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Sample records for neon flying squid

  1. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Alabia, Irene D; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ.

  2. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Alabia, Irene D.; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999–2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid’s putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37–40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40–44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ. PMID:26571118

  3. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements.

  4. Possible link between interannual variation of neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) abundance in the North Pacific and the climate phase shift in 1998/1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ichii, Taro; Sakai, Mitsuo; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Toyoda, Takahiro; Masuda, Shuhei; Sugiura, Nozomi; Mahapatra, Kedarnath; Awaji, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between interannual variation in abundance of the autumn cohort of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) and ocean environmental changes in the central North Pacific was examined. We focused on the change in subsurface ocean state during the 1998/1999 climate shift. Changes in catch per unit effort (CPUE) of the neon flying squid derived from long-term driftnet survey was compared to that in ocean environments related to the feeding conditions of the squid. A four-dimensional variational (4D-VAR) ocean data assimilation product was used as an accurate estimate of the dynamic state in the North Pacific. Correlation analysis indicated that the squid CPUE was highly related with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in winter. In January, the correlation field with the entrainment rate (ENT), the proxy for the nutrient-rich water supply entering the mixed layer, showed a good agreement with the main spawning and nursery ground of the autumn cohort (MSNGAC). The nutrient-rich water supply in the MSNGAC in early winter was mainly induced by the deepening of the mixed layer forced by surface latent heat cooling and turbulent mixing, while the basin-scale wind stress curl and the horizontal advection were less affected. These results suggest that the amount of newly supplied nutrient-rich water mass in early winter could affect the primary productivity throughout the winter and the resultant feeding conditions of the juvenile squid. We assumed that this process would determine the stock levels of the neon flying squid in the following summer. We further attempted to reconstruct the changes in neon flying squid CPUE during 1994-2006 by applying regression analysis to several parameters. The result showed that ENT, surface and subsurface temperatures, and the PDO index in February were good predictors for estimating the squid CPUE time series. In addition, the subsurface temperature in the MSNGAC in the preceding autumn was also a good predictor

  5. Detection of spatial hot spots and variation for the neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii resources in the northwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongjiu; Chen, Xinjun; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing effects of global climate change and fishing activities, the spatial distribution of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is changing in the traditional fishing ground of 150°-160°E and 38°-45°N in the northwest Pacific Ocean. This research aims to identify the spatial hot and cold spots (i.e. spatial clusters) of O. bartramii to reveal its spatial structure using commercial fishery data from 2007 to 2010 collected by Chinese mainland squid-jigging fleets. A relatively strongly-clustered distribution for O. bartramii was observed using an exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) method. The results show two hot spots and one cold spot in 2007 while only one hot and one cold spots were identified each year from 2008 to 2010. The hot and cold spots in 2007 occupied 8.2% and 5.6% of the study area, respectively; these percentages for hot and cold spot areas were 5.8% and 3.1% in 2008, 10.2% and 2.9% in 2009, and 16.4% and 11.9% in 2010, respectively. Nearly half (>45%) of the squid from 2007 to 2009 reported by Chinese fleets were caught in hot spot areas while this percentage reached its peak at 68.8% in 2010, indicating that the hot spot areas are central fishing grounds. A further change analysis shows the area centered at 156°E/43.5°N was persistent as a hot spot over the whole period from 2007 to 2010. Furthermore, the hot spots were mainly identified in areas with sea surface temperature (SST) in the range of 15-20°C around warm Kuroshio Currents as well as with the chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration above 0.3 mg/m3. The outcome of this research improves our understanding of spatiotemporal hotspots and its variation for O. bartramii and is useful for sustainable exploitation, assessment, and management of this squid.

  6. Interannual and seasonal variability of winter-spring cohort of neon flying squid abundance in the Northwest Pacific Ocean during 1995-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2016-06-01

    The neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, is a species of economically important cephalopod in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Its short lifespan increases the susceptibility of the distribution and abundance to the direct impact of the environmental conditions. Based on the generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), the commercial fishery data from the Chinese squid-jigging fleets during 1995 to 2011 were used to examine the interannual and seasonal variability in the abundance of O. bartramii, and to evaluate the influences of variables on the abundance (catch per unit effort, CPUE). The results from GLM suggested that year, month, latitude, sea surface temperature (SST), mixed layer depth (MLD), and the interaction term ( SST×MLD) were significant factors. The optimal model based on GAM included all the six significant variables and could explain 42.43% of the variance in nominal CPUE. The importance of the six variables was ranked by decreasing magnitude: year, month, latitude, SST, MLD and SST×MLD. The squid was mainly distributed in the waters between 40°N and 44°N in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The optimal ranges of SST and MLD were from 14 to 20°C and from 10 to 30 m, respectively. The squid abundance greatly fluctuated from 1995 to 2011. The CPUE was low during 1995-2002 and high during 2003-2008. Furthermore, the squid abundance was typically high in August. The interannual and seasonal variabilities in the squid abundance were associated with the variations of marine environmental conditions and the life history characteristics of squid.

  7. Variability of Suitable Habitat of Western Winter-Spring Cohort for Neon Flying Squid in the Northwest Pacific under Anomalous Environments.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model to evaluate the variability of suitable habitat for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) under anomalous environments in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Commercial fisheries data from the Chinese squid-jigging vessels on the traditional fishing ground bounded by 35°-45°N and 150°-175°E from July to November during 1998-2009 were used for analyses, as well as the environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Two empirical HSI models (arithmetic mean model, AMM; geometric mean model, GMM) were established according to the frequency distribution of fishing efforts. The AMM model was found to perform better than the GMM model. The AMM-based HSI model was further validated by the fishery and environmental data in 2010. The predicted HSI values in 1998 (high catch), 2008 (average catch) and 2009 (low catch) indicated that the squid habitat quality was strongly associated with the ENSO-induced variability in the oceanic conditions on the fishing ground. The La Niña events in 1998 tended to yield warm SST and favorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, resulting in high-quality habitats for O. bartramii. While the fishing ground in the El Niño year of 2009 experienced anomalous cool waters and unfavorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, leading to relatively low-quality squid habitats. Our findings suggest that the La Niña event in 1998 tended to result in more favorable habitats for O. bartramii in the Northwest Pacific with the gravity centers of fishing efforts falling within the defined suitable habitat and yielding high squid catch; whereas the El Niño event in 2009 yielded less favorable habitat areas with the fishing effort distribution mismatching the suitable habitat and a dramatic decline of the catch of O. bartramii. This study might provide some potentially valuable

  8. Variability of Suitable Habitat of Western Winter-Spring Cohort for Neon Flying Squid in the Northwest Pacific under Anomalous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a habitat suitability index (HSI) model to evaluate the variability of suitable habitat for neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) under anomalous environments in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Commercial fisheries data from the Chinese squid-jigging vessels on the traditional fishing ground bounded by 35°-45°N and 150°-175°E from July to November during 1998-2009 were used for analyses, as well as the environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and sea surface salinity (SSS). Two empirical HSI models (arithmetic mean model, AMM; geometric mean model, GMM) were established according to the frequency distribution of fishing efforts. The AMM model was found to perform better than the GMM model. The AMM-based HSI model was further validated by the fishery and environmental data in 2010. The predicted HSI values in 1998 (high catch), 2008 (average catch) and 2009 (low catch) indicated that the squid habitat quality was strongly associated with the ENSO-induced variability in the oceanic conditions on the fishing ground. The La Niña events in 1998 tended to yield warm SST and favorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, resulting in high-quality habitats for O. bartramii. While the fishing ground in the El Niño year of 2009 experienced anomalous cool waters and unfavorable range of Chl-a concentration and SSHA, leading to relatively low-quality squid habitats. Our findings suggest that the La Niña event in 1998 tended to result in more favorable habitats for O. bartramii in the Northwest Pacific with the gravity centers of fishing efforts falling within the defined suitable habitat and yielding high squid catch; whereas the El Niño event in 2009 yielded less favorable habitat areas with the fishing effort distribution mismatching the suitable habitat and a dramatic decline of the catch of O. bartramii. This study might provide some potentially valuable

  9. Size increment of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas mature females in Peruvian waters, 1989-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles, Juan; Tafur, Ricardo; Taipe, Anatolio; Villegas, Piero; Keyl, Friedeman; Dominguez, Noel; Salazar, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Changes in population structure of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas in Peruvian waters were studied based on size-at-maturity from 1989 to 2004. From 1989 to 1999, mature squid belonging to the medium-sized group prevailed, but from 2001 on, mature squids were larger. This change is not related to the changes in sea surface temperature and we hypothesized that it was caused by the population increase of mesopelagic fishes as prey.

  10. Fishery biology of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas off Costa Rica Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjun; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Bilin; Li, Gang; Lu, Huajie

    2014-06-01

    The jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) population was surveyed with the help of Chinese squid jigging vessels off the Costa Rica Dome (4°-11°N, 90°-100°W) in 2009 and 2010. The daily catch of D. gigas in the two survey cruises ranged from 0 to 5.5 t and was mostly obtained from the areas bounded by 6°-9°N and 91°-94°W and by 6°30'-7°30'N and 96°-97°W. The sea surface temperature in the areas yielding the most catch ranged from 27.5 to 29°C. The sex ratio of the total catch was 3.75:1 (female: male). The mantle length of the squid ranged from 211 to 355 mm (male) and from 204 to 429 mm (female) with an average of 297.9 and 306.7 mm, respectively. In the relationship of the mantle length (mm) and body weight (g) of the squid, there was no significant difference between sexes. The female and male were at a similar maturity, and most individuals are maturing or have matured with a few females being spent. The size (mantle length) and age at the first sexual maturity were 297 mm and 195 d in females, and less than 211 mm and 130 d in males, respectively. Most of the sampled stomachs (70.6%) had no food remains. The major preys of the squids were fish, cephalopods and crustaceans, with the most abundant Myctophum orientale and D. gigas. The preys in more than 65% of the non-empty sampled stomachs evidenced the cannibalism of D. gigas. The results improved current understanding of the fishery biology of D. gigas off the Costa Rica Dome, which may facilitate the assessment and management of relative fishery resources.

  11. Digestion of Ceramide 2-Aminoethylphosphonate, a Sphingolipid from the Jumbo Flying Squid Dosidicus gigas, in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tomonaga, Nami; Manabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2017-04-01

    Ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphonate (CAEP), a sphingophosphonolipid containing a carbon-phosphorus bond, is frequently found in marine organisms and has a unique triene type of sphingoid base in its structure. CAEP has not been evaluated as a food ingredient, although it is generally contained in Mollusca organisms such as squids and shellfish, which are consumed worldwide. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of CAEP as a food component by evaluating the digestion of CAEP extracted from the skin of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas. Our results revealed that dietary CAEP was digested to free sphingoid bases via ceramides by the mouse small intestinal mucosa. At pH 7.2, CAEP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than the major mammalian sphingolipid sphingomyelin; however, the hydrolysis of CAEP was similar to that of sphingomyelin at pH 9.0. Thus, the digestion of CAEP may be catalyzed by alkaline spingomyelinase and other enzymes. Our findings provide important insights into the digestion of the dietary sphingophosphonolipid CAEP in marine foods.

  12. Natural mortality estimation and rational exploitation of purpleback flying squid Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis in the southern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuehui; Qiu, Yongsong; Zhang, Peng; Du, Feiyan

    2016-09-01

    Based on the biological data of purpleback flying squid (Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis) collected by light falling-net in the southern South China Sea (SCS) during September to October 2012 and March to April 2013, growth and mortality of `Medium' and `Dwarf' forms of squid are derived using the Powell-Wetherall, ELEFAN methods and length-converted catch curves (FiSAT package). Given a lack of commercial exploitation, we assume total mortality to be due entirely to natural mortality. We estimate these squid have fast growth, with growth coefficients (k) ranging from 1.42 to 2.39, and high natural mortality (M), with estimates ranging from 1.61 to 2.92. To sustainably exploit these squid stocks, yield per recruitment based on growth and natural mortality was determined using the Beverton-Holt dynamic pool model. We demonstrate squid stocks could sustain high fishing mortality and low ages at first capture, with an optimal fishing mortality >3.0, with the optimal age at first capture increased to 0.4-0.6 years when fishing mortality approached optimal levels. On the basis of our analyses and estimates of stock biomass, we believe considerable potential exists to expand the squid fishery into the open SCS, relieving fishing pressure on coastal waters.

  13. A comparison of fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas outside three Exclusive Economic Zones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2013-05-01

    Although many studies on the fishery biology of jumbo flying squid, Dosidicus gigas, have been conducted in the coastal areas within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) of various countries due to its commercial and ecological importance, limited biological information is available from waters outside these EEZs. In this paper, we examined D. gigas fishery biology from waters outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, based on the fishery data collected by Chinese jigging vessels during 2006 to 2010. The dominant mantle lengths of D. gigas were 350-450 mm, 250-400 mm and 250-350 mm outside Chilean, Peruvian and Costa Rican EEZs, respectively. Size structure analysis show that a medium-sized group existed mostly in the waters outside the Chilean and Peruvian EEZs, whereas a small-sized group occurred mainly in the waters outside the Costa Rican EEZ. The longevity of the squid outside the Costa Rican EEZ was less than 10 months, while most of those outside Chilean and Peruvian EEZs were about 1-1.5 years and very few large individuals were 1.5-2 years old. A higher percentage of mature individuals existed outside Costa Rican EEZ implying the region as a potential spawning ground, while lower proportions of mature squid outside the Peruvian and Chilean EEZs indicated that spawning may be occurring outside our study area. Spatial differences in sizes at maturity of the squid are thought to be result from different environmental factors especially different temperature and nutrition among the three areas. Stomach-content analysis showed that cannibalism was important in the diet of D. gigas. Stress generated by jigging may increase the incidence of cannibalism.

  14. A Comparative Study of Clam and Squid. Biting Flies of the Coastal Region. Diatoms: Nature's Aquatic Gems. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 227, 231, 232. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are three units related to coastal and oceanic awareness. The units are: (1) A Comparative Study of Clam and Squid; (2) Biting Flies of the Coastal Region; and (3) Diatoms: Nature's Aquatic Gems. All three units were designed for secondary school students. Each unit contains teacher background materials, student activity materials,…

  15. Trophic relationships of albatrosses associated with squid and large-mesh drift-net fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Patrick J.; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Walker, William

    1997-01-01

    The diets of Laysan (Diomedea immutabilis) and black-footed albatrosses (D. nigripes) killed in squid and large-mesh drift nets in the transitional zone of the North Pacific Ocean were investigated by examining the contents of the digestive tracts and determining δ13C and δ15N values in breast-muscle tissue. The results show that (i) the combined prey of the two species of albatross consists of over 46 species of marine organisms including coelenterates, arthropods, mollusks, fish, and marine mammals; (ii) both species supplement their traditional diets with food made available by commercial fishing operations (e.g., net-caught squid and offal); (iii) while obtained from drift nets, diets of nonbreeding Laysan and black-footed albatrosses are dominated by neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartrami); (iv) in the absence of drift-net-related food, Laysan albatrosses feed most heavily on fish and black-footed albatrosses feed most heavily on squid; and (v) based on δ15N values, nonbreeding adult Laysan albatrosses from the transitional zone of the North Pacific Ocean and Laysan albatross nestlings fed by adults from Midway Island in the subtropical Pacific feed at one trophic level and one-third of a trophic level lower than black-footed albatrosses, respectively.

  16. First SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Arnold

    2014-03-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is the most sensitive magnetic flux sensor and the most widely applied superconductor electronic device, whose applications range from magnetocardiography to picovoltmeters, from digital logic to quantum computing, and from non-destructive testing to Gravity Probe B, a spaceborne test of Einstein's theory of gravity. In this presentation, I describe the initial experiments and device modeling at the Ford Scientific Laboratory that produced the early versions of the SQUID during the 1960's. That history originated in an anomalous observation during microwave ENDOR experiments and led to the first report of macroscopic quantum interference in superconductors in 1964 [Phys. Rev. Letters 12 (1964)]. The SQUID is based on London's electrodynamic theory of multiply-connected superconductors [Superfluids Wiley, New York (1950)], the magnetic flux quantum (h/2e=2.07E-15 Wb), and Josephson's theory of weakly-connected superconductors [Phys. Lett. 1 (1962)]. Physically, it incorporates Josephson tunnel junctions in a low inductance, superconducting ring. Two distinct types of SQUIDs were demonstrated: first the ``dc SQUID'' and then the ``rf SQUID.'' The former has two Josephson junctions and produces a dc frequency response; the latter has only one junction and responds only at rf and microwave frequencies. The first phase, conducted by Lambe, Jaklevic, Mercereau, and Silver, used type I thin film superconductors and Josephson tunnel junctions. The second phase, conducted by Silver and Zimmerman, used bulk niobium structures with ``cat whisker'' junction technology [Phys.Rev. 157 (1967)].

  17. Squid rocket science: How squid launch into air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dor, Ron; Stewart, Julia; Gilly, William; Payne, John; Borges, Teresa Cerveira; Thys, Tierney

    2013-10-01

    Squid not only swim, they can also fly like rockets, accelerating through the air by forcefully expelling water out of their mantles. Using available lab and field data from four squid species, Sthenoteuthis pteropus, Dosidicus gigas, Illex illecebrosus and Loligo opalescens, including sixteen remarkable photographs of flying S. pteropus off the coast of Brazil, we compared the cost of transport in both water and air and discussed methods of maximizing power output through funnel and mantle constriction. Additionally we found that fin flaps develop at approximately the same size range as flight behaviors in these squids, consistent with previous hypotheses that flaps could function as ailerons whilst aloft. S. pteropus acceleration in air (265 body lengths [BL]/s2; 24.5m/s2) was found to exceed that in water (79BL/s2) three-fold based on estimated mantle length from still photos. Velocities in air (37BL/s; 3.4m/s) exceed those in water (11BL/s) almost four-fold. Given the obvious advantages of this extreme mode of transport, squid flight may in fact be more common than previously thought and potentially employed to reduce migration cost in addition to predation avoidance. Clearly squid flight, the role of fin flaps and funnel, and the energetic benefits are worthy of extended investigation.

  18. Portable neon purification system

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, R.A.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the principle design features of a portable neon purification system and the results of the system performance testing. Neon gas replaces air in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector without using vacuum, in experiment E781(SELEX) at Fermilab. The portable neon purification system purifies neon gas by, first purging air with CO{sub 2}, freezing the CO{sub 2}, then cryoadsorbing the remaining contaminants. The freezer removes carbon dioxide from a neon gas mixture down to a maximum concentration of 500 parts-per-million (ppm). The charcoal bed adsorber removes nitrogen from neon gas down to a maximum concentration of 100 ppm. The original RICH vessel was designed to hold vacuum but its photomultiplier tube plates were not.

  19. NEON Airborne Remote Sensing of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is the continental-scale research platform that will collect information on ecosystems across the United States to advance our understanding and ability to forecast environmental change at the continental scale. One of NEON's observing systems, the Airborne Observation Platform (AOP), will fly an instrument suite consisting of a high-fidelity visible-to-shortwave infrared imaging spectrometer, a full waveform small footprint LiDAR, and a high-resolution digital camera on a low-altitude aircraft platform. NEON AOP is focused on acquiring data on several terrestrial Essential Climate Variables including bioclimate, biodiversity, biogeochemistry, and land use products. These variables are collected throughout a network of 60 sites across the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico via ground-based and airborne measurements. Airborne remote sensing plays a critical role by providing measurements at the scale of individual shrubs and larger plants over hundreds of square kilometers. The NEON AOP plays the role of bridging the spatial scales from that of individual organisms and stands to the scale of satellite-based remote sensing. NEON is building 3 airborne systems to facilitate the routine coverage of NEON sites and provide the capacity to respond to investigator requests for specific projects. The first NEON imaging spectrometer, a next-generation VSWIR instrument, was recently delivered to NEON by JPL. This instrument has been integrated with a small-footprint waveform LiDAR on the first NEON airborne platform (AOP-1). A series of AOP-1 test flights were conducted during the first year of NEON's construction phase. The goal of these flights was to test out instrument functionality and performance, exercise remote sensing collection protocols, and provide provisional data for algorithm and data product validation. These test flights focused the following questions: What is the optimal remote

  20. The Squid Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillaume, Andrea M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an approach to the study of squid that helps students of all ages develop richer ideas about the structure of living things, how living things are adapted to their habitats, and how they interact with other organisms. Highlights include the external and internal features of the squid, squid statements and statistics, and writing…

  1. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  2. SQUID application research in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo

    2003-12-01

    Japanese research activities using SQUIDs are reviewed in this paper. Low-Tc SQUIDs are applied to multi-channel systems for magnetoencephalogram (MEG) and magnetocardiogram (MCG). High-Tc SQUIDs are applied to MCG, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), SQUID microscopy, biological testing using fine magnetic markers, geological surveying, food inspection, large-scale integration (LSI) defect analysis and SQUID-NQR (nuclear quadrupole resonance). These applications of SQUIDs are being researched and developed actively and some of them are expected to be in the commercial market in the near future.

  3. Subranging scheme for SQUID sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A readout scheme for measuring the output from a SQUID-based sensor-array using an improved subranging architecture that includes multiple resolution channels (such as a coarse resolution channel and a fine resolution channel). The scheme employs a flux sensing circuit with a sensing coil connected in series to multiple input coils, each input coil being coupled to a corresponding SQUID detection circuit having a high-resolution SQUID device with independent linearizing feedback. A two-resolution configuration (course and fine) is illustrated with a primary SQUID detection circuit for generating a fine readout, and a secondary SQUID detection circuit for generating a course readout, both having feedback current coupled to the respective SQUID devices via feedback/modulation coils. The primary and secondary SQUID detection circuits function and derive independent feedback. Thus, the SQUID devices may be monitored independently of each other (and read simultaneously) to dramatically increase slew rates and dynamic range.

  4. Lowering effect of firefly squid powder on triacylglycerol content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Morita, Ritsuko; Shirai, Yoko; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Terashima, Teruya; Ushikubo, Shun; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Effects of dietary firefly squid on serum and liver lipid levels were investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing 5% freeze-dried firefly squid or Japanese flying squid for 2 weeks. There was no significant difference in the liver triacylglycerol level between the control and Japanese flying squid groups, but the rats fed the firefly squid diet had a significantly lower liver triacylglycerol content than those fed the control diet. No significant difference was observed in serum triacylglycerol levels between the control and firefly squid groups. The rats fed the firefly squid had a significantly lower activity of liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the rats fed the control diet. There was no significant difference in liver fatty acid synthetase activity among the three groups. Hepatic gene expression and lipogenic enzyme activity were investigated; a DNA microarray showed that the significantly enriched gene ontology category of down-regulated genes in the firefly squid group was "lipid metabolic process". The firefly squid group had lower mRNA level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase compared to the controls. These results suggest that an intake of firefly squid decreases hepatic triacylglycerol in rats, and the reduction of mRNA level and enzyme activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might be related to the mechanisms.

  5. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  6. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  7. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  8. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  9. SQUID gradiometers for archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwala, Andreas; Stolz, Ronny; IJsselsteijn, Rob; Schultze, Volkmar; Ukhansky, Nikolay; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Schüler, Tim

    2001-12-01

    The mapping of the Earth's magnetic field or field gradient is a proven method in surface exploration and archaeometry. Caesium vapour magnetometers show the best magnetic field resolution of commercial devices, but their sampling frequency is limited to 10 Hz. Using SQUIDs it is possible to achieve the same or even better magnetic field resolution with a sampling frequency as high as 100 Hz or more. This allows significantly shorter acquisition times, which is essential for the mapping of large objects. In this paper we check the performance of our developed systems on a neolithic double-ring ditch enclosure near Weimar, Germany. We compare mappings of this area using an electronic caesium gradiometer, an electronic HTS SQUID gradiometer and an integrated planar LTS SQUID gradiometer. With all three systems the magnetic pattern of the ditch is visible; however, the electronic HTS gradiometer shows disturbances of the same order of magnitude as the gradient signal of the ditch, due to an insufficient common mode rejection whilst being moved. The planar LTS SQUID gradiometer shows superior performance. Its mapping shows a much better contrast and features that are not visible in the mapping of the caesium gradiometer.

  10. SQUIDs - ultimate magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Gordon B.

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) have extreme electromagnetic energy sensitivity, which can be applied in a wide variety of ways. Some of these are covered in the papers representing the rest of this symposium: in this brief introductory paper we indicate the wide extent of the full range of applications to which they have been put, from bioscience to tests of General Relativity.

  11. The microstrip SQUID amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therrien, Roy

    A Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDS) can operate at frequencies up to several GHz and can be cooled to less than 100 mK. Such characteristics make the SQUID---a flux-to-voltage transducer---an excellent candidate for use as a low-noise rf amplifier. Coupling of input signals of frequencies larger than 200 MHz, however, has been limited by the parasitic capacitance between the input coil and SQUID body. We present experimental observations of a do SQUID-based rf amplifier which circumvents this problem by incorporating the input coil as a microstrip resonator. The microstrip input configuration uses the capacitance and inductance of the input coil to form a resonant cavity capable of operating up to several GHz. The input signal is applied between the SQUID body and one end of the input coil, while the other end of the coil is left open. We present data from microstrip SQUID amplifiers with gains of up to 22 dB at 900 MHz. In order to understand the gain and input impedance of the microstrip SQUID in greater detail, we made and studied a 1:190 scale analog patterned on a double-sided printed circuit board consisting of copper deposited on a kapton sheet. The measured input impedance of the analog SQUID is successfully modeled by describing the microstrip input as a low-loss transmission line. When operated with the slit in the copper washer ground plane shorted, the input coil behaves exactly like a linear resonator with the resonant frequency given by f = 1/2ℓ(L 0C0)1/2, where L0 and C0 are the inductance and capacitance per unit length and ℓ is the coil length. With the slit in the washer left open, the inductance of the input coil is significantly altered in a manner partially consistent with the Ketchen-Jaycox model in which the reflected inductance of the input coil is Li = n2L, where L is the inductance of the washer loop and n is the number of turns in the coil. We present input impedance measurements on microstrip SQUIDs cooled to 4

  12. SQUIDs: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    In 1964, Jaklevic, Lambe, Silver and Mercereau demonstrated quantum interference in a superconducting ring containing two Josephson tunnel junctions. This observation marked the birth of the SQUID--Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. The following year saw the appearance of the SLUG (Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer)--a blob of solder frozen around a length of niobium wire--that was used as a voltmeter with femtovolt resolution. Although extremely primitive by today's standards, the SLUG was used successfully in a number of ultrasensitive experiments. Today, the square washer dc SQUID, fabricated on a wafer-scale from thin films with an integrated input coil, finds a wide range of applications. One example is the use of a SQUID amplifier to read out ADMX--Axion Dark Matter eXperiment--at the University of Washington, Seattle. This experiment, which involves a cooled microwave cavity surrounded by a superconducting magnet, searches for the axion, a candidate for cold dark matter. In the presence of a magnetic field the axion is predicted to decay into a photon, which is detected by the SQUID. In another example, the combination of a SQUID with prepolarized proton spins enables one to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in magnetic fields of the order of 0.1 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI systems. In vivo images of the human brain acquired at these ultralow fields are able distinguish brain tissue, blood, cerebrospinal fluid and scalp fat using a combination of inversion recovery and multiple echo sequences. Potential clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  13. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  14. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  15. CyroSQUID: A SQUID-Based Magnetic Field Sensor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-15

    SQUID-based magnetometers. The motivation stems from a variety of applications, including the study of biomagnetic fields (Zimmerman and Radebaugh ...University Press, in press). J.E. Zimmerman and R. Radebaugh (1978). "Operation of a SQUID in a very low-power cryocooler," in: Applications of Closed-Cycle

  16. Remote NDE using high- Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, K.; Tsuduki, M.; Sakuta, K.; Itozaki, H.

