Atif; Sahito, Shah Muhammad; Nizami, S Qamaruddin; Acosta, Camilo J; Clemens, John D; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2012-08-03

    Typhoid fever is endemic in Karachi, with an incidence among children ranging from 170 to 450 per 100,000 child-years. Vaccination strategies are important for prevention, and the Vi capsular polysaccharide (ViCPS) vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of typhoid fever. A cluster randomized trial was conducted in three low socioeconomic urban squatter settlements in Karachi, Pakistan between 2002 and 2007. Subsamples were followed up for assessment of immune response and adverse events after vaccination. The study participants were similar in a wide variety of socio-demographic and economic characteristics at baseline. A total of 27,231 individuals of the total target population of 51,965 in 120 clusters either received a ViCPS vaccine (13,238 [52% coverage]) or the control Hepatitis A vaccine (13,993 [53%]). Typhoid fever was diagnosed in 30 ViCPS vaccine recipients and 49 Hepatitis A vaccine recipients with an adjusted total protective effectiveness of 31% (95%CI: -28%, 63%). The adjusted total vaccine protective effectiveness was -38% (95%CI: -192%, 35%) for children aged 2-5 years and 57% (95%CI: 6%, 81%) for children 5-16 years old. The ViCPS vaccine did not confer statistically significant protection to children in the study areas, and there was a decline in antibody response 2 years post-vaccination. However, the ViCPS vaccine showed significant total protection in children 5-16 years of age, which is consistent with other studies of ViCPS vaccine conducted in India, Nepal, China and South Africa. These findings suggest that ViCPS vaccination of school-aged children will protect the children of urban, typhoid endemic areas against typhoid fever. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell growth rate regulates expression of group B Streptococcus type III capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, L C; Ross, R A; Johnson, K D

    1996-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of group B streptococci (GBS) is an important virulence factor that also serves to protect cells from nonspecific host defense mechanisms. Expression of CPS by GBS, as with other encapsulated bacterial pathogens, is not constitutive but varies during growth in vitro and in primary cultures isolated from different sites of infection. Despite this understanding, little is known about regulation of this surface-expressed carbohydrate antigen in GBS. Here we report that expression of type III CPS by GBS strain M781 grown in continuous culture with a modified chemically defined medium is regulated by growth rate. Cells in steady state at mass doubling times (tds) of 0.8, 1.4, and 1.6 h expressed an average of sixfold more cell-associated CPS than did cells held at tds of 2.3 and 11 h. Strain M781 grown at a td of 1.4 h repeatedly produced more type III CPS than those held at a td of 11.0 h, even when limited for glucose, pyridoxamine, or thiamine. In our studies, > or = 93% of the total CPS expressed by strain M781 was cell associated. Strain M781 grown at a td of 11.0 h (i.e., lowered CPS expression) was susceptible to in vitro complement-mediated opsonophagocytosis and killing by human peripheral blood leukocytes, whereas cells grown at a td of 1.4 h (i.e., higher CPS expression) were not killed unless type III CPS-specific antibody was present. Factors that allow GBS to asymptomatically colonize women yet cause invasive infection to both mother and infant are poorly understood. Our results shed new light on parameters that regulate the pathogenic potential of GBS and may also serve as a way to discern more fully the genetics and biochemistry of GBS capsule synthesis. PMID:8606082

  9. The efficacy of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide-specific antibodies to serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae requires macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Kevin; Manix, Catherine; Tian, Haijun; van Rooijen, Nico; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2010-11-03

    The efficacy of antibody immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae stems from the ability of opsonic, serotype (ST)-specific antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS) to facilitate killing of the homologous ST by host phagocytes. However, PPS-specific antibodies have been identified that are protective in mice, but do not promote opsonic killing in vitro, raising the question of how they mediate protection in vivo. To probe this question, we investigated the dependence of antibody efficacy against lethal systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 (ST3) on macrophages and neutrophils for the following PPS3-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in survival experiments in mice using a non-opsonic human IgM (A7), a non-opsonic mouse IgG1 (1E2) and an opsonic mouse IgG1 (5F6). The survival of A7- and PPS3-specific and isotype control MAb-treated neutrophil-depleted and neutrophil-sufficient and macrophage-depleted and macrophage-sufficient mice were determined after i.p. challenge with ST3 strains 6303 and WU2. Neutrophils were dispensable for A7 and the mouse MAbs to mediate protection in this model, but macrophages were required for the efficacy of A7 and optimal mouse MAb-mediated protection. For A7-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had higher blood CFU, cytokines and peripheral neutrophil levels than macrophage-sufficient mice, and macrophage-sufficient mice had lower tissue bacterial burdens than control MAb-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that macrophages contribute to opsonic and non-opsonic PPS3-specific MAb-mediated protection against ST3 infection by enhancing bacterial clearance and suggest that neutrophils do not compensate for the absence of macrophages in the model used in this study.

  10. Expression of crossreactive idiotypes by human antibodies specific for the capsular polysaccharide of Hemophilus influenzae B.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, A H

    1988-01-01

    Human antibodies specific, for polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP), the capsular polysaccharide of Hemophilus influenzae b, were studied using idiotypic analysis. Antisera were prepared against purified F(ab')2 anti-PRP from two unrelated adults, H.H. and P.T. After repeated absorption with IgG myeloma proteins and with PRP-absorbed normal human Ig and donor Ig, anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) sera were obtained that specifically reacted with anti-PRP antibodies. Anti-IdHH and anti-IdPT reciprocally crossreacted with H.H. and P.T. anti-PRP antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments, and also reacted with the serum anti-PRP antibodies from three additional adults unrelated to P.T. and H.H. Both anti-Id sera partially inhibited anti-PRP paratopes but not anti-tetanus toxoid paratopes. PRP did not inhibit anti-Id recognition of shared or crossreactive idiotypic (CRI) determinants. Naturally occurring and PRP immunization-induced anti-PRP antibodies expressed CRI. While CRI titer increased after immunization, the increase was usually less than the rise in total anti-PRP antibody. Quantitative differences in CRI expression were also apparent between natural and immunization-induced H.H. and P.T. anti-PRP antibodies as shown by their differential inhibitability by anti-Id. Our data demonstrate that anti-PRP antibodies from five unrelated adults express CRI determinants that are probably distant from the PRP combining site. Naturally occurring and immunization-induced anti-PRP antibodies share CRI and therefore appear to be clonally related, although immunization apparently induces the expression CRI-negative antibodies as well. These results, taken with previous studies showing restricted and identical anti-PRP isoelectric focusing spectrotypes in unrelated adults, suggest that some PRP-specific V domains are structurally conserved and probably germ-line encoded. PMID:3257499

  11. Protection against Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Infection Using a Capsular Polysaccharide Glycoconjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Calzas, Cynthia; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Neubauer, Axel; Kempker, Jennifer; Roy, René; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an encapsulated bacterium and one of the most important bacterial pathogens in the porcine industry. Despite decades of research for an efficient vaccine, none is currently available. Based on the success achieved with other encapsulated pathogens, a glycoconjugate vaccine strategy was selected to elicit opsonizing anti-capsular polysaccharide (anti-CPS) IgG antibodies. In this work, glycoconjugate prototypes were prepared by coupling S. suis type 2 CPS to tetanus toxoid, and the immunological features of the postconjugation preparations were evaluated in vivo. In mice, experiments evaluating three different adjuvants showed that CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) induces very low levels of anti-CPS IgM antibodies, while the emulsifying adjuvants Stimune and TiterMax Gold both induced high levels of IgGs and IgM. Dose-response trials comparing free CPS with the conjugate vaccine showed that free CPS is nonimmunogenic independently of the dose used, while 25 μg of the conjugate preparation was optimal in inducing high levels of anti-CPS IgGs postboost. With an opsonophagocytosis assay using murine whole blood, sera from immunized mice showed functional activity. Finally, the conjugate vaccine showed immunogenicity and induced protection in a swine challenge model. When conjugated and administered with emulsifying adjuvants, S. suis type 2 CPS is able to induce potent IgM and isotype-switched IgGs in mice and pigs, yielding functional activity in vitro and protection against a lethal challenge in vivo, all features of a T cell-dependent response. This study represents a proof of concept for the potential of glycoconjugate vaccines in veterinary medicine applications against invasive bacterial infections. PMID:27113360

  12. Synthesis and conformational analysis of a simplified inositol-model of the Streptococcus pneumoniae 19F capsular polysaccharide repeating unit.

    PubMed

    Catelani, Giorgio; D'Andrea, Felicia; Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Griselli, Alessio; Testi, Nicola; Chiacchio, Maria Assunta; Legnani, Laura; Toma, Lucio

    2017-04-18

    Carbohydrate mimics have been studied for a long time as useful sugar substitutes, both in the investigation of biological events and in the treatment of sugar-related diseases. Here we report further evaluation of the capabilities of inositols as carbohydrate substitutes. The conformational features of an inositol-model of a simplified repeating unit corresponding to the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae 19F has been evaluated by computational analysis, and compared to the native repeating unit. The inositol mimic was synthesized, and its experimental spectroscopic data allowed for verification of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Type 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides are expressed by Staphylococcus aureus isolates from rabbits, poultry, pigs, and horses.

    PubMed Central

    Poutrel, B; Sutra, L

    1993-01-01

    A total of 103 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from rabbits (n = 37), poultry (n = 33), pigs (n = 27), and horses (n = 6) and 14 Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from wild animals were serotyped for capsular polysaccharide types 5 and 8 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal rabbit antibodies. About 98% of the S. aureus isolates were typeable. Type 5 was predominant in the poultry (75.8%) and pig (66.7%) isolates, whereas type 8 was more frequent among the isolates from rabbits (59.5%) and horses (83.3%). By contrast, none of the 14 S. intermedius isolates was typeable. PMID:8432841

  14. Structure elucidation of capsular polysaccharides from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 33C, 33D, and revised structure of serotype 33B.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fiona L; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Deng, Chenghua; Zeller, Sandra; Phelan, Lynn; Green, Bruce A; Jansen, Kathrin U; Pavliak, Viliam

    2014-01-13

    We report herein the previously unknown structures of the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides serotype 33C and 33D, and a revised structure of serotype 33B. The syntenic pair 33B/33D has nearly identical polysaccharide repeat units with the exception of one sugar residue (→2-α-Glcp in 33B and →2-α-Galp in 33D). Serotype 33C is structurally more similar to 33B/33D than 33A/33F, in that it also possesses a backbone ribitol-phosphate group and a →3-β-GalpNAc residue, both of which are absent in the repeat units of 33A/33F. Serotype 33C is notably different from all other serogroup 33 polysaccharides, as there is no →3-β-Glcp residue and the location of the O-acetylation of the →5-β-Galf residue (O-6) differs from the other serogroup 33 polysaccharides (O-2). This completes the structural assignments of polysaccharides within serogroup 33 and provides a framework for understanding the recognition of epitopes by serogroup 33 typing sera based on observed cross-reactivities reported in the literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Levels of Antibodies Specific to Tetanus Toxoid, Haemophilus influenzae Type b, and Pneumococcal Capsular Polysaccharide in Healthy Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Uwe; Stemberg, Frank; Rieger, Christian H. L.; Büttner, Wolfgang; Borte, Michael; Schubert, Simone; Möllers, Helga; Riedel, Frank; Herz, Udo; Renz, Harald; Herzog, Wilhelm

    2003-01-01

    Antibody levels specific for capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and for tetanus toxoid were measured in serum samples of 386 age-stratified subjects. The study group consists of healthy adult blood donors and hospitalized children undergoing elective surgery, excluding individuals with a history of infection. In children, anti-tetanus toxoid antibody levels displayed two peaks of 1.20 IU/ml (20.4 mg/liter) and 1.65 IU/ml (28.1 mg/liter) related to the schedule of routine childhood immunization in the first year and at 8 years of age. Eighty percent of the antibodies are of the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype. For pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PCP), the specific antibody levels represent the acquisition of natural immunity. The initial concentration of 9.2 mg/liter was low in infancy (0.5 to 1 years of age) and remained low until 3 to 4 years of age (14.6 mg/liter). During this period PCP antibodies were almost 100% of the IgG2 subclass. Thereafter, IgG anti-PCP antibody titers increased steadily to adult levels (59.5 mg/liter). The data are intended to provide reference ranges to aid in the interpretation of specific antibody determinations in the clinical setting. PMID:12626443

  16. Levels of antibodies specific to tetanus toxoid, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide in healthy children and adults.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Uwe; Stemberg, Frank; Rieger, Christian H L; Büttner, Wolfgang; Borte, Michael; Schubert, Simone; Möllers, Helga; Riedel, Frank; Herz, Udo; Renz, Harald; Herzog, Wilhelm

    2003-03-01

    Antibody levels specific for capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and for tetanus toxoid were measured in serum samples of 386 age-stratified subjects. The study group consists of healthy adult blood donors and hospitalized children undergoing elective surgery, excluding individuals with a history of infection. In children, anti-tetanus toxoid antibody levels displayed two peaks of 1.20 IU/ml (20.4 mg/liter) and 1.65 IU/ml (28.1 mg/liter) related to the schedule of routine childhood immunization in the first year and at 8 years of age. Eighty percent of the antibodies are of the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype. For pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PCP), the specific antibody levels represent the acquisition of natural immunity. The initial concentration of 9.2 mg/liter was low in infancy (0.5 to 1 years of age) and remained low until 3 to 4 years of age (14.6 mg/liter). During this period PCP antibodies were almost 100% of the IgG2 subclass. Thereafter, IgG anti-PCP antibody titers increased steadily to adult levels (59.5 mg/liter). The data are intended to provide reference ranges to aid in the interpretation of specific antibody determinations in the clinical setting.

  17. Identification and characterization of a DNA region involved in the export of capsular polysaccharide by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, C K; Inzana, T J

    1997-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae synthesizes a serotype-specific capsular polysaccharide that acts as a protective barrier to phagocytosis and complement-mediated killing. To begin understanding the role of A. pleuropneumoniae capsule in virulence, we sought to identify the genes involved in capsular polysaccharide export and biosynthesis. A 5.3-kb XbaI fragment of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5a J45 genomic DNA that hybridized with DNA probes specific for the Haemophilus influenzae type b cap export region was cloned and sequenced. This A. pleuropneumoniae DNA fragment encoded four open reading frames, designated cpxDCBA. The nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of cpxDCBA contained a high degree of homology to the capsule export genes of H. influenzae type b bexDCBA, Neisseria meningitidis group B ctrABCD, and, to a lesser extent, Escherichia coli K1 and K5 kpsE and kpsMT. When present in trans, the cpxDCBA gene cluster complemented kpsM::TnphoA or kpsT::TnphoA mutations, determined by enzyme immunoassay and by restored sensitivity to a K5-specific bacteriophage. A cpxCB probe hybridized to genomic DNA from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes tested, indicating that this DNA was conserved among serotypes. These data suggest that A. pleuropneumoniae produces a group II family capsule similar to those of related mucosal pathogens. PMID:9169799

  18. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsular Polysaccharide Recognition by a Monoclonal Antibody Reveals Key Details toward a Biodefense Vaccine and Diagnostics against Melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Roberta; Dillon, Michael J; Burtnick, Mary N; Hubbard, Mark A; Kenfack, Marielle Tamigney; Blériot, Yves; Gauthier, Charles; Brett, Paul J; AuCoin, David P; Lanzetta, Rosa; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-10-16

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium responsible for melioidosis, an infectious disease with high mortality rates. Since melioidosis is a significant public health concern in endemic regions and the organism is currently classified as a potential biothreat agent, the development of effective vaccines and rapid diagnostics is a priority. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) expressed by B. pseudomallei is a highly conserved virulence factor and a protective antigen. Because of this, CPS is considered an attractive antigen for use in the development of both vaccines and diagnostics. In the present study, we describe the interactions of CPS with the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4C4 using a multidisciplinary approach including organic synthesis, molecular biology techniques, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Using these methods, we determined the mode of binding between mAb 4C4 and native CPS or ad hoc synthesized capsular polysaccharide fragments. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the O-acetyl moiety of CPS is essential for the interaction of the CPS epitope with mAb 4C4. Collectively, our results provide important insights into the structural features of B. pseudomallei CPS that enable antibody recognition that may help the rational design of CPS-based vaccine candidates. In addition, our findings confirm that the mAb 4C4 is suitable for use in an antibody-based detection assay for diagnosis of B. pseudomallei infections.

  19. Structure of the neutral capsular polysaccharide of Acinetobacter baumannii NIPH146 that carries the KL37 capsule gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Shneider, Mikhail M; Kenyon, Johanna J; Shashkov, Alexander S; Popova, Anastasiya V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Volozhantsev, Nikolay V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-09-02

    Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was isolated from Acinetobacter baumannii NIPH146, and the following structure of branched pentasaccharide repeating unit was established by sugar analyses along with 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy: In comparison to most other known capsular polysaccharides of A. baumannii, the CPS studied is neutral and lacks any specific monosaccharide component. The synthesis, assembly and export of this structure could be attributed to genes in a novel capsule biosynthesis gene cluster, designated KL37, which was found in the NIPH146 genome. The CPS of A. baumannii NIPH146 shares the α-d-Galp-(1→6)-β-d-Glcp-(1→3)-d-GalpNAc-(1→ trisaccharide fragment with the CPS units of several A. baumannii strains, including ATCC 17978 and LUH 5537 that carry the KL3 and KL22 gene clusters, respectively. KL37 contains two genes for glycosyltransferases that are related to two glycosyltransferase genes present in both KL3 and KL22, and the encoded proteins could be tentatively assigned to linkages between sugars in the CPS repeat.

  20. Solution conformation and flexibility of capsular polysaccharides from Neisseria meningitidis and glycoconjugates with the tetanus toxoid protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad; Adams, Gary G.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-10-01

    The structural integrity of meningococcal native, micro-fluidized and activated capsular polysaccharides and their glycoconjugates – in the form most relevant to their potential use as vaccines (dilute solution) - have been investigated with respect to their homogeneity, conformation and flexibility. Sedimentation velocity analysis showed that the polysaccharide size distributions were generally bimodal with some evidence for higher molar mass forms at higher concentration. Weight average molar masses Mw where lower for activated polysaccharides. Conjugation with tetanus toxoid protein however greatly increased the molar mass and polydispersity of the final conjugates. Glycoconjugates had an approximately unimodal log-normal but broad and large molar mass profiles, confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium “SEDFIT MSTAR” analysis. Conformation analysis using HYDFIT (which globally combines sedimentation and viscosity data), “Conformation Zoning” and Wales-van Holde approaches showed a high degree of flexibility – at least as great as the unconjugated polysaccharides, and very different from the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein used for the conjugation. As with the recently published finding for Hib-TT complexes, it is the carbohydrate component that dictates the solution behaviour of these glycoconjugates, although the lower intrinsic viscosities suggest some degree of compaction of the carbohydrate chains around the protein.

  1. Solution conformation and flexibility of capsular polysaccharides from Neisseria meningitidis and glycoconjugates with the tetanus toxoid protein

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad; Adams, Gary G.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    The structural integrity of meningococcal native, micro-fluidized and activated capsular polysaccharides and their glycoconjugates – in the form most relevant to their potential use as vaccines (dilute solution) - have been investigated with respect to their homogeneity, conformation and flexibility. Sedimentation velocity analysis showed that the polysaccharide size distributions were generally bimodal with some evidence for higher molar mass forms at higher concentration. Weight average molar masses Mw where lower for activated polysaccharides. Conjugation with tetanus toxoid protein however greatly increased the molar mass and polydispersity of the final conjugates. Glycoconjugates had an approximately unimodal log-normal but broad and large molar mass profiles, confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium “SEDFIT MSTAR” analysis. Conformation analysis using HYDFIT (which globally combines sedimentation and viscosity data), “Conformation Zoning” and Wales-van Holde approaches showed a high degree of flexibility – at least as great as the unconjugated polysaccharides, and very different from the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein used for the conjugation. As with the recently published finding for Hib-TT complexes, it is the carbohydrate component that dictates the solution behaviour of these glycoconjugates, although the lower intrinsic viscosities suggest some degree of compaction of the carbohydrate chains around the protein. PMID:27782149

  2. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of capsular polysaccharide and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine milk collected from Brazilian dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Salimena, Alessandra P S; Lange, Carla C; Camussone, Cecilia; Signorini, Marcelo; Calvinho, Luis F; Brito, Maria A V P; Borges, Cristiano A V; Guimarães, Alessandro S; Ribeiro, João B; Mendonça, Letícia C; Piccoli, Roberta H

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that frequently causes mastitis in bovine herds worldwide. This pathogen produces several virulence factors, including cell-associated adhesins, toxic and cytolytic exoproteins, and capsular polysaccharides. The aim of the present study was to test for the presence of genes involved in capsular polysaccharide production and biofilm formation in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis samples collected from 119 dairy herds located in three different Brazilian regions, as well as to assay the production of capsular polysaccharides and biofilm, in vitro. The detection of the cap, icaAD, and bap genes was performed using PCR. The detection and quantification of capsular polysaccharide production was performed using ELISA assays. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm was examined using the polystyrene surface of microtiter plates. All 159 S. aureus isolates investigated harboured the cap gene: 80 % carried the cap5 gene and 20 % carried the cap8 gene. Sixty-nine percent of the isolates expressed capsular polysaccharide (CP) in vitro, 58 % expressed CP5 and 11 % expressed CP8. All of the isolates harboured the icaA and icaD genes, and 95.6 % of the isolates carried the bap gene. Of the 159 isolates analysed, 97.5 % were biofilm producers. A significant association between the capsular genotype and phenotype and the amount of biofilm formation was detected: cap5/CP5 isolates tended to form more biofilm and to produce a thinner CP layer than cap8/CP8 isolates. The results indicate a high potential for pathogenicity among S. aureus isolated from bovine milk collected from three different regions in Brazil.

  3. A unique capsular polysaccharide structure from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H that mimics antifreeze (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Casillo, Angela; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W; Lanzetta, Rosa; Marino, Gennaro; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Randazzo, Antonio; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, M Michela

    2015-01-14

    The low temperatures of polar regions and high-altitude environments, especially icy habitats, present challenges for many microorganisms. Their ability to live under subfreezing conditions implies the production of compounds conferring cryotolerance. Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a γ-proteobacterium isolated from subzero Arctic marine sediments, provides a model for the study of life in cold environments. We report here the identification and detailed molecular primary and secondary structures of capsular polysaccharide from C. psychrerythraea 34H cells. The polymer was isolated in the water layer when cells were extracted by phenol/water and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy together with chemical analysis. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were also performed. The polysaccharide consists of a tetrasaccharidic repeating unit containing two amino sugars and two uronic acids bearing threonine as substituent. The structural features of this unique polysaccharide resemble those present in antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. These results suggest a possible correlation between the capsule structure and the ability of C. psychrerythraea to colonize subfreezing marine environments.

  4. Recombinant Escherichia coli K5 strain with the deletion of waaR gene decreases the molecular weight of the heparosan capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haichan; Liu, Xiaobo; Lv, Shencong; Zhong, Weihong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Heparosan, the capsular polysaccharide of Escherichia coli K5 having a carbohydrate backbone similar to that of heparin, has become a potential precursor for bioengineering heparin. In the heparosan biosynthesis pathway, the gene waaR encoding α-1-, 2- glycosyltransferase catalyze s the third glucosyl residues linking to the oligosaccharide chain. In the present study, a waaR deletion mutant of E. coli K5 was constructed. The mutant showed improvement of capsule polysaccharide yield. It is interesting that the heparosan molecular weight of the mutant is reduced and may become more suitable as a precursor for the production of low molecular weight heparin derived from the wild-type K5 capsular polysaccharide.

  5. Structural determination of the K14 capsular polysaccharide from an ST25 Acinetobacter baumannii isolate, D46.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Johanna J; Hall, Ruth M; De Castro, Cristina

    2015-11-19

    The structure of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) recovered from D46, an extensively antibiotic resistant ST25 Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate, was elucidated. The structure was resolved on the basis of NMR spectroscopy and chemical analyses, and was found to contain a branched neutral pentasaccharide with a backbone composed of GalpNAc and Galp residues, all d configured, and a d-Glcp side group. The KL14 gene cluster found in the D46 genome includes genes for four glycosyltransferases but no modules for synthesis of complex sugars, and this is consistent with the structure of K14. The K14 structure and KL14 sequence clarify the relationship between the structure and K locus sequence for A. nosocomialis isolate LUH5541. The identity of the first sugar of the K14 repeat unit (K unit), and the functions of the four encoded glycosyltransferases and Wzy polymerase were predicted.

  6. Genotyping and investigating capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene loci of non-serotypeable Streptococcus suis isolated from diseased pigs in Canada.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han; Qiu, Xiaotong; Roy, David; Segura, Mariela; Du, Pengchen; Xu, Jianguo; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2017-02-20

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent. Most clinical S. suis strains express capsular polysaccharides (CPS), which can be typed by antisera using the coagglutination test. In this study, 79 S. suis strains recovered from diseased pigs in Canada and which could not be typed using antisera were further characterized by capsular gene typing and sequencing. Four patterns of cps locus were observed: (1) fifteen strains were grouped into previously reported serotypes but presented several mutations in their cps loci, when compared to available data from reference strains; (2) seven strains presented a complete deletion of the cps locus, which would result in an inability to synthesize capsule; (3) forty-seven strains were classified in recently described novel cps loci (NCLs); and (4) ten strains carried novel NCLs not previously described. Different virulence gene profiles (based on the presence of mrp, epf, and/or sly) were observed in these non-serotypeable strains. This study provides further insight in understanding the genetic characteristics of cps loci in non-serotypeable S. suis strains recovered from diseased animals. When using a combination of the previously described 35 serotypes and the complete NCL system, the number of untypeable strains recovered from diseased animals in Canada would be significantly reduced.

  7. Antibodies to Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharides 5 and 8 perform similarly in vitro but are functionally distinct in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Park, Saeyoung; Thompson, Christopher D; Li, Xue; Lee, Jean C

    2016-12-09

    The capsular polysaccharide (CP) produced by Staphylococcus aureus is a virulence factor that allows the organism to evade uptake and killing by host neutrophils. Polyclonal antibodies to the serotype 5 (CP5) and type 8 (CP8) capsular polysaccharides are opsonic and protect mice against experimental bacteremia provoked by encapsulated staphylococci. Thus, passive immunotherapy using CP antibodies has been considered for the prevention or treatment of invasive antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infections. In this report, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against S. aureus CP5 or CP8. Backbone specific mAbs reacted with native and O-deacetylated CPs, whereas O-acetyl specific mAbs reacted only with native CPs. Reference strains of S. aureus and a selection of clinical isolates reacted by colony immunoblot with the CP5 and CP8 mAbs in a serotype-specific manner. The mAbs mediated in vitro CP type-specific opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus strains, and mice passively immunized with CP5 mAbs were protected against S. aureus bacteremia. Neither CP8-specific mAbs or polyclonal antibodies protected mice against bacteremia provoked by serotype 8 S. aureus clinical isolates, although these same antibodies did protect against a serotype 5 S. aureus strain genetically engineered to produce CP8. We detected soluble CP8 in culture supernatants of serotype 8 clinical isolates and in the plasma of infected animals. Serotype 5 S. aureus released significantly less soluble CP5 in vitro and in vivo. The release of soluble CP8 by S. aureus may contribute to the inability of CP8 vaccines or antibodies to protect against serotype 8 staphylococcal infections.

  8. Regulated expression of polysaccharide utilization and capsular biosynthesis loci in biofilm and planktonic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during growth in chemostats.

    PubMed

    TerAvest, Michaela A; He, Zhen; Rosenbaum, Miriam A; Martens, Eric C; Cotta, Michael A; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a prominent member of the human distal gut microbiota that specializes in breaking down diet and host-derived polysaccharides. While polysaccharide utilization has been well studied in B. thetaiotaomicron, other aspects of its behavior are less well characterized, including the factors that allow it to maintain itself in the gut. Biofilm formation may be a mechanism for bacterial retention in the gut. Therefore, we used custom GeneChips to compare the transcriptomes of biofilm and planktonic B. thetaiotaomicron during growth in mono-colonized chemostats. We identified 1,154 genes with a fold-change greater than 2, with confidence greater than or equal to 95%. Among the prominent changes observed in biofilm populations were: (i) greater expression of genes in polysaccharide utilization loci that are involved in foraging of O-glycans normally found in the gut mucosa; and (ii) regulated expression of capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis loci. Hierarchical clustering of the data with different datasets, which were obtained during growth under a range of conditions in minimal media and in intestinal tracts of gnotobiotic mice, revealed that within this group of differentially expressed genes, biofilm communities were more similar to the in vivo samples than to planktonic cells and exhibited features of substrate limitation. The current study also validates the use of chemostats as an in vitro "gnotobiotic" model to study gene expression of attached populations of this bacterium. This is important to gut microbiota research, because bacterial attachment and the consequences of disruptions in attachment are difficult to study in vivo. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Regulated expression of polysaccharide utilization and capsular biosynthesis loci in biofilm and planktonic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during growth in chemostats

    PubMed Central

    TerAvest, Michaela A.; He, Zhen; Rosenbaum, Miriam A.; Martens, Eric C.; Cotta, Michael A.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Angenent, Largus T.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a prominent member of the human distal gut microbiota that specializes in breaking down diet and host-derived polysaccharides. While polysaccharide utilization has been well studied in B. thetaiotaomicron, other aspects of its behavior are less well characterized, including the factors that allow it to maintain itself in the gut. Biofilm formation may be a mechanism for bacterial retention in the gut. Therefore, we used custom GeneChips to compare the transcriptomes of biofilm and planktonic B. thetaiotaomicron during growth in mono-colonized chemostats. We identified 1154 genes with a fold-change greater than 2, with confidence greater than or equal to 95%. Among the prominent changes observed in biofilm populations were: (i) greater expression of genes in polysaccharide utilization loci that are involved in foraging of O-glycans normally found in the gut mucosa; and (ii) regulated expression of capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis loci. Hierarchical clustering of the data with different datasets, which were obtained during growth under a range of conditions in minimal media and in intestinal tracts of gnotobiotic mice, revealed that within this group of differentially expressed genes, biofilm communities were more similar to the in vivo samples than to planktonic cells and exhibited features of substrate limitation. The current study also validates the use of chemostats as an in vitro ‘gnotobiotic’ model to study gene expression of attached populations of this bacterium. This is important to gut microbiota research, because bacterial attachment and the consequences of disruptions in attachment are difficult to study in vivo. PMID:23996813

  10. The capsule of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; De Jesus, Magdia; Frases, Susana; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The capsule of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans has been studied extensively in recent decades, and a large body of information is now available to the scientific community. Well-known aspects of the capsule include its structure, antigenic properties and its function as a virulence factor. The capsule is composed primarily of two polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and galactoxylomannan (GalXM), in addition to a smaller proportion of mannoproteins (MP). Most of the studies on the composition of the capsule have focused on GXM, which comprises more than 90% of the capsule's polysaccharide mass. It is GalXM, however, that is of particular scientific interest because of its immunological properties. The molecular structure of these polysaccharides is very complex and has not yet been fully elucidated. Both GXM and GalXM are high molecular mass polymers with the mass of GXM equaling roughly 10 times that of GalXM. Recent findings suggest, however, that the actual Mw might be different to what it has traditionally been thought to be. In addition to their structural roles in the polysaccharide capsule, these molecules have been associated with many deleterious effects on the immune response. Capsular components are therefore considered key virulence determinants in Cryptococcus neoformans, which has motivated their use in vaccines and made them targets for monoclonal antibody treatments. In this review we will provide an update on the current knowledge of the C. neoformans capsule, covering aspects related to its structure, synthesis, and particularly, its role as a virulence factor. PMID:19426855

  11. B cell response during infection with the MAT a and MAT alpha mating types of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adila Regina T Santos; Heise, Norton; Previato, José Osvaldo; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Peçanha, Ligia M T

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the B cell response of BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice during Cryptococcus neoformans infection. This response was investigated using virulent serotype D forms of mating types alpha and a (MAT alpha and MAT a). C57Bl/6 mice showed massive (mainly cerebral) infection by both types, while BALB/c were resistant to infection. Some resistance of C57Bl/6 mice was induced by previous immunization with the capsular polysaccharide from MAT alpha. Passive immunization of C57Bl/6 mice with purified antibody (Ab) obtained from capsular polysaccharide-immunized mice also increased resistance to infection. Both mouse strains showed comparable low IgM response to the capsular polysaccharide from MAT alpha, and only C57Bl/6 mice produced IgM to the polysaccharide of MAT a. Comparable levels of different immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes against capsular components of MAT alpha and MAT a were detected, and the response of C57Bl/6 mice was higher when compared to that of BALB/c mice. FACS analysis indicated an increase in the percentage of a high-granulosity (side-scatter) splenic subpopulation and in the percentage of splenic Gr-1+ cells in infected C57Bl/6 mice. In addition, the percentage of follicular splenic B cells was decreased after C. neoformans infection of C57Bl/6 mice. This response was more pronounced when we investigated infection induced by the MAT a mating type. Taken together, our results indicate that capsular polysaccharide derived from MAT alpha and MAT a types of C. neoformans have a stimulatory effect upon B cells but that there is no correlation between resistance of BALB/c mice and Ab production. However, the increase in resistance of C57Bl/6 mice parallels the production of Abs and a major change in splenic cell populations.

  12. Neisseria meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide. Bacterial content and release in relation to categories of infection and filtrability of released endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Hoddevik, G M; Baastad, K L; Bukholm, G; Bryn, K; Bøvre, K

    1990-06-01

    A total of 41 Neissera meningitidis isolates were analyzed for capsular polysaccharide (CP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) release and filtrability. Twenty-two of these isolates were serogroup B from blood or cerebrospinal fluid of patients, five were group B isolates from healthy throat carriers, and 14 were nongroupable (acapsular) meningococcal isolates from healthy carriers. Filtration of liquid whole-cell cultures through cellulose acetate-nitrate filters resulted in distinctly lower LPS filtrate activity for acapsular than for capsular meningococci (p less than 0.001). On the other hand, when polysulfone membrane filtration was performed, filtrates from acapsular and capsular meningococci contained LPS in similar amounts. These results indicate that LPS-containing particles released from acapsular isolates are larger or more aggregated than corresponding CP- and LPS-containing particles released from capsular isolates. The LPS released from acapsular isolates apparently are more efficiently retained by adsorption to cellulose acetate-nitrate. From the capsular isolates comparatively more CP than LPS appeared to be released, as related to cell-bound amounts. The total amounts of CP and released, filtrable LPS through cellulose acetate-nitrate filters were both relatively low and had similar values for capsular carrier meningococci and systemic isolates from mild meningococcal disease. The amount of CP released and passing this type of membrane was significantly higher for systemic isolates from severe septicemia than from mild meningococcal disease (p = 0.03).

  13. Serological, chemical, and structural analyses of the Escherichia coli cross-reactive capsular polysaccharides K13, K20, and K23.

    PubMed Central

    Vann, W F; Soderstrom, T; Egan, W; Tsui, F P; Schneerson, R; Orskov, I; Orskov, F

    1983-01-01

    The Escherichia coli K13, K20, and K23 capsular polysaccharide antigens are serologically related. All of these polysaccharides contain ribose and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate in equimolar quantities. The K13 and K20 polysaccharides are partially O-acetylated. A comparison of these polysaccharides after O-deacetylation, by nuclear magnetic resonance and permethylation analysis, showed that these polysaccharides contained the disaccharide repeat unit leads to)-beta-ribofuranosyl-(1 leads to 7)-beta-2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. They differed in the presence and location of an acetyl moiety. The K13 polysaccharide was O-acetylated at C-4 of the 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. The K20 antigen was O-acetylated at C-5 of the ribose moiety. The K23 polymer was nonacetylated. The cross-reactivity of these antigens was demonstrated by tandem-crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Antibodies to K23 could be completely absorbed from OK K23 serum by K13, K20, and K23 antigenic extracts. The K13 and K20 antibodies could be completely absorbed from their respective antisera only by homologous antigenic extracts. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a protein conjugate of the K13 polysaccharide. Analyses of the reactions of these antibodies with the three polysaccharides suggest that the K13 polysaccharide has at least three antigenic sites, one of which is common to the K13, K20, and K23 polysaccharides. PMID:6187684

  14. Oxidation of the capsular polysaccharide of pneumoccal type IX by periodate

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amalendu; Higginbotham, John D.; Heidelberger, Michael

    1972-01-01

    1. The pneumococcal type IX polysaccharide (polysaccharide S IX) has been oxidized by sodium metaperiodate and reduced by sodium borohydride. Of the constituent monosaccharides, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmannosamine remain unaltered, whereas 40% of the glucose and 90% of the glucuronic acid are oxidized. 2. The effect of oxidation and subsequent reduction on the precipitation of polysaccharide S IX in anti-(pneumococcal) sera is described and interpreted in structural terms. 3. Oligosaccharides produced by oxidation, reduction and hydrolysis with dilute acid have been isolated and partially characterized. 4. The results in this paper and the preceding one (Higginbotham et al., 1972) are used to postulate a possible structure for polysaccharide S IX. PMID:4403879

  15. Evaluation of the saccharide content and stability of the first WHO International Standard for Haemophilus influenzae b capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Mawas, Fatme; Bolgiano, Barbara; Rigsby, Peter; Crane, Dennis; Belgrave, Danielle; Corbel, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Haemophilus influenzae b conjugate vaccines (Hib) are almost entirely evaluated by physico-chemical methods to ensure the consistency of manufacture of batches. As different assays are employed for the quantification of Hib capsular polysaccharide PRP (polyribosyl ribitol phosphate; 5-D-ribitol-(1-->1)-beta-D-ribose-3-phosphate) in final formulations and bulk components, there was deemed a need for an International Standard of Hib PRP polysaccharide to be made available. Ten laboratories from 8 different countries participated in a collaborative study to determine the PRP content and assess the suitability of a candidate International Standard PRP preparation (02/208). The results illustrate that a reduction in between-laboratory variability could be achieved by use of a common reference preparation and data analysis showed no significant differences in the values obtained by the different assays: ribose, phosphorus, and high performance anion exchange chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), suggesting the suitability of the proposed reference for use across these assays for quantification of PRP content in Hib vaccines. On the basis of the results of this study, the First International Standard for PRP, NIBSC Code 02/208, has been established by the Expert Committee of Biological Standards of the World Health Organisation, with a content of 4.933+/-0.267mg/ampoule, as determined by the ribose assays carried out by 7 of the participating laboratories.

  16. Role of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in biofilm formation and regulation of CPS production by quorum-sensing in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jo; Kim, Jeong-A; Hwang, Won; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides, such as lipopolysaccharide and loosely associated exopolysaccharides, are essential for Vibrio vulnificus to form biofilms. The role of another major component of the V. vulnificus extracellular matrix, capsular polysaccharide (CPS), which contributes to colony opacity, has been characterized in biofilm formation. A CPS-deficient mutant, whose wbpP gene encoding UDP-GlcNAc C4-epimerase was knocked out, formed significantly more biofilm than wild type, due to increased hydrophobicity of the cell surface, adherence to abiotic surfaces and cell aggregation. To elucidate the direct effect of CPS on biofilm structure, extracted CPS and a CPS-degrading enzyme, α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, were added in biofilm assays, resulting in reduction and increment of biofilm sizes respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that CPS play a critical role in determining biofilm size by restricting continual growth of mature biofilms. Since CPS is required after maturation, CPS biosynthesis should be controlled in a cell density-dependent manner, e.g. by quorum-sensing (QS) regulation. Analysing transcription of the CPS gene cluster revealed that it was activated by SmcR, a QS master regulator, via binding to the upstream region of the cluster. Therefore, CPS was produced when biofilm cell density reached high enough to turn on QS regulation and limited biofilms to appropriate sizes.

  17. Structure Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus UDP-N-acetyl-mannosamine Dehydrogenase Cap5O Involved in Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyk, Jakub; Fleurie, Aurore; Olivares-Illana, Vanesa; Béchet, Emmanuelle; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Moréra, Solange; Meyer, Philippe; Pompidor, Guillaume; Kahn, Richard; Grangeasse, Christophe; Nessler, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial UDP-sugar dehydrogenases are part of the biosynthesis pathway of extracellular polysaccharides. These compounds act as important virulence factors by protecting the cell from opsonophagocytosis and complement-mediated killing. In Staphylococcus aureus, the protein Cap5O catalyzes the oxidation of UDP-N-acetyl-mannosamine to UDP-N-acetyl-mannosaminuronic acid. Cap5O is crucial for the production of serotype 5 capsular polysaccharide that prevents the interaction of bacteria with both phagocytic and nonphagocytic eukaryotic cells. However, details of its catalytic mechanism remain unknown. We thus crystallized Cap5O and solved the first structure of an UDP-N-acetyl-mannosamine dehydrogenase. This study revealed that the catalytic cysteine makes a disulfide bond that has never been observed in other structurally characterized members of the NDP-sugar dehydrogenase family. Biochemical and mutagenesis experiments demonstrated that the formation of this disulfide bridge regulates the activity of Cap5O. We also identified two arginine residues essential for Cap5O activity. Previous data suggested that Cap5O is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation, so we characterized the phosphorylation site and examined the underlying regulatory mechanism. PMID:21454499

  18. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G.; Morris, Gordon A.; Almutairi, Fahad M.; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 106 g.mol−1) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 106 g.mol−1). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 106 g.mol−1), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution. PMID:26915577

  19. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Brisson, J R; Uhrinova, S; Woods, R J; van der Zwan, M; Jarrell, H C; Paoletti, L C; Kasper, D L; Jennings, H J

    1997-03-18

    The conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide (GBSP III) exhibits unique properties which can be ascribed to the presence of sialic acid in its structure and the requirement for an extended binding site. By means of NMR and molecular dynamics studies on GBSP III and its fragments, the extended epitope of GBSP III was further defined. The influence of sialic acid on the conformational properties of GBSP III was examined by performing conformational analysis on desialylated GBSP III, which is identical to the polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14, and also on oxidized and reduced GBSP III. Conformational changes were gauged by 1H and 13C chemical shift analysis, NOE, 1D selective TOCSY-NOESY experiments, J(HH) and J(CH) variations, and NOE of OH resonances. Changes in mobility were examined by 13C T1 and T2 measurements. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water using the AMBER force field and the GLYCAM parameter set were used to assess static and dynamic conformational models, simulate the observable NMR parameters and calculate helical parameters. GBSP III was found to be capable of forming extended helices. Hence, the length dependence of the conformational epitope could be explained by its location on extended helices within the random coil structure of GBSP III. The interaction of sialic acid with the backbone of the PS was also found to be important in defining the conformational epitope of GBSP III.

  20. E. coli Group 1 Capsular Polysaccharide Exportation Nanomachinary as a Plausible Antivirulence Target in the Perspective of Emerging Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Palur, Raghuvamsi V.; Sudhakar, Karpagam U.; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria evolving resistance against the action of multiple drugs and its ability to disseminate the multidrug resistance trait(s) across various strains of the same bacteria or different bacterial species impose serious threat to public health. Evolution of such multidrug resistance is due to the fact that, most of the antibiotics target bacterial survival mechanisms which exert selective pressure on the bacteria and aids them to escape from the action of antibiotics. Nonetheless, targeting bacterial virulence strategies such as bacterial surface associated polysaccharides biosynthesis and their surface accumulation mechanisms may be an attractive strategy, as they impose less selective pressure on the bacteria. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) or K-antigen that is located on the bacterial surface armors bacteria from host immune response. Thus, unencapsulating bacteria would be a good strategy for drug design, besides CPS itself being a good vaccine target, by interfering with CPS biosynthesis and surface assembly pathway. Gram-negative Escherichia coli uses Wzy-polymerase dependent (Groups 1 and 4) and ATP dependent (Groups 1 and 3) pathways for CPS production. Considering E. coli as a case in point, this review explains the structure and functional roles of proteins involved in Group 1 Wzy dependent CPS biosynthesis, surface expression and anchorage in relevance to drug and vaccine developments. PMID:28217109

  1. A novel monoclonal antibody to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X capsular polysaccharide and its potential use in quantitation of meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Fátima; Otero, Oscar; Camacho, Frank; Amin, Nevis; Ramírez, Fidel; Valdés, Yolanda; Acevedo, Reynaldo; García, Luis; Cardoso, Daniel; Cuello, Maribel

    2014-11-01

    A novel murine hybridoma monoclonal antibody (MAb) was produced against the capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup X (MenX) in order to develop a sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantitation of the meningococcal polysaccharide. The MAb only reacted with the CP from MenX and did not react with CPs from N. meningitidis serogroups A, C, Y and W (MenA, MenC, MenY, MenW). The affinity constant (Ka) of the MAb measured by non-competitive ELISA was 7.25 × 10(7) M(-1). The application of this MAb in a sandwich ELISA was demonstrated by its ability to properly quantitate three lots of an experimental meningococcal CP-based vaccine. The MAb obtained in this work could be a valuable reagent for the detection and quantitation of future meningococcal vaccines containing MenX CP. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Autologous albumin enhances the humoral immune response to capsular polysaccharide covalently co-attached to bacteria-sized latex beads

    PubMed Central

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2014-01-01

    Abundant autologous proteins, like serum albumin, should be immunologically inert. However, individuals with no apparent predisposition to autoimmune disease can develop immune responses to autologous therapeutic proteins. Protein aggregation is a potential major trigger of these responses. Adsorption of proteins to particles provides macromolecular size and may generate structural changes in the protein, resembling aggregation. Using aldehyde/sulfate latex beads coated with murine serum albumin (MSA), we found that mice mounted MSA-specific IgG responses that were dependent on CD4+ T cells. IgG were specific for MSA adsorbed to solid surfaces and non-cross-reactive with human, bovine or pig albumins. T cells induced in response to MSA, augmented the primary and induced boosted secondary IgG and IgM responses specific for the T cell-independent antigen, capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 (PPS14), when the latter was attached to the same bead. Similar to the anti-MSA IgG response, the boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary response was CD4+ T cell-dependent, displayed a typical carrier effect, and was enhanced by, but did not require, Toll-like receptor stimulation. These results provide a potential mechanism for the induction of responses to autoantigens unable to induce specific T cell responses, and provide new insights into polysaccharide-specific immunity. PMID:24481921

  3. A glycoconjugate of Haemophilus influenzae Type b capsular polysaccharide with tetanus toxoid protein: hydrodynamic properties mainly influenced by the carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Adams, Gary G; Morris, Gordon A; Almutairi, Fahad M; Duvivier, Pierre; Conrath, Karel; Harding, Stephen E

    2016-02-26

    Three important physical properties which may affect the performance of glycoconjugate vaccines against serious disease are molar mass (molecular weight), heterogeneity (polydispersity), and conformational flexibility in solution. The dilute solution behaviour of native and activated capsular polyribosylribitol (PRP) polysaccharides extracted from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the corresponding glycoconjugate made by conjugating this with the tetanus toxoid (TT) protein have been characterized and compared using a combination of sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity in the analytical ultracentrifuge with viscometry. The weight average molar mass of the activated material was considerably reduced (Mw ~ 0.24 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)) compared to the native (Mw ~ 1.2 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)). Conjugation with the TT protein yielded large polydisperse structures (of Mw ~ 7.4 × 10(6) g.mol(-1)), but which retained the high degree of flexibility of the native and activated polysaccharide, with frictional ratio, intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation conformation zoning behaviour and persistence length all commensurate with highly flexible coil behaviour and unlike the previously characterised tetanus toxoid protein (slightly extended and hydrodynamically compact structure with an aspect ratio of ~3). This non-protein like behaviour clearly indicates that it is the carbohydrate component which mainly influences the physical behaviour of the glycoconjugate in solution.

  4. Capsular polysaccharide typing of domestic mastitis-causing Staphylococcus aureus strains and its potential exploration of bovine mastitis vaccine development. I. Capsular polysaccharide typing, isolation and purification of the strains.

    PubMed

    Han, H R; Pak, S I; Kang, S W; Jong, W S; Youn, C J

    2000-06-01

    One hundred seven isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from bovine mastitis were investigated for colony morphology in serum-soft agar (SSA), autoagglutination in salt, and capsular serotype. Capsular polysaccharide (CP) was purified and quantified from the extracts of clinical isolates. Overall, 89 isolates (83.2%) were diffuse in the SSA, without any difference in the proportion of diffuse colony between type 5 and type 8 strains. Some strains exhibited compact colonies in the SSA and expressed CP as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indicating that compact morphology does not exclude encapsulation. The majority of the strains (11/12) showed autoagglutination in the salt aggregation test. The serotype 336 accounted for 46.7% of the isolates followed by serotype 5 (12.1%) and serotype 8 (12.1%). Particularly, twenty-six (24.3%) isolates reacted with two serotypes; 7 for type 8/336 and 19 for type 5/336. Five isolates (4.7%) were nontypeable with monoclonal antibodies specific for CP serotype 5, 8, or 336. The CP concentration in culture supernatants varied with the serotypes, and the total amount of CP produced by cells grown in a liquid medium was much less than that produced by cells grown on a solid medium. The Western blotting indicated that the CP bands of S. aureus serotype 5 and 8 were ranged in the molecular mass of 58-84 kilodalton (kDa), with additional bands in the region of approximately >/= 48 or

  5. Homologous overexpression of RfaH in E. coli K4 improves the production of chondroitin-like capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Donatella; De Rosa, Mario; Carlino, Elisabetta; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2013-05-09

    Glycosaminoglycans, such as hyaluronic acid, heparin, and chondroitin sulfate, are among the top ranked products in industrial biotechnology for biomedical applications, with a growing world market of billion dollars per year. Recently a remarkable progress has been made in the development of tailor-made strains as sources for the manufacturing of such products. The genetic modification of E. coli K4, a natural producer of chondroitin sulfate precursor, is challenging considering the lack of detailed information on its genome, as well as its mobilome. Chondroitin sulfate is currently used as nutraceutical for the treatment of osteoarthritis, and several new therapeutic applications, spanning from the development of skin substitutes to live attenuated vaccines, are under evaluation. E. coli K4 was used as host for the overexpression of RfaH, a positive regulator that controls expression of the polysaccharide biosynthesis genes and other genes necessary for the virulence of E. coli K4. Various engineering strategies were compared to investigate different types of expression systems (plasmid vs integrative cassettes) and integration sites (genome vs endogenous mobile element). All strains analysed in shake flasks on different media showed a capsular polysaccharide production improved by 40 to 140%, compared to the wild type, with respect to the final product titer. A DO-stat fed-batch process on the 2L scale was also developed for the best performing integrative strain, EcK4r3, yielding 5.3 g ∙ L(-1) of K4 polysaccharide. The effect of rfaH overexpression in EcK4r3 affected the production of lipopolysaccharide and the expression of genes involved in the polysaccharide biosynthesis pathway (kfoC and kfoA), as expected. An alteration of cellular metabolism was revealed by changes of intracellular pools of UDP-sugars which are used as precursors for polysaccharide biosynthesis. The present study describes the identification of a gene target and the application of a

  6. Hydrolytic stability of pneumococcal group 6 (type 6A and 6B) capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Zon, G; Szu, S C; Egan, W; Robbins, J D; Robbins, J B

    1982-01-01

    The hydrolyses of the immunologically cross-reactive and constitutionally isomeric group 6 pneumococcal polysaccharides, types 6A and 6B, were investigated by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gel filtration through Sepharose 4B, reducing-sugar analysis, and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that cleavage of the repeating-unit phosphodiester linkages at pH 10, 60 degrees C was considerably faster (greater than 10(3) ) for the type 6A than the type 6B polysaccharide. Under these reaction conditions, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance kinetic measurements showed that the Na+ form of the type 6A polysaccharide underwent phosphodiester-linkage hydrolysis two times slower than the corresponding Ca+2 form; a stoichiometrically excess amount of Ca+2 caused a 30-fold enhancement of the latter hydrolysis rate. The spectroscopic characterization of phosphorus-containing end groups resulting from hydrolysis of the type 6A polymer provided additional mechanistic information. Heating the type 6A and 6B polysaccharides at 56 degrees C for various times led to gel filtration coefficients of distribution (Kd values) which indicated that the type 6A material underwent size reductions considerably faster than did the type 6B antigen; these increased Kd values qualitatively correlated with the loss of immunochemical reactivity measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The application of a statistical theory to the depolymerization of the type 6A and 6B polysaccharides was consistent with random bond cleavage, as evidenced by the calculated versus measured gel filtration patterns. Although the molecular changes causing the size reductions were not fully elaborated, it was established that the acetal linkages of the type 6A and 6B polysaccharides were comparatively resistant to hydrolysis and that depolymerization by hydrolysis of the phosphodiester linkage was a major factor only in the type 6A structure. It was concluded

  7. Hydrolytic stability of pneumococcal group 6 (type 6A and 6B) capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zon, G; Szu, S C; Egan, W; Robbins, J D; Robbins, J B

    1982-07-01

    The hydrolyses of the immunologically cross-reactive and constitutionally isomeric group 6 pneumococcal polysaccharides, types 6A and 6B, were investigated by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gel filtration through Sepharose 4B, reducing-sugar analysis, and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that cleavage of the repeating-unit phosphodiester linkages at pH 10, 60 degrees C was considerably faster (greater than 10(3) ) for the type 6A than the type 6B polysaccharide. Under these reaction conditions, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance kinetic measurements showed that the Na+ form of the type 6A polysaccharide underwent phosphodiester-linkage hydrolysis two times slower than the corresponding Ca+2 form; a stoichiometrically excess amount of Ca+2 caused a 30-fold enhancement of the latter hydrolysis rate. The spectroscopic characterization of phosphorus-containing end groups resulting from hydrolysis of the type 6A polymer provided additional mechanistic information. Heating the type 6A and 6B polysaccharides at 56 degrees C for various times led to gel filtration coefficients of distribution (Kd values) which indicated that the type 6A material underwent size reductions considerably faster than did the type 6B antigen; these increased Kd values qualitatively correlated with the loss of immunochemical reactivity measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The application of a statistical theory to the depolymerization of the type 6A and 6B polysaccharides was consistent with random bond cleavage, as evidenced by the calculated versus measured gel filtration patterns. Although the molecular changes causing the size reductions were not fully elaborated, it was established that the acetal linkages of the type 6A and 6B polysaccharides were comparatively resistant to hydrolysis and that depolymerization by hydrolysis of the phosphodiester linkage was a major factor only in the type 6A structure. It was concluded

  8. Peptidoglycan Association of Murein Lipoprotein Is Required for KpsD-Dependent Group 2 Capsular Polysaccharide Expression and Serum Resistance in a Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jingyu; Bouwman, Catrien; Yan, Donghong; Kang, Jing; Katakam, Anand K.; Liu, Peter; Pantua, Homer; Abbas, Alexander R.; Nickerson, Nicholas N.; Austin, Cary; Reichelt, Mike; Sandoval, Wendy; Xu, Min

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Murein lipoprotein (Lpp) and peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Pal) are major outer membrane lipoproteins in Escherichia coli. Their roles in cell-envelope integrity have been documented in E. coli laboratory strains, and while Lpp has been linked to serum resistance in vitro, the underlying mechanism has not been established. Here, lpp and pal mutants of uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073 showed reduced survival in a mouse bacteremia model, but only the lpp mutant was sensitive to serum killing in vitro. The peptidoglycan-bound Lpp form was specifically required for preventing complement-mediated bacterial lysis in vitro and complement-mediated clearance in vivo. Compared to the wild-type strain, the lpp mutant had impaired K2 capsular polysaccharide production and was unable to respond to exposure to serum by elevating capsular polysaccharide amounts. These properties correlated with altered cellular distribution of KpsD, the predicted outer membrane translocon for “group 2” capsular polysaccharides. We identified a novel Lpp-dependent association between functional KpsD and peptidoglycan, highlighting important interplay between cell envelope components required for resistance to complement-mediated lysis in uropathogenic E. coli isolates. PMID:28536290

  9. Capsular Polysaccharide (CPS) Release by Serotype 3 Pneumococcal Strains Reduces the Protective Effect of Anti-Type 3 CPS Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Hwa; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of the serotype 3 (ST3) pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) remains unclear. While the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of most serotypes is wzy dependent, the strains of two serotypes, 3 and 37, synthesize CPS by the synthase-dependent pathway, resulting in a polysaccharide that is not covalently linked to peptidoglycan and can be released during growth. We hypothesized that the release of CPS during growth reduces anti-type 3 CPS antibody-mediated protection and may explain the lower efficacy of the type 3 component of PCV than that of other PCVs. The in vitro-released CPS concentrations per 107 CFU of ST3 and ST37 strains were significantly higher than those for the ST1, ST4, ST6B, and ST14 strains. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in mice, blood concentrations of CPS were significantly higher for the ST3 than for the ST4/5 strains. The opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPKA) titer of anti-type 3 CPS antibody was significantly reduced by type 3 CPS, culture supernatant, or serum from Streptococcus pneumoniae ST3 strain WU2-infected mice. Mice were injected with capsule-specific antibodies and challenged i.p. with or without the addition of sterile culture supernatant containing type-specific CPS. The addition of 0.2 μl of culture supernatant from WU2 inhibited passive protection, whereas 100-fold-more culture supernatant from S. pneumoniae ST4 strain TIGR4 was required for the inhibition of protection. We conclude that released type 3 CPS interferes with antibody-mediated killing and protection by anti-CPS antibodies. The relative failure of ST3 PCV may be due to CPS release, suggesting that alternative immunization approaches for ST3 may be necessary. PMID:26677201

  10. Capsular Polysaccharide (CPS) Release by Serotype 3 Pneumococcal Strains Reduces the Protective Effect of Anti-Type 3 CPS Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Hwa; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Ying-Jie; Malley, Richard

    2015-12-16

    The efficacy of the serotype 3 (ST3) pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) remains unclear. While the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of most serotypes is wzy dependent, the strains of two serotypes, 3 and 37, synthesize CPS by the synthase-dependent pathway, resulting in a polysaccharide that is not covalently linked to peptidoglycan and can be released during growth. We hypothesized that the release of CPS during growth reduces anti-type 3 CPS antibody-mediated protection and may explain the lower efficacy of the type 3 component of PCV than that of other PCVs. The in vitro-released CPS concentrations per 10(7) CFU of ST3 and ST37 strains were significantly higher than those for the ST1, ST4, ST6B, and ST14 strains. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in mice, blood concentrations of CPS were significantly higher for the ST3 than for the ST4/5 strains. The opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPKA) titer of anti-type 3 CPS antibody was significantly reduced by type 3 CPS, culture supernatant, or serum from Streptococcus pneumoniae ST3 strain WU2-infected mice. Mice were injected with capsule-specific antibodies and challenged i.p. with or without the addition of sterile culture supernatant containing type-specific CPS. The addition of 0.2 μl of culture supernatant from WU2 inhibited passive protection, whereas 100-fold-more culture supernatant from S. pneumoniae ST4 strain TIGR4 was required for the inhibition of protection. We conclude that released type 3 CPS interferes with antibody-mediated killing and protection by anti-CPS antibodies. The relative failure of ST3 PCV may be due to CPS release, suggesting that alternative immunization approaches for ST3 may be necessary.

  11. Vi Capsular Polysaccharide Produced by Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Paratyphi A Confers Immunoprotection against Infection by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kun; Zhu, Chunyue; Chen, Zhijin; Zheng, Chunping; Tan, Yong; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2017-01-01

    Enteric fever is predominantly caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A, and accounts for an annual global incidence of 26.9 millions. In recent years, the rate of S. Paratyphi A infection has progressively increased. Currently licensed vaccines for typhoid fever, live Ty21a vaccine, Vi subunit vaccine, and Vi-conjugate vaccine, confer inadequate cross immunoprotection against enteric fever caused by S. Paratyphi A. Therefore, development of bivalent vaccines against enteric fever is urgently required. The immunogenic Vi capsular polysaccharide is characteristically produced in S. Typhi, but it is absent in S. Paratyphi A. We propose that engineering synthesis of Vi in S. Paratyphi A live-attenuated vaccine may expand its protection range to cover S. Typhi. In this study, we cloned the viaB locus, which contains 10 genes responsible for Vi biosynthesis, and integrated into the chromosome of S. Paratyphi A CMCC 50093. Two virulence loci, htrA and phoPQ, were subsequently deleted to achieve a Vi-producing attenuated vaccine candidate. Our data showed that, despite more than 200 passages, the viaB locus was stably maintained in the chromosome of S. Paratyphi A and produced the Vi polysaccharide. Nasal immunization of the vaccine candidate stimulated high levels of Vi-specific and S. Paratyphi A-specific antibodies in mice sera as well as total sIgA in intestinal contents, and showed significant protection against wild-type challenge of S. Paratyphi A or S. Typhi. Our study show that the Vi-producing attenuated S. Paratyphi A is a promising bivalent vaccine candidate for the prevention of enteric fever.

  12. Vi Capsular Polysaccharide Produced by Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Paratyphi A Confers Immunoprotection against Infection by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Kun; Zhu, Chunyue; Chen, Zhijin; Zheng, Chunping; Tan, Yong; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2017-01-01

    Enteric fever is predominantly caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A, and accounts for an annual global incidence of 26.9 millions. In recent years, the rate of S. Paratyphi A infection has progressively increased. Currently licensed vaccines for typhoid fever, live Ty21a vaccine, Vi subunit vaccine, and Vi-conjugate vaccine, confer inadequate cross immunoprotection against enteric fever caused by S. Paratyphi A. Therefore, development of bivalent vaccines against enteric fever is urgently required. The immunogenic Vi capsular polysaccharide is characteristically produced in S. Typhi, but it is absent in S. Paratyphi A. We propose that engineering synthesis of Vi in S. Paratyphi A live-attenuated vaccine may expand its protection range to cover S. Typhi. In this study, we cloned the viaB locus, which contains 10 genes responsible for Vi biosynthesis, and integrated into the chromosome of S. Paratyphi A CMCC 50093. Two virulence loci, htrA and phoPQ, were subsequently deleted to achieve a Vi-producing attenuated vaccine candidate. Our data showed that, despite more than 200 passages, the viaB locus was stably maintained in the chromosome of S. Paratyphi A and produced the Vi polysaccharide. Nasal immunization of the vaccine candidate stimulated high levels of Vi-specific and S. Paratyphi A-specific antibodies in mice sera as well as total sIgA in intestinal contents, and showed significant protection against wild-type challenge of S. Paratyphi A or S. Typhi. Our study show that the Vi-producing attenuated S. Paratyphi A is a promising bivalent vaccine candidate for the prevention of enteric fever. PMID:28484685

  13. Streptococcus suis Capsular Polysaccharide Inhibits Phagocytosis through Destabilization of Lipid Microdomains and Prevents Lactosylceramide-Dependent Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Mathieu; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Gagnon, Fleur; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus suis type 2 is a major swine pathogen and a zoonotic agent, causing meningitis in both swine and humans. S. suis infects the host through the respiratory route, reaches the bloodstream, and persists until breaching into the central nervous system. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of S. suis type 2 is considered a key virulence factor of the bacteria. Though CPS allows S. suis to adhere to the membrane of cells of the immune system, it provides protection against phagocytosis. In fact, nonencapsulated mutants are easily internalized and killed by macrophages and dendritic cells. The objective of this work was to study the molecular mechanisms by which the CPS of S. suis prevents phagocytosis. By using latex beads covalently linked with purified CPS, it was shown that CPS itself was sufficient to inhibit entry of both latex beads and bystander fluorescent beads into macrophages. Upon contact with macrophages, encapsulated S. suis was shown to destabilize lipid microdomains at the cell surface, to block nitric oxide (NO) production during infection, and to prevent lactosylceramide accumulation at the phagocytic cup during infection. In contrast, the nonencapsulated mutant was easily internalized via lipid rafts, in a filipin-sensitive manner, leading to lactosylceramide recruitment and strong NO production. This is the first report to identify a role for CPS in lipid microdomain stability and to recognize an interaction between S. suis and lactosylceramide in phagocytes. PMID:22124659

  14. Capsular polysaccharides facilitate enhanced iron acquisition by the colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. isolated from a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Ke; Dai, Guo-Zheng; Juneau, Philippe; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Microcystis sp., especially in its colonial form, is a common dominant species during cyanobacterial blooms in many iron-deficient water bodies. It is still not entirely clear, however, how the colonial forms of Microcystis acclimate to iron-deficient habitats, and the responses of unicellular and colonial forms to iron-replete and iron-deficient conditions were examined here. Growth rates and levels of photosynthetic pigments declined to a greater extent in cultures of unicellular Microcystis than in cultures of the colonial form in response to decreasing iron concentrations, resulting in the impaired photosynthetic performance of unicellular Microcystis as compared to colonial forms as measured by variable fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the light-harvesting ability and photosynthetic capacity of colonial Microcystis was less affected by iron deficiency than the unicellular form. The carotenoid contents and nonphotochemical quenching of colonial Microcystis were less reduced than those of the unicellular form under decreasing iron concentrations, indicating that the colonial morphology enhanced photoprotection and acclimation to iron-deficient conditions. Furthermore, large amounts of iron were detected in the capsular polysaccharides (CPS) of the colonies, and more iron was found to be attached to the colonial Microcystis CPS under decreasing iron conditions as compared to unicellular cultures. These results demonstrated that colonial Microcystis can acclimate to iron deficiencies better than the unicellular form, and that CPS plays an important role in their acclimation advantage in iron-deficient waters.

  15. Structure of the capsular polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O139 synonym Bengal containing D-galactose 4,6-cyclophosphate.

    PubMed

    Knirel, Y A; Paredes, L; Jansson, P E; Weintraub, A; Widmalm, G; Albert, M J

    1995-09-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Vibrio cholerae O139 synonym Bengal, which is thought to carry determinants of O-specificity, was isolated by phenol/water extraction followed by delipidation of the contaminating lipopolysaccharide at pH 4.2 and gel-permeation chromatography. The CPS contained D-galactose, 3,6-dideoxy-L-xylo-hexose (colitose, Col), 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose, 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-D-glucose (N-acetyl-D-quinovosamine, D-QuiNAc), D-galacturonic acid (D-GalA), and phosphate. The CPS was studied by NMR spectroscopy, methylation analysis, and selective degradations, including partial acid hydrolysis at pH 3.1 and dephosphorylation with aqueous 48% hydrofluoric acid, which both resulted in complete cleavage of Col. It was concluded that the CPS is built up of hexasaccharide repeating units containing inter alia D-galactose 4,6-cyclophosphate and having the following structure [structure: see text] These data basically confirm the structure of the V. cholerae CPS proposed on the basis of an NMR study [L. M. Preston et al. (1995) J. Bacteriol. 177, 835-838] and specify exactly the absolute configurations of the constituent monosaccharides and the position of the cyclic phosphate.

  16. Fur regulation of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and iron-acquisition systems in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Wu, Chien-Chen; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chyi; Chi, Chia; Lin, Jing-Ciao; Chen, Yeh; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2011-02-01

    The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been reported to repress the expression of rmpA, a regulatory gene for the mucoid phenotype, leading to decreased capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. Here, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Fur also repressed the expression of the CPS regulatory genes rmpA2 and rcsA. Interestingly, deletion of rmpA or rcsA but not rmpA2 from the Δfur strain was able to suppress the deletion effect of Fur. The availability of extracellular iron affected the amount of CPS, suggesting that Fur regulates CPS biosynthesis in an Fe(II)-dependent manner. Increased production of siderophores was observed in the Δfur strain, suggesting that uptake of extracellular iron in K. pneumoniae is regulated by Fur. Fur titration assays and qRT-PCR analyses demonstrated that at least six of the eight putative iron-acquisition systems, identified by a blast search in the contig database of K. pneumoniae CG43, were directly repressed by Fur. We conclude that Fur has a dual role in the regulation of CPS biosynthesis and iron acquisition in K. pneumoniae.

  17. Fine Specificity and Cross-Reactions of Monoclonal Antibodies to Group B Streptococcal Capsular Polysaccharide Type III

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Seth H.; Moran, Emily; Maresh, Grace; Jennings, Harold J.; Pritchard, David G.; Egan, Marianne L.; Blixt, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Despite aggressive campaigns using antenatal prophylactic antibiotic therapy, infections continue. Developing an effective maternal vaccine is a public health priority. Antibody (Ab) to the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is considered the dominant “protective” immune mediator. Here we study the fine specificity and potential host reactivity of a panel of well-characterized murine monoclonal Abs against the type III CPS by examining the binding of the Abs to intact and neuraminidase-digested GBS, purified CPS, synthetic carbohydrate structures, and cells. The results showed marked differences in the fine specificity among these mAbs to a single carbohydrate structure. Cross-reactions with synthetic GD3 and GT3 carbohydrates, representing structures found on surfaces of neural and developing cells, were demonstrated using carbohydrate array technology. The anti-CPSIII mAbs did not react with cells expressing GD3 and GT3, nor did mAbs specific for the host carbohydrates cross-react with GBS, raising questions about the physiological relevance of this cross-reaction. But in the process of these investigations, we serendipitously demonstrated cross-reactions of some anti-CPSIII mAbs with antigens, likely carbohydrates, found on human leukocytes. These studies suggest caution in the development of a maternal vaccine to prevent infection by this important human pathogen. PMID:22634296

  18. Humoral immune response of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: capsular polysaccharide serotype 14-Lysine modified PspA.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Raquel; Goulart, Cibelly; Perciani, Catia T; Barazzone, Giovana C; Carvalho, Rimenys; Gonçalves, Viviane M; Leite, Luciana C C; Tanizaki, Martha M

    2011-11-03

    Polysaccharide-protein conjugates are so far the current antigens used for pneumococcal vaccines for children under 2 years of age. In this study, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) was used as a carrier protein for pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide serotype 14 as an alternative to broaden the vaccine coverage. PspA was modified by reductive amination with formaldehyde in order to improve the specificity of the reaction between protein and polysaccharide, inhibiting polymerization and the gel formation reaction. In the synthesis process, the currently used activator, 1-[3-(dimethylamine)propyl]-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDAC) was substituted for 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). BALB/c mice were immunized with either the PS14-mPspA conjugate or the co-administered components in a three dose regimen and sera from the immunized animals were assayed for immunity induced against both antigens: PS14 and mPspA. Modification of more than 70% of lysine residues from PspA (mPspA) did not interfere in the immune response as evaluated by the anti-PspA titer and C3 complement deposition assay. Sera of mice immunized with conjugated PS14-mPspA showed similar IgG titers, avidity and isotype profile as compared to controls immunized with PspA or mPspA alone. The complement deposition was higher in the sera of mice immunized with the conjugate vaccine and the opsonophagocytic activity was similar for both sera. Conjugation improved the immune response against PS14. The anti PS14 IgG titer was higher in sera of mice immunized with the conjugate than with co-administered antigens and presented an increased avidity index, induction of a predominant IgG1 isotype and increased complement deposition on a bacteria with a surface serotype 14. These results strongly support the use of PspA as carrier in a conjugate vaccine where both components act as antigens.

  19. Comparison of the immunogenicity and safety of two different brands of Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sabitha, P; Prabha Adhikari, M R; Chowdary, Abhijit; Prabhu, Malathi; Soofi, Mohammad; Shetty, Meenakshi; Kamath, Asha; Lokaranjan, S S; Bangera, S S

    2004-04-01

    The recent emergence of multi-drug-resistant Salmonella strains highlights the need for better preventive measures, including vaccination. Safe and immunologic vaccines have been developed based on purified Vi polysaccharide. To compare the immune response elicited by two different brands of Salmonella Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccine (ViCPS). Double blind, randomized (3:1), controlled, parallel, phase III study was conducted at two centres in India to compare the safety and immunogenicity of Typbar, the investigational vaccine with an already marketed vaccine "X", in healthy subjects aged between 12 -25 years. A sample size of 184 subjects was calculated. Subjects were randomly distributed in two groups, immunized with single dose of Typbar or Vaccine "X". Serum samples were taken before 7 days and 4 weeks after immunization for the determination of antibodies to Vi polysaccharide, by ELISA method. Safety was assessed by physical examination, laboratory parameters before and after vaccination and by monitoring adverse events. The geometric mean antibody titre (GMT) 4 weeks after vaccination was compared from respective pre-vaccination values by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Geometric mean of antibody levels before and after immunization and the ratio between them (Mann-Whitney test), the Seroconversion rates (Z test of proportions) and the adverse events (Fisher's exact test and Chi square test), were compared between two groups. P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. P values and 95% confidence intervals were estimated in two-tailed fashion. 153 subjects (Typbar =116 and Vaccine "X" =37) were studied. 71.6% (95% CI=63.4%-79.8%) and 75.7% (95% CI=64.9% - 89.5%) were the seroconversion rates with Typbar and vaccine "X" respectively. The GMT values for Vi antibodies induced after Typbar and vaccine "X" were 10.23 Typbar and 13.46 mg/mL respectively and these values showed high significance when compared to their respective pre-immunization GMT

  20. Antibody response to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine in Down syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Costa-Carvalho, B T; Martinez, R M A; Dias, A T N; Kubo, C A; Barros-Nunes, P; Leiva, L; Solé, D; Carneiro-Sampaio, M M S; Naspitz, C K; Sorensen, R U

    2006-12-01

    The majority of children with Down syndrome (DS) tend to have frequent bacterial infections including recurrent respiratory infections. Our objective was to evaluate the production of antibodies to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens after active immunization in DS subjects. IgG antibodies to pneumococcal serotypes (1, 3, 6B, 9V, and 14) were measured before and 6 weeks after immunization with a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (Pneumo23, Pasteur-Merrieux) in 6- to 13-year-old DS children (N = 17) and in aged-matched normal controls (N = 30). An adequate response was defined as a 4-fold increase over baseline or a post-immunization level of specific pneumococcal serotype antibody > or = 1.3 microg/mL. After immunization, all DS children had an increase in post-immunization levels against all serotypes analyzed. A 4-fold or more increase was observed in all DS children concerning serotypes 1 and 14, in 90% of subjects for serotypes 3 and 9V, and in 65% for serotype 6B. Regarding this increase, 8 of the 17 DS children had an adequate response to all serotypes analyzed, 8/17 patients to 4 serotypes and 1/17 to 3 serotypes. However, when we compared post-immunization levels between DS children and controls, we observed lower levels in the former group (P < 0.05) for all serotypes except serotype 3. We conclude that pneumococcal polysaccharide immunization could be beneficial for these DS children.

  1. Evidence for a LOS and a capsular polysaccharide in Capnocytophaga canimorsus

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Ittig, Simon J.; Sadovskaya, Irina; Hess, Estelle; Lauber, Frederic; Dol, Melanie; Shin, Hwain; Mally, Manuela; Fiechter, Chantal; Sauder, Ursula; Chami, Mohamed; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2016-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a dog’s and cat’s oral commensal which can cause fatal human infections upon bites or scratches. Infections mainly start with flu-like symptoms but can rapidly evolve in fatal septicaemia with a mortality as high as 40%. Here we present the discovery of a polysaccharide capsule (CPS) at the surface of C. canimorsus 5 (Cc5), a strain isolated from a fulminant septicaemia. We provide genetic and chemical data showing that this capsule is related to the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and probably composed of the same polysaccharide units. A CPS was also found in nine out of nine other strains of C. canimorsus. In addition, the genomes of three of these strains, sequenced previously, contain genes similar to those encoding CPS biosynthesis in Cc5. Thus, the presence of a CPS is likely to be a common property of C. canimorsus. The CPS and not the LOS confers protection against the bactericidal effect of human serum and phagocytosis by macrophages. An antiserum raised against the capsule increased the killing of C. canimorsus by human serum thus showing that anti-capsule antibodies have a protective role. These findings provide a new major element in the understanding of the pathogenesis of C. canimorsus. PMID:27974829

  2. New insight into chondroitin and heparosan-like capsular polysaccharide synthesis by profiling of the nucleotide sugar precursors

    PubMed Central

    di Lauro, Irene; Di Nuzzo, Rosaria; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli K4 and K5 capsular polysaccharides (K4 and K5 CPSs) have been used as starting material for the biotechnological production of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparin (HP) respectively. The CPS covers the outer cell wall but in late exponential or stationary growth phase it is released in the surrounding medium. The released CPS concentration was used, so far, as the only marker to connect the strain production ability to the different cultivation conditions employed. Determining also the intracellular UDP-sugar precursor concentration variations, during the bacterial growth, and correlating it with the total CPS production (as sum of the inner and the released ones), could help to better understand the chain biosynthetic mechanism and its bottlenecks. In the present study, for the first time, a new capillary electrophoresis method was set up to simultaneously analyse the UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc), UDP-galactose (UDP-Gal), UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc), UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcA) and the inner CPS portion, extracted at the same time from the bacterial biomasses; separation was performed at 18°C and 18 kV with a borate-based buffer and detection at 200 nm. The E. coli K4 and K5 UDP-sugar pools were profiled, for the first time, at different time points of shake flask growths on a glycerol-containing medium and on the same medium supplemented with the monosaccharide precursors of the CPSs: their concentrations varied from 0.25 to 11 μM·gcdw−1, according to strain, the type of precursor, the growth phase and the cultivation conditions and their availability dramatically influenced the total CPS produced. PMID:28104792

  3. Antibodies to Staphylococcus aureus Serotype 8 Capsular Polysaccharide React with and Protect against Serotype 5 and 8 Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Saeyoung; Gerber, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Most Staphylococcus aureus isolates produce either a serotype 5 (CP5) or 8 (CP8) capsular polysaccharide, and the CP antigens are targets for vaccine development. Since CP5 and CP8 have similar trisaccharide repeating units, it is important to identify an epitope shared by both CP5 and CP8. To characterize cross-reactivity between CP5 and CP8, the immunogenicity of CP5 and CP8 conjugate vaccines in mice and rabbits was evaluated by serological assays. Immune sera were also tested for functional activity by in vitro opsonophagocytic-killing assays and a murine bacteremia model. Antibodies to the CP5-cross-reactive material 197 (CRM197) conjugate vaccine bound only to purified CP5. In contrast, antibodies to the CP8-CRM conjugate vaccine reacted with CP8 and (to a lesser extent) CP5. De-O-acetylation of CP5 increased its reactivity with CP8 antibodies. Moreover, CP8 antibodies bound to Pseudomonas aeruginosa O11 lipopolysaccharide, which has a trisaccharide repeating unit similar to that of the S. aureus CPs. CP8-CRM antibodies mediated in vitro opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus expressing CP5 or CP8, whereas CP5-CRM antibodies were serotype specific. Passive immunization with antiserum to CP5-CRM or CP8-CRM protected mice against bacteremia induced by a serotype 5 S. aureus isolate, suggesting that CP8-CRM elicits antibodies cross-reactive to CP5. The identification of epitopes shared by CP5 and CP8 may inform the rational design of a vaccine to protect against infections caused by CP5- or CP8-producing strains of S. aureus. PMID:25245803

  4. Sub-MICs of Azithromycin Decrease Biofilm Formation of Streptococcus suis and Increase Capsular Polysaccharide Content of S. suis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-Bei; Chen, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Bai, Jing-Wen; Ding, Wen-Ya; Zhou, Yong-Hui; Chen, Xue-Ying; Liu, Di; Li, Yan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) caused serious disease symptoms in humans and pigs. S. suis is able to form thick biofilms and this increases the difficulty of treatment. After growth with 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of azithromycin, 1/4 MIC of azithromycin, or 1/8 MIC of azithromycin, biofilm formation of S. suis dose-dependently decreased in the present study. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed the obvious effect of azithromycin against biofilm formation of S. suis. Especially, at two different conditions (1/2 MIC of azithromycin non-treated cells and treated cells), we carried out comparative proteomic analyses of cells by using iTRAQ technology. Finally, the results revealed the existence of 19 proteins of varying amounts. Interestingly, several cell surface proteins (such as ATP-binding cassette superfamily ATP-binding cassette transporter (G7SD52), CpsR (K0FG35), Cps1/2H (G8DTL7), CPS16F (E9NQ13), putative uncharacterized protein (G7SER0), NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G5L259), putative uncharacterized protein (G7S2D6), amino acid permease (B0M0G6), and NsuB (G5L351)) were found to be implicated in biofilm formation. More importantly, we also found that azithromycin affected expression of the genes cps1/2H, cpsR and cps16F. Especially, after growth with 1/2 MIC of azithromycin and 1/4 MIC of azithromycin, the capsular polysaccharide content of S. suis was significantly higher. PMID:27812354

  5. Key Role of Capsular Polysaccharide in the Induction of Systemic Infection and Abortion by Hypervirulent Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Orhan; Terhorst, Samantha A; Burrough, Eric R; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Zuowei; Dai, Lei; Tang, Yizhi; Plummer, Paul J; Ji, Ju; Yaeger, Michael J; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic pathogen, and a hypervirulent clone, named clone SA, has recently emerged as the predominant cause of ovine abortion in the United States. To induce abortion, orally ingested Campylobacter must translocate across the intestinal epithelium, spread systemically in the circulation, and reach the fetoplacental tissue. Bacterial factors involved in these steps are not well understood. C. jejuni is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS), but the specific role that CPS plays in systemic infection and particularly abortion in animals remains to be determined. In this study, we evaluated the role of CPS in bacteremia using a mouse model and in abortion using a pregnant guinea pig model following oral challenge. Compared with C. jejuni NCTC 11168 and 81-176, a clone SA isolate (IA3902) resulted in significantly higher bacterial counts and a significantly longer duration of bacteremia in mice. The loss of capsule production via gene-specific mutagenesis in IA3902 led to the complete abolishment of bacteremia in mice and abortion in pregnant guinea pigs, while complementation of capsule expression almost fully restored these phenotypes. The capsule mutant strain was also impaired for survival in guinea pig sera and sheep blood. Sequence-based analyses revealed that clone SA possesses a unique CPS locus with a mosaic structure, which has been stably maintained in all clone SA isolates derived from various hosts and times. These findings establish CPS as a key virulence factor for the induction of systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals and provide a viable candidate for the development of vaccines against hypervirulent C. jejuni. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Induction of functional secretory IgA responses in breast milk, by pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Finn, Adam; Zhang, Qibo; Seymour, Lynn; Fasching, Claudine; Pettitt, Emily; Janoff, Edward N

    2002-11-15

    Capsule-specific secretory IgA (s-IgA) in breast milk may enhance protection against pneumococcal disease in infants. After immunization of 3 lactating mothers with 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine, specific s-IgA, but not IgG, increased by >2-fold in milk of at least 1 subject for 6 of 7 serotypes. The s-IgA was predominantly IgA1, in secretory form, and highly specific with avidity distinct from serum IgA and IgG. Milk whey from 2 immunized women supported dose- and complement-dependent killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 19F and 14 by human neutrophils, as did purified s-IgA to serotype 19F. These data reveal that capsule-specific human s-IgA in breast milk can initiate killing of S. pneumoniae, providing proof of concept that vaccine-induced human mucosal s-IgA can support functional bactericidal activity. Determining the biologic role for s-IgA in killing and inhibiting adherence of S. pneumoniae in vivo will contribute to the development of mucosal vaccines against S. pneumoniae.

  7. Capsular polysaccharide from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides shows potential for protection against contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mwirigi, Martin; Nkando, Isabel; Olum, Moses; Attah-Poku, Samuel; Ochanda, Horace; Berberov, Emil; Potter, Andrew; Gerdts, Volker; Perez-Casal, Jose; Wesonga, Hezron; Soi, Reuben; Naessens, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a severe respiratory disease caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) which is widespread in Africa. The capsule polysaccharide (CPS) of Mmm is one of the few identified virulence determinants. In a previous study, immunization of mice against CPS generated antibodies, but they were not able to prevent multiplication of Mmm in this model animal. However, mice cannot be considered as a suitable animal model, as Mmm does not induce pathology in this species. Our aim was to induce antibody responses to CPS in cattle, and challenge them when they had specific CPS antibody titres similar or higher than those from cattle vaccinated with the live vaccine. The CPS was linked to the carrier protein ovalbumin via a carbodiimide-mediated condensation with 1-ethyl-3(3-imethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Ten animals were immunized twice and challenged three weeks after the booster inoculation, and compared to a group of challenged non-immunized cattle. When administered subcutaneously to adult cattle, the vaccine elicited CPS-specific antibody responses with the same or a higher titre than animals vaccinated with the live vaccine. Pathology in the group of immunized animals was significantly reduced (57%) after challenge with Mmm strain Afadé compared to the non-immunized group, a figure in the range of the protection provided by the live vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapeutic properties in Tunisian hot springs: first evidence of phenolic compounds in the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. biomass, capsular polysaccharides and releasing polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Lamia; Mnari, Amira; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Abid-Essafi, Salwa; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-12-13

    In Tunisia, the use of hot spring waters for both health and recreation is a tradition dating back to Roman times. In fact, thermal baths, usually called "Hammam" are recommended as a therapeutic and prophylactic measure against many types of illness and toxicity. While the chemical concentration of thermal water is admittedly associated with its therapeutic effects, the inclusion in spa waters of efficient bioproduct additives produced by photosynthetic microorganisms and that act against oxidative stress may comprise a significant supplementary value for thermal centers. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant potential of the Tunisian thermophilic cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. and to determine its phytochemical constituents and phenolic profile. BME (Biomass Methanolic Extract), CME (Capsular polysaccharides Methanolic Extract) and RME (Releasing polysaccharides Methanolic Extract) of Leptolyngbya sp. were examined for their antioxidant activities by means of DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging and ferrous ion chelating assays. Their total phenols, flavonoids, carotenoids, Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and vitamin C contents, as well as their phenolic profiles were also determined. BME has the highest content of phenols (139 ± 1.2 mg/g), flavonoids (34.9 ± 0.32 mg CEQ/g), carotenoids (2.03 ± 0.56 mg/g) and vitamin C (15.7 ± 1.55 mg/g), while the highest MAAs content (0.42 ± 0.03 mg/g) was observed in CME. BME presented both the highest DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging ability with an IC50 of 0.07 and 0.38 mg/ml, respectively. The highest ferrous chelating capacity was detected in CME with an IC50 = 0.59 mg/ml. Phenolic profiles revealed the presence of 25 phenolic compounds with the existence of hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, resveratrol and pinoresinol. The study demonstrated that the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. possesses abundant natural antioxidant products which may have prophylactic and

  9. Impaired Function of Antibodies to Pneumococcal Surface Protein A but Not to Capsular Polysaccharide in Mexican American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Christine E.; Brown, Eric L.; Martinez, Perla J.; Bagaria, Upasana; Nahm, Moon H.; Burton, Robert L.; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the study was to determine baseline protective titers of antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae surface protein A (PspA) and capsular polysaccharide in individuals with and individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 561 individuals (131 individuals with diabetes and 491 without) were screened for antibodies to PspA using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A subset of participants with antibodies to PspA were retested using a WHO ELISA to determine titers of antibodies to capsular polysaccharide (CPS) (serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F). Functional activity of antibodies was measured by assessing their ability to enhance complement (C3) deposition on pneumococci and promote killing of opsonized pneumococci. Titers of antibodies to protein antigens (PspA) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than controls without diabetes (P = 0.01), and antibodies showed a significantly reduced complement deposition ability (P = 0.02). Both antibody titers and complement deposition were negatively associated with hyperglycemia. Conversely, titers of antibodies to capsular polysaccharides were either comparable between the two groups or were significantly higher in individuals with diabetes, as was observed for CPS 14 (P = 0.05). The plasma specimens from individuals with diabetes also demonstrated a higher opsonophagocytic index against CPS serotype 14. Although we demonstrate comparable protective titers of antibodies to CPS in individuals with and individuals without diabetes, those with diabetes had lower PspA titers and poor opsonic activity strongly associated with hyperglycemia. These results suggest a link between diabetes and impairment of antibody response. PMID:22761295

  10. Differential idiotype utilization for the in vivo type 14 capsular polysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin responses to intact Streptococcus pneumoniae versus a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Chen, Quanyi; Liu, Leyu; Lucas, Alexander H.; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2012-01-01

    Murine IgG responses specific for the capsular polysaccharide (PPS14) of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 (Pn14) induced in response to intact Pn14 or a PPS14-protein conjugate are both dependent on CD4+ T cell help, but appear to utilize marginal zone versus follicular B cells, respectively. Here we identify an idiotype (44.1-Id) that dominates the PPS14-specific IgG, but not IgM, responses to intact Pn14, isolated PPS14 and Group B Streptococcus (strain COH1-11) expressing capsular polysaccharide structurally identical to PPS14. The 44.1-Id is however not expressed in the repertoire of natural PPS14-specific antibodies. In distinct contrast, PPS14-specific IgG responses to a soluble PPS14-protein conjugate exhibits minimal usage of the 44.1-Id, although significant 44.1-Id expression is elicited in response to conjugate attached to particles. The 44.1-Id elicited in response to intact Pn14 was expressed in similar proportions among all 4 IgG subclasses during both the primary and secondary responses. 44.1-Id usage was linked to the Igha, but not Ighb, allotype and was associated with induction of relatively high total PPS14-specific IgG responses. In contrast to PPS14-protein conjugate, avidity maturation of the 44.1-Id-dominant PPS14-specific IgG responses were limited, even during the highly boosted T cell-dependent PPS14-specific secondary responses to COH1-11. These results indicate that different antigenic forms of the same capsular polysaccharide can recruit distinct B cell clones expressing characteristic idiotypes under genetic control, and suggest that the 44.1-Id is derived from marginal zone B cells. PMID:22706079

  11. Methamphetamine enhances Cryptococcus neoformans pulmonary infection and dissemination to the brain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhavan; Desai, Gunjan M; Frases, Susana; Cordero, Radames J B; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Martinez, Luis R

    2013-07-30

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a major addictive drug of abuse in the United States and worldwide, and its use is linked to HIV acquisition. The encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common cause of fungal meningitis in patients with AIDS. In addition to functioning as a central nervous system stimulant, METH has diverse effects on host immunity. Using a systemic mouse model of infection and in vitro assays in order to critically assess the impact of METH on C. neoformans pathogenesis, we demonstrate that METH stimulates fungal adhesion, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) release, and biofilm formation in the lungs. Interestingly, structural analysis of the capsular polysaccharide of METH-exposed cryptococci revealed that METH alters the carbohydrate composition of this virulence factor, an event of adaptation to external stimuli that can be advantageous to the fungus during pathogenesis. Additionally, we show that METH promotes C. neoformans dissemination from the respiratory tract into the brain parenchyma. Our findings provide novel evidence of the impact of METH abuse on host homeostasis and increased permissiveness to opportunistic microorganisms. Methamphetamine (METH) is a major health threat to our society, as it adversely changes people's behavior, as well as increases the risk for the acquisition of diverse infectious diseases, particularly those that enter through the respiratory tract or skin. This report investigates the effects of METH use on pulmonary infection by the AIDS-related fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. This drug of abuse stimulates colonization and biofilm formation in the lungs, followed by dissemination of the fungus to the central nervous system. Notably, C. neoformans modifies its capsular polysaccharide after METH exposure, highlighting the fungus's ability to adapt to environmental stimuli, a possible explanation for its pathogenesis. The findings may translate into new knowledge and development of therapeutic and public health

  12. Group B Streptococcus Capsular Polysaccharide-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Conjugate Vaccines Prepared by Different Methods for Intranasal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xuzhuang; Lagergård, Teresa; Yang, Yonghong; Lindblad, Marianne; Fredriksson, Margareta; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS III) was conjugated to recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (rCTB) using three different methods which employed (i) cystamine and N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP), (ii) carbodiimide with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as a spacer, or (iii) reductive amination (RA). The CPS III-rCTB conjugates were divided into large- and small-molecular-weight (Mr) fractions, and the immunogenicities of the different preparations after intranasal (i.n.) immunization were studied in mice. Both large- and small-Mr conjugates of CPS III-rCTBRA or CPS III-rCTBADH induced high, almost comparable levels of CPS-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum, lungs, and vagina that were generally superior to those obtained with CPS III-rCTBSPDP conjugates or a CPS III and rCTB mixture. However, the smaller-Mr conjugates of CPS III-rCTBRA or CPS III-rCTBADH in most cases elicited a lower anti-CPS IgA immune response than the large-Mr conjugates, and the highest anti-CPS IgA titers in both tissues and serum were obtained with the large-Mr CPS III-rCTBRA conjugate. Serum IgG anti-CPS titers induced by the CPS III-rCTBRA conjugate had high levels of specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 antibodies. Based on the effectiveness of RA for coupling CPS III to rCTB, RA was also tested for conjugating GBS CPS Ia with rCTB. As for the CPS III-rCTB conjugates, the immunogenicity of CPS Ia was greatly increased by conjugation to rCTB. Intranasal immunization with a combination of CPS Ia-rCTB and CPS III-rCTB conjugates was shown to induce anti-CPS Ia and III immune responses in serum and lungs that were fully comparable with the responses to immunization with the monovalent CPS Ia-rCTB or CPS III-rCTB conjugates. These results suggest that the GBS CPS III-rCTB and CPS Ia-rCTB conjugates prepared by the RA method may be used in bivalent and possibly also in multivalent mucosal GBS conjugate vaccines. PMID:11119518

  13. A Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) vaccine and CP-specific antibodies protect mice against bacterial challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A I; Sarwar, J; Ortiz, A; Naso, R

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of capsular polysaccharide (CP)-specific antibodies elicited by active immunization with vaccines composed of Staphylococcus aureus types 5 and 8 CP linked to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A or with immune immunoglobulin G (I-IgG) obtained from vaccinated plasma donors was tested in lethal and sublethal bacterial mouse challenge models. A dose of 2 x 10(5) CFU of S. aureus type 5 CP per mouse administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 5% hog mucin was found to cause 80 to 100% mortality in BALB/c mice within 2 to 5 days. Mice passively immunized i.p. 24 h earlier or subcutaneously 48 h earlier with 0.5 ml of I-IgG showed significantly higher average survival rates than animals receiving standard IgG or saline (P < 0.01) following the bacterial challenge. Animals actively immunized with the monovalent type 5 CP-P. aeruginosa exoprotein A conjugate showed a survival rate of 73% compared with 13% in phosphate-buffered saline-immunized animals. The prechallenge geometric mean titer of type 5 CP antibodies in animals that died was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of animals which survived the challenge (95.7 versus 223.6 micrograms/ml, respectively). The IgG was further evaluated in mice challenged i.p. with a sublethal dose of 5 x 10(4) CFU per mouse. Serial blood counts were performed on surviving animals at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. Surviving animals were sacrificed at 72 h, and bacterial counts were performed on their kidneys, livers, and peritoneal lavage fluids. Animals receiving I-IgG had lower bacterial counts in blood samples and lower bacterial densities in kidneys, livers, and peritoneal lavage samples than mice immunized with standard IgG (P < 0.05). These data suggest that S. aureus type 5 CP antibodies induced by active immunization or administered by passive immunization confer protection against S. aureus infections. PMID:8613375

  14. The capsular polysaccharide of Staphylococcus aureus is attached to peptidoglycan by the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) family of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne Gar-Yun; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-05-30

    Envelope biogenesis in bacteria involves synthesis of intermediates that are tethered to the lipid carrier undecaprenol-phosphate. LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) enzymes have been proposed to catalyze the transfer of undecaprenol-linked intermediates onto the C6-hydroxyl of MurNAc in peptidoglycan, thereby promoting attachment of wall teichoic acid (WTA) in bacilli and staphylococci and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) in streptococci. S. aureus encodes three lcp enzymes, and a variant lacking all three genes (Δlcp) releases WTA from the bacterial envelope and displays a growth defect. Here, we report that the type 5 capsular polysaccharide (CP5) of Staphylococcus aureus Newman is covalently attached to the glycan strands of peptidoglycan. Cell wall attachment of CP5 is abrogated in the Δlcp variant, a defect that is best complemented via expression of lcpC in trans. CP5 synthesis and peptidoglycan attachment are not impaired in the tagO mutant, suggesting that CP5 synthesis does not involve the GlcNAc-ManNAc linkage unit of WTA and may instead utilize another Wzy-type ligase to assemble undecaprenyl-phosphate intermediates. Thus, LCP enzymes of S. aureus are promiscuous enzymes that attach secondary cell wall polymers with discrete linkage units to peptidoglycan.

  15. Recognition of flavin mononucleotide, Haemophilus influenzae type b and its capsular polysaccharide vaccines by antibodies specific to D-ribitol-5-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Ravi, G; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2014-11-01

    D-Ribitol-5-phosphate (Rbt-5-P) is an important metabolite in the pentose phosphate pathway and an integral part of bacterial cell wall polysaccharides, specifically as polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP) in Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). The major objective of this study was to investigate whether an antibody specific to Rbt-5-P can recognize the PRP of Hib. D-Ribose-5-phosphate was reacted with proteins in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride to obtain Rbt-5-P epitopes; 120 h reaction resulted in conjugation of ~30 and ~17 moles of Rbt-5-P/mole of BSA and OVA, respectively, based on decrease in amino groups, MALDI-TOF analyses, an increase in apparent molecular weight (SDS-PAGE) and glycoprotein staining. Immunization of rabbits with Rbt-5-P-BSA conjugate generated antibodies to Rbt-5-P as demonstrated by dot immunoblot and non-competitive ELISA. Homogeneous Rbt-5-P-specific antibody was purified from Rbt-5-P-BSA antiserum subjected to caprylic acid precipitation followed by hapten-affinity chromatography; its affinity constant is 7.1 × 10(8) M(-1). Rbt-5-P antibody showed 100 % specificity to Rbt-5-P, ~230 %, 10 % and 3.4 % cross-reactivity to FMN, riboflavin and FAD, respectively; the antibody showed ~4 % cross-reactivity to D-ribitol and <3 % to other sugars/sugar alcohols. Rbt-5-P-specific antibody recognized Hib conjugate vaccines containing PRP which was inhibited specifically by Rbt-5-P, and also detected Hib cell-surface capsular polysaccharides by immunofluorescence. In conclusion, Rbt-5-P-protein conjugate used as an immunogen elicited antibodies binding to an epitope also present in PRP and Hib bacteria. Rbt-5-P-specific antibody has potential applications in the detection and quantification of free/bound Rbt-5-P and FMN as well as immunological recognition of Hib bacteria and its capsular polysaccharide.

  16. The contribution of naturally occurring IgM antibodies, IgM cross-reactivity and complement dependency in murine humoral responses to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hannah E; Taylor, Philip R; McGreal, Eamon; Zamze, Susanne; Wong, Simon Y C

    2009-09-25

    Immunogenicity of 12 capsular polysaccharides (CPS) from Streptococcus pneumoniae did not correlate with pre-existing levels of natural IgM anti-CPS antibodies in mice. Immunization of mice with individual CPS, with the exception of type 14 (the only neutral CPS tested), increased serum IgM that also bound other CPS serotypes independent of structural similarity or commonly known contaminants. Surprisingly only IgM response to type 4 (which has a small immunodominant epitope) was dependent on either complement C3 or complement receptors CD35/CD21. IgG anti-CPS responses were infrequently induced, but critically dependent on complement. Our results have clarified the role of complement in the induction of IgM and IgG anti-CPS antibody responses in mice and have implications for CPS vaccine development.

  17. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a DNA region involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis reveals the molecular basis of the nontypeability of two Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroya; Ogawa, Torata; Fukamizu, Dai; Morinaga, Yuiko; Kusumoto, Masahiro

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study was to reveal the molecular basis of the serologic nontypeability of 2 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae field isolates. Nine field strains of A. pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, were isolated from pigs raised on the same farm and sent to our diagnostic laboratory for serotyping. Seven of the 9 strains were identified as serovar 15 strains by immunodiffusion tests. However, 2 strains, designated FH24-2 and FH24-5, could not be serotyped with antiserum prepared against serovars 1-15. Strain FH24-5 showed positive results in 2 serovar 15-specific PCR tests, whereas strain FH24-2 was only positive in 1 of the 2 PCR tests. The nucleotide sequence analysis of gene clusters involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis of the 2 nontypeable strains revealed that both had been rendered nontypeable by the action of ISApl1, a transposable element of A. pleuropneumoniae belonging to the IS30 family. The results showed that ISApl1 of A. pleuropneumoniae can interfere with both the serologic and molecular typing methods, and that nucleotide sequence analysis across the capsular gene clusters is the best means of determining the cause of serologic nontypeability in A. pleuropneumoniae. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Regulated expression of polysaccharide utilization and capsular biosynthesis loci in biofilm and planktonic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during growth in chemostats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a prominent member of the human distal gut microbiota that specializes in breaking down diet and host-derived polysaccharides. While polysaccharide utilization has been well studied in B. thetaiotaomicron, other aspects of its behavior are less well characterized, in...

  19. Cloning of type 8 capsule genes and analysis of gene clusters for the production of different capsular polysaccharides in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sau, S; Lee, C Y

    1996-04-01

    Eleven serotypes of capsular polysaccharide from Staphylococcus aureus have been reported. We have previously cloned a cluster of type 1 capsule (cap1) genes responsible for type 1 capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis in S. aureus M. To clone the type 8 capsule (cap8) genes, a plasmid library of type 8 strain Becker was screened with a labelled DNA fragment containing the cap1 genes under low-stringency conditions. One recombinant plasmid containing a 14-kb insert was chosen for further study and found to complement 14 of the 18 type 8 capsule-negative (Cap8-) mutants used in the study. Additional library screening, subcloning, and complementation experiments showed that all of the 18 Cap8- mutants were complemented by DNA fragments derived from a 20.5-kb contiguous region of the Becker chromosome. The mutants were mapped into six complementation groups, indicating that the cap8 genes are clustered. By Southern hybridization analyses under high-stringency conditions, we found that DNA fragments containing the cap8 gene cluster show extensive homology with all 17 strains tested, including type 1 strains. By further Southern analyses and cloning of the cap8-related homolog from strain M, we show that strain M carries an additional capsule gene cluster different from the cap1 gene cluster. In addition, by using DNA fragments containing different regions of the cap8 gene cluster as probes to hybridize DNA from different strains, we found that the central region of the cap8 gene cluster hybridizes only to DNAs from certain strains tested whereas the flanking regions hybridize to DNAs of all strains tested. Thus, the cap8 gene clusters and its closely related homologs are likely to have organizations similar to those of the encapsulation genes of other bacterial systems.

  20. Tts, a processive beta-glucosyltransferase of Streptococcus pneumoniae, directs the synthesis of the branched type 37 capsular polysaccharide in Pneumococcus and other gram-positive species.

    PubMed

    Llull, D; Garcia, E; Lopez, R

    2001-06-15

    The type 37 capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a homopolysaccharide built up from repeating units of [beta-d-Glcp-(1-->2)]-beta-d-Glcp-(1-->3). The elements governing the expression of the tts gene, coding for the glucosyltransferase involved in the synthesis of the type 37 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide, have been studied. Primer extension analysis and functional tests demonstrated the presence of four new transcriptional start points upstream of the previously reported tts promoter (ttsp). Most interesting, three of these transcriptional start points are located in a RUP element thought to be involved in recombinational events (Oggioni, M. R., and Claverys, J. P. (1999) Microbiology 145, 2647-2653). Transformation experiments using either a recombinant plasmid containing the whole transcriptional unit of tts or chromosomal DNA from a type 37 pneumococcus showed that tts is the only gene required to drive the biosynthesis of a type 37 capsule in S. pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, namely Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Bacillus subtilis. The Tts synthase was overproduced in S. pneumoniae and purified as a membrane-associated enzyme. These membrane preparations used UDP-Glc as substrate to catalyze the synthesis of a high molecular weight polysaccharide immunologically identical to the type 37 capsule. In addition, UDP-Gal was also a substrate to produce type 37 polysaccharide since a strong UDP-Glc-4'-epimerase activity is associated to the membrane fraction of S. pneumoniae. These results indicated that Tts has a dual biochemical activity that leads to the synthesis of the branched type 37 polysaccharide.

  1. Vibrio cholerae O139 Conjugate Vaccines: Synthesis and Immunogenicity of V. cholerae O139 Capsular Polysaccharide Conjugates with Recombinant Diphtheria Toxin Mutant in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kossaczka, Zuzana; Shiloach, Joseph; Johnson, Virginia; Taylor, David N.; Finkelstein, Richard A.; Robbins, John B.; Szu, Shousun C.