    2007-10-01

    In nondestructive evaluation (NDE) using SQUID, the distance between a SQUID and a sample has been used to reduce as much as possible to improve the sensitivity. On the other hand, a remote NDE with a SQUID set several tens mm away from a sample was examined to detect a sample, to which a sensor head could not be close. A through-hole in an aluminum or steel plate was detected by the remote NDE with a SQUID. The signal from the defect up to 50 mm away from the SQUID was detected. This result shows that a remote SQUID-NDE is useful for NDE where a SQUID cannot be close.

  17. SQUIDs: microscopes and nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are magnetic field sensores with unsurpassed sensitivity. They are amazingly versatile, being able to measure all physical quantities which can be converted to magnetic flux. They are routinely fabricated in thin film technology from two classes of superconducting materials: high-temperature superconductors (HTS) which are usually cooled to 77 K, and low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which have to be cooled to 4.2 K. SQUIDs have many applications, two of which shall be discussed in this paper. In SQUID microscopy, a SQUID scans a sample, which preferrably is at room temperature, and measures the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution at the surface of the sample. In order to achieve a relatively high spatial resolution, the stand-off distance between the sample and the SQUID is made as small as possible. SQUIDs show also promising results in the field of nondestructive testing of various materials. For example, ferromagnetic impurities in stainless steel formed by aging processes in the material can be detected with high probability, and cracks in conducting materials, for example aircraft parts, can be located using eddy current methods. Especially for the case of thick, highly conductive, or ferromagnetic materials, as well as sintered materials, it can be shown that a SQUID-based NDE system exhibits a much higher sensitivity compared to conventional eddy current NDE and ultrasonic testing.

  18. Graphoepitaxial high-Tc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Meertens, D.; Poppe, U.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2014-05-01

    The fabrication process and physical properties of graphoepitaxially engineered high-Tc direct current superconducting quantum interferometer devices (DC SQUIDs) are studied. Double buffer layers, each comprising a graphoepitaxial seed layer of YBa2Cu3O7-x and an epitaxial blocking layer of SrTiO3, were deposited over textured step edges on (001) surfaces of MgO substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the microstructural properties of DC SQUIDs with graphoepitaxial Josephson junctions. Both direct coupled and inductively coupled high-Tc DC SQUIDs with graphoepitaxial step edge junctions and flux transformers were studied.

  19. Rogue mantle helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-15

    The canonical model of helium isotope geochemistry describes the lower mantle as undegassed, but this view conflicts with evidence of recycled material in the source of ocean island basalts. Because mantle helium is efficiently extracted by magmatic activity, it cannot remain in fertile mantle rocks for long periods of time. Here, I suggest that helium with high 3He/4He ratios, as well as neon rich in the solar component, diffused early in Earth's history from low-melting-point primordial material into residual refractory "reservoir" rocks, such as dunites. The difference in 3He/4He ratios of ocean-island and mid-ocean ridge basalts and the preservation of solar neon are ascribed to the reservoir rocks being stretched and tapped to different extents during melting.

  20. Occupational allergy to squid (Loligo vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Wiszniewska, M; Tymoszuk, D; Pas-Wyroślak, A; Nowakowska-Świrta, E; Chomiczewska-Skóra, D; Pałczyński, C; Walusiak-Skorupa, J

    2013-06-01

    Occupational allergy from exposure to squid has been rarely described, mainly as contact dermatitis or urticaria. Our report presents the first case of occupational asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis and contact urticaria to squid in a 33-year-old seafood production worker, with documented increased eosinophilia in the nasal and tear fluids after specific inhalation challenge test (SICT) with squid. IgE-mediated sensitization to squid was confirmed by positive skin prick test and opened skin test with squid extract. SICT demonstrated a direct and significant link between the exposure to squid and the allergic response from the respiratory system and conjunctiva.

  1. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  2. Squid Systems For Archaeomagnetic Prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, V.; Chwala, A.; Ijsselsteijn, R.; Stolz, R.; Schüler, T.; Meyer, H.-G.

    Two SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) systems have been de- veloped for archaeomagnetic prospection. Both were tested on a Neolithic double ring ditch enclosure near Weimar, Germany, in comparison with conventional Cs vapour magnetometers. The first SQUID system uses "high-Tc" SQUIDs working with liquid nitrogen at a temperature of 77 K. Two separate magnetometers with a vertical distance of z = 0.5 m form an electronic gradiometer measuring the gradient dBz/dz of the verti- cal component of the magnetic field. Except for the measurement of the total vertical gradient dB/dz by the Cs gradiometer these two systems are set up in the same man- ner. Additionally, the resolutionof the magnetic field gradient is of the same order of magnitude 100fT/(cm · Hz). Consequently, both systems yield comparable mappings of the archaeological site. However, in contrast to the Cs gradiometer sys- tem, whose sampling frequency is limited to several Hz for the highest resolution, the SQUID system permits sampling frequencies as high as 1 kHz or more. This would allow the mapping of large objects in a passable measurement time. The second SQUID system uses "low-Tc" SQUIDs working with liquid helium at a temperature of 4.2K. Because of this rather exotic coolant in contrast to the "high- Tc" SQUID system its use is restricted to more exclusive cases. However, it yields much better performance than any other sensor system. The gradiometer is formed intrinsically by two loops of a gradiometric superconducting antenna whose distance z is only 4 cm. This intrinsic gradiometer measures the vertical gradient dBx/dz of the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Based on the ultimate sensitivity of "low-Tc" SQUIDs the resolution of the magnetic field gradient is of the order of only 1fT/(cm· Hz). The mapping of the archaeological site with this system exhibits extraordinary sharp pictures with a very clear resolution not available otherwise. By an excavation in the

  3. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  4. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  5. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A neon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of neon in a gas mixture exhaled by...

  9. Tracking Electromagnetic Energy With SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a gadget used to measure extremely weak signals, specifically magnetic flux. It can detect subtle changes in energy, up to 100 billion times weaker than the electromagnetic energy required to move a compass needle. SQUIDs are used for a variety of testing procedures where extreme sensitivity is required and where the test instrument need not come into direct contact with the test subject. NASA uses SQUIDs for remote, noncontact sensing in a variety of venues, including monitoring the Earth s magnetic field and tracking brain activity of pilots. Scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have been making extensive use of this technology, from astrophysical research, to tracking the navigational paths of bees in flight to determine if they are using internal compasses. These very sensitive measurement devices have a wide variety of uses within NASA and even more uses within the commercial realm.

  10. Cryogenics for SQUIDS. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    While not much work on SQUID cryocoolers as such has been done yet, a large amount of work on higher temperature refrigerators for infrared sensors and for use in spacecraft provides a sophisticated technical base upon which to build. A low-power five-stage Stirling cryocooler with a single-component SQUID gradiometer has begun operation. Although this machine requires only 20 W of mechanical power input to maintain a temperature of 7 K, a large reduction of input power is theoretically possible.

  11. Chromatic induction in neon colour spreading.

    PubMed

    da Pos, Osvaldo; Bressan, Paola

    2003-03-01

    Neon colour spreading occurs when sections of a lattice are replaced by segments of a different colour. This colour appears to diffuse out of the segments, and produce a slightly tinted transparent surface floating above the lattice. In two of the four experiments reported here, observers varied the colour of an area in a test display, until it matched the neon colour perceived in a corresponding (illusory) area in a comparison display. We found that the neon colour is an additive mixture of the colour of the segments and the colour complementary to the lattice, as suggested by Bressan (Vision Research 35 (1995) 375). In the other two experiments, we separately manipulated the presence and alignment of lattice and segments, to test whether the neon effect is fully predicted by a combination of colour diffusion and simultaneous colour contrast. We found that the colour induced in a neon figure is more saturated than the colour induced in a comparable non-neon figure. We discuss the implications of these results on our current understanding of the mechanisms of neon colour spreading.

  12. Small scale demand type neon liquefaction plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, W. P.; Slifka, A. J.; Bitsy, R. M.; Sparks, L. L.; Johnson, K. B.

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials is generally made using a boil-off calorimetry technique involving liquid hydrogen (LH2). Liquid neon (LNe) has nearly the same normal boiling point as LH2, but has a much larger heat of vaporization, allowing extended run times. The main drawback of using LNe has been its excessive cost; $170.00 versus $1.50/l for LH2 (1989 prices). A neon liquefaction plant has been designed and constructed to capture, purify, and refrigerate the neon boil-off from calorimetry experiments. Recycling the neon reduces operating costs to approximately $20/l. The system consists of a purification section, a heat exchanger, LNe and LH2 storage dewars, and a fully automated control system. After purification, neon is liquified in the heat exchanger by LH2 flowing countercurrently through stainless steel cooling coils. Hydrogen flow is automatically adjusted to keep the neon at its normal saturation temperature, 27 K. The liquid neon is then stored in a dewar placed directly below the heat exchanger.

  13. High-Tc SQUID magnetocardiography imaging system.

    PubMed

    Yang, H C; Hung, S Y; Wu, C H; Chen, J C; Hsu, S J; Liao, S H; Horng, H E

    2004-11-30

    We set up a high-Tc SQUID system for magnetocardiography (MCG) in a moderately magnetically shielded room. The electronically balanced gradiometer consists of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. One reference SQUID was mounted above the sensing SQUID while the sensing SQUID is seated at the bottom of the cryostat. The baseline of the gradiometer is varied from 5 cm to 7 cm. The output of the MCG signal was filtered with the band pass filter (0.5 - 40 Hz) and the power-line filter. The MCG system was used to detect the magnetic signal of the human heart. Equivalent current sources were used to study the inverse problem.

  14. A SQUID series array dc current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, J.; Drung, D.

    2008-09-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are used to sense changes in various physical quantities, which can be transformed into changes in the magnetic flux threading the SQUID loop. We have developed a novel SQUID array dc current sensor. The device is based on a series array of identical dc SQUIDs. An input signal current to be measured is coupled tightly but non-uniformly to the SQUID array elements. The input signal coupling to the individual array elements is chosen such that a single-valued, non-periodic overall voltage response is obtained. Flux offsets in the individual SQUIDs which would compromise the sensor voltage response are avoided or can be compensated. We present simulations and experimental results on the SQUID Array for Dc (SQUAD) current sensor current sensor performance. A dc current resolution of <1 nA in a measurement bandwidth of 0-25 Hz is achieved for an input inductance of LIn<3 nH.

  15. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  16. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-09-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and office supply stores. We also employ violet-blue and green laser pointers as excitation sources. We conclude with a brief discussion of neon pigments in terms of the "day glow" or "daylight fluorescence" phenomenon.

  17. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.C. |

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  18. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high TC SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio.

  19. Biomagnetic Measurements Using SQUID Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassi, D.; Zhuravlev, Y.

    2000-09-01

    Biomagnetic measurements involve the detection of the magnetic fields generated by physiological activity in living organisms. Because magnetic fields are sensed remotely, no physical contact with the subject is required, making the technique totally non-invasive Furthermore, only the magnetic fields originating within the body are measured. No external field is applied and it can therefore be confidently stated that the technique is completely safe. These characteristics make biomagnetometry an ideal tool for the investigation of physiological processes. The only magnetic field detector capable of measuring these extremely weak biomagnetic signals is the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). In the last thirty years SQUID-based ultrasensitive magnetometers have been widely used in the investigation of physiologically produced magnetic fields for diagnostic purposes. Owing to the numerous sources of noise and interference typical of an urban environment, it has until recently been considered almost impossible to operate a SQUID magnetometer in such a location without magnetic shielding. We have overcome these technical problems and have successfully used our specially developed unshielded SQUID systems in laboratory and hospital environments. This instrumentation is suitable for recording the biomagnetic fields in adults, neonates and fetuses, and has been applied in a number of clinical studies including fetal magnetocardiography.

  20. Compact integrated dc SQUID gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    de Waal, V.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1982-10-01

    An all-niobium integrated system of first-order gradiometer and dc suprconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed. It is relatively simple to fabricate, has an overall size of 17 x 12 mm and a sensitivity of 3.5 x 10/sup -12/ T m/sup -1/ Hz/sup -1/2/.

  1. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  2. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  3. Capturing neon - the first experimental structure of neon trapped within a metal-organic environment.

    PubMed

    Wood, Peter A; Sarjeant, Amy A; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Ward, Suzanna C; Groom, Colin R

    2016-08-21

    Despite being the fifth most abundant element in the atmosphere, neon has never been observed in an organic or metal-organic environment. This study shows the adsorption of this highly unreactive element within such an environment and reveals the first crystallographic observation of an interaction between neon and a transition metal.

  4. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  5. Helium and Neon in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1996-01-01

    Two comets were observed with EUVE in late 1994. Both comet Mueller and comet Borrelly are short-period comets having well established orbital elements and accurate ephemerides. Spectra of 40 ksec were taken of each. No evidence for emission lines from either Helium or Neon was detected. We calculated limits on the production rates of these atoms (relative to solar) assuming a standard isotropic outflow model, with a gas streaming speed of 1 km/s. The 3-sigma (99.7% confidence) limits (1/100,000 for He, 0.8 for Ne) are based on a conservative estimate of the noise in the EUVE spectra. They are also weakly dependent on the precise pointing and tracking of the EUVE field of view relative to the comet during the integrations. These limits are consistent with ice formation temperatures T greater than or equal to 30 K, as judged from the gas trapping experiments of Bar-Nun. For comparison, the solar abundances of these elements are He/O = 110, Ne/O = 1/16. Neither limit was as constraining as we had initially hoped, mainly because comets Mueller and Borrelly were intrinsically less active than anticipated.

  6. Flying wings / flying fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    The present paper has documented the historical relationships between various classes of all lifting vehicles, which includes the flying wing, all wing, tailless, lifting body, and lifting fuselage. The diversity in vehicle focus was to ensure that all vehicle types that map have contributed to or been influenced by the development of the classical flying wing concept was investigated. The paper has provided context and perspective for present and future aircraft design studies that may employ the all lifting vehicle concept. The paper also demonstrated the benefit of developing an understanding of the past in order to obtain the required knowledge to create future concepts with significantly improved aerodynamic performance.

  7. Analytical derivation of DC SQUID response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Schegolev, A. E.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu

    2016-09-01

    We consider voltage and current response formation in DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with overdamped Josephson junctions in resistive and superconducting state in the context of a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. For simplicity we neglect the junction capacitance and the noise effect. Explicit expressions for the responses in resistive state were obtained for a SQUID which is symmetrical with respect to bias current injection point. Normalized SQUID inductance l=2{{eI}}{{c}}L/{\\hslash } (where I c is the critical current of Josephson junction, L is the SQUID inductance, e is the electron charge and ℏ is the Planck constant) was assumed to be within the range l ≤ 1, subsequently expanded up to l≈ 7 using two fitting parameters. SQUID current response in the superconducting state was considered for arbitrary value of the inductance. The impact of small technological spread of parameters relevant to low-temperature superconductor (LTS) technology was studied, using a generalization of the developed analytical approach, for the case of a small difference of critical currents and shunt resistances of the Josephson junctions, and inequality of SQUID inductive shoulders for both resistive and superconducting states. Comparison with numerical calculation results shows that developed analytical expressions can be used in practical LTS SQUIDs and SQUID-based circuits design, e.g. large serial SQIF, drastically decreasing the time of simulation.

  8. The First NEON School in La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Melo, C.; Selman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The NEON Observing Schools have long provided PhD students with practical experience in the preparation, execution and reduction of astronomical observations, primarily at northern observatories. The NEON School was held in Chile for the first time, with observations being conducted at La Silla. The school was attended by 20 students, all from South America, and observations were performed with two telescopes, including the New Technology Telescope. A brief description of the school is presented and the observing projects and their results are described.

  9. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  10. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  11. Low field electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with SQUID detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor); Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Cohen, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a flux transformer with a gradiometer pickup coil is magnetically coupled to a SQUID, and a SQUID array amplifier comprising a plurality of SQUIDs, connected in series, is magnetically coupled to the output of the SQUID. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  12. First demonstration of transcontinental SQUID magnetometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, C.; Febvre, P.; Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Waysand, G.; Gouws, D.; Saunderson, E.; Henry, S.; Gaffet, S.; Janse van Vuuren, L.; Lochner, E. T.; Matladi, T.; Kwisanga, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first simultaneous measurements from an ultra-sensitive dual-node transcontinental SQUID magnetometer network, available in real time on the internet. A three-axis low temperature SQUID sensor at LSBB Underground Research Laboratory, Rustrel, France (43.841 N, 5.484 E) and a two-axis high temperature SQUID sensor at SANSA Space Science in Hermanus, South Africa (34.424 S, 19.223 E), form the sensitive nodes of the network. Data are measured and GPS time stamped continuously at 125 Hz. The low-Tc SQUID at LSBB URL (known as a [SQUID]2 system) is inside a shielded steel capsule underneath 500 meters of karstic rock, which allows a low magnetic noise floor. The less sensitive high-Tc SQUID at SANSA Space Science is completely unshielded, and housed only in a magnetically neutral hut, 50 metres from a calibrated fluxgate node of the INTERMAGNET network, to protect it against the weather. The network, which is more sensitive than observatory fluxgate magnetometers, detects Earth's magnetosphere pulsations, Schumann waves, mesopause resonance, breathing modes of the Earth and oceanic swell. Our goal is further to extract directional or polarization information if earthquake precursors are observed again, as with the Sichuan-Wenchuan earthquake on 12 May 2008. In the medium term, we are exploring the possibility to extend the network with more spatially distributed SQUID sensors, such as at the South African National Antarctic Expedition's SANAE IV base in Antarctica.

  13. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes.

  14. Genetic identification of a rare record of Ommastrephes Bartramii (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) from the Eastern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Franjević, Damjan; Skaramuca, Daria; Katavić, Vedran; Rajević, Nives; Skaramuca, Boško

    2015-01-01

    The neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii Lesueur, 1821 belongs to the Ommastrephidae, Cephalopoda family. The family Ommastrephidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) includes many commercially important species, dispersed around the world. The Ommastrephidae family is conventionally divided into three subfamilies (Illicinae, Todarodinae, and Ommastrephinae). We report a specimen of neon flying squid caught in the winter 2013 at Luka Šipanska, Island of Šipan, Croatia and identified at the genetic level using the standard mitochondrial COI barcode region. This record represents the first genetic identification of a neon flying squid from the Adriatic Sea.

  15. First-order high- Tc SQUID gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X. Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Yutani, A.; Maki, T.; Itozaki, H.

    2008-09-01

    SQUID gradiometers are attractive for magnetic field measurements in noisy environments. A first-order planar gradiometer has been designed and fabricated. The layout of the planar gradiometer used to have two symmetric pickup coils; however, our design adopted one compensation loop with the same size as the SQUID loop at the symmetric position to reduce the imbalance caused by the SQUID. The gradient field resolution is up to 2.2 pT cm -1 Hz -1/2 (white noise) and 30 pT cm -1 Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz.

  16. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  17. Epitaxial thick film high-Tc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Mi, S. B.; Jia, C. L.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.; Fagaly, R. L.

    2008-02-01

    Low-noise operation of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in magnetic fields requires high critical current and strong pinning of vortices in the superconducting electrodes and in the flux transformer. Crack-free epitaxial high-Tc dc-SQUID structures with a total thickness ?5 μm and a surface roughness determined by 30 nm high growth spirals were prepared with YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) films on MgO substrates buffered by a SrTiO3/BaZrO3-bilayer. HRTEM demonstrated a high quality epitaxial growth of the films. The YBCO films and SQUID structures deposited on the buffered MgO substrates had a superconducting transition temperature Tc exceeding 91 K and critical current densities Jc > 3 MA/cm2 at 77 K up to a thickness ~5 μm. The application of thicker superconducting and insulator films helped us to increase the critical current and dynamic range of the multilayer high-Tc flux transformer and improve the insulation between the superconducting layers. An optimization of SQUID inductance allowed us to fabricate 8 mm SQUID magnetometers with SQUID voltage swings of ~60 μV and a field resolution of ~30 fT/√Hz at 77 K.

  18. The NEON Soil Archive - A community resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, E.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a 30-year National Science Foundation-funded facility for understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, and ecohydrology. NEON will measure a wide range of properties at 60 terrestrial and 36 aquatic sites throughout the US using in situ sensors, sample collection/lab analysis, and remote sensing, and all data will be made freely available. The Observatory is currently under construction and will be fully operational by 2017, however, limited data collection and release will begin in 2013. In addition, NEON is archiving large numbers of samples, including surface soils (top ~30 cm) collected from locations across each site, and soils collected by horizon to 2 m deep from a single soil pit at each site. Here I present information about the latter, focusing on sampling and processing, metadata, and currently available samples. At each terrestrial site the soil pit is dug in the locally dominant soil type and soil is collected by horizon, mixed, and ~4-8 liters soil is sent for processing. Soil samples are air-dried and sieved (mineral soil) or air-dried (organic soil) and 1.2 kg is split between 4 glass jars for archiving (protocol available upon request). To date 15 soil pits have been sampled, representing 7 soil orders, and soils from 110 horizons have been archived or are being processed. Metadata associated with each archive sample include a soil profile description, photos, and soil properties (total C, N, S, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Sr, Ti, Zr, bulk density, pH, and texture). The procedure for requesting samples from the archive is under development and I encourage scientists to use the archive in their future research. Collecting and processing samples for the NEON Soil Archive

  19. Vortex fluctuation measurements in high-Tc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, S.; Sing, M. Lam Chok; Warsito, W.; Ridereau, X.; Gunther, C.; Méchin, L.; Bloyet, D.; Abell, S.

    2004-05-01

    The correlation of the outputs of two dc-SQUIDs connected to the same solid washer was studied. A dedicated electronic system was used in order to operate both SQUIDs at the same time. It was found that the temporal correlation of the SQUID outputs is strongly dependent on the geometry of the SQUID loop. For a solid washer, the flux noise is mainly due to vortices located close to the SQUIDs. However, by surrounding the SQUID loop with a hole patterned in the superconducting solid washer, it is possible to drastically reduce the flux penetration around the loop. The resulting flux noise becomes dominated by vortices located inside the washer far from the SQUIDs. Magneto-optical images were also used to visualize the flux penetration inside the washer around the slit of such SQUIDs. These confirm previous descriptions of vortex penetration deduced from the electrical measurements.

  20. Visually guided eye growth in the squid.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Philip R K; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John R

    2015-09-21

    Eyes with refractive error have reduced visual acuity and are rarely found in the wild. Vertebrate eyes possess a visually guided emmetropisation process within the retina which detects the sign of defocus, and regulates eye growth to align the retina at the focal plane of the eye's optical components to avoid the development of refractive error, such as myopia, an increasing problem in humans. However, the vertebrate retina is complex, and it is not known which of the many classes of retinal neurons are involved. We investigated whether the camera-type eye of an invertebrate, the squid, displays visually guided emmetropisation, despite squid eyes having a simple photoreceptor-only retina. We exploited inherent longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) to create disparate focal lengths within squid eyes. We found that squid raised under orange light had proportionately longer eyes and more myopic refractions than those raised under blue light, and when switched between wavelengths, eye size and refractive status changed appropriately within a few days. This demonstrates that squid eye growth is visually guided, and suggests that the complex retina seen in vertebrates may not be required for emmetropisation.

  1. Comparative expression and tissue distribution analyses of astacin-like squid metalloprotease in squid and cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Takuya; Asakura, Masanori; Okiyama, Keisuke; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2008-01-01

    Astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM) is a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases. In the present study, we investigated the expression and tissue distribution of ALSM in bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) and golden cuttlefish (Sepia esculenta). Myosin heavy chain hydrolysis tests showed ALSM-I-like activity in both species. We isolated partial cDNA clones showing high sequence similarity to ALSM-I and -III, suggesting that ALSM is common to squid and cuttlefish. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ALSMs are classified into two clades: ALSM-I forms one clade, and ALSM-II and -III form the other. ALSM was expressed in several tissues in bigfin reef squid, though expression was confined to the liver in cuttlefish. ALSMs are distributed in digestive organs but not in mantle muscle of squid and cuttlefish. Immunofluorescence analysis further showed that cellular localization of ALSM is evident not only in hepatic cells but also in pancreatic cells of bigfin reef squid. Thus, ALSM is commonly expressed in squid and cuttlefish, but its expression levels and distribution are distinct.

  2. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1670 Neon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A...

  3. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  4. Electrically Tunable Multiterminal SQUID-on-Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uri, Aviram; Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Anahory, Yonathan; Embon, Lior; Lachman, Ella O.; Halbertal, Dorri; HR, Naren; Myasoedov, Yuri; Huber, Martin E.; Young, Andrea F.; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    We present a new nanoscale superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) whose interference pattern can be shifted electrically in-situ. The device consists of a nanoscale four-terminal/four-junction SQUID fabricated at the apex of a sharp pipette using a self-aligned three-step deposition of Pb. In contrast to conventional two-terminal/two-junction SQUIDs that display optimal sensitivity when flux biased to about a quarter of the flux quantum, the additional terminals and junctions allow optimal sensitivity at arbitrary applied flux, thus eliminating the magnetic field "blind spots". We demonstrate spin sensitivity of 5 to 8 $\\mu_B/\\text{Hz}^{1/2}$ over a continuous field range of 0 to 0.5 T, with promising applications for nanoscale scanning magnetic imaging.

  5. Neon reduction program on Cymer ArF light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanawade, Dinesh; Roman, Yzzer; Cacouris, Ted; Thornes, Josh; O'Brien, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    In response to significant neon supply constraints, Cymer has responded with a multi-part plan to support its customers. Cymer's primary objective is to ensure that reliable system performance is maintained while minimizing gas consumption. Gas algorithms were optimized to ensure stable performance across all operating conditions. The Cymer neon support plan contains four elements: 1. Gas reduction program to reduce neon by >50% while maintaining existing performance levels and availability; 2. short-term containment solutions for immediate relief. 3. qualification of additional gas suppliers; and 4. long-term recycling/reclaim opportunity. The Cymer neon reduction program has shown excellent results as demonstrated through the comparison on standard gas use versus the new >50% reduced neon performance for ArF immersion light sources. Testing included stressful conditions such as repetition rate, duty cycle and energy target changes. No performance degradation has been observed over typical gas lives.

  6. Neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, D. C.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss an experimental effort to study the atomic kinetics in neon photoionized plasmas via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a Z-pinch to heat and backlight a photoionized plasma contained within a cm-scale gas cell placed at various distances from the Z-pinch and filled with neon gas pressures in the range from 3.5 to 30 torr. The experimental platform affords an order of magnitude range in the ionization parameter characterizing the photoionized plasma from about 3 to 80 erg*cm/s. An x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of collecting both time-integrated and time-gated spectra is used to collect absorption spectra. A suite of IDL programs has been developed to process the experimental data to produce transmission spectra. The spectra show line absorption by several ionization stages of neon, including Be-, Li-, He-, and H-like ions. Analysis of these spectra yields ion areal-densities and charge state distributions, which can be compared with results from atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature is extracted from level population ratios of nearby energy levels in Li- and Be-like ions, which can be used to test heating models of photoionized plasmas. This work was sponsored in part by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  7. 40 K Liquid Neon Energy Storage Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, D.; Sousa, P. Borges de; Catarino, I.; Bonfait, G.

    A thermal Energy Storage Unit (ESU) could be used to attenuate inherent temperature fluctuations of a cold finger, either from a cryocooler working or due to suddenly incoming heat bursts. An ESU directly coupled to the cold source acts as a thermal buffer temporarily increasing its cooling capacity and providing a better thermal stability of the cold finger ("Power Booster mode"). The energy storage units presented here use an enthalpy reservoir based on the high latent heat of the liquid-vapour transition of neon in the temperature range 38 - 44 K to store up to 900 J, and that uses a 6 liters expansion volume at room temperature in order to work as a closed system. Experimental results in the power booster mode are described: in this case, the liquid neon cell was directly coupled to the cold finger of the working cryocooler, its volume (≈12 cm3) allowing it to store 450 J at around 40 K. 10 W heat bursts were applied, leading to liquid evaporation, with quite reduced temperature changes. The liquid neon reservoir can also work as a temporary cold source to be used after stopping the cryocooler, allowing for a vibration-free environment. In this case the enthalpy reservoir implemented (≈24 cm3) was linked to the cryocooler cold finger through a gas-gap heat switch for thermal coupling/decoupling of the cold finger. We show that, by controlling the enthalpy reservoir's pressure, 900 Jcan be stored at a constant temperature of 40 K as in a triple-point ESU.

  8. Perceptual transparency in neon color spreading displays.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Faul, Franz

    2002-08-01

    In neon color spreading displays, both a color illusion and perceptual transparency can be seen. In this study, we investigated the color conditions for the perception of transparency in such displays. It was found that the data are very well accounted for by a generalization of Metelli's (1970) episcotister model of balanced perceptual transparency to tristimulus values. This additive model correctly predicted which combinations of colors would lead to optimal impressions of transparency. Color combinations deviating slightly from the additive model also looked transparent, but less convincingly so.

  9. Magnetism in SQUIDs at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, S.; Hover, D.; Kittel, A.; Mück, M.; Martinis, John M.; McDermott, R.

    2008-06-01

    We have characterized the temperature dependence of the flux threading dc SQUIDs cooled to millikelvin temperatures. The flux increases as 1/T as temperature is lowered; moreover, the flux change is proportional to the density of trapped vortices. The data are compatible with the thermal polarization of surface spins in the trapped fields of the vortices. In the absence of trapped flux, we observe evidence of spin-glass freezing at low temperature. These results suggest an explanation for the universal 1/f flux noise in SQUIDs and superconducting qubits.

  10. Multi-channel scanning SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su-Young

    I designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested an 8-channel high- Tc scanning SQUID system. I started by modifying an existing single-channel 77 K high-Tc scanning SQUID microscope into a multi-channel system with the goal of reducing the scanning time and improving the spatial resolution by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio S/N. I modified the window assembly, SQUID chip assembly, cold-finger, and vacuum connector. The main concerns for the multi-channel system design were to reduce interaction between channels, to optimize the use of the inside space of the dewar for more than 50 shielded wires, and to achieve good spatial resolution. In the completed system, I obtained the transfer function and the dynamic range (phimax ˜ 11phi0) for each SQUID. At 1kHz, the slew rate is about 3000 phi0/s. I also found that the white noise level varies from 5 muphi0/Hz1/2 to 20 muphi 0/Hz1/2 depending on the SQUID. A new data acquisition program was written that triggered on position and collects data from up to eight SQUIDS. To generate a single image from the multichannel system, I calibrated the tilt of the xy-stage and z-stage manually, rearranged the scanned data by cutting overlapping parts, and determined the applied field by multiplying by the mutual inductance matrix. I found that I could reduce scanning time and improve the image quality by doing so. In addition, I have analyzed and observed the effect of position noise on magnetic field images and used these results to find the position noise in my scanning SQUID microscope. My analysis reveals the relationship between spatial resolution and position noise and that my system was dominated by position noise under typical operating conditions. I found that the smaller the sensor-sample separation, the greater the effect of position noise is on the total effective magnetic field noise and on spatial resolution. By averaging several scans, I found that I could reduce position noise and that the spatial resolution can

  11. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-06-01

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory.

  12. Biological applications of the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Yann Robert

    The recently developed "microscope" based on a high-T c dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to detect the magnetic fields produced by biological samples maintained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The microscope consists of a SQUID placed on the end of a sapphire "cold finger" thermally anchored to a liquid nitrogen reservoir inside a vacuum enclosure. A 3-mu m thick silicon nitride (SiN) membrane, located above the SQUID, acts as a vacuum window. Room temperature samples are placed on top of the window and can be brought within 15mum of the SQUID. In Part I, the SQUID microscope is used to investigate magnetotactic bacteria, microorganisms which possess a permanent dipole moment. The magnetic field produced by the motion of the bacteria in growth medium is detected by the SQUID in the microscope. Measurements are performed on both motile and nonmotile bacteria. In the nonmotile case, we obtain the power spectrum of the magnetic flux noise produced by the rotational Brownian motion of the ensemble of bacteria. Furthermore, we measure the time-dependent flux produced by the ensemble in response to an applied uniform magnetic field. In the motile case, we obtain the magnetic flux power spectra produced by the swimming bacteria. Combined, these measurements determine the average rotational drag coefficient, magnetic moment, and the frequency and amplitude of the vibrational and rotational modes of the bacteria in a unified set of measurements. In addition, the microscope can easily resolve the motion of a single bacterium. This technique can be extended to any biological substance to which a suitable magnetic label can be attached. In Part II, a technique is described for the specific, sensitive, quantitative, and rapid detection of biological targets using superparamagnetic nanoparticle labels. In this technique, a mylar film to which the targets have been bound is placed on the microscope, typically 40mum from the SQUID. A

  13. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter Γ> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)∝Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller Γ). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling.

  14. Damage accumulation in neon implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Oliviero, E.; Peripolli, S.; Amaral, L.; Fichtner, P. F. P.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2006-08-15

    Damage accumulation in neon-implanted silicon with fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 14} to 5x10{sup 16} Ne cm{sup -2} has been studied in detail. As-implanted and annealed samples were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry under channeling conditions and by transmission electron microscopy in order to quantify and characterize the lattice damage. Wavelength dispersive spectrometry was used to obtain the relative neon content stored in the matrix. Implantation at room temperature leads to the amorphization of the silicon while a high density of nanosized bubbles is observed all along the ion distribution, forming a uniform and continuous layer for implantation temperatures higher than 250 deg.C. Clusters of interstitial defects are also present in the deeper part of the layer corresponding to the end of range of ions. After annealing, the samples implanted at temperatures below 250 deg.C present a polycrystalline structure with blisters at the surface while in the other samples coarsening of bubbles occurs and nanocavities are formed together with extended defects identified as (311) defects. The results are discussed in comparison to the case of helium-implanted silicon and in the light of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  15. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Mahdi; Bahadır Olcay, Ali; Gokçen, Gökhan; Heperkan, Hasan A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid's different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin). The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area) of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid's mantle cavity.

  16. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  17. Normal conducting transfer coil for SQUID NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Tadayuki; Itozaki, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the performance of a normal conducting transfer coil (n-coil) for nondestructive evaluation with a SQUID. The transfer efficiency, which depends on frequency and wire impedance, has been calculated for several coil designs to determine the performance of the n-coil. We have fabricated a 30 mm diameter n-coil and examined its performance with a high-TC SQUID. If both the pick-up coil and the input coil have 50 turns, then at high frequencies the magnetic field produced by the input coil becomes 50% of the magnetic field at the pick-up coil, with a low cut-off frequency of 2 kHz. The experimental result agrees well with a numerical calculation, which suggests a magnitude of magnetic field detected by our SQUID equal to the magnitude of the quasi-uniform magnetic field produced by the input coil. We also confirmed that the thermal noise of the n-coil, produced by its normal resistance, does not become higher than the intrinsic magnetic field noise of the SQUID.

  18. Large Array SQUID Magnetometer for NDE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-27

    responsible for the magnetic precursor to plastic flow in ferromagnetic materials. --Determine how the magnetic precursor correlates with Barkhausen noise...Demonstrate the multiple-channel SQUIDs can localize the sites in the sample where individual stress-induced Barkhausen jumps are occurring. 1Il

  19. Multichannel SQUID systems for brain research

    SciTech Connect

    Ahonen, A.I.; Hamalainen, M.S.; Kajola, M.J.; Knuutila, J.E.F.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Simola, J.T.; Vilkman, V.A. . Low Temperature Lab.); Tesche, C.D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reviews basis principles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and neuromagnetic instrumentation. The authors' 24-channel system, based on planar gradiometer coils and dc-SQUIDs, is then described. Finally, recent MEG-experiments on human somatotopy and focal epilepsy, carried out in the authors' laboratory, are presented.

  20. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  1. Stochastic Resonance in a Bistable Squid Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    as a possible explanation for the observed periodicities in the recurrences of the Earth’s Ice Ages. The first publication of a modern theory led to... fields . Using a modern, miniature, thin film SQUID, we hope this demonstration will stimulate further research and development of SR in applied

  2. Near-Quantum-Limited SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2009-03-01

    The SET (Single-Electron Transistor), which detects charge, is the dual of the SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device), which detects flux. In 1998, Schoelkopf and co-workers introduced the RFSET, which uses a resonance circuit to increase the frequency response to the 100-MHz range. The same year saw the introduction of the Microstrip SQUID Amplifier^1 (MSA) in which the input coil forms a microstrip with the SQUID washer, thereby extending the operating frequency to the gigahertz range. I briefly describe the theory of SQUID amplifiers involving a tuned input circuit with resonant frequency f. For an optimized SQUID at temperature T, the power gain and noise temperature are approximately G = fp/πf and TN = 20T(f/fp), respectively; fp is the plasma frequency of one of the Josephson junctions. Because the SQUID voltage and current noise are correlated, however, the optimum noise temperature is at a frequency below resonance. For a phase-preserving amplifier, TN = (.5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 + A)hf/kB, where Caves' added noise number A = .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 at the quantum limit. Simulations based on the quantum Langevin equation (QLE) suggest that the SQUID amplifier should attain A = .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . We have measured the gain and noise of an MSA in which the resistive shunts of the junctions are coupled to cooling fins to reduce hot electron effects. The minimum value A = 1.1 ± 0.2 occurs at a frequency below resonance. On resonance, the value A = 1.5 ± 0.3 is close to the predictions of the QLE, suggesting that this model may fail to predict the cross-correlated noise term correctly. Indeed, recent work suggests that a fully quantum mechanical theory is required to account properly for this term^2. This work is in collaboration with D. Kinion and supported by DOE BES. ^1M. Mueck, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 72, 2885 (1998). ^2A. Clerk, et al., http://arxiv.org/abs/0810.4729.

  3. Flying Cars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Flying cars have nearly mythical appeal to nonpilots, a group that includes almost the whole human race. The appeal resides in the perceived utility of flying cars, vehicles that offer portal-to-portal transportation, yet break the bonds of road and traffic and travel freely through the sky at the drivers will. Part of the appeal is an assumption that flying cars can be as easy to fly as to drive. Flying cars have been part of the dream of aviation since the dawn of powered flight. Glenn Curtiss built, displayed, and maybe even flew a flying car in 1917, the Curtiss Autoplane. Many roadable airplanes were built in the 1930's, like the Waterman Arrowbile and the Fulton Airphibian. Two flying cars came close to production in the early 1950's. Ted Hall built a series of flying cars culminating in the Convaircar, sponsored by Consolidated Vultee, General Motors, and Hertz. Molt Taylor built and certified his Aerocar, and Ford came close to producing them. Three Aerocars are still flyable, two in museums in Seattle and Oshkosh, and the third owned and flown by Ed Sweeny. Flying cars do have problems, which so far have prevented commercial success. An obvious problem is complexity of the vehicle, the infrastructure, or both. Another is the difficulty of matching low power for normal driving with high power in flight. An automobile uses only about 20 hp at traffic speeds, while a personal airplane needs about 160 hp at speeds typical of flight. Many automobile engines can deliver 160 hp, but not for very long. A more subtle issue involves the drag of automobiles and airplanes. A good personal airplane can fly 30 miles per gallon of fuel at 200 mph. A good sports car would need 660 hp at the same speed and would travel only 3 miles per gallon. The difference is drag area, about 4.5 sq ft for the automobile and 1.4 sq ft for the airplane. A flying car better have the drag area of the airplane, not the car!

  4. Choreography of the squid's "nuptial dance".

    PubMed

    Sauer, W H; Roberts, M J; Lipinski, M R; Smale, M J; Hanlon, R T; Webber, D M; O'Dor, R K

    1997-04-01

    A mass spawning of squid resembles, at first glance, a chaotic "nuptial dance" (1). But for the first time, we have applied 3-D, radio-linked acoustic positioning (RAP) to this confusing process, and our early results now reveal a choreography that is, in fact, well organized in time and space. Remote tracking with RAP of individual Loligo vulgaris reynaudii off South Africa has provided insights into the daily sequence of behaviours that lead these animals to aggregate for sexual selection. Each dawn, the squid navigate for several kilometers, towards the shore, to small, well-defined zones near egg beds on the substrate. After several hours of circling above the egg beds, a pelagic, 3-D lek-like aggregation of large males forms: females are drawn in, and the aggregation condenses as the females and males pair, mate, and lay eggs. Smaller "sneaker males" remain on the periphery of the mating arena and, from this station, attempt extra-pair copulations (EPCs). The mating system of squids is thus unexpectedly complex, rivaling those of mammals and birds (2, 3). Commercial squid-jigging fishermen in South Africa have recently been attracted to the spawning grounds, and they have been successful. Moreover, their activities may be selective for large males. Thus, attention should be devoted to ensuring that such targeted fishing does not alter the characteristics of squid population genetics. Remote tracking and video observations, in combination with genetic analyses, may offer a new opportunity to monitor mating effort and reproductive success, and thus to manage the fishery.

  5. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species.

  6. SIGN, a WIMP detector based on high pressure gaseous neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. T.; Gao, J.; Maxin, J.; Miller, J.; Salinas, G.; Wang, H.

    A new WIMP detector concept based on the measurement of Scintillation and Ionization in Gaseous Neon (SIGN) is presented. The detector employs room temperature gaseous neon at a pressure of ≥100 bars as the WIMP target. The ionization is readout using either charge gain or electrofluorescence or both in a modified cylindrical proportional chamber geometry. The primary scintillation is detected by placing a CsI photocathode on the inside wall of the cylindrical chamber. The neon is doped with xenon (≤0.5%) for signal enhancement. Theoretical considerations suggest that the measurement of both scintillation and ionization will provide discrimination between nuclear and electron recoils in this gas mixture.

  7. Neon colour spreading with and without its figural prerequisites.

    PubMed

    Bressan, P

    1993-01-01

    Neon colour spreading has been shown to disappear if certain figural conditions are not met. Evidence is presented which suggests that these conditions are only incidentally related to the neon spreading effect; in particular, that they can be violated as long as the structure remains compatible with the interpretation of a transparent surface. It is proposed that neon spreading and classical colour assimilation share the same basic mechanism, and that the peculiar perceptual attributes of the former derive from the perceptual scissioning of ordinary assimilation colour. This process is identical to that occurring with nonillusory colours in phenomenal transparency.

  8. The prospects of a subnanometer focused neon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Rahman, F H M; McVey, Shawn; Farkas, Louis; Notte, John A; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    The success of the helium ion microscope has encouraged extensions of this technology to produce beams of other ion species. A review of the various candidate ion beams and their technical prospects suggest that a neon beam might be the most readily achieved. Such a neon beam would provide a sputtering yield that exceeds helium by an order of magnitude while still offering a theoretical probe size less than 1-nm. This article outlines the motivation for a neon gas field ion source, the expected performance through simulations, and provides an update of our experimental progress.

  9. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  10. High-Tc and low-Tc dc SQUID electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are commonly operated in a flux-locked loop (FLL). The SQUID electronics amplifies the small SQUID signal to an acceptable level without adding noise, and it linearizes the transfer function of the SQUID in order to provide sufficient dynamic range. In this paper, the fundamentals of SQUID readout are reviewed including a discussion of preamplifier noise. The basic FLL concepts, direct readout and flux modulation readout, are discussed both with dc bias and bias reversal. Alternative readout concepts such as additional positive feedback (APF), two-stage SQUIDs, SQUID series arrays, relaxation oscillation SQUIDs and digital SQUIDs are briefly described. The FLL dynamics are discussed on the basis of a simple model with finite loop delay. It is shown that with optimized SQUID electronics a system bandwidth of ap18 MHz and a corresponding slew rate of ap8 PHgr0 µs-1 are possible. A novel FLL scheme involving a Smith predictor is presented which allows one to increase the FLL bandwidth to about 100 MHz. The theoretical predictions are experimentally checked using a high-speed SQUID electronics prototype with a small-signal bandwidth of 300 MHz. Methods for increasing the dynamic range of SQUID systems are described: flux-quanta counting and dynamic field compensation (DFC). With DFC, the residual magnetic field at the SQUID can be kept close to zero even if the device is moved in the Earth's field. Therefore, the noise level of a high-Tc magnetometer measured inside a magnetically shielded room (60 fT Hz-1/2 with a 1/f corner at 2 Hz) remained unchanged after moving the device in the magnetic field outside the room (60 µT dc plus 0.8 µT peak-to-peak power line interference).

  11. Jet flow in steadily swimming adult squid.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Erik J; Grosenbaugh, Mark A

    2005-03-01

    Although various hydrodynamic models have been used in past analyses of squid jet propulsion, no previous investigations have definitively determined the fluid structure of the jets of steadily swimming squid. In addition, few accurate measurements of jet velocity and other jet parameters in squid have been reported. We used digital particle imaging velocimetry (DPIV) to visualize the jet flow of adult long-finned squid Loligo pealei (mantle length, L(m)=27.1+/-3.0 cm, mean +/-S.D.) swimming in a flume over a wide range of speeds (10.1-59.3 cm s(-1), i.e. 0.33-2.06 L(m) s(-1)). Qualitatively, squid jets were periodic, steady, and prolonged emissions of fluid that exhibited an elongated core of high speed flow. The development of a leading vortex ring common to jets emitted from pipes into still water often appeared to be diminished and delayed. We were able to mimic this effect in jets produced by a piston and pipe arrangement aligned with a uniform background flow. As in continuous jets, squid jets showed evidence of the growth of instability waves in the jet shear layer followed by the breakup of the jet into packets of vorticity of varying degrees of coherence. These ranged from apparent chains of short-lived vortex rings to turbulent plumes. There was some evidence of the complete roll-up of a handful of shorter jets into single vortex rings, but steady propulsion by individual vortex ring puffs was never observed. Quantitatively, the length of the jet structure in the visualized field of view, L(j), was observed to be 7.2-25.6 cm, and jet plug lengths, L, were estimated to be 4.4-49.4 cm using average jet velocity and jet period. These lengths and an average jet orifice diameter, D, of 0.8 cm were used to calculate the ratios L(j)/D and L/D, which ranged from 9.0 to 32.0 and 5.5 to 61.8, respectively. Jets emitted from pipes in the presence of a background flow suggested that the ratio between the background flow velocity and the jet velocity was more

  12. 8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION SHOWING NEON TWA SIGN AND ROOF MASTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - TWA Maintenance Hangar, South side of Tinicum Island Road, Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: Seeking Input on a Community Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SanClements, M.; Loescher, H. W.

    2012-12-01

    We seek input from the AGU community on the National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) PI and agency requestable Mobile Deployment Platform (MDP). The NEON MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach. We aim to glean input on selecting infrastructure and instrumentation relevant to meeting the needs of NEON and the broader scientific community. This poster will be formatted to allow for direct commentary on the MDP. Comments will be compiled and made available on the NEON website for further discussion.

  14. Scanning SQUID microscopy with single electron spin sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukov, Denis

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting interference devices (SQUIDs) have been traditionally used for studying fundamental properties of magnetic materials and superconductors. Although widely used in scanning magnetic microscopy, their progress towards detection of small magnetic moments was stagnating of late due to limitations imposed by conventional designs of planar SQUIDs and contemporary lithography techniques, restricting sample-to-sensor distance smaller than ~ 0.5 micron and SQUIDs diameters smaller than ~ 200 nm. These limitations were overcome by the invention of a SQUID-on-tip device, subsequent realization of a SQUID-on-tip microscope, and by creation of an ultra-small sensor with spatial resolution of 20 nm and sensitivity to a single electron spin per 1 Hz bandwidth. In this talk I will describe the principles of scanning SQUID magnetometry, its applications to study superconductors and its potential for magnetic nano-scale imaging of novel materials.

  15. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, Patrick; In, Visarath; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2011-04-19

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique 'anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical 'electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  16. A method for simulating a flux-locked DC SQUID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutt, G. M.; Kasdin, N. J.; Condron, M. R., II; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J. M.; Cromar, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a computationally efficient and accurate method for simulating a dc SQUID's V-Phi (voltage-flux) and I-V characteristics which has proven valuable in evaluating and improving various SQUID readout methods. The simulation of the SQUID is based on fitting of previously acquired data from either a real or a modeled device using the Fourier transform of the V-Phi curve. This method does not predict SQUID behavior, but rather is a way of replicating a known behavior efficiently with portability into various simulation programs such as SPICE. The authors discuss the methods used to simulate the SQUID and the flux-locking control electronics, and present specific examples of this approach. Results include an estimate of the slew rate and linearity of a simple flux-locked loop using a characterized dc SQUID.

  17. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Patrick; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; de Escobar, Anna Leese; In, Visarath

    2011-04-01

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique `anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical `electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  18. Developments of thick solid neon as an active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiguchi, Nagaaki; Moriguchi, Tetsurou; Ozawa, Akira; Isimoto, Sigeru

    2009-10-01

    One of research subjects in our group is to measure reaction cross sections (σR) of RI beams. By measuring σR, we can deduce root mean square radii of unstable nuclei. In the measurements of σR, we usually used a carbon as the reaction targets (a few cm thickness). If we use the reaction target as a detector (active target), there are some advantages in the measurements; (1)The events only colliding with the reaction target can be selected. (2)If position information is available, we may define the colliding point inside the target. (3)If energy information is available, we may measure the energy loss of the beams inside the target. As the active target in the σR measurements, we noticed the solid neon. Since the neon is a noble gas, it is predicted to emit scintillations and work as an ionization chamber for charged particles. Indeed, scintillations from liquid and solid neon have been already observed. We will present production of the thick solid neon (˜30mm thickness), and observations of scintillations and ionization signals from the solid neon. We will also discuss possibility to use the sold neon as the active target in the σR measurements.

  19. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  20. Supersensitive SQUID/magnetostrictor detecting system

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Tskhovrebov, Andrei M; Izmailov, G N

    2012-12-31

    It is shown that using the state-of-the-art quantum interferometer (SQUID) with the resolution 10{sup -6} {Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} = 2.07 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} Wb Hz{sup -1/2}, coupled to a magnetostrictor, playing the role of tensomagnetic transducer, it is possible to construct a system for detecting pressure variations with the ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -13} Pa Hz{sup -1/2} and for measuring specific elongation with the sensitivity of 10{sup -24} Hz{sup -1/2}. The analysis of physical grounds of the inverse magnetostriction effect demonstrates concrete ways to essentially higher efficiency of tensomagnetic conversion. The estimates performed demonstrate the possibility of using the SQUID/magnetostrictor system as a detector of gravitational waves. Other possibilities of using this system for solving both fundamental and applied problems are also considered. (experimental techniques)

  1. Image processing for HTS SQUID probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Koetitz, R.; Itozaki, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabe, U.

    2005-10-01

    An HTS SQUID probe microscope has been developed using a high-permeability needle to enable high spatial resolution measurement of samples in air even at room temperature. Image processing techniques have also been developed to improve the magnetic field images obtained from the microscope. Artifacts in the data occur due to electromagnetic interference from electric power lines, line drift and flux trapping. The electromagnetic interference could successfully be removed by eliminating the noise peaks from the power spectrum of fast Fourier transforms of line scans of the image. The drift between lines was removed by interpolating the mean field value of each scan line. Artifacts in line scans occurring due to flux trapping or unexpected noise were removed by the detection of a sharp drift and interpolation using the line data of neighboring lines. Highly detailed magnetic field images were obtained from the HTS SQUID probe microscope by the application of these image processing techniques.

  2. Practical SQUID Instrument for Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J. R.; Miller, John H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-Tc superconducting and A-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature.

  3. Biomagnetism using SQUIDs: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternickel, Karsten; Braginski, Alex I.

    2006-03-01

    Biomagnetism involves the measurement and analysis of very weak local magnetic fields of living organisms and various organs in humans. Such fields can be of physiological origin or due to magnetic impurities or markers. This paper reviews existing and prospective applications of biomagnetism in clinical research and medical diagnostics. Currently, such applications require sensitive magnetic SQUID sensors and amplifiers. The practicality of biomagnetic methods depends especially on techniques for suppressing the dominant environmental electromagnetic noise, and on suitable nearly real-time data processing and interpretation methods. Of the many biomagnetic methods and applications, only the functional studies of the human brain (magnetoencephalography) and liver susceptometry are in clinical use, while functional diagnostics of the human heart (magnetocardiography) approaches the threshold of clinical acceptance. Particularly promising for the future is the ongoing research into low-field magnetic resonance anatomical imaging using SQUIDs.

  4. Ceramic HTSC SQUID-based galvanometer

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, S.V.; Hiep, L.H. )

    1992-06-01

    A highly sensitive galvanometer operating at liquid-nitrogen temperature for direct and low-frequency current measurements was developed on the basis of a HTSC SQUID. The direct-current sensitivity of the galvanometer is approximately 0.5 nA at an internal resistance of about 20 ohms. Its energy resolution in the white noise region is 2 x 10 exp 21 J/Hz. 11 refs.