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data provide evidence that a critical level of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the surface polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O1 (lipopolysaccharide) and of Vibrio cholerae O139 (capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) is associated with immunity to the homologous pathogen. The immunogenicity of polysaccharides, especially in infants, may be enhanced by their covalent attachment to proteins (conjugates). Two synthetic schemes, involving 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents, were adapted to prepare four conjugates of V. cholerae O139 CPS with the recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant, CRMH21G. Adipic acid dihydrazide was used as a linker. When injected subcutaneously into young outbred mice by a clinically relevant dose and schedule, these conjugates elicited serum CPS antibodies of the IgG and IgM classes with vibriocidal activity to strains of capsulated V. cholerae O139. Treatment of these sera with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) reduced, but did not eliminate, their vibriocidal activity. These results indicate that the conjugates elicited IgG with vibriocidal activity. Conjugates also elicited high levels of serum diphtheria toxin IgG. Convalescent sera from 20 cholera patients infected with V. cholerae O139 had vibriocidal titers ranging from 100 to 3,200: absorption with the CPS reduced the vibriocidal titer of all sera to ≤50. Treatment with 2-ME reduced the titers of 17 of 20 patients to ≤50. These data show that, like infection with V. cholerae O1, infection with V. cholerae O139 induces vibriocidal antibodies specific to the surface polysaccharide of this bacterium (CPS) that are mostly of IgM class. Based on these data, clinical trials with the V. cholerae O139 CPS conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin are planned. PMID:10948122

  2. Distribution of the O-acetyl groups and β-galactofuranose units in galactoxylomannans of the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Previato, Jose O; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Maes, Emmanuel; Fonseca, Leonardo M; Guerardel, Yann; Oliveira, Priscila A V; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia

    2016-12-16

    Galactoxylomannans (GalXMs) are a mixture of neutral and acidic capsular polysaccharides produced by the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans that exhibit potent suppressive effects on the host immune system. Previous studies describing the chemical structure of C. neoformans GalXMs have reported species without O-acetyl substituents. Herein we describe that C. neoformans grown in capsule-inducing medium produces highly O-acetylated GalXMs. The location of the O-acetyl groups was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the neutral GalXM (NGalXM), 80% of 3-linked mannose (α-Manp) residues present in side chains are acetylated at the O-2 position. In the acidic GalXM also termed glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal), 85% of the 3-linked α-Manp residues are acetylated either in the O-2 (75%) or in the O-6 (25%) position, but O-acetyl groups are not present at both positions simultaneously. In addition, NMR spectroscopy and methylation analysis showed that β-galactofuranose (β-Galf) units are linked to O-2 and O-3 positions of nonbranched α-galactopyranose (α-Galp) units present in the GalXMs backbone chain. These findings highlight new structural features of C. neoformans GalXMs. Among these features, the high degree of O-acetylation is of particular interest, since O-acetyl group-containing polysaccharides are known to possess a range of immunobiological activities.

  3. Combinatorial Library Cloning of Human Antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharides: Variable Region Primary Structures and Evidence for Somatic Mutation of Fab Fragments Specific for Capsular Serotypes 6B, 14, and 23F

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Alexander H.; Moulton, Karen D.; Tang, Vanessa R.; Reason, Donald C.

    2001-01-01

    Antibodies specific for capsular polysaccharides play a central role in immunity to encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae, but little is known about their genetics or the variable (V) region polymorphisms that affect their protective function. To begin to address these issues, we used combinatorial library cloning to isolate pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS)-specific Fab fragments from two vaccinated adults. We determined complete V region primary structures and performed antigen binding analyses of seven Fab fragments specific for PPS serotype 6B, 14, or 23F. Fabs were of the immunoglobulin G2 or A isotype. Several VHIII gene segments (HV 3-7, 3-15, 3-23, and 3-11) were identified. VL regions were encoded by several κ genes (KV 4-1, 3-15, 2-24, and 2D-29) and a λ gene (LV 1-51). Deviation of the VH and VL regions from their assigned germ line counterparts indicated that they were somatically mutated. Fabs of the same serotype specificity isolated from a single individual differed in affinity, and these differences could be accounted for either by the extent of mutation among clonal relatives or by usage of different V-region genes. Thus, functionally disparate anti-PPS antibodies can arise within individuals both by activation of independent clones and by intraclonal somatic mutation. For one pair of clonally related Fabs, the more extensively mutated VH was associated with lower affinity for PPS 14, a result suggesting that somatic mutation could lead to diminished protective efficacy. These findings indicate that the PPS repertoire in the adult derives from memory B-cell populations that have class switched and undergone extensive hypermutation. PMID:11159978

  4. Characterization of the antigenicity of Cpl1, a surface protein of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jian-Piao; Liu, Ling-Li; To, Kelvin K W; Lau, Candy C Y; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Guo, Yong-Hui; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Che, Xiao-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is an important fungal pathogen. The capsule is a well established virulence factor and a target site for diagnostic tests. The CPL1 gene is required for capsular formation and virulence. The protein product Cpl1 has been proposed to be a secreted protein, but the characteristics of this protein have not been reported. Here we sought to characterize Cpl1. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Cpl1 of C. neoformans var. neoformans and the Cpl1 orthologs identified in C. neoformans var. grubii and C. gattii formed a distinct cluster among related fungi; while the putative ortholog found in Trichosporon asahii was distantly related to the Cryptococcus cluster. We expressed Cpl1 abundantly as a secreted His-tagged protein in Pichia pastoris. The protein was used to immunize guinea pigs and rabbits for high titer mono-specific polyclonal antibody that was shown to be highly specific against the cell wall of C. neoformans var. neoformans and did not cross react with C. gattii, T. asahii, Aspergillus spp., Candida spp. and Penicillium spp. Using the anti-Cpl1 antibody, we detected Cpl1 protein in the fresh culture supernatant of C. neoformans var. neoformans and we showed by immunostaining that the Cpl1 protein was located on the surface. The Cpl1 protein is a specific surface protein of C. neoformans var. neoformans.

  5. Gene content and diversity of the loci encoding biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides of the 15 serovar reference strains of Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Howell, Kate J; Weinert, Lucy A; Luan, Shi-Lu; Peters, Sarah E; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Harris, David; Angen, Oystein; Aragon, Virginia; Parkhill, Julian; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew N; Wren, Brendan W; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2013-09-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease of pigs, and is also associated with pneumonia. H. parasuis can be classified into 15 different serovars. Here we report, from the 15 serotyping reference strains, the DNA sequences of the loci containing genes for the biosynthesis of the group 1 capsular polysaccharides, which are potential virulence factors of this bacterium. We contend that these loci contain genes for polysaccharide capsule structures, and not a lipopolysaccharide O antigen, supported by the fact that they contain genes such as wza, wzb, and wzc, which are associated with the export of polysaccharide capsules in the current capsule classification system. A conserved region at the 3' end of the locus, containing the wza, ptp, wzs, and iscR genes, is consistent with the characteristic export region 1 of the model group 1 capsule locus. A potential serovar-specific region (region 2) has been found by comparing the predicted coding sequences (CDSs) in all 15 loci for synteny and homology. The region is unique to each reference strain with the exception of those in serovars 5 and 12, which are identical in terms of gene content. The identification and characterization of this locus among the 15 serovars is the first step in understanding the genetic, molecular, and structural bases of serovar specificity in this poorly studied but important pathogen and opens up the possibility of developing an improved molecular serotyping system, which would greatly assist diagnosis and control of Glässer's disease.

  6. Gene Content and Diversity of the Loci Encoding Biosynthesis of Capsular Polysaccharides of the 15 Serovar Reference Strains of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Luan, Shi-Lu; Peters, Sarah E.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Harris, David; Angen, Øystein; Aragon, Virginia; Parkhill, Julian; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease of pigs, and is also associated with pneumonia. H. parasuis can be classified into 15 different serovars. Here we report, from the 15 serotyping reference strains, the DNA sequences of the loci containing genes for the biosynthesis of the group 1 capsular polysaccharides, which are potential virulence factors of this bacterium. We contend that these loci contain genes for polysaccharide capsule structures, and not a lipopolysaccharide O antigen, supported by the fact that they contain genes such as wza, wzb, and wzc, which are associated with the export of polysaccharide capsules in the current capsule classification system. A conserved region at the 3′ end of the locus, containing the wza, ptp, wzs, and iscR genes, is consistent with the characteristic export region 1 of the model group 1 capsule locus. A potential serovar-specific region (region 2) has been found by comparing the predicted coding sequences (CDSs) in all 15 loci for synteny and homology. The region is unique to each reference strain with the exception of those in serovars 5 and 12, which are identical in terms of gene content. The identification and characterization of this locus among the 15 serovars is the first step in understanding the genetic, molecular, and structural bases of serovar specificity in this poorly studied but important pathogen and opens up the possibility of developing an improved molecular serotyping system, which would greatly assist diagnosis and control of Glässer's disease. PMID:23873912

  7. Phase II, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a polyclonal anti-Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin in treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Mark E; Holley, H Preston; Lutz, Jon; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Woods, Christopher W; Levine, Donald P; Veney, Naomi; Fowler, Vance G

    2007-12-01

    New treatment modalities are needed for the treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin (Altastaph) is a polyclonal immune globulin preparation that is being developed as adjunctive therapy for persons with S. aureus infections complicated by bacteremia. In a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 40 subjects with documented S. aureus bacteremia received standard therapy plus either Altastaph at 200 mg/kg of body weight in each of two infusions 24 h apart or placebo. During the 42-day observation period, antibody pharmacokinetics and safety were the primary characteristics studied. Information regarding the resolution of bacteremia and fever was also analyzed. Anti-type-5 and anti-type-8 capsular antibody levels peaked after the second infusion at 550 mug/ml and 419 mug/ml, respectively, and remained above 100 mug/ml at day 28. A total of 316 adverse events were noted in 39 of 40 subjects. Infusion-related adverse events in Altastaph recipients were infrequent and similar to those among recipients of commercial intravenously administered immunoglobulin G products. Five of 21 (23%) subjects in the Altastaph group died, whereas 2 of 18 (11%) subjects in the placebo group died (P = 0.42). Compared to the control patients, the Altastaph recipients had a shorter median time to the resolution of fever (2 days and 7 days, respectively; P = 0.09) and a shorter length of hospital stay (9 days and 14 days, respectively; P = 0.03). However, these findings are exploratory, and there were few differences in the other variables measured. High levels of opsonizing antibodies were maintained for the initial 4 weeks. Although the study was not powered to show efficacy, these preliminary findings and safety profile suggest that Altastaph may be an effective adjunct to antibiotics and warrants further investigation (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00063089).

  8. Clinical streptococcal isolates, distinct from Streptococcus pneumoniae, but containing the β-glucosyltransferase tts gene and expressing serotype 37 capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Carmen L; Kapatai, Georgia; Broughton, Karen; Schaefer, Ulf; Hannah, Matthew; Litt, David J; Fry, Norman K

    2017-01-01

    The major virulence factor of the pneumococcus, and target for conjugate vaccines, is the polysaccharide capsule, which is usually encoded by the highly variable cps locus. Serotype 37 is an unusual pneumococcal type in which the single β-glucosyltransferase gene responsible for serotype capsule production (tts) is located outside of the capsular operon region. Using a previously described automated whole genome sequence (WGS)-based serotyping bioinformatics tool, PneumoCaT, we identified and investigated seven clinical isolates (three from blood cultures) of non-pneumococcal streptococci containing a highly homologous tts and included them in a study panel of 20 isolates which included a 11 further clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae serotype 37, a reference strain of serotype 37 and the S. pseudopneumoniae type strain BAA 960(T). The seven non-pneumococcal isolates generated novel alleles at all pneumococcal MLST loci and gave low percentage similarity (<45%) to S. pneumoniae or S. pseudopneumoniae species by comparison of short sequence patterns in genomic data (k-mer analysis). The S. pseudopneumoniae BAA-960(T) isolate generated two novel alleles in the MLST and gave a high similarity (>99%) to the reference sequence for BAA-960(T). Twelve isolates gave high similarity (>77%) to the Streptococcus pneumoniae 5652-06 serotype 19A reference genome sequence and had previously reported MLST alleles. Each of the seven clinical non-pneumococcal strains and all of the 12 S. pneumoniae possessed a β-glycosyltransferase gene (tts) with >95% similarity to the pneumococcal tts reference DNA sequence with 20-22 non-synonymous SNPs. All but two strains in which the tts gene was detected gave positive reactions for serotype 37 in slide agglutination tests with serotype 37 typing sera. Phylogenetic analysis using both SNP and MLST data showed distinct clades corresponding to strains identified as pneumococcus or non-pneumococcus by kmer WGS analysis. Extended k

  9. Clinical streptococcal isolates, distinct from Streptococcus pneumoniae, but containing the β-glucosyltransferase tts gene and expressing serotype 37 capsular polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kapatai, Georgia; Broughton, Karen; Schaefer, Ulf; Hannah, Matthew; Litt, David J.; Fry, Norman K.

    2017-01-01

    The major virulence factor of the pneumococcus, and target for conjugate vaccines, is the polysaccharide capsule, which is usually encoded by the highly variable cps locus. Serotype 37 is an unusual pneumococcal type in which the single β-glucosyltransferase gene responsible for serotype capsule production (tts) is located outside of the capsular operon region. Using a previously described automated whole genome sequence (WGS)-based serotyping bioinformatics tool, PneumoCaT, we identified and investigated seven clinical isolates (three from blood cultures) of non-pneumococcal streptococci containing a highly homologous tts and included them in a study panel of 20 isolates which included a 11 further clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae serotype 37, a reference strain of serotype 37 and the S. pseudopneumoniae type strain BAA 960T. The seven non-pneumococcal isolates generated novel alleles at all pneumococcal MLST loci and gave low percentage similarity (<45%) to S. pneumoniae or S. pseudopneumoniae species by comparison of short sequence patterns in genomic data (k-mer analysis). The S. pseudopneumoniae BAA-960T isolate generated two novel alleles in the MLST and gave a high similarity (>99%) to the reference sequence for BAA-960T. Twelve isolates gave high similarity (>77%) to the Streptococcus pneumoniae 5652-06 serotype 19A reference genome sequence and had previously reported MLST alleles. Each of the seven clinical non-pneumococcal strains and all of the 12 S. pneumoniae possessed a β-glycosyltransferase gene (tts) with >95% similarity to the pneumococcal tts reference DNA sequence with 20–22 non-synonymous SNPs. All but two strains in which the tts gene was detected gave positive reactions for serotype 37 in slide agglutination tests with serotype 37 typing sera. Phylogenetic analysis using both SNP and MLST data showed distinct clades corresponding to strains identified as pneumococcus or non-pneumococcus by kmer WGS analysis. Extended k-mer database

  10. Environmentally triggered genomic plasticity and capsular polysaccharide formation are involved in increased ethanol and acetic acid tolerance in Kozakia baliensis NBRC 16680.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Julia U; Born, Friederike-Leonie; Jakob, Frank; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-08-10

    tolerance. The polE gene turned out to be involved in the formation of a cell-associated, capsular polysaccharide, which seems to be essential for increased ethanol/acetic tolerance in contrast to the secreted gum-cluster derived heteropolysaccharide. The genetic and morphological switch could represent an adaptive evolutionary step during the development of K. baliensis NBRC 16680 in course of changing environmental conditions.

  11. Thermodynamics and density of binding of a panel of antibodies to high-molecular-weight capsular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Harris, Shannon L; Fernsten, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between antipolysaccharide (anti-PS) antibodies and their antigens was investigated by the use of isothermal titration calorimetry to determine the thermodynamic binding constant (K), the change in the enthalpy of binding (DeltaH), and the binding density (N) to high-molecular-weight PSs. From these values, the change in the entropy of binding (DeltaS) was calculated. The thermodynamic parameters of binding to high-molecular-weight capsular PSs are reported for two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with different specificities for meningococcal serogroup C PS, five MAbs specific for different pneumococcal serotypes, and the Fab fragments of two antipneumococcal MAbs. The K values were in the range of 10(6) to 10(7) M(-1), and these values were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported K values derived from antibody-oligosaccharide interactions. The DeltaH associated with binding was favorable for each MAb and Fab fragment. The DeltaS associated with binding was also generally favorable for both the MAbs and the Fab fragments, with the exception of the anti-serotype 14 MAb and its Fab fragment. N provides information regarding how densely MAbs or Fabs can bind along PS chains and, as expressed in terms of monosaccharides, was very similar for the seven MAbs, with an average of 12 monosaccharides per bound MAb. The value of N for each Fab was smaller, with five or seven monosaccharides per bound Fab. These results suggest that steric interactions between antibody molecules are a major influence on the values of N of high-affinity MAbs to capsular PSs.

  12. Synthesis of di- and tri-saccharide fragments of Salmonella typhi Vi capsular polysaccharide and their zwitterionic analogues.

    PubMed

    Fusari, Matteo; Fallarini, Silvia; Lombardi, Grazia; Lay, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPS) behave like traditional T cell-dependent antigens, suggesting the design of new classes of vaccines alternative to currently used glycoconjugates and based on the artificial introduction of a zwitterionic charge motif onto the carbohydrate structure of pathogen antigens. Here we report the new synthesis and antigenic evaluation of di-/tri-saccharide fragments of Salmonella typhi Vi polysaccharide, as well as of their corresponding zwitterionic analogues. Our strategy is based on versatile intermediates enabling chain elongation either by iterative single monomer attachment or by faster and more flexible approach using disaccharide donors. The effect of structural modifications of the synthetic compounds on antigenic properties was evaluated by competitive ELISA. All the oligosaccharides were recognized by specific anti-Vi polyclonal antibodies in a concentration-dependent manner, and the introduction of a zwitterionic motif into the synthetic molecules did not prevent the binding.

  13. Recognition of riboflavin and the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b by antibodies generated to the haptenic epitope D-ribitol.

    PubMed

    Ravi, G; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2014-04-01

    D-Ribitol, a five-carbon sugar alcohol, is an important metabolite in the pentose phosphate pathway; it is an integral part of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and cell wall polysaccharides in most Gram-positive and a few Gram-negative bacteria. Antibodies specific to D-ribitol were generated in New Zealand white rabbits by using reductively aminated D-ribose-BSA conjugate as the immunogen. MALDI-TOF and amino group analyses of ribitol-BSA conjugate following 120 h reaction showed ~27-30 mol of ribitol conjugated per mole BSA. The presence of sugar alcohol in the conjugates was also confirmed by an increase in molecular mass and a positive periodic acid-Schiff staining in SDS-PAGE. Caprylic acid precipitation of rabbit serum followed by hapten affinity chromatography on ribitol-KLH-Sepharose CL-6B resulted in pure ribitol-specific antibodies (~45-50 μg/mL). The affinity constant of ribitol antibodies was found to be 2.9 × 10(7) M(-1) by non-competitive ELISA. Ribitol antibodies showed 100% specificity towards ribitol, ~800% cross-reactivity towards riboflavin, 10-15% cross-reactivity with sorbitol, xylitol and mannitol, and 5-7% cross-reactivity with L-arabinitol and meso-erythritol. The specificity of antibody to ribitol was further confirmed by its low cross-reactivity (0.4%) with lumichrome. Antibodies to D-ribitol recognized the purified capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b, which could be specifically inhibited by ribitol. In conclusion, antibodies specific to D-ribitol have been generated and characterized, which have potential applications in the detection of free riboflavin and ribitol in biological samples, as well as identification of cell-surface macromolecules containing ribitol.

  14. Capsular Polysaccharide of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Induces Sheep Airway Epithelial Cell Apoptosis via ROS-Dependent JNK/P38 MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhongjia; Song, Fuyang; Li, Yanan; Xue, Di; Zhao, Ning; Zhang, Jiamei; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the pathogen-host interaction between invading Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) and sheep airway epithelial cells, biological effects and possible molecular mechanism of capsular polysaccharide of M. ovipneumoniae (CPS) in the induction of cell apoptosis were explored using sheep bronchial epithelial cells cultured in air-liquid interface (ALI). The CPS of M. ovipneumoniae was first isolated and purified. Results showed that CPS had a cytotoxic effect by disrupting the integrity of mitochondrial membrane, accompanied with an increase of reactive oxygen species and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Of importance, the CPS exhibited an ability to induce caspase-dependent cell apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Mechanistically, the CPS induced extrinsic cell apoptosis by upregulating FAS/FASL signaling proteins and cleaved-caspase-8 and promoted a ROS-dependent intrinsic cell apoptosis by activating a JNK and p38 signaling but not ERK1/2 signaling of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. These findings provide the first evidence that CPS of M. ovipneumoniae induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in sheep bronchial epithelial cells, which may be mainly attributed by a ROS-dependent JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:28367270

  15. Structure determination of Streptococcus suis serotype 9 capsular polysaccharide and assignment of functions of the cps locus genes involved in its biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgueny; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2016-10-04

    Streptococcus suis serotype 9 is the most prevalent S. suis serotype in several European countries. In spite of its pathogenicity for pigs and increasing zoonotic potential, limited information is available on this serotype. Here we determined for the first time the chemical composition and structure of serotype 9 capsular polysaccharide (CPS), a major bacterial virulence factor and the antigen at the origin of S. suis classification into serotypes. Chemical and spectroscopic data gave the repeating unit sequence: [3)Glcol-6-P-3-[D-Gal(α1-2)]D-Gal(β1-3)D-Sug(β1-3)L-Rha(α1-)]n. Compared to previously characterized S. suis CPSs (serotypes 1, 1/2, 2 and 14), serotype 9 CPS does not contain sialic acid but contains a labile 4-keto sugar (2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-β-D-xylo-hexopyranos-4-ulose), one particular feature of this serotype. A correlation between S. suis serotype 9 CPS sequence and genes of this serotype cps locus encoding putative glycosyltransferases and polymerase responsible for the biosynthesis of the repeating unit was tentatively established. Knowledge of CPS structure and composition will contribute to better dissect the role of this bacterial component in the pathogenesis of S. suis serotype 9.

  16. [Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibodies to Salmonella Typhi lipopolysaccharide O and capsular polysaccharide Vi antigens in persons from outbreak of typhoid fever].

    PubMed

    Rastawicki, Waldemar; Kałużewski, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever is dependent upon either isolation of S. Typhi from a clinical sample or the detection of raised titers of serum antibodies in the Widal test or the passive hemagglutination assay (PHA). In this study we evaluated the usefulness of ELISA for detection of antibodies to S. Typhi lipopolysaccharide O and capsular polysaccharide Vi antigens in the sera of persons from outbreak of typhoid fever. Fifteen serum samples from patients with laboratory confirmed typhoid fever and 140 sera from persons suspected for contact with typhoid fever patients from outbreak in 1974/75 in Poland were tested by ELISA. Additionally, as the control group, we tested 115 sera from blood donors for the presence of S. Typhi anti-LPS and anti-Vi antibodies. Anti-LPS and anti-Vi antibodies were detected in 80% and 53.3% of sera obtained from patients with laboratory confirmed typhoid fever, respectively. The high percentages of positive results in ELISA were also noted in the group of persons suspected for contact with typhoid fever patients (51.4% and 45%) but not in the group of blood donors (7.8% and 6.1%, respectively). The ELISA could be a useful tool for the serological diagnosis of typhoid fever in patients who have clinical symptoms but are culture negative, especially during massive outbreaks of typhoid fever.

  17. Expression of type 8 capsular polysaccharide and production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 are associated among vaginal isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J C; Liu, M J; Parsonnet, J; Arbeit, R D

    1990-01-01

    A colony immunoblot method was developed for serotyping the capsular polysaccharides expressed by Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The method was rapid and specific and was performed with either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the capsule types. S. aureus isolates were obtained from patients with toxic shock syndrome (TSS) or other staphylococcal infections and from asymptomatic women with vaginal colonization. Among the vaginal isolates of S. aureus, expression of the type 8 capsule was significantly (P less than 0.001) more frequent among strains that produced TSS toxin 1 (TSST-1) than it was among TSST-1-negative strains. In contrast, the frequency of type 8 capsule expression was similar among both TSST-1-positive and -negative strains of S. aureus from patients with nonvaginal TSS. When all vaginal and nonvaginal isolates were compared, TSST-1-negative S. aureus strains were equally distributed among the type 5 and 8 and nontypeable capsule groups, whereas TSST-1-positive strains were predominantly capsule type 8. Images PMID:2279990

  18. Comparative characterization of the virulence gene clusters (lipooligosaccharide [LOS] and capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) for Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni and related Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Richards, Vincent P; Lefébure, Tristan; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Stanhope, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni and Campylobacter coli are leading causes of gastroenteritis, with virulence linked to cell surface carbohydrate diversity. Although the associated gene clusters are well studied for C. jejuni subsp. jejuni, C. coli has been largely neglected. Here we provide comparative analysis of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) gene clusters, using genome and cluster sequence data for 36 C. coli strains, 67 C. jejuni subsp. jejuni strains and ten additional Campylobacter species. Similar to C. jejuni subsp. jejuni, C. coli showed high LOS/CPS gene diversity, with each cluster delineated into eight gene content classes. This diversity was predominantly due to extensive gene gain/loss, with the lateral transfer of genes likely occurring both within and between species and also between the LOS and CPS. Additional mechanisms responsible for LOS/CPS diversity included phase-variable homopolymeric repeats, gene duplication/inactivation, and possibly host environment selection pressure. Analyses also showed that (i) strains of C. coli and Campylobacter upsaliensis possessed genes homologous to the sialic acid genes implicated in the neurological disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), and (ii) C. coli LOS classes were differentiated between bovine and poultry hosts, potentially aiding post infection source tracking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative characterization of the virulence gene clusters (lipooligosacharide [LOS] and capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) for Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni and related Campylobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Vincent P.; Lefébure, Tristan; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni and Campylobacter coli are leading causes of gastroenteritis, with virulence linked to cell surface carbohydrate diversity. Although the associated gene clusters are well studied for C. jejuni subsp. jejuni, C. coli has been largely neglected. Here we provide comparative analysis of the lipooligosacharide (LOS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) gene clusters, using genome and cluster sequence data for 36 C. coli strains, 67 C. jejuni subsp. jejuni strains and ten additional Campylobacter species. Similar to C. jejuni subsp. jejuni, C. coli showed high LOS/CPS gene diversity, with each cluster delineated into eight gene content classes. This diversity was predominantly due to extensive gene gain/loss, with the lateral transfer of genes likely occurring both within and between species and also between the LOS and CPS. Additional mechanisms responsible for LOS/CPS diversity included phase-variable homopolymeric repeats, gene duplication/inactivation, and possibly host environment selection pressure. Analyses also showed that (i) strains of C. coli and Campylobacter upsaliensis possessed genes homologous to the sialic acid genes implicated in the neurological disorder Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), and (ii) C. coli LOS classes were differentiated between bovine and poultry hosts, potentially aiding post infection source tracking. PMID:23279811

  20. Type-specific polysaccharides of Cryptococcus neoformans. n.m.r.-spectral study of a glucuronomannan chemically derived from a Tremella mesenterica exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, R; Jones, R G; Slodki, M E

    1988-11-01

    A glucuronomannan (GM) was derived by removal, through Smith degradation, of xylose from the native (3-O-acetylglucurono)xylomannan exopolysaccharide isolated from Tremella mesenterica. 13C-N.m.r. chemical shifts measured at various pD values were compared for p-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (1) and two GMs (2 and 3) differing in GlcA content (Man:GlcA; 2, 10:1; and 3, 5:1). Also measured and compared were pKa values for 1 and 2. One-dimensional and two-dimensional (COSY and HETCOR) n.m.r. data allowed unambiguous assignments of pD-sensitive chemical shifts due to 2-O-beta-D-GlcpA substituents attached to a (1----3)-linked alpha-D-Manp backbone. The pKa and n.m.r. data indicated that the CO2H groups in either GM are independent of each other, and are similar in behavior to those of p-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid molecules. The n.m.r. data confirmed the previous, chemically deduced, structural role of GlcpA in the native polysaccharide from T. mesenterica, and indicated that significant pD-induced changes occur in the stabilities of the glycosidic orientations in the GM. Previous 13C-n.m.r. assignments for 2-O-beta-D-GlcpA in polysaccharides derived from Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A-variant were confirmed, except for the signal due to the anomeric carbon atom. This signal is now known to be pD-sensitive. In acidic solutions, it is coincident with the signal (104.5 p.p.m.) due to the anomeric carbon atoms of the unsubstituted alpha-D-Manp backbone residues. In basic solutions, the 2-O-beta-D-GlcpA anomeric carbon resonance is shifted upfield by approximately 0.2 p.p.m., and is observed as a separate signal.

  1. ComE, an Essential Response Regulator, Negatively Regulates the Expression of the Capsular Polysaccharide Locus and Attenuates the Bacterial Virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Libin; Zhang, Jinghui; Yin, Yibing

    2017-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main virulence factors required for effective colonization and invasive disease. The capacity to regulate CPS production at the transcriptional level is critical for the survival of S. pneumoniae in different host niches, but little is known about the transcription regulators of cps locus. In the present study, we isolated and identified the response regulator ComE, the master competence switch in transformation of S. pneumoniae, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus by DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Our results showed that phosphorylated mimetic of ComE (ComED58E) bound specifically to the cps locus prompter in vitro, and phosphorylated ComE negatively impacted both cps locus transcription and CPS production attenuating the pneumococcal virulence in vivo. Compared with D39-WT strain, D39ΔcomE mutant exhibited much thicker capsule, attenuated nasopharyngeal colonization and enhanced virulence in both pneumonia and bacteremia models of Balb/c mice. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that CSP-ComD/E competence system involved in regulating negatively the CPS production during the progress of transformation in D39. Our CSP1 induction experiment results showed that the expression of ComE in D39-WT strain increased powerfully by 120% after 10 min of CSP1 induction, but the CPS production in D39-WT strain decreased sharply by 67.1% after 15 min of CSP1 induction. However, the CPS production in D39ΔcomE mutant was almost constant during the whole stage of induction. Additionally, we found that extracellular glucose concentration could affect both the expression of ComE and CPS production of D39 in vitro. Taken together, for the first time, we report that ComE, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus, plays an important role in transcriptional regulation of cps locus and capsular production level. PMID

  2. ComE, an Essential Response Regulator, Negatively Regulates the Expression of the Capsular Polysaccharide Locus and Attenuates the Bacterial Virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Libin; Zhang, Jinghui; Yin, Yibing

    2017-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main virulence factors required for effective colonization and invasive disease. The capacity to regulate CPS production at the transcriptional level is critical for the survival of S. pneumoniae in different host niches, but little is known about the transcription regulators of cps locus. In the present study, we isolated and identified the response regulator ComE, the master competence switch in transformation of S. pneumoniae, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus by DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Our results showed that phosphorylated mimetic of ComE (ComE(D58E)) bound specifically to the cps locus prompter in vitro, and phosphorylated ComE negatively impacted both cps locus transcription and CPS production attenuating the pneumococcal virulence in vivo. Compared with D39-WT strain, D39ΔcomE mutant exhibited much thicker capsule, attenuated nasopharyngeal colonization and enhanced virulence in both pneumonia and bacteremia models of Balb/c mice. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that CSP-ComD/E competence system involved in regulating negatively the CPS production during the progress of transformation in D39. Our CSP1 induction experiment results showed that the expression of ComE in D39-WT strain increased powerfully by 120% after 10 min of CSP1 induction, but the CPS production in D39-WT strain decreased sharply by 67.1% after 15 min of CSP1 induction. However, the CPS production in D39ΔcomE mutant was almost constant during the whole stage of induction. Additionally, we found that extracellular glucose concentration could affect both the expression of ComE and CPS production of D39 in vitro. Taken together, for the first time, we report that ComE, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus, plays an important role in transcriptional regulation of cps locus and capsular production level.

  3. The vacuolar-sorting protein Snf7 is required for export of virulence determinants in members of the Cryptococcus neoformans complex.

    PubMed Central

    da C. Godinho, Rodrigo M.; Crestani, Juliana; Kmetzsch, Lívia; de S. Araujo, Glauber; Frases, Susana; Staats, Charley C.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pathogenesis requires a number of extracellularly released virulence factors. Recent studies demonstrating that most fungal extracellular molecules lack secretory tags suggest that unconventional secretion mechanisms and fungal virulence are strictly connected. Proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) have been recently associated with polysaccharide export in the yeast-like human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Snf7 is a key ESCRT operator required for unconventional secretion in Eukaryotes. In this study we generated snf7Δ mutant strains of C. neoformans and its sibling species C. gattii. Lack of Snf7 resulted in important alterations in polysaccharide secretion, capsular formation and pigmentation. This phenotype culminated with loss of virulence in an intranasal model of murine infection in both species. Our data support the notion that Snf7 expression regulates virulence in C. neoformans and C. gattii by ablating polysaccharide and melanin traffic. These results are in agreement with the observation that unconventional secretion is essential for cryptococcal pathogenesis and strongly suggest the occurrence of still obscure mechanisms of exportation of non-protein molecules in Eukaryotes. PMID:25178636

  4. Molecular characterization of the early B cell response to pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2012-12-15

    The role of B cells in host defense against fungi has been difficult to establish. We quantified and determined the molecular derivation of B-1a, B-1b, and B-2 B cell populations in C57BL/6 mice after pulmonary infection with Cryptococcus neoformans. Total B-1 and B-2 cell numbers increased in lungs and peritoneal cavity as early as day 1 postinfection, but lacked signs of clonal expansion. Labeled capsular (24067) and acapsular (Cap67) C. neoformans strains were used to identify C. neoformans-binding B cell subsets by flow cytometry. Peritoneal cavity B-1a B cells exhibited the most acapsular and capsular C. neoformans binding in C. neoformans-infected mice, and C. neoformans-selected B-1 B cells secreted laminarin- and C. neoformans-binding IgM. Single-cell PCR-based sequence analysis of B-1a, B-1b, and B-2 cell IgH V region H chain (V(H)) genes revealed increased usage of V(H)11 and V(H)12, respectively, in acapsular and capsular C. neoformans-selected B-1a cells. Germline V(H) segments were used, with capsular C. neoformans-selected cells having less junctional diversity than acapsular C. neoformans-selected cells. Further studies in B-1 B cell-depleted mice showed that these mice had higher brain and lung fungal burdens and less alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of C. neoformans than did control and B-1a B cell-reconstituted mice. Taken together, these results establish a mechanistic role for B-1 B cells in the innate B cell response to pulmonary infection with C. neoformans and reveal that IgM-producing B-1a cells, which express germline V(H) genes, bind C. neoformans and contribute to early fungal clearance. Thus, B-1a B cells provide a first line of defense during pulmonary C. neoformans infection in mice.

  5. Methamphetamine Enhances Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection and Dissemination to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhavan; Desai, Gunjan M.; Frases, Susana; Cordero, Radames J. B.; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Martinez, Luis R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methamphetamine (METH) is a major addictive drug of abuse in the United States and worldwide, and its use is linked to HIV acquisition. The encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common cause of fungal meningitis in patients with AIDS. In addition to functioning as a central nervous system stimulant, METH has diverse effects on host immunity. Using a systemic mouse model of infection and in vitro assays in order to critically assess the impact of METH on C. neoformans pathogenesis, we demonstrate that METH stimulates fungal adhesion, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) release, and biofilm formation in the lungs. Interestingly, structural analysis of the capsular polysaccharide of METH-exposed cryptococci revealed that METH alters the carbohydrate composition of this virulence factor, an event of adaptation to external stimuli that can be advantageous to the fungus during pathogenesis. Additionally, we show that METH promotes C. neoformans dissemination from the respiratory tract into the brain parenchyma. Our findings provide novel evidence of the impact of METH abuse on host homeostasis and increased permissiveness to opportunistic microorganisms. PMID:23900172

  6. Rapid Detection of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Using a Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, J. B.; Gammack, C.; Nicholas, R.

    2000-01-01

    Latex microspheres (diameter, 8 μm) were coated with anti-Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antiserum (anti-F38 biotype). The coated microspheres, when used in a latex agglutination test (LAT), detected M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae antigen in the serum of goats with contagious caprine pleuropneumoniae (CCPP). Beads also agglutinated strongly in the presence of purified M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Preabsorption of CPS-specific antibodies prior to coating of the beads removed agglutinating activity in the presence of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, strongly suggesting that CPS is the likely soluble antigen recognized by the test. In addition, the specificity of the LAT exactly mirrored that of an M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae CPS-specific monoclonal antibody (WM25): of the 8 other mycoplasma species tested, agglutination was observed only with bovine serogroup 7. The LAT detected all 11 strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 1.7 × 104 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml of serum. With field sera from goats with CCPP, the results of the LAT exhibited a 67% correlation with the results of the currently used complement fixation test (CFT), with the main discrepancy in diagnosis resulting from the increased sensitivity of the LAT compared to that of CFT. This antigen-detection LAT should prove particularly useful in identifying animals in the earliest stages of CCPP and combines sensitivity and low cost with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:11060083

  7. Design and optimization of a chromatographic purification process for Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23F capsular polysaccharide by a Design of Experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu; Tian, Yang; Ahnfelt, Mattias; Sui, Lili

    2014-06-27

    Multivalent pneumococcal vaccines were used worldwide to protect human beings from pneumococcal diseases. In order to eliminate the toxic organic solutions used in the traditional vaccine purification process, an alternative chromatographic process for Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23F capsular polysaccharide (CPS) was proposed in this study. The strategy of Design of Experiments (DoE) was introduced into the process development to solve the complicated design procedure. An initial process analysis was given to review the whole flowchart, identify the critical factors of chromatography through FMEA and chose the flowthrough mode due to the property of the feed. A resin screening study was then followed to select candidate resins. DoE was utilized to generate a resolution IV fractional factorial design to further compare candidates and narrow down the design space. After Capto Adhere was selected, the Box-Behnken DoE was executed to model the process and characterize all effects of factors on the responses. Finally, Monte Carlo simulation was used to optimize the process, test the chosen optimal conditions and define the control limit. The results of three scale-up runs at set points verified the DoE and simulation predictions. The final results were well in accordance with the EU pharmacopeia requirements: Protein/CPS (w/w) 1.08%; DNA/CPS (w/w) 0.61%; the phosphorus content 3.1%; the nitrogen 0.315% and the Methyl-pentose percentage 47.9%. Other tests of final pure CPS also met the pharmacopeia specifications. This alternative chromatographic purification process for pneumococcal vaccine without toxic organic solvents was successfully developed by the DoE approach and proved scalability, robustness and suitability for large scale manufacturing.

  8. Sialylation of Group B Streptococcal Capsular Polysaccharide Is Mediated by cpsK and Is Required for Optimal Capsule Polymerization and Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chaffin, D. O.; Mentele, L. M.; Rubens, C. E.

    2005-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens have evolved the means to escape immune detection by mimicking host cell surface carbohydrates that are crucial for self/non-self recognition. Sialic acid, a terminal residue on these carbohydrates, inhibits activation of the alternate pathway of complement by recruiting the immune modulating molecule factors H, I, and iC3b. Sialylation of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is important for virulence of group B streptococci (GBS), a significant human pathogen. We previously reported that cpsK, a gene within the cps locus of type III GBS, could complement a sialyltransferase deficient lst mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi, implicating its role in sialylation of the GBS capsule. To explore the function of cpsK in GBS capsule production, we created a mutant in cpsK. Immunoblot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using anti-type III CPS antisera demonstrated that the mutant CPS did not contain sialic acid. This was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography after mild acid hydrolysis of the CPS. Although increased CPS chain length was seen for this strain, CPS production was <20% of the parental isolate. An episomal cpsK copy restored synthesis of sialo-CPS to wild-type levels. These data support our hypothesis that cpsK encodes the GBS CPS sialyltransferase and provide further evidence that lack of CPS oligosaccharide sialylation reduces the amount of CPS expressed on the cell surface. These observations also imply that one or more of the components involved in synthesis or transport of oligosaccharide repeating units requires a sialo-oligosaccharide for complete activity. PMID:15968073

  9. Acinetobacter baumannii K11 and K83 capsular polysaccharides have the same 6-deoxy-l-talose-containing pentasaccharide K units but different linkages between the K units.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Johanna J; Shashkov, Alexander S; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shneider, Mikhail M; Liu, Bin; Popova, Anastasiya V; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Wang, Lei; Knirel, Yuriy A; Hall, Ruth M

    2017-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii produces a variety of capsular polysaccharides (CPS) via genes located at the chromosomal K locus and some KL gene clusters include genes for the synthesis of specific sugars. The structures of K11 and K83 CPS produced by isolates LUH5545 and LUH5538, which carry related KL11a and KL83 gene clusters, respectively, were established by sugar analysis and one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Both CPS contain l-rhamnose (l-Rha) and 6-deoxy-l-talose (l-6dTal), and both KL gene clusters include genes for dTDP-l-Rhap synthesis and a tle (talose epimerase) gene encoding an epimerase that converts dTDP-l-Rhap to dTDP-l-6dTalp. The K11 and K83 repeat units are the same pentasaccharide, consisting of d-glucose, l-Rha, l-6dTal, and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, except that l-6dTal is 2-O-acetylated in K83. However, the K units are linked differently, with l-Rha in the main chain in K11, but as a side-branch in K83. KL11 and KL83 encode unrelated Wzy polymerases that link the K units together and different acetyltransferases, though only Atr8 from KL83 is active. The substrate specificity of each Wzy polymerase was assigned, and the functions of all glycosyltransferases were predicted. The CPS structures produced by three closely related K loci, KL29, KL105 and KL106, were also predicted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibodies to capsular polysaccharide and clumping factor A prevent mastitis and the emergence of unencapsulated and small-colony variants of Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    PubMed

    Tuchscherr, Lorena P N; Buzzola, Fernanda R; Alvarez, Lucía P; Lee, Jean C; Sordelli, Daniel O

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections is influenced by multiple virulence factors that are expressed under variable conditions, and this has complicated the design of an effective vaccine. Clinical trials that targeted the capsule or clumping factor A (ClfA) failed to protect the recipients against staphylococcal infections. We passively immunized lactating mice with rabbit antibodies to S. aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) serotype 5 (CP5) or CP8 or with monoclonal antibodies to ClfA. Mice immunized with antibodies to CP5 or CP8 or with ClfA had significantly reduced tissue bacterial burdens 4 days after intramammary challenge with encapsulated S. aureus strains. After several passages in mice passively immunized with CP-specific antiserum, increasing numbers of stable unencapsulated variants of S. aureus were cultured from the infected mammary glands. Greater numbers of these unencapsulated S. aureus variants than of the corresponding encapsulated parental strains were internalized in vitro in MAC-T bovine cells. Furthermore, small-colony variants (SCVs) were recovered from the infected mammary glands after several passages in mice passively immunized with CP-specific antiserum. A combination of antibodies effectively sterilized mammary glands in a significant number of passively immunized mice. More importantly, passive immunization with antibodies to both CP and ClfA fully inhibited the emergence of unencapsulated "escape mutants" and significantly reduced the appearance of SCVs. A vaccine formulation comprising CP conjugates plus a surface-associated protein adhesin may be more effective than either antigen alone for prevention of S. aureus infections.

  11. Diversity of Capsular Polysaccharide Gene Clusters in Kpc-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates of Sequence Type 258 Involved in the Italian Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Amisano, Francesco; Giani, Tommaso; Conte, Viola; Ciacci, Nagaia; Ambretti, Simone; Santoriello, Luisa; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type beta-lactamases (KPC-Kp) are broadly disseminating worldwide and constitute a major healthcare threat given their extensively drug resistant phenotypes and ability to rapidly disseminate in healthcare settings. In this work we report on the characterization of two different capsular polysaccharide (CPS) gene clusters, named cpsBO-4 and cps207-2, from two KPC-Kp clinical strains from Italy belonging in sequence type (ST) 258, which is one of the most successful ST of KPC-Kp spreading worldwide. While cpsBO-4 was different from known 78 K-types according to the recently proposed typing schemes based on the wzi or wzc gene sequences, cps207-2 was classified as K41 by one of these methods. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that they were represented in the genomic sequences of KPC-Kp from strains of ST258 from different countries, and cpsBO-4 was also detected in a KPC-Kp strain of ST442 from Brazil. Investigation of a collection of 46 ST258 and ST512 (a single locus variant of ST258) clinical strains representative of the recent Italian epidemic of KPC-Kp by means of a multiplex PCR typing approach revealed that cpsBO-4 was the most prevalent type, being detected both in ST258 and ST512 strains with a countrywide distribution, while cps207-2 was only detected in ST258 strains with a more restricted distribution. PMID:24823690

  12. Diversity of capsular polysaccharide gene clusters in Kpc-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates of sequence type 258 involved in the Italian epidemic.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Amisano, Francesco; Giani, Tommaso; Conte, Viola; Ciacci, Nagaia; Ambretti, Simone; Santoriello, Luisa; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type beta-lactamases (KPC-Kp) are broadly disseminating worldwide and constitute a major healthcare threat given their extensively drug resistant phenotypes and ability to rapidly disseminate in healthcare settings. In this work we report on the characterization of two different capsular polysaccharide (CPS) gene clusters, named cpsBO-4 and cps207-2, from two KPC-Kp clinical strains from Italy belonging in sequence type (ST) 258, which is one of the most successful ST of KPC-Kp spreading worldwide. While cpsBO-4 was different from known 78 K-types according to the recently proposed typing schemes based on the wzi or wzc gene sequences, cps207-2 was classified as K41 by one of these methods. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that they were represented in the genomic sequences of KPC-Kp from strains of ST258 from different countries, and cpsBO-4 was also detected in a KPC-Kp strain of ST442 from Brazil. Investigation of a collection of 46 ST258 and ST512 (a single locus variant of ST258) clinical strains representative of the recent Italian epidemic of KPC-Kp by means of a multiplex PCR typing approach revealed that cpsBO-4 was the most prevalent type, being detected both in ST258 and ST512 strains with a countrywide distribution, while cps207-2 was only detected in ST258 strains with a more restricted distribution.

  13. USA300 and USA500 Clonal Lineages of Staphylococcus aureus Do Not Produce a Capsular Polysaccharide Due to Conserved Mutations in the cap5 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D.; Sieth, Julia; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Dobbins, Ginette; David, Michael Z.; Kumar, Neha; Eells, Samantha J.; Miller, Loren G.; Boxrud, David J.; Chambers, Henry F.; Lynfield, Ruth; Lee, Jean C.; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The surface capsular polysaccharide (CP) is a virulence factor that has been used as an antigen in several successful vaccines against bacterial pathogens. A vaccine has not yet been licensed against Staphylococcus aureus, although two multicomponent vaccines that contain CP antigens are in clinical trials. In this study, we evaluated CP production in USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates that have become the predominant community-associated MRSA clones in the United States. We found that all 167 USA300 MRSA and 50 USA300 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were CP negative (CP−). Moreover, all 16 USA500 isolates, which have been postulated to be the progenitor lineage of USA300, were also CP−. Whole-genome sequence analysis of 146 CP− USA300 MRSA isolates revealed they all carry a cap5 locus with 4 conserved mutations compared with strain Newman. Genetic complementation experiments revealed that three of these mutations (in the cap5 promoter, cap5D nucleotide 994, and cap5E nucleotide 223) ablated CP production in USA300 and that Cap5E75 Asp, located in the coenzyme-binding domain, is essential for capsule production. All but three USA300 MSSA isolates had the same four cap5 mutations found in USA300 MRSA isolates. Most isolates with a USA500 pulsotype carried three of these four USA300-specific mutations, suggesting the fourth mutation occurred in the USA300 lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the cap loci of our USA300 isolates as well as publicly available genomes from 41 other sequence types revealed that the USA300-specific cap5 mutations arose sequentially in S. aureus in a common ancestor of USA300 and USA500 isolates. PMID:25852165

  14. STEPWISE INTRATYPE TRANSFORMATION OF PNEUMOCOCCUS FROM R TO S BY WAY OF A VARIANT INTERMEDIATE IN CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE PRODUCTION

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Colin M.; Krauss, Marjorie R.

    1947-01-01

    1. A variant intermediate between the classical R and S forms has been isolated by selective procedures from a rough strain of pneumococcus originally derived from Type II S. 2. The intermediate variant D39/Int53 is avirulent for mice, forms rough colonies, and does not possess a demonstrable capsule. However, it synthesizes SSSII which is immunologically indistinguishable from that produced by fully encapsulated pneumococcus Type II, though in much smaller amount. The polysaccharide is present as a surface component and as it exists in the cell is highly antigenic for rabbits. 3. An extract of the intermediate variant causes the transformation in vitro of an R strain into a variant resembling the intermediate in SSSII production but without any apparent alteration in the colonial characteristics of the R variant. 4. The intermediate variant is convertible in vivo, into a fully encapsulated strain of pneumococcus Type II. Transformation of the intermediate to a heterologous type of pneumococcus (Type III) was unsuccessful. 5. A method is described for the preparation of transforming extracts of pneumococci utilizing the massive growth of the organisms obtained in the presence of a large concentration of glucose. PMID:19871689

  15. The nature of an in vivo anti-capsular polysaccharide response is markedly influenced by the composition and/or architecture of the bacterial subcapsular domain.

    PubMed

    Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Massari, Paola; Wetzler, Lee M; Lees, Andrew; Colino, Jesus; Snapper, Clifford M

    2012-01-15

    In vivo anti-polysaccharide Ig responses to isolated polysaccharide (PS) are T cell independent, rapid, and fail to generate memory. However, little is known regarding PS-specific Ig responses to intact gram-positive and gram-negative extracellular bacteria. We previously demonstrated that intact heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive bacterium, elicited a rapid primary pneumococcal capsular PS (PPS) response in mice that was dependent on CD4(+) T cells, B7-dependent costimulation, and CD40-CD40L interactions. However, this response was ICOS independent and failed to generate a boosted PPS-specific secondary IgG response. In the current study, we analyzed the murine meningococcal type C PS (MCPS)-specific Ig response to i.p.-injected intact, heat-killed Neisseria meningitidis, serogroup C (MenC), a gram-negative bacterium. In contrast to S. pneumoniae, the IgG anti-MCPS response to MenC exhibited delayed primary kinetics and was highly boosted after secondary immunization, whereas the IgG anti-MCPS response to isolated MCPS was rapid, without secondary boosting, and consisted of only IgG1 and IgG3, as opposed to all four IgG isotypes in response to intact MenC. The secondary, but not primary, IgG anti-MCPS response to MenC was dependent on CD4(+) T cells, CD40L, CD28, and ICOS. The primary and secondary IgG anti-MCPS responses were lower in TLR4-defective (C3H/HeJ) but not TLR2(-/-) or MyD88(-/-) mice, but secondary boosting was still observed. Of interest, coimmunization of S. pneumoniae and MenC resulted in a boosted secondary IgG anti-PPS response to S. pneumoniae. Our data demonstrate that the nature of the in vivo anti-PS response is markedly influenced by the composition and/or architecture of the bacterial subcapsular domain.

  16. Preparation and characterization of a Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate prepared by a low cost technique: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Pujato, Nazarena; Díaz, Germán; Barbagelata, María Sol; Vicco, Miguel Hernán; Calvinho, Luis Fernando; Marcipar, Iván Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a worldwide distributed pathogen that produces several diseases in many species and is the major cause of mastitis in dairy cows. S. aureus capsular polysaccharide 5 (CP5) has been widely proposed as a vaccine candidate since it is expressed in a high proportion of isolates from intramammary infections and is able to induce opsonophagocytic antibodies. However, to reach immunological properties, polysaccharides need to be coupled to carrier proteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate a conjugation method employing p-benzoquinone (PBQ), which was not previously reported for the development of vaccine components. Purified S. aureus CP5 was coupled to human serum albumin (HSA) with high efficiency, reaching a rate PS/protein of 0.5. Mice groups were immunized at days 0, 14, 28, and 42, with the conjugate (CP5-HSAPBQ), free CP5, or PBS, formulated with incomplete Freund adjuvant, and after 3 months, they were challenged with free CP5 to evaluate the memory response. IgG and IgM isotypes were measured on serum samples all along the experiment, and IgG subclasses were determined to analyze the humoral profile. In contrast to the response obtained with free CP5, CP5-HSAPBQ induced IgG titers of 1/238,900 after three doses and a memory response was observed after the challenge. Results indicate that immunization with CP5-HSAPBQ effectively induce a T-dependent immune response against CP5. Moreover, besides IgG2a was the main subtype obtained, the joint production of specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 types indicated a balanced humoral response. As p-benzoquinone conjugation of CPs to proteins is far less expensive and straightforward than other methods commonly used in vaccine preparations, the robust humoral response obtained using this method points out that this can be an interesting alternative to prepare S. aureus CP5 conjugate vaccines.

  17. Constitutive Expression of the Vi Polysaccharide Capsular Antigen in Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Oral Vaccine Strain CVD 909

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Noriega, Fernando R.; Galen, James E.; Barry, Eileen; Levine, Myron M.