  5. Digital filter design approach for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.C.; Ribeiro, P.C.

    1988-04-15

    A review of the traditional method for designing gradiometers is made. A nonrecursive digital filter model for the gradiometer is presented, giving a new set of parameters for the gradiometer identification. Some designs are analyzed using the proposed set. As an example, a true differentiator is designed to be used as the SQUID input coil. It is shown that the differentiator has the same noise rejection as the conventional gradiometer but provides more signal sensitivity.

  6. SQUID applications to geophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.E.; Weinstock, H.; Overton, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    No alternatives to liquid-helium cryostats for SQUID geomagnetic measurements are presently available, but micro-miniature Joule-Thomson and low-power nonmagnetic Stirling cryocoolers are being developed for this and similar purposes. With increasing interest and experimental work on the subject during the past year or two, it is likely that demonstrations of feasibility will occur in the moderately near future, and perhaps even a suitable commercial cryocooler in the next few years.

  7. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  8. Input Impedance of the Microstrip SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinion, Darin; Clarke, John

    2008-03-01

    We present measurements of the complex scattering parameters of microstrip SQUID amplifiers (MSA) cooled to 4.2 K. The input of the MSA is a microstrip transmission line in the shape of a square spiral coil surrounding the hole in the SQUID washer that serves as the ground plane. The input impedance is found by measuring the reverse scattering parameter (S11) and is described well by a low-loss transmission line model. We map the low-loss transmission line model into an equivalent parallel RLC circuit in which a resistance R, inductance L, and capacitance C are calculated from the resonant frequency, characteristic impedance and attenuation factor. Using this equivalent RLC circuit, we model the MSA and input network with a lumped circuit model that accurately predicts the observed gain given by the forward scattering parameter (S21). We will summarize results for different coil geometries and terminations as well as SQUID bias conditions. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  9. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  10. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  11. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is {approx} 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current-applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  12. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is ~ 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current–applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  13. Detecting defect in cast iron using high- TC SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Yoshizawa, M.; Oyama, Y.; Nakamura, M.

    2004-10-01

    For eddy-current NDE, due to the big permeability of ferromagnetic material, low testing frequency is needed to detect defects in it. SQUID has advantages in low frequency eddy current NDE. But the large magnetic field produced by ferromagnetic material often exceeds the dynamic range of general SQUID system. We developed a mobile high- TC SQUID system, with which, the dc and low-frequency magnetic field could be compensated well. Using our mobile SQUID system, the magnetic field produced by the cast iron could be compensated well and the defect in it could be successfully detected.

  14. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  15. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  16. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  17. Single SQUID frequency-domain multiplexer for large bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Skidmore, J.T.; Richards, P.L.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe the development of a frequency-domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. We have built an eight-channel prototype and demonstrated channel separation and signal recovery.

  18. 76 FR 39313 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed... under the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The procedures...

  19. 75 FR 51683 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Directed Butterfish Fishery..., Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The procedures for setting the annual...

  20. Laying the groundwork for NEON's continental-scale ecological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, G.; Denslow, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is designed to examine a suite of ecological issues. Field-collected data from 96 terrestrial and aquatic sites across the U.S. will be combined with remotely sensed data and existing continental-scale data sets. Field collections will include a range of physical and biological types, including soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, precipitation, plants, animals, insects, and microbes as well as biological sub-samples such as leaf material, blood and tissue samples, and DNA extracts. Initial data analyses and identifications of approximately 175,000 samples per year will occur at numerous external laboratories when all sites are fully staffed in 2017. Additionally, NEON will archive biotic and abiotic specimens at collections facilities where they will be curated and available for additional analyses by the scientific community. The number of archived specimens is currently estimated to exceed 130,000 per year by 2017. We will detail how NEON is addressing the complexities and challenges around this set of analyses and specimens and how the resulting high-quality data can impact ecological understanding. The raw data returned from external laboratories that is quality checked and served by NEON will be the foundation for many NEON data products. For example, sequence-quality nucleic acids extracted from surface waters, benthic biofilms, and soil samples will be building blocks for data products on microbial diversity. The raw sequence data will also be available for uses such as evolutionary investigations, and the extracts will be archived so others can acquire them for additional research. Currently, NEON is establishing contracts for the analysis and archiving of field-collected samples through 2017. During this period, NEON will gather information on the progress and success of this large-scale effort in order to determine the most effective course to pursue with external facilities. Two areas that NEON

  1. Some remarks on the theory of SQUID structures. I. Topology of SQUID structures—A unified picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odehnal, M.; Petříček, V.

    1980-06-01

    A topological analysis of different rf SQUID structures is performed. A simple unified picture of these devices is obtained by considering the topological properties of the magnetic force lines around superconducting (or resistive) SQUID structures containing one weak link. Due to the periodic collapse of the superconducting order parameter in the weak link the “normal” space around these structures can change its connectivity. A number of rf SQUID structures are analyzed from the point of view of simple topological homotopy theory. The rf SQUID is then viewed as a device which realize a topological switching between two different classes of simple closed loops of the magnetic force lines. This switching (through the weak superconductivity region) is modulated by the low-frequency closed loops of the magnetic field and results in the well-known periodic response of the rf SQUID. The surfaces surrounding the rf excitation coil of the rf SQUID are analyzed from the point of view of homology theory. The screening currents flowing on these surfaces are represented as one-dimensional closed loops (cycles). It is shown that the SQUID can work only if the surface of the structure has at least one class of so-called nonbounding cycles, which are all “cut” by the weak link. A number of known SQUID structures are analyzed from the point of view of homotopy and homology theory and some new SQUID structures are discussed.

  2. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; ...

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphenemore » based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.« less

  3. Graphene engineering by neon ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Iberi, Vighter; Ievlev, Anton V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Joy, David C.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-02-18

    Achieving the ultimate limits of materials and device performance necessitates the engineering of matter with atomic, molecular, and mesoscale fidelity. While common for organic and macromolecular chemistry, these capabilities are virtually absent for 2D materials. In contrast to the undesired effect of ion implantation from focused ion beam (FIB) lithography with gallium ions, and proximity effects in standard e-beam lithography techniques, the shorter mean free path and interaction volumes of helium and neon ions offer a new route for clean, resist free nanofabrication. Furthermore, with the advent of scanning helium ion microscopy, maskless He+ and Ne+ beam lithography of graphene based nanoelectronics is coming to the forefront. Here, we will discuss the use of energetic Ne ions in engineering graphene devices and explore the mechanical, electromechanical and chemical properties of the ion-milled devices using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). By using SPM-based techniques such as band excitation (BE) force modulation microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the exact same devices can be quantitatively extracted. Additionally, the effect of defects inherent in ion beam direct-write lithography, on the overall performance of the fabricated devices is elucidated.

  4. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  5. Neon color spreading in dynamic displays: temporal factors.

    PubMed

    Cicchini, Marco; Spillmann, Lothar

    2013-10-04

    When a red star is placed in the middle of an Ehrenstein figure so as to be collinear with the surrounding black rays, a reddish veil is perceived to fill the white center. This is called neon color spreading. To better understand the processes that give rise to this phenomenon, we studied the temporal properties of the effect. Specifically, we presented a "sustained" black Ehrenstein figure (rays) for 600 ms and a "transient" red star for 48 ms, or the converse pattern, at various stimulus onset asynchronies (-100-700 ms) and asked subjects to compare the strength of the neon color in the test stimulus to that of a reference pattern in which the transient star had an onset asynchrony of 300 ms. Additional exposure durations of 24 and 96 ms were used for each transient stimulus in order to study the effect of temporal integration. Simultaneity of the on- and off-transients of the star and the Ehrenstein rays were found to optimize neon color spreading, especially when both stimuli terminated together. Longer exposure durations of the transient stimulus up to 96 ms further improved the effect. Neon color spreading was much reduced when the transient stimulus was presented soon after the beginning of the sustained stimulus, with a gradual build-up towards the end. These results emphasize the importance of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) and stimulus termination asynchrony (STA) for the perception of neon color spreading.

  6. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  7. Peripheral injury alters schooling behavior in squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Megumi; di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Carroll, Julia; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T; Crook, Robyn J

    2016-07-01

    Animals with detectable injuries are at escalated threat of predation. The anti-predation tactic of schooling reduces individual predation risk overall, but it is not known how schooling behavior affects injured animals, or whether risks are reduced equally for injured animals versus other school members. In this laboratory study we examined the effects of minor fin injury on schooling decisions made by squid. Schooling behavior of groups of squid, in which one member was injured, was monitored over 24h. Injured squid were more likely to be members of a school shortly after injury (0.5-2h), but there were no differences compared with sham-injured squid at longer time points (6-24h). Overall, the presence of an injured conspecific increased the probability that a school would form, irrespective of whether the injured squid was a member of the school. When groups containing one injured squid were exposed to a predator cue, injured squid were more likely to join the school, but their position depended on whether the threat was a proximate visual cue or olfactory cue. We found no evidence that injured squid oriented themselves to conceal their injury from salient threats. Overall we conclude that nociceptive sensitization after injury changes grouping behaviors in ways that are likely to be adaptive.

  8. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  9. An all-thin-film SQUID for ambient field operation

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, M.F.

    1985-03-01

    Thin film SQUIDs were constructed in which the aspect ratios of metal lines were controlled, and in which there were no closed loops which couple to a uniform field. The SQUIDs were operated in uniform fields and shown to suitable for use within an integrated magnetic gradiometer system.

  10. X-ray absorption in neon modulated by a strong laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, M. P.; Glover, T. E.; Allison, T. K.; van Tilborg, J.; Rude, B. S.; Belkacem, A.; Southworth, S. H.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Varma, H. R.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2009-11-01

    We have measured the absorption of x-rays in neon gas in the presence of a strong laser pulse. The femtosecond x-rays were tuned to energies near the neon 1s-3p resonance, and the laser intensity of 1013 W/cm2 was below the intensity required to alone ionize neon. We observed strong modification of the x-ray absorption when the neon was subjected to laser light that was temporally overlapped with the x-rays.

  11. Planar thin film SQUID with integral flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (Inventor); Sisk, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A thin film SQUID is disclosed having improved flux concentration combined with simplicity of design and fabrication. The SQUID starts with a wafer like substrate having simple planar geometry. A large area of superconducting film is coated on the substrate, with a small open or uncoated area remaining at its center to define a SQUID loop, and a gap in the film formed, beginning at the outer circumferential edge of the substrate and extending radially inward to the open area. A Josephson junction is formed across the gap near the open area to interrupt the electrical continuity of the SQUID loop. A coil is attached to the surface of the substrate, electrically insulated from the superconducting film, and is energized to induce flux within the SQUID which is concentrated within the open area.

  12. A planar gradiometer based on a microwave rf-SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Muck, M.; Diehl, D.; Heiden, C. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper describes a type of gradiometer, working on the basis of a planar microwave rf SQUID. In this type of rf-SQUID, a superconducting half-wavelength stripline resonator serves as tank circuit, into which the SQUID is integrated. If a gradiometer configuration is used for the SQUID (i.e. two loops), a certain asymmetry of the stripline resonator should be provided to ensure sufficient coupling between gradiometer and resonator. For first experiments, gradiometers were prepared from thin Niobium films on sapphire substrates, having either microbridges or tunnel junctions as Josephson elements. When operated in hysteretic mode, modulation voltages of about 100 {mu}V were measured for both microbridge- and tunnel junction SQUIDs.

  13. A SQUID gradiometer module with large junction shunt resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Wang, Yong-Liang; Li, Hua; Zeng, Jia; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2014-08-01

    A dual-washer superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a loop inductance of 350 pH and two on-washer integrated input coils is designed according to conventional niobium technology. In order to obtain a large SQUID flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient, the junction shunt resistance is selected to be 33 Ω. A vertical SQUID gradiometer module with a baseline of 100 mm is constructed by utilizing such a SQUID and a first-order niobium wire-wound antenna. The sensitivity of this module reaches about 0.2 fT/(cm·Hz1/2) in the white noise range using a direct readout scheme, i.e., the SQUID is directly connected to an operational amplifier, in a magnetically shielded room. Some magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements with a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are demonstrated.

  14. The Ubiquitous SQUID: From Axions to Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2011-03-01

    I briefly review the principles, practical implementation and applications of the dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device), an ultrasensitive detector of magnetic flux. Cosmological observations show that a major constituent of the universe is cold dark matter (CDM). A candidate particle for CDM is the axion which, in the presence of a magnetic field, is predicted to decay into a photon with energy given by the axion mass, ranging from 0.001 to 1 meV. The axion detector constructed at LLNL consists of a cooled, tunable cavity surrounded by a 7-T superconducting magnet. Photons from the axion decay would be detected by a cooled semiconductor amplifier. To search for the axion over an octave of frequency, however, would take two centuries. Now at the University of Washington, Seattle the axion detector will be upgraded by cooling it to 50 mK and installing a near-quantum limited SQUID amplifier. The scan time will be reduced by three orders of magnitude to a few months. In medical physics, we use an ultralow-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULFMRI) system with SQUID detection to obtain images in a magnetic field of 0.132 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI. An advantage of low fields is that different types of tissue exhibit much greater contrast in the relaxation time T1 than in high fields. We have measured T1 in ex vivo specimens of surgically removed healthy and malignant prostate tissue. The percentage of tumor in each specimen is determined with pathology. The MRI contrast between two specimens from a given patient scales with the difference in the percentage of tumor; in healthy tissue T1 is typically 50 percent higher than in a tumor. These results suggest that ULFMRI with T1-weighted contrast may have clinical applications to imaging prostate cancer and potentially other types of cancer. Supported by DOE BES and HEP, and NIH

  15. Presynaptic calcium currents in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Steinberg, I Z; Walton, K

    1981-01-01

    A voltage clamp study has been performed in the presynaptic terminal of the squid stellate ganglion. After blockage of the voltage-dependent sodium and potassium conductances, an inward calcium current is demonstrated. Given a step-depolarization pulse, this voltage- and time-dependent conductance has an S-shaped onset. At the "break" of the voltage step, a rapid tail current is observed. From these results a kinetic model is generated which accounts for the experimental results and predicts for the time course and amplitude a possible calcium entry during presynaptic action potentials. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7225510

  16. Acoustic detectability of squid egg beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Kenneth G.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Henry, Annette E.; Hochstaedter, Alfred; Kvitek, Rikk; Sullivan, Deidre; Yogozawa, Yuko

    2003-10-01

    Egg beds of the market squid (Loligo opalescens) on the bottom of Monterey Bay seem to have been detected by means of sidescan sonar at 420 kHz. Evidence for this is presented in the form of sidescan sonar images and egg-bed distribution maps from the same area, as prepared from camera surveys by scuba divers. The general detectability issue is also considered, with specific reference made to preliminary physical measurements performed on two egg capsules. [Work supported by Sea Grant.

  17. Moderately shielded high-Tc SQUID system for rat MCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, S.; Kim, I.-S.; Drung, D.; Novikov, I.; Schurig, Th

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a 5-channel high-Tc SQUID system with one signal channel intended for rat magnetocardiography (MCG) in moderately shielded or "quiet" real environment. This system is an adapted version of a human MCG system which has been improved with respect to user-friendliness and stability. A dewar with a cold-warm distance of 7 mm and a refill cycle time of up to one week is utilized. The implemented high-Tc SQUIDs are single-layer devices with grain boundary junctions fabricated at KRISS with laser ablation on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates. In order to cancel environmental magnetic noise, three of the five SQUIDs are arranged to build an axial software first-order or second-order gradiometer with a base line of 35 mm. The other two SQUIDs are used for balancing. To overcome previous system instabilities, we have implemented an Earth field compensation for each SQUID. For this, the SQUIDs were mounted in capsules containing integrated field compensation coils. The three Earth field components are measured with an additional triaxial fluxgate, and compensated at the SQUID locations using the low-noise current source of the SQUID readout electronics. This way, the SQUIDs can be cooled and operated in a low residual field that improves system stability and reduces low-frequency SQUID noise. It is even possible to slowly move the dewar in the Earth field (dynamic field compensation). Different noise cancellation procedures were optimized and compared employing a periodic signal source.

  18. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-10

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) {approx} 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  19. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed.

  1. 50 CFR 648.27 - Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... squid fishery. 648.27 Section 648.27 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.27 Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery. (a) A vessel issued a longfin squid and...

  2. 50 CFR 648.27 - Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... squid fishery. 648.27 Section 648.27 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.27 Observer requirements for the longfin squid fishery. (a) A vessel issued a longfin squid and...

  3. Comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for crystalline neon.

    PubMed

    Nolan, S J; Bygrave, P J; Allan, N L; Manby, F R

    2010-02-24

    We present a critical comparison of the incremental and hierarchical methods for the evaluation of the static cohesive energy of crystalline neon. Both of these schemes make it possible to apply the methods of molecular electronic structure theory to crystalline solids, offering a systematically improvable alternative to density functional theory. Results from both methods are compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies of solid neon and potential sources of error are discussed. We explore the similarities of the two methods and demonstrate how they may be used in tandem to study crystalline solids.

  4. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  5. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  6. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  7. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  8. Peaked density profiles due to neon injection on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotta, C.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Marinucci, M.; Pucella, G.; Told, D.; Tudisco, O.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Sozzi, C.; the FTU Team

    2015-07-01

    Neon injection in FTU can cause a spontaneous increase of the line-average density by a factor 2. The recent experiments were devoted to characterize the plasma response to the neon injection at different densities and plasma currents. A qualitative estimate from UV spectroscopy measurements indicates that the density behaviour cannot be attributed simply to the stripped electrons from the puffed impurity, but a modification of particle transport should be invoked in order to explain the spontaneous rise and the higher peaking. JETTO transport and GENE gyrokinetic codes analyses, as well as a calculation of the electron diffusion coefficients D and pinch velocity U, contribute to feature the peaking effect.

  9. Cascade units for neon isotope production by rectification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, V. L.; Simonenko, Yu. M.; Diachenko, O. V.; Matveyev, E. V.

    2013-05-01

    The basics of neon isotope separation by the distillation method at T = 28 K are discussed. The required numbers of transfer units at the top and bottom column sections are calculated for different loads. The experimental characteristics of packed rectification columns are presented and examples of the cascade are discussed. A configuration for a cryogenic circuit based on a high-pressure throttle neon cycle with intermediate nitrogen cooling is presented. The necessity for and the technical feasibility of creating a driver pressure difference between the columns for different stages are demonstrated.

  10. Cross-linking chemistry of squid beak.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J Herbert

    2010-12-03

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed.

  11. The curvy photonics of squid camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Alison; Holt, Amanda; Daniel, Morse; Stramski, Dariusz

    2013-03-01

    Cephalopods (squids and octopuses) ubiquitously possess reflective structures in their skin composed of ``reflectin'' proteins. Although a few simple laminar, Bragg-stack type optical structures have been known in a handful of common squid species for some time, our extensive survey of optically active tissues of exotic deep-sea species has revealed complex, extended curvatures and topologies in dermal reflectors of these rarely-studied animals. Molecular deep-sequencing has revealed these structures also to be composed of reflectin-like proteins. Here we show a survey of some of these deep-sea reflector structures, and present evidence that each novel structure may be a transform of the radiance in the optical niche in the ocean where each of these species live, such that light reflecting off the sides of these animals in their specific ocean habitat resembles the light that would be transmitted through the animals if they were transparent, from many different viewing angles and possible ocean depths.

  12. Base distance optimization for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Garachtchenko, A.; Matlashov, A.; Kraus, R.

    1998-12-31

    The measurement of magnetic fields generated by weak nearby biomagnetic sources is affected by ambient noise generated by distant sources both internal and external to the subject under study. External ambient noise results from sources with numerous origins, many of which are unpredictable in nature. Internal noise sources are biomagnetic in nature and result from muscle activity (such as the heart, eye blinks, respiration, etc.), pulsation associated with blood flow, surgical implants, etc. Any magnetic noise will interfere with measurements of magnetic sources of interest, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), in various ways. One of the most effective methods of reducing the magnetic noise measured by the SQUID sensor is to use properly designed superconducting gradiometers. Here, the authors optimized the baseline length of SQUID-based symmetric axial gradiometers using computer simulation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used as the optimization criteria. They found that in most cases the optimal baseline is not equal to the depth of the primary source, rather it has a more complex dependence on the gradiometer balance and the ambient magnetic noise. They studied both first and second order gradiometers in simulated shielded environments and only second order gradiometers in a simulated unshielded environment. The noise source was simulated as a distant dipolar source for the shielded cases. They present optimal gradiometer baseline lengths for the various simulated situations below.

  13. Broadband Tunable Transparency in rf SQUID Metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Mukhanov, Oleg; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ustinov, Alexey; Anlage, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a metamaterial with broadband tunable transparency in microwave electromagnetic fields. This metamaterial is made of Radio Frequency Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (rf SQUIDs). We show both experimentally and theoretically that the resonance of this metamaterial totally disappears when illuminated with electromagnetic waves of certain power ranges, so that waves can propagate through the metamaterial with little dissipation in a wide frequency spectrum. Unlike traditional electromagnetically induced transparency, high transmission through this metamaterial is due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of the rf SQUID. Transparency occurs when the metamaterial enters its bistability regime. We can control the metamaterial to be transparent or opaque by switching between the two states depending on the initial conditions and signal scanning directions. We also show that the degree of transparency can be tuned by temperature, power of the incident wave, and dc magnetic field and discuss analytical and numerical models that reveal how to systematically control the transparency regime. The metamaterial has potential application in fast tunable digital filter, power limiter and auto-cloaking. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE programs through grant # ECCS-1158644, and CNAM.

  14. Enhancements to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) Multiplexer Readout and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, J.; Benford, D. J.; Buchanan, E. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rebar, J.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark 111 system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided hooks in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark 111 system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  15. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  16. Hydrodynamics of locomotion in the squid Loligo pealei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Erik J.; Quinn, Willie; de Mont, M. Edwin

    2001-06-01

    Potential flow analysis, including unsteady effects, has been applied to live swimming squid, Loligo pealei. Squid were modelled as slender, axisymmetric bodies. High-speed video records, recorded at frame rates of 125 to 250 Hz, provided time-varying body outlines which were digitized automatically. Axisymmetric renderings of these body outlines and the real motion of the squid were used as the input of the potential flow analysis. Axial and lateral inviscid fluid forces simply due to the flow past the squid body were calculated from pressures coefficients obtained from the unsteady Bernoulli equation. Lateral forces were found to play virtually no role in determining muscle stresses in squid jet propulsion. Axial pressure forces were also found to be small in comparison to both net force (based on the observed whole body kinematics) and estimations of skin friction. These findings demonstrate the effects of the highly adapted shape of squid with regard to hydrodynamics. The work suggests that skin friction and working fluid intake are the most significant sources of drag on a swimming squid.

  17. Self-assembled heterogeneous argon/neon core-shell clusters studied by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lundwall, M; Pokapanich, W; Bergersen, H; Lindblad, A; Rander, T; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Barth, S; Hergenhahn, U; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2007-06-07

    Clusters formed by a coexpansion process of argon and neon have been studied using synchrotron radiation. Electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay as well as ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the heterogeneous nature of the clusters and the cluster structure. Binary clusters of argon and neon produced by coexpansion are shown to exhibit a core-shell structure placing argon in the core and neon in the outer shells. Furthermore, the authors show that 2 ML of neon on the argon core is sufficient for neon valence band formation resembling the neon solid. For 1 ML of neon the authors observe a bandwidth narrowing to about half of the bulk value.

  18. A SQUID Bootstrap Circuit with a Large Parameter Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Feng; Zhang, Yi; Hans-Joachim, Krause; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Andreas, Offenhäusser; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The voltage biased (SQUID) bootstrap circuit (SBC) was recently introduced as an effective means to reduce the preamplifier noise contribution. We analyze the tolerances of the SBC noise suppression performance to spreads in SQUID and SBC circuit parameters. It is found that the tolerance to spread mainly caused by the integrated circuit fabrication process could be extended by a one-time adjustable current feedback. A helium-cooled niobium SQUID with a loop inductance of 350 pH is employed to experimentally verify the analysis. From this work, design criteria for fully integrated SBC devices with a high yield can be derived.

  19. Two-stage series array SQUID amplifier for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J. G.; DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.; Welty, R. P.; Radparvar, M.

    We present test results for a two-stage integrated SQUID amplifier which uses a series array of d.c. SQUIDS to amplify the signal from a single input SQUID. The device was developed by Welty and Martinis at NIST and recent versions have been manufactured by HYPRES, Inc. Shielding and filtering techniques were employed during the testing to minimize the external noise. Energy resolution of 300 h was demonstrated using a d.c. excitation at frequencies above 1 kHz, and better than 500 h resolution was typical down to 300 Hz.

  20. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  1. Neon and CO2 adsorption on open carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Ziegler, Carl A; Banjara, Shree R; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, S; Migone, Aldo D

    2013-07-30

    We present the results of a thermodynamics and kinetics study of the adsorption of neon and carbon dioxide on aggregates of chemically opened carbon nanohorns. Both the equilibrium adsorption characteristics, as well as the dependence of the kinetic behavior on sorbent loading, are different for these two adsorbates. For neon the adsorption isotherms display two steps before reaching the saturated vapor pressure, corresponding to adsorption on strong and on weak binding sites; the isosteric heat of adsorption is a decreasing function of sorbent loading (this quantity varies by about a factor of 2 on the range of loadings studied), and the speed of the adsorption kinetics increases with increasing loading. By contrast, for carbon dioxide there are no substeps in the adsorption isotherms; the isosteric heat is a nonmonotonic function of loading, the value of the isosteric heat never differs from the bulk heat of sublimation by more than 15%, and the kinetic behavior is opposite to that of neon, with equilibration times increasing for higher sorbent loadings. We explain the difference in the equilibrium properties observed for neon and carbon dioxide in terms of differences in the relative strengths of adsorbate-adsorbate to adsorbate-sorbent interaction for these species.

  2. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  3. A Closed Neon Liquefier System for Testing Superconducting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, M.; Al-Mosawi, M. K.; Yang, Y.; Beduz, C.; Giunchi, G.

    2006-04-01

    A Neon liquefier system has been developed by Southampton University (UK) and EDISON (Italy) with the aim to provide a facility for testing HTS superconducting devices using Magnesium Diboride materials, in the range 25-30K. The system consists of a liquid Neon cryostat coupled to a two stages cryocooler and a recovery system. The first stage of the cryocooler is connected to the thermal shield of the cryostat and a copper station positioned at mid point along the access neck to the liquid Neon bath to reduce heat leak and to provide pre-cooling of samples. The second stage, capable of 20W cooling power at 22K, is used to provide the cooling power for liquefaction and to refrigerate the liquid Neon bath and the superconducting device/sample during the steady state operation. The recovery system has been designed to automatically compress excess boil-off generated by a quench or a transient heating into a storage gas container. Transport measurement up to 900A can be carried out in the Ne cryostat using purposely build hybrid current leads. These leads have a copper upper section cooled by liquid Nitrogen and a superconducting lower section of Ag/AuBi2223 tapes. In this paper we report on the performance of the system and the initial measurement of superconducting samples.

  4. NEON Data Products: Enabling Continental-Scale Ecological Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berukoff, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a NSF-funded major research and facilities initiative under development, designed to address how climate change, land use change, and invasive species affect ecological science on a continental scale. The standardization of measurement methodologies, engineering practice, and data organization across NEON's sixty sites fosters the creation of ecological data products. These data products are community-approved and Observatory-vetted, and cover the breadth of NEON collection activities, including measurements of physical variables such as air, water, and soil temperature and chemistry, observations and analyses of species and habitats, and airborne spectral and LiDAR remote sensing. Together, these low-level (fundamental measurement and observation data)and high-level (integrative, continental-scale assessments) will be useful for scientists, students, educators, policymakers, and the general public. Here, we discuss the development status of NEON's data product suites, describing how they are constructed and vetted, and provide an example of how one current effort will provide several foundational data products. Further, we discuss and solicit feedback for how stakeholder communities can contribute to their veracity and validation.

  5. The NEON Aquatic Network: Expanding the Availability of Biogeochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Bohall, C.; Fitzgerald, M.; Utz, R.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; McLaughlin, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing unprecedented pressure from climate change and land-use practices. Invasive species, whether plant, animal, insect or microbe present additional threat to aquatic ecosystem services. There are significant scientific challenges to understanding how these forces will interact to affect aquatic ecosystems, as the flow of energy and materials in the environment is driven by multivariate and non-linear biogeochemical cycles. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect and provide observational data across multiple scales. Sites were selected to maximize representation of major North American ecosystems using a multivariate geographic clustering method that partitioned the continental US, AK, HI, and Puerto Rico into 20 eco-climatic domains. The NEON data collection systems and methods are designed to yield standardized, near real-time data subjected to rigorous quality controls prior to public dissemination through an online data portal. NEON will collect data for 30 years to facilitate spatial-temporal analysis of environmental responses and drivers of ecosystem change, ranging from local through continental scales. Here we present the NEON Aquatic Network, a multi-parameter network consisting of a combination of in situ sensor and observational data. This network will provide data to examine biogeochemical, biological, hydrologic and geomorphic metrics at 36 sites, which are a combination of small 1st/2nd order wadeable streams, large rivers and lakes. A typical NEON Aquatic site will host up to two in-stream sensor sets designed to collect near-continuous water quality data (e.g. pH/ORP, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CDOM) along with up to 8 shallow groundwater monitoring wells (level, temp., cond.), and a local meteorological station (e.g. 2D wind speed, PAR, barometric pressure, temperature, net radiation). These coupled sensor suites will be complemented by observational data (e.g. water

  6. Neon isotopes show that Earth was accreted from irradiated material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 1980s, the notion that the Earth's mantle has a "solar" isotopic signature for neon has been favoured. Indeed, the 20Ne/22Ne ratio is above 12.5 in the mantle sources of OIB and MORB, close to the solar composition (13.4 for the Sun or 13.8 for the solar wind) and different from both atmospheric and chondritic compositions (Phase Q, Neon A). The most well accepted process invoked to explain this observed solar composition in the mantle is dissolution into a magma ocean of solar gases captured by gravity around the proto-Earth. However, Earth was accreted after gas from the proto-planetary disk had evaporated, suggesting that Earth itself could not have captured such a solar primordial atmosphere. Only planetary embryos were formed when the gas was still present in the disk. However, these planetary embryos with the mass of Mars are not massive enough to capture a solar dense atmosphere able to incorporate enough neon into the mantle. New estimates of the neon isotopic compositions of both the Earth's mantle and of the implanted solar wind into grains suggest that the origin of the neon on Earth is related to solar wind irradiation on μm grains before planetary accretion started and not dissolution. Although incorporation of solar ions by this process is only significant for very volatiles (depleted) elements, the irradiation by x-rays has important consequences for the bulk chemistry of irradiated grains as it has been demonstrated that it produces depletion in Mg and Si, relatively to O (e.g Bradley et al., 1994), a pattern also observed for the Bulk silicate Earth. References Bradley, J. (1994). "Chemically Anomalous, Preaccretionally irradiated Grains in Interplanetary fust from Comets." Science 265: 925-929.

  7. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth.

  8. Squid as nutrient vectors linking Southwest Atlantic marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.

    2013-10-01

    Long-term investigations of three abundant nektonic squid species from the Southwest Atlantic, Illex argentinus, Doryteuthis gahi and Onykia ingens, permitted to estimate important population parameters including individual growth rates, duration of ontogenetic phases and mortalities. Using production model, the productivity of squid populations at different phases of their life cycle was assessed and the amount of biomass they convey between marine ecosystems as a result of their ontogenetic migrations was quantified. It was found that squid are major nutrient vectors and play a key role as transient 'biological pumps' linking spatially distinct marine ecosystems. I. argentinus has the largest impact in all three ecosystems it encounters due to its high abundance and productivity. The variable nature of squid populations increases the vulnerability of these biological conveyers to overfishing and environmental change. Failure of these critical biological pathways may induce irreversible long-term consequences for biodiversity, resource abundance and spatial availability in the world ocean.

  9. Brooding in a gonatid squid off northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Bower, John R; Seki, Katsunori; Kubodera, Tsunemi; Yamamoto, Jun; Nobetsu, Takahiro

    2012-12-01

    Brooding of egg masses by a squid in Japan is described. Brooding females were photographed in situ, and the females, their eggs, and their hatchlings were collected. The squid had all undergone gelatinous degeneration and swam slowly and continuously by undulating the fins and expelling water sporadically through the funnel. Eggs were held together by a dark, viscous material that formed a single-layer, sheet-like mass, from which hatchlings were seen to emerge. The annual appearance of brooding females in surface waters during spring suggests that they transport their egg masses from deep water to the surface before the eggs hatch. Genetic analyses identified the squid as Gonatus madokai (family Gonatidae), now the second gonatid and third squid known to brood.

  10. Chimera states and synchronization in magnetically driven SQUID metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Neofotistos, G.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional arrays of Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) form magnetic metamaterials exhibiting extraordinary properties, including tunability, dynamic multistability, negative magnetic permeability, and broadband transparency. The SQUIDs in a metamaterial interact through non-local, magnetic dipole-dipole forces, that makes it possible for multiheaded chimera states and coexisting patterns, including solitary states, to appear. The spontaneous emergence of chimera states and the role of multistability is demonstrated numerically for a SQUID metamaterial driven by an alternating magnetic field. The spatial synchronization and temporal complexity are discussed and the parameter space for the global synchronization reveals the areas of coherence-incoherence transition. Given that both one- and two-dimensional SQUID metamaterials have been already fabricated and investigated in the lab, the presence of a chimera state could in principle be detected with presently available experimental set-ups.

  11. Magnetoencephalography using a Multilayer hightc DC SQUID Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Poppe, U.; Borkowski, R. E. Dunin; Schiek, M.; Boers, F.; Chocholacs, H.; Dammers, J.; Eich, E.; Shah, N. J.; Ermakov, A. B.; Slobodchikov, V. Yu.; Maslennikov, Yu. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    We describe tests of the use of a multilayer highTc DC SQUID magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and compare our measurements with results obtained using a lowTc SQUID sensor. The integration of bias reversal readout electronics for highTc DC SQUID magnetometry into a commercial MEG data acquisition system is demonstrated. Results of measurements performed on a salinefilled head phantom are shown and the detection of an auditory evoked magnetic response of the human cortex elicited by a stimulus is illustrated. Future modifications of highTc DC SQUID sensors for applications in MEG, in order to reach a resolution of 1 fT/√Hz at 77.5 K over a wide frequency band, are outlined.

  12. SQUID-amplified photon detection: from cosmology to material science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Kent

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting photon detectors amplified by SQUIDs are playing an increasingly important role in science ranging from cosmology to materials characterization. The most widely used superconducting photon detector uses a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES), which is a superconducting film biased in the narrow transition region between the normal and superconducting state. The film is voltage biased, and the current flowing through it is measured with a SQUID. An incident photon increases the resistance of the TES, which reduces the current through the SQUID. Large arrays of SQUID-coupled TES detectors are read out by cryogenic multiplexing of the SQUIDs with a time-division, frequency-division, or code-division multiplexing scheme. SQUID-coupled TES detectors are now widely deployed in ground- and balloon-borne observatories to measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. By measuring the power and the polarization of the CMB, new constraints have been placed on cosmological parameters, as well as the absolute masses and number of neutrino species. Experiments are now being conducted to search for the signature of gravitational waves in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, which would provide strong evidence of inflation at GUT energy scales. Remarkably, very similar sensor arrays to those developed for CMB measurements can also be used for spectroscopic measurements at synchrotron and free-electron laser x-ray light sources. SQUID-coupled TES sensors provide spectroscopic resolution previously only achieved with dispersive detectors based on gratings and crystal diffraction, but with the high efficiency of semiconductor x-ray detectors. I will describe experiments using SQUID-coupled TES arrays for x-ray emission and x-ray absorption spectroscopy of materials, and plans to develop much larger arrays for next-generation light sources.

  13. High-T(c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    In our laboratory of high-T(sub c), a one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of a 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet, a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which the superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet, a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  14. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, Eugene

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  15. Detection of the Cracks using High-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuhiko; Hyun-Sung, Tae; Takamatsu, Tsuyoshi; Sakuta, Ken; Itozaki, Hideo

    Eddy current non-distractive evaluation (NDE) is very useful technique for detection of cracks. We use the high-Tc SQUID in this system. First, we respect the result of this measurement by the finite element method. We can detect of the signal from the hole by NDE system with high-Tc SQUID. This result is reasonable to compare with the result of simulation. Finaly, we can detect of the hidden defect under 5mm depth from the sample surface.

  16. ELECTROPHORETIC AND IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SQUID AXOPLASM PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    HUNEEUS-COX, F

    1964-03-06

    By disc electrophoresis of the axoplasm of Dosidicus gigas, 14 protein bands have been resolved. Anti-bodies to the intra-axonal proteins and to squid blood proteins were produced in rabbits. By Ouchterlony's technique, six antigenic components can be demonstrated in axoplasm; the combined use of disc electrophoresis and immune diflusion in agar resolves seven antigenic components in axoplasm; none of these components is detectable in squid blood.

  17. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-08-01

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

  18. High-performance DC SQUIDs with submicrometer niobium Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    de Waal, V.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; van den Hamer, P.

    1983-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of low-noise, all-niobium, thin-film planar dc SQUIDs with submicrometer Josephson junctions. The junctions are evaporated obliquely through a metal shadow evaporation mask, which is made using optical lithography with 0.5 ..mu..m tolerance. The Josephson junction barrier is formed by evaporating a thin silicon film and with a subsequent oxidation in a glow discharge. The junction parameters can be reproduced within a factor of two. Typical critical currents of the SQUIDs are about 3 ..mu..A and the resistances are about 100 ..cap omega... With SQUIDs having an inductance of 1 nH the voltage modulation is a least 60 ..mu..V. An intrinsic energy resolution of 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz has been reached. The SQUIDs are coupled to wire-wound input coils or with thin-film input coils. The thin-film input coil consists of a niobium spiral of 20 turns on a separate substrate. In both cases the coil is glued onto a 2-nH SQUID with a coupling efficiency of at least 0.5. Referred to the thin-film input coil, the best coupled energy resolution achieved is 1.2 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz measured in a flux-locked loop at frequencies above 10 Hz. As far as we know, this is the best figure achieved with an all-refractory-metal thin-film SQUID. The fabrication technique used is suited for making circuits with SQUID and pickup coil on the same substrate. We describe a compact, planar, first-order gradiometer integrated with a SQUID on a single substrate. The gradient noise of this device is 3 x 10/sup -12/ Tm/sup -1/. The gradiometer has a size of 12 mm x 17 mm, is simple to fabricate, an is suitable for biomedical applications.

  19. SQUID magnetometry applied as non-invasive electroanalytic chemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, B.D.; MacVicar, M.L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a SQUID magnetometer, employed as a highly sensitive ammeter, used to perform standard electroanalytic chemical measurements non- invasively. Specifically, the magnetic fields generated by the net ionic movement in the solution of a driven electrochemical system is detected by the gradiometer coils. The SQUID signal can then be compared to conventional current measurements. One such standard measurement investigated is Cyclic Voltametry (CV) which determines the I-V characteristics of an electrochemical system yielding critical kinetic parameters.

  20. Neon diffusion kinetics in olivine, pyroxene and feldspar: Retentivity of cosmogenic and nucleogenic neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourbet, Loraine; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg; Cassata, William S.; Renne, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan

    2012-06-01

    We performed stepwise degassing experiments by heating single crystals of neutron- or proton-irradiated olivine, pyroxene and feldspar to study diffusion kinetics of neon. This is important in evaluating the utility of these minerals for cosmogenic 21Ne measurements and, potentially, for Ne thermochronometry. Degassing patterns are only partially explained by simple Arrhenius relationships; most samples do not exhibit a precisely-determined activation energy in an individual diffusion domain. Regardless, we find clear differences in diffusion kinetics among these minerals. Based on sub-selected data, our estimates for neon diffusion kinetics (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor Do, assuming the analyzed fragments approximate the diffusion domain) in each mineral are as follows: for the feldspars, Ea ranges from ∼65 to 115 kJ/mol and Do from 3.9 × 10-3 to 7.1 × 102 cm2s-1; for the pyroxenes, Ea ranges from ∼292 to 480 kJ/mol and Do from 1.6 × 102 to 2.9 × 1011 cm2s-1; for the olivines, Ea ranges from ∼360 to 370 kJ/mol and Do from 1.5 × 106 to 5.0 × 106 cm2s-1. Differences in these parameters are broadly consistent with the expected effect of structural differences between feldspar, and olivine and pyroxene. These results indicate that cosmogenic 21Ne will be quantitatively retained within olivine and pyroxene at Earth surface temperatures over geological timescales. The diffusion kinetics for feldspars, on the other hand, predicts that 21Ne retention at Earth surface temperatures will vary significantly with domain size, crystal microtexture, surface temperature, and exposure duration. Quantitative retention is expected only in favorable conditions. This conclusion is reinforced by additional measurements of cosmogenic 21Ne in coexisting quartz and feldspar from naturally irradiated surface samples; sanidine from a variety of rhyolitic ignimbrites exhibits quantitative retention, whereas alkali-feldspar from several granites does not.

  1. Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

  2. [Biochemistry and functional characterization of squid mantle meat (Dosidicus gigas)].

    PubMed

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; María Pérez, L; Isabel Donghi, M

    2000-12-01

    A study for the characterization of frozen giant squid mantle (meat) protein stored at -25 degrees C for 8 month was started. In the present research, the following functional properties were investigate: emulsifying, water holding and gel forming capacities. Optimal conditions for the separation and differentiation of miofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic proteins were also studied. It was found that the unfrozen giant squid mantle meat es capable of emulifying 2.817,4 g of oil/g of protein and holding capacity was 3.64 g of water/g of protein. Related to the gel forming capacity, it was not obtain, probably due to excessive storage of the meat. With regard to miofibrilar protein obtention of the squid mantle meat, it was found that two low ionic strength washings (I = 0.05), the sarcoplasmic proteins were practically eliminated from the protein matrix. The differentiation of miofibrilar and sarcoplasmatic proteins was obtained by PAGE-SDS of the squid mantle meat extracted at two different ionic strength (I = 0.05 and I = 0.5). This work demonstrates that the giant squid mantle protein has a high emulsifying and water holding capacity, and it can be used, as a raw material, for the improvement of sausage products. About the gelling products, more studies will be necessary with fresh squid mantle meat to conclude about this functional property.

  3. Investigation of nanoSQUID designs for practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, Sylke; Köhn, Claudia; Drung, Dietmar; Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Kieler, Oliver; Morosh, Viacheslav; Schurig, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    In the recent past, considerable effort was spent on the development of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) designs for magnetic detection in the micro- and nano-scale. Where these novel nanoSQUIDs were mostly of a simple format, real applications require more elaborate designs including auxiliary components such as coils and transformers. Therefore, we have developed SQUID designs based on a Nb/HfTi/Nb thin-film technology which offers both, nano-patterning and waferscale manufacturing of complex design structures. Employing e-beam lithography and chemical–mechanical polishing process steps, the area of the superconductor–normal conductor–superconductor Josephson junctions of these nanoSQUIDs has been varied between 150 nm × 150 nm and 200 nm × 200 nm, whereas the thickness of the barrier is about 20 nm. In order to enable real practical applications, nanoSQUID designs with a number of implemented auxiliary components and design features, such as gradiometric feedback loops, gradiometric transformers, and rf filters, have been carefully investigated. This paper combines a summary of recent achievements with a presentation of detailed measurements of the device performance in magnetic fields of up to a few tens of millitesla. This investigation is intended to pave the way for future practical complex nanoSQUID tools.

  4. DC SQUID RF magnetometer with 200 MHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanov, Vladimir; Lettsome, Nesco; Orozco, Antonio; Cawthorne, Alfred; Borzenets, Valery

    2012-02-01

    Because of periodic flux-to-voltage transfer function, Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers operate in a closed-loop regime [1], which linearizes the response, and increases the dynamic range and sensitivity. However, a transmission line delay between the SQUID and electronics fundamentally limits the closed-loop bandwidth at 20 MHz [1], although the intrinsic bandwidth of SQUIDs is in gigahertz range. We designed a DC SQUID based RF magnetometer capable of wideband sensing coherent magnetic fields up to 200 MHz. To overcome the closed-loop bandwidth limitation, we utilized a low-frequency flux-modulated closed-loop to simultaneously lock the quasi-static magnetic flux and provide AC bias for the RF flux. The SQUID RF voltage is processed by RF electronics based on a double lock-in technique. This yields a signal proportional to the amplitude and phase of the RF magnetic flux, with more than four decades of a linear response. For YBaCuO SQUID on bi-crystal SrTiO substrate at 77 K we achieved a flux noise density of 4 μφ0/Hz at 190 MHz, which is similar to that measured at kHz frequencies with conventional flux-locked loop. [1] D. Drung, et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19, S235 (2006).

  5. A scanning SQUID microscope with 200 MHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanov, Vladimir V.; Lettsome, Nesco M., Jr.; Borzenets, Valery; Gagliolo, Nicolas; Cawthorne, Alfred B.; Orozco, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    We developed a scanning DC SQUID microscope with novel readout electronics capable of wideband sensing of RF magnetic fields from 50 to 200 MHz and simultaneously providing closed-loop response at kHz frequencies. To overcome the 20 MHz bandwidth limitation of traditional closed-loop SQUIDs, a flux-modulated closed-loop simultaneously locks the SQUID quasi-static flux and flux-biases the SQUID for amplification of the RF flux up to Φ0/4 in amplitude. Demodulating the SQUID voltage with a double lock-in technique yields a signal representative of both the amplitude and phase of the RF flux. This provides 80 dB of a linear dynamic range with a flux noise density of 4 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 at 200 MHz for a Y Ba2Cu3O7 bi-crystal SQUID at 77 K. We describe the electronics’ performance and present images for RF magnetic field of the travelling wave in a coplanar waveguide, the standing wave in an open-circuited microstrip, and a surface mounted device antenna.

  6. Noise analysis of DC SQUIDs with damped superconducting flux transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.; Fagaly, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    An analysis was performed of intrinsic noise for high-Tc DC SQUID with superconducting flux transformer (FT) containing resistive elements. For a SQUID with a loop inductance of about 40 pH we observed voltage swings of ~55 μV and a flux noise of ~4 μΦ0/√Hz at 77 K. Inductive coupling of an 8-mm multilayer superconducting FT to the SQUID increased voltage swings to ~70 μV due to effective reduction of the SQUID loop inductance. This also increased the flux noise to ~6μΦ0/√Hz, corresponding to a field resolution of ~18 fT/√Hz at 77 K with a white noise spectrum down to frequency ~10 Hz. The main sources of white flux noise were the Nyquist noise in the Josephson junctions and the FT, as well as the suppression of the DC SQUID voltage swings caused by parasitic capacitance between the FT and the SQUID. An ultra-low-ohmic resistor with resistance value between the flux-creep-induced resistances of superconductors (below ~0.1 nΩ) and resistances of conventional resistors (above ~0.1 mΩ) was developed. An RL-circuit based high-pass filter (HPF) with time constant ~7 sec was realized and integrated in the superconducting FT. The contribution of the HPF to the noise of the sensors was measured and compared with calculated values.

  7. Perception of neon color spreading in 3-6-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2009-12-01

    Although lots of studies about neon color spreading have been reported, few of these studies have focused on the perceptual development of it in human infants. Therefore, this study explores the perceptual development of neon color spreading in infants. In experiment 1, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in static conditions. In experiment 2, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in moving conditions. Our results suggest that while only 5-6-month-old infants show a preference for neon color spreading in the static condition, 3-4-month-old infants also prefer neon color spreading if motion information is available.

  8. A Cyberinfrastructure for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, D.; Berukoff, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an NSF-funded project designed to provide physical and information infrastructure to support the development of continental-scale, quantitative ecological sciences. The network consists of sixty sites located in the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, each site hosting terrestrial and aquatic sensors and observational apparati that acquire data across multiple ecoclimatic domains. As well, an airborne remote sensing platform provides spectral and LiDAR data, and acquisition of data sets from external agencies allows for land-use studies. Together, this data is ingested, vetted, processed, and curated by a standards-based, provenance-driven, metadata-rich cyberinfrastructure, which will provide not only access to but discovery and manipulation of NEON data, and the construction of integrative data products and inputs for ecological forecasting that address fundamental processual questions in climate change, land use change, and invasive species.

  9. Influence of dust void on neon DC discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumova, V. V.; Polyakov, D. N.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2017-03-01

    The diffusion/drift model of the positive column of glow discharge in neon with fine dust particles was used to study the role of a dust cloud with a void in the interaction between plasma and dust particles in the range of neon pressure and discharge current where dust particles may form structures with cavities. The results represent the nonlocal effect of void size on plasma composition, configuration of electric field and on distributions of plasma components in discharge with voids in dust structures. Simulations show that the electric field strength and the metastable atom concentration inside the void are higher than in the discharge without dust particles, while electron concentration may be either higher or lower.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  11. Dynamics of Imploding Neon Gas Puff Plasmas. I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b OECLASSIFICATION IDOWNGRADING SCHEDULE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 4 PERFORMING...29 Accesz ion Por NTIS G-RA&I DTIL .: Dtj LAb l i - I _ q 4 .5Fenn a-.-. DYNAMICS OF IMPLODING NEON GAS...state was assumed, viz. 2 T1 2 P = (CT -- pu2 - Ci) , ( 4 ) where eI is the potential energy due to ionization and excitation. (A non-ideal equation of

  12. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  13. Illusory depth from moving subjective figures and neon colour spreading.

    PubMed

    Bressan, P; Vallortigara, G

    1991-01-01

    If a pattern of concentric circles, interrupted so as to produce the perception of a subjective bar extending from the centre to the periphery of the pattern, was slowly rotated in a plane perpendicular to the line of sight, observers reported seeing the bar slanted in depth and moving over complete and stationary concentric circles. When the interrupted concentric circles were completed by red segments--thereby giving rise to a neon colour-spreading effect--observers reported seeing a reddish bar, which sometimes appeared to be slanted in depth, moving behind the plane of the concentric circles. A combination of the two patterns was found to originate a compelling percept of a unitary bar slanted in depth: part of the bar (the subjective half) appeared to be located in front of its inducing elements, whereas the other part (the neon-like half) appeared to continue behind them. When translatory instead of rotary motion was used, the bars did not look slanted in depth: however, the neon bar appeared either behind or in front of the inducing lines, depending on the luminance contrast between the segments and the inducing lines themselves.

  14. Helium-neon laser improves skin repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Peccin, Maria Stella; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; de Oliveira, Flavia; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on skin injury in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral skin damage in leg. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluence of 6 J∕cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm, was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right leg lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections. The results showed little infiltration of inflammatory cells, with proliferation of fibroblasts forming a few fibrous connective tissue after 1 week post-injury. The lesion on the 3rd week was characterized by granulation tissue, which formed from proliferated fibrous connective tissue, congested blood vessels and mild mononuclear cell infiltration. On the 5th week, it was observed that debris material surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue and dense collage, fibroblasts cells present in the dermis covered by a thick epidermal layer represented by keratinized epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve skin repair in rabbits at early phases of recovery.

  15. Nova LMC 1990 no. 1: The first extragalactic neon nova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shore, Steven N.; Starrfield, Sumner G.

    1990-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations of nova LMC (Large Magellanic Cloud) 1990 No. 1, the first neon (or ONeMg) nova observed outside the Galaxy are presented. The observations were obtained from 17 Jan. to Mar. 1990, with especially dense coverage during the first 25 days of the outburst. (The neon nova categorization is based on the detection of forbidden Ne 3-4 lines in optical spectra; the ultraviolet neon lines were not detected.) During the first 30 days of the outburst, the radiative losses were dominated by the N 5 delta 1240 and C 4 delta 1550 lines. The maximum ejection velocity was approximately 8000 km/s, based on the blue absorption edge of the C 4 P-Cygni profile. Early in the outburst of Nova LMC 1990 No. 1 the UV luminosity alone was approximately 3 times 10 to the 38th power erg/sec, implying that the bolometric luminosity was well in excess of the Eddington luminosity for a one solar mass object.

  16. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  17. Transport and dissociation of neon dimer cations in neon gas: a joint dynamical and Monte Carlo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhenni, Malika; Stachoň, Martin; Gadéa, Florent Xavier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Kalus, René

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid dynamical method based on the classical treatment of nuclei and the quantum treatment of electrons was used to calculate momentum transfer and dissociation cross-sections for collisions of neon dimer cations with neon atoms. For the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects, a semi-empirical factor was introduced to correct the hybrid momentum transfer cross-sections at low collision energies. Both uncorrected and quantum corrected hybrid cross-sections were used to calculate the {{Ne}}2+ mobility, and longitudinal and transverse characteristic diffusion energies over a wide range of the reduced electric field. Furthermore, the {{Ne}}2+ dissociation rate constant was calculated and compared to measured data. In addition, an approximate inverse method based on an effective isotropic interaction potential was also used to calculate the momentum transfer cross-sections and related transport data.