    2000-01-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced PtviA in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter Ptac, resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  18. The K1 Capsular Polysaccharide of Acinetobacter baumannii Strain 307-0294 Is a Major Virulence Factor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Thomas A.; Luke, Nicole R.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Sauberan, Shauna L.; MacDonald, Ulrike; Schultz, L. Wayne; Umland, Timothy C.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen of increasing medical importance with a propensity to be multidrug resistant, thereby making treatment challenging. Little is known of virulence traits in A. baumannii. To identify virulence factors and potential drug targets, random transposon (Tn) mutants derived from the A. baumannii strain AB307-0294 were screened to identify genes essential for growth in human ascites fluid in vitro, an inflammatory exudative fluid. These studies led to the identification of two genes that were predicted to be required for capsule polymerization and assembly. The first, ptk, encodes a putative protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), and the second, epsA, encodes a putative polysaccharide export outer membrane protein (EpsA). Monoclonal antibodies used in flow cytometric and Western analyses confirmed that these genes are required for a capsule-positive phenotype. A capsule-positive phenotype significantly optimized growth in human ascites fluid, survival in human serum, and survival in a rat soft tissue infection model. Importantly, the clearance of the capsule-minus mutants AB307.30 (ptk mutant, capsule minus) and AB307.45 (epsA mutant, capsule minus) was complete and durable. These data demonstrated that the K1 capsule from AB307-0294 was an important protectin. Further, these data suggested that conserved proteins, which contribute to the capsule-positive phenotype, are potential antivirulence drug targets. Therefore, the results from this study have important biologic and translational implications and, to the best of our knowledge, are the first to address the role of capsule in the pathogenesis of A. baumannii infection. PMID:20643860

  19. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of genes required for the biosynthesis of type 1 capsular polysaccharide in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lin, W S; Cunneen, T; Lee, C Y

    1994-11-01

    We previously cloned a 19.4-kb DNA region containing a cluster of genes affecting type 1 capsule production from Staphylococcus aureus M. Subcloning experiments showed that these capsule (cap) genes are localized in a 14.6-kb region. Sequencing analysis of the 14.6-kb fragment revealed 13 open reading frames (ORFs). Using complementation tests, we have mapped a collection of Cap- mutations in 10 of the 13 ORFs, indicating that these 10 genes are involved in capsule biosynthesis. The requirement for the remaining three ORFs in the synthesis of the capsule was demonstrated by constructing site-specific mutations corresponding to each of the three ORFs. Using an Escherichia coli S30 in vitro transcription-translation system, we clearly identified 7 of the 13 proteins predicted from the ORFs. Homology search between the predicted proteins and those in the data bank showed very high homology (52.3% identity) between capL and vipA, moderate homology (29% identity) between capI and vipB, and limited homology (21.8% identity) between capM and vipC. The vipA, vipB, and vipC genes have been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of Salmonella typhi Vi antigen, a homopolymer polysaccharide consisting of N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid, which is also one of the components of the staphylococcal type 1 capsule. The homology between these sets of genes therefore suggests that capL, capI, and capM may be involved in the biosynthesis of amino sugar, N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid. In addition, the search showed that CapG aligned well with the consensus sequence of a family of acetyltransferases from various prokaryotic organisms, suggesting that CapG may be an acetyltransferase. Using the isogenic Cap- and Cap+ strains constructed in this study, we have confirmed that type 1 capsule is an important virulence factor in a mouse lethality test.

  20. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of genes required for the biosynthesis of type 1 capsular polysaccharide in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, W S; Cunneen, T; Lee, C Y

    1994-01-01

    We previously cloned a 19.4-kb DNA region containing a cluster of genes affecting type 1 capsule production from Staphylococcus aureus M. Subcloning experiments showed that these capsule (cap) genes are localized in a 14.6-kb region. Sequencing analysis of the 14.6-kb fragment revealed 13 open reading frames (ORFs). Using complementation tests, we have mapped a collection of Cap- mutations in 10 of the 13 ORFs, indicating that these 10 genes are involved in capsule biosynthesis. The requirement for the remaining three ORFs in the synthesis of the capsule was demonstrated by constructing site-specific mutations corresponding to each of the three ORFs. Using an Escherichia coli S30 in vitro transcription-translation system, we clearly identified 7 of the 13 proteins predicted from the ORFs. Homology search between the predicted proteins and those in the data bank showed very high homology (52.3% identity) between capL and vipA, moderate homology (29% identity) between capI and vipB, and limited homology (21.8% identity) between capM and vipC. The vipA, vipB, and vipC genes have been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of Salmonella typhi Vi antigen, a homopolymer polysaccharide consisting of N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid, which is also one of the components of the staphylococcal type 1 capsule. The homology between these sets of genes therefore suggests that capL, capI, and capM may be involved in the biosynthesis of amino sugar, N-acetylgalactosamino uronic acid. In addition, the search showed that CapG aligned well with the consensus sequence of a family of acetyltransferases from various prokaryotic organisms, suggesting that CapG may be an acetyltransferase. Using the isogenic Cap- and Cap+ strains constructed in this study, we have confirmed that type 1 capsule is an important virulence factor in a mouse lethality test. Images PMID:7961465

  1. What makes Cryptococcus neoformans a pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, K. L.; Murphy, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Life-threatening infections caused by the encapsulated fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans have been increasing steadily over the past 10 years because of the onset of AIDS and the expanded use of immunosuppressive drugs. Intricate host-organism interactions make the full understanding of pathogenicity and virulence of C. neoformans difficult. We discuss the current knowledge of the characteristics C. neoformans must possess to enter the host and establish progressive disease: basic growth requirements and virulence factors, such as the polysaccharide capsule; shed products of the organism; melanin production; mannitol secretion; superoxide dismutase; proteases; and phospholipases. PMID:9452400

  2. Specific and cross-reactive immune response to oral Salmonella Typhi Ty21a and parenteral Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccines administered concomitantly.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Sari H; Kantele, Jussi M; Savolainen, Laura E; Rombo, Lars; Kantele, Anu

    2015-01-09

    Since protective efficacy of the current typhoid vaccines-oral whole-cell Salmonella Typhi Ty21a and parenteral Vi-capsular polysaccharide preparation-is not optimal, and no vaccines are available against paratyphoid or non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serotypes, new approaches deserve to be explored. The immunological mechanisms elicited by the two typhoid vaccines are mainly targeted against different structures. We studied whether these vaccines would enhance S. Typhi-specific immune response and cross-reactivity against other Salmonellae, if administered concomitantly. Volunteers were immunized simultaneously with Ty21a and Vi vaccines (Ty21a+Vi group) or with either of the two singly (Ty21a and Vi groups). All volunteers were investigated for circulating specific and cross-reactive plasmablasts, identified by ELISPOT as IgA, IgG or IgM antibody-secreting cells (ASC) reactive with S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A/B/C, or selected NTS serotypes (S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium). In the Ty21a+Vi group, no specific or cross-reactive plasmablasts were detected before vaccination. After vaccination, the number of S. Typhi-specific plasmablasts (878 ASC/10(6) PBMC, 95%CI 554-1201) proved higher than in the Ty21a (339 ASC/10(6) PBMC; p<0.001) and Vi (149 ASC/10(6) PBMC; p<0.001) groups. Likewise, cross-reactive responses in the Ty21a+Vi group were higher than in the Ty21a and Vi groups (Ty21a+Vi vs Ty21a: ASC against S. Paratyphi A/B, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium p<0.05, against S. Paratyphi C p<0.01; Ty21a+Vi vs Vi: against S. Paratyphi C not significant, others p<0.0001). A gut-directed homing profile was seen among O antigen-specific and a systemic one among Vi antigen-specific plasmablasts. Concomitant administration of Ty21a and Vi vaccines is well tolerated and induces an additive immune response to the two vaccines. Thus it enhances the magnitude of both typhoid-specific plasmablast responses and those cross-reacting with paratyphoid and most important NTS serotypes

  3. Concentration of anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide IgM, IgG and IgA specific antibodies in adult blood donors.

    PubMed

    Parker, Antony R; Allen, Syreeta; Harding, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Anti-pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PCP) IgM, IgG and IgA ELISAs have been developed to aid assessment of the adaptive immune system. The relationship between the concentrations of PCP IgM, IgG, and IgA was investigated. The concentrations of PCP IgM, IgG, and IgA were measured in sera obtained from 231 adult blood donors. Concentrations of each isotype were not normally distributed. The median concentration for PCP IgM was 54 U/mL (range 37-75 U/mL), IgG 40 mg/L (range 26-79 mg/L) and IgA 21 U/mL (range 13-44 U/mL). The median PCP IgM titres decreased with age and were significantly lower in patients aged 81-90 years compared to those aged 18-80 years. By contrast, there was a significantly higher median serum PCP IgG titre in the 61-90 years group compared to those aged 18-60 years and a significantly higher median serum PCP IgA titre in the 51-90 years group compared to those aged 18-50 years. The correlation between PCP IgG and IgA was more significant than between IgM and IgA and between IgM and IgG. Correlation of PCP IgA and IgM concentrations identified four phenotypes: high PCP IgM and IgA; high PCP IgM only; high PCP IgA only; and low PCP IgM and IgA. A significant number of individuals with a PCP IgG concentration >50 mg/L had low PCP IgA and IgM concentrations. The additional measurement of PCP IgA and PCP IgM, alongside PCP IgG, in individuals investigated for a compromised immune system may provide a more detailed antibody profile.

  4. Determination of the chemical structure of the capsular polysaccharide of strain B33, a fast-growing soya bean-nodulating bacterium isolated from an arid region of China.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carvajal, M A; Tejero-Mateo, P; Espartero, J L; Ruiz-Sainz, J E; Buendía-Clavería, A M; Ollero, F J; Yang, S S; Gil-Serrano, A M

    2001-01-01

    We have determined the structure of a polysaccharide from strain B33, a fast-growing bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with Asiatic and American soya bean cultivars. On the basis of monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis, one-dimensional 1H- and 13C-NMR and two-dimensional NMR experiments, the structure was shown to consist of a polymer having the repeating unit -->6)-4-O-methyl-alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-3-O-methyl-beta-D-GlcpA-(1--> (where GlcpA is glucopyranuronic acid and Glcp is glucopyranose). Strain B33 produces a K-antigen polysaccharide repeating unit that does not have the structural motif sugar-Kdx [where Kdx is 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (Kdo) or a Kdo-related acid] proposed for different Sinorhizobium fredii strains, all of them being effective with Asiatic soya bean cultivars but unable to form nitrogen-fixing nodules with American soya bean cultivars. Instead, it resembles the K-antigen of S. fredii strain HH303 (rhamnose, galacturonic acid)n, which is also effective with both groups of soya bean cultivars. Only the capsular polysaccharide from strains B33 and HH303 have monosaccharide components that are also present in the surface polysaccharide of Bradyrhizobium elkanii strains, which consists of a 4-O-methyl-D-glucurono-L-rhamnan. PMID:11439101

  5. Deletion of Cryptococcus neoformans AIF ortholog promotes chromosome aneuploidy and fluconazole-resistance in a metacaspase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Semighini, Camile P; Averette, Anna F; Perfect, John R; Heitman, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death critical for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Apoptosis-like cell death (ALCD) has been described in several fungi, including the opportunistic human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. In addition, capsular polysaccharides of C. neoformans are known to induce apoptosis in host immune cells, thereby contributing to its virulence. Our goals were to characterize the apoptotic signaling cascade in C. neoformans as well as its unique features compared to the host machinery to exploit the endogenous fungal apoptotic pathways as a novel antifungal strategy in the future. The dissection of apoptotic pathways revealed that apoptosis-inducing factor (Aif1) and metacaspases (Mca1 and Mca2) are independently required for ALCD in C. neoformans. We show that the apoptotic pathways are required for cell fusion and sporulation during mating, indicating that apoptosis may occur during sexual development. Previous studies showed that antifungal drugs induce ALCD in fungi and that C. neoformans adapts to high concentrations of the antifungal fluconazole (FLC) by acquisition of aneuploidy, especially duplication of chromosome 1 (Chr1). Disruption of aif1, but not the metacaspases, stimulates the emergence of aneuploid subpopulations with Chr1 disomy that are resistant to fluconazole (FLC(R)) in vitro and in vivo. FLC(R) isolates in the aif1 background are stable in the absence of the drug, while those in the wild-type background readily revert to FLC sensitivity. We propose that apoptosis orchestrated by Aif1 might eliminate aneuploid cells from the population and defects in this pathway contribute to the selection of aneuploid FLC(R) subpopulations during treatment. Aneuploid clinical isolates with disomies for chromosomes other than Chr1 exhibit reduced AIF1 expression, suggesting that inactivation of Aif1 might be a novel aneuploidy-tolerating mechanism in fungi that facilitates the selection of antifungal drug

  6. Mannoprotein MP84 mediates the adhesion of Cryptococcus neoformans to epithelial lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Pedro A. C.; Penha, Luciana L.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Previato, Jose O.

    2014-01-01

    The capsule is the most important virulence factor of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This structure consists of highly hydrated polysaccharides, including glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), and galactoxylomannan (GalXM). It is also composed of mannoproteins (MPs) which corresponds to less than 1% of the capsular weight. Despite MPs being the minority and least studied components, four of these molecules with molecular masses of 115, 98, 88, and 84 kDa were identified and characterized as C. neoformans immunoreactive antigens involved in the pathogenesis, and are potential cryptococcosis vaccine candidates. With the aim to describe the adhesive property of MPs, we cloned and expressed the MP84, a mannoprotein with molecular weight of 84 kDa, on Pichia pastoris yeast, and performed interaction assays of C. neoformans with epithelial lung cells, in the presence or absence of capsule components. Two fungal strains, the wild type, NE-241, and a mutant, CAP67, deficient in GXM production, were used throughout this study. The adhesion assays were completed using epithelial lung cells, A549, and human prostate cancer cells, PC3, as a control. We observed that capsulated wild type (NE-241), and acapsular (CAP67) strains adhered significantly to A549 cells, compared with PC3 cells (p < 0.05). GXM inhibits the NE-241 adhesion, but not the CAP67. In contrast, CAP67 adhesion was only inhibited in the presence of MP84. These results demonstrate the involvement of MP in the adhesion of C. neoformans to epithelial lung cells. We conclude that this interaction possibly involves an adhesion-like interaction between MP on the fungal surface and the complementary receptor molecules on the epithelial cells. PMID:25191644

  7. Contribution of the mannan backbone of cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan and a glycolytic enzyme of Staphylococcus aureus to contact-mediated killing of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Reiko; Saito, Fumito; Matsuo, Miki; Kurokawa, Kenji; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kawamoto, Susumu

    2007-07-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is killed by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and the killing is inhibited by soluble capsular polysaccharides. To investigate the mechanism of killing, cells in coculture were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. S. aureus attached to the capsule of C. neoformans, and the ultrastructure of the attached C. neoformans cells was characteristic of dead cells. To identify the molecules that contributed to the fungal-bacterial interaction, we treated each with NaIO(4) or protease. Treatment of C. neoformans with NaIO(4) promoted adherence. It was inferred that cleavage of xylose and glucuronic acid side chains of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) allowed S. aureus to recognize mannose residues in the backbone, which resisted periodate oxidation. On the other hand, treatment of S. aureus with protease decreased adherence, suggesting that protein contributed to attachment in S. aureus. In confirmation, side chain-cleaved polysaccharide or defined alpha-(1-->3)-mannan inhibited the killing at lower concentrations than native GXM did. Also, these polysaccharides reduced the adherence of the two species and induced clumping of pure S. aureus cells. alpha-(1-->3)-Mannooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization (DP) of >/=3 induced cluster formation of S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance analyses showed interaction of GXM and surface protein from S. aureus; the interaction was inhibited by oligosaccharides with a DP of > or =3. Conformations of alpha-(1-->3) oligosaccharides were predicted. The three-dimensional structures of mannooligosaccharides larger than triose appeared curved and could be imagined to be recognized by a hypothetical staphylococcal lectin. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of staphylococcal protein followed by electroblotting, enzyme-linked immunolectin assay, protein staining, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing suggested that the candidate protein was

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans requires the ESCRT protein Vps23 for iron acquisition from heme, for capsule formation, and for virulence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Cadieux, Brigitte; Chan, Vivienne; Liu, Victor; Kronstad, James

    2013-01-01

    Iron availability is a key regulator of virulence factor elaboration in Cryptococcus neoformans, the causative agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in HIV/AIDS patients. In addition, iron is an essential nutrient for pathogen proliferation in mammalian hosts but little is known about the mechanisms of iron sensing and uptake in fungal pathogens that attack humans. In this study, we mutagenized C. neoformans by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA insertion and screened for mutants with reduced growth on heme as the sole iron source. Among 34 mutants, we identified a subset with insertions in the gene for the ESCRT-I (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) protein Vps23 that resulted in a growth defect on heme, presumably due to a defect in uptake via endocytosis or misregulation of iron acquisition from heme. Remarkably, vps23 mutants were also defective in the elaboration of the cell-associated capsular polysaccharide that is a major virulence factor, while overexpression of Vps23 resulted in cells with a slightly enlarged capsule. These phenotypes were mirrored by a virulence defect in the vps23 mutant in a mouse model of cryptococcosis and by hypervirulence of the overexpression strain. Overall, these results reveal an important role for trafficking via ESCRT functions in both heme uptake and capsule formation, and they further reinforce the connection between iron and virulence factor deployment in C. neoformans.

  9. Combined meningococcal serogroup A and W135 outer-membrane vesicles activate cell-mediated immunity and long-term memory responses against non-covalent capsular polysaccharide A.

    PubMed

    Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; García, Luis; Cedré, Bárbara; Mandariote, Aleida; Fariñas, Mildrey; Oliva, Reynaldo; Rosenqvist, Einar; Pérez, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs) have inherent adjuvant properties, and many vaccines use OMV as vaccine components. Utilizing the adjuvant properties of OMV could lead to the formulation of vaccines that are less expensive and potentially more immunogenic than covalently conjugated polysaccharide vaccines. We evaluated the adjuvant effect in Balb/c mice of combinations of OMV from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A and W135 as compared to that of the non-covalently conjugated capsular polysaccharide A. Both antigens were adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide. The mice were given a booster dose of plain polysaccharide A to stimulate an immunologic memory response. Subclasses determination and cytokine assays demonstrated the capacity of OMV to induce a IgG2a/IgG2b isotype profile and IFN-γ production, suggesting the induction of a Th1 pattern immune response. Lymphoproliferative responses to OMVs were high, with affinity maturation of antibodies observed. Bactericidal titers after the booster dose were also observed. Memory B cells and long-term memory T cells were also detected. The results of this study indicate that combined meningococcal serogroup A and W135 OMV can activate cell-mediated immunity and induce a long-term memory response.

  10. Differential Regulation of IgG Anti-Capsular Polysaccharide and Antiprotein Responses to Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae in the Presence of Cognate CD4+ T Cell Help

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    polysaccharide (PPS14), the phosphorylcholine determinant of the cell wall C-polysaccharide, and the cell wall protein, pneumococcal surface protein A...a more rapid delivery of CD4 T cell help. In contrast, the IgG anti- phosphorylcholine response, although also dependent on CD4 T cells, is TCR...and/or IgG isotypes specific for the phosphorylcholine (PC) determinant of the cell wall C-polysaccharide (teichoic acid) and for the cell wall

  11. Synthetic trimer and tetramer of 3-beta-D-ribose-(1-1)-D-ribitol-5-phosphate conjugated to protein induce antibody responses to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide in mice and monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, C C; Evenberg, D; Hoogerhout, P; Käyhty, H; Saarinen, L; van Boeckel, C A; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Poolman, J T

    1992-01-01

    Synthetic oligosaccharides derived from the capsular polysaccharide (PRP) of Haemophilus influenzae type b were conjugated to carrier proteins via a thioether linkage. Conjugates were made of trimeric and tetrameric ribose-ribitol-phosphate and tetanus toxoid or diphtheria toxin. All conjugates elicited anti-PRP antibody responses with an increasing immunoglobulin G/immunoglobulin M ratio in adult mice and monkeys. Trimer conjugates elicited lower anti-PRP antibody responses compared with tetramer conjugates. Adult monkeys responded equally well to the tetrameric oligosaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate as to the oligosaccharide-CRM197 conjugate (HbOC), which elicits protective levels of serum antibodies in human infants after two or three injections. PMID:1563770

  12. Modulation of Macrophage Inflammatory Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling by Intracellular Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Hayes, James B; Sircy, Linda M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Ding, Wandi; Leander, Rachel N; McClelland, Erin E; Nelson, David E

    2016-07-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a common facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause life-threatening fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. Shortly after infection, Cn is detectable as both extra- and intracellular yeast particles, with Cn being capable of establishing long-lasting latent infections within host macrophages. Although recent studies have shown that shed capsular polysaccharides and intact extracellular Cn can compromise macrophage function through modulation of NF-κB signaling, it is currently unclear whether intracellular Cn also affects NF-κB signaling. Utilizing live cell imaging and computational modeling, we find that extra- and intracellular Cn support distinct modes of NF-κB signaling in cultured murine macrophages. Specifically, in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages treated with extracellular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major Cn capsular polysaccharide, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is inhibited, whereas in cells with intracellular Cn, LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 is both amplified and sustained. Mathematical simulations and quantification of nascent protein expression indicate that this is a possible consequence of Cn-induced "translational interference," impeding IκBα resynthesis. We also show that long term Cn infection induces stable nuclear localization of p65 and IκBα proteins in the absence of additional pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this case, nuclear localization of p65 is not accompanied by TNFα or inducible NOS (iNOS) expression. These results demonstrate that capsular polysaccharides and intact intracellular yeast manipulate NF-κB via multiple distinct mechanisms and provide new insights into how Cn might modulate cellular signaling at different stages of an infection.

  13. Diagnostic Challenges of Cryptococcus neoformans in an Immunocompetent Individual Masquerading as Chronic Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Kedar R; Roberts, Amity L; Curtis, Mark T; Fortuna, Danielle; Dharia, Robin; Sheehan, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can cause disseminated meningoencephalitis and evade immunosurveillance with expression of a major virulence factor, the polysaccharide capsule. Direct diagnostic assays often rely on the presence of the cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan capsular antigen (CrAg) or visualization of the capsule. Strain specific phenotypic traits and environmental conditions influence differences in expression that can thereby compromise detection and timely diagnosis. Immunocompetent hosts may manifest clinical signs and symptoms indolently, often expanding the differential and delaying appropriate treatment and diagnosis. We describe a 63-year-old man who presented with a progressive four-year history of ambulatory dysfunction, headache, and communicating hydrocephalus. Serial lumbar punctures (LPs) revealed elevated protein (153-300 mg/dL), hypoglycorrhachia (19-47 mg/dL), lymphocytic pleocytosis (89-95% lymphocyte, WBC 67-303 mg/dL, and RBC 34-108 mg/dL), and normal opening pressure (13-16 cm H2O). Two different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CrAg assays were negative. A large volume CSF fungal culture grew unencapsulated C. neoformans. He was initiated on induction therapy with amphotericin B plus flucytosine and consolidation/maintenance therapy with flucytosine, but he died following discharge due to complications. Elevated levels of CSF Th1 cytokines and decreased IL6 may have affected the virulence and detection of the pathogen.

  14. Cryptococcosis in the era of AIDS--100 years after the discovery of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, T G; Perfect, J R

    1995-01-01

    Although Cryptococcus neoformans and cryptococcosis have existed for several millennia, a century has passed since the discovery of this encapsulated yeast and its devastating disease. With the advent of the AIDS pandemic, cryptococcal meningitis has emerged as a leading cause of infectious morbidity and mortality and a frequently life-threatening opportunistic mycosis among patients with AIDS. Both basic and clinical research have accelerated in the 1990s, and this review attempts to highlight some of these advances. The discussion covers recent findings, current concepts, controversies, and unresolved issues related to the ecology and genetics of C. neoformans; the surface structure of the yeast; and the mechanisms of host defense. Regarding cell-mediated immunity, CD4+ T cells are crucial for successful resistance, but CD8+ T cells may also participate significantly in the cytokine-mediated activation of anticryptococcal effector cells. In addition to cell-mediated immunity, monoclonal antibodies to the major capsular polysaccharide, the glucuronoxylomannan, offer some protection in murine models of cryptococcosis. Clinical concepts are presented that relate to the distinctive features of cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS and the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cryptococcosis in AIDS patients. PMID:8665468

  15. Phenotypic switching of Cryptococcus neoformans occurs in vivo and influences the outcome of infection

    PubMed Central

    Fries, Bettina C.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Serfass, Evan; Casadevall, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Phenotypic switching has been linked to the virulence of many pathogens, including fungi. However, it has not been conclusively shown to occur in vivo or to influence the outcome of infection. Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypic switching in vitro to colony types that differ in their virulence in mice. In this study, we asked whether C. neoformans undergoes phenotypic switching in vivo and whether this phenomenon contributes to virulence. By using a small inoculum to preclude the introduction of variants that had already switched during in vitro propagation, we demonstrated that in vivo switching to a mucoid phenotype occurred in two mice strains and was associated with a lethal outcome. Phenotypic switching resulted in changes of the capsular polysaccharide that inhibited phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. This promoted a more vigorous inflammatory response and rapid demise. These data document in vivo switching in a fungus and associate this phenomenon with enhanced virulence and a lethal outcome. The importance of this finding is underscored by the increased likelihood of phenotypic switching in chronic cryptococcosis; thus this mechanism may account for the inability to eradicate the organism in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:11733559

  16. Polysaccharide-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Violeta Fernández; Balbin, Yury Valdés; Calderón, Janoi Chang; Icart, Luis Peña; Verez-Bencomo, Vicente

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and lipopolysaccharides from bacteria are employed for the production of vaccines against human diseases. Initial development of CPS as a vaccine was followed by the development and introduction of conjugate polysaccharide-protein vaccines. The principles leading to both developments are reviewed.

  17. Biosynthesis of dermatan sulphate. Defructosylated Escherichia coli K4 capsular polysaccharide as a substrate for the D-glucuronyl C-5 epimerase, and an indication of a two-base reaction mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Hannesson, H H; Hagner-McWhirter, A; Tiedemann, K; Lindahl, U; Malmström, A

    1996-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide from Escherichia coli K4 consists of a chondroitin ([GlcA(beta 1-->3)GalNAc(beta 1-->4)]n) backbone, to which beta-fructofuranose units are linked to C-3 of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) residues. Removal of the fructose units by mild acid hydrolysis provided a substrate for the GlcA C-5 epimerase, which is involved in the generation of L-iduronic acid (IdoA) units during dermatan sulphate biosynthesis. Incubation of this substrate with solubilized fibroblast microsomal enzyme in the presence of 3H2O resulted in the incorporation of tritium at C-5 of hexuronyl units. A Km of 67 x 10(-6) M hexuronic acid (equivalent to disaccharide units) was determined, which is similar to that (80 x 10(-6) M) obtained for dermatan (desulphated dermatan sulphate). Vmax was about 4 times higher with dermatan than with the K4 substrate. A defructosylated K4 polysaccharide isolated after incubation of bacteria with D-[5-3H]glucose released 3H2O on reaction with the epimerase, and thus could be used to assay the enzyme. Incubation of a K4 substrate with solubilized microsomal epimerase for 6 h in the presence of 3H2O resulted in the formation of about 5% IdoA and approximately equal amounts of 3H in GlcA and IdoA. A corresponding incubation of dermatan yielded approx. 22% GlcA, which contained virtually all the 3H label. These results are tentatively explained in terms of a two-base reaction mechanism, involving a monoprotic L-ido-specific base and a polyprotic D-gluco-specific base. Most of the IdoA residues generated by the enzyme occurred singly, although some formation of two or three consecutive IdoA-containing disaccharide units was observed. PMID:8573097

  18. Nasal immunization of mice with AFCo1 or AFPL1 plus capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella typhi induces cellular response and memory B and T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Reyes, Laura; González, Elizabeth; Borrero, Yusnaby; Lescaille, Diandra; Pérez, Rocmira; Nuñez, Darzy; Pérez, Oliver

    2014-12-05

    The response to infection against Salmonella involves both B and T cell mediated immunity. An effective immunization can activate an adequate immune response capable to control the primary infection and protect against a secondary infection. Mucosal vaccination, by inducing local pathogen-specific immune responses, has the potential to counter mucosally transmitted pathogens at the portal of entry, thereby increasing the efficacy of vaccines. The aim of this work was to explore the efficacy of AFCo1 or AFPL1, as mucosal adjuvants to stimulate cell immunity and memory responses against Vi polysaccharide antigen of Salmonella typhi (PsVi). Mice immunized with 3 intranasal doses exhibited high levels of PsVi-specific IgG (p<0.05), IgG2a and IgG2c subclasses. Also, an amplified recall response after a booster immunization with a plain polysaccharide vaccine was induced. Avidities index were higher in mice immunized with adjuvanted formulations at different chaotropic concentrations. Furthermore, IL-12 and IFN-γ levels in nasally vaccinated mice with both adjuvants were induced. Moreover, priming with 3 doses followed by booster immunization with VaxTyVi(®) resulted in high levels of anti-Vi specific IgG, IgG subclasses and antibody avidity. Long lived plasma cells in bone marrow, memory B cells and long-term memory T cells after booster dose were induced. The combined formulation of Vi polysaccharide with mucosal adjuvants provides an improved immunogenicity, in particular with regard to cellular responses and long lasting cells responses.

  19. Eucalyptus Tree: A Potential Source of Cryptococcus neoformans in Egyptian Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Dalia; Elhelw, Rehab; Refai, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, the River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is a well-known tree and is highly appreciated by the rural and urban dwellers. The role of Eucalyptus trees in the ecology of Cryptococcus neoformans is documented worldwide. The aim of this survey was to show the prevalence of C. neoformans during the flowering season of E. camaldulensis at the Delta region in Egypt. Three hundred and eleven samples out of two hundred Eucalyptus trees, including leaves, flowers, and woody trunks, were collected from four governorates in the Delta region. Thirteen isolates of C. neoformans were recovered from Eucalyptus tree samples (4.2%). Molecular identification of C. neoformans was done by capsular gene specific primer CAP64 and serotype identification was done depending on LAC1 gene. This study represents an update on the ecology of C. neoformans associated with Eucalyptus tree in Egyptian environment. PMID:26884765

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma against 78 Genetically Different (mecA, luk-P, agr or Capsular Polysaccharide Type) Staphylococcus aureus Strains.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Rutger; Lührman, Anne; Holtfreter, Silva; Kolata, Julia; Radke, Dörte; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on the antimicrobial activity of cold atmospheric pressure argon plasma showed varying effects against mecA+ or mecA-Staphylococcus aureus strains. This observation may have important clinical and epidemiological implications. Here, the antibacterial activity of argon plasma was investigated against 78 genetically different S. aureus strains, stratified by mecA, luk-P, agr1-4, or the cell wall capsule polysaccharide types 5 and 8. kINPen09® served as the plasma source for all experiments. On agar plates, mecA+luk-P-S. aureus strains showed a decreased susceptibility against plasma compared to other S. aureus strains. This study underlines the high complexity of microbial defence against antimicrobial treatment and confirms a previously reported strain-dependent susceptibility of S. aureus to plasma treatment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Efficacy of immune sera from human immunoglobulin transgenic mice immunized with a peptide mimotope of Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan.

    PubMed

    Maitta, Robert W; Datta, Kausik; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2004-09-28

    The efficacy of antibody mediated immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established experimentally for human antibodies. Our group has previously shown that immunization with a conjugate consisting of a peptide mimotope of the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), P13, and diphtheria toxoid (P13-DT) prolonged survival of transgenic mice with human immunoglobulin loci, XenoMouse mice, which were challenged with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. In the study reported herein, we determined the efficacy of human antibodies in the sera of immunized XenoMouse mice against C. neoformans in passive transfer experiments in naïve BALB/c mice. Survival studies were performed with sera from XenoMouse mice expressing human IgG2/kappa (G2/k mice) or IgG4/kappa (G4/k mice) that had been immunized with P13-tetanus toxoid (TT)/Alhydrogel with or without CpG, and G2/k mice that had been immunized with P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG or Alhydrogel/CpG, obtained on day 7 (early sera) and days 30 or 35-59 (late sera) after primary immunization. Compared to mice receiving sera from G2/k-PBS-treated mice, the survival of naïve mice was prolonged by both early and late sera from G2/k-P13-DT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice, but only late sera from G2/k-P13-TT/Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice. Late, but not early sera from G2/k-Alhydrogel/CpG-immunized mice also prolonged survival. For all sera, prolongation of survival was associated with GXM-specific serum IgM. Sera from G2/k mice that received P13-TT without CpG, and all groups of G4/k mice had low to undetectable levels of antibody to GXM and were not protective. Our findings suggest that GXM-specific human IgM may be a functional mediator of protection against C. neoformans.

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D L; Casadevall, A; Cho, Y; Lee, S C

    1996-12-01

    The primary clinical manifestation of Cryptococcus neoformans infection in humans is meningoencephalitis. To study the defense mechanisms that participate in the host response against C. neoformans infection of the central nervous system (CNS), we have developed a new model of cryptococcal meningitis in rats. Intracisternal inoculation of C. neoformans produced a granulomatous meningitis with minimal brain parenchymal involvement, resembling cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompetent patients. The granulomas were composed of T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) and macrophages (CD11b/c+); a subpopulation of the macrophages expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). In this model, C. neoformans disseminated to systemic organs early in the course of infection and provoked granuloma formation and NOS2 expression. The temporal profile of inflammation indicated that the CNS inflammatory response is delayed relative to that in the lung and the spleen, which suggests that the effective inflammatory response within the CNS may follow activation of T cells in the periphery and their subsequent entry into the CNS. Inflammation in the meninges was associated with signs of subpial and subependymal glial activation, including enhanced expression of CD11b/c and CD4 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes. Neither cells, however, expressed NOS2. Although C. neoformans invasion to the brain parenchyma was rare, soluble polysaccharide was commonly associated with reactive glial cells. Necrosis was not a feature of C. neoformans granulomas, but, instead, inflammatory cells underwent apoptosis in inflamed organs. The current rat intrathecal cryptococcosis model has several unique advantages for the study of human cryptococcal meningoencephalitis that include close resemblance of histopathologic changes to those in humans, easy accessibility to the cerebrospinal fluid compartment, and no requirement of immunosuppressive agents for establishment of infection.

  3. Acinetobacter baumannii K27 and K44 capsular polysaccharides have the same K unit but different structures due to the presence of distinct wzy genes in otherwise closely related K gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Shashkov, Alexander S; Kenyon, Johanna J; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shneider, Mikhail M; Popova, Anastasiya V; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Volozhantsev, Nikolay V; Hall, Ruth M; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-05-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs), from Acinetobacter baumannii isolates 1432, 4190 and NIPH 70, which have related gene content at the K locus, were examined, and the chemical structures established using 2D(1)H and(13)C NMR spectroscopy. The three isolates produce the same pentasaccharide repeat unit, which consists of 5-N-acetyl-7-N-[(S)-3-hydroxybutanoyl] (major) or 5,7-di-N-acetyl (minor) derivatives of 5,7-diamino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-ulosonic (legionaminic) acid (Leg5Ac7R), D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. However, the linkage between repeat units in NIPH 70 was different to that in 1432 and 4190, and this significantly alters the CPS structure. The KL27 gene cluster in 4190 and KL44 gene cluster in NIPH 70 are organized identically and contain lga genes for Leg5Ac7R synthesis, genes for the synthesis of the common sugars, as well as anitrA2 initiating transferase and four glycosyltransferases genes. They share high-level nucleotide sequence identity for corresponding genes, but differ in the wzy gene encoding the Wzy polymerase. The Wzy proteins, which have different lengths and share no similarity, would form the unrelated linkages in the K27 and K44 structures. The linkages formed by the four shared glycosyltransferases were predicted by comparison with gene clusters that synthesize related structures. These findings unambiguously identify the linkages formed by WzyK27 and WzyK44, and show that the presence of different wzy genes in otherwise closely related K gene clusters changes the structure of the CPS. This may affect its capacity as a protective barrier for A. baumannii.

  4. Group B Streptococcus and Streptococcus suis Capsular Polysaccharides Induce Chemokine Production by Dendritic Cells via Toll-Like Receptor 2- and MyD88-Dependent and -Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Calzas, Cynthia; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Lemire, Paul; Gagnon, Fleur; Lachance, Claude; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (also known as group B Streptococcus [GBS]) and Streptococcus suis are encapsulated streptococci causing severe septicemia and meningitis. Bacterial capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are poorly immunogenic, but anti-CPS antibodies are essential to the host defense against encapsulated bacteria. The mechanisms underlying anti-CPS antibody responses are not fully elucidated, but the biochemistry of CPSs, particularly the presence of sialic acid, may have an immunosuppressive effect. We investigated the ability of highly purified S. suis and GBS native (sialylated) CPSs to activate dendritic cells (DCs), which are crucial actors in the initiation of humoral immunity. The influence of CPS biochemistry was studied using CPSs extracted from different serotypes within these two streptococcal species, as well as desialylated CPSs. No interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-12p70, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), or IL-10 production was observed in S. suis or GBS CPS-stimulated DCs. Moreover, these CPSs exerted immunosuppressive effects on DC activation, as a diminution of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-induced B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) expression was observed in CPS-pretreated cells. However, S. suis and GBS CPSs induced significant production of CCL3, via partially Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent pathways, and CCL2, via TLR-independent mechanisms. No major influence of CPS biochemistry was observed on the capacity to induce chemokine production by DCs, indicating that DCs respond to these CPSs in a patterned way rather than a structure-dedicated manner. PMID:23774593

  5. The KL24 gene cluster and a genomic island encoding a Wzy polymerase contribute genes needed for synthesis of the K24 capsular polysaccharide by the multiply antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate RCH51.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Johanna J; Kasimova, Anastasiya A; Shneider, Mikhail M; Shashkov, Alexander S; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Popova, Anastasiya V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Hall, Ruth M; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2017-03-01

    The whole-genome sequence of the multiply antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate RCH51 belonging to sequence type ST103 (Institut Pasteur scheme) revealed that the set of genes at the capsule locus, KL24, includes four genes predicted to direct the synthesis of 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose (d-Fuc3NAc), and this sugar was found in the capsular polysaccharide (CPS). One of these genes, fdtE, encodes a novel bifunctional protein with an N-terminal FdtA 3,4-ketoisomerase domain and a C-terminal acetyltransferase domain. KL24 lacks a gene encoding a Wzy polymerase to link the oligosaccharide K units to form the CPS found associated with isolate RCH51, and a wzy gene was found in a small genomic island (GI) near the cpn60 gene. This GI is in precisely the same location as another GI carrying wzy and atr genes recently found in several A. baumannii isolates, but it does not otherwise resemble it. The CPS isolated from RCH51, studied by sugar analysis and 1D and 2D 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, revealed that the K unit has a branched pentasaccharide structure made up of Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc residues with d-Fuc3NAc as a side branch, and the K units are linked via a β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→3)-β-d-Galp linkage formed by the Wzy encoded by the GI. The functions of the glycosyltransferases encoded by KL24 were assigned to formation of specific bonds. A correspondence between the order of the genes in KL24 and other KL and the order of the linkages they form was noted, and this may be useful in future predictions of glycosyltransferase specificities.

  6. The KL24 gene cluster and a genomic island encoding a Wzy polymerase contribute genes needed for synthesis of the K24 capsular polysaccharide by the multiply antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate RCH51.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Johanna J; Kasimova, Anastasiya A; Shneider, Mikhail; Shashkov, Alexander S; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Popova, Anastasiya V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Hall, Ruth M; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2017-01-17

    The whole genome sequence of the multiply antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate RCH51 belonging to sequence type ST103 (Institut Pasteur scheme) revealed that the set of genes at the capsule locus, KL24, includes four genes predicted to direct the synthesis of 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-D-galactose (D-Fuc3NAc) and this sugar was found in the capsular polysaccharide (CPS). One of these genes, fdtE, encodes a novel bifunctional protein with an N-terminal FdtA 3,4-ketoisomerase domain and a C-terminal acetyltransferase domain. KL24 lacks a gene encoding a Wzy polymerase to link the oligosaccharide K units to form the CPS found associated with isolate RCH51, and a wzy gene was found in a small genomic island (GI) near cpn60 gene. This GI is in precisely the same location as a GI carrying wzy and atr genes recently found in several A. baumannii isolates, but does not otherwise resemble it. The CPS isolated from RCH51, studied by sugar analysis and one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, revealed that the K unit has a branched pentasaccharide structure made up of Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc residues with D-Fuc3NAc as a side branch, and the K units are linked via a β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→3)-β-D-Galp linkage formed by the Wzy encoded by the GI. The functions of the glycosyltransferases encoded by KL24 were assigned to formation of specific bonds. A correspondence between the order of the genes in KL24 and other KL and the order of the linkages they form was noted, and this may be useful in future predictions of glycosyltransferase specificities.

  7. Molecular analysis of region 1 of the Escherichia coli K5 antigen gene cluster: a region encoding proteins involved in cell surface expression of capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Pazzani, C; Rosenow, C; Boulnois, G J; Bronner, D; Jann, K; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of region 1 of the K5 antigen gene cluster of Escherichia coli was determined. This region is postulated to encode functions which, at least in part, participate in translocation of polysaccharide across the periplasmic space and onto the cell surface. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed five genes that encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 75.7, 60.5, 44, 43, and 27 kDa. The 27-kDa protein was 70.7% homologous to the CMP-2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid synthetase enzyme encoded by the E. coli kdsB gene, indicating the presence of a structural gene for a similar enzyme within the region 1 operon. The 43-kDa protein was homologous to both the Ctrb and BexC proteins encoded by the Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae capsule gene clusters, respectively, indicating common stages in the expression of capsules in these gram-negative bacteria. However, no homology was detected between the 75.7, 60.5-, and 44-kDa proteins and any of the proteins so far described for the H. influenzae and N. meningitidis capsule gene clusters. Images PMID:8397187

  8. Eosinophil-Cryptococcus neoformans interactions in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, M; Casadevall, A; Kress, Y; Spira, G; Orlofsky, A

    1997-01-01

    Eosinophils are components of inflammatory responses to a variety of pathogens. Although a variety of beneficial and harmful functions have been ascribed to these cells, their role in protection against infectious agents remains uncertain. Previous studies have reported eosinophilic pneumonia in mice infected intratracheally with Cryptococcus neoformans. We confirmed this observation and studied the inflammatory response in the lung at day 14 by light and electron microscopy. Immunostaining for glucuronoxylomannan showed isolated cryptococci inside the eosinophilic cuffs. Eosinophils were found to be in close association with C. neoformans in vivo. Cryptococci were associated with eosinophils within eosinophilic perivascular cuffs, within granulomas, and lining the alveolar space. To further investigate this phenomenon in vitro, we isolated rat peritoneal eosinophils and studied cryptococcus-eosinophil interactions in the presence and absence of anti-capsular immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgE monoclonal antibody (MAb). Eosinophils phagocytosed C. neoformans only in the presence of specific antibody. Phagocytosis was rapid, and dense rings that appeared to consist of granule contents were formed around the organisms. Mast cells were observed to occasionally phagocytose C. neoformans in vitro in the presence of IgE MAb. Our observations suggest that eosinophils may be effector cells against C. neoformans. PMID:9125578

  9. The Effect of a BSA Conjugate of a Synthetic Hexasaccharide Related to the Fragment of Capsular Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae Type 14 on the Activation of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akhmatova, Nelli K.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina A.; Akhmatov, Elvin A.; Egorova, Nadezhda B.; Logunov, Denis Yu.; Gening, Marina L.; Sukhova, Elena V.; Yashunsky, Dmitry V.; Tsvetkov, Yury E.; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.

    2016-01-01

    We report the effect of a bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate of a synthetic hexasaccharide (HS) related to the fragment of the capsular polysaccharide (PS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 on the stimulation of innate immune system and the subsequent development of a PS-specific antibody response. Glycoconjugate (GC) in the presence (GC + AL) or absence of aluminum hydroxide was administered to mice twice. GC increased the number of TLR2-expressing cells and induced the maturation of dendritic cells (CD11c+, CD80+ and, MHCII+), which secreted IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα into the culture medium. The level of IL-1β, IL-10, IFNγ, and TNFα in the blood increased within 24 h after the single GC administration to mice. On day 7, the numbers of splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes increased. After the second immunization, the levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower than in the control, whereas the B cell, NK cell, and MHC class II-expressing cell numbers remained enhanced. However, of the presence of anti-PS, IgG antibodies were not detected. The addition of aluminum hydroxide to GC stimulated the production of GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFNγ, and TNFα. Anti-PS IgG1 antibody titers 7 days after the second immunization were high. During that period, normal levels of splenic CD4+ T lymphocytes were maintained, whereas reduced CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers and increased levels of B lymphocytes, NK cells, and MHC class II-expressing cell numbers were observed. Anti-PS IgG levels diminished until day 92. A booster immunization with GC + AL stimulated the production of anti-PS IgG memory antibodies, which were determined within 97 days. The elucidation of specific features of the effect of the synthetic HS conjugate on the stimulation of innate, cell-mediated immunity, and antibody response can favor the optimization of GC vaccine design. PMID:27446078

  10. Sequence diversity within the capsular genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup 6 and 19.

    PubMed

    Elberse, Karin; Witteveen, Sandra; van der Heide, Han; van de Pol, Ingrid; Schot, Corrie; van der Ende, Arie; Berbers, Guy; Schouls, Leo

    2011-01-01

    The main virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the capsule. The polysaccharides comprising this capsule are encoded by approximately 15 genes and differences in these genes result in different serotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the sequence diversity of the capsular genes of serotypes 6A, 6B, 6C, 19A and 19F and to explore a possible effect of vaccination on variation and distribution of these serotypes in the Netherlands. The complete capsular gene locus was sequenced for 25 serogroup 6 and for 20 serogroup 19 isolates. If one or more genes varied in 10 or more base pairs from the reference sequence, it was designated as a capsular subtype. Allele-specific PCRs and specific gene sequencing of highly variable capsular genes were performed on 184 serogroup 6 and 195 serogroup 19 isolates to identify capsular subtypes. This revealed the presence of 6, 3 and a single capsular subtype within serotypes 6A, 6B and 6C, respectively. The serotype 19A and 19F isolates comprised 3 and 4 capsular subtypes, respectively. For serogroup 6, the genetic background, as determined by multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), seemed to be closely related to the capsular subtypes, but this was less pronounced for serogroup 19 isolates. The data also suggest shifts in the occurrence of capsular subtypes within serotype 6A and 19A after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine. The shifts within these non-vaccine serotypes might indicate that these capsular subtypes are filling the niche of the vaccine serotypes. In conclusion, there is considerable DNA sequence variation of the capsular genes within pneumococcal serogroup 6 and 19. Such changes may result in altered polysaccharides or in strains that produce more capsular polysaccharides. Consequently, these altered capsules may be less sensitive for vaccine induced immunity.

  11. Effects of Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus (Gomes) L. R. Landrum, on melanized and non-melanized Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Lisboa Fernandes, Orionalda; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; de Souza Lino Junior, Ruy; Vinaud, Marina Clare; Hasimoto E Souza, Lúcia Kioko; de Paula, Joelma Abadia Marciano; do Rosário Rodrigues Silva, Maria

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, the in vitro susceptibility and capsular width from both melanized and non-melanized Cryptococcus neoformans cells in the presence of Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus crude extract were determined. The results were compared with those obtained for voriconazole and amphotericin B. Melanization was obtained in minimal medium broth with the addition of L-dopa, and the antifungal susceptibility tests were performed using the broth microdilution method. Capsular width of 30 cells of each one of the isolates in medium with crude extracts of P. pseudocaryophyllus or voriconazole or amphotericin B at a concentration corresponding to 0.5 times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was measured, and the mean was calculated. The MICs and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) for plant extract and voriconazole were identical for both melanized and non-melanized C. neoformans isolates, but for amphotericin, the MFCs for melanized cells were up to 8 times higher than for non-melanized cells. The capsular width of C. neoformans cells was smaller (p < 0.001) in the presence crude extract of P. pseudocaryophyllus and of voriconazole regardless melanization. The findings of capsule alterations of C. neoformans verified in this study provide fertile ways for future research into the effects of antifungal agents on the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis.

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, the etiologic agents of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Fraser, James A; Doering, Tamara L; Wang, Zhou; Janbon, Guilhem; Idnurm, Alexander; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2014-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are the two etiologic agents of cryptococcosis. They belong to the phylum Basidiomycota and can be readily distinguished from other pathogenic yeasts such as Candida by the presence of a polysaccharide capsule, formation of melanin, and urease activity, which all function as virulence determinants. Infection proceeds via inhalation and subsequent dissemination to the central nervous system to cause meningoencephalitis. The most common risk for cryptococcosis caused by C. neoformans is AIDS, whereas infections caused by C. gattii are more often reported in immunocompetent patients with undefined risk than in the immunocompromised. There have been many chapters, reviews, and books written on C. neoformans. The topics we focus on in this article include species description, pathogenesis, life cycle, capsule, and stress response, which serve to highlight the specializations in virulence that have occurred in this unique encapsulated melanin-forming yeast that causes global deaths estimated at more than 600,000 annually.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, the Etiologic Agents of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.; Fraser, James A.; Doering, Tamara L.; Wang, Zhou; Janbon, Guilhem; Idnurm, Alexander; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are the two etiologic agents of cryptococcosis. They belong to the phylum Basidiomycota and can be readily distinguished from other pathogenic yeasts such as Candida by the presence of a polysaccharide capsule, formation of melanin, and urease activity, which all function as virulence determinants. Infection proceeds via inhalation and subsequent dissemination to the central nervous system to cause meningoencephalitis. The most common risk for cryptococcosis caused by C. neoformans is AIDS, whereas infections caused by C. gattii are more often reported in immunocompetent patients with undefined risk than in the immunocompromised. There have been many chapters, reviews, and books written on C. neoformans. The topics we focus on in this article include species description, pathogenesis, life cycle, capsule, and stress response, which serve to highlight the specializations in virulence that have occurred in this unique encapsulated melanin-forming yeast that causes global deaths estimated at more than 600,000 annually. PMID:24985132

  14. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  15. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses.

  16. Specificity of Cryptococcus neoformans factor sera determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and dot enzyme assay.

    PubMed Central

    Belay, T; Cherniak, R; Shinoda, T

    1993-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a dot enzyme assay (DEA) were used to determine the specificities of Cryptococcus neoformans factor sera to serotype type-specific capsular polysaccharides, glucuronoxylomannans (GXMs). Pure and chemically characterized GXMs were obtained from representative isolates of C. neoformans serotypes A, B, C, and D. Distinctive specificity patterns and quantitative differences were observed for each factor serum when the selected GXMs were studied by ELISA. The specificity patterns for each factor serum determined by DEA almost completely paralleled the ELISA results. The serotype specificities demonstrated by ELISA and DEA were similar to previously reported results that were obtained by slide agglutination studies of whole cells. On the basis of the ELISA and DEA activity patterns, factor sera 5, 6, and 8 were specific for serotypes B, C, and D, respectively; factor serum 1 was strongly reactive to all serotypes; factor serum 2 was specific for serotypes A, B, and D; factor serum 3 was specific for serotypes A and D; and factor serum 4 was specific for serotypes B and C. The specificity of factor serum 7 for serotype A was demonstrated by DEA only. Structural variation was indicated among the serotype C isolates studied because a unique activity pattern versus factor serum 6 was observed for each isolate. The quantitative differences in the activity of the GXMs from five serotype C isolates suggest that mannopyranoside residues substituted O-2 and O-4 with xylose are essential elements of the determinant responsible for the observed activity of factor 6. No significant differences in activity patterns and specificities of factor serum 6 were observed when O-deacetylated GXMs were substituted for the native GXMs. Our results show that ELISA and DEA are valuable techniques for the serological analysis of cryptococcal factor sera and GXMs. Images PMID:7685739

  17. In vitro synergistic effects of chlorpromazine and sertraline in combination with amphotericin B against Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Luana; Loreto, Érico S; Zanette, Régis A; Chassot, Francieli; Santurio, Janio M; Alves, Sydney H

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is encapsulated yeast that causes cryptococcosis. The cryptococcal meningitis may cause neuropsychiatric symptoms. Here, we evaluated the in vitro activity of amphotericin B (AMB), chlorpromazine (CLOR), and sertraline (SERT) alone or in combination against clinical isolates of C. neoformans considering the capsular induction in vitro. Susceptibility tests were carried out using the broth microdilution method in accordance with the CLSI document M27-A3. The combination [CLOR + AMB] exhibited synergism for 50 and 67 % of strains before capsular induction (group I) and after capsular induction (group II), respectively. The combination [SERT + AMB] showed 60 % of synergism against the both groups. Antagonism was not observed. Our results show the therapeutic potential of chlorpromazine and sertraline in combination with amphotericin B against neurocryptococcosis.

  18. The Cryptococcus neoformans Capsule: a Sword and a Shield

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Teresa R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is characterized by its ability to induce a distinct polysaccharide capsule in response to a number of host-specific environmental stimuli. The induction of capsule is a complex biological process encompassing regulation at multiple steps, including the biosynthesis, transport, and maintenance of the polysaccharide at the cell surface. By precisely regulating the composition of its cell surface and secreted polysaccharides, C. neoformans has developed intricate ways to establish chronic infection and dormancy in the human host. The plasticity of the capsule structure in response to various host conditions also underscores the complex relationship between host and parasite. Much of this precise regulation of capsule is achieved through the transcriptional responses of multiple conserved signaling pathways that have been coopted to regulate this C. neoformans-specific virulence-associated phenotype. This review focuses on specific host stimuli that trigger the activation of the signal transduction cascades and on the downstream transcriptional responses that are required for robust encapsulation around the cell. PMID:22763631

  19. The capsular network of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Cassone, A; Garaci, E

    1977-06-01

    Attempts at improving chemical fixation for electron-microscopic observation of the capsule of Klebsiella pneumoniae were made. The capsule was preserved by using alcian blue - lanthanum and tris-(1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) - aldehyde - osmium procedures. Despite the different retention of the overall capsular material and minor variations in morphological details, in both cases the interpretation of ultrastructural patterns suggested that the capsule be composed of a meshed network of thin polysaccharide fibrils radiating from the cell wall. This organization is in keeping with all recognized chemical properties of bacterial polysaccharide capsules or, at least, does not contradict them. Moreover, an effective preservation of bacterial structures other than capsule has been obtained, mostly in specimens fixed by the TAPO-aldehyde-osmium method, a fact which gives further reliability to the technical approach used for capsule visualization.

  20. Interleukin-6 production by human monocytes stimulated with Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Lupis, E; Celeste, A; Petrelli, M L; Curró, F; Cusumano, V; Teti, G

    1997-06-01

    In order to ascertain if Cryptococcus neoformans components can induce interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, we stimulated human whole blood with purified capsular products. Their potencies in stimulating IL-6 release were mannoproteins > galactoxylomannan = glucuronoxylomannan > alpha(1-3)glucan. IL-6 production was tumor necrosis factor alpha independent and required the presence of monocytes and plasma. Since IL-6 can stimulate replication of the human immunodeficiency virus in monocytic cells, these findings may be clinically relevant.

  1. Interleukin-6 production by human monocytes stimulated with Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Lupis, E; Celeste, A; Petrelli, M L; Curró, F; Cusumano, V; Teti, G

    1997-01-01

    In order to ascertain if Cryptococcus neoformans components can induce interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, we stimulated human whole blood with purified capsular products. Their potencies in stimulating IL-6 release were mannoproteins > galactoxylomannan = glucuronoxylomannan > alpha(1-3)glucan. IL-6 production was tumor necrosis factor alpha independent and required the presence of monocytes and plasma. Since IL-6 can stimulate replication of the human immunodeficiency virus in monocytic cells, these findings may be clinically relevant. PMID:9169790

  2. Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Cryptococcus neoformans as a model of yeast pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph; Calderwood, Stephen B.

    2002-01-01

    We found that the well-studied nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can use various yeasts, including Cryptococcus laurentii and Cryptococcus kuetzingii, as a sole source of food, producing similar brood sizes compared with growth on its usual laboratory food source Escherichia coli OP50. C. elegans grown on these yeasts had a life span similar to (C. laurentii) or longer than (C. kuetzingii) those fed on E. coli. However, the human pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans killed C. elegans, and the C. neoformans polysaccharide capsule as well as several C. neoformans genes previously shown to be involved in mammalian virulence were also shown to play a role in C. elegans killing. These included genes associated with signal transduction pathways (GPA1, PKA1, PKR1, and RAS1), laccase production (LAC1), and the α mating type. C. neoformans adenine auxotrophs, which are less virulent in mammals, were also less virulent in C. elegans. These results support the model that mammalian pathogenesis of C. neoformans may be a consequence of adaptations that have evolved during the interaction of C. neoformans with environmental predators such as free-living nematodes and amoebae and suggest that C. elegans can be used as a simple model host in which C. neoformans pathogenesis can be readily studied. PMID:12438649

  3. Localization on encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans of serum components opsonic for phagocytosis by macrophages and neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, T R; Highison, B; Stratton, C J

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the cryptococcal capsule inhibits phagocytosis of Cryptococcus neoformans by macrophages and neutrophils. In this study, the binding sites of potential serum opsonins in immune and nonimmune sera were determined by immunoelectron microscopy, and the results were compared with the results of phagocytosis of the yeasts by mouse peritoneal macrophages and human neutrophils. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from normal human serum showed low-density binding at the capsular surface and at sites throughout the capsule. Complement component C3 from normal serum bound heavily at the capsular surface. IgG from rabbit capsular antiserum showed relatively dense deposition at the capsular surface and at sites throughout the capsule. Cells opsonized with heat-inactivated human serum were engulfed poorly by both macrophages and neutrophils, indicating that the low-density deposition of IgG produced by normal serum was not adequate for opsonization. Yeasts opsonized with normal human serum were engulfed in large numbers by neutrophils and to a lesser extent by macrophages, indicating that neutrophils in particular were able to effectively utilize the opsonically active C3 which normal human serum deposited at the capsular surface. Yeasts opsonized with rabbit anticapsular serum were engulfed by both macrophages and neutrophils, indicating that the high density of surface IgG produced by capsular antiserum is an effective opsonin for both cells. These results suggest that the complement-neutrophil system is a possible defense mechanism in the nonimmune host. Images PMID:6363293

  4. The Anti-helminthic Compound Mebendazole Has Multiple Antifungal Effects against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Luna S.; Schneider, Rafael; Lopes, William; Azevedo, Renata; Staats, Charley C.; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Schrank, Augusto; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the most lethal pathogen of the central nervous system. The gold standard treatment of cryptococcosis, a combination of amphotericin B with 5-fluorocytosine, involves broad toxicity, high costs, low efficacy, and limited worldwide availability. Although the need for new antifungals is clear, drug research and development (R&D) is costly and time-consuming. Thus, drug repurposing is an alternative to R&D and to the currently available tools for treating fungal diseases. Here we screened a collection of compounds approved for use in humans seeking for those with anti-cryptococcal activity. We found that benzimidazoles consist of a broad class of chemicals inhibiting C. neoformans growth. Mebendazole and fenbendazole were the most efficient antifungals showing in vitro fungicidal activity. Since previous studies showed that mebendazole reaches the brain in biologically active concentrations, this compound was selected for further studies. Mebendazole showed antifungal activity against phagocytized C. neoformans, affected cryptococcal biofilms profoundly and caused marked morphological alterations in C. neoformans, including reduction of capsular dimensions. Amphotericin B and mebendazole had additive anti-cryptococcal effects. Mebendazole was also active against the C. neoformans sibling species, C. gattii. To further characterize the effects of the drug a random C. gattii mutant library was screened and indicated that the antifungal activity of mebendazole requires previously unknown cryptococcal targets. Our results indicate that mebendazole is as a promising prototype for the future development of anti-cryptococcal drugs. PMID:28400768

  5. Iron and fungal pathogenesis: a case study with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Hee; Kronstad, James W

    2008-02-01

    The acquisition of iron from mammalian hosts is an important aspect of infection because microbes must compete with the host for this nutrient and iron perception often regulates virulence factor expression. For example, iron levels are known to influence the elaboration of two major virulence factors, the polysaccharide capsule and melanin, in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. This pathogen, which causes meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised people, acquires iron through the use of secreted reductants, cell surface reductases, a permease/ferroxidase uptake system and siderophore transporters. In addition, a master regulator, Cir1, integrates iron sensing with the expression of virulence factors, with growth at 37 degrees C and with signalling pathways that also influence virulence. The challenge ahead is to develop mechanistic views of the iron acquisition functions and regulatory schemes that operate when C. neoformans is in host tissue. Achieving these goals may contribute to an understanding of the notable predilection of the fungus for the mammalian central nervous system.

  6. Chitosan, the deacetylated form of chitin, is necessary for cell wall integrity in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lorina G; Specht, Charles A; Donlin, Maureen J; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2007-05-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The fungal cell wall is an excellent target for antifungal therapies as it is an essential organelle that provides cell structure and integrity, it is needed for the localization or attachment of known virulence factors, including the polysaccharide capsule, melanin, and phospholipase, and it is critical for host-pathogen interactions. In C. neoformans, chitosan produced by the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups from nascent chitin polymers has been implicated as an important component of the vegetative cell wall. In this study, we identify four putative chitin/polysaccharide deacetylases in C. neoformans. We have demonstrated that three of these deacetylases, Cda1, Cda2, and Cda3, can account for all of the chitosan produced during vegetative growth in culture, but the function for one, Fpd1, remains undetermined. The data suggest a model for chitosan production in vegetatively growing C. neoformans where the three chitin deacetylases convert chitin generated by the chitin synthase Chs3 into chitosan. Utilizing a collection of chitin/polysaccharide deacetylase deletion strains, we determined that during vegetative growth, chitosan helps to maintain cell integrity and aids in bud separation. Additionally, chitosan is necessary for maintaining normal capsule width and the lack of chitosan results in a "leaky melanin" phenotype. Our analysis indicates that chitin deacetylases and the chitosan made by them may prove to be excellent antifungal targets.

  7. Rapid direct identification of Cryptococcus neoformans from pigeon droppings by nested PCR using CNLAC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chae, H S; Park, G N; Kim, S H; Jo, H J; Kim, J T; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J; Kim, N H; Shin, B W; Kang, Y I; Chang, K S

    2012-08-01

    Isolation and identification of Cryptococcus neoformans and pathogenic yeast-like fungi from pigeon droppings has been taken for a long time and requires various nutrients for its growth. In this study, we attempted to establish a rapid direct identification method of Cr. neoformans from pigeon dropping samples by nested-PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) CAP64 and CNLAC1 genes, polysaccharide capsule gene and laccase-associated gene to produce melanin pigment, respectively, which are common genes of yeasts. The ITS and CAP64 genes were amplified in all pathogenic yeasts, but CNLAC1 was amplified only in Cr. neoformans. The ITS gene was useful for yeast genotyping depending on nucleotide sequence. Homology of CAP64 genes among the yeasts were very high. The specificity of PCR using CNLAC1 was demonstrated in Cr. neoformans environmental strains but not in other yeast-like fungi. The CNLAC1 gene was detected in 5 serotypes of Cr. neoformans. The nested-PCR amplified up to 10(-11) μg of the genomic DNA and showed high sensitivity. All pigeon droppings among 31 Cr. neoformans-positive samples were positive and all pigeon droppings among 348 Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the direct nested-PCR. In addition, after primary enrichment of pigeon droppings in Sabouraud dextrose broth, all Cr. neoformans-negative samples were negative by the nested-PCR, which showed high specificity. The nested-PCR showed high sensitivity without culture of pigeon droppings. Nested-PCR using CNLAC1 provides a rapid and reliable molecular diagnostic method to overcome weak points such as long culture time of many conventional methods.

  8. Evolution of the capsular operon of Streptococcus iniae in response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Millard, Candice M; Baiano, Justice C F; Chan, Candy; Yuen, Benedict; Aviles, Fabian; Landos, Matt; Chong, Roger S M; Benedict, Suresh; Barnes, Andrew C

    2012-12-01

    Streptococcus iniae causes severe septicemia and meningitis in farmed fish and is also occasionally zoonotic. Vaccination against S. iniae is problematic, with frequent breakdown of protection in vaccinated fish. The major protective antigens in S. iniae are the polysaccharides of the capsule, which are essential for virulence. Capsular biosynthesis is driven and regulated by a 21-kb operon comprising up to 20 genes. In a long-term study, we have sequenced the capsular operon of strains that have been used in autogenous vaccines across Australia and compared it with the capsular operon sequences of strains subsequently isolated from infected vaccinated fish. Intriguingly, strains isolated from vaccinated fish that subsequently become infected have coding mutations that are confined to a limited number of genes in the cps operon, with the remainder of the genes in the operon remaining stable. Mutations in strains in diseased vaccinated fish occur in key genes in the capsular operon that are associated with polysaccharide configuration (cpsG) and with regulation of biosynthesis (cpsD and cpsE). This, along with high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations within the cps genes, suggests that immune response directed predominantly against capsular polysaccharide may be driving evolution in a very specific set of genes in the operon. From these data, it may be possible to design a simple polyvalent vaccine with a greater operational life span than the current monovalent killed bacterins.

  9. Evolution of the Capsular Operon of Streptococcus iniae in Response to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Candice M.; Baiano, Justice C. F.; Chan, Candy; Yuen, Benedict; Aviles, Fabian; Landos, Matt; Chong, Roger S. M.; Benedict, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae causes severe septicemia and meningitis in farmed fish and is also occasionally zoonotic. Vaccination against S. iniae is problematic, with frequent breakdown of protection in vaccinated fish. The major protective antigens in S. iniae are the polysaccharides of the capsule, which are essential for virulence. Capsular biosynthesis is driven and regulated by a 21-kb operon comprising up to 20 genes. In a long-term study, we have sequenced the capsular operon of strains that have been used in autogenous vaccines across Australia and compared it with the capsular operon sequences of strains subsequently isolated from infected vaccinated fish. Intriguingly, strains isolated from vaccinated fish that subsequently become infected have coding mutations that are confined to a limited number of genes in the cps operon, with the remainder of the genes in the operon remaining stable. Mutations in strains in diseased vaccinated fish occur in key genes in the capsular operon that are associated with polysaccharide configuration (cpsG) and with regulation of biosynthesis (cpsD and cpsE). This, along with high ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations within the cps genes, suggests that immune response directed predominantly against capsular polysaccharide may be driving evolution in a very specific set of genes in the operon. From these data, it may be possible to design a simple polyvalent vaccine with a greater operational life span than the current monovalent killed bacterins. PMID:23001668

  10. Role of Cln1 during melanization of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    García-Rodas, Rocío; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Román, Elvira; Janbon, Guilhem; Moyrand, Frédérique; Pla, Jesús; Casadevall, Arturo; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has several well-described virulence determinants. A polysaccharide capsule and the ability to produce melanin are among the most important. Melanization occurs both in vitro, in the presence of catecholamine and indole compounds, and in vivo during the infection. Despite the importance of melanin production for cryptococcal virulence, the component and mechanisms involved in its synthesis have not been fully elucidated. In this work, we describe the role of a G1/S cyclin (Cln1) in the melanization process. Cln1 has evolved specifically with proteins present only in other basidiomycetes. We found that Cln1 is required for the cell wall stability and production of melanin in C. neoformans. Absence of melanization correlated with a defect in the expression of the LAC1 gene. The relation between cell cycle elements and melanization was confirmed by the effect of drugs that cause cell cycle arrest at a specific phase, such as rapamycin. The cln1 mutant was consistently more susceptible to oxidative damage in a medium that induces melanization. Our results strongly suggest a novel and hitherto unrecognized role for C. neoformans Cln1 in the expression of virulence traits.

  11. Identification of a capsular variant and characterization of capsular acetylation in Klebsiella pneumoniae PLA-associated type K57

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Yang, Han-Ru; Yang, Feng-Ling; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can cause community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is important for its virulence. Among 79 capsular (K) types discovered thus far, K57 is often associated with PLA. Here, we report the identification of a K57 variant. Cps gene locus sequencing revealed differences between the K57 reference strain 4425/51 (Ref-K57) and a variant, the PLA isolate A1142. While Ref-K57 cps contained orf13 encoding a putative acetyltransferase, the insertion of a putative transposase-encoding gene at this position was detected in A1142. This variation was detected in other K57 clinical strains. Biochemical analyses indicated that A1142 was deficient in CPS acetylation. Genetic replacement and complementation verified that orf13 was responsible for CPS acetylation. Acetylation increased CPS immunoreactivity to antiserum and enhanced K. pneumoniae induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines through JNK and MAPK signaling. While acetylation diminished the serum resistance of bacteria, it promoted adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells possibly via increasing production of type I fimbriae. In conclusion, acetylation-mediated capsular variation in K57 was observed. Capsular acetylation contributed to the variety and antigenic diversity of CPS, influenced its biological activities, and was involved in K. pneumoniae-host interactions. These findings have implications for vaccine design and pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae. PMID:27550826

  12. The heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 of Cryptococcus neoformans is associated with the fungal cell surface and influences the interaction between yeast and host cells.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Carolina P; Piffer, Alicia C; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Fonseca, Fernanda L; Soares, Danielle A; Staats, Charley C; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans secretes numerous proteins, such as heat shock proteins, by unconventional mechanisms during its interaction with host cells. Hsp70 is a conserved chaperone that plays important roles in various cellular processes, including the interaction of fungi with host immune cells. Here, we report that sera from individuals with cryptococcosis infection recognize a recombinant C. neoformans Hsp70 (Cn_rHsp70). Moreover, immunofluorescence assays using antibodies against Cn_rHsp70 revealed the localization of this protein at the cell surface mainly in association with the capsular network. We found that the addition of Cn_rHsp70 positively modulated the interaction of C. neoformans with human alveolar epithelial cells and decreased fungal killing by mouse macrophages, without affecting phagocytosis rates. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that there was a competitive association among the receptor, GXM and Cn_rHsp70, indicating that the Hsp70-binding sites in host cells appear to be shared by glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major capsular antigen in C. neoformans. Our observations suggest additional mechanisms by which Hsp70 influences the interaction of C. neoformans with host cells.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii: serotypes in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pérez, C; Dolande, M; Moya, M; Roselló, A; de Capriles, Claudia R Hartung; Landaeta, M E; Mata-Essayag, S

    2008-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the medically important yeast-like fungi. C. neoformans var. gatti has been made a species: C. gatti. In our country, there are few studies about these two species and their serotypes. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of C. neoformans and C. gattii, and their serotypes in Venezuelan clinical isolates. One hundred and twenty C. neoformans and 12 C. gattii clinical isolates were identified by L-canavanine, glycine, and bromothymol blue agar media (CGB). These were investigated by agglutination and adsorption studies with anticryptococcal sera, which were produced by rabbit immunization. Of the 132 isolates 59.8% were typed serotype A (C. neoformans), followed by 25.8% serotype D (C. neoformans), 5.3% serotype AD (C. neoformans), and 5.3% were typed serotype C (var. gattii). Additionally 3.8% were serotype B (C. gattii).

  14. Activity of tannins from Stryphnodendron adstringens on Cryptococcus neoformans: effects on growth, capsule size and pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kelly; Rozental, Sonia; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2009-01-01

    Background Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville, Leguminosae, also known in Brazil as barbatimão, is rich in tannins and many flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins such as prodelphinidins and prorobinetinidins. Previous studies have demonstrated several pharmacological properties of tannins from barbatimão, including anti-candidal activity. Methods The antifungal activity of proanthocyanidin polymeric tannins from Stryphnodendron adstringens (subfraction F2.4) was evaluated against three strains of Cryptococcus neoformans with different capsule expressions, using the broth microdilution technique, light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of subfraction F2.4 on C. neoformans and melanoma mammalian cells pigmentation was also evaluated. Results Although susceptibility assays revealed MIC values quite similar (between 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml), analyses of MFC values revealing that the acapsular mutant Cap 67 was more susceptible to be killed by the subfraction F2.4 (MFC = 20 μg/ml) than the two tested capsular strains (T1-444 and ATCC 28957) (MFC > 160 μg/ml). Optical and electron microscopy experiments revealed relevant alterations in cell shape and size in all strains treated with 1 and 2.5 μg/ml of subfraction F2.4. Capsule size of the capsular strains decreased drastically after subfraction F2.4 treatment. In addition, ultrastructural alterations such as cell wall disruption, cytoplasm extraction, mitochondria swelling, increase in the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles and formation of membranous structures in the cytoplasm were also observed in treated yeasts. Incubation with subfraction F2.4 also decreased C. neoformans pigmentation, however, did not interfere in melanization of B16F10 mammalian cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that tannins extracted from S. adstringens interfered with growth, capsule size and pigmentation, all important virulence factors of C. neoformans, and may be considered as a putative candidate for the

  15. Effects of microplusin, a copper-chelating antimicrobial peptide, against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda D; Rossi, Diego C P; Martinez, Luis R; Frases, Susana; Fonseca, Fernanda L; Campos, Claudia Barbosa L; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Daffre, Sirlei

    2011-11-01

    Microplusin is an antimicrobial peptide isolated from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. Its copper-chelating ability is putatively responsible for its bacteriostatic activity against Micrococcus luteus as microplusin inhibits respiration in this species, which is a copper-dependent process. Microplusin is also active against Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC(50) = 0.09 μM), the etiologic agent of cryptococcosis. Here, we show that microplusin is fungistatic to C. neoformans and this inhibitory effect is abrogated by copper supplementation. Notably, microplusin drastically altered the respiratory profile of C. neoformans. In addition, microplusin affects important virulence factors of this fungus. We observed that microplusin completely inhibited fungal melanization, and this effect correlates with the inhibition of the related enzyme laccase. Also, microplusin significantly inhibited the capsule size of C. neoformans. Our studies reveal, for the first time, a copper-chelating antimicrobial peptide that inhibits respiration and growth of C. neoformans and modifies two major virulence factors: melanization and formation of a polysaccharide capsule. These features suggest that microplusin, or other copper-chelation approaches, may be a promising therapeutic for cryptococcosis.

  16. Analysis of multiple components involved in the interaction between Cryptococcus neoformans and Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Juliana; Albuquerque, Priscila C; Wolf, Julie M; Nascimento, Renata; Pereira, Marcos D; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an environmental fungus that can cause lethal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. The mechanisms by which environmental microbes become pathogenic to mammals are still obscure, but different studies suggest that fungal virulence evolved from selection imposed by environmental predators. The soil-living Acanthamoeba castellanii is a well-known predator of C. neoformans. In this work, we evaluated the participation of C. neoformans virulence-associated structures in the interaction of fungal cells with A. castellanii. Fungal extracellular vesicles (EVs) and the polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) were internalized by A. castellanii with no impact on the viability of amoebal cells. EVs, but not free GXM, modulated antifungal properties of A. castellanii by inducing enhanced yeast survival. Phagocytosis of C. neoformans by amoebal cells and the pathogenic potential in a Galleria mellonella model were not affected by EVs, but previous interactions with A. castellanii rendered fungal cells more efficient in killing this invertebrate host. This observation was apparently associated with marked amoeba-induced changes in surface architecture and increased resistance to both oxygen- and nitrogen-derived molecular species. Our results indicate that multiple components with the potential to impact pathogenesis are involved in C. neoformans environmental interactions. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Connecting virulence pathways to cell-cycle progression in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Christina M; Haase, Steven B

    2017-03-06

    Proliferation and host evasion are critical processes to understand at a basic biological level for improving infectious disease treatment options. The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals by proliferating in cerebrospinal fluid. Current antifungal drugs target "virulence factors" for disease, such as components of the cell wall and polysaccharide capsule in C. neoformans. However, mechanistic links between virulence pathways and the cell cycle are not as well studied. Recently, cell-cycle synchronized C. neoformans cells were profiled over time to identify gene expression dynamics (Kelliher et al., PLoS Genet 12(12):e1006453, 2016). Almost 20% of all genes in the C. neoformans genome were periodically activated during the cell cycle in rich media, including 40 genes that have previously been implicated in virulence pathways. Here, we review important findings about cell-cycle-regulated genes in C. neoformans and provide two examples of virulence pathways-chitin synthesis and G-protein coupled receptor signaling-with their putative connections to cell division. We propose that a "comparative functional genomics" approach, leveraging gene expression timing during the cell cycle, orthology to genes in other fungal species, and previous experimental findings, can lead to mechanistic hypotheses connecting the cell cycle to fungal virulence.

  18. Origin of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans Diploid Strains

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo; Esposto, Maria C.; Clarke, David L.; Wickes, Brian L.; Viviani, Maria A.

    2001-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is an important human fungal pathogen. Two varieties, C. neoformans var. neoformans and C. neoformans var. gattii, have been identified. Both are heterothallic with two mating types, MATa and MATα. Some rare isolates are self-fertile and are considered occasional diploid or aneuploid strains. In the present study, 133 isolates, mostly from Italian patients, were investigated to detect the presence of diploid strains in the Igiene Università Milano culture collection. All of the diploid isolates were further investigated by different methods to elucidate their origins. Forty-nine diploid strains were identified by flow cytometry. PCR fingerprinting using the (GACA)4 primer showed that the diploid state was associated with two specific genotypes identified as VN3 and VN4. Determination of mating type on V8 juice medium confirmed that the majority of the strains were sterile. PCR and dot blotting using the two pheromone genes (MFa and MFα) as probes identified 36 of the 49 diploid isolates as MATa/α. The results of pheromone gene sequencing showed that two allelic MFα genes exist and are distinct for serotypes A and D. In contrast, the MFa gene sequence was conserved in both serotype alleles. Amplification of serotype-specific STE20 alleles demonstrated that the diploid strains contained one mating locus inherited from a serotype A parent and one inherited from a serotype D parent. The present results suggest that diploid isolates may be common among the C. neoformans population and that in Italy and other European countries serotype A and D populations are not genetically isolated but are able to recombine by sexual reproduction. PMID:11682503

  19. Capsular hook-assisted implantation of modified capsular tension ring.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Gupta, Shikha; Nayak, Bhagabat; Gogia, Varun

    2016-04-04

    A 16-year-old boy presented with decrease of vision over a period of 2 years. On examination, he was diagnosed to have microspherophakia with lenticular myopia with secondary glaucoma in both eyes. He was treated by lens aspiration and two-point capsular support using a modified capsular tension ring (M-CTR) and capsular tension segment (CTS) sutured to the sclera along with implantation of a foldable intraocular lens inside the bag. Lens aspiration was performed without artificial capsular hook support of the bag, as the lens was soft and vitreous was formed. However, M-CTR rotation into the bag was fraught with repeated adherence of the advancing end of the M-CTR into the loose bag causing simultaneous rotation of the bag with the rotation of the ring resulting in transient increase in bag subluxation. Capsular hooks provided appropriate countertraction to the unsupported bag, thus facilitating easy insertion and rotation of the ring into the bag. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Campylobacter jejuni capsular genotypes are related to Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heikema, A P; Islam, Z; Horst-Kreft, D; Huizinga, R; Jacobs, B C; Wagenaar, J A; Poly, F; Guerry, P; van Belkum, A; Parker, C T; Endtz, H P

    2015-09-01

    In about one in a thousand cases, a Campylobacter jejuni infection results in the severe polyneuropathy Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). It is established that sialylated lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) of C. jejuni are a crucial virulence factor in GBS development. Frequent detection of C. jejuni with sialylated LOS in stools derived from patients with uncomplicated enteritis implies that additional bacterial factors should be involved. To assess whether the polysaccharide capsule is a marker for GBS, the capsular genotypes of two geographically distinct GBS-associated C. jejuni strain collections and an uncomplicated enteritis control collection were determined. Capsular genotyping of C. jejuni strains from the Netherlands revealed that three capsular genotypes, HS1/44c, HS2 and HS4c, were dominant in GBS-associated strains and capsular types HS1/44c and HS4c were significantly associated with GBS (p 0.05 and p 0.01, respectively) when compared with uncomplicated enteritis. In a GBS-associated strain collection from Bangladesh, capsular types HS23/36c, HS19 and HS41 were most prevalent and the capsular types HS19 and HS41 were associated with GBS (p 0.008 and p 0.02, respectively). Next, specific combinations of the LOS class and capsular genotypes were identified that were related to the occurrence of GBS. Multilocus sequence typing revealed restricted genetic diversity for strain populations with the capsular types HS2, HS19 and HS41. We conclude that capsular types HS1/44c, HS2, HS4c, HS19, HS23/36c and HS41 are markers for GBS. Besides a crucial role for sialylated LOS of C. jejuni in GBS pathogenesis, the identified capsules may contribute to GBS susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. All rights reserved.

  1. Opsonization of encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans by specific anticapsular antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, T R; Follette, J L

    1981-01-01

    Antisera prepared in rabbits against either whole encapsulated cells of Cryptococcus neoformans or purified cryptococcal polysaccharide were opsonic for the encapsulated yeast. The opsonic activity was removed by absorption with whole cryptococci and was inhibited by free polysaccharide. As little as 0.13 microgram of cryptococcal polysaccharide produced a 50% inhibition of opsonization. Various degrees of neutralization by polysaccharides from the four cryptococcal serotypes suggested that the opsonins were type specific. Fractionation of antiserum on Bio-Gel A-5m (Bio-Rad Laboratories) and diethylaminoethyl cellulose showed that the opsonins were antibodies of the immunoglobulin G class. These opsonizing antibodies did not require heat-labile serum components for optimal phagocytosis of the yeast. Inhibition studies using 2-deoxy-D-glucose demonstrated that ingestion of encapsulated cryptococci opsonized with anticapsular antibody was a 2-deoxy-D-glucose-inhibitable process. This result differed from similar studies with non-encapsulated cryptococci which showed that ingestion of non-encapsulated cryptococci opsonized with normal serum was not inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. PMID:7014468

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans var neoformans isolated from droppings of captive birds in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Irokanulo, E O; Makinde, A A; Akuesgi, C O; Ekwonu, M

    1997-04-01

    The yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans, was found in apparently healthy birds at the Jos Wildlife Park and Zoo in Jos, Nigeria. Cryptococcus neoformans var neoformans was isolated from feces of four captive bird species. Five isolates belonged to serotype A while two were serotype D. Serotype A of C. neoformans was isolated from a white face duck (Dendrocygna viduata), eagle owl (Bubo africanus cinerascene) and peacock (Pavo cristatus). The other two (serotype D), were isolated from a spotted eagle owl.

  3. PCR for capsular typing of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Falla, T J; Crook, D W; Brophy, L N; Maskell, D; Kroll, J S; Moxon, E R

    1994-01-01

    A PCR method for the unequivocal assignment of Haemophilus influenzae capsular type (types a to f) was developed. PCR primers were designed from capsule type-specific DNA sequences cloned from the capsular gene cluster of each of the six capsular types. PCR product was amplified only from the capsular type for which the primers were designed. Product was confirmed by using either an internal oligonucleotide or restriction endonuclease digestion. A total of 172 H. influenzae strains of known capsular type (determined genetically) comprising all capsular types and noncapsulate strains were tested by PCR capsular typing. In all cases the PCR capsular type corresponded to the capsular genotype determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the cap region. When used in conjunction with PCR primers derived from the capsular gene bexA, capsulate, noncapsulate, and capsule-deficient type b mutant strains could be differentiated. PCR capsular typing overcomes the problems of cross-reaction and autoagglutination associated with the serotyping of H. influenzae strains. The rapid and unequivocal capsular typing method that is described will be particularly important for typing invasive H. influenzae strains isolated from recipients of H. influenzae type b vaccine. Images PMID:7814470

  4. Physicochemical Properties of Neisseria meningitidis Group X Polysaccharide Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, M. A.; Robinson, John A.

    1972-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis group X occurs in human carrier populations and is rarely implicated in serious disease. This organism possesses a capsular group antigen which is an acidic polysaccharide. It is composed of the amino sugars, glucosamine, glucosamine-6-phosphate, galactosamine, and the simple hexose, glucose. The group X capsular antigen has an S20,w0 of 3.6, and the acidic nature of the polysaccharide is reflected in an isoelectric point of 3.65. The meningococcal A, B, C, and Y polysaccharide group antigens are also composed primarily of amino sugars. The chemical composition of the group X antigen most closely resembles the capsular antigen of N. meningitidis group Y, which is also predominately a carrier organism. Images PMID:4629206

  5. Current status of meningococcal group B vaccine candidates: capsular or noncapsular?

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Romero, J; Outschoorn, I M

    1994-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a severe, life-threatening infection for which no adequate vaccine exists. Current vaccines, based on the group-specific capsular polysaccharides, provide short-term protection in adults against serogroups A and C but are ineffective in infants and do not induce protection against group B strains, the predominant cause of infection in western countries, because the purified serogroup B polysaccharide fails to elicit human bactericidal antibodies. Because of the poor immunogenicity of group B capsular polysaccharide, different noncapsular antigens have been considered for inclusion in a vaccine against this serogroup: outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharides, iron-regulated proteins, Lip, pili, CtrA, and the immunoglobulin A proteases. Alternatively, attempts to increase the immunogenicity of the capsular polysaccharide have been made by using noncovalent complexes with outer membrane proteins, chemical modifications, and structural analogs. Here, we review the strategies employed for the development of a vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B; the difficulties associated with the different approaches are discussed. PMID:7834605

  6. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  7. Quantification and assessment of viability of Cryptococcus neoformans by LightCycler amplification of capsule gene mRNA.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Muhammad; Kfoury, Najla; Cha, Raymond; Mobarak, Reem

    2004-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen. It infects the central nervous system causing meningitis, which is fatal if untreated, especially in AIDS and immunosuppressed patients. In this study a method of quantification and assessment of viability of C. neoformans by LightCycler RT-PCR amplification of the capsule gene mRNA is established. The sequence of primers and probes were derived from C. neoformans capsular CAP10 gene mRNA (GenBank accession number AF144574), and were species specific. Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis of LightCycler RT-PCR product showed a single band of 223 bp in length. In order to develop an internal control a 223 bp exon fragment of capsule mRNA was cloned in the pCR2.1 plasmid vector and RNA was generated by in vitro transcription. To determine the sensitivity of the assay, serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA with known concentrations and copy numbers, and serially diluted cultures of viable and nonviable C. neoformans were used. Under optimal conditions as little as 0.472 fg of capsule mRNA could be detected, corresponding to 1-10 c.f.u. ml(-1) of the sample. No amplification was observed from up to 10(5) heat/UV radiation-killed yeast cells and RNA of other bacterial and fungal pathogens and human genomic DNA or RNA. The amplification of capsule mRNA represents a sensitive, specific and quantitative means of detection of viable C. neoformans in clinical specimens and can be useful in the evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of antifungal drugs in the treatment of C. neoformans meningitis.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans STE12α Regulates Virulence but Is Not Essential for Mating

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y.C.; Wickes, B.L.; Miller, G.F.; Penoyer, L.A.; Kwon-Chung, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    The Cryptococcus neoformans STE12α gene, a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE12, exists only in mating type (MAT)α cells. In S. cerevisiae, STE12 was required for mating and filament formation. In C. neoformans, haploid fruiting on filament agar required STE12α. The ability to form hyphae, however, was not affected by deletion of STE12α when convergently growing MATa strains were present. Furthermore, ste12α disruptants were fertile when mated with MATa strains, albeit with reduced mating frequency. Most importantly, the virulence of a ste12α disruptant of serotype D strain was significantly reduced in a mouse model. When the ste12α locus was reconstituted with the wild-type allele by cotransformation, virulence was restored. Histopathological analysis demonstrated a reduction in capsular size of yeast cells, less severe cystic lesions, and stronger immune responses in meninges of mice infected with ste12α cells than those of mice infected with STE12α cells. Using reporter gene constructs, we found that STE12α controls the expression of several phenotypes known to be involved in virulence, such as capsule and melanin production. These results demonstrate a clear molecular link between mating type and virulence in C. neoformans. PMID:10704467

  9. Binding of the wheat germ lectin to Cryptococcus neoformans chitooligomers affects multiple mechanisms required for fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Silva, Fernanda D.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Frases, Susana; Staats, Charley C.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2015-01-01

    The principal capsular component of Cryptococcus neoformans, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), interacts with surface glycans, including chitin-like oligomers. Although the role of GXM in cryptococcal infection has been well explored, there is no information on how chitooligomers affect fungal pathogenesis. In this study, surface chitooligomers of C. neoformans were blocked through the use of the wheat germ lectin (WGA) and the effects on animal pathogenesis, interaction with host cells, fungal growth and capsule formation were analyzed. Treatment of C. neoformans cells with WGA followed by infection of mice delayed mortality relative to animals infected with untreated fungal cells. This observation was associated with reduced brain colonization by lectin-treated cryptococci. Blocking chitooligomers also rendered yeast cells less efficient in their ability to associate with phagocytes. WGA did not affect fungal viability, but inhibited GXM release to the extracellular space and capsule formation. In WGA-treated yeast cells, genes that are involved in capsule formation and GXM traffic had their transcription levels decreased in comparison with untreated cells. Our results suggest that cellular pathways required for capsule formation and pathogenic mechanisms are affected by blocking chitin-derived structures at the cell surface of C. neoformans. Targeting chitooligomers with specific ligands may reveal new therapeutic alternatives to control cryptococcosis. PMID:23608320

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans myositis without dissemination.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mamta; Khatib, Riad; Jones, Bruce A; Fakih, Mohamad G

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of isolated cryptococcal myositis involving the paraspinal muscle without evidence of disseminated disease in a patient with a large B-cell lymphoma diagnosed at the time of presentation. Biopsy of the muscle involved grew a pure culture of Cryptococcus neoformans and periodic acid-Schiff staining showed numerous budding yeast consistent with Cryptococcus spp. The patient responded to systemic antifungal therapy with complete resolution of his infection. We also present a review of 5 previously published cases of cryptococcal myositis.

  11. Analysis of E. coli K5 capsular polysaccharide heparosan

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Mellisa; Wang, Zhenyu; Laremore, Tatiana N.; Zhang, Fuming; Zhong, Weihong; Pu, Dennis; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Heparosan is the key precursor for the preparation of bioengineered heparin, a potential replacement for porcine intestinal heparin, an important anticoagulant drug. The molecular weight (MW) distribution of heparosan produced by the fermentation of E. coli K5 was investigated. Large-slab isocratic and mini-slab gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to analyze the MW and polydispersity of heparosan. A preparative method that allowed fractionation by continuous-elution PAGE was used to obtain heparosan MW standards. The MWs of the heparosan standards were determined by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS). A ladder of the standards was then used to determine the MW properties of polydisperse heparosan samples. Unbleached and bleached heparosan produced by fermentation of E. coli K5 had similar number-averaged MWs (MN), weight-averaged MWs (MW), and MW ranges of 3,000 to 150,000 Da. PMID:20407891

  12. Pflanzen als Naehrsubstrat fuer Cryptococcus Neoformans (Plants as a Substratum for Growth of Cryptococcus Neoformans),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The suitability of plants as a possible substratum for growth (in vitro) of C . neoformans has been investigated. A sample of hay collected from...the second left unsterile. The samples were inoculated by flooding them with suspensions prepared from two known strains of C . neoformans . The...month and subsequently at room temperature. Discrete colonies of C . neoformans appeared after five days on samples of hay as well as of dandelion

  13. Iron acquisition by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Vartivarian, S E; Cowart, R E; Anaissie, E J; Tashiro, T; Sprigg, H A

    1995-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for the growth and metabolism of microbial cells. Most pathogenic microbes elaborate powerful iron chelating agents (siderophores) to mobilize iron from ferric ligands. The pathogenic yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans has not been found to produce siderophores and its mechanism of iron acquisition is unknown. This investigation explored an alternative pathway for iron acquisition by examining the interactions of iron with the cell surface. Iron uptake experiments were conducted utilizing radiolabelled ferrous iron and ferric iron chelates, with evidence for the presence of iron(II) receptors and the generation of ferrous iron by surface reduction. Hyperbolic kinetics were found when 59FeII was presented to the organism and uptake was blocked with bathophenanthroline sulphonate, an Fe2+ chelator. The yeast also acquired iron as [59Fe3+]-citrate and [59Fe3+]-pyrophosphate while bathophenanthroline sulphonate reduced the acquisition of these ferric ligands by 48% and 52% respectively. Pre-incubation with either ferric ligand also reduced iron acquisition by 50%. KCN inhibited uptake of iron(II) by 90% and uptake of [59Fe3+]-pyrophosphate and [59Fe3+]-citrate by 46% and 56% respectively; dinitrophenol had no effect on these processes. The data suggest that C. neoformans can (i) generate ferrous iron at the cell surface via a reduction of ferric chelates, with the subsequent acquisition of the ferrous iron, and (ii) acquire iron through the interaction of ferric chelates with a surface component.

  14. Capsular Suspension Technique for Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Andrew E.; Karas, Vasili; Nho, Shane; Coleman, Struan H.; Mather, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has recently become a common procedure to treat central and peripheral hip pathology. Capsulotomies are necessary in these procedures, and negotiating adequate visualization, as well as capsular preservation, is a challenge. We describe a capsular suspension technique that allows for adequate visualization of the central and peripheral compartments while facilitating preservation of the native hip capsule. This technique eliminates the need for additional personnel for retraction, potentially decreases iatrogenic hip injury, eliminates the need for excessive capsular debridement, and allows for capsular closure under minimal tension. PMID:26759769

  15. Detection of Cryptococcus neoformans in bird excreta.

    PubMed

    Soogarun, Suphan; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Palasuwan, Attakorn; Pradniwat, Paweena; Suwansaksri, Jamsai; Lertlum, Thamaporn; Maungkote, Tusrin

    2006-07-01

    We evaluated 14 samples of bird excreta from pigeons, parrots, open billed storks and crows obtained from thirteen places in Bangkok and nearby areas between April and July 2004. These bird excreta were examined for Cryptococcus neoformans by direct plating method to inspect their ability to grow at 37 degrees C. Capsule production was examined by Indian ink preparation. They were also tested for urease and phenoloxidase enzymes. Cryptococcus neoformans var neoformans was recovered from pigeon excreta in 9.09%. This implies those having impaired immunity may get this fungus from the environment.

  16. A Rare Case of Primary Supraclavicular Lymphadenitis due to Cryptococcus Neoformans in an HIV Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Anuradha; Chandel, Lata R; Chauhan, Smriti; Thakur, Kamlesh; Jaryal, S.C

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis caused by encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans most commonly presents as disease of the central nervous system. Cryptococcus is a non–mycelial budding yeast found in soil, pigeon droppings and their nesting places. The three ‘classic’ virulence factors of cryptococci are: polysaccharide capsule, melanin production and growth at 37°C. Here, we present a rare case of cryptococcosis affecting left supraclavicular lymph node in a Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individual. Culture of fine needle aspirate of the lymph node yielded Cryptococcus neoformans which was identified by standard microbiological techniques. Meyer’s mucicarmine stain imparted a typical rose burgundy colour to the capsule. Unusual characteristics of the isolate included poorly developed capsule and the presence of yeast in chains resembling pseudo-hyphae. This case highlights the importance of microbiological techniques for diagnosis and prompt treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:24701506

  17. Host immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by the fungal genus Cryptococcus. Cryptococcosis, predominantly meningoencephalitis, emerged with the HIV pandemic, primarily afflicting HIV-infected patients with profound T-cell deficiency. Where in use, combination antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of and risk for disease, but cryptococcosis continues to afflict those without access to therapy, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in solid organ transplant recipients and patients with other immunodeficiencies as well as those with no known immunodeficiency. This article reviews innate and adaptive immune responses to C. neoformans, with an emphasis on recent studies on the role of B cells, natural IgM and Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in resistance to cryptococcosis. PMID:25865194

  18. Serogroup quantitation of multivalent polysaccharide and polysaccharide-conjugate meningococcal vaccines from China.

    PubMed

    Cook, Matthew C; Gibeault, Sabrina; Filippenko, Vasilisa; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Junzhi; Kunkel, Jeremy P

    2013-07-01

    The active components of most meningococcal vaccines are four antigenic serogroup capsular polysaccharides (A, C, Y, W135). The vaccines, monovalent or multivalent mixtures of either free polysaccharides or polysaccharides conjugated to antigenic carrier proteins, may be in liquid or lyophilised formulations, with or without excipients. Acid hydrolysis and chromatographic methods for serogroup quantitation, which were previously optimised and qualified using polysaccharide-based standards and a narrow range of real vaccines, are here challenged with multiple lots of a broad assortment of additional multivalent polysaccharide-based meningococcal vaccine products. Centrifugal filtration successfully removed all interfering lactose excipient without loss of polysaccharides to allow for the determination of Y and W135 serogroups. Replicate operations by three different analysts indicated high method reproducibility. Results indicated some lot-to-lot and product-to-product variations. However, all vaccines were within general specifications for each serogroup polysaccharide, with the exception of all lots of one polysaccharide vaccine - which by these methods were found to be deficient in the serogroup A component only. These robust techniques are very useful for the evaluation of antigen content and consistency of manufacture. The deformulation, hydrolysis and chromatographic methods may be adaptable for the evaluation of other types of polysaccharide-based vaccines.

  19. Antibiotic modulation of capsular exopolysaccharide and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition between states of low

  20. Antibiotic Modulation of Capsular Exopolysaccharide and Virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition between states of low

  1. Surfactant Protein D Facilitates Cryptococcus neoformans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Geunes-Boyer, Scarlett; Beers, Michael F.; Heitman, Joseph; Wright, Jo Rae

    2012-01-01

    Concurrent with the global escalation of the AIDS pandemic, cryptococcal infections are increasing and are of significant medical importance. Furthermore, Cryptococcus neoformans has become a primary human pathogen, causing infection in seemingly healthy individuals. Although numerous studies have elucidated the virulence properties of C. neoformans, less is understood regarding lung host immune factors during early stages of fungal infection. Based on our previous studies documenting that pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) protects C. neoformans cells against macrophage-mediated defense mechanisms in vitro (S. Geunes-Boyer et al., Infect. Immun. 77:2783–2794, 2009), we postulated that SP-D would facilitate fungal infection in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we examined the role of SP-D in response to C. neoformans using SP-D−/− mice. Here, we demonstrate that mice lacking SP-D were partially protected during C. neoformans infection; they displayed a longer mean time to death and decreased fungal burden at several time points postinfection than wild-type mice. This effect was reversed by the administration of exogenous SP-D. Furthermore, we show that SP-D bound to the surface of the yeast cells and protected the pathogenic microbes against macrophage-mediated defense mechanisms and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate that C. neoformans is capable of coopting host SP-D to increase host susceptibility to the yeast. This study establishes a new paradigm for the role played by SP-D during host responses to C. neoformans and consequently imparts insight into potential future preventive and/or treatment strategies for cryptococcosis. PMID:22547543

  2. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF AZOTOBACTER VINELANDII1

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gary H.; Johnstone, Donald B.

    1964-01-01

    Cohen, Gary H. (University of Vermont, Burlington), and Donald B. Johnstone. Extracellular polysaccharides of Azotobacter vinelandii. J. Bacteriol. 88:329–338. 1964.—Extracellular polysaccharides synthetized by Azotobacter vinelandii strains 155, 102, and 3A were shown to be carboxylic acid heteropolysaccharides of apparent high molecular weight. Cells were grown in a nitrogen-free, mineral broth medium with 2% sucrose. Extracellular slime was recovered by centrifugation and purified by repeated alcohol precipitation and Sevag deproteinization. Capsular polysaccharide was recovered from washed cells by mild alkaline digestion. Methods of isolation and purification appeared to provide polysaccharide showing no evidence of heterogeneity when examined by chemical and physical methods. Infrared analysis of purified slime from the three strains suggested fundamental structural similarities. Colorimetric, paper chromatographic, and enzymatic analyses on both intact and acid-hydrolyzed slime polysaccharide indicated that the polymers contained in common galacturonic acid, [α] d-glucose, and rhamnose at a ratio of approximately 43:2:1, as well as a hexuronic acid lactone, probably mannurono-lactone. However, as shown by chemical and infrared analysis, minor differences did exist; namely, slime from strain 155 and 102 contained o-acetyl groups, whereas slime from strain 3A contained none. A sialic acid-like component (1.5% of dry weight of the polysaccharide, calculated as N-acetyl neuraminic acid), was found only in the slime of strain 155. Capsular polysaccharide composition closely resembled that for slime. It is of interest that the major slime components were identical whether the energy source provided for the cells was sucrose, glucose, fructose, or ethanol. PMID:14203348

  3. Toward an Integrated Model of Capsule Regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Brian C.; Skowyra, Michael L.; Spencer, Sarah J.; Gish, Stacey R.; Williams, Matthew; Held, Elizabeth P.; Brent, Michael R.; Doering, Tamara L.

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes serious human disease in immunocompromised populations. Its polysaccharide capsule is a key virulence factor which is regulated in response to growth conditions, becoming enlarged in the context of infection. We used microarray analysis of cells stimulated to form capsule over a range of growth conditions to identify a transcriptional signature associated with capsule enlargement. The signature contains 880 genes, is enriched for genes encoding known capsule regulators, and includes many uncharacterized sequences. One uncharacterized sequence encodes a novel regulator of capsule and of fungal virulence. This factor is a homolog of the yeast protein Ada2, a member of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex that regulates transcription of stress response genes via histone acetylation. Consistent with this homology, the C. neoformans null mutant exhibits reduced histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation. It is also defective in response to a variety of stress conditions, demonstrating phenotypes that overlap with, but are not identical to, those of other fungi with altered SAGA complexes. The mutant also exhibits significant defects in sexual development and virulence. To establish the role of Ada2 in the broader network of capsule regulation we performed RNA-Seq on strains lacking either Ada2 or one of two other capsule regulators: Cir1 and Nrg1. Analysis of the results suggested that Ada2 functions downstream of both Cir1 and Nrg1 via components of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway. To identify direct targets of Ada2, we performed ChIP-Seq analysis of histone acetylation in the Ada2 null mutant. These studies supported the role of Ada2 in the direct regulation of capsule and mating responses and suggested that it may also play a direct role in regulating capsule-independent antiphagocytic virulence factors. These results validate our experimental approach to dissecting capsule

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inactivation mechanism is affected by capsular extracellular polymeric substances reactivity with chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Hessler, Christopher M; Panmanee, Warunya; Hassett, Daniel J; Seo, Youngwoo

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of capsular extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to chlorine and monochloramine was assessed and compared in this study. The impact of capsular EPS on Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa inactivation mechanisms was investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively using a combination of batch experiments, viability tests with LIVE/DEAD staining, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Both wild-type and isogenic mutant strains with different alginate EPS production capabilities were used to evaluate their susceptibility to chlorine and monochloramine. The mucA22 mutant strain, which overproduces the EPS composed largely of acidic polysaccharide alginate, exhibited high resistance and prolonged inactivation time to both chlorine and monochloramine relative to PAO1 (wild-type) and algT(U) mutant strains (alginate EPS deficient). Multiple analyses were combined to better understand the mechanistic role of EPS against chlorine-based disinfectants. The extracted EPS exhibited high reactivity with chlorine and very low reactivity with monochloramine, suggesting different mechanism of protection against disinfectants. Moreover, capsular EPS on cell membrane appeared to reduce membrane permeabilization by disinfectants as suggested by deformation of key functional groups in EPS and cell membrane (the C-O-C stretching of carbohydrate and the C=O stretching of ester group). The combined results supported that capsular EPS, acting either as a disinfectant consumer (for chlorine inactivation) or limiting access to reactive sites on cell membrane (for monochloramine inactivation), provide a protective role for bacterial cells against regulatory residual disinfectants by reducing membrane permeabilization.

  5. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow talar neck fracture especially if anterior approaches have been used for fracture fixation. Capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful hindfoot stiffness cannot be controlled with conservative treatment. Open capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint demands extensive soft tissue dissection and hinders early postoperative mobilization exercise of the joint. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach of arthroscopic capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint that is composed of arthroscopic release of the talonavicular joint and the anterior subtalar joint. This allows immediate postoperative mobilization of the joint.

  6. Multilocus sequence typing analysis reveals that Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is a recombinant population.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zani, Alberto; Rickerts, Volker; McCormick, Ilka; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Velegraki, Aristea; Escandon, Patricia; Ichikawa, Tomoe; Ikeda, Reiko; Bienvenu, Anne-Lise; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Tore, Okan; Akcaglar, Sevim; Lockhart, Shawn; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Varma, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans (serotype D) represents about 30% of the clinical isolates in Europe and is present less frequently in the other continents. It is the prevalent etiological agent in primary cutaneous cryptococcosis as well as in cryptococcal skin lesions of disseminated cryptococcosis. Very little is known about the genotypic diversity of this Cryptococcus subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotypic diversity among a set of clinical and environmental C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates and to evaluate the relationship between genotypes, geographical origin and clinical manifestations. A total of 83 globally collected C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates from Italy, Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Turkey, Thailand, Japan, Colombia, and the USA, recovered from different sources (primary and secondary cutaneous cryptococcosis, disseminated cryptococcosis, the environment, and animals), were included in the study. All isolates were confirmed to belong to genotype VNIV by molecular typing and they were further investigated by MLST analysis. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic as well as network analysis strongly suggested the existence of a recombinant rather than a clonal population structure. Geographical origin and source of isolation were not correlated with a specific MLST genotype. The comparison with a set of outgroup C. neoformans var. grubii isolates provided clear evidence that the two varieties have different population structures.