  18. High-Tc SQUIDs: Noise and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hsiao-Mei

    2001-08-01

    A major challenge in the design and operation of high transition temperature (Tc ) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) is their potential to exhibit substantially higher levels of noise at low frequency f when exposed to earth’s magnetic field. To investigate this problem, we studied the noise of high-Tc SQUIDs, directly coupled magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers in both static and changing magnetic fields. The directly coupled magnetometer consists of a dc SQUID connected to a large area pickup loop in parallel. The multilayer magnetometer involves a multiturn flux transformer inductively coupled to a dc SQUID on a separate substrate. All the devices are made of thin films of the high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ, patterned into 4 μm linewidths. After cooling in a magnetic field, the devices showed no increase in 1/f noise for fields up to threshold values well above the earth’s magnetic field. The devices were also cooled in a magnetic field that was subsequently turned off. The 1/f noise of bare SQUIDs was unchanged for fields up to 12 μT. The addition of the flux transformer containing flux dams increased the sensitivity to magnetic field by a factor of 43 while reducing the threshold field only moderately, to 5 μT. This result implies that the multilayer magnetometer can be rotated in the earth’s magnetic field through an angle of up to 26o without increasing the low frequency noise. The results of these studies were incorporated into a 5-channel high-Tc magnetocardiography system involving two first-derivative SQUID gradiometers and three reference SQUIDs. Each planar gradiometer consists of a directly coupled SQUID magnetometer inductively coupled to the smaller coil of an asymmetric, two-loop flux transformer. The reference SQUIDs are patterned into 4 μm lines. The outputs of the five channels were subtracted in software to form a second-derivative gradiometer. Its

  19. Detection of Magnetically-Tagged Antigens with a SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Y. R.; Grossman, H. L.; Clarke, John; Poon, Y. S.; Alper, M. D.; Stevens, R. C.

    2000-03-01

    We describe a novel immunoassay using a SQUID microscope to detect magnetically-tagged antigens. The SQUID microscope consists of a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device, cooled to 77K inside a vacuum enclosure, thermally isolated from a room-temperature sample which may be positioned to within 15μ m of the SQUID. At this distance we are able to detect a dipole moment of 10-17 Am^2 in a 1 Hz bandwidth, corresponding to one single-domain 35nm magnetite nanoparticle. A substrate of liposomes labeled with the FLAG epitope is placed on the microscope and immersed in a solution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with anti-FLAG antibodies. A pulse of magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments parallel to the SQUID. Subsequently, the SQUID detects the decay of the remanent magnetization of the magnetic tags bound to the antigens, whereas unbound magnetic nanoparticles relax very rapidly by Brownian rotation and do not contribute to the signal. We also explore the possible use of nanoparticles extracted from magnetotactic bacteria as magnetic tags.

  20. SQUIDs De-fluxing Using a Decaying AC Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Semenov, Vasili Kirilovich; Anderson, Bill

    2016-06-08

    Flux trapping is the Achilles’ heel of all superconductor electronics. The most direct way to avoid flux trapping is a prevention of superconductor circuits from exposure to magnetic fields. Unfortunately this is not feasible if the circuits must be exposed to a strong DC magnetic field even for a short period of time. For example, such unavoidable exposures take place in superparamagnetic relaxation measurements (SPMR) and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) using unshielded thin-film SQUID-based gradiometers. Unshielded SQUIDs stop working after being exposed to DC magnetic fields of only a few Gauss in strength. In this paper we present experimental results with de-fluxing of planar thin-film LTS SQUID-based gradiometers using a strong decaying AC magnetic field. We used four commercial G136 gradiometers for SPMR measurements with up to a 10 mT magnetizing field. Strong 12.9 kHz decaying magnetic field pulses reliably return SQUIDs to normal operation 50 ms after zeroing the DC magnetizing field. This new AC de-fluxing method was also successfully tested with seven other different types of LTS SQUID sensors and has been shown to dissipate extremely low energy.

  1. Environmental effects on recreational squid jigging fishery catches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz

    2012-08-01

    Experimental fishing sessions simulating the operating procedures of the recreational fishery for the European squid that operates at inshore Palma Bay (Balearic Islands, Spain) were conducted to investigate the effects of environmental variables on squid catches. The catch per unit of effort (cpue) of recreational-like jigging sessions showed a seasonal pattern (higher cpue during colder months). Two alternative hypotheses can explain such a pattern. First, squid could migrate inshore during colder months to seek spatio-temporal windows within which the sea temperature maximize spawning success. Second, the timing of the seasonal reproductive peak and the growth rate of any given cohort would result in a higher percentage of squid whose body size is greater than the gear-specific vulnerability threshold during the colder months. The combination of environmental variables that maximized cpue was a low sea surface temperature, a low windspeed, low atmospheric pressure, and days close to the new moon. A specific period of the day, narrowly around sunset, favoured the catches. Within this narrow period, the sunlight is still sufficient to allow the recreational fishing lures to be effective, and the squid have already shifted to a more active pattern of movement characteristic of the night-time period.

  2. Coupled non-uniform bi-squid: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Patrick; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; In, Visarath; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2012-06-01

    This work investigates through numerical simulations a novel device that improvesdynamic range and linearity. The standard DC SQUID can increase in linearity by adding athird junction, changing to a device known as the bi-SQUID. It is known that the dynamicrange can increase by connecting SQUIDs in series, and it has been shown that nonuniformityin the loops sizes in arrays of SQUIDs can produce a unique 'anti'-peak at thezero magnetic flux (device know as a SQIF). Thus, combining these ideas we can improvethe dynamic range and design a highly linear device with a unique 'anti'-peak. Hence, this device can be referred to as a bi-SQIF or non-uniform bi-SQUID array. Results have shown that the maximum voltage swing increase proportional to N, where N is the number of loops connected in series. The spur free dynamic range also improves as N increases, which is directly related to the linearity of the device. Therefore, we have designed a device which can lead to improvements which can be applicable to low noise amplifier (LNA), and provide a platform for creating "electrically" small antennas.

  3. NanoSQUIDs based on niobium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R.; Esposito, E.; Crescitelli, A.; Di Gennaro, E.; Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Cristiano, R.; Lisitskiy, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present an experimental investigation of nanoSQUIDs based on niobium nitride films. Niobium nitride has a relatively high critical temperature and a large upper critical magnetic field, making it a good material for superconducting electronics working in high magnetic field. We have fabricated nanoSQUIDs using electron beam lithography lift-off technique and deposition of niobium nitride films by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The characterization of nanoSQUIDs was performed at 4.2 K and it consists mainly of current-voltage (IV) characteristics and critical current as a function of external magnetic field (magnetic pattern). The fabricated nanoSQUIDs show a hysteretic IV characteristic and they present a multi-values magnetic pattern. We show that by reducing the critical current by ion etching it is possible to obtain nanoSQUIDs with a single value magnetic pattern suitable for magnetic particle measurements. Magnetic noise analysis has been performed and a white noise of 0.3 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 has been estimated.

  4. 50 CFR 648.23 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing 2,500 lb (1.13 mt) or more of butterfish...) Longfin squid fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing longfin squid harvested in or... constriction. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels fishing for and/or possessing longfin squid shall...

  5. 77 FR 40527 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the 2012 Trimester 2 Directed Longfin Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... percent of the Trimester 2 longfin squid (longfin) quota is projected to be harvested by 0001 hours,...

  6. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  7. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  8. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  9. 75 FR 37739 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Adjustment to the Loligo Trimester 2... Fishing Year (FY) Trimester 2 and 3 Loligo squid quotas. This action complies with the 2010 Specifications and Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries Management...

  10. 77 FR 23635 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Specifications and Management Measures... regulatory text in the final rule for 2012 Specifications for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish... specifications and management measures for the Atlantic mackerel and squid fisheries, and the interim final...

  11. 76 FR 51272 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the 2011 Trimester 2 Directed Loligo Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... percent of the Trimester 2 Loligo squid (Loligo) quota is projected to be harvested by 0001 hours,...

  12. 75 FR 43090 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Adjustment to the Loligo Trimester 2... temporary rule to adjust the 2010 fishing year (FY) Trimester 2 and 3 Loligo squid quotas. The rule... was published adjusting the FY 2010 Trimester 2 and 3 Loligo squid quotas. The temporary...

  13. The response of small SQUID pickup loops to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John R.; Paulius, Lisa; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Schiessl, Daniel; Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan; Holland, Connor M.; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Huber, Martin E.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Gibson, Gerald W., Jr.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-12-01

    In the past, magnetic images acquired using scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy have been interpreted using simple models for the sensor point spread function. However, more complicated modeling is needed when the characteristic dimensions of the field sensitive areas in these sensors become comparable to the London penetration depth. In this paper we calculate the response of SQUIDs with deep sub-micron pickup loops to different sources of magnetic fields by solving coupled London’s and Maxwell’s equations using the full sensor geometry. Tests of these calculations using various field sources are in reasonable agreement with experiments. These calculations allow us to more accurately interpret sub-micron spatial resolution data obtained using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  14. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  15. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  16. Intermodulation in nonlinear SQUID metamaterials: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daimeng; Trepanier, Melissa; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2016-11-01

    The response of nonlinear metamaterials and superconducting electronics to two-tone excitation is critical for understanding their use as low-noise amplifiers and tunable filters. A new setting for such studies is that of metamaterials made of radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs). The two-tone response of self-resonant rf-SQUID meta-atoms and metamaterials is studied here via intermodulation (IM) measurement over a broad range of tone frequencies and tone powers. A sharp onset followed by a surprising strongly suppressed IM region near the resonance is observed. Using a two time scale analysis technique, we present an analytical theory that successfully explains our experimental observations. The theory predicts that the IM can be manipulated with tone power, center frequency, frequency difference between the two tones, and temperature. This quantitative understanding potentially allows for the design of rf-SQUID metamaterials with either very low or very high IM response.

  17. Bio-application of high-Tc SQUID magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Aspanut, Zarina; Kurita, Hirofumi; Toriyabe, Chika; Hatuskade, Yoshimi; Katsura, Shinji

    2006-05-01

    We propose medical applications using ultra-small magnetic particles and a SQUID magnetic sensor. A high-Tc SQUID system for biological molecules (DNA) detection is one of that. This system is based on a hybridization process. Two strands in a DNA molecule are held together by hydrogen bonds between base pairs like a ladder. The two strands are referred to as being complementary to each other. One strand (sample DNA) was labeled with Fe 3O 4 ultra-small magnetic particles and the other (probe DNA) was anchored on a glass slide. Then they were hybridized each other on the slide. After washing the excess sample DNA, the hybridized DNA was evaluated in the presence of excitation AC field by high-Tc SQUID. The signal was initially proportional to the concentration of the sample DNA and then saturated. It means that the hybridization occurred successfully between the sample DNA and the probe DNA.

  18. High-resolution displacement sensor using squid array amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, T.; Penanen, K.; Barmatz, M.; Paik, H.

    Improvement in the measurement of displacement has profound implications for gravitational physics. Examples of high-impact projects that can benefit from a better displacement sensor are: detection of gravitational waves, test of the equivalence principle, search for the postulated ?axion? particle, and test of the inverse square law of gravity. We describe the concept of a new displacement sensor that makes use of a recent development in the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. The SQUID array amplifier, invented by Welty and Martinis (IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconductivity 3, 2605, 1993), has about the same noise as a conventional SQUID; however, it can work at a much higher frequency of up to 5 MHz. We explain how the higher bandwidth can be translated into higher resolution using a bridge-balancing scheme that can simultaneously balance out both the carrier signal at the bridge output and the electrostatic force acting on the test mass.

  19. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  20. Noise in relaxation-oscillation-driven DC SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Gugoshnikov, S.A.; Snigirev, O.V. ); Kaplunenko, O.V. ); Maslennikov, Y.V. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the noise properties of the simple-relaxation-oscillation-driven dc SQUIDs (RO-SQUIDs). The limitation of its internal energy sensitivity E{sub v} at the level close to 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}31} J/Hz due to the influence of the Josephson junctions plasma oscillation has been found for the 5-{mu}m design rules technology. The signal characteristics with the transfer flux-to-voltage factor up to 2 mV/{phi}{sub 0} and equivalent noise flux about of 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {phi}{sub 0}/Hz{sup {1/2}} in the new all-niobium version of the balanced RO-SQUID have been measured.

  1. Robust chimera states in SQUID metamaterials with local interactions.

    PubMed

    Hizanidis, J; Lazarides, N; Tsironis, G P

    2016-09-01

    We report on the emergence of robust multiclustered chimera states in a dissipative-driven system of symmetrically and locally coupled identical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) oscillators. The "snakelike" resonance curve of the single SQUID is the key to the formation of the chimera states and is responsible for the extreme multistability exhibited by the coupled system that leads to attractor crowding at the geometrical resonance (inductive-capacitive) frequency. Until now, chimera states were mostly believed to exist for nonlocal coupling. Our findings provide theoretical evidence that nearest-neighbor interactions are indeed capable of supporting such states in a wide parameter range. SQUID metamaterials are the subject of intense experimental investigations, and we are highly confident that the complex dynamics demonstrated in this paper can be confirmed in the laboratory.

  2. Robust chimera states in SQUID metamaterials with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the emergence of robust multiclustered chimera states in a dissipative-driven system of symmetrically and locally coupled identical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) oscillators. The "snakelike" resonance curve of the single SQUID is the key to the formation of the chimera states and is responsible for the extreme multistability exhibited by the coupled system that leads to attractor crowding at the geometrical resonance (inductive-capacitive) frequency. Until now, chimera states were mostly believed to exist for nonlocal coupling. Our findings provide theoretical evidence that nearest-neighbor interactions are indeed capable of supporting such states in a wide parameter range. SQUID metamaterials are the subject of intense experimental investigations, and we are highly confident that the complex dynamics demonstrated in this paper can be confirmed in the laboratory.

  3. Flux noise in ion-implanted nanoSQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe C.; Pakes, Christopher I.; Lam, Simon K. H.; Prawer, Steven

    2009-06-01

    Focused ion-beam (FIB) technology has been used to fabricate miniature Nb DC SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) which incorporate resistively shunted microbridge junctions and a central loop with a hole diameter ranging from 1058 to 50 nm. The smallest device, with a 50 nm hole diameter, has a white flux noise level of 2.6 µΦ0 Hz-1/2 at 104 Hz. The scaling of the flux noise properties and focusing effect of the SQUID with the hole size were examined. The observed low frequency flux noises of different devices were compared with the contribution due to the spin fluctuation of defects introduced during FIB processing and of thermally activated flux hopping in the SQUID washer.

  4. Flux noise in SQUIDs: Electron versus nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Rogerio; Laforest, Stephanie

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are limited by intrinsic flux noise whose origin is unknown. We develop a method to accurately calculate the flux produced by spin impurities in realistic superconducting thin film wires, and show that the flux produced by each spin is much larger than anticipated by former calculations. Remarkably, the total flux noise power due to electron spins at the thin side surface of the wires is found to be of similar magnitude as the one due to electrons at the wide top surface of the wires. In addition, flux noise due to lattice nuclear spins in the bulk of the wires is found to be a sizable fraction of the total noise for some SQUID geometries. We discuss the relative importance of electron and nuclear spin species in determining the total noise power, and propose strategies to design SQUIDs with lower flux noise. We acknowledge support from the Canadian agency NSERC through its Discovery and Engage programs.

  5. Stable Fly Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  6. Ionized calcium concentrations in squid axons

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Values for ionized [Ca] in squid axons were obtained by measuring the light emission from a 0.1-mul drop of aequorin confined to a plastic dialysis tube of 140-mum diameter located axially. Ionized Ca had a mean value of 20 x 10(-9) M as judged by the subsequent introduction of CaEGTA/EGTA buffer (ratio ca. 0.1) into the axoplasm, and light measurement on a second aequorin drop. Ionized Ca in axoplasma was also measured by introducing arsenazo dye into an axon by injection and measuring the Ca complex of such a dye by multichannel spectrophotometry. Values so obtained were ca. 50 x 10(-9) M as calibrated against CaEGTA/EGTA buffer mixtures. Wth a freshly isolated axon in 10 mM Ca seawater, the aequorin glow invariably increased with time; a seawater [Ca] of 2-3 mM allowed a steady state with respect to [Ca]. Replacement of Na+ in seawater with choline led to a large increase in light emission from aequorin. Li seawater partially reversed this change and the reintroduction of Na+ brought light levels back to their initial value. Stimulation at 60/s for 2-5 min produced an increase in aequorin glow about 0.1% of that represented by the known Ca influx, suggesting operationally the presence of substantial Ca buffering. Treatment of an axon with CN produced a very large increase in aequorin glow and in Ca arsenazo formation only if the external seawater contained Ca. PMID:818340

  7. Application of a pulse-discharge helium detector to the determination of neon in air and water.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J; Mochalski, P; Lokas, E; Kedzior, L

    2002-08-30

    A pulse-discharge helium detector (Valco, PD-D2-I) is used to measure neon concentrations in air and water. The detection level is 0.5 x 10(-8) g/cm3 (0.2 ppm). Discharge gas doped with neon results in a linear response to the neon mass up to 10(-6) g. For measuring the neon concentration in water, a simple enrichment system is used.

  8. Improved Readout Scheme for SQUID-Based Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    An improved readout scheme has been proposed for high-resolution thermometers, (HRTs) based on the use of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to measure temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibilities. The proposed scheme would eliminate counting ambiguities that arise in the conventional scheme, while maintaining the superior magnetic-flux sensitivity of the conventional scheme. The proposed scheme is expected to be especially beneficial for HRT-based temperature control of multiplexed SQUIDbased bolometer sensor arrays. SQUID-based HRTs have become standard for measuring and controlling temperatures in the sub-nano-Kelvin temperature range in a broad range of low-temperature scientific and engineering applications. A typical SQUIDbased HRT that utilizes the conventional scheme includes a coil wound on a core made of a material that has temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of interest. The core and the coil are placed in a DC magnetic field provided either by a permanent magnet or as magnetic flux inside a superconducting outer wall. The aforementioned coil is connected to an input coil of a SQUID. Changes in temperature lead to changes in the susceptibility of the core and to changes in the magnetic flux detected by the SQUID. The SQUID readout instrumentation is capable of measuring magnetic-flux changes that correspond to temperature changes down to a noise limit .0.1 nK/Hz1/2. When the flux exceeds a few fundamental flux units, which typically corresponds to a temperature of .100 nK, the SQUID is reset. The temperature range can be greatly expanded if the reset events are carefully tracked and counted, either by a computer running appropriate software or by a dedicated piece of hardware.

  9. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles Delgado, Carlos A.; Salvado, Jordi; Weaver, Christopher N.

    2015-11-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  10. Scanning high-Tc SQUID imaging system for magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Chang; Wu, Tsung-Yeh; Horng, Herng-Er; Wu, Chau-Chung; Yang, S. Y.; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wu, Chiu-Hsien; Jeng, J. T.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Kuen-Lin; Chen, M. J.

    2006-05-01

    A scanning magnetocardiography (MCG) system constructed from SQUID sensors offers potential to basic or clinical research in biomagnetism. In this work, we study a first order scanning electronic high-Tc (HTS) SQUID MCG system for biomagnetic signals. The scanning MCG system was equipped with an x-y translation bed powered by step motors. Using noise cancellation and μ-metal shielding, we reduced the noise level substantially. The established scanning HTS MCG system was used to study the magnetophysiology of hypercholesterolaemic (HC) rabbits. The MCG data of HC rabbits were analysed. The MCG contour map of HC rabbits provides experimental models for the interpretation of human cardiac patterns.

  11. An Economical Magnetocardiogram System Based on High-Tc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuo; Zhu, Xue-Min; Zhang, Li-Hua; Huang, Xu-Guang; Ren, Yu-Feng; Chen, Geng-Hua; Yang, Qian-Sheng; Feng, Ji

    2006-08-01

    An economical magnetocardiogram (MCG) system is built in our laboratory. It mainly consists of a MCG data acquisition stage equipped with two high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers, a data processing stage with digital filtering and a one-layer μ-metal magnetically shielded room in conjunction with a high-Tc SQUID based active compensation. Experimental results show that a noise level of pico-tesla in MCG profiles, which is necessary for clinical applications, may be achieved with the system. Moreover, stable and convenient operations of the system are demonstrated with simulating MCG measurements.

  12. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  13. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  14. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  15. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  16. Common trends in northeast Atlantic squid time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuur, A. F.; Pierce, G. J.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, dynamic factor analysis is used to estimate common trends in time series of squid catch per unit effort in Scottish (UK) waters. Results indicated that time series of most months were related to sea surface temperature measured at Millport (UK) and a few series were related to the NAO index. The DFA methodology identified three common trends in the squid time series not revealed by traditional approaches, which suggest a possible shift in relative abundance of summer- and winter-spawning populations.

  17. DETERMINATION OF THE SOLUBILITY OF NEON IN WATER AND EXTRACTED HUMAN FAT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    coefficient (alpha) for neon in water, olive oil , and extracted human fat. Essentially, the method consists of a double extraction of sample material that...observed Bunsen absorption coefficients supply new information on the solubility of neon in human fatty material, olive oil , and water. (Author)

  18. Two Methods for a First Order Hardware Gradiometer Using Two HTS SQUID's

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-09-15

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. ''Analog'' gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  19. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two HTS SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-12-31

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. Analog gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  20. Atomistic simulations of tungsten surface evolution under low-energy neon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, Marie; Hammond, Karl D.; Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the divertor of fusion reactors, where it will be subject to a high flux of particles coming from the fusion plasma as well as a significant heat load. Under helium plasma exposure in fusion-reactor-like conditions, a nanostructured morphology is known to form on the tungsten surface in certain temperature and incident energy ranges, although the formation mechanism is not fully established. A recent experimental study (Yajima et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 282-6) using neon or argon exposure did not produce similar nanostructure. This article presents molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten aimed at investigating the surface evolution and elucidating the role of noble gas mass in fuzz formation. In contrast to helium, neon impacts can sputter both tungsten and previously implanted neon atoms. The shorter range of neon ions, along with sputtering, limit the formation of large bubbles and likely prevents nanostructure formation.

  1. The NEON Science Commissioning Plan: Strategies for Confirming System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Thorpe, A.; Buur, H.

    2015-12-01

    A transformation is underway in the field of ecological monitoring as compelling science questions motivate us to build ever-larger networks aiming to acquire uniform datasets over wide geographical ranges and long timescales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), currently under construction across the U.S., represents the most ambitious such effort to characterize ecology at the continental scale. When completed in 2017, NEON will begin a 30-year program to monitor the state of North American ecosystems at scores of independent sites by employing a combination of terrestrial and aquatic sensors, organismal, biogeochemical, and hydrological sampling conducted by field staff, and airborne remote-sensing imaging and spectroscopy. Simply building and bringing such complex, long-term monitoring networks online is, however, insufficient to produce a useful result: the science team must also confirm that the system fulfills its essential mission to generate accurate and uniform data from all sites over time. This is the role of Science Commissioning, the process which completes the construction stage by confirming that the system operates as designed before entering full operations. Ideally, Science Commissioning involves simply testing the completed system against all applicable science requirements. In the real world of large, complex networks, planners of Science Commissioning must grapple with several key questions: How can we verify that the measurements from a given subsystem reflect "truth"? How can we ensure that similar subsystems at different sites return equivalent results? How can we confirm that data from the same site remain comparable over long periods of time? How can we conduct meaningful tests on a large system in a reasonable amount of time and effort? We describe the specific strategies NEON is developing to meet these challenges and the implications for other large ecological monitoring networks.

  2. Observations on the spawning behavior, egg masses and paralarval development of the ommastrephid squid Todarodes pacificus in a laboratory mesocosm.

    PubMed

    Puneeta, Pandey; Vijai, Dharmamony; Yoo, Hae-Kyun; Matsui, Hajime; Sakurai, Yasunori

    2015-12-01

    The spawning behavior of ommastrephid squids has never been observed under natural conditions. Previous laboratory observations of Japanese flying squid (Todarodes pacificus) suggest that pre-spawning females might rest on the continental shelf or slope before they ascend above the pycnocline to spawn, and that the egg masses might settle in the pycnocline. Here, two mesocosm experiments were conducted in a 300 m(3) tank that was 6 m deep to investigate this hypothesis. In the first experiment, a thermocline (2.5-3.5 m) was established in the tank by creating a thermally stratified (17-22°C) water column. In the second experiment, the temperature was uniform (22°C) at all depths. Prior to spawning, females did not rest on the tank floor. In the stratified water column, egg masses remained suspended in the thermocline, but in an unstratified water column, they settled on the tank bottom, collapsed and were infested by microbes, resulting in abnormal or nonviable embryos. Eleven females spawned a total of 18 egg masses (17-80 cm in diameter), indicating that females can spawn more than once when under stress. Paralarvae hatched at stage 30/31 and survived for up to 10 days, allowing us to observe the most advanced stage of paralarvae in captivity. Paralarvae survived after consumption of the inner yolk, suggesting they might have fed in the tank.

  3. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  4. Cutaneous Ossifying Fibroma in a Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi).

    PubMed

    Murphy, B; Imai, D M

    2016-01-01

    A cutaneous proliferative mass was identified arising from the caudal peduncle of a captive neon tetra fish (Paracheirodon innesi). The lesion was histologically consistent with an ossifying fibroma (OF), a fibro-osseous proliferative lesion typically identified in the jaws or tooth-associated supportive tissues of mammals. Although it has been previously reported, there is no recent report of this lesion occurring in a fish. This is the first report of a cutaneous ossifying fibroma in a characin fish. The authors speculate on the pathogenesis of this lesion, which may have arisen from the scale-associated mesenchymal tissues.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics modulation in a neon glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Paul M.

    In dynamics modulation, two modes in a driven neon glow discharge alternate as the dominant mode as their response to the driving force alternates between spatiotemporal and temporal periodic pulling. This phenomenon was first noted by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher (Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 40, 1716 (1995)), who saw two limited but representative cases and proposed a mechanism (Phys. Rev. E 62, 2773 (2000)) by which it occurs. The intent of this dissertation is to document experimentally and test the dynamics modulation mechanism they proposed. Using a new extension of a previous mathematical treatment of periodic pulling, the resulting experimental data are used to verify the predicted mechanism. A numerical model is also presented that reproduces the signature of dynamics modulation and further supports the validity of the mechanism. For two pairs of mode frequencies, three complete data series as driving frequency is increased are presented. Each of these data series shows the progression of the system from pure spatiotemporal behavior, through dynamics modulation, and ending at entrainment in the upper mode. Ionization wave modes are examined using time series recorded using a photodiode with a narrow band filter that selectively passes the primary neon spectral line at 640 nm. The system was periodically driven using a narrow-band ring dye laser tuned to a wavelength near the metastable neon transition at 588.35 nm. The amplitude of the driving force was decreased (increased) by tuning the laser away from (nearer to) the center of the neon line, while the driving frequency was controlled by an acousto-optic modulator chopping the laser beam at the desired frequency. Arnol'd tongue boundaries identifying the edges of frequency entrainment regions in the driving amplitude-driving frequency plane were established for four different discharge currents. The (upward) dynamics modulation behavior seen by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher was reproduced and additional data

  6. Optimizing Sampling Efficiency for Biomass Estimation Across NEON Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, H. H.; Meier, C. L.; Spencer, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the course of 30 years, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will measure plant biomass and productivity across the U.S. to enable an understanding of terrestrial carbon cycle responses to ecosystem change drivers. Over the next several years, prior to operational sampling at a site, NEON will complete construction and characterization phases during which a limited amount of sampling will be done at each site to inform sampling designs, and guide standardization of data collection across all sites. Sampling biomass in 60+ sites distributed among 20 different eco-climatic domains poses major logistical and budgetary challenges. Traditional biomass sampling methods such as clip harvesting and direct measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) involve collecting and processing plant samples, and are time and labor intensive. Possible alternatives include using indirect sampling methods for estimating LAI such as digital hemispherical photography (DHP) or using a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. These LAI estimations can then be used as a proxy for biomass. The biomass estimates calculated can then inform the clip harvest sampling design during NEON operations, optimizing both sample size and number so that standardized uncertainty limits can be achieved with a minimum amount of sampling effort. In 2011, LAI and clip harvest data were collected from co-located sampling points at the Central Plains Experimental Range located in northern Colorado, a short grass steppe ecosystem that is the NEON Domain 10 core site. LAI was measured with a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. The layout of the sampling design included four, 300 meter transects, with clip harvests plots spaced every 50m, and LAI sub-transects spaced every 10m. LAI was measured at four points along 6m sub-transects running perpendicular to the 300m transect. Clip harvest plots were co-located 4m from corresponding LAI transects, and had dimensions of 0.1m by 2m. We conducted regression analyses

  7. The Bright Fluorescent Protein mNeonGreen Facilitates Protein Expression Analysis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hostettler, Lola; Grundy, Laura; Käser-Pébernard, Stéphanie; Wicky, Chantal; Schafer, William R.; Glauser, Dominique A.