  7. Multilocus sequence typing analysis reveals that Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans is a recombinant population

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zani, Alberto; Rickerts, Volker; McCormick, Ilka; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Velegraki, Aristea; Escandon, Patricia; Ichikawa, Tomoe; Ikeda, Reiko; Bienvenue, Anne-Lise; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Tore, Okan; Akcaglar, Sevim; Lockhart, Shawn; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Varma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans (serotype D) represents about 30% of the clinical isolates in Europe and is present less frequently in the other continents. It is the prevalent etiological agent in primary cutaneous cryptococcosis as well as in cryptococcal skin lesions of disseminated cryptococcosis. Very little is known about the genotypic diversity of this Cryptococcus subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotypic diversity among a set of clinical and environmental C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates and to evaluate the relationship between genotypes, geographical origin and clinical manifestations. A total of 83 globally collected C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates from Italy, Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Turkey, Thailand, Japan, Colombia, and the USA, recovered from different sources (primary and secondary cutaneous cryptococcosis, disseminated cryptococcosis, the environment, and animals), were included in the study. All isolates were confirmed to belong to genotype VNIV by molecular typing and they were further investigated by MLST analysis. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic as well as network analysis strongly suggested the existence of a recombinant rather than a clonal population structure. Geographical origin and source of isolation were not correlated with a specific MLST genotype. The comparison with a set of outgroup C. neoformans var. grubii isolates provided clear evidence that the two varieties have different population structures. PMID:26768709

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection.

    PubMed

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Kamuyango, Alfred A; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C; Renshaw, Stephen A; Johnston, Simon A

    2016-02-18

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis.

  9. Base hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds in pneumococcal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Pujar, Narahari S; Huang, Ngan Fong; Daniels, Christopher L; Dieter, Lance; Gayton, Marshall G; Lee, Ann L

    2004-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the base hydrolysis of all phosphodiester bond-containing capsular polysaccharides of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is described here. Capsular polysaccharides from serotypes 6B, 10A, 17F, 19A, 19F, and 20 contain a phosphodiester bond that connects the repeating units in these polysaccharides (also referred to as backbone phosphodiester bonds), and polysaccharides from serotypes 11A, 15B, 18C, and 23F contain a phosphodiester bond that links a side chain to their repeating units. Molecular weight measurements of the polysaccharides, using high performance size exclusion chromatography with tandem multiangle laser light scattering and refractive index detection, was used to evaluate the kinetics of hydrolysis. The measurement of molecular weight provides a high degree of sensitivity in the case of small extents of reaction, thus allowing reliable measurements of the kinetics over short times. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for these polysaccharides were estimated using a simple model that accounts for the polydispersity of the starting sample. It was found that the relative order of backbone phosphodiester bond instability due to base hydrolysis was 19A > 10A > 19F > 6B > 17F, 20. Degradation of side-chain phosphodiester bonds was not observed, although the high degree of sensitivity in measurements is lost in this case, due to the low contribution of the side chains to the total polysaccharide molecular weight. In comparison with literature data on pneumococcal polysaccharide 6A, 19A was found to be the more labile, and hence appears to be the most labile pneumococcal polysaccharide studied to date. The rate of hydrolysis increased at higher pH and in the presence of divalent cation, but the extent was lower than expected based on similar data on RNA. Finally, the differences in the phosphodiester bond stabilities were analyzed by considering stereochemical factors in these polysaccharides. These results also provide a framework

  10. Fine structure of Cryptococcus neoformans grown in vivo as observed by freeze-etching.

    PubMed

    Takeo, K; Uesaka, I; Uehira, K; Nishiura, M

    1973-03-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans grown in the parasitic state was observed by the freeze-etching technique and was compared with that grown on culture media. Unlike other yeasts, this organism grown in vivo is very often devoid of the "ordinary" invaginations. The membrane of the cell grown in vivo was almost free from concavity and convexity except for many round depressions which represent the surface view of paramural bodies. Some of the paramural bodies were found to be multivesicular systems. Most were spherical invaginations containing a single vesicle or its ghost remaining after secretion of the vesicles. In clear contrast to the cell grown in vitro, the in vivo cell contained a great number of vesicles in the cytoplasm. These seemed to show high-secretion activity in C. neoformans grown in the parasitic state. On transfer from in vitro to in vivo, this organism enlarged the cell wall, capsule, and cell body. The appearance of a large vacuole, accumulation of storage organelles, and the existence of rodlike structures, seemingly lipid deposits, were also noted in the cytoplasm of the cell grown in vivo. the meaning of these results as well as the mode of capsular production are discussed.

  11. Streptococcus iniae cpsG alters capsular carbohydrate composition and is a cause of serotype switching in vaccinated fish.

    PubMed

    Heath, Candice; Gillen, Christine M; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis; Walker, Mark J; Barnes, Andrew C

    2016-09-25

    Streptococcus iniae causes septicaemia and meningitis in marine and freshwater fish wherever they are farmed in warm-temperate and tropical regions. Although serotype specific, vaccination with bacterins (killed bacterial cultures) is largely successful and vaccine failure occurs only occasionally through emergence of new capsular serotypes. Previously we showed that mutations in vaccine escapes are restricted to a limited repertoire of genes within the 20-gene capsular polysaccharide (cps) operon. cpsG, a putative UDP-galactose 4-epimerase, has three sequence types based on the insertion or deletion of the three amino acids leucine, serine and lysine in the substrate binding site of the protein. To elucidate the role of cpsG in capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis and capsular composition, we first prepared isogenic knockout and complemented mutants of cpsG by allelic exchange mutagenesis. Deletion of cpsG resulted in changes to colony morphology and cell buoyant density, and also significantly decreased galactose content relative to glucose in the capsular polysaccharide as determined by GC-MS, consistent with epimerase activity of CpsG. There was also a metabolic penalty of cpsG knockout revealed by slower growth in complex media, and reduced proliferation in whole fish blood. Moreover, whilst antibodies raised in fish against the wild type cross-reacted in whole cell and cps ELISA, they did not cross-opsonise the mutant in a peripheral blood neutrophil opsonisation assay, consistent with reported vaccine escape. We have shown here that mutation in cpsG results in altered CPS composition and this in turn results in poor cross-opsonisation that explains some of the historic vaccination failure on fish farms in Australia.

  12. Networks of fibers and factors: regulation of capsule formation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    de S. Araújo, Glauber R.; Frases, Susana; Kronstad, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to cause life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals is due in large part to elaboration of a capsule consisting of polysaccharide fibers. The size of the cell-associated capsule is remarkably responsive to a variety of environmental and host conditions, but the mechanistic details of the regulation, synthesis, trafficking, and attachment of the polysaccharides are poorly understood. Recent studies reveal a complex network of transcription factors that influence capsule elaboration in response to several different signals of relevance to disease (e.g., iron deprivation). The emerging complexity of the network is consistent with the diversity of conditions that influence the capsule and illustrates the responsiveness of the fungus to both the environment and mammalian hosts. PMID:27516877

  13. HapX Positively and Negatively Regulates the Transcriptional Response to Iron Deprivation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won Hee; Saikia, Sanjay; Hu, Guanggan; Wang, Joyce; Fung, Carlen Ka-Yin; D'Souza, Cletus; White, Rick; Kronstad, James W.

    2010-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a major cause of illness in immunocompromised individuals such as AIDS patients. The ability of the fungus to acquire nutrients during proliferation in host tissue and the ability to elaborate a polysaccharide capsule are critical determinants of disease outcome. We previously showed that the GATA factor, Cir1, is a major regulator both of the iron uptake functions needed for growth in host tissue and the key virulence factors such as capsule, melanin and growth at 37°C. We are interested in further defining the mechanisms of iron acquisition from inorganic and host-derived iron sources with the goal of understanding the nutritional adaptation of C. neoformans to the host environment. In this study, we investigated the roles of the HAP3 and HAPX genes in iron utilization and virulence. As in other fungi, the C. neoformans Hap proteins negatively influence the expression of genes encoding respiratory and TCA cycle functions under low-iron conditions. However, we also found that HapX plays both positive and negative roles in the regulation of gene expression, including a positive regulatory role in siderophore transporter expression. In addition, HapX also positively regulated the expression of the CIR1 transcript. This situation is in contrast to the negative regulation by HapX of genes encoding GATA iron regulatory factors in Aspergillus nidulans and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Although both hapX and hap3 mutants were defective in heme utilization in culture, only HapX made a contribution to virulence, and loss of HapX in a strain lacking the high-affinity iron uptake system did not cause further attenuation of disease. Therefore, HapX appears to have a minimal role during infection of mammalian hosts and instead may be an important regulator of environmental iron uptake functions. Overall, these results indicated that C. neoformans employs multiple strategies for iron acquisition during infection. PMID:21124817

  14. Trans locus inhibitors limit concomitant polysaccharide synthesis in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Weinacht, Katja G; Comstock, Laurie E

    2010-06-29

    Bacteroides is an abundant genus of bacteria of the human intestinal microbiota. Bacteroides species synthesize a large number of capsular polysaccharides (PS), a biological property not shared with closely related oral species, suggesting importance for intestinal survival. Bacteroides fragilis, for example, synthesizes eight capsular polysaccharides per strain, each of which phase varies via inversion of the promoters located upstream of seven of the eight polysaccharide biosynthesis operons. In a single cell, many of these polysaccharide loci promoters can be simultaneously oriented on for transcription of the downstream biosynthesis operons. Here, we demonstrate that despite the promoter orientations, concomitant transcription of multiple polysaccharide loci within a cell is inhibited. The proteins encoded by the second gene of each of these eight loci, collectively designated the UpxZ proteins, inhibit the synthesis of heterologous polysaccharides. These unique proteins interfere with the ability of UpxY proteins encoded by other polysaccharide loci to function in transcriptional antitermination of their respective operon. The eight UpxZs have different inhibitory spectra, thus establishing a hierarchical regulatory network for polysaccharide synthesis. Limitation of concurrent polysaccharide synthesis strongly suggests that these bacteria evolved this property as an evasion-type mechanism to avoid killing by polysaccharide-targeting factors in the ecosystem.

  15. Antibiofilm polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rendueles, Olaya; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial extracellular polysaccharides have been shown to mediate many of the cell-to cell and cell-to-surface interactions that are required for the formation, cohesion and stabilization of bacterial biofilms. However, recent studies have identified several bacterial polysaccharides that inhibit biofilm formation by a wide-spectrum of bacteria and fungi both in vitro and in vivo. This review discusses the composition, modes of action, and potential biological roles of antibiofilm polysaccharides recently identified in bacteria and eukaria. Some of these molecules may have technological applications as antibiofilm agents in industry and medicine. PMID:22730907

  16. Development of an opsonin inhibition assay for evaluation of complex polysaccharide protective epitopes.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Tessie; Luo, Shengyuan; Manger, Walt; Herber, Wayne; Schofield, Tim; Tan, Charles; Newman, Kathy; Sadoff, Jerald; Donnelly, John; Cross, Alan

    2006-03-10

    The induction of opsonic antibodies directed against capsular polysaccharides (Ps) is an important mechanism by which immunization protects against the development of invasive pneumococcal (Pn) infection. In preparing Pn vaccines, it is necessary to compare different manufacturing lots of capsular Ps, or to compare oligosaccharides used for conjugate vaccines with native capsular Ps, in order to insure that important epitopes of the Ps are maintained. We have developed an opsonic-antibody inhibition assay (OIA) to compare the functional epitopes of different capsular Ps preparations in vitro. Components of the OIA are primary neutrophils, rabbit complement (C'), and type-specific antibody (Ab). After conditions for optimal opsonic killing were determined for each Pn serotype, anti-Pn Ab was pre-incubated with different dilutions of purified capsular Ps, then added to the OIA mix. Plotting the % bacteria killed versus Ps concentration (log transformed) yielded a linear curve that was used to quantify the concentration of capsular Ps which inhibited the bacteria killing by 50% (IC50). The IC50 was determined for 8 Pn Ps types. These ranged between 6 ng/ml for type 6B and 1268 ng/ml for type 23F. Importantly OIA curves were statistically identical for two different manufacturing lots of capsular Ps for the 8 Pn Ps types. We conclude that differences among capsular Ps used for Pn vaccines could be detected with an OIA assay and these differences may predict the ability of Ps preparations to induce functionally active antibody when formulated into vaccines.

  17. Cryptococcus neoformans: Tripping on Acid in the Phagolysosome

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a basidiomycetous pathogenic yeast that is a frequent cause of meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. Cn is a facultative intracellular pathogen in mammals, insects and amoeba. Cn infection occurs after inhalation of spores or desiccated cells from the environment. After inhalation Cn localizes to the lungs where it can be phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages. Cn is surrounded by a polysaccharide capsule that helps the fungus survive in vivo by interfering with phagocytosis, quenching free radical bursts and shedding polysaccharides that negatively modulates the immune system. After phagocytosis, Cn resides within the phagosome that matures to become a phagolysosome, a process that results in the acidification of the phagolysosomal lumen. Cn replicates at a higher rate inside macrophages than in the extracellular environment, possibly as a result that the phagosomal pH is near that optimal for growth. Cn increases the phagolysosomal pH and modulates the dynamics of Rab GTPases interaction with the phagolysosome. Chemical manipulation of the phagolysosomal pH with drugs can result in direct and indirect killing of Cn and reduced non-lytic exocytosis. Phagolysosomal membrane damage after Cn infection occurs both in vivo and in vitro, and is required for Cn growth and survival. Macrophage treatment with IFN-γ reduces the phagolysosomal damage and increases intracellular killing of Cn. Studies on mice and humans show that treatment with IFN-γ can improve host control of the disease. However, the mechanism by which Cn mediates phagolysosomal membrane damage remains unknown but likely candidates are phospholipases and mechanical damage from an enlarging capsule. Here we review Cn intracellular interaction with a particular emphasis on phagosomal interactions and develop the notion that the extent of damage of the phagosomal membrane is a key determinant of the outcome of the Cn-macrophage interaction. PMID:26925039

  18. Factors affecting capsular volume changes and association with outcomes after Bankart repair and capsular shift.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Chung, Seok Won; Kumar, Gurudeo; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Choi, Jin Hyeok; Lee, Deukhee; Park, Sehyung

    2015-02-01

    Capsular laxity is a main contributing factor in recurrent shoulder instability and is suggested to be correlated with increased capsular volume. Arthroscopic capsular shift combined with Bankart repair can reduce the capsular volume and reinforce the redundant capsule; however, as the capsuloligamentous structure has viscoelastic properties, it is possible for the shifted and tensioned capsule of the glenohumeral joint to slowly stretch out again over time, resulting in an increase in capsular volume. To analyze changes in capsular volume of the glenohumeral joint over time after arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift, the factors associated with these changes, and their relevance to outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 105 patients (mean age, 25.8 ± 8.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and capsular shift for anterior shoulder instability and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at 3 months and 1 year postoperatively and whose various functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>12 months). Among these patients, 27 also had preoperative CTA. These 27 patients were used to make comparisons between preoperative and 3-month postoperative CTA measurements, and all 105 patients were used for all other comparisons. Two raters measured the separate anterior and posterior capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position using 3-dimensional (3D) Slicer software. These measurements were subsequently adjusted for each glenoid size. The changes in capsular volume and cross-sectional area at the 5-o'clock position over time, the factors related to higher change in anterior capsular volume, and their correlation with outcomes were evaluated. Three months postoperatively, the total and anterior capsular volume and anterior cross-sectional area significantly decreased; however, these values increased again at 1 year postoperatively (all P < .01). The inter- and

  19. Dectin-2 Deficiency Promotes Th2 Response and Mucin Production in the Lungs after Pulmonary Infection with Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuri; Sato, Ko; Yamamoto, Hideki; Matsumura, Kana; Matsumoto, Ikumi; Nomura, Toshiki; Miyasaka, Tomomitsu; Ishii, Keiko; Kanno, Emi; Tachi, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Sho; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-2 is a C-type lectin receptor that recognizes high mannose polysaccharides. Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-form fungal pathogen, is rich in polysaccharides in its cell wall and capsule. In the present study, we analyzed the role of Dectin-2 in the host defense against C. neoformans infection. In Dectin-2 gene-disrupted (knockout) (Dectin-2KO) mice, the clearance of this fungus and the inflammatory response, as shown by histological analysis and accumulation of leukocytes in infected lungs, were comparable to those in wild-type (WT) mice. The production of type 2 helper T (Th2) cytokines in lungs was higher in Dectin-2KO mice than in WT mice after infection, whereas there was no difference in the levels of production of Th1, Th17, and proinflammatory cytokines between these mice. Mucin production was significantly increased in Dectin-2KO mice, and this increase was reversed by administration of anti-interleukin 4 (IL-4) monoclonal antibody (MAb). The levels of expression of β1-defensin, cathelicidin, surfactant protein A (Sp-A), and Sp-D in infected lungs were comparable between these mice. In in vitro experiments, IL-12p40 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production and expression of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and alveolar macrophages were completely abrogated in Dectin-2KO mice. Finally, the disrupted lysates of C. neoformans, but not of whole yeast cells, activated Dectin-2-triggered signaling in an assay with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter cells expressing this receptor. These results suggest that Dectin-2 may oppose the Th2 response and IL-4-dependent mucin production in the lungs after infection with C. neoformans, and it may not be required for the production of Th1, Th17, and proinflammatory cytokines or for clearance of this fungal pathogen. PMID:25422263

  20. Transcriptomic and virulence factors analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans hypoxia response.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingtao; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Wenquan; Du, Xue; Huang, Suyang; Jiang, Yuan; Liu, Weida; Sang, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an environmental pathogen requiring atmospheric levels of oxygen for optimal growth. Upon inhalation, C. neoformans disseminates to the brain and causes meningoencephalitis. However, the mechanisms by which the pathogen adapts to the low-oxygen environment in the brain have not been investigated. We isolated a C. neoformans strain with a small capsule from a host tissue, although this strain produces large capsules in normoxic conditions. We hypothesize that this difference in capsule size is attributed to hypoxia caused by chronic inflammatory response. This study investigated the effect of hypoxia on virulence factors (including capsule, melanin, urease, and phospholipase) of C. neoformans and conducted transcriptomic analyses of the virulence-associated genes. We found that C. neoformans grew under hypoxic condition, albeit slowly, and that hypoxia may have inhibited the capsule size, melanin production, and phospholipase and urease activities in C. neoformans.

  1. Evaluation of serotype-specific pneumococcal IgG measurement using two different polysaccharides from ATCC and SSI Diagnostica.

    PubMed

    Slotved, Hans-Christian; Kantsø, Bjørn; Kerrn, Mette B; Skovsted, Ian C; Jørgensen, Charlotte S

    2011-09-02

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in infants and elderly people. Pneumococcus capsular polysaccharide has been characterised and more than 90 different serotypes have been identified. Serotype-specific antibodies against the capsular polysaccharide are produced during infection. At present, many countries follow the WHO pneumococcal ELISA IgG measurement protocol, in which polysaccharides from ATCC are used as antigens. In recent years, serotype specific polysaccharides from different producers have been tested in pneumococcal antibody assay's. In this project, purified serotype specific pneumococcal antigens from SSI Diagnostica and from ATCC were compared. In general, the data showed that both types of polysaccharide could be used as antigens. Furthermore, the effect of adsorption using different combinations of adsorption procedures was tested, showing similar results using CWPSmulti or CWPS+22F. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Dermal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Soares, Eduardo; Mook, William R; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Because hip arthroscopic procedures are increasing in number, complications related to the operation itself are starting to emerge. Whereas the capsule has been recognized as an important static stabilizer for the hip, it has not been until recently that surgeons have realized the importance of its preservation and restoration. Disruption of the capsule during arthroscopic procedures is a potential contributor to postoperative iatrogenic hip instability. In cases of a symptomatic deficient capsule, a capsular reconstruction is mandatory because instability may lead to detrimental chondral and labral changes. The purpose of this report was to describe our technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using dermal allograft.

  3. Role of capsular modified heptose in the virulence of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Wong, Anthony; Lange, Dirk; Houle, Sebastien; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Valvano, Miguel A; Knirel, Yuriy A; Dozois, Charles M; Creuzenet, Carole

    2015-06-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni capsular polysaccharide is important for virulence and often contains a modified heptose. In strain ATCC 700819 (a.k.a. NCTC 11168), the modified heptose branches off from the capsular backbone and is directly exposed to the environment. We reported previously that the enzymes encoded by wcaG, mlghB and mlghC are involved in heptose modification. Here, we show that inactivation of any of these genes leads to production of capsule lacking modified heptose and alters the transcription of other capsule modification genes differentially. Inactivation of mlghB or mlghC, but not of wcaG, decreased susceptibility to bile salts and abrogated invasion of intestinal cells. All mutants showed increased sensitivity to serum killing, especially wcaG::cat, and had defects in colonization and persistence in chicken intestine, but did not show significant differences in adhesion, phagocytosis and intracellular survival in murine macrophages. Together, our findings suggest that the capsular heptose modification pathway contributes to bacterial resistance against gastrointestinal host defenses and supports bacterial persistence via its role in serum resistance and invasion of intestinal cells. Our data further suggest a dynamic regulation of expression of this pathway in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Virulence-Associated Enzymes of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Wolf, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play key roles in fungal pathogenesis. Manipulation of enzyme expression or activity can significantly alter the infection process, and enzyme expression profiles can be a hallmark of disease. Hence, enzymes are worthy targets for better understanding pathogenesis and identifying new options for combatting fungal infections. Advances in genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and mass spectrometry have enabled the identification and characterization of new fungal enzymes. This review focuses on recent developments in the virulence-associated enzymes from Cryptococcus neoformans. The enzymatic suite of C. neoformans has evolved for environmental survival, but several of these enzymes play a dual role in colonizing the mammalian host. We also discuss new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies that could be based on the underlying enzymology. PMID:26453651

  5. Isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans from bird droppings, fruits and vegetables in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, R; Castañón-Olivares, L R

    1995-01-01

    The presence of Cryptococcus neoformans in various natural sources, such as bird droppings, fruits and vegetables, was investigated. A total of 711 samples were analyzed; C. neoformans var. neoformans was isolated from seven out of 74 bird droppings (9.5%), with parrots as one of the most significant sources. Fruits were positive in 9.5% of the 169 samples studied, specially citrus fruits, particularly grapefruit, in which the highest frequency was found. From the 468 vegetable samples, only 20 were positive (4.2%). It is emphasized that five of the positive vegetables species are autochthonous to Mexico: avocado (Nectandra salicifolia), beet (Beta vulgaris var. quinopodiace), chayote (Sechium edule), stringbean (Cassia sp), and nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica).

  6. Rapid presumptive identification of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Muchmore, H G; Felton, F G; Scott, E N

    1978-08-01

    Carbohydrate-containing extracts were prepared from mature yeast colonies grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar by mixing a 0.001-ml loopful of yeast cells for 30 s in phenolized saline and removing the cells by centrifugation. Extracts were prepared from 54 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, 29 isolates of other Cryptococcus species, 16 isolates of Candida species, 2 Rhodotorula, 2 Torulopsis, and 1 Saccharomyces species. Initially the carbohydrate content of each extract was estimated (Molisch method) and adjusted to 1, 5, and 10 microgram/ml. Twofold dilutions of each extract were tested for reactivity with the cryptococcal latex agglutination reagent of Bloomfield et al. (N. Bloomfield, M.A. Gordon, and D.F. Elmendorf, Jr., Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 114:64-67, 1963). All 54 C. neoformans extracts gave strong agglutinations (3+ to 4+) in dilutions of 1:4 or greater. None of the other yeasts produced any agglutination, except for 1 of 15 C. laurentii isolates, which showed a 1+ reaction that disappeared at a dilution of 1:4 and above. Subsequent testing established that a single extract made from 0.001 ml of yeast cells in 6 ml of phenolized saline contained less than 5 microgram of carbohydrate per ml, was suitable for a single rapid screening dilution, and eliminated any cross-reaction from the C. laurentii isolates. In our hands this method has provided a reliable differentiation of C. neoformans from other unknown yeast colonies in less than 20 min exclusive of a Molisch determination.

  7. Role of capsular colanic acid in adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Andrea; Berg, Michael; Stout, Valerie; Razatos, Anneta

    2003-08-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common urologic disease in the United States and one of the most common bacterial infections of any organ system. Biofilms persist in the urinary tract and on catheter surfaces because biofilm microorganisms are resistant to host defense mechanisms and antibiotic therapy. The first step in the establishment of biofilm infections is bacterial adhesion; preventing bacterial adhesion represents a promising method of controlling biofilms. Evidence suggests that capsular polysaccharides play a role in adhesion and pathogenicity. This study focuses on the role of physiochemical and specific binding interactions during adhesion of colanic acid exopolysaccharide mutant strains. Bacterial adhesion was evaluated for isogenic uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains that differed in colanic acid expression. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to directly measure the reversible physiochemical and specific binding interactions between bacterial strains and various substrates as bacteria initially approach the interface. AFM results indicate that electrostatic interactions were not solely responsible for the repulsive forces between the colanic acid mutant strains and hydrophilic substrates. Moreover, hydrophobic interactions were not found to play a significant role in adhesion of the colanic acid mutant strains. Adhesion was also evaluated by parallel-plate flow cell studies in comparison to AFM force measurements to demonstrate that prolonged incubation times alter bacterial adhesion. Results from this study demonstrate that the capsular polysaccharide colanic acid does not enhance bacterial adhesion but rather blocks the establishment of specific binding as well as time-dependent interactions between uropathogenic E. coli and inert substrates.

  8. Fungal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, G; Suzuki, S; Hearn, V; Pinel, C; Kobayashi, H; Mendez, C; Niño, G; Nishikawa, A; San-Blas, F; Shibata, N

    1994-01-01

    Fungal polysaccharides are cell wall components which may act as antigens or as structural substrates. As antigens, the role of mannans in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, and of glycoproteins in Aspergillus fumigatus are discussed. Analyses on beta-glucan synthetase in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and the inhibitory effect of Hansenula mrakii killer toxin on beta-glucan biosynthesis are also considered.

  9. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Jin; Park, Ki Rin; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-08-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction.

  10. Simvastatin Reduces Capsular Fibrosis around Silicone Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Capsular fibrosis and contracture occurs in most breast reconstruction patients who undergo radiotherapy, and there is no definitive solution for its prevention. Simvastatin was effective at reducing fibrosis in various models. Peri-implant capsular formation is the result of tissue fibrosis development in irradiated breasts. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on peri-implant fibrosis in rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to an experimental group (9 rats, 18 implants) or a control group (9 rats, 18 implants). Two hemispherical silicone implants, 10 mm in diameter, were inserted in subpanniculus pockets in each rat. The next day, 10-Gy of radiation from a clinical accelerator was targeted at the implants. Simvastatin (15 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage in the experimental group, while animals in the control group received water. At 12 weeks post-implantation, peri-implant capsules were harvested and examined histologically and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The average capsular thickness was 371.2 μm in the simvastatin group and 491.2 μm in the control group. The fibrosis ratio was significantly different, with 32.33% in the simvastatin group and 58.44% in the control group (P < 0.001). Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 gene expression decreased significantly in the simvastatin group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). This study shows that simvastatin reduces radiation-induced capsular fibrosis around silicone implants in rats. This finding offers an alternative therapeutic strategy for reducing capsular fibrosis and contracture after implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27478339

  11. Application of glyco-blotting for identification of structures of polysaccharides causing membrane fouling in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Katsuki; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Miyoshi, Risho; Hoque, Asiful; Miyoshi, Taro; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2015-03-01

    A new approach for the analysis of polysaccharides in membrane bioreactor (MBR) is proposed in this study. Enrichment of polysaccharides by glyco-blotting, in which polysaccharides are specifically collected via interactions between the aldehydes in the polysaccharides and aminooxy groups on glycoblotting beads, enabled MALDI-TOF/MS analysis at a high resolution. Structures of polysaccharides extracted from fouled membranes used in a pilot-scale MBR treating municipal wastewater and those in the supernatant of the mixed liquor suspension in the MBR were investigated. It was found that the overlap between polysaccharides found in the supernatants and those extracted from the fouled membrane was rather limited, suggesting that polysaccharides that dominate in supernatants may not be important in membrane fouling in MBRs. Analysis using a bacterial carbohydrate database suggested that capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and/or lipo-polysaccharides (LPS) produced by gram-negative bacteria are key players in the evolution of membrane fouling in MBRs.

  12. Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii by use of rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Lisa; Richardson, Susan E; Seah, Christine; Hoang, Linda; Fothergill, Annette; Zhang, Sean X

    2011-07-01

    Rapid identification of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii is imperative for facilitation of prompt treatment of cryptococcosis and for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. Our purpose was to evaluate a test algorithm incorporating commercial rapid biochemical tests, differential media, and DNA sequence analysis that will allow us to differentiate these taxa rapidly and accurately. We assessed 147 type, reference, and clinical isolates, including 6 other Cryptococcus spp. (10 isolates) and 14 other yeast species (24 isolates), using a 4-hour urea broth test (Remel), a 24-hour urea broth test (Becton Dickinson), a 4-hour caffeic acid disk test (Hardy Diagnostics and Remel), 40- to 44-hour growth assessment on l-canavanine glycine bromothymol blue (CGB) agar, and intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence analysis. All 123 Cryptococcus isolates hydrolyzed urea, along with 7 isolates of Rhodotorula and Trichosporon. Eighty-five of 86 C. neoformans (99%) and 26 of 27 C. gattii (96%) isolates had positive caffeic acid results, unlike the other cryptococci (0/10) and yeast species (0/24). Together, these two tests positively identified virtually all C. neoformans/C. gattii isolates (98%) within 4 h. CGB agar or IGS sequencing further differentiated these isolates within 48 h. On CGB, 25 of 27 (93%) C. gattii strains induced a blue color change, in contrast to 0 of 86 C. neoformans isolates. Neighbor-joining cluster analysis of IGS sequences differentiated C. neoformans var. grubii, C. neoformans var. neoformans, and C. gattii. Based on these results, we describe a rapid identification algorithm for use in a microbiology laboratory to distinguish clinically relevant Cryptococcus spp.

  13. The water channel protein aquaporin 1 regulates cellular metabolism and competitive fitness in a global fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Gena Lee; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Bang, Soohyun; Kim, Jungyeon; Kim, Sooah; Hong, Joohyeon; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2017-03-02

    In this study, an aquaporin protein, Aqp1, in Cryptococcus neoformans, which can lead either saprobic or parasitic lifestyles and causes life-threatening fungal meningitis was identified and characterized. AQP1 expression was rapidly induced (via the HOG pathway) by osmotic or oxidative stress. In spite of such transcriptional regulation, Aqp1 was found to be largely unnecessary for adaptation to diverse environmental stressors, regardless of the presence of the polysaccharide capsule. The latter is shown here to be a key environmental-stress protectant for C. neoformans. Furthermore, Aqp1 was not required for the development and virulence of C. neoformans. Deletion of AQP1 increased hydrophobicity of the cell surface. The comparative metabolic profiling analysis of the aqp1Δ mutant and AQP1-overexpressing strains revealed that deletion of AQP1 significantly increased cellular accumulation of primary and secondary metabolites, whereas overexpression of AQP1 depleted such metabolites, suggesting that this water channel protein performs a critical function in metabolic homeostasis. In line with this result, it was found that the aqp1Δ mutant (which is enriched with diverse metabolites) survived better than the wild type and a complemented strain, indicating that Aqp1 is likely to be involved in competitive fitness of this fungal pathogen.

  14. Macrophage mitochondrial and stress response to ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carolina; Souza, Ana Camila Oliveira; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; de Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Wang, Bo; Leon-Rivera, Rosiris; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    Human infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, a common fungal pathogen, follows deposition of yeast spores in the lung alveoli. The subsequent host-pathogen interaction can result in eradication, latency, or extrapulmonary dissemination. Successful control of C. neoformans infection is dependent on host macrophages, but macrophages display little ability to kill C. neoformans in vitro. Recently, we reported that ingestion of C. neoformans by mouse macrophages induces early cell cycle progression followed by mitotic arrest, an event that almost certainly reflects host cell damage. The goal of the present work was to understand macrophage pathways affected by C. neoformans toxicity. Infection of macrophages by C. neoformans was associated with alterations in protein translation rate and activation of several stress pathways, such as hypoxia-inducing factor-1-α, receptor-interacting protein 1, and apoptosis-inducing factor. Concomitantly we observed mitochondrial depolarization in infected macrophages, an observation that was replicated in vivo. We also observed differences in the stress pathways activated, depending on macrophage cell type, consistent with the nonspecific nature of C. neoformans virulence known to infect phylogenetically distant hosts. Our results indicate that C. neoformans infection impairs multiple host cellular functions and undermines the health of these critical phagocytic cells, which can potentially interfere with their ability to clear this fungal pathogen.

  15. Iron regulation of the major virulence factors in the AIDS-associated pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Hee; Sham, Anita; White, Rick; Kronstad, James W

    2006-11-01

    Iron overload is known to exacerbate many infectious diseases, and conversely, iron withholding is an important defense strategy for mammalian hosts. Iron is a critical cue for Cryptococcus neoformans because the fungus senses iron to regulate elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule that is the major virulence factor during infection. Excess iron exacerbates experimental cryptococcosis and the prevalence of this disease in Sub-Saharan Africa has been associated with nutritional and genetic aspects of iron loading in the background of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. We demonstrate that the iron-responsive transcription factor Cir1 in Cr. neoformans controls the regulon of genes for iron acquisition such that cir1 mutants are "blind" to changes in external iron levels. Cir1 also controls the known major virulence factors of the pathogen including the capsule, the formation of the anti-oxidant melanin in the cell wall, and the ability to grow at host body temperature. Thus, the fungus is remarkably tuned to perceive iron as part of the disease process, as confirmed by the avirulence of the cir1 mutant; this characteristic of the pathogen may provide opportunities for antifungal treatment.

  16. Systematic genetic analysis of virulence in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Oliver W.; Chun, Cheryl D.; Chow, Eric D.; Chen, Changbin; Madhani, Hiten D.; Noble, Suzanne M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected individuals. We utilized the completed genome sequence and optimized methods for homologous DNA replacement using high-velocity particle bombardment to engineer 1,201 gene knockout mutants. We screened this resource in vivo for proliferation in murine lung tissue and in vitro for three well-recognized virulence attributes — polysaccharide capsule formation, melanization, and growth at body temperature. We identified dozens of previously uncharacterized genes that affect these known attributes as well as 40 infectivity mutants without obvious defects in these traits. The latter mutants affect predicted regulatory factors, secreted proteins, and immune-related factors, and represent powerful tools for elucidating novel virulence mechanisms. In particular, we describe a GATA family transcription factor that inhibits phagocytosis by murine macrophages independently of the capsule, indicating a previously unknown mechanism of innate immune modulation. PMID:18854164

  17. Systematic genetic analysis of virulence in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Oliver W; Chun, Cheryl D; Chow, Eric D; Chen, Changbin; Madhani, Hiten D; Noble, Suzanne M

    2008-10-03

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected individuals. We utilized the completed genome sequence and optimized methods for homologous DNA replacement using high-velocity particle bombardment to engineer 1201 gene knockout mutants. We screened this resource in vivo for proliferation in murine lung tissue and in vitro for three well-recognized virulence attributes-polysaccharide capsule formation, melanization, and growth at body temperature. We identified dozens of previously uncharacterized genes that affect these known attributes as well as 40 infectivity mutants without obvious defects in these traits. The latter mutants affect predicted regulatory factors, secreted proteins, and immune-related factors, and represent powerful tools for elucidating novel virulence mechanisms. In particular, we describe a GATA family transcription factor that inhibits phagocytosis by murine macrophages independently of the capsule, indicating a previously unknown mechanism of innate immune modulation.

  18. Polysaccharide Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  19. Solid-state NMR Reveals the Carbon-based Molecular Architecture of Cryptococcus neoformans Fungal Eumelanins in the Cell Wall*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Melanin pigments protect against both ionizing radiation and free radicals and have potential soil remediation capabilities. Eumelanins produced by pathogenic Cryptococcus neoformans fungi are virulence factors that render the fungal cells resistant to host defenses and certain antifungal drugs. Because of their insoluble and amorphous characteristics, neither the pigment bonding framework nor the cellular interactions underlying melanization of C. neoformans have yielded to comprehensive molecular-scale investigation. This study used the C. neoformans requirement of exogenous obligatory catecholamine precursors for melanization to produce isotopically enriched pigment “ghosts” and applied 2D 13C-13C correlation solid-state NMR to reveal the carbon-based architecture of intact natural eumelanin assemblies in fungal cells. We demonstrated that the aliphatic moieties of solid C. neoformans melanin ghosts include cell-wall components derived from polysaccharides and/or chitin that are associated proximally with lipid membrane constituents. Prior to development of the mature aromatic fungal pigment, these aliphatic moieties form a chemically resistant framework that could serve as the scaffold for melanin synthesis. The indole-based core aromatic moieties show interconnections that are consistent with proposed melanin structures consisting of stacked planar assemblies, which are associated spatially with the aliphatic scaffold. The pyrrole aromatic carbons of the pigments bind covalently to the aliphatic framework via glycoside or glyceride functional groups. These findings establish that the structure of the pigment assembly changes with time and provide the first biophysical information on the mechanism by which melanin is assembled in the fungal cell wall, offering vital insights that can advance the design of bioinspired conductive nanomaterials and novel therapeutics. PMID:25825492

  20. Solid-state NMR Reveals the Carbon-based Molecular Architecture of Cryptococcus neoformans Fungal Eumelanins in the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E

    2015-05-29

    Melanin pigments protect against both ionizing radiation and free radicals and have potential soil remediation capabilities. Eumelanins produced by pathogenic Cryptococcus neoformans fungi are virulence factors that render the fungal cells resistant to host defenses and certain antifungal drugs. Because of their insoluble and amorphous characteristics, neither the pigment bonding framework nor the cellular interactions underlying melanization of C. neoformans have yielded to comprehensive molecular-scale investigation. This study used the C. neoformans requirement of exogenous obligatory catecholamine precursors for melanization to produce isotopically enriched pigment "ghosts" and applied 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation solid-state NMR to reveal the carbon-based architecture of intact natural eumelanin assemblies in fungal cells. We demonstrated that the aliphatic moieties of solid C. neoformans melanin ghosts include cell-wall components derived from polysaccharides and/or chitin that are associated proximally with lipid membrane constituents. Prior to development of the mature aromatic fungal pigment, these aliphatic moieties form a chemically resistant framework that could serve as the scaffold for melanin synthesis. The indole-based core aromatic moieties show interconnections that are consistent with proposed melanin structures consisting of stacked planar assemblies, which are associated spatially with the aliphatic scaffold. The pyrrole aromatic carbons of the pigments bind covalently to the aliphatic framework via glycoside or glyceride functional groups. These findings establish that the structure of the pigment assembly changes with time and provide the first biophysical information on the mechanism by which melanin is assembled in the fungal cell wall, offering vital insights that can advance the design of bioinspired conductive nanomaterials and novel therapeutics.

  1. Rapid presumptive identification of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Muchmore, H G; Felton, F G; Scott, E N

    1978-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing extracts were prepared from mature yeast colonies grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar by mixing a 0.001-ml loopful of yeast cells for 30 s in phenolized saline and removing the cells by centrifugation. Extracts were prepared from 54 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, 29 isolates of other Cryptococcus species, 16 isolates of Candida species, 2 Rhodotorula, 2 Torulopsis, and 1 Saccharomyces species. Initially the carbohydrate content of each extract was estimated (Molisch method) and adjusted to 1, 5, and 10 microgram/ml. Twofold dilutions of each extract were tested for reactivity with the cryptococcal latex agglutination reagent of Bloomfield et al. (N. Bloomfield, M.A. Gordon, and D.F. Elmendorf, Jr., Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 114:64-67, 1963). All 54 C. neoformans extracts gave strong agglutinations (3+ to 4+) in dilutions of 1:4 or greater. None of the other yeasts produced any agglutination, except for 1 of 15 C. laurentii isolates, which showed a 1+ reaction that disappeared at a dilution of 1:4 and above. Subsequent testing established that a single extract made from 0.001 ml of yeast cells in 6 ml of phenolized saline contained less than 5 microgram of carbohydrate per ml, was suitable for a single rapid screening dilution, and eliminated any cross-reaction from the C. laurentii isolates. In our hands this method has provided a reliable differentiation of C. neoformans from other unknown yeast colonies in less than 20 min exclusive of a Molisch determination. PMID:359587

  2. Preparation, characterization, and immunogenicity of Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide-protein conjugates

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    A method is presented for covalently bonding Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HIB Ps) to several proteins. The method is efficient and relies upon the use of adipic dihydrazide as a spacer between the capsular polysaccharide and the carrier protein. In contrast to the poor immunogenicity of the purified HIB Ps in mice and rabbits, the HIB Ps-protein conjugates induced serum anti-type b antibodies having bactericidal activity at levels shown to be protective in humans when low doses were injected subcutaneously in a saline solution. The antibody response in mice was related to the dose of the conjugates, increased with the number of injections, and could be primed by the previous injection of the carrier protein. The HIB Ps- protein conjugates were immunogenic in three different mouse strains. The importance of the carrier molecule for the enhanced immunogenicity of the HIB Ps-protein conjugates was shown by the failure of HIB Ps hybrids prepared with either the homologous polysaccharide or pneumococcus type 3 polysaccharide to induce antibodie in mice. Rabbits injected with the HIB Ps-protein conjugates emulsified in Freund's adjuvant produced high levels of serum anti-type b antibodies which induced a bactericidal effect upon H. influenzae type b organisms. It is proposed that the HIB Ps component of the polysaccharide protein conjugates has been converted to a thymic-dependent immunogen. This method may be used to prepare protein-polysaccharide conjugates with HIB Ps and other polysaccharides to be considered for human use. PMID:6967514

  3. [Etiopathogenesis and treatment of breast capsular contracture].

    PubMed

    Pereira Leite, Luis; Correia Sá, Inês; Marques, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A contractura capsular é a complicação crónica mais frequente da mamoplastia de aumento com próteses mamárias e a principal causa de insatisfação da doente e do cirurgião plástico. A cápsula mamária consiste num tecido fibroso que circunda a prótese e que pode contrair, alterando a forma e a consistência da mama. No estádio mais avançado é acompanhada de deformidade acentuada, rigidez e dor, tendo indicação para tratamento cirúrgico.Material e Métodos: Foram revistos todos os artigos indexados na PubMed através da pesquisa ‘capsular contracture’ (2000 - Janeiro 2012), dos quais foram inseridos os artigos de maior interesse em termos de etiologia, profilaxia e tratamento. Artigos referenciados em publicações relevantes foram também analisados.Resultados: Tudo indica que a sua etiologia é multifactorial; a etiopatogenia da contractura capsular mamária continua a ser alvo de múltipla investigação pré-clínica. Vários são os estudos realizados de forma a prevenir a ocorrência de contractura capsular e, embora os resultados sejam promissores, pouco está definido em termos da sua aplicação na prática clínica. Relativamente ao tratamento a capsulectomia/capsulotomia continua a ser o gold-standard, no entanto o futuro poderá passar por técnicas não invasivas, pelo menos em estádios mais leves da doença.Conclusão: Apesar das técnicas cirúrgicas e a qualidade das próteses mamárias terem vindo a melhorar drasticamente nos últimos anos, a contractura capsular mamária mantém-se uma complicação real, com incidência elevada e que continua a afectar milhares de mulheres no mundo.

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans isolation from swallow (Hirundo rustica) excreta in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mohammad T; Mayahi, Sabah; Fakhar, Mahdi; Shokohi, Tahereh; Majidi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated yeast that can cause cryptococcosis, a life-threatening infection that mainly occurs in immunocompromised patients. The major environmental sources of C. neoformans have been shown to be soil contaminated with avian droppings. In the present study, we evaluated the isolation of C. neoformans from swallow (Hirundo rustica) excreta in two northern cities of Iran. Ninety-seven swallow droppings were evaluated and 498 yeast-like colonies were isolated and identified as Rhodotorula spp. (62.8%), Candida spp. (28.5%)and C. neoformans (8.7%). Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from 5/97 (5.2%) of collected samples. Min-Max colony forming units (CFU) per one gram for the positive samples were 3-10 C. neoformans colonies. The total mean CFU per one gram for the positive samples was 4.8. The results of this study demonstrate that excreta of swallow may harbor different species of potentially pathogenic yeasts, mainly C. neoformans, and may be capable of disseminating these fungi in the environment.

  5. EPS-I Polysaccharide Protects Mycoplasma pulmonis from Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Brandon M.; Daubenspeck, James M.; Simmons, Warren L.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Few mycoplasmal polysaccharides have been described and little is known about their role in pathogenesis. The infection of mice with Mycoplasma pulmonis has been utilized in many in vivo and in vitro studies to gain a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions during chronic respiratory infection. Although alveolar macrophages have a primary role in host defense, M. pulmonis is killed inefficiently in vitro. One antiphagocytic factor produced by the mycoplasma is the family of phase- and size-variable Vsa lipoproteins. However, bacteria generally employ multiple strategies for combating host defenses, with capsular polysaccharide often having a key role. We show here that mutants lacking the EPS-I polysaccharide of M. pulmonis exhibit increased susceptibility to binding and subsequent killing by alveolar macrophages. These results give further insight into how mycoplasmas are able to avoid the host immune system and sustain a chronic infection. PMID:23190331

  6. Multiplex PCR for Identification of Two Capsular Types in Epidemic KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 258 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Findlay, Jacqueline; Peirano, Gisele; Hopkins, Katie; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Woodford, Neil; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiplex PCR assay capable of identifying two capsular polysaccharide synthesis sequence types (sequence type 258 [ST258] cps-1 and cps-2) in epidemic Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 strains. The assay performed with excellent sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%) for identifying cps types in 60 ST258 K. pneumoniae sequenced isolates. The screening of 419 ST258 clonal isolates revealed a significant association between cps type and K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) variant: cps-1 is largely associated with KPC-2, while cps-2 is primarily associated with KPC-3. PMID:24733470

  7. Enzymatic characterisation of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii and other environmental Cryptococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Chan, M Y; Tay, S T

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the enzymatic activity of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii, environmental isolates of C. neoformans and non-neoformans Cryptococcus. Most of the cryptococcal isolates investigated in this study exhibited proteinase and phospholipase activities. Laccase activity was detected from all the C. neoformans and C. gattii isolates, but not from the non-neoformans Cryptococcus isolates. There was no significant difference in the proteinase, phospholipase and laccase activities of C. neoformans and C. gattii. However, significant difference in the enzymatic activities of beta-glucuronidase, alpha-glucosidase, beta-glucosidase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase between C. neoformans and C. gattii isolates was observed in this study. Environmental isolates of C. neoformans exhibited similar enzymatic profiles as the clinical isolates of C. neoformans, except for lower proteinase and laccase activities.

  8. The perfect state of Cryptococcus neoformans, Filobasidiella neoformans, on pigeon manure filtrate agar.

    PubMed

    Staib, F

    1981-02-01

    To enable studies of the dependence of Cryptococcus neoformans and its perfect and imperfect states upon bird manure as a habitat of this pathogen, a nutrient medium closely resembling natural conditions was prepared. As sole nutrient, the water soluble ingredients of manure from pigeons (Columbia livia) were used. There was no heat sterilization of the manure filtrate. Using a standard pair of C. neoformans strains for mating, it could be demonstrated that the perfect state of the fungus developed on this so called pigeon manure filtrate agar within 48 h at 26 degrees C. This medium is supposed to help in the elucidation of the epidemiological significance of the perfect and imperfect states of this pathogen.

  9. Traumatic Extra-capsular and Intra-capsular Floating Fat: Fat-fluid Levels of the Knee Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Vachhani, Prasann

    2015-01-01

    Floating fat is a sign of acute bone injury at the knee following trauma. The goal of this article is to review the etiology, patterns, and mimickers of extra-capsular and intra-capsular floating fat, with the major emphasis on knee trauma in the acute setting. We will discuss the spectrum of multimodal imaging findings for rare presentations of extra-capsular floating fat, and contrast these with common and atypical forms of intra-capsular lipohemarthrosis, as an aid to the assessment of acute bone trauma at the knee. PMID:26713176

  10. Capsular Contracture after Breast Augmentation: An Update for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Headon, Hannah; Kasem, Adbul

    2015-01-01

    Capsular contracture is the most common complication following implant based breast surgery and is one of the most common reasons for reoperation. Therefore, it is important to try and understand why this happens, and what can be done to reduce its incidence. A literature search using the MEDLINE database was conducted including search terms 'capsular contracture breast augmentation', 'capsular contracture pathogenesis', 'capsular contracture incidence', and 'capsular contracture management', which yielded 82 results which met inclusion criteria. Capsular contracture is caused by an excessive fibrotic reaction to a foreign body (the implant) and has an overall incidence of 10.6%. Risk factors that were identified included the use of smooth (vs. textured) implants, a subglandular (vs. submuscular) placement, use of a silicone (vs. saline) filled implant and previous radiotherapy to the breast. The standard management of capsular contracture is surgical via a capsulectomy or capsulotomy. Medical treatment using the off-label leukotriene receptor antagonist Zafirlukast has been reported to reduce severity and help prevent capsular contracture from forming, as has the use of acellular dermal matrices, botox and neopocket formation. However, nearly all therapeutic approaches are associated with a significant rate of recurrence. Capsular contracture is a multifactorial fibrotic process the precise cause of which is still unknown. The incidence of contracture developing is lower with the use of textured implants, submuscular placement and the use of polyurethane coated implants. Symptomatic capsular contracture is usually managed surgically, however recent research has focussed on preventing capsular contracture from occurring, or treating it with autologous fat transfer. PMID:26430623

  11. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  12. In vitro interactions of immune lymphocytes and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, P Y; Murphy, J W

    1982-01-01

    CBA/J mice immunized subcutaneously with emulsions of heat-killed Cryptococcus neoformans in complete Freund adjuvant displayed delayed-type hypersensitivity to cryptococcal culture filtrate antigen and developed sensitized splenic lymphoid cells which inhibited the growth of C. neoformans in vitro. The in vitro assay of growth inhibition served to investigate further the kinetics of the effect of sensitized lymphoid cells on the pathogen. There was a close correlation between the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in mice and inhibition of growth of C. neoformans by lymphoid cells. Sensitized splenic lymphocytes capable of inhibiting the growth of the cryptococci were detected at day 6 after immunization and reached maximum levels by days 8 through 16. Inhibition of growth was highest with effector-to-target cell ratios of 300:1 or greater. Inhibition of growth of C. neoformans by sensitized lymphoid cells was detectable as early as 4 h after effector and target cells were mixed and increased gradually, reaching a maximum at 24 h, but dropped significantly by 48 h. By supplementing the reaction mixtures with fresh medium or additional sensitized effector cells during incubation, the inhibition of growth of C. neoformans could be maintained through 48 h. C. neoformans-sensitized effector lymphoid populations not only inhibited the growth of the pathogen in vitro but also restricted C. neoformans proliferation in various vital organs upon transfer to naive recipient animals, indicating that the in vitro growth inhibition assay may be a means of assessing the resistance of animals to C. neoformans. The effector cells from sensitized animals were nylon wool-nonadherent Thy-1+ and Ia+ lymphocytes. PMID:7047393

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans shows a remarkable genotypic diversity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto de Oliveira, M T; Boekhout, T; Theelen, B; Hagen, F; Baroni, F A; Lazera, M S; Lengeler, K B; Heitman, J; Rivera, I N G; Paula, C R

    2004-03-01

    The genotypic diversity of Brazilian Cryptococcus neoformans strains was analyzed. The majority of the samples were alphaA (65%), followed by alphaB (17.5%), alphaD (9%), alphaAaD hybrids (5%), and alphaC (3.5%). A considerable genotypic diversity occurred within C. neoformans var. grubii, and a new amplified fragment length polymorphism genotype, 1B, was recognized.