    2017-01-01

    The Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) has been tremendously useful in investigating cell architecture, protein localization, and protein function. Recent developments in transgenesis and genome editing methods now enable working with fewer transgene copies and, consequently, with physiological expression levels. However, lower signal intensity might become a limiting factor. The recently developed mNeonGreen protein is a brighter alternative to GFP in vitro. The goal of the present study was to determine how mNeonGreen performs in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans—a model used extensively for fluorescence imaging in intact animals. We started with a side-by-side comparison between cytoplasmic forms of mNeonGreen and GFP expressed in the intestine, and in different neurons, of adult animals. While both proteins had similar photostability, mNeonGreen was systematically 3–5 times brighter than GFP. mNeonGreen was also used successfully to trace endogenous proteins, and label specific subcellular compartments such as the nucleus or the plasma membrane. To further demonstrate the utility of mNeonGreen, we tested transcriptional reporters for nine genes with unknown expression patterns. While mNeonGreen and GFP reporters gave overall similar expression patterns, low expression tissues were detected only with mNeonGreen. As a whole, our work establishes mNeonGreen as a brighter alternative to GFP for in vivo imaging in a multicellular organism. Furthermore, the present research illustrates the utility of mNeonGreen to tag proteins, mark subcellular regions, and describe new expression patterns, particularly in tissues with low expression. PMID:28108553

  8. Neon Isotope Fractionation in Ice Cores at Close-Off Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analyzing trapped air bubbles in glacial ice is a well-established and useful method to reconstruct past atmospheric gas concentrations. However, trapped gas composition can be affected by fractionation during the closure of the air bubbles, complicating the reconstruction. Gases such as dioxygen (O2) and dihydrogen (H2) are known to leak out of the bubbles by permeation through the ice lattice at the close-off depth,where firn turns into ice. This process also can cause isotope fractionation, which obscures the past atmospheric isotope ratios in air bubbles in glacial ice. In order to establish the most accurate measurements of past atmospheric content, we need very detailed understanding of the permeation leakage mechanism in order to establish possible corrections. In this study, we propose the use of neon stable isotopes (neon-22 and neon-20) to place constraints on the mechanism of permeation leakage. Neon isotopes are an ideal system to explore because neon has a constant atmospheric isotope ratio, and thus only is affected by close-off fractionation. Neon permeation occurs via velocity-dependent hopping between sites within the ice lattice, because the neon atom is smaller than the critical size (3.6 Å) of the opening in the lattice. Theory predicts that neon isotope fractionation will occur due to the lower velocity of the heavier isotope, but this has never been experimentally verified and the theory is unable to quantitatively predict the magnitude of the fractionation. We will present the first results of high-precision neon isotope (22Ne/20Ne) measurements made in air pumped from the firm-to-ice transition in the Greenland Ice Sheet, where actively closing air bubbles drive permeation leakage. By measuring this natural neon isotope fractionation, we hope to learn about the mass dependence of the leakage mechanism and develop a more quantitative theory that is generalizable to biogeochemically- and climatically-active gases.

  9. Relationship between tissue structural collapse and disappearance of flesh transparency during postmortem changes in squid mantles.

    PubMed

    Kugino, Mutsuko; Kugino, Kenji; Tamura, Tomoko; Asakura, Tomiko

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between squid flesh transparency and muscle tissue microstructure. Squid mantle muscle was stored at 4 degrees C after being transported for 2 h by 4 different transportation methods used commonly in Japan (Group 1: live squid packed in ice-cold seawater; Group 2: live squid packed at 4 degrees C; Group 3: squid killed immediately after harvest and packed at 4 degrees C; Group 4: live squid packed in a fish tank containing seawater). Parameters of muscle tissue transparency were measured by an image analysis of digital images of squid muscle tissue. The mantle muscle tissue was observed under a transmission electron microscope to determine the postmortem structural changes at the cellular level. The ATP content of muscle tissue and rupture energy of squid flesh were also measured. As a result, the transparency of squid flesh and the ATP content of the muscles showed the same pattern of change in degree as time passed. The values of these parameters were highest in the group of squid killed immediately followed in order by those transported live, the refrigerated squid, and squid stored in ice-cold seawater. The mantle muscle tissue started to lose its transparency when the ATP in the muscle tissue started to decline. Disintegration of squid muscle tissue structure at the cellular level during storage under refrigeration for 24 h (4 degrees C) was observed in all methods of transportation. This suggested that destruction of the squid muscle tissue structure by autolysis is remarkably fast. The muscle tissue structure disintegrates due to decomposition of the muscle proteins, and muscle transparency is lost because the entire muscle develops a mixed coarse-minute structure.

  10. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John R.; Paulius, Lisa; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Spanton, Eric M.; Schiessl, Daniel; Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Huber, Martin E.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Gibson, Gerald W.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-09-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ0/Hz1/2. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  11. Development of RF Sensor Based on Two-Cell Squid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-15

    βrf = 2πLI0/Φ0 is the so called SQUID hysteresis parameter [1], and Φa the static flux introduced by the flux scan. At βrf < 1, the potential of the... Puebla G, Steffen L and Wallraff A 2008 Coplanar waveguide resonators for circuit quantum electrodynamics Journal of Applied Physics 104 113904-8

  12. Quorum sensing in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subhash C; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-08-07

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization.

  13. A YBCO RF-SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luwei, Zhou; Jingwu, Qiu; Xienfeng, Zhang; Zhiming, Tank; Yongjia, Qian

    1990-01-01

    An applicable RF-superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID) magnetometer was made using a bulk sintered yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO). The temperature range of the magnetometer is 77 to 300 K and the field range 0 to 0.1T. At 77 K, the equivalent flux noise of the SQUID is 5 x 10 to minus 4 power theta sub o/square root of Hz at the frequency range of 20 to 200 Hz. The experiments show that the SQUID noise at low-frequency end is mainly from 1/f noise. A coil test shows that the magnetic moment sensitivity delta m is 10 to the minus 6th power emu. The RF-SQUID is shielded in a YBCO cylinder with a shielding ability B sub in/B sub ex of about 10 to the minus 6th power when external dc magnetic field is about a few Oe. The magnetometer is successfully used in characterizing superconducting thin films.

  14. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  15. Crystallographic Study of the LUMI Intermediate of Squid Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Midori; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Upon absorption of light, the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin isomerizes from the 11-cis to the trans configuration, initiating a photoreaction cycle. The primary photoreaction state, bathorhodopsin (BATHO), relaxes thermally through lumirhodopsin (LUMI) into a photoactive state, metarhodopsin (META), which stimulates the conjugated G-protein. Previous crystallographic studies of squid and bovine rhodopsins have shown that the structural change in the primary photoreaction of squid rhodopsin is considerably different from that observed in bovine rhodopsin. It would be expected that there is a fundamental difference in the subsequent thermal relaxation process between vertebrate and invertebrate rhodopsins. In this work, we performed crystallographic analyses of the LUMI state of squid rhodopsin using the P62 crystal. When the crystal was illuminated at 100 K with blue light, a half fraction of the protein was converted into BATHO. This reaction state relaxed into LUMI when the illuminated crystal was warmed in the dark to 170 K. It was found that, whereas trans retinal is largely twisted in BATHO, it takes on a more planar configuration in LUMI. This relaxation of retinal is accompanied by reorientation of the Schiff base NH bond, the hydrogen-bonding partner of which is switched to Asn185 in LUMI. Unlike bovine rhodopsin, the BATHO-to-LUMI transition in squid rhodopsin was accompanied by no significant change in the position/orientation of the beta-ionone ring of retinal.

  16. High-Resolution Displacement Sensor Using a SQUID Array Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Barmatz, M.; Paik, Ho Jung

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in the measurement of displacement has profound implications for both exploration technologies and fundamental physics. For planetary exploration, the new SQUID-based capacitive displacement sensor will enable a more sensitive gravity gradiometer for mapping the interior of planets and moons. A new concept of a superfluid clock to be reported by Penanen and Chui at this workshop is also based on a high-resolution displacement sensor. Examples of high-impact physics projects that can benefit from a better displacement sensor are: detection of gravitational waves, test of the equivalence principle, search for the postulated "axion" particle, and test of the inverse square law of gravity. We describe the concept of a new displacement sensor that makes use of a recent development in the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. The SQUID array amplifier, invented by Welty and Martinis (IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconductivity 3, 2605, 1993), has about the same noise as a conventional SQUID; however, it can work at a much higher frequency of up to 5 MHz. We explain how the higher bandwidth can be translated into higher resolution using a bridge-balancing scheme that can simultaneously balance out both the carrier signal at the bridge output and the electrostatic force acting on the test mass.

  17. A multi-channel high-? SQUID system and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Tanaka, Saburou; Toyoda, Haruhisa; Hirano, Tetsuya; Haruta, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Masahiro; Saijou, Tetsuya; Kado, Hisashi

    1996-04-01

    A multi-channel high-temperature superconducting interference device (high-0953-2048/9/4A/011/img11 SQUID) system has been developed. Step edge junctions were employed for the SQUID. Magnetic field resolution was in the range 0953-2048/9/4A/011/img12 at 1 Hz, 0953-2048/9/4A/011/img13 at 10 Hz and 0953-2048/9/4A/011/img14 at 1 kHz. We have designed and developed 16-channel and 32-channel high-0953-2048/9/4A/011/img11 SQUID systems. We used them in a magnetically shielded room to measure magnetic signals of the human heart. We obtained clear multi-channel magnetocardiac signals, which showed clearly the R, S, and T wave peaks. A clear isofield contour map of magnetocardiac signals was also obtained. We also observed activities of the stomach using a tiny steel ball as a tracer. These data indicate that the use of the high-0953-2048/9/4A/011/img11 SQUID is feasible for these biomagnetic applications.

  18. Spatial Fourier transform method for evaluating SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, P.C.; Bruno, A.C.; Paulsen, C.C.; Symko, O.G.

    1987-08-01

    A simple method of measuring the spatial transfer function of a gradiometer, consisting of a flux transformer coupled to a SQUID, is presented and it is compared with theoretical predictions. Based, on this approach, a new method of reporting a gradiometer's performance is proposed; the rejection factor is expressed in decibels obtained directly from the transfer function plot.

  19. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-11-22

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce.

  20. A 128 Multiplexing Factor Time-Domain SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.; Decourcelle, T.; Perbost, C.; Chapron, C.; Rambaud, D.; Maestre, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.

    2016-07-01

    A cryogenic 128:1 Time-Domain Multiplexer (TDM) has been developed for the readout of kilo-pixel Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays dedicated to the Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology (QUBIC) instrument which aims to measure the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are usually used to read out TESs. Moreover, SQUIDs are used to build TDM by biasing sequentially the SQUIDs connected together—one for each TES. In addition to this common technique which allows a typical 32 multiplexing factor, a cryogenic integrated circuit provides a 4:1 second multiplexing stage. This cryogenic integrated circuit is one of the original part of our TDM achieving an unprecedented 128 multiplexing factor. We present these two dimension TDM stages: topology of the SQUID multiplexer, operation of the cryogenic integrated circuit, and integration of the full system to read out a TES array dedicated to the QUBIC instrument. Flux-locked loop operation in multiplexed mode is also discussed.

  1. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Hoving, Hendrik J. T.; Robison, Bruce H.

    2012-01-01

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce. PMID:23015627

  2. A Practical HTS SQUID Magnetometer System for NDI of Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-10

    York, 1017 (1993). I Final Report Quantum Magnetics, Inc. 115 Contract No. F49620-93-C-0029I I 18. A. D. Hibbs, R. E. Sager, D. W. Cox, T. H. Aukerman ... Aukerman , and H. M. Schneider, "A SQUID Based AC Suscep-3tometer," to be published in Review of Scientific Instrunents. 38. Superconductivity News

  3. Basic and applied magnetism with a squid gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstock, H.; Nisenoff, M. N.; Erber, T.

    1985-12-01

    A facility was established to evaluate the magnetic signatures of cryocoolers, i.e., small closed-cycle liquid helium refrigerators, by use of a (superconducting) SQUID gradiometer. This gradiometer also was utilized to study the: (1) threshold of Barkhausen emission and onset of hysteresis in iron, (2) detection of defects in metal pipes by remote sensing, and (3) magnetoelastic behavior in steel bars.

  4. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: II. Noise Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate rf SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices), coupled to a resonant input circuit, a readout tank circuit and a preamplifier, by numerically solving the corresponding Langevin equations and optimizing model parameters with respect to noise temperature. We also give approximate analytic solutions for the noise temperature, which we reduce to parameters of the SQUID and the tank circuit in the absence of the input circuit. The analytic solutions agree with numerical simulations of the full circuit to within 10%, and are similar to expressions used to calculate the noise temperature of dc SQUIDs. The best device performance is obtained when {beta}{sub L}{prime} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} is 0.6-0.8; L is the SQUID inductance, I{sub 0} the junction critical current and F{sub 0} the flux quantum. For a tuned input circuit we find an optimal noise temperature T{sub N,opt} {approx} 3Tf/f{sub c}, where T, f and f{sub c} denote temperature, signal frequency and junction characteristic frequency, respectively. This value is only a factor of 2 larger than the optimal noise temperatures obtained by approximate analytic theories carried out previously in the limit {beta}{sub L}{prime} << 1. We study the dependence of the noise temperature on various model parameters, and give examples using realistic device parameters of the extent to which the intrinsic noise temperature can be realized experimentally.

  5. Evaluation of a pulse-discharge helium ionisation detector for the determination of neon concentrations by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J; Mochalski, P; Pusz, J

    2004-05-07

    A pulse-discharge helium ionisation detector, PDHID (Valco, PD-D2-I) with sample introduced to the discharge zone is shown to be applicable for reliable determinations of neon by gas chromatography. The detection level of 80 pg was obtained, but the dependence between detector response and neon mass was non-linear. However, for the discharge gas doped with 33 ppm of neon, a linear response to the neon mass up to 10(-5) g and the detection level of 0.5 ng were obtained. The method can be used for measuring neon concentrations in groundwater systems for hydrogeological purposes.

  6. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  7. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  8. Reaction times to neon, LED, and fast incandescent brake lamps.

    PubMed

    Sivak, M; Flannagan, M J; Sato, T; Traube, E C; Aoki, M

    1994-06-01

    Standard incandescent brake lamps have a relatively slow rise time. It takes approximately a quarter of a second for them to reach 90% of asymptotic light output, causing potential delays in responses by following drivers. The present study evaluated reaction times to brake signals from standard incandescent brake lamps and from three alternative brake lamps with substantially faster rise times: neon, LED, and fast incandescent. The study, performed in a laboratory, simulated a daytime driving condition. The subject's task was to respond as quickly as possible to the onset of either of two brake lamps in the visual periphery, while engaged in a central tracking task. Brake signals were presented at two levels of luminous intensity. The results showed that reaction times to the alternative brake lamps were faster than to the standard incandescent lamp, with the advantage averaging 166 ms for the LED and neon lamps, and 135 ms for the fast incandescent lamp. A reduction of the signals' luminous intensity from 42 cd to 5 cd increased the reaction time by 84 ms.

  9. Helium-neon laser treatment transforms fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Ahmed, A.; Soudry, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Kopp, F.; Franquin, J. C.; Martin, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    The differentiation of myofibroblastic cells from normal human gingival fibroblasts in vitro has been established by transmission electron microscopy and quantitated by immunohistochemistry, using antigelsolin monoclonal antibodies. Untreated control cultures were compared to cultures exposed to Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser irradiation. A direct and massive transformation of the cultured fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was observed as early as 24 hours after laser treatment, whereas control cultures were comprised of only resting fibroblasts and active fibroblasts. This in vitro induction of myofibroblasts may be analogous to that which occurs in vivo. Therefore we undertook a similar study using biopsies from gingival tissues after wisdom tooth extraction. Myofibroblasts were present in the connective tissue of laser-treated gums 48 hours after irradiation, but not in untreated contralateral control tissues. These data provide evidence that the primary biologic effect of the Helium-Neon laser on connective tissue is the rapid generation of myofibroblasts from fibroblasts. The induction of a phenotype with contractile properties may have clinical significance in the acceleration of the wound-healing process. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2372040

  10. NEON, Establishing a Standardized Network for Groundwater Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Schroeter, N.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is establishing a standardized set of data collection systems comprised of in-situ sensors and observational sampling to obtain data fundamental to the analysis of environmental change at a continental scale. NEON will be collecting aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric data using Observatory-wide standardized designs and methods via a systems engineering approach. This approach ensures a wealth of high quality data, data algorithms, and models that will be freely accessible to all communities such as academic researchers, policy makers, and the general public. The project is established to provide 30 years of data which will enable prediction and forecasting of drivers and responses of ecological change at scales ranging from localized responses through regional gradients and up to the continental scale. The Observatory is a distributed system of sites spread across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, which is subdivided into 20 statistically unique domains, based on a set of 18 ecologically important parameters. Each domain contains at least one core aquatic and terrestrial site which are located in unmanaged lands, and up to 2 additional sites selected to study domain specific questions such as nitrogen deposition gradients and responses of land use change activities on the ecosystem. Here, we present the development of NEON's groundwater observation well network design and the timing strategy for sampling groundwater chemistry. Shallow well networks, up to 100 feet in depth, will be installed at NEON aquatic sites and will allow for observation of localized ecohydrologic site conditions, by providing basic spatio-temporal near-real time data on groundwater parameters (level, temperature, conductivity) collected from in situ high-resolution instrumentation positioned in each well; and biannual sampling of geochemical and nutrient (N and P) concentrations in a subset of wells for each

  11. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a

  12. Revisitation of the luminance conditions for the occurrence of the achromatic neon color spreading illusion.

    PubMed

    Bressan, P

    1993-07-01

    This paper develops the idea (Bressan, 1993) that neon spreading derives from the perceptual scissioning of ordinary assimilation color, a process identical to that occurring with nonillusory colors in phenomenal transparency. It is commonly held that the critical elements in achromatic neon spreading patterns must be of luminance intermediate between that of the embedding lines and of the background. The interpretation of neon spreading on the basis of color scissioning, however, predicts that neon spreading should also be observed for different luminance hierarchies, provided that these are compatible with transparency. This prediction found experimental support in the present work. The results suggest that (1) the widespread notion that chromatic and achromatic neon spreading must be mediated by separate mechanisms is unwarranted; (2) the widespread notion that color spreading in ordinary assimilation patterns and color spreading in neon patterns must be mediated by separate mechanisms is unwarranted; and (3) other than pointing to the way in which the overall organization of a scene affects the mode of color appearance, the neon spreading effect may not convey any extra theoretical relevance.

  13. Predicting helium and neon adsorption and separation on carbon nanotubes by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Bolboli Nojini, Zabiollah; Abbas Rafati, Amir; Majid Hashemianzadeh, Seyed; Samiee, Sepideh

    2011-04-01

    The adsorption of helium and neon mixtures on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated at various temperatures (subcritical and supercritical) and pressures using canonical Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at different temperatures (4, 40, 77 and 130 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 16 MPa. Separation factors and isosteric enthalpies of adsorption were also calculated. Moreover, the adsorption isotherms were obtained at constant specific temperatures (4 and 40 K) and pressures (0.2 and 1.0 MPa) as a function of the amount adsorbed. All of the adsorption isotherms for an equimolar mixture of helium and neon have a Langmuir shape, indicating that no capillary condensation occurs. Both the helium and the neon adsorption isotherms exhibit similar behavior, and slightly more of the helium and neon mixture is adsorbed on the inner surfaces of the SWCNTs than on their outer surfaces. More neon is adsorbed than helium within the specified pressure range. The data obtained show that the isosteric enthalpies for the adsorption of neon are higher than those for helium under the same conditions, which means that adsorption of neon preferentially occurs by (15, 15) SWCNTs. Furthermore, the isosteric enthalpies of adsorption of both gases decrease with increasing temperature.

  14. Influence of dust particles on ionization and excitation in neon dc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumova, V. V.; Polyakov, D. N.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of dust particles on the concentration of metastable neon atoms and ionization was investigated using the developed drift/diffusion model for plasma of positive column of glow discharge. The detailed de-excitation in neon was considered. In addition to usual plasma losses in dusty plasmas, the quenching of metastable atoms on dust particle surface was considered. The strong influence of dust particles on the ionization rate and concentration of metastable neon atoms in a positive column of glow discharge is shown to result from the change in the longitudinal electric field strength.

  15. A Flying Summer Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Frank X.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a five-day summer camp which provided 12 children, ages 9-14, with a complete flying experience. The training consisted of ground school and one hour actual flying time, including the basics of aircraft control and a flight prepared and executed by the students. (MLH)

  16. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  17. Ever Fly a Tetrahedron?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Few things capture the spirit of spring like flying a kite. Watching a kite dance and sail across a cloud spotted sky is not only a visually appealing experience it also provides a foundation for studies in science and mathematics. Put simply, a kite is an airfoil surface that flies when the forces of lift and thrust are greater than the forces of…

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. SQUIDs in biomagnetism: a roadmap towards improved healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Rainer; Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Seton, Hugh; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Paetau, Ritva; Parkkonen, Lauri; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Riaz, Bushra; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Dong, Hui; Hwang, Seong-min; You, Lixing; Inglis, Ben; Clarke, John; Espy, Michelle A.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Magnelind, Per E.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Volegov, Petr L.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Höfner, Nora; Burghoff, Martin; Enpuku, Keiji; Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, Jen-Jei; Knuutila, Jukka; Laine, Petteri; Nenonen, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Globally, the demand for improved health care delivery while managing escalating costs is a major challenge. Measuring the biomagnetic fields that emanate from the human brain already impacts the treatment of epilepsy, brain tumours and other brain disorders. This roadmap explores how superconducting technologies are poised to impact health care. Biomagnetism is the study of magnetic fields of biological origin. Biomagnetic fields are typically very weak, often in the femtotesla range, making their measurement challenging. The earliest in vivo human measurements were made with room-temperature coils. In 1963, Baule and McFee (1963 Am. Heart J. 55 95-6) reported the magnetic field produced by electric currents in the heart (‘magnetocardiography’), and in 1968, Cohen (1968 Science 161 784-6) described the magnetic field generated by alpha-rhythm currents in the brain (‘magnetoencephalography’). Subsequently, in 1970, Cohen et al (1970 Appl. Phys. Lett. 16 278-80) reported the recording of a magnetocardiogram using a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). Just two years later, in 1972, Cohen (1972 Science 175 664-6) described the use of a SQUID in magnetoencephalography. These last two papers set the scene for applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, the subject of this roadmap. The SQUID is a combination of two fundamental properties of superconductors. The first is flux quantization—the fact that the magnetic flux Φ in a closed superconducting loop is quantized in units of the magnetic flux quantum, Φ0 ≡ h/2e, ≈ 2.07 × 10-15 Tm2 (Deaver and Fairbank 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 43-6, Doll R and Näbauer M 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 51-2). Here, h is the Planck constant and e the elementary charge. The second property is the Josephson effect, predicted in 1962 by Josephson (1962 Phys. Lett. 1 251-3) and observed by Anderson and Rowell (1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 230-2) in 1963. The Josephson junction consists of two weakly coupled superconductors

  20. A SQUID gradiometer module with wire-wound pickup antenna and integrated voltage feedback circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Shulin; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Wang, Yongliang; Liu, Chao; Zeng, Jia; Qiu, Yang; Kong, Xiangyan; Dong, Hui; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2012-10-01

    The performance of the direct readout schemes for dc SQUID, Additional Positive Feedback (APF), noise cancellation (NC) and SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC), have been studied in conjunction with planar SQUID magnetometers. In this paper, we examine the NC technique applied to a niobium SQUID gradiometer module with an Nb wire-wound antenna connecting to a dual-loop SQUID chip with an integrated voltage feedback circuit for suppression of the preamplifier noise contribution. The sensitivity of the SQUID gradiometer module is measured to be about 1 fT/(cm √Hz) in the white noise range in a magnetically shielded room. Using such gradiometer, both MCG and MEG signals are recorded.

  1. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size.

  2. Helium and neon abundances and compositions in cometary matter.

    PubMed

    Marty, Bernard; Palma, Russell L; Pepin, Robert O; Zimmermann, Laurent; Schlutter, Dennis J; Burnard, Peter G; Westphal, Andrew J; Snead, Christopher J; Bajt, Sasa; Becker, Richard H; Simones, Jacob E

    2008-01-04

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet 81P/Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here we report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. Neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in "phase Q," a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays 3He/4He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are probably carried in high-temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively, the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion-flux nebular environment close to the young Sun.

  3. A Comparison of Detailed Level and Superconfiguration Models of Neon

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S B; Fournier, K B; Bauche-Arnoult, C; Bauche, J; Peyrusse, O

    2005-01-03

    The superconfiguration (SC) approach to collisional-radiative modeling can significantly decrease the computational demands of finding non-LTE level populations in complex systems. However, it has not yet been fully determined whether the statistical averaging of SC models leads to a significant loss of accuracy. The present work compares results from two independent models: a detailed-level accounting (DLA) model based on HULLAC data and the SC model MOST. The relatively simple level structures of the K- and L-shell ions of the neon test system ensure a tractable number of levels in the DLA model but challenge the statistical assumptions of the SC approach. Nonetheless, we find fair agreement between the two models for average ion charges, SC populations, and various effective temperatures.

  4. Helium and Neon Abundances and Compositions in Cometary Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, B; Palma, R L; Pepin, R O; Zimmmermann, L; Schlutter, D J; Burnard, P G; Westphal, A J; Snead, C J; Bajt, S; Becker, R H; Simones, J E

    2007-10-15

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here they report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in 'phase Q', a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are carried in high temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion flux nebular environment close to the young Sun.

  5. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C.; Wu, R. Q.

    2015-08-01

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O2 molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O2 molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ˜1.8 μB . The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic X Y spins on a square lattice find 1 /f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs.