  14. Hepatic capsular retraction: spectrum of diagnosis at MRI.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, David; Mons, Antoine; Braidy, Chadi; Montoriol, Pierre François; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic capsular retraction is an imaging feature that deserves the attention of the radiologist. Hepatic capsular retraction is associated with a number of hepatic lesions, benign or malignant, treated or untreated. The purpose of this pictorial review is to discuss the most common benign and malignant hepatic lesions associated with this feature with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  15. Hepatic capsular retraction: spectrum of diagnosis at MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mons, Antoine; Braidy, Chadi; Montoriol, Pierre François; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic capsular retraction is an imaging feature that deserves the attention of the radiologist. Hepatic capsular retraction is associated with a number of hepatic lesions, benign or malignant, treated or untreated. The purpose of this pictorial review is to discuss the most common benign and malignant hepatic lesions associated with this feature with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:25535571

  16. Capsular Switching in Invasive Neisseria meningitidis, Brazil1

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, David E.; Marsh, Jane W.; Tulenko, Mary M.; Krauland, Mary G.; Rebelo, Maria C.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    During the 1990s, an epidemic of B:4 Neisseria meningitidis infections affected Brazil. Subsequent increase in C:4 disease suggested B→C capsular switching. This study identified B→C switches within the sequence type 32 complex. Substantial disease related to capsular switching emphasizes the need for surveillance of circulating meningococcal strains to optimize disease control. PMID:22840713

  17. Capsular switching in invasive Neisseria meningitidis, Brazil(1).

    PubMed

    Castiñeiras, Terezinha M P P; Barroso, David E; Marsh, Jane W; Tulenko, Mary M; Krauland, Mary G; Rebelo, Maria C; Harrison, Lee H

    2012-08-01

    During the 1990s, an epidemic of B:4 Neisseria meningitidis infections affected Brazil. Subsequent increase in C:4 disease suggested B → C capsular switching. This study identified B → C switches within the sequence type 32 complex. Substantial disease related to capsular switching emphasizes the need for surveillance of circulating meningococcal strains to optimize disease control.

  18. Targeted Genome Editing via CRISPR in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Arras, Samantha D. M.; Chua, Sheena M. H.; Wizrah, Maha S. I.; Faint, Joshua A.; Yap, Amy S.; Fraser, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Low rates of homologous integration have hindered molecular genetic studies in Cryptococcus neoformans over the past 20 years, and new tools that facilitate genome manipulation in this important pathogen are greatly needed. To this end, we have investigated the use of a Class 2 CRISPR system in C. neoformans (formerly C. neoformans var. grubii). We first expressed a derivative of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nuclease in C. neoformans, and showed that it has no effect on growth, production of virulence factors in vitro, or virulence in a murine inhalation model. In proof of principle experiments, we tested the CAS9 construct in combination with multiple self-cleaving guide RNAs targeting the well-characterized phosphoribosylaminoamidazole carboxylase-encoding ADE2 gene. Utilizing combinations of transient and stable expression of our constructs, we revealed that functionality of our CRISPR constructs in C. neoformans is dependent upon the CAS9 construct being stably integrated into the genome, whilst transient expression of the guide RNA is sufficient to enhance rates of homologous recombination in the CAS9 genetic background. Given that the presence of the CRISPR nuclease does not influence virulence in a murine inhalation model, we have successfully demonstrated that this system is compatible with studies of C. neoformans pathogenesis and represents a powerful tool that can be exploited by researchers in the field. PMID:27711143

  19. Targeted Genome Editing via CRISPR in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Arras, Samantha D M; Chua, Sheena M H; Wizrah, Maha S I; Faint, Joshua A; Yap, Amy S; Fraser, James A

    2016-01-01

    Low rates of homologous integration have hindered molecular genetic studies in Cryptococcus neoformans over the past 20 years, and new tools that facilitate genome manipulation in this important pathogen are greatly needed. To this end, we have investigated the use of a Class 2 CRISPR system in C. neoformans (formerly C. neoformans var. grubii). We first expressed a derivative of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nuclease in C. neoformans, and showed that it has no effect on growth, production of virulence factors in vitro, or virulence in a murine inhalation model. In proof of principle experiments, we tested the CAS9 construct in combination with multiple self-cleaving guide RNAs targeting the well-characterized phosphoribosylaminoamidazole carboxylase-encoding ADE2 gene. Utilizing combinations of transient and stable expression of our constructs, we revealed that functionality of our CRISPR constructs in C. neoformans is dependent upon the CAS9 construct being stably integrated into the genome, whilst transient expression of the guide RNA is sufficient to enhance rates of homologous recombination in the CAS9 genetic background. Given that the presence of the CRISPR nuclease does not influence virulence in a murine inhalation model, we have successfully demonstrated that this system is compatible with studies of C. neoformans pathogenesis and represents a powerful tool that can be exploited by researchers in the field.

  20. Acapsular Cryptococcus neoformans activates the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caiqin; Chen, Mingkuan; Fa, Zhenzong; Lu, Ailing; Fang, Wei; Sun, Bing; Chen, Changbin; Liao, Wanqing; Meng, Guangxun

    2014-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that mainly infects immunocompromised individuals such as AIDS patients. Although cell surface receptors for recognition of C. neoformans have been studies intensively, cytoplasmic recognition of this pathogen remains unclear. As an important detector of pathogen infection, inflammasome can sense and get activated by infection of various pathogens, including pathogenic fungi such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Our present study showed that acapsular C. neoformans (cap59Δ) activated the NLRP3-, but not AIM2-nor NLRC4- inflammasome. During this process, viability of the fungus was required. Moreover, our in vivo results showed that during the pulmonary infection of cap59Δ, immune cell infiltration into the lung and effective clearance of the fungus were both dependent on the presence of NLRP3 inflammasome. In summary, our data suggest that the capsule of C. neoformans prevents recognition of the fungus by host NLRP3 inflammasome and indicate that manipulation of inflammasome activity maybe a novel approach to control C. neoformans infection.

  1. Polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli: microscope study of its size, structure, and sites of synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, M E; Thurow, H

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the structure, size, and shape of the uncollapsed polysaccharide capsule of Escherichia coli strain Bi 161/42 [O9:K29(A):H-], its ultrastructural preservation as well as the filamentous components of the isolated capsular material. In a temperature-sensitive mutant, sites were localized at which capsular polysaccharide is "exported" to the cell surface. The highly hydrated capsule of the wild-type cells was visible in the uncollapsed state after freeze-etching, whereas dehydration in greater than or equal to 50% acetone or alcohol caused the capsule to collapse into thick bundles. This was prevented by pretreatment of the cell with capsule-specific immunoglobulin G; the capsule appeared as a homogeneous layer of 250- to 300-nm thickness. The structural preservation depended on the concentration of the anti-capsular immunoglobulin G. Temperature-sensitive mutants, unable to produce capsular antigen at elevated temperatures, showed, 10 to 15 min after shift down to permissive temperature, polysaccharide strands with K29 specificity appearing at the cell surface at roughly 20 sites per cell; concomitantly, capsule-directed antibody started to agglutinate the bacteria. The sites at which the new antigen emerged were found in random distribution over the entire surface of the organism. Spreading of purified polysaccharide was achieved on air-water interfaces; after subsequent shadow casting with heavy metal, filamentous elements were observed with a smallest class of filaments measuring 250 nm in length and 3 to 6 nm in width. At one end these fibers revealed a knoblike structure of about 10-nm diameter. The slimelike polysaccharides from mutants produced filamentous bundles of greater than 100-microns length, with antigenic and phage-receptor properties indistinguishable from those of the wild-type K29 capsule antigen. Images PMID:400798

  2. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  3. [Characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans strains isolated from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)].

    PubMed

    Garza-Garza, D; Buendía-Uribe, J L; Martínez-Cruz, E; Argüero-Licea, B

    1995-01-01

    In Mexico cryptococosis ranks third in frequency among the mycoses ocurring as complications in AIDS patients. Neither the prevalence of the two varieties of C. neoformans in these patients nor the morphological and physiological changes suffered by these strains in AIDS patients are known. A total of 60 isolates were obtained from patients with AIDS from the Hospital de Infectología, Centro Médico "La Raza" IMSS. The identity of each isolate was established by: growth at 37 degrees C, colony and microscopic characteristics, urease and phenoloxidase activity, carbon sources assimilation. The canavanine glycine-bromothymol blue agar was used to distinguish C. neoformans var. neoformans and C. neoformans var. gattii. Pathogenicity in mice was also tested. Fifty one isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans and nine of C. neoformans var. gattii were identified. All strains grew well at 37 degrees C, urease and phenoloxidase were positive, the morphology and the auxanographic profile were variable. C. neoformans var. neoformans was more virulent in mouse than C. neoformans var. gattii. This study has confirmed the presence of the two varieties of C. neoformans in Mexico with 85% prevalence of var. neoformans and 15% of var. gattii in AIDS patients. This frequency was higher than in reports from other countries.

  4. High-resolution melting analysis for identification of the Cryptococcus neoformans-Cryptococcus gattii complex.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sara; Zaragoza, Óscar; Cuesta, Isabel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Buitrago, María J

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a two-step method based on high-resolution melting (HRM) that reliably identifies species from the Cryptococcus species complex (Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans, and Cryptococcus gattii). Our results indicate that HRM can provide a fast protocol to identify and distinguish among the main Cryptococcus species.

  5. Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with two to nine years of follow-up, comparing the pre- and postoperative range of motion. This was an observational study (case series) of 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness. The mean age was of 53.6 years (range: 39 to 68), with female predominance (77.77%) and nine cases left shoulders. There were 6 primary (33.33%) and 12 secondary cases (66.67%). Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all patients after a mean of 9.33 months of physical therapy (range: 6 to 20 months) with a minimum follow-up of two years (range: 26 to 110 months). The mean active and passive forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation increased from 94.4°/103.3°, 11.9°/21.9°, and S1/L5 vertebral level, respectively, to 151.1°/153.8°, 57.2°/64.4°, and T12/T10 vertebral level, respectively. There was a significant difference between the pre- and postoperative range of motion (p < 0.001). According to the Constant-Murley functional score (ROM), the value increased from 14 (preoperative mean) to 30 points (postoperative mean). Postoperatively, all patients showed diminished shoulder pain (none or mild/15 or 10 points in the Constant-Murley score). Arthroscopic treatment is an effective treatment for refractory shoulder stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Planktonic/sessile dimorphism of polysaccharide-encapsulated sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Pollock, T J; Armentrout, R W

    1999-10-01

    Sphingomonads have acquired diverse metabolic activities to inhabit a wide range of environments. Several strains of Sphingomonas display phenotypic dimorphism and can adopt either a planktonic or sessile behavior in liquid media. The sessile state is marked by the presence of a viscous exopolysaccharide capsule. Specific types of these capsular polysaccharides are harvested from large-scale fermentations for use as rheology modifiers in many industrial and food applications. Sensing of environmental stimuli and genetic control over synthesis of the capsule are key events in alternating between these two phenotypes.

  7. Molecular genetic analyses of mating pheromones reveal intervariety mating or hybridization in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Fan, Jinjiang; Stein, Birgit; Behr, Melissa J; Samsonoff, William A; Wickes, Brian L; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2002-09-01

    The sexual mating of the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is important for pathogenesis studies because the fungal virulence is linked to the alpha mating type (MAT(alpha)). We characterized C. neoformans mating pheromones (MF(alpha) 1 and MFa1) from 122 strains to understand intervariety hybridization or mating and intervariety virulence. MF(alpha) 1 in three C. neoformans varieties showed (a) specific nucleotide polymorphisms, (b) different copy numbers and chromosomal localizations, and (c) unique deduced amino acids in two geographic populations of C. neoformans var. gattii. MF(alpha) 1 of different varieties cross-hybridized in Southern hybridizations. Their phylogenetic analyses showed purifying selection (neutral evolution). These observations suggested that MAT(alpha) strains from any of the three C. neoformans varieties could mate or hybridize in nature with MATa strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans. A few serotype A/D diploid strains provided evidence for mating or hybridization, while a majority of A/D strains tested positive for haploid MF(alpha) 1 identical to that of C. neoformans var. grubii. MF(alpha) 1 sequence and copy numbers in diploids were identical to those of C. neoformans var. grubii, while their MFa1 sequences were identical to those of C. neoformans var. neoformans; thus, these strains were hybrids. The mice survival curves and histological lesions revealed A/D diploids to be highly pathogenic, with pathogenicity levels similar to that of the C. neoformans var. grubii type strain and unlike the low pathogenicity levels of C. neoformans var. neoformans strains. In contrast to MF(alpha) 1 in three varieties, MFa1 amplicons and hybridization signals could be obtained only from two C. neoformans var. neoformans reference strains and eight A/D diploids. This suggested that a yet undiscovered MFa pheromone(s) in C. neoformans var. gattii and C. neoformans var. grubii is unrelated to, highly divergent from, or rarer than that in C

  8. Intron retention-dependent gene regulation in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Paulet, Damien; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Hon, Chung-Chau; Lechat, Pierre; Mogensen, Estelle; Moyrand, Frédérique; Proux, Caroline; Barboux, Rony; Bussotti, Giovanni; Hwang, Jungwook; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-01-01

    The biological impact of alternative splicing is poorly understood in fungi, although recent studies have shown that these microorganisms are usually intron-rich. In this study, we re-annotated the genome of C. neoformans var. neoformans using RNA-Seq data. Comparison with C. neoformans var. grubii revealed that more than 99% of ORF-introns are in the same exact position in the two varieties whereas UTR-introns are much less evolutionary conserved. We also confirmed that alternative splicing is very common in C. neoformans, affecting nearly all expressed genes. We also observed specific regulation of alternative splicing by environmental cues in this yeast. However, alternative splicing does not appear to be an efficient method to diversify the C. neoformans proteome. Instead, our data suggest the existence of an intron retention-dependent mechanism of gene expression regulation that is not dependent on NMD. This regulatory process represents an additional layer of gene expression regulation in fungi and provides a mechanism to tune gene expression levels in response to any environmental modification. PMID:27577684

  9. DAP12 Inhibits Pulmonary Immune Responses to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Heung, Lena J.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that is inhaled into the lungs and can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Currently, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the mammalian immune response to respiratory cryptococcal challenge remain poorly defined. DAP12, a signaling adapter for multiple pattern recognition receptors in myeloid and natural killer (NK) cells, has been shown to play both activating and inhibitory roles during lung infections by different bacteria and fungi. In this study, we demonstrate that DAP12 plays an important inhibitory role in the immune response to C. neoformans. Infectious outcomes in DAP12−/− mice, including survival and lung fungal burden, are significantly improved compared to those in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. We find that eosinophils and macrophages are decreased while NK cells are increased in the lungs of infected DAP12−/− mice. In contrast to WT NK cells, DAP12−/− NK cells are able to repress C. neoformans growth in vitro. Additionally, DAP12−/− macrophages are more highly activated than WT macrophages, with increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and CCL5/RANTES and more efficient uptake and killing of C. neoformans. These findings suggest that DAP12 acts as a brake on the pulmonary immune response to C. neoformans by promoting pulmonary eosinophilia and by inhibiting the activation and antifungal activities of effector cells, including NK cells and macrophages. PMID:27068093

  10. Isolation and characterization of the Cryptococcus neoformans MATa pheromone gene.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Carol M; Fu, Jianmin; Woodlee, Gay L; Seymour, Tara S; Wickes, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a heterothallic basidiomycete with two mating types, MATa and MATalpha. The mating pathway of this fungus has a number of conserved genes, including a MATalpha-specific pheromone (MFalpha1). A modified differential display strategy was used to identify a gene encoding the MATa pheromone. The gene, designated MFa1, is 42 amino acids in length and contains a conserved farnesylation motif. MFa1 is present in three linked copies that span a 20-kb fragment of MATa-specific DNA and maps to the MAT-containing chromosome. Transformation studies showed that MFa1 induced filament formation only in MATalpha cells, demonstrating that MFa1 is functionally conserved. Sequence analysis of the predicted Mfa1 and Mfalpha1 proteins revealed that, in contrast to other fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the C. neoformans pheromone genes are structurally and functionally conserved. However, unlike the MFalpha1 gene, which is found in MATalpha strains of both varieties of C. neoformans, MFa1 is specific for the neoformans variety of C. neoformans. PMID:11901112

  11. ALL2, a Homologue of ALL1, Has a Distinct Role in Regulating pH Homeostasis in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Bouklas, Tejas; Gupta, Anjali; Varshney, Avanish K.; Orner, Erika P.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular fungal pathogen that has a polysaccharide capsule and causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Its capsule, as well as its ability to survive in the acidic environment of the phagolysosome, contributes to the pathogen's resilience in the host environment. Previously, we reported that downregulation of allergen 1 (ALL1) results in the secretion of a shorter, more viscous exopolysaccharide with less branching and structural complexity, as well as altered iron homeostasis. Now, we report on a homologous coregulated gene, allergen 2 (ALL2). ALL2's function was characterized by generating null mutants in C. neoformans. In contrast to ALL1, loss of ALL2 attenuated virulence in the pulmonary infection model. The all2Δ mutant shed a less viscous exopolysaccharide and exhibited higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide than the wild type, and as a result, the all2Δ mutant was more resistant to macrophage-mediated killing. Transcriptome analysis further supported the distinct function of these two genes. Unlike ALL1's involvement in iron homeostasis, we now present data on ALL2's unique function in maintaining intracellular pH in low-pH conditions. Thus, our data highlight that C. neoformans, a human-pathogenic basidiomycete, has evolved a unique set of virulence-associated genes that contributes to its resilience in the human niche. PMID:26597983

  12. The formation of titan cells in Cryptococcus neoformans depends on the mouse strain and correlates with induction of Th2-type responses.

    PubMed

    García-Barbazán, Irene; Trevijano-Contador, Nuria; Rueda, Cristina; de Andrés, Belén; Pérez-Tavárez, Raquel; Herrero-Fernández, Inés; Gaspar, María Luisa; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that can form titan cells in the lungs, which are fungal cells of abnormal enlarged size. Little is known about the factors that trigger titan cells. In particular, it is not known how the host environment influences this transition. In this work, we describe the formation of titan cells in two mouse strains, CD1 and C57BL/6J. We found that the proportion of C. neoformans titan cells was significantly higher in C57BL/6J mice than in CD1. This higher proportion of titan cells was associated with a higher dissemination of the yeasts to the brain. Histology sections demonstrated eosinophilia in infected animals, although it was significantly lower in the CD1 mice which presented infiltration of lymphocytes. Both mouse strains presented infiltration of granulocytes, but the amount of eosinophils was higher in C57BL/6J. CD1 mice showed a significant accumulation of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL17, while C57BL/BL mice had an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4. IgM antibodies to the polysaccharide capsule and total IgE were more abundant in the sera from C57BL/6J, confirming that these animals present a Th2-type response. We conclude that titan cell formation in C. neoformans depends, not only on microbe factors, but also on the host environment.

  13. Enzymatic Modifications of Polysaccharides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polysaccharides are often modified chemically in order to improve its properties or to impart specific characteristics. Indeed quite a few commercial products are based on modified polysaccharides. In this talk, I shall describe a new set of modified polysaccharides based on enzymatic reactions. ...

  14. Decoration of Chondroitin Polysaccharide with Threonine: Synthesis, Conformational Study, and Ice-Recrystallization Inhibition Activity.

    PubMed

    Laezza, Antonio; Casillo, Angela; Cosconati, Sandro; Biggs, Caroline I; Fabozzi, Antonio; Paduano, Luigi; Iadonisi, Alfonso; Novellino, Ettore; Gibson, Matthew I; Randazzo, Antonio; Corsaro, Maria M; Bedini, Emiliano

    2017-08-14

    Several threonine (Thr)- and alanine (Ala)-rich antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) and polysaccharides act in nature as ice recrystallization inhibitors. Among them, the Thr-decorated capsular polysaccharide (CPS) from the cold-adapted Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H bacterium was recently investigated for its cryoprotectant activity. A semisynthetic mimic thereof was here prepared from microbial sourced chondroitin through a four-step strategy, involving a partial protection of the chondroitin polysaccharide as a key step for gaining an unprecedented quantitative amidation of its glucuronic acid units. In-depth NMR and computational analysis suggested a fairly linear conformation for the semisynthetic polysaccharide, for which the antifreeze activity by a quantitative ice recrystallization inhibition assay was measured. We compared the structure-activity relationships for the Thr-derivatized chondroitin and the natural Thr-decorated CPS from C. psychrerythraea.

  15. Immunochemical characterization of the "native" type III polysaccharide of group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The type III polysaccharide of -roup B Streptococcus has been isolated and purified by a method that employs washing of intact cells at neutral pH. That the polysaccharide prepared by this procedure is the "native" type III antigen is suggested by its molecular size in excess of 10(6) daltons, its degradation by acid and heat treatment to a fragment with immunologic characteristics of the classical HCl antigen, and its type-specific serologic activity. The type III polysaccharide in native form contains sialic acid, galactose, glucose, glucosamine, heptose, and mannose. It is acidic in nature, is resistant to neuramindiase degradation, contains no O-acetyl groups, and does not share antigenic determinants with capsular type K1 antigen of Escherichia coli or Group B polysaccharide antigen of Neiserria meningitidis. PMID:55450

  16. Serotyping of 467 Cryptococcus neoformans Isolates from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Brazil: Analysis of Host and Regional Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Marília M.; Lazera, Márcia S.; Barbosa, Glaucia G.; Trilles, Luciana; Balassiano, Beatriz R.; Macedo, Regina C. L.; Bezerra, Cláudia C. F.; Pérez, Maurício A.; Cardarelli, Paola; Wanke, Bodo

    2003-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an important zoopathogen, and it is one of the most prevalent lethal mycotic agents. Its polysaccharide capsule, synthesized in vivo and in vitro, is a virulence factor, contains predominantly glucuronoxylomannan, and is responsible for the antigenic differentiation of serotypes A, B, C, D, and AD. A total of 467 isolates of C. neoformans obtained from clinical and environmental sources from Brazilian regions were studied serologically by using the Crypto Check Iatron RM 304-K kit. Serotyping of the clinical isolates showed the following prevalences of the serotypes: A (77.95%), followed by B (18.2%), AD (1.3%), D (0.4%), C (0.2%), and untypeable (1.93%). The epidemiology of serotype A in the Brazilian southern and southeastern regions reproduces the picture observed worldwide. In contrast, serotype B was the most frequent agent of cryptococcosis in the northeastern region, occurring nearly equally in male and female healthy hosts. Among the isolates from environmental sources, serotypes A and B were found to occur in the hollows of tropical trees of the genera Cassia, Ficus, and Moquillea. The few isolates from Eucalyptus camaldulensis debris were serotypes A and B and untypeable. Overall, no association with a specific host tree was identified for these serotypes, denoting a distinct ecoepidemiological regional pattern. The one serotype C isolate was recovered from a human immunodeficiency virus-negative host. Serotype AD predominated over serotype D among both clinical and environmental isolates. PMID:12517828

  17. Quality Control of Fungus-specific Glucosylceramide in Cryptococcus neoformans by Endoglycoceramidase-related Protein 1 (EGCrP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Sakaguchi, Keishi; Okino, Nozomu; Taguchi, Ryo; Ito, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    A fungus-specific glucosylceramide (GlcCer), which contains a unique sphingoid base possessing two double bonds and a methyl substitution, is essential for pathogenicity in fungi. Although the biosynthetic pathway of the GlcCer has been well elucidated, little is known about GlcCer catabolism because a GlcCer-degrading enzyme (glucocerebrosidase) has yet to be identified in fungi. We found a homologue of endoglycoceramidase tentatively designated endoglycoceramidase-related protein 1 (EGCrP1) in several fungal genomic databases. The recombinant EGCrP1 hydrolyzed GlcCer but not other glycosphingolipids, whereas endoglycoceramidase hydrolyzed oligosaccharide-linked glycosphingolipids but not GlcCer. Disruption of egcrp1 in Cryptococcus neoformans, a typical pathogenic fungus causing cryptococcosis, resulted in the accumulation of fungus-specific GlcCer and immature GlcCer that possess sphingoid bases without a methyl substitution concomitant with a dysfunction of polysaccharide capsule formation. These results indicated that EGCrP1 participates in the catabolism of GlcCer and especially functions to eliminate immature GlcCer in vivo that are generated as by-products due to the broad specificity of GlcCer synthase. We conclude that EGCrP1, a glucocerebrosidase identified for the first time in fungi, controls the quality of GlcCer by eliminating immature GlcCer incorrectly generated in C. neoformans, leading to accurate processing of fungus-specific GlcCer. PMID:22072709

  18. Using Solid-state NMR to Monitor the Molecular Consequences of Cryptococcus neoformans Melanization with Different Catecholamine Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Frases, Susana; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are a class of natural pigments associated with a wide range of biological functions, including microbial virulence, energy transduction, and protection against solar radiation. Because of their insolubility and structural heterogeneity, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides an unprecedented means to define the molecular architecture of these enigmatic pigments. The requirement of obligatory catecholamines for melanization of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also offers unique opportunities for investigating melanin development. In the current study, pigments produced with L-dopa, methyl-L-dopa, epinephrine, and norepinephrine precursors are compared structurally using 13C and 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Striking structural differences were observed for both aromatic and aliphatic molecular constituents of the mature fungal pigment assemblies, thus making it possible to redefine the molecular prerequisites for formation of the aromatic domains of insoluble indole-based biopolymers, to rationalize their distinctive physical characteristics, and to delineate the role of cellular constituents in assembly of the melanized macromolecules with polysaccharides and fatty acyl chain-containing moieties. By achieving an augmented understanding of the mechanisms of C. neoformans melanin biosynthesis and cellular assembly, such studies can guide future drug discovery efforts related to melanin-associated virulence, resistance to tumor therapy, and production of melanin mimetics under cell-free conditions. PMID:22765382

  19. Using solid-state NMR to monitor the molecular consequences of Cryptococcus neoformans melanization with different catecholamine precursors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Frases, Susana; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E

    2012-08-07

    Melanins are a class of natural pigments associated with a wide range of biological functions, including microbial virulence, energy transduction, and protection against solar radiation. Because of their insolubility and structural heterogeneity, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides an unprecedented means to define the molecular architecture of these enigmatic pigments. The requirement of obligatory catecholamines for melanization of the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans also offers unique opportunities for investigating melanin development. In the current study, pigments produced with L-dopa, methyl-L-dopa, epinephrine, and norepinephrine precursors are compared structurally using (13)C and (1)H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Striking structural differences were observed for both aromatic and aliphatic molecular constituents of the mature fungal pigment assemblies, thus making it possible to redefine the molecular prerequisites for formation of the aromatic domains of insoluble indole-based biopolymers, to rationalize their distinctive physical characteristics, and to delineate the role of cellular constituents in assembly of the melanized macromolecules with polysaccharides and fatty acyl chain-containing moieties. By achieving an augmented understanding of the mechanisms of C. neoformans melanin biosynthesis and cellular assembly, such studies can guide future drug discovery efforts related to melanin-associated virulence, resistance to tumor therapy, and production of melanin mimetics under cell-free conditions.

  20. Capsular Plication for Treatment of Iatrogenic Hip Instability

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Grzybowski, Jeffrey; Salata, Michael J.; Mather, Richard C.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported reasons for persistent hip pain after hip arthroscopy are residual femoroacetabular impingement, dysplasia and dysplasia variants, or extra-articular impingement. There are some cases in which the underlying osseous pathomorphology has been appropriately treated, and the cause of persistent hip pain can be soft-tissue injuries such as chondrolabral tears or capsular abnormalities. Capsular defects after hip arthroscopy may suggest an alteration of the biomechanical properties of the iliofemoral ligament and lead to iatrogenically induced hip instability. There are a growing number of biomechanical and clinical studies showing the importance of capsular management during hip arthroscopy. We describe the workup, examination under anesthesia, diagnostic arthroscopy, and technique of capsular plication for iatrogenic instability of the hip. PMID:26870636

  1. Is the Capsular Bag Perimeter Round or Elliptical?

    PubMed Central

    Amigó, Alfredo; Bonaque-González, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report findings that could suggest an elliptical shape of the capsular bag. Methods: Five eyes of three patients with axial length greater than 24 mm underwent phacoemulsification cataract surgery with plate-haptic multifocal toric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation oriented in the vertical meridian. Results: In all cases, correct orientation of the IOLs was verified 30 minutes after surgery. After 24 hours, all eyes demonstrated unwanted rotation of the IOLs ranging from 15 to 45 degrees. The IOLs remained stable in the new position in all cases until adhesion of the capsular bag took place. Conclusion: These observations could suggest that the perimeter of the capsular bag has an elliptical shape. Therefore, the IOL tends to become fixated in a meridian of the capsular bag that best fits the diagonal diameter of the IOL. PMID:27413495

  2. Threonine biosynthetic genes are essential in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kingsbury, Joanne M.; McCusker, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We identified and attempted to disrupt the Cryptococcus neoformans homoserine and/or threonine biosynthetic genes encoding aspartate kinase (HOM3), homoserine kinase (THR1), and threonine synthase (THR4), however, each gene proved recalcitrant to disruption. By replacing the endogenous promoters of HOM3 and THR1 with the copper-repressible CTR4-1 promoter, we showed that HOM3 and THR1 were essential for the growth of C. neoformans in rich media, when ammonium was the nitrogen source, or when threonine was supplied as an amino acid instead of a dipeptide. Moreover, the severity of the growth defect associated with HOM3- or THR1-repression increased with increasing incubation temperature. This study comprises the first demonstration of threonine biosynthetic genes being essential in a fungus. The necessity of these genes for C. neoformans growth, particularly at physiologically relevant temperatures, makes threonine biosynthetic genes ideal anti-cryptococcal drug targets. PMID:18757810

  3. Experimental murine cryptococcal infection results in contamination of bedding with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Mednick, Aron; Shi, Li; Casadevall, Arturo

    2003-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that survives in diverse environments. To determine whether cages of mice infected with C. neoformans posed an infection risk to animal caregivers, we investigated whether the fungus could be isolated from the bedding or stool of mice infected by intratracheal (i.t.), intravenous (i.v.), or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes. The bedding of mice infected i.t. was contaminated with C. neoformans. In contrast, no contamination of bedding with C. neoformans was detected in cages of mice infected i.v. or i.p. C. neoformans was not isolated from murine feces. The C. neoformans strain recovered from bedding material was indistinguishable from the infecting strain by biochemical and molecular techniques. This result suggests that precautions may be warranted when disposing bedding from cages that housed mice with pulmonary C. neoformans infection.

  4. The role of host gender in the pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans infections.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Erin E; Hobbs, Letizia M; Rivera, Johanna; Casadevall, Arturo; Potts, Wayne K; Smith, Jennifer M; Ory, Jeramia J

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is a pathogenic yeast and the cause of cryptococcal meningitis. Prevalence of disease between males and females is skewed, with males having an increased incidence of disease. Based on the reported gender susceptibility differences to Cn in the literature, we used clinical isolates from Botswanan HIV-infected patients to test the hypothesis that different gender environments exerted different selective pressures on Cn. When we examined this data set, we found that men had significantly higher risk of death despite having significantly higher CD4(+) T lymphocyte counts upon admittance to the hospital. These observations suggested that Cn strains are uniquely adapted to different host gender environments and that the male immune response may be less efficient in controlling Cn infection. To discriminate between these possibilities, we tested whether there were phenotypic differences between strains isolated from males and females and whether there was an interaction between Cn and the host immune response. Virulence phenotypes showed that Cn isolates from females had longer doubling times and released more capsular glucoronoxylomannan (GXM). The presence of testosterone but not 17-β estradiol was associated with higher levels of GXM release for a laboratory strain and 28 clinical isolates. We also measured phagocytic efficiency, survival of Cn, and amount of killing of human macrophages by Cn after incubation with four isolates. While macrophages from females phagocytosed more Cn than macrophages from males, male macrophages had a higher fungal burden and showed increased killing by Cn. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that differential interaction between Cn and macrophages within different gender environments contribute to the increased prevalence of cryptococcosis in males. This could be related to differential expression of cryptococcal virulence genes and capsule metabolism, changes in Cn phagocytosis and increased

  5. Ferric iron reduction by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Nyhus, K J; Wilborn, A T; Jacobson, E S

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans must reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) prior to uptake. We investigated mechanisms of reduction using the chromogenic ferrous chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate. Iron-depleted cells reduced 57 nmol of Fe(III) per 10(6) cells per h, while iron-replete cells reduced only 8 nmol of Fe(III). Exponential-phase cells reduced the most and stationary-phase cells reduced the least Fe(III), independent of iron status. Supernatants from iron-depleted cells reduced up to 2 nmol of Fe(III) per 10(6) cells per h, while supernatants from iron-replete cells reduced 0.5 nmol of Fe(III), implying regulation of the secreted reductant(s). One such reductant is 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3HAA), which was found at concentrations up to 29 microM in iron-depleted cultures but <2 microM in cultures supplemented with iron. Moreover, when washed and resuspended in low iron medium, iron-depleted cells secreted 20.4 microM 3HAA, while iron-replete cells secreted only 4.5 microM 3HAA. Each mole of 3HAA reduced 3 mol of Fe(III), and increasing 3HAA concentrations correlated with increasing reducing activity of supernatants; however, 3HAA accounted for only half of the supernatant's reducing activity, indicating the presence of additional reductants. Finally, we found that melanized stationary-phase cells reduced 2 nmol of Fe(III) per 10(6) cells per h--16 times the rate of nonmelanized cells--suggesting that this redox polymer participates in reduction of Fe(III). PMID:9009293

  6. Pheromone independent unisexual development in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rachana; Zhao, Youbao; Lin, Jianfeng; Fan, Yumeng; Xu, Xinping; Upadhyay, Srijana; Lin, Xiaorong

    2017-05-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans can undergo a-α bisexual and unisexual reproduction. Completion of both sexual reproduction modes requires similar cellular differentiation processes and meiosis. Although bisexual reproduction generates equal number of a and α progeny and is far more efficient than unisexual reproduction under mating-inducing laboratory conditions, the α mating type dominates in nature. Population genetic studies suggest that unisexual reproduction by α isolates might have contributed to this sharply skewed distribution of the mating types. However, the predominance of the α mating type and the seemingly inefficient unisexual reproduction observed under laboratory conditions present a conundrum. Here, we discovered a previously unrecognized condition that promotes unisexual reproduction while suppressing bisexual reproduction. Pheromone is the principal stimulus for bisexual development in Cryptococcus. Interestingly, pheromone and other components of the pheromone pathway, including the key transcription factor Mat2, are not necessary but rather inhibitory for Cryptococcus to complete its unisexual cycle under this condition. The inactivation of the pheromone pathway promotes unisexual reproduction despite the essential role of this pathway in non-self-recognition during bisexual reproduction. Nonetheless, the requirement for the known filamentation regulator Znf2 and the expression of hyphal or basidium specific proteins remain the same for pheromone-dependent or independent sexual reproduction. Transcriptome analyses and an insertional mutagenesis screen in mat2Δ identified calcineurin being essential for this process. We further found that Znf2 and calcineurin work cooperatively in controlling unisexual development in this fungus. These findings indicate that Mat2 acts as a repressor of pheromone-independent unisexual development while serving as an activator for a-α bisexual development. The bi-functionality of Mat2 might have allowed

  7. Pheromone independent unisexual development in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Rachana; Zhao, Youbao; Fan, Yumeng; Xu, Xinping; Lin, Xiaorong

    2017-01-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans can undergo a-α bisexual and unisexual reproduction. Completion of both sexual reproduction modes requires similar cellular differentiation processes and meiosis. Although bisexual reproduction generates equal number of a and α progeny and is far more efficient than unisexual reproduction under mating-inducing laboratory conditions, the α mating type dominates in nature. Population genetic studies suggest that unisexual reproduction by α isolates might have contributed to this sharply skewed distribution of the mating types. However, the predominance of the α mating type and the seemingly inefficient unisexual reproduction observed under laboratory conditions present a conundrum. Here, we discovered a previously unrecognized condition that promotes unisexual reproduction while suppressing bisexual reproduction. Pheromone is the principal stimulus for bisexual development in Cryptococcus. Interestingly, pheromone and other components of the pheromone pathway, including the key transcription factor Mat2, are not necessary but rather inhibitory for Cryptococcus to complete its unisexual cycle under this condition. The inactivation of the pheromone pathway promotes unisexual reproduction despite the essential role of this pathway in non-self-recognition during bisexual reproduction. Nonetheless, the requirement for the known filamentation regulator Znf2 and the expression of hyphal or basidium specific proteins remain the same for pheromone-dependent or independent sexual reproduction. Transcriptome analyses and an insertional mutagenesis screen in mat2Δ identified calcineurin being essential for this process. We further found that Znf2 and calcineurin work cooperatively in controlling unisexual development in this fungus. These findings indicate that Mat2 acts as a repressor of pheromone-independent unisexual development while serving as an activator for a-α bisexual development. The bi-functionality of Mat2 might have allowed

  8. Ferrous iron uptake in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E S; Goodner, A P; Nyhus, K J

    1998-09-01

    Previous studies have implicated ferric reduction in the iron uptake pathway of the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Here we studied iron uptake directly, using 55Fe in the presence of reductants. Uptake was linear with respect to time and number of yeast cells. The plot of uptake versus concentration exhibited a steep rise up to about 1 microM, a plateau between 1 and 25 microM, and a second steep rise above 25 microM, consistent with high- and low-affinity uptake systems. A Km for high-affinity uptake was estimated to be 0.6 microM Fe(II); 1 microM was used for standardized uptake assays. At this concentration, the uptake rate was 110 +/- 3 pmol/10(6) cells/h. Iron repletion (15 microM) and copper starvation drastically decreased high-affinity iron uptake. Incubation at 0 degreesC or in the presence of 2 mM KCN abolished high-affinity iron uptake, suggesting that uptake requires metabolic energy. When exogenous reducing agents were not supplied and the culture was washed free of secreted reductants, uptake was reduced by 46%; the remaining uptake activity presumably was dependent upon the cell membrane ferric reductase. Further decreases in free Fe(II) levels achieved by trapping with bathophenanthroline disulfonate or reoxidizing with potassium nitrosodisulfonate reduced iron uptake very drastically, suggesting that it is the Fe(II) species which is transported by the high-affinity transporter. The uptake of Fe was stimulated two- to threefold by deferoxamine, but this increment could be abolished by copper starvation or inhibition of the ferric reductase by Pt, indicating that Fe solubilized by this molecule also entered the reductive iron uptake pathway.

  9. Production of Extracellular Polysaccharide by Zoogloea ramigera

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Anders B.; Enfors, Sven-Olof

    1982-01-01

    In batch cultures of Zoogloea ramigera the maximum rate of exopolysaccharide synthesis occurred in a partly growth-linked process. The exopolysaccharide was attached to the cells as a capsule. The capsules were released from the cell walls after 150 h of cultivation, which caused the fermentation broth to be highly viscous. Ultrasonication could be used to release capsular polysaccharide from the microbial cell walls. Treatment performed after 48 to 66 h of cultivation revealed exopolysaccharide concentration and apparent viscosity values in accordance with values of untreated samples withdrawn after 161 h of cultivation. The yield coefficient of exopolysaccharide on the basis of consumed glucose was in the range of 55 to 60% for batch cultivations with an initial glucose concentration of 25 g liter−1. An exopolysaccharide concentration of up to 38 g liter−1 could be attained if glucose, nitrogen, and growth factors were fed into the batch culture. The oxygen consumption rate in batch fermentations reached 25 mmol of O2 liter−1 h−1 during the exopolysaccharide synthesis phase and then decreased to values below 5 mmol of O2 liter−1 h−1 during the release phase. The fermentation broth showed pseudoplastic flow behavior, and the polysaccharide was not degraded when growth had ceased. Images PMID:16346138

  10. Production of Extracellular Polysaccharide by Zoogloea ramigera.

    PubMed

    Norberg, A B; Enfors, S O

    1982-11-01

    In batch cultures of Zoogloea ramigera the maximum rate of exopolysaccharide synthesis occurred in a partly growth-linked process. The exopolysaccharide was attached to the cells as a capsule. The capsules were released from the cell walls after 150 h of cultivation, which caused the fermentation broth to be highly viscous. Ultrasonication could be used to release capsular polysaccharide from the microbial cell walls. Treatment performed after 48 to 66 h of cultivation revealed exopolysaccharide concentration and apparent viscosity values in accordance with values of untreated samples withdrawn after 161 h of cultivation. The yield coefficient of exopolysaccharide on the basis of consumed glucose was in the range of 55 to 60% for batch cultivations with an initial glucose concentration of 25 g liter. An exopolysaccharide concentration of up to 38 g liter could be attained if glucose, nitrogen, and growth factors were fed into the batch culture. The oxygen consumption rate in batch fermentations reached 25 mmol of O(2) liter h during the exopolysaccharide synthesis phase and then decreased to values below 5 mmol of O(2) liter h during the release phase. The fermentation broth showed pseudoplastic flow behavior, and the polysaccharide was not degraded when growth had ceased.

  11. Cephalosporin and Aminoglycoside Concentrations in Peritoneal Capsular Fluid in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Dale N.; Hall, Wendell H.; Schierl, Elizabeth A.; Manion, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    To study the penetration of antibiotics into peritoneal tissue fluid, a subcutaneous tissue capsule model was modified by implanting multiple, perforated spherical capsules in the peritoneal cavity of rabbits. Capsules became vascularized, encased in connective tissue, and filled with fluid having a mean protein concentration of 3.6 g/100 ml. Capsular fluid was obtained by percutaneous needle aspiration and assayed for antibiotic by the disk plate bioassay technique. Cephalosporins were administered intramuscularly at a dose of 30 mg/kg. Mean peak concentrations of cephaloridine and cefazolin were significantly higher than cephalothin and cephapirin in capsular fluids, but the percent penetration (ratio of capsular mean peak to serum mean peak) ranged from 8.7 to 16.9% and was not significantly different among the cephalosporins. At 24 h the capsular concentration of cefazolin was significantly greater than for the other cephalosporins (P < 0.001). Lower rabbit serum protein binding observed at high in vivo concentrations may have enabled cefazolin to penetrate capsular fluid, but in vitro protein binding studies did not confirm a decrease in serum protein binding at high concentrations within the clinical range. Kanamycin and amikacin showed comparable capsular fluid peak concentrations as did gentamicin and tobramycin. The percent penetration ranged from 15.2 to 34.5% for the aminoglycosides. The only statistical difference was that amikacin penetration was significantly higher than that for tobramycin. Mean capsular concentrations of amikacin, cefazolin, and cephaloridine compared most favorably with the minimum inhibitory concentration of gram-negative bacilli at the dosages used in this study. Images PMID:1008548

  12. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... Cryptococcosis infections are found most often as chronic meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes) and, if...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... Cryptococcosis infections are found most often as chronic meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes) and, if...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... Cryptococcosis infections are found most often as chronic meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes) and, if...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... Cryptococcosis infections are found most often as chronic meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes) and, if...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3165 - Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cryptococcus neoformans serological reagents. 866.3165 Section 866.3165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... Cryptococcosis infections are found most often as chronic meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes) and, if...

  17. Primary Larynx Cryptococcus neoformans Infection: A Distinctive Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Mathieu; Gagné, Andrée-Anne; Côté, Mathieu; Chênevert, Jacinthe; Dubé, Robert; Pelletier, René

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans can directly infect the vocal cords. Endoscopic findings were undistinctive from most infiltrative diseases. Tissue biopsy was essential for the diagnosis. Inhaled corticosteroids can predispose to the infection, and fluconazole 400 mg daily for at least 6 weeks appeared to be minimal to achieve a permanent cure. PMID:26753169

  18. Production of diagnostic pigment by phenoloxidase activity of cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C E; Kapica, L

    1972-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces brown pigmented colonies when grown on agar media made from an extract of potatoes and carrots, broad beans (Vicia faba), or Guizotia abyssinica seeds. Since other yeasts do not produce the pigment, these media are useful as differential isolation media for C. neoformans. Similar specific pigment was produced by C. neoformans on chemically defined agar media which contained six different substrates of phenoloxidase (o-diphenol: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.10.3.1) an enzyme which catalyses the oxidation of o-diphenols to melanin. Substrates were incorporated singly into the media and included L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid, catechol, norepinephrine, and 3-hydroxytyramine hydrochloride (dopamine). No pigment was produced on media without substrate. Phenoloxidase activity in (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitates of C. neoformans cell-free extract was assayed by measuring increases in absorbance at 480 nm produced in solutions of L-DOPA. This reaction showed oxygen uptake and was effectively inhibited by copper chelators, but not by catalase. The enzyme also oxidized the five other substrates which induced pigment formation. Electron micrographs of cells incubated in L-DOPA showed deposition of the pigment in the cell wall.

  19. Laccase Expression in Murine Pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rivera, Javier; Tucker, Stephanie C.; Feldmesser, Marta; Williamson, Peter R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2005-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans laccase expression during murine infection was investigated in lung tissue by immunohistochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy. Laccase was detected in the fungal cell cytoplasm, cell wall, and capsule in vivo. The amount of laccase found in different sites varied as a function of the time of infection. PMID:15845520

  20. Genotypic diversity of environmental Cryptococcus neoformans isolates from Northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Sampaio, Ana; Maduro, Ana Paula; Silva, Inês; Teles, Fernando; Martins, Maria da Luz; Inácio, João

    2014-02-01

    The Cryptococcus neoformans/C. gattii species complex members are the main agents of systemic cryptococcosis. This disease is believed to be acquired from the environment via fungal cell inhalation. Often, isolates recovered from environmental and clinical sources have proven to be genotypically similar. We assessed the occurrence of C. neoformans and C. gattii in environmental substrates collected in a Portuguese region. Twenty-eight isolates were identified as C. neoformans - five from decaying Eucalyptus leaves and 23 from domestic pigeon droppings. The isolates were genotyped using a URA5-RFLP approach. The C. neoformans VNIV (53.6%, n = 15) and VNI (32.1%, n = 9) genotypes were abundantly present among environmental isolates. The hybrid VNIII (14.3%, n = 4) genotype was underrepresented and the VNII was not found. Cryptococcus gattii was also not found although some isolates yielded a positive canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue test.

  1. Temporal Kinetics and Quantitative Analysis of Cryptococcus neoformans Nonlytic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Stukes, Sabriya A.; Cohen, Hillel W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of cryptococcosis, a disease that is often fatal to those with compromised immune systems. C. neoformans has the capacity to escape phagocytic cells through a process known as nonlytic exocytosis whereby the cryptococcal cell is released from the macrophage into the extracellular environment, leaving both the host and pathogen alive. Little is known about the mechanism behind nonlytic exocytosis, but there is evidence that both the fungal and host cells contribute to the process. In this study, we used time-lapse movies of C. neoformans-infected macrophages to delineate the kinetics and quantitative aspects of nonlytic exocytosis. We analyzed approximately 800 macrophages containing intracellular C. neoformans and identified 163 nonlytic exocytosis events that were further characterized into three subcategories: type I (complete emptying of macrophage), type II (partial emptying of macrophage), and type III (cell-to-cell transfer). The majority of type I and II events occurred after several hours of intracellular residence, whereas type III events occurred significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in the course of macrophage infection. Our results show that nonlytic exocytosis is a morphologically and temporally diverse process that occurs relatively rapidly in the course of macrophage infection. PMID:24595144

  2. Radioimmunotherapy of Cryptococcus neoformans spares bystander mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ruth A; Jiang, Zewei; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previously, we showed that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for cryptococcal infections using radioactively labeled antibodies recognizing the cryptococcal capsule reduced fungal burden and prolonged survival of mice infected with Cryptococcus neoformans. Here, we investigate the effects of RIT on bystander mammalian cells. Materials & methods Heat-killed C. neoformans bound to anticapsular antibodies, unlabeled or labeled with the β-emitter rhenium-188 (16.9-h half-life) or the α-emitter bismuth-213 (46-min half-life), was incubated with macrophage-like J774.16 cells or epithelial-like Chinese hamster ovary cells. Lactate dehydrogenase activity, crystal violet uptake, reduction of tetrazolium dye (2,3)-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfenyl)-(2H)-terazolium-5-carboxanilide and nitric oxide production were measured. Results The J774.16 and Chinese hamster ovary cells maintained membrane integrity, viability and metabolic activity following exposure to radiolabeled C. neoformans. Conclusion RIT of C. neoformans is a selective therapy with minimal effects on host cells and these results are consistent with observations that RIT-treated mice with cryptococcal infection lacked RIT-related pathological changes in lungs and brain tissues. PMID:24020737

  3. Broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition by a secreted bacterial polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Jaione; Da Re, Sandra; Henry, Nelly; Fontaine, Thierry; Balestrino, Damien; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    The development of surface-attached biofilm bacterial communities is considered an important source of nosocomial infections. Recently, bacterial interference via signaling molecules and surface active compounds was shown to antagonize biofilm formation, suggesting that nonantibiotic molecules produced during competitive interactions between bacteria could be used for biofilm reduction. Hence, a better understanding of commensal/pathogen interactions within bacterial community could lead to an improved control of exogenous pathogens. To reveal adhesion or growth-related bacterial interference, we investigated interactions between uropathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli in mixed in vitro biofilms. We demonstrate here that the uropathogenic strain CFT073 and all E. coli expressing group II capsules release into their environment a soluble polysaccharide that induces physicochemical surface alterations, which prevent biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We show that the treatment of abiotic surfaces with group II capsular polysaccharides drastically reduces both initial adhesion and biofilm development by important nosocomial pathogens. These findings identify capsular polymers as antiadhesion bacterial interference molecules, which may prove to be of significance in the design of new strategies to limit biofilm formation on medical in dwelling devices. PMID:16894146

  4. Chemical Modification of Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Cumpstey, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This review covers methods for modifying the structures of polysaccharides. The introduction of hydrophobic, acidic, basic, or other functionality into polysaccharide structures can alter the properties of materials based on these substances. The development of chemical methods to achieve this aim is an ongoing area of research that is expected to become more important as the emphasis on using renewable starting materials and sustainable processes increases in the future. The methods covered in this review include ester and ether formation using saccharide oxygen nucleophiles, including enzymatic reactions and aspects of regioselectivity; the introduction of heteroatomic nucleophiles into polysaccharide chains; the oxidation of polysaccharides, including oxidative glycol cleavage, chemical oxidation of primary alcohols to carboxylic acids, and enzymatic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes; reactions of uronic-acid-based polysaccharides; nucleophilic reactions of the amines of chitosan; and the formation of unsaturated polysaccharide derivatives. PMID:24151557

  5. Isolation, Characterization, and Localization of a Capsule-Associated Gene, CAP10, of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y. C.; Kwon-Chung, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus which most commonly affects the central nervous system and causes fatal meningoencephalitis primarily in patients with AIDS. This fungus produces a thick extracellular polysaccharide capsule which is well recognized as a virulence factor. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel gene, CAP10, which is required for capsule formation. Complementation of the acapsular cap10 mutant produced an encapsulated strain and the deletion of CAP10 from a wild strain resulted in an acapsular phenotype. The molecular mass of the hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Cap10p is about 73 kDa, which is similar to the size predicted from sequence analysis. When CAP10 was fused with a hybrid green fluorescent protein construct, the fluorescence signals appeared as patches in the cytoplasm. Using a reporter gene construct, we found that CAP10 was expressed at high levels in late-stationary-phase cells. In addition, we found that the expression levels of CAP10 are modulated by the transcriptional factor STE12α. Deletion of STE12α downregulated the expression levels of CAP10 while overexpression of STE12α upregulated the expression levels of CAP10. Animal model studies indicate that deletion of the CAP10 gene results in the loss of virulence, and complementation of the acapsular phenotype of cap10 restores virulence. Thus, CAP10 is required for capsule formation and virulence. PMID:10482503

  6. Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Controls Virulence of the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Yue, Changli; Harashima, Toshiaki; Cox, Gary M.; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that infects the human central nervous system. This pathogen elaborates two specialized virulence factors: the antioxidant melanin and an antiphagocytic immunosuppressive polysaccharide capsule. A signaling cascade controlling mating and virulence was identified. The PKA1 gene encoding the major cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit was identified and disrupted. pka1 mutant strains were sterile, failed to produce melanin or capsule, and were avirulent. The PKR1 gene encoding the protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit was also identified and disrupted. pkr1 mutant strains overproduced capsule and were hypervirulent in animal models of cryptococcosis. pkr1 pka1 double mutant strains exhibited phenotypes similar to that of pka1 mutants, providing epistasis evidence that the Pka1 catalytic subunit functions downstream of the Pkr1 regulatory subunit. The PKA pathway was also shown to function downstream of the Gα protein Gpa1 and to regulate cAMP production by feedback inhibition. These findings define a Gα protein-cAMP-PKA signaling pathway regulating differentiation and virulence of a human fungal pathogen. PMID:11287622

  7. Role of Phospholipases in Fungal Fitness, Pathogenicity, and Drug Development – Lessons from Cryptococcus Neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, Julianne Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Many pathogenic microbes, including many fungi, produce phospholipases which facilitate survival of the pathogen in vivo, invasion and dissemination throughout the host, expression of virulence traits and evasion of host immune defense mechanisms. These phospholipases are either secreted or produced intracellularly and act by physically disrupting host membranes, and/or by affecting fungal cell signaling and production of immunomodulatory effectors. Many of the secreted phospholipases acquire a glycosylphosphatidylinositol sorting motif to facilitate membrane and/or cell wall association and secretion. This review focuses primarily on the role of two members of the phospholipase enzyme family, phospholipase B (Plb) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C (PI-C/Plc), in fungal pathogenesis and in particular, what has been learnt about their function from studies performed in the model pathogenic yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans. These studies have revealed how Plb has adapted to become an important part of the virulence repertoire of pathogenic fungi and how its secretion is regulated. They have also provided valuable insight into how the intracellular enzyme, Plc1, contributes to fungal fitness and pathogenicity – via a putative role in signal transduction pathways that regulate the production of stress-protecting pigments, polysaccharide capsule, cell wall integrity, and adaptation to growth at host temperature. Finally, this review will address the role fungal phospholipases have played in the development of a new class of antifungal drugs, which mimic their phospholipid substrates. PMID:21687772

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans dual GDP-mannose transporters and their role in biology and virulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo A; Griffith, Cara L; Skowyra, Michael L; Salinas, Nichole; Williams, Matthew; Maier, Ezekiel J; Gish, Stacey R; Liu, Hong; Brent, Michael R; Doering, Tamara L

    2014-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic yeast responsible for lethal meningoencephalitis in humans. This pathogen elaborates a polysaccharide capsule, which is its major virulence factor. Mannose constitutes over one-half of the capsule mass and is also extensively utilized in cell wall synthesis and in glycosylation of proteins and lipids. The activated mannose donor for most biosynthetic reactions, GDP-mannose, is made in the cytosol, although it is primarily consumed in secretory organelles. This compartmentalization necessitates specific transmembrane transporters to make the donor available for glycan synthesis. We previously identified two cryptococcal GDP-mannose transporters, Gmt1 and Gmt2. Biochemical studies of each protein expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that both are functional, with similar kinetics and substrate specificities in vitro. We have now examined these proteins in vivo and demonstrate that cells lacking Gmt1 show significant phenotypic differences from those lacking Gmt2 in terms of growth, colony morphology, protein glycosylation, and capsule phenotypes. Some of these observations may be explained by differential expression of the two genes, but others suggest that the two proteins play overlapping but nonidentical roles in cryptococcal biology. Furthermore, gmt1 gmt2 double mutant cells, which are unexpectedly viable, exhibit severe defects in capsule synthesis and protein glycosylation and are avirulent in mouse models of cryptococcosis.

  9. Molecular typing of clinical Cryptococcus neoformans isolates collected in Germany from 2004 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Sanchini, Andrea; Smith, Ilka McCormick; Sedlacek, Ludwig; Schwarz, Roman; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Rickerts, Volker

    2014-10-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection mostly caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. We identified agents of cryptococcosis diagnosed in Germany from 2004 to 2010. We used multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to understand the molecular epidemiology of cryptococcosis. Sero- and mating types of individual patient isolates were determined by PCR. MLST was performed using the seven-locus scheme. Allele and nucleotide diversity was calculated for each locus of C. neoformans var. grubii and C. neoformans var. neoformans. Phylogenetic relations were assessed by dendrograms. Clinical data were compared between infections caused by the two variants. We studied 101 isolates. Eight were identified as hybrids (8%). All non-hybrids were of the α mating type. Among 78 C. neoformans var. grubii (77%), 16 sequence types (STs) were identified including three novel STs. They clustered in four groups, previously isolated in Asia, Europe or worldwide. Among 15 C. neoformans var. neoformans (15%), 10 STs were identified, without clustering. These isolates showed higher allele, and nucleotide diversity compared with C. neoformans var. grubii. C. neoformans var. neoformans was more likely to cause soft-tissue infections (3/9, 33 vs. 1/63, 2%, p = 0.005) and to affect non-AIDS patients (7/14, 50 vs. 15/76, 20%, p = 0.036). C. neoformans var. grubii is the predominant agent of cryptococcosis in Germany. MLST suggests that a part of these cases are acquired abroad by immigrants or tourists. C. neoformans var. neoformans isolates represent a greater genetic diversity and are associated with more variable clinical presentations.

  10. Characterizing the role of RNA silencing components in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Janbon, Guilhem; Maeng, Shinae; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Ko, Young-Joon; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Moyrand, Frédérique; Floyd, Anna; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Summary The RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by homology-dependent degradation of the target mRNA with small RNA molecules plays a key role in controlling transcription and translation processes in a number of eukaryotic organisms. The RNAi machinery is also evolutionarily conserved in a wide variety of fungal species, including pathogenic fungi. To elucidate the physiological functions of the RNAi pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans that causes fungal meningitis, here we performed genetic analyses for genes encoding Argonaute (AGO1 and AGO2), RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDP1), and Dicers (DCR1 and DCR2) in both serotype A and D C. neoformans. The present study shows that Ago1, Rdp1, and Dcr2 are the major components of the RNAi process occurring in C. neoformans. However, the RNAi machinery is not involved in regulation of production of two virulence factors (capsule and melanin), sexual differentiation, and diverse stress response. Comparative transcriptome analysis of the serotype A and D RNAi mutants revealed that only modest changes occur in the genome-wide transcriptome profiles when the RNAi process was perturbed. Notably, the serotype D rdp1Δ mutants showed an increase in transcript abundance of active retrotransposons and transposons, such as T2 and T3, the latter of which is a novel serotype D-specific transposon of C. neoformans. In a wild type background both T2 and T3 were found to be weakly active mobile elements, although we found no evidence of Cnl1 retrotransposon mobility. In contrast, all three transposable elements exhibited enhanced mobility in the rdp1Δ mutant strain. In conclusion, the RNAi pathway plays an important role in controlling transposon activity and genome integrity of C. neoformans. PMID:21067947

  11. Capsular Weakness around Breast Implant: A Non-Recognized Complication

    PubMed Central

    Arquero, Pedro Salinero; Zanata, Fabiana Cristina; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Nahas, Fabio Xerfan

    2015-01-01

    Capsular contraction is a frequent complication following breast augmentation. On the other hand, capsular weakness, a not widely recognized complication, may occur around the implant. A weak capsule allows the migration of the prosthesis to the lateral region of the thoracic region or inferiorly, towards the abdomen, due to gravitational forces. The cause of capsular weakness remains unresolved. Implant malposition, with lateral or downward displacement, breast asymmetry, improper contour, with implants moving in the pocket that compromise the aesthetic outcome of breast augmentation and require surgical correction may be different symptoms from the same clinical problem. Capsular weakness is a short or mid-term complication of breast augmentation. Most techniques aim to correct the malposition by making sutures to increase the resistance to the displacement of the implant, rearrange the structures using the capsule as flaps to remodel the envelope of the new pocket, obtaining a more stable and reliable result. In this article, four cases of displacement of breast prosthesis with capsular weakness are described and the surgical treatment that included a capsulotomy and capsulorraphy is described. PMID:26284187

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans Typing by PCR Fingerprinting Using (GACA)4 Primers Based on C. neoformans Genome Project Data▿

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo; Esposto, Maria Carmela; Liberi, Giordano; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2007-01-01

    Four (GACA)4 PCR fingerprinting sequences, used as markers to identify serotypes A and D and AD hybrids, were retrieved in four Cryptococcus neoformans genome databases. Their locations, both in serotype A and D genomes, were confirmed by chromosomal hybridization with specific probes. Two sequences were recognized to code for hypothetical functional proteins. PMID:17670921

  13. Gene arrangement and sequence of the 5S rRNA in Filobasidiella neoformans (Cryptococcus neoformans) as a phylogenetic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kwon-Chung, K J; Chang, Y C

    1994-04-01

    We cloned the 5S rRNA gene and determined its organization in the four genes encoding rRNAs in a ribosomal DNA repeat unit of Filobasidiella neoformans, the teleomorph of Cryptococcus neoformans. The 5S rRNA gene contained 118 nucleotides and was located 1 kb upstream from the 18S rRNA gene within the 8.6-kb fragment of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. The sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from F. neoformans was more similar to the sequence of the 5S rRNA gene from Tremella mesenterica than to the sequences of the 5S rRNA genes from Filobasidium species. The arrangement of the rRNA genes in F. neoformans closely resembles the arrangement of the rRNA genes in mushrooms such as Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Coprinus cinereus in that the 5S rRNA-coding region not only is located within the repeat unit that encodes the other rRNAs but also is transcribed in the same direction as the other rRNA genes. This is the first description of the arrangement of rRNA genes in a species belonging to the Heterobasidiomycetes.

  14. Cross-protection in Neisseria meningitidis serogroups Y and W polysaccharides: A comparative conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuttel, Michelle M; Timol, Zaheer; Ravenscroft, Neil

    2017-06-29

    The capsular polysaccharide is the main virulence factor in meningococcus. The capsular polysaccharides for meningococcal serogroups Y and W are almost identical polymers of hexose-sialic acid, suggesting the possibility of cross-protection between group Y and W vaccines. However, early studies indicated that they elicit different levels of cross-protection. Here we explore the conformations of the meningococcal Y and W polysaccharides with molecular dynamics simulations of three repeating unit oligosaccharide strands. We find differences in Y and W antigen conformation: the Y polysaccharide has a single dominant conformation, whereas W exhibits a family of conformations including the Y conformation. This result is supported by our NMR NOESY analysis, which indicates key close contacts for W that are not present in Y. These conformational differences provide an explanation for the different levels of cross-protection measured for the Y and W monovalent vaccines and the high group W responses observed in HibMenCY-TT vaccinees. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of the Kingella kingae Polysaccharide Capsule and Exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Kimberly F.; Porsch, Eric A.; Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that Kingella kingae produces a polysaccharide capsule. In an effort to determine the composition and structure of this polysaccharide capsule, in the current study we purified capsular material from the surface of K. kingae strain 269–492 variant KK01 using acidic conditions to release the capsule and a series of steps to remove DNA, RNA, and protein. Analysis of the resulting material by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc), 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo), and galactose (Gal). Further analysis by NMR demonstrated two distinct polysaccharides, one consisting of GalNAc and Kdo with the structure →3)-β-GalpNAc-(1→5)-β-Kdop-(2→ and the other containing galactose alone with the structure →5)-β-Galf-(1→. Disruption of the ctrA gene required for surface localization of the K. kingae polysaccharide capsule resulted in elimination of GalNAc and Kdo but had no effect on the presence of Gal in bacterial surface extracts. In contrast, deletion of the pamABCDE locus involved in production of a reported galactan exopolysaccharide eliminated Gal but had no effect on the presence of GalNAc and Kdo in surface extracts. Disruption of ctrA and deletion of pamABCDE resulted in a loss of all carbohydrates in surface extracts. These results establish that K. kingae strain KK01 produces a polysaccharide capsule with the structure →3)-β-GalpNAc-(1→5)-β-Kdop-(2→ and a separate exopolysaccharide with the structure →5)-β-Galf-(1→. The polysaccharide capsule and the exopolysaccharide require distinct genetic loci for surface localization. PMID:24098695

  16. A polysaccharide produced by a mucoid strain of Moraxella nonliquefaciens with a 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-5-O-(3-deoxy-beta-D-manno-octulopyranosyl)-beta-D- galactopyranosyl repeating unit.

    PubMed

    Reistad, R; Zähringer, U; Bryn, K; Alstad, J; Bøvre, K; Jantzen, E

    1993-07-05

    A capsular polysaccharide, isolated from the mucoid Moraxella nonliquefaciens strain 3828/60, has been investigated by component analyses, periodate oxidation, methylation analyses, mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and hydrolysis to give a disaccharide that was isolated and characterised. The results showed that the polysaccharide has the repeating unit-->3)-beta-D- GalpNAc-(1-->5)-beta-Kdo p-(2-->, with approximately 40% of O-8 of Kdo being acetylated.

  17. Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharides induce inflammatory responses via TLR2 and TLR4-MD-2

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.

    2011-01-01

    CPS are major virulence factors in infections caused by Neisseria meningitidis and form the basis for meningococcal serogroup designation and protective meningococcal vaccines. CPS polymers are anchored in the meningococcal outer membrane through a 1,2-diacylglycerol moiety, but the innate immunostimulatory activity of CPS is largely unexplored. Well-established human and murine macrophage cell lines and HEK/TLR stably transfected cells were stimulated with CPS, purified from an endotoxin-deficient meningococcal serogroup B NMB-lpxA mutant. CPS induced inflammatory responses via TLR2- and TLR4-MD-2. Meningococcal CPS induced a dose-dependent release of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and CXCL10) and NO from human and murine macrophages, respectively. CPS induced IL-8 release from HEK cells stably transfected with TLR2/6, TLR2, TLR2/CD14, and TLR4/MD-2/CD14 but not HEK cells alone. mAb to TLR2 but not an isotype control antibody blocked CPS-induced IL-8 release from HEK-TLR2/6-transfected cells. A significant reduction in TNF-α and IL-8 release was seen when THP-1- and HEK-TLR4/MD-2-CD14- but not HEK-TLR2- or HEK-TLR2/6-transfected cells were stimulated with CPS in the presence of Eritoran (E5564), a lipid A antagonist that binds to MD-2, and a similar reduction in NO and TNF-α release was also seen in RAW 264.7 cells in the presence of Eritoran. CD14 and LBP enhanced CPS bioactivity, and NF-κB was, as anticipated, the major signaling pathway. Thus, these data suggest that innate immune recognition of meningococcal CPS by macrophages can occur via TLR2- and TLR4-MD-2 pathways. PMID:21191086

  18. Isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii from Eucalyptus camaldulensis in India.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, A; Jatana, M; Kumar, P; Chatha, L; Kaushal, A; Padhye, A A

    1997-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii has an ecological association with five Eucalyptus species: E. blakelyi, E. camaldulensis, E. gomphocephala, E. rudis, and E. tereticornis. After human infections due to C. neoformans var. gattii were diagnosed in the states of Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, and Karnataka, India, a study was undertaken to investigate the association of C. neoformans var. gattii with Indian eucalypts, especially in the state of Punjab. A total of 696 specimens collected from E. camaldulensis, E. citriodora and E. tereticornis (hybrid) trees were examined for the presence of C. neoformans var. gattii. Flowers from two trees of E. camaldulensis in the Chak Sarkar forest and one from the village of Periana near the Ferozepur area yielded five isolates of C. neoformans var. gattii. The origin of the trees could be traced to Australia, thus providing evidence that the distribution of E. camaldulensis correlated with the distribution of human cryptococcosis cases caused by C. neoformans var. gattii in northern India. PMID:9399553

  19. Type-specific capsular antigen is associated with virulence in late-onset group B Streptococcal type III disease.

    PubMed Central

    Klegerman, M E; Boyer, K M; Papierniak, C K; Levine, L; Gotoff, S P

    1984-01-01

    Strain differences have been postulated to explain the observation that group B Streptococcus type III (GBS III) late-onset disease occurs in only a fraction of colonized infants. To determine the distribution of type-specific polysaccharide antigen (Ag) in GBS III, Ag was measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis in both supernatant fluids and EDTA extracts and by radial immunodiffusion in multiple HCl extracts of the pellet from cultures of 10 strains of GBS III. Capsular Ag was defined as the sum of Ag in EDTA extracts + Ag in multiple HCl extracts. Both Ag in EDTA extracts and Ag in supernatant fluids correlated with capsular Ag (r = 0.94). GBS III strains were obtained from the blood of 19 infants with late-onset sepsis, from the cerebrospinal fluid or blood of 22 infants with late-onset meningitis, and from mucosal surfaces of both 18 infants and 12 mothers of infants with low levels of type-specific antibody and asymptomatic colonization. Mean values of Ag in supernatant fluids in strains from infants with late-onset sepsis (1.50 +/- 0.08 micrograms/ml) and late-onset meningitis (1.67 +/- 0.09 micrograms/ml) were significantly greater than those in asymptomatic colonization strains (1.14 +/- 0.05 micrograms/ml; P less than 0.001). The number of organisms required for a 50% lethal dose in the chick embryo, determined in 29 strains, was inversely related to Ag in supernatant fluids (r = -0.60). The demonstration that the quantity of capsular Ag produced by GBS III strains is related to their virulence in chick embryos and to their invasiveness in susceptible infants supports the hypothesis that Ag is a virulence factor in humans. Images PMID:6423540

  20. Bacterial biofilms and capsular contracture in patients with breast implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, U M; Mesina, J; Kalbermatten, D F; Haug, M; Frey, H P; Pico, R; Frei, R; Pierer, G; Lüscher, N J; Trampuz, A

    2013-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that bacterial biofilms on breast implants may cause chronic inflammation leading to capsular contracture. The association between bacterial biofilms of removed implants and capsular contracture was investigated. Breast implants explanted between 2006 and 2010 at five participating centres for plastic and reconstructive surgery were investigated by sonication. Bacterial cultures derived from sonication were correlated with patient, surgical and implant characteristics, and the degree of capsular contracture. The study included 121 breast implants from 84 patients, of which 119 originated from women and two from men undergoing gender reassignment. Some 50 breast prostheses were implanted for reconstruction, 48 for aesthetic reasons and 23 implants were used as temporary expander devices. The median indwelling time was 4·0 (range 0·1-32) years for permanent implants and 3 (range 1-6) months for temporary devices. Excluding nine implants with clinical signs of infection, sonication cultures were positive in 40 (45 per cent) of 89 permanent implants and in 12 (52 per cent) of 23 temporary devices. Analysis of permanent implants showed that a positive bacterial culture after sonication correlated with the degree of capsular contracture: Baker I, two of 11 implants; Baker II, two of ten; Baker III, nine of 23; and Baker IV, 27 of 45 (P < 0·001). The most frequent organisms were Propionibacterium acnes (25 implants) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (21). Sonication cultures correlated with the degree of capsular contracture, indicating the potential causative role of bacterial biofilms in the pathogenesis of capsular contracture. NCT01138891 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Two variants among Haemophilus influenzae serotype b strains with distinct bcs4, hcsA and hcsB genes display differences in expression of the polysaccharide capsule

    PubMed Central

    Schouls, Leo; van der Heide, Han; Witteveen, Sandra; Zomer, Bert; van der Ende, Arie; Burger, Marina; Schot, Corrie

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite nearly complete vaccine coverage, a small number of fully vaccinated children in the Netherlands have experienced invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib). This increase started in 2002, nine years after the introduction of nationwide vaccination in the Netherlands. The capsular polysaccharide of Hib is used as a conjugate vaccine to protect against Hib disease. To evaluate the possible rise of escape variants, explaining the increased number of vaccine failures we analyzed the composition of the capsular genes and the expressed polysaccharide of Dutch Hib strains collected before and after the introduction of Hib vaccination. Results The DNA sequences of the complete capsular gene clusters of 9 Dutch Hib strains were assessed and two variants, designated type I and type II were found. The two variants displayed considerable sequence divergence in the hcsA and hcsB genes, involved in transport of capsular polysaccharide to the cell surface. Application of hcsA type specific PCRs on 670 Hib strains collected from Dutch patients with invasive Hib disease showed that 5% of the strains collected before 1996 were type II. No endogenous type II Hib strains were isolated after 1995 and all type II strains were isolated from 0–4 year old, non-vaccinated children only. Analysis of a worldwide collection of Hib strains from the pre-vaccination era revealed considerable geographic differences in the distribution of the type I and type II strains with up to 73% of type II strains in the USA. NMR analysis of type I and type II capsule polysaccharides did not reveal structural differences. However, type I strains were shown to produce twice as much surface bound capsular polysaccharide. Conclusion Type II strains were only isolated during the pre-vaccination era from young, non-vaccinated individuals and displayed a lower expression of capsular polysaccharide than type I strains. The higher polysaccharide expression may have

  2. Enhanced virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum through transfer and surface incorporation of glycans from Cryptococcus neoformans during co-infection.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Radames J B; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; de S Araújo, Glauber R; Martinez, Luis R; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Frases, Susana; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Guimaraes, Allan J

    2016-02-24

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) co-exist in the environment and occasionally co-infect individuals, which can lead to severe disease/lethal outcomes. We investigated specific interactions between Cn-Hc to determine the impact of synchronous infection in virulence and disease. Co-infected mice had significantly higher mortality than infection with either species or acapsular Cn-Hc. Coating of Hc with cryptococcal glycans (Cn-gly) resulted in higher pulmonary fungal burden in co-infected animals relative to control. Co-cultivation or addition of Cn-gly resulted in enhanced pellicle formation with a hybrid polysaccharide matrix with higher reactivity to GXM mAbs. Transfer and incorporation of Cn polysaccharide onto Hc surface was time and temperature dependent. Cn-gly transfer altered the zeta potential of Hc and was associated with increased resistance to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. Mice infected with Hc and subsequently injected with purified Cn-gly died significantly more rapidly than Hc alone infected, establishing the precedent that virulence factors from one fungus can enhance the virulence of unrelated species. These findings suggest a new mechanism of microbial interaction involving the transfer of virulence traits that translates into enhanced lethality during mixed fungal infections and highlights the importance of studying heterogeneous microbial populations in the setting of infection.

  3. Enhanced virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum through transfer and surface incorporation of glycans from Cryptococcus neoformans during co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Radames J. B.; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; de S. Araújo, Glauber R.; Martinez, Luis R.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Frases, Susana; Peralta, Jose Mauro; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Guimaraes, Allan J.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) and Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) co-exist in the environment and occasionally co-infect individuals, which can lead to severe disease/lethal outcomes. We investigated specific interactions between Cn-Hc to determine the impact of synchronous infection in virulence and disease. Co-infected mice had significantly higher mortality than infection with either species or acapsular Cn-Hc. Coating of Hc with cryptococcal glycans (Cn-gly) resulted in higher pulmonary fungal burden in co-infected animals relative to control. Co-cultivation or addition of Cn-gly resulted in enhanced pellicle formation with a hybrid polysaccharide matrix with higher reactivity to GXM mAbs. Transfer and incorporation of Cn polysaccharide onto Hc surface was time and temperature dependent. Cn-gly transfer altered the zeta potential of Hc and was associated with increased resistance to phagocytosis and killing by macrophages. Mice infected with Hc and subsequently injected with purified Cn-gly died significantly more rapidly than Hc alone infected, establishing the precedent that virulence factors from one fungus can enhance the virulence of unrelated species. These findings suggest a new mechanism of microbial interaction involving the transfer of virulence traits that translates into enhanced lethality during mixed fungal infections and highlights the importance of studying heterogeneous microbial populations in the setting of infection. PMID:26908077

  4. Amino Acid Permeases and Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Martho, Kevin Felipe Cruz; de Melo, Amanda Teixeira; Takahashi, Juliana Possato Fernandes; Guerra, Juliana Mariotti; Santos, Dayane Cristina da Silva; Purisco, Sônia Ueda; Melhem, Márcia de Souza Carvalho; Fazioli, Raquel Dos Anjos; Phanord, Clerlune; Sartorelli, Patrícia; Vallim, Marcelo A; Pascon, Renata C

    2016-01-01

    Fungal opportunistic pathogens colonize various environments, from plants and wood to human and animal tissue. Regarding human pathogens, one great challenge during contrasting niche occupation is the adaptation to different conditions, such as temperature, osmolarity, salinity, pressure, oxidative stress and nutritional availability, which may constitute sources of stress that need to be tolerated and overcome. As an opportunistic pathogen, C. neoformans faces exactly these situations during the transition from the environment to the human host, encountering nutritional constraints. Our previous and current research on amino acid biosynthetic pathways indicates that amino acid permeases are regulated by the presence of the amino acids, nitrogen and temperature. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have twenty-four and twenty-seven genes encoding amino acid permeases, respectively; conversely, they are scarce in number in Basidiomycetes (C. neoformans, Coprinopsis cinerea and Ustilago maydis), where nine to ten permease genes can be found depending on the species. In this study, we have demonstrated that two amino acid permeases are essential for virulence in C. neoformans. Our data showed that C. neoformans uses two global and redundant amino acid permeases, Aap4 and Aap5 to respond correctly to thermal and oxidative stress. Double deletion of these permeases causes growth arrest in C. neoformans at 37°C and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The inability to uptake amino acid at a higher temperature and under oxidative stress also led to virulence attenuation in vivo. Our data showed that thermosensitivity caused by the lack of permeases Aap4 and Aap5 can be remedied by alkaline conditions (higher pH) and salinity. Permeases Aap4 and Aap5 are also required during fluconazole stress and they are the target of the plant secondary metabolite eugenol, a potent antifungal inhibitor that targets amino acid permeases. In summary, our work unravels (i

  5. The Cryptococcus neoformans transcriptome at the site of human meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Toffaletti, Dena L; Tenor, Jennifer L; Litvintseva, Anastasia P; Fang, Charles; Mitchell, Thomas G; McDonald, Tami R; Nielsen, Kirsten; Boulware, David R; Bicanic, Tihana; Perfect, John R

    2014-02-04

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the leading cause of fungal meningitis worldwide. Previous studies have characterized the cryptococcal transcriptome under various stress conditions, but a comprehensive profile of the C. neoformans transcriptome in the human host has not been attempted. Here, we extracted RNA from yeast cells taken directly from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis prior to antifungal therapy. The patients were infected with strains of C. neoformans var. grubii of molecular type VNI and VNII. Using RNA-seq, we compared the transcriptional profiles of these strains under three environmental conditions (in vivo CSF, ex vivo CSF, and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose [YPD]). Although we identified a number of differentially expressed genes, single nucleotide variants, and novel genes that were unique to each strain, the overall expression patterns of the two strains were similar under the same environmental conditions. Specifically, yeast cells obtained directly from each patient's CSF were more metabolically active than cells that were incubated ex vivo in CSF. Compared with growth in YPD, some genes were identified as significantly upregulated in both in vivo and ex vivo CSF, and they were associated with genes previously recognized for contributing to pathogenicity. For example, genes with known stress response functions, such as RIM101, ENA1, and CFO1, were regulated similarly in the two clinical strains. Conversely, many genes that were differentially regulated between the two strains appeared to be transporters. These findings establish a platform for further studies of how this yeast survives and produces disease. Cryptococcus neoformans, an environmental, opportunistic yeast, is annually responsible for an estimated million cases of meningitis and over 600,000 deaths, mostly among HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Using RNA-seq, we analyzed the gene expression of two strains of C

  6. Modulation of Replicative Lifespan in Cryptococcus neoformans: Implications for Virulence.

    PubMed

    Bouklas, Tejas; Jain, Neena; Fries, Bettina C

    2017-01-01

    The fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, has been shown to undergo replicative aging. Old cells are characterized by advanced generational age and phenotypic changes that appear to mediate enhanced resistance to host and antifungal-based killing. As a consequence of this age-associated resilience, old cells accumulate during chronic infection. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that shifting the generational age of a pathogenic yeast population would alter its vulnerability to the host and affect its virulence. SIR2 is a well-conserved histone deacetylase, and a pivotal target for the development of anti-aging drugs. We tested its effect on C. neoformans' replicative lifespan (RLS). First, a mutant C. neoformans strain (sir2Δ) was generated, and confirmed a predicted shortened RLS in sir2Δ cells consistent with its known role in aging. Next, RLS analysis showed that treatment of C. neoformans with Sir2p-agonists resulted in a significantly prolonged RLS, whereas treatment with a Sir2p-antagonist shortened RLS. RLS modulating effects were dependent on SIR2 and not observed in sir2Δ cells. Because SIR2 loss resulted in a slightly impaired fitness, effects of genetic RLS modulation on virulence could not be compared with wild type cells. Instead we chose to chemically modulate RLS, and investigated the effect of Sir2p modulating drugs on C. neoformans cells in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Consistent with our hypothesis that shifts in the generational age of the infecting yeast population alters its vulnerability to host cells, we observed decreased virulence of C. neoformans in the Galleria host when RLS was prolonged by treatment with Sir2p agonists. In contrast, treatment with a Sir2p antagonist, which shortens RLS enhanced virulence in Galleria. In addition, combination of Sir2p agonists with antifungal therapy enhanced the antifungal's effect. Importantly, no difference in virulence was observed with drug treatment when sir2Δ cells were

  7. Amino Acid Permeases and Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Juliana Possato Fernandes; Guerra, Juliana Mariotti; Santos, Dayane Cristina da Silva; Purisco, Sônia Ueda; Melhem, Márcia de Souza Carvalho; Fazioli, Raquel dos Anjos; Phanord, Clerlune; Sartorelli, Patrícia; Vallim, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal opportunistic pathogens colonize various environments, from plants and wood to human and animal tissue. Regarding human pathogens, one great challenge during contrasting niche occupation is the adaptation to different conditions, such as temperature, osmolarity, salinity, pressure, oxidative stress and nutritional availability, which may constitute sources of stress that need to be tolerated and overcome. As an opportunistic pathogen, C. neoformans faces exactly these situations during the transition from the environment to the human host, encountering nutritional constraints. Our previous and current research on amino acid biosynthetic pathways indicates that amino acid permeases are regulated by the presence of the amino acids, nitrogen and temperature. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have twenty-four and twenty-seven genes encoding amino acid permeases, respectively; conversely, they are scarce in number in Basidiomycetes (C. neoformans, Coprinopsis cinerea and Ustilago maydis), where nine to ten permease genes can be found depending on the species. In this study, we have demonstrated that two amino acid permeases are essential for virulence in C. neoformans. Our data showed that C. neoformans uses two global and redundant amino acid permeases, Aap4 and Aap5 to respond correctly to thermal and oxidative stress. Double deletion of these permeases causes growth arrest in C. neoformans at 37°C and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The inability to uptake amino acid at a higher temperature and under oxidative stress also led to virulence attenuation in vivo. Our data showed that thermosensitivity caused by the lack of permeases Aap4 and Aap5 can be remedied by alkaline conditions (higher pH) and salinity. Permeases Aap4 and Aap5 are also required during fluconazole stress and they are the target of the plant secondary metabolite eugenol, a potent antifungal inhibitor that targets amino acid permeases. In summary, our work unravels (i

  8. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin.

  9. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  10. Improved conjugation and purification strategies for the preparation of protein-polysaccharide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N; Massaldi, H; Franco Fraguas, L; Ferreira, F

    2008-12-12

    A glycoconjugate constituted by the Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide (CPS14) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was prepared, and the unique properties of Sephadex LH-20 were used to separate the conjugate from the unconjugated material. The strength of this approach consists in its capacity to produce pure polysaccharide-protein conjugate in good yield and free from unconjugated material, a common residual contaminant of this type of immunobiologicals. The CPS14-BSA conjugate prepared via an improved 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP)-activation technique was characterized chemically and its immunogenicity was evaluated in mice. The purified conjugate, unlike the corresponding polysaccharide, produced a T-cell-dependent response in this species.

  11. The isolation, characterization and antifungal susceptibilities of Cryptococcus neoformans from bird excreta in Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tay, S T; Chai, H C; Na, S L; Hamimah, H; Rohani, M Y; Soo-Hoo, T S

    2005-06-01

    The occurrence of Cryptococcus neoformans in bird excreta in Klang valley, Malaysia was determined in this study. Of 544 samples of bird excreta collected from a local zoo, pet shops and public areas, 20 strains of C. neoformans were isolated. All C. neoformans strains were serotype A and thus identified as C. neoformans variety grubii. All did not produce color changes on canavanine-glycine-bromothymol blue agar. All were of alpha-mating types, as determined by a pheromone-specific PCR assay. The antifungal susceptibility testing using agar diffusion method Neo-sensitabs showed that all were susceptible to amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole.

  12. Differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans serotypes A and D using creatinine dextrose bromothymol blue thymine medium.

    PubMed

    Irokanulo, E A; Akueshi, C O; Makinde, A A

    1994-06-01

    A serotype differentiation of the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is described using creatinine dextrose bromothymol blue thymine (CDBT) medium. On CDBT medium C. neoformans serotype D grew as bright red colonies, turning the medium a bright orange after five days incubation at 28 degrees C. C. neoformans serotype A grew as pale colonies with no apparent colour effect on the medium. Serotypes B and C caused a slight greening of the medium. The reaction of the four serotypes of C. neoformans on CDBT medium is considered useful in the differentiation of the closely related serotype A and D.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Eastman, Alison J; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R; Osterholzer, John J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Swanson, Joel A; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-03-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms that allow classical activation to counteract replication. C. neoformans-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time, and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in C. neoformans-containing lung cells compared with C. neoformans-free cells. Among C. neoformans-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased C. neoformans replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased C. neoformans replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of C. neoformans. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important C. neoformans survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies that decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections.

  14. Rapid and Reliable Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Capsular Serotypes by Means of Artificial Neural Network-Assisted Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Grunert, Tom; Wenning, Mareike; Barbagelata, María Sol; Fricker, Martina; Sordelli, Daniel O.; Buzzola, Fernanda R.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharides (CP) are important virulence factors and represent putative targets for vaccine development. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a high-throughput method to identify and discriminate the clinically important S. aureus capsular serotypes 5, 8, and NT (nontypeable). A comprehensive set of clinical isolates derived from different origins and control strains, representative for each serotype, were used to establish a CP typing system based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and chemometric techniques. By combining FTIR spectroscopy with artificial neuronal network (ANN) analysis, a system was successfully established, allowing a rapid identification and discrimination of all three serotypes. The overall accuracy of the ANN-assisted FTIR spectroscopy CP typing system was 96.7% for the internal validation and 98.2% for the external validation. One isolate in the internal validation and one isolate in the external validation failed in the classification procedure, but none of the isolates was incorrectly classified. The present study demonstrates that ANN-assisted FTIR spectroscopy allows a rapid and reliable discrimination of S. aureus capsular serotypes. It is suitable for diagnostic as well as large-scale epidemiologic surveillance of S. aureus capsule expression and provides useful information with respect to chronicity of infection. PMID:23658268

  15. A Novel ICOS-Independent, but CD28- and SAP-Dependent, Pathway of T Cell-Dependent, Polysaccharide-Specific Humoral Immunity in Response to Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae versus Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    PPS14) and the phosphorylcholine determinant (PC) of the cell wall C-polysaccharide (C-PS, teichoic acid). The protein- and PS-specific IgG responses...hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl; PC, phosphorylcholine determi- nant of teichoic or lipoteichoic acid; Pn, intact Streptococcus pneumoniae; PPS14, capsular

  16. Titan cells in Cryptococcus neoformans: cells with a giant impact.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2013-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that commonly infects immunocompromised individuals, yet has developed multiple adaptation mechanisms to the host. Several virulence factors (capsule and melanin) have been known for many years. However, this yeast also possesses a morphogenetic program that is still not well characterized. C. neoformans has the ability to dramatically enlarge its size during infection to form 'titan cells' that can reach up to 100μm in cell body diameter, in contrast to typical size cells of 5-7μm. These titan cells pose a problem for the host because they contribute to fungal survival, dissemination to the central nervous system, and possibly even latency. In this review, we will provide an overview of these cells, covering current knowledge about their phenotypic features, mechanism of formation, and their significance during infection.

  17. Reduced virulence of melanized Cryptococcus neoformans in Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, Helene C; Duong, Raymond; Chan, Hsi; Tsue, Ryan; McClelland, Erin E

    2014-07-01

    Fungal melanins are important in the virulence of many pathogenic fungi. In this study, we examined the role of melanin in the interaction between Cryptococcus neoformans and the invertebrate host, Galleria mellonella. C. neoformans was able to melanize in the presence of G. mellonella homogenate, indicating the presence of melanin substrates. Melanization was confirmed by the recovery of acid-resistant particles that were recognized by anti-melanin antibodies. In addition, we tested the effect of fungal melanization on virulence. Surprisingly, G. mellonella larvae infected with melanized fungal cells lived longer than those infected with non-melanized fungi. When the cellular immune response of G. mellonella to melanized and non-melanized cells was compared, inflammatory nodules were observed in both groups. However the response was stronger in larvae infected with melanized cells. These results suggest that fungal melanin activates the immune response of G. mellonella, thereby resulting in the decreased virulence observed with melanized cells.

  18. A copper hyperaccumulation phenotype correlates with pathogenesis in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Raja, Meera R; Waterman, Scott R; Qiu, Jin; Bleher, Reiner; Williamson, Peter R; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2013-04-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a major human pathogen and a cause of meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Many factors contribute to the extraordinary survivability and pathogenicity of this fungus in humans, including copper homeostasis pathways. Previous work has shown that deletion of the copper-dependent regulator Cuf1 results in decreased virulence and dissemination in brain infection, suggesting that copper acquisition is important to the persistence of this pathogen. Here, we show that the minimal copper quota of C. neoformans is maintained at a high level even when grown under conditions of stringent copper limitation. Intriguingly, when this fungal pathogen is grown in standard and copper-enriched media, it sequesters even higher levels of this essential metal, achieving levels that are far higher than non-pathogenic S. cerevisiae. The hypothesis that copper acquisition plays an essential role in virulence is further corroborated by the findings that a hypovirulent CUF1-deletant strain of C. neoformans retrieved from infected mice contains almost a 6-fold lower concentration of intracellular copper than the pathogenic wild-type strain. The concentration difference arises in part from larger-sized cuf1Δ cell. Under in vitro growth conditions, the size of the cuf1Δ cells is normal and the hypertrophy phenotype is readily induced in vitro under conditions of copper starvation. Taken together, these data suggest that acquisition of extraordinary levels of copper is an important factor in the survivability of the pathogen in the copper-deplete environment of infection, and effective copper concentration may play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. neoformans.

  19. Characterization of glycoinositolphosphoryl ceramide structure mutant strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Ana L S; Farage, Layla; Melo, Manuel N; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo S; Guerardel, Yann; Coddeville, Bernadete; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Previato, Jose O

    2007-06-01

    In fungi, glycoinositolphosphoryl ceramide (GIPC) biosynthetic pathway produces essential molecules for growth, viability, and virulence. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans synthesizes a complex family of xylose-(Xyl) branched GIPCs, all of which have not been previously reported in fungi. As an effort to understand the biosynthesis of these sphingolipids, we have now characterized the structures of GIPCs from C. neoformans wild-type (KN99alpha) and mutant strains that lack UDP-Xyl, by disruption of either UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (NE321) or UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (NE178). The structures of GIPCs were determined by a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, tandem mass spectrometry (MS), and gas chromatography-MS. The main and largest GIPC from wild-type strain was identified as an alpha-Manp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 3)alpha-Manp[beta-Xylp(1 --> 2)]alpha-Manp(1 --> 4)beta-Galp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 2) Ins-1-P-Ceramide, whereas the most abundant GIPC from both mutant strains was found to be an alpha-Manp(1 --> 3)alpha-Manp(1 --> 4)beta-Galp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 2)Ins-1-P-Ceramide. The ceramide moieties of C. neoformans wild-type and mutant strains were composed of a C(18) phytosphingosine, which was N-acylated with 2-hydroxy tetra-, or hexacosanoic acid, and 2,3-dihydroxy-tetracosanoic acid. Our structural analysis results indicate that the C. neoformans mutant strains are unable to complete the assembly of the GIPC-oligosaccharide moiety due the absence of Xyl side chain.

  20. Effects of murine natural killer cells on Cryptococcus neoformans

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavi Nouri, N.

    1985-01-01

    Previous data generated by Murphy and McDaniel indicate that normal murine nylon wool nonadherent splenic cells, with the characteristics of natural killer (NK) cells, effectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-like pathogen. Nylon wood nonadherent cells from spleens of 7-8 week old mice were further fractionated on discontinuous Percoll gradients. The enrichment of NK cells in Percoll fractions 1 and 2 was confirmed by morphological examination, immunofluorescent staining, and by assessing the cytolytic activity of each Percoll cell fraction against YAC-1 targets in the 4 h /sup 51/Cr release assay. Cells isolated from each Percoll fraction were tested for growth inhibitory activity against C neoformans, using an in vitro 18 h growth inhibition assay. The results showed that NK cell enrichment was concomitant with the enrichment of anti-cryptococcal activity the Percoll fractions 1 and 2. An immunolabeling method combined with scanning electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that the effector cells attached to C. neoformans were asialo GM/sub 1/ positive and, therefore, had NK cell characteristics. NK cells have Fc receptors on their surfaces , and are capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against IgG-coated target cells. The author examined the effects of the IgG fraction of rabbit anti-cryptococcal antibody on the NK cell-mediated growth inhibition of C. neoformans. The data indicated that the effector cells involved in antibody-dependent growth inhibition of cryptococci are either NK cells or copurify and coexist in the same population with NK cells.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Italian clinical Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii isolates.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zamfirova, Ralika R; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii is the major etiological agent of cryptococcal meningitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The current PCR-based molecular methods are not sufficient to discriminate among the different populations of this yeast. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the genotypes of the Italian clinical C. neoformans var. grubii isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 53 isolates, each representative of a single case, were studied. Genotyping was performed using the ISHAM Cryptococcus MLST consensus scheme and the results were compared to the publically available global C. neoformans var. grubii MLST dataset. A total of 16 genotypes were identified; 14 were new genotypes, one was identical to sequence type (ST) ST81, which had been previously reported from Thailand, and one to ST23 already identified in Uganda, the USA and Korea. Sequence type ST61 was the most numerous, including 16 isolates. Network phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian isolates could be divided into at least three clusters with similarities with those recovered in Africa, Asia and Americas. Distribution of the STs among the isolates could not be correlated to the hospital in which they were recovered or to the HIV status of the patients. The majority of the isolates belonged to the molecular type VNI; three belonged to the rare molecular type VNII and one to the VNB group, which until now had not been described in Europe. The results reveal that the Italian C. neoformans var. grubii population presents a distinct variability, displaying a high number of new genotypes, and probably recombines sexually.

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans Host Adaptation: Toward Biological Evidence of Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Vernel-Pauillac, Frédérique; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Dromer, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic infection due to the ubiquitous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. This yeast interacts closely with innate immune cells, leading to various fates, including fungal persistence within cells, making possible the dissemination of the yeast cells with monocytes via a Trojan horse strategy. In humans, the natural history of the infection begins with primoinfection during childhood, which is followed by dormancy and, in some individuals, reactivation upon immunosuppression. To address the question of dormancy, we studied C. neoformans infection at the macrophage level (in vitro H99-macrophage interaction) and at the organ level in a murine model of cryptococcosis. We analyzed the diversity of yeast adaptation to the host by characterizing several C. neoformans populations with new assays based on flow cytometry (quantitative flow cytometry, multispectral imaging flow cytometry, sorting), microscopy (dynamic imaging), and gene expression analysis. On the basis of parameters of multiplication and stress response, various populations of yeast cells were observed over time in vivo and in vitro. Cell sorting allowed the identification of a subpopulation that was less prone to grow under standard conditions than the other populations, with growth enhanced by the addition of serum. Gene expression analysis revealed that this population had specific metabolic characteristics that could reflect dormancy. Our data suggest that dormant yeast cells could exist in vitro and in vivo. C. neoformans exhibits a huge plasticity and adaptation to hosts that deserves further study. In vitro generation of dormant cells is now the main challenge to overcome the limited number of yeast cells recovered in our models. PMID:25827423

  3. Differential gene expression in auristatin PHE-treated Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Woyke, Tanja; Berens, Michael E; Hoelzinger, Dominique B; Pettit, George R; Winkelmann, Günther; Pettit, Robin K

    2004-02-01

    The antifungal pentapeptide auristatin PHE was recently shown to interfere with microtubule dynamics and nuclear and cellular division in the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. To gain a broader understanding of the cellular response of C. neoformans to auristatin PHE, mRNA differential display (DD) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) were applied. Examination of approximately 60% of the cell transcriptome from cells treated with 1.5 times the MIC (7.89 micro M) of auristatin PHE for 90 min revealed 29 transcript expression differences between control and drug-treated populations. Differential expression of seven of the transcripts was confirmed by RT-PCR, as was drug-dependent modulation of an additional seven transcripts by RT-PCR only. Among genes found to be differentially expressed were those encoding proteins involved in transport, cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, cell stress, DNA repair, nucleotide metabolism, and capsule production. For example, RHO1 and an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with 91% similarity to the Schizophyllum commune 14-3-3 protein, both involved in cell cycle regulation, were down-regulated, as was the gene encoding the multidrug efflux pump Afr1p. An ORF encoding a protein with 57% identity to the heat shock protein HSP104 in Pleurotus sajor-caju was up-regulated. Also, three transcripts of unknown function were responsive to auristatin PHE, which may eventually contribute to the elucidation of the function of their gene products. Further study of these differentially expressed genes and expression of their corresponding proteins are warranted to evaluate how they may be involved in the mechanism of action of auristatin PHE. This information may also contribute to an explanation of the selectivity of auristatin PHE for C. neoformans. This is the first report of drug action using DD in C. neoformans.

  4. Differential Gene Expression in Auristatin PHE-Treated Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Woyke, Tanja; Berens, Michael E.; Hoelzinger, Dominique B.; Pettit, George R.; Winkelmann, Günther; Pettit, Robin K.

    2004-01-01

    The antifungal pentapeptide auristatin PHE was recently shown to interfere with microtubule dynamics and nuclear and cellular division in the opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. To gain a broader understanding of the cellular response of C. neoformans to auristatin PHE, mRNA differential display (DD) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) were applied. Examination of approximately 60% of the cell transcriptome from cells treated with 1.5 times the MIC (7.89 μM) of auristatin PHE for 90 min revealed 29 transcript expression differences between control and drug-treated populations. Differential expression of seven of the transcripts was confirmed by RT-PCR, as was drug-dependent modulation of an additional seven transcripts by RT-PCR only. Among genes found to be differentially expressed were those encoding proteins involved in transport, cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, cell stress, DNA repair, nucleotide metabolism, and capsule production. For example, RHO1 and an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with 91% similarity to the Schizophyllum commune 14-3-3 protein, both involved in cell cycle regulation, were down-regulated, as was the gene encoding the multidrug efflux pump Afr1p. An ORF encoding a protein with 57% identity to the heat shock protein HSP104 in Pleurotus sajor-caju was up-regulated. Also, three transcripts of unknown function were responsive to auristatin PHE, which may eventually contribute to the elucidation of the function of their gene products. Further study of these differentially expressed genes and expression of their corresponding proteins are warranted to evaluate how they may be involved in the mechanism of action of auristatin PHE. This information may also contribute to an explanation of the selectivity of auristatin PHE for C. neoformans. This is the first report of drug action using DD in C. neoformans. PMID:14742210

  5. Systematic functional profiling of transcription factor networks in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Lee, Kyung-Tae; So, Yee-Seul; Hong, Joohyeon; Choi, Jaeyoung; Byun, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyelim; Bang, Soohyun; Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Seo-Young; Ji, Je-Hyun; Park, Goun; Kwon, Hyojeong; Cha, Suyeon; Meyers, Gena Lee; Wang, Li Li; Jang, Jooyoung; Janbon, Guilhem; Adedoyin, Gloria; Kim, Taeyup; Averette, Anna K.; Heitman, Joseph; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Yin-Won; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans, but its overall biological and pathogenic regulatory circuits remain elusive, particularly due to the presence of an evolutionarily divergent set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we report the construction of a high-quality library of 322 signature-tagged gene-deletion strains for 155 putative TF genes previously predicted using the DNA-binding domain TF database, and examine their in vitro and in vivo phenotypic traits under 32 distinct growth conditions. At least one phenotypic trait is exhibited by 145 out of 155 TF mutants (93%) and ∼85% of them (132/155) are functionally characterized for the first time in this study. The genotypic and phenotypic data for each TF are available in the C. neoformans TF phenome database (http://tf.cryptococcus.org). In conclusion, our phenome-based functional analysis of the C. neoformans TF mutant library provides key insights into transcriptional networks of basidiomycetous fungi and human fungal pathogens. PMID:25849373

  6. Extracellular proteins of Cryptococcus neoformans and host antibody response.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L C; Pirofski, L A; Casadevall, A

    1997-01-01

    Proteins secreted by the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans may be involved in invasion and could be useful in vaccine design. Despite the medical importance of this fungus, little is known about its extracellular proteins or the immune response to these antigens. To study C. neoformans extracellular proteins, 12 strains were metabolically radiolabeled and protein supernatants were analyzed. Both strain- and growth condition-dependent differences were observed. Enzymatic assays of filtered culture supernatants revealed butyrate esterase and caprylate esterase lipase activity for 11 of 12 strains, as well as acid phosphatase, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase, and beta-glucosidase activities in some strains. Serum from infected rodents immunoprecipitated several secreted proteins, consistent with in vivo expression and development of an antibody response. For strain 24067, two immunodominant species, of approximately 75 and 30 kDa, were recognized. The relative intensity of the autoradiographic bands depended on the route of infection for both rats and mice. In summary, our results indicate that (i) there are multiple proteins in C. neoformans culture supernatants, (ii) there are strain differences in supernatant protein profiles, (iii) there are differences in supernatant protein profile depending on the growth conditions, (iv) there are several new extracellular and/or cell-associated enzymatic activities, and (v) antibodies to several supernatant proteins are made in the course of infection. PMID:9199426

  7. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fabiana As; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects.

  8. [Distribution of capsular types and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus agalactiae causing infections in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Pérez, J; Limansky, A; Toresani, I; Ebner, G; Di Bartolomeo, S; de Inocenti, I; Pretto, G; Salazar, N; Laferrara, M; Bottiglieri, M; Ballester, D; Morales, M; Rivera, L; Cacace, M L; Castro, H; Roldán, L; Notario, R; Borda, N; Cera, G; Spoletti, M J; Gregorini, E; Sutich, E G

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an endogenous bacterium that has emerged in the last 20 years as an etiological agent in both neonatal and perinatal infections, and in immunocompromised patients. The differentiation of the capsular polysaccharide, the presence of surface proteins c, X, R, and molecular methods allow classification in serotypes and genotypes. This identification is a useful tool for epidemiological purposes and virulence studies in this bacterium. The objective of this work was to study the serotypes and the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates recovered from invasive diseases in different areas of Argentina. In the analyzed sample a fair predominance of Ia and III serotypes was recovered, followed by II and IV serotypes. All the isolates were found to be sensitive to penicillin. A 6% of resistance to erythromycin and a 4.5% to clindamycin were detected. In three of the isolates, constitutive MLS phenotype (resistance to macrolides, lincosamins and streptogramins) was founded, while in the remaining one, inducible MLS phenotype was detected. These results stress the importance of conducting a surveillance of the prevalent serotypes in our country with the goal of future prevention of this disease with an effective vaccine. The knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibility profile will be also important to obtain therapeutic success in the treatment.

  9. Evaluation of capsular and acapsular strains of S. aureus in an experimental brain abscess model

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Nilufer; Wagoner, Gail; Philips, Napoleon

    2011-01-01

    Brain abscesses are mainly caused by either direct or indirect inoculation of gram positive bacteria including Stapylococcus aureus (S. aureus) or Streptococcus species into the central nervous system. In the present study, we aimed to compare potential changes in brain abscess pathogenesis induced by two different strains of S. aureus, namely the laboratory strain RN6390 and the clinical isolate Reynolds. Although the Reynolds strain was expected to be more resistant to eradication by the host, due to the existence of a polysaccharide capsule, and subsequently to be more virulent, instead we found parenchymal damage and mortality rates to be more prominent following RN6390 infection. In contrast, the Reynolds strain proliferated faster and induced early expression of the chemokine CXCL2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and complement 3a and C5. Furthermore, there were early and more abundant infiltration of PMNs, T cells and erythrocyte extravasation in brain abscesses induced by the Reynolds strain. However, several immune parameters were not different between the two strains during the later stages of the disease. These results suggest that capsular S. aureus can modulate innate immunity and complement system activation differently than the acapsular strain RN6390, and the early changes induced by Reynolds strain may have an important impact on survival. PMID:19906446

  10. Differential regulation of polysaccharide-specific antibody responses to isolated polysaccharides, conjugate vaccines, and intact Gram-positive versus Gram-negative extracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial capsular polysaccharides are major virulence factors and are key targets in a number of licensed anti-bacterial vaccines. Their major characteristics are their large molecular weight and expression of repeating antigenic epitopes that mediate multivalent B cell receptor cross-linking. In addition, since the majority of thes