  6. A SQUID NDE system for the investigation of pinch welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary results for a magnetic flow spectrometer for magnetic microparticle separation, and a magnetic flow cytometer for particle identification. The application of the instrument is to high-throughput bioassay. Here we report on the first application of our magnetic spectrometer to the sorting of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic microspheres in flow. The system is based on a permanent magnet quadrupole and separates the polymer coated magnetic microspheres based on their magnetic moments. The cryogenic section of our magnetic flow cytometer, which involves SQUID-based detection of the sorted magnetic microspheres based on their magnetic moments, has been re-engineered to permit a smaller standoff between the SQUID array and the flowing magnetic particles. We present preliminary results with the new experimental setup, with an emphasis on both spatial and signal resolution.

  7. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; ...

    2015-12-07

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. Additionally, we consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. Furthermore, the first two regimes can be controlled bymore » the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation.« less

  8. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-12-07

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. Additionally, we consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. Furthermore, the first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation.

  9. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-01-01

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. We also consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. The first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation. PMID:26641890

  10. nSQUID arrays as conveyers of quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Qiang; Averin, D. V.

    2014-12-15

    We have considered the quantum dynamics of an array of nSQUIDs—two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms. Effective dual-rail structure of the array creates additional internal degree of freedom for the fluxons in the array, which can be used to encode and transport quantum information. Physically, this degree of freedom is represented by electromagnetic excitations localized on the fluxon. We have calculated the spatial profile and frequency spectrum of these excitations. Their dynamics can be reduced to two quantum states, so that each fluxon moving through the array carries with it a qubit of information. Coherence properties of such a propagating qubit in the nSQUID array are characterized by the dynamic suppression of the low-frequency decoherence due to the motion-induced spreading of the noise spectral density to a larger frequency interval.

  11. Low-frequency Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, Steven; Hover, David; Kittel, Achim; Mueck, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting qubits are a leading candidate for scalable quantum information processing. In order to realize the full potential of these qubits, it is necessary to develop a more complete understanding of the microscopic physics that governs dissipation and dephasing of the quantum state. In the case of the Josephson phase and flux qubits, the dominant dephasing mechanism is an apparent low-frequency magnetic flux noise with a 1/f spectrum. The origin of this excess noise is not understood. We report the results of SQUID measurements that explore the dependence of the excess low-frequency flux noise on SQUID inductance, geometry, materials, and temperature. We discuss contributions to the measured noise from temperature fluctuations, trapped vortices in the superconducting films, and surface magnetic states in the native oxides of the superconductors. We discuss implications of our measurements for qubit dephasing.

  12. Nested Sphere Model for SQUID-based Impedance Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajrala, Vijayanand; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Claycomb, James; Miller, John

    2004-03-01

    An axisymmetric FEM model is used to predict the SQUID response to changes in tissue conductivity and blood volume during the cardiac cycle. The heart is modeled as a nested sphere inside a cylindrical conducting thorax. The current density and resulting magnetic field is calculated during end systolic, end diastolic and diastolic phases. Modeling results are compared to Impedance Magnetocardiography (IMCG) measurements made using a High-Tc SQUID magnetometer in an unshielded environment .In this measurements, a low amplitude ac current is passed through the body through outer electrodes. Variations in blood flow during the cardiac cycle perturb currents that give rise to time varying magnetic fields amplitudes. Applications to inductive IMCG will be discussed.

  13. The Purification of Choline Acetyltransferase of Squid-Head Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S. S.; Mautner, Henry G.

    1973-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.6) isolated from the head ganglia of squid could be purified by use of mercurial-Sepharose columns as well as Sepharose columns to which the enzyme inhibitor p-(m-bromophenyl)vinyl pyridinium had been attached. These columns, in conjunction with 30-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, 40-30% ammonium sulfate extraction, chromatography on sulfopropyl-Sephadex and on cellulose phosphate and hydroxylapatite columns, led to the isolation of three factions of choline acetyltransferase ranging in activity from 1000 to 4000 μmole/mg of protein/per hr. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggests that two of these fractions are homogeneous. The squid choline acetyltransferase is different from the mammalian-brain enzymes in having a larger molecular weight under the conditions used and in being relatively poorly inhibited by styryl pyridinium compounds. Images PMID:4521199

  14. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schönau, T; Zakosarenko, V; Schmelz, M; Stolz, R; Anders, S; Linzen, S; Meyer, M; Meyer, H-G

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz(1/2). The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  15. Isolation and characterization of collagen from squid ( Ommastrephes bartrami) skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mingyan; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2009-06-01

    Collagen of squid ( Ommastrephes bartrami) skin was examined in the present study. Histology showed that collagen fiber in the skin was partially cross-linked with muscle fiber. Acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) and pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) were extracted from the skin and characterized. The results of amino acid composition and electrophoretic patterns revealed that ASC and PSC were both type I collagen, containing α1 and α2 chains. FTIR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) investigations confirmed the existence of helical arrangements in PSC of squid skin. The denaturation temperature (Td) and shrinkage temperature (Ts) of PSC were 29.4°C and 52.8°C, respectively.

  16. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction

    PubMed Central

    McCaughan, Adam N.; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films. PMID:27296586

  17. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  18. TES Detector Noise Limited Readout Using SQUID Multiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Khan, S. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) with large numbers of individual detector pixels requires multiplexers for efficient readout. The use of multiplexers reduces the number of wires needed between the cryogenic electronics and the room temperature electronics and cuts the number of required cryogenic amplifiers. We are using an 8 channel SQUID multiplexer to read out one-dimensional TES arrays which are used for submillimeter astronomical observations. We present results from test measurements which show that the low noise level of the SQUID multiplexers allows accurate measurements of the TES Johnson noise, and that in operation, the readout noise is dominated by the detector noise. Multiplexers for large number of channels require a large bandwidth for the multiplexed readout signal. We discuss the resulting implications for the noise performance of these multiplexers which will be used for the readout of two dimensional TES arrays in next generation instruments.

  19. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1984-03-13

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  20. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by squid gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1984-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  1. Acoustical Scattering, Propagation, and Attenuation Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake Kelly J. Benoit-Bird College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences 104...Attenuation Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...have successfully recruited graduate students that will conduct thesis research as part of this project. RESULTS Both hake and Humboldt squid

  2. Acoustical Scattering, Propagation, and Attenuation Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Caused by Two Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake Kelly J. Benoit-Bird College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences 104...Abundant Pacific Schooling Species: Humboldt Squid and Hake 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...with maximum lengths of up to 90 cm. A more recent immigrant to these waters, is the similarly sized and highly abundant jumbo or Humboldt squid

  3. Fragmentation dynamics of ionized neon trimer inside helium nanodroplets: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Bonhommeau, David; Viel, Alexandra; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2004-06-22

    We report a theoretical study of the fragmentation dynamics of Ne(3) (+) inside helium nanodroplets, following vertical ionization of the neutral neon trimer. The motion of the neon atoms is treated classically, while transitions between the electronic states of the ionic cluster are treated quantum mechanically. A diatomics-in-molecules description of the potential energy surfaces is used, in a minimal basis set consisting of three effective p orbitals on each neon atom for the missing electron. The helium environment is modeled by a friction force acting on the neon atoms when their speed exceeds the Landau velocity. A reasonable range of values for the corresponding friction coefficient is obtained by comparison with existing experimental measurements.

  4. Neon as a Buffer Gas for a Mercury-Ion Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John; Chung, Sang

    2008-01-01

    A developmental miniature mercury-ion clock has stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling components are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein a getter pump is used to maintain the partial vacuum, and the evacuated tube is backfilled with mercury vapor in a buffer gas. Neon was determined to be the best choice for the buffer gas: The pressure-induced frequency pulling by neon was found to be only about two-fifths of that of helium. Furthermore, because neon diffuses through solids much more slowly than does helium, the operational lifetime of a tube backfilled with neon could be considerably longer than that of a tube backfilled with helium.

  5. Equation of state of dense neon and krypton plasmas in the partial ionization regime

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, Z. G.

    2015-12-15

    The compression behaviors of dense neon and krypton plasmas over a wide pressure-temperature range are investigated by self-consistent fluid variational theory. The ionization degree and equation of state of dense neon and krypton are calculated in the density-temperature range of 0.01–10 g/cm{sup 3} and 4–50 kK. A region of thermodynamic instability is found which is related to the plasma phase transition. The calculated shock adiabat and principal Hugoniot of liquid krypton are in good agreement with available experimental data. The predicted results of shock-compressed liquid neon are presented, which provide a guide for dynamical experiments or numerical first-principle calculations aimed at studying the compression properties of liquid neon in the partial ionization regime.

  6. Development of RF Sensor Based on Two-cell SQUID

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    public release; distribution is unlimited. where βrf = 2πLI0/Φ0 is the so called SQUID hysteresis parameter [1], and Φa the static flux introduced by...Journal of Applied Physics 109 063915-10 [12] Goppl M, Fragner A, Baur M, Bianchetti R, Filipp S, Fink J M, Leek P J, Puebla G, Steffen L and Wallraff A

  7. Simulated bi-SQUID Arrays Performing Direction Finding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    First, we applied the multiple signal classification ( MUSIC ) algorithm on linearly polarized signals. We included multiple signals in the output...both of the same frequency and different fre- quencies. Next, we explored a modified MUSIC algorithm called dimensionality reduction MUSIC (DR- MUSIC ... MUSIC algorithm is able to determine the AoA from the simulated SQUID data for linearly polarized signals. The MUSIC algorithm could accurately find

  8. Project SQUID. Liquid Propellant Rockets. Volume 2, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-06-30

    Department . This report was prepared by the Technical Survey Group of Project SQUID as a cooperative effort of Princeton University and Engineering Re...In addition, Professor J. V. Charyk of the Aeronautical Engineering Depart - ment at Princeton visited the California Institute of Technology and fur...of the War and Navy Departments and other Government agencies, and of representatives of academic and industrial laboratories who arc under contract

  9. Detecting damage in steel with scanning SQUID microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Clatterbuck, David; Morris Jr., J.W.; Shaw, T.J.; McDermott R.; Clarke, John

    2001-09-04

    A ''Holy Grail'' of NDE research is a non-destructive method for measuring fatigue damage prior to crack initiation. High-Tc scanning SQUID microscopy may be a useful tool. Because of the exceptional magnetic sensitivity of this technique, fatigue damage can be detected well before microcrack initiation, and in the absence of other obvious microstructure or property changes. Given the spatial resolution of the technique, undamaged material can be located and used to set internal standards.

  10. Absolute calibration and beam background of the Squid Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.M.; Cameron, P.R.; Shea, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of beam background in Squid Polarimetry is not without residual benefits. The authors may deliberately generate beam background by gently kicking the beam at the spin tune frequency. This signal may be used to accomplish a simple and accurate absolute calibration of the polarimeter. The authors present details of beam background calculations and their application to polarimeter calibration, and suggest a simple proof-of-principle accelerator experiment.

  11. Hierarchical, Self-Similar Structure in Native Squid Pen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei-Chi; Peters, Robert; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Proteins, chitin and keratin form the elementary building blocks of many biomaterials. How these molecules assemble into larger, macroscopic structures with very different properties is the fundamental question we are trying to answer. Squid pen is a transparent backbone inside the squid, which supports the mantle of the squid. The pens show a hierarchical, self-similar structure under the microscope and the AFM with fibers from 500 μm to 0.2 μm in diameter. The chitin molecules form nano-crystallites of monoclinic lattice symmetry surrounded by a protein layer, resulting in β-chitin nano-fibrils. Signals corresponding to the α-coil protein phase and β-chitin were observed in X-ray experiments in-situ. The molecular structure is highly anisotropic with 90% of the α-coils and β-chitin crystallites oriented along the fiber-axis indicating a strong correlation between the structures on millimeters down to the molecular scale. This research was funded by NSERC, NRC, CFI, and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation.

  12. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  13. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of shunted μ-SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nikhil; Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2014-04-24

    In order to eliminate hysteresis, we have fabricated and characterized niobium based shunted micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUIDs). We find a wide temperature range where these μ-SQUIDs are non-hysteretic in nature and show a very good I{sub c} vs. B oscillations in hysteretic regime and V vs. B oscillations in non-hysteretic regime. Here we report the characteristics of a shunted- μ-SQUID (Wf38LS72D5). In this device we have achieved a large voltage modulation, in non-hysteretic regime, at various temperatures including such as 1.1 mV at 6.62 K with a transfer function V{sub Φ} = 7.2mV/Φ{sub 0}. The figures within the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, the article re-flowed and pagination increased from 3 to 4 pages. This article was updated on 14 May 2014 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged. Readers are advised that the replacement article PDF file contains an additional blank page to preserve the original pagination.

  15. High Tc SQUID Detector for Magnetic Metallic Particles in Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Akai, Tomonori; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Suzuki, Shuichi

    High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor. After the discovery of the high-Tc superconducting materials, the performance of the high-Tc SQUID has been improved and stabilized. One strong candidate for application is a detection system of magnetic foreign matters in industrial products. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products such as lithium ion batteries. If this happens, the manufacturer of the product suffers a great loss recalling products. The outer dimension of metallic particles less than 100 micron cannot be detected using X-ray imaging, which is commonly used for the inspection. Therefore a highly sensitive system for small foreign matters is required. We developed detection systems based on high-Tc SQUID for industrial products. We could successfully detect small iron particles of less than 50 micron on a belt conveyer. These detection levels were hard to be achieved using conventional X-ray detection or other methods.

  16. SQUID sensor application for small metallic particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Takeyoshi; Suzuki, Shuichi

    2009-04-01

    High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is an ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor. Since the performance of the SQUID is improved and stabilized, now it is ready for application. One strong candidate for application is a detection system of magnetic foreign matters in industrial products or beverages. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products such as lithium ion batteries. If this happens, the manufacturer of the product suffers a great loss recalling products. The outer dimension of metallic particles less than 100 μm cannot be detected by an X-ray imaging, which is commonly used for the inspection. Ionization of the material is also a big issue for beverages in the case of the X-ray imaging. Therefore a highly sensitive and safety detection system for small foreign matters is required. We developed detection systems based on high-Tc SQUID with a high-performance magnetic shield. We could successfully measure small iron particles of 100 μm on a belt conveyer and stainless steel balls of 300 μm in water. These detection levels were hard to be achieved by a conventional X-ray detection or other methods.

  17. SQUID array for magnetic inspection of prestressed concrete bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, H.-J.; Wolf, W.; Glaas, W.; Zimmermann, E.; Faley, M. I.; Sawade, G.; Mattheus, R.; Neudert, G.; Gampe, U.; Krieger, J.

    2002-03-01

    For detection of tendon ruptures in prestressed members of bridges, a four-channel SQUID system was developed. The tendons are magnetized by scanning a yoke electromagnet over the concrete surface along the hidden member. Four HTS dc-SQUID magnetometers with ramp-type junctions, optimized for high-field performance, are mounted in an orientation-independent liquid nitrogen cryostat. The SQUIDs are integrated as a linear array within the yoke and operated in magnetic fields up to 15 mT, recording the stray field during magnetization as well as the remanent field after switching off the excitation. Unwanted signals from stirrups of the mild steel reinforcement are suppressed with two types of techniques: either the comparison of remanent field signals after changing the magnetization direction of the stirrups, or a best fit of typical stirrup signals to the stray field signal and their subtraction. Subsequent correlation analysis with the dipolar signal of a typical void yields rupture signal amplitudes. A finite element program was written to simulate stray field and remanent field traces of typical steel configurations. Excellent agreement with measured data was found. Results of measurements on a prestressed highway bridge are presented. Signal amplitudes above the threshold values were verified as originating from ruptures of the steel tendon by opening the bridge deck.

  18. A planar second-order DC SQUID gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Carelli, P; Chiaventi, L; Leoni, R; Pullano, M; Schirripa Spagnolo, G

    1991-01-01

    In this work we describe a DC SQUID gradiometer, sensitive to the second spatial derivative of the magnetic field. The sensitive area of the gradiometer is the inductive body of the DC SQUID itself. The isoflux line distribution generated by a dipolar source, obtained by performing magnetic measurements with an array of such detectors, is relatively complicated, but its localisation capability is similar to that one usually achieves with axial detector arrays. Planar gradiometers also show a better resolution for near sources and a stronger rejection of far disturbances. The final device is expected to have an inductance of a few hundreds of pH in order to obtain performances typical of a low noise DC SQUID. The pick-up coils will be the combination of four square holes of 500 microns side with a 1.05 cm baseline. Due to the magnetic field concentration (in the final device it can be a factor 10) the gradiometer will have a sensitivity of 10(-11) T m-2 Hz-1/2 and a field sensitivity of about 2 fT Hz-1/2. Some preliminary results, obtained on detectors with an intermediate area between the prototype and final device, are reported here. The process used to fabricate this second-order gradiometer is based on Nb-NbO chi-PbAuIn Josephson tunnel junctions. Some possible improvements will also be described.

  19. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  1. Magnetic microscopy based on high-Tc SQUIDs for room temperature samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. W.; Kong, X. Y.; Ren, Y. F.; Yu, H. W.; Ding, H. S.; Zhao, S. P.; Chen, G. H.; Zhang, L. H.; Zhou, Y. L.; Yang, Q. S.

    2003-11-01

    The SQUID microscope is the most suitable instrument for imaging magnetic fields above sample surfaces if one is mainly interested in field sensitivity. In this paper, both the magnetic moment sensitivity and spatial resolution of the SQUID microscope are analysed with a simple point moment model. The result shows that the ratio of SQUID sensor size to sensor-sample distance effectively influences the sensitivity and spatial resolution. In comparison with some experimental results of magnetic images for room temperature samples from our high-Tc SQUID microscope in an unshielded environment, a brief discussion for further improvement is presented.

  2. Trophic niche of squids: Insights from isotopic data in marine systems worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Joan; Coll, Marta; Somes, Christoper J.; Olson, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    Cephalopods are an important prey resource for fishes, seabirds, and marine mammals, and are also voracious predators on crustaceans, fishes, squid and zooplankton. Because of their high feeding rates and abundance, squids have the potential to exert control on the recruitment of commercially important fishes. In this review, we synthesize the available information for two intrinsic markers (δ15N and δ13C isotopic values) in squids for all oceans and several types of ecosystems to obtain a global view of the trophic niches of squids in marine ecosystems. In particular, we aimed to examine whether the trophic positions and trophic widths of squid species vary among oceans and ecosystem types. To correctly compare across systems, we adjusted squid δ15N values for the isotopic variability of phytoplankton at the base of the food web provided by an ocean circulation-biogeochemistry-isotope model. Studies that focused on the trophic ecology of squids using isotopic techniques were few, and most of the information on squids was from studies on their predators. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic positions and exploit a large range of trophic resources, reflecting the versatility of their feeding behavior and confirming conclusions from food-web models. Clear differences in both trophic position and trophic width were found among oceans and ecosystem types. The study also reinforces the importance of considering the natural variation in isotopic values when comparing the isotopic values of consumers inhabiting different ecosystems.

  3. Device-structure dependence of shift in SQUID characteristics by flux trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshikazu; Takeda, Eriko; Takagi, Kazumasa

    1994-02-01

    Shifts in voltage-flux characteristics of a SQUID by flux trapping have been measured to study effectiveness of guard ring structure on shielding of magnetic field. The measurements are made under controlled magnetic field. Magnitude of the shift depends on the device structure. It is found that there exists a threshold field for the flux trapping, and the field is reduced by introducing the guard-ring in the SQUID. Comparing to the SQUID without the structure, the SQUID with it needs higher-grade shielding to prevent the flux trapping during cooling down.

  4. Design of improved integrated thin-film planar dc SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchen, M.B.

    1985-12-01

    Key issues in the design of improved first and second derivative, thin-film, planar dc SQUID gradiometers are discussed. The introduction of a planar coupling scheme to optimally couple the planar dc SQUID to the gradiometer pickup loops leads to significantly increased sensitivity as well as elimination of the sensitivity differences between series and parallel gradiometer loop configurations. Two-hole and figure-8 SQUID designs are presented which are consistent with intrinsic gradiometer balance < or approx. =10/sup -4/ against uniform field changes. Straightforward calculations together with data from existing low-noise SQUIDs suggest improvements in gradient sensitivity on the order of 10/sup 2/ over existing planar gradiometers.

  5. Quantum dynamical structure factor of liquid neon via a quasiclassical symmetrized method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Bonella, Sara; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    We apply the phase integration method for quasiclassical quantum time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011), 10.1080/00268976.2011.619506] to compute the dynamic structure factor of liquid neon. So far the method had been tested only on model systems. By comparing our results for neon with experiments and previous calculations, we demonstrate that the scheme is accurate and efficient also for a realistic model of a condensed phase system showing quantum behavior.

  6. Method and apparatus for cooling high temperature superconductors with neon-nitrogen mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Laverman, Royce J.; Lai, Ban-Yen

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for cooling high temperature superconducting materials (HTSC) to superconductive temperatures within the range of 27.degree. K. to 77.degree. K. using a mixed refrigerant consisting of liquefied neon and nitrogen containing up to about ten mole percent neon by contacting and surrounding the HTSC material with the mixed refrigerant so that free convection or forced flow convection heat transfer can be effected.

  7. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  8. Emission anomalous optical magnetic resonances in a mixture of even neon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Saprykin, E. G.; Sorokin, V. A. Shalagin, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    Unusual resonances have been detected in the dependence of the discharge glow in neon on the longitudinal magnetic field. The resonances appear in fairly high magnetic fields and are observed only at low gas pressures and exclusively in a mixture of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne isotopes. This phenomenon is an evidence of collective resonant radiation processes involving atoms of different neon isotopes.

  9. A comparison of neon versus helium ion beam induced deposition via Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Smith, Daryl A; Rack, Philip D

    2013-03-22

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of PtCx (where x ∼ 5) using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated by performing Monte Carlo simulations of helium and neon ions. The helium beam leads to more lateral growth relative to the neon beam because of its larger interaction volume. The lateral growth of the nanopillars is dominated by molecules deposited via secondary electrons in both the simulations. Notably, the helium pillars are dominated by SE-I electrons whereas the neon pillars are dominated by SE-II electrons. Using a low precursor residence time of 70 μs, resulting in an equilibrium coverage of ∼4%, the neon simulation has a lower deposition efficiency (3.5%) compared to that of the helium simulation (6.5%). At larger residence time (10 ms) and consequently larger equilibrium coverage (85%) the deposition efficiencies of helium and neon increased to 49% and 21%, respectively; which is dominated by increased lateral growth rates leading to broader pillars. The nanoscale growth is further studied by varying the ion beam diameter at 10 ms precursor residence time. The study shows that total SE yield decreases with increasing beam diameters for both the ion types. However, helium has the larger SE yield as compared to that of neon in both the low and high precursor residence time, and thus pillars are wider in all the simulations studied.

  10. Electrical Properties for Capacitively Coupled Radio Frequency Discharges of Helium and Neon at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanisli, Murat; Sahin, Neslihan; Demir, Suleyman

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the symmetric radio frequency (RF) electrode discharge is formed between the two electrodes placing symmetric parallel. The electrical properties of symmetric capacitive RF discharge of pure neon and pure helium have been obtained from current and voltage waveforms. Calculations are done according to the homogeneous discharge model of capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) using with the data in detail. Electrical properties of bulk plasma and sheath capacitance are also investigated at low pressure with this model. This study compares the electrical characteristics and sheath capacitance changes with RF power and pressure for helium and neon discharges. Also, the aim of the study is to see the differences between helium and neon discharges' current and voltage values. Their root-mean-square voltages and currents are obtained from Tektronix 3052C oscilloscope. Modified homogeneous discharge model of CCRF is used for low pressure discharges and the calculations are done using experimental results. It is seen that homogeneous discharge model of CCRF is usable with modification and then helium and neon discharge's electrical properties are investigated and presented with a comparison. Helium discharge's voltage and current characteristic have smaller values than neon's. It may be said that neon discharge is a better conductor than helium discharge. It is seen that the sheath capacitance is inversely correlation with sheath resistance.

  11. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K.

  12. Helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure: A superior option.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Hua; Zhao, Chen; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Chen, Mei-Juan; Liu, Qing-Huai

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of helium-neon laser therapy in the treatment of hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure and compare the results with those of a combined drugs and surgery regimen. A total of 70 patients with hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure in 70 eyes were randomly divided into two groups: Helium-neon laser therapy (group A) and drugs plus surgery (group B). Each group contained 35 patients. The healing rates and times of the conjunctival wound were recorded and compared following helium-neon laser treatment or the drugs plus surgery regimen. Changes in the hydroxyapatite orbital implant prior to and following helium-neon laser irradiation were analyzed. A similar animal study was conducted using 24 New Zealand white rabbits, which received orbital implants and were then received drug treatment or helium-neon therapy. In the human experiment, the rates for conjunctival wound healing were 97.14% in group A and 74.29% in group B, with a significant difference between the groups (χ(2)=5.71, P<0.05). Patients with mild exposure were healed after 7.22±2.11 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 14.33±3.20 days of drugs plus surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the groups (t=8.97, P<0.05). Patients with moderate to severe exposure were healed after 18.19±2.12 days of helium-neon laser therapy and 31.25±4.21 days of drugs plus surgery. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (t=7.91, P<0.05). Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the helium-neon laser therapy significantly promoted vascularization of the hydroxyapatite orbital implant. These results, combined with pathological findings in animals, which showed that a helium-neon laser promoted vascularization and had anti-inflammatory effects, suggest that helium-neon laser irradiation is an effective method for treating hydroxyapatite orbital implant exposure, thereby avoiding secondary surgery.

  13. 77 FR 22678 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648- XB145 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Trimester 1 Longfin Squid Fishery AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  14. A YBCO RF-squid variable temperature susceptometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Luwei; Qiu, Jinwu; Zhang, Xianfeng; Tang, Zhimin; Cai, Yimin; Qian, Yongjia

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) susceptibility using a high-temperature radio-frequency (rf) SQUID and a normal metal pick-up coil is employed in testing weak magnetization of the sample. The magnetic moment resolution of the device is 1 x 10(exp -6) emu, and that of the susceptibility is 5 x 10(exp -6) emu/cu cm.

  15. Production of valued materials from squid viscera by subcritical water hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M Salim; Ahn, Hyang-Min; Kishimura, Hideki; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2010-09-01

    Subcritical water hydrolysis was carried out to produce valued materials from squid viscera, the waste product of fish processing industries. The reaction temperatures for hydrolysis of rawand deoiled squid viscera were maintained from 180 to 280 degrees C for5 min. The ratio of material to water forhydrolysis was 1:50. Most of the proteins from deoiled squid viscera were recovered at high temperature. The protein yield in raw squid viscera hydrolyzate decreased with the rise of temperature. The reducing sugar yield was higher at high temperature in subcritical water hydrolysis of both raw and deoiled squid viscera. The highest yield of amino acids in raw and deoiled squid viscera hydrolyzates were 233.25 +/- 3.25 and 533.78 +/- 4.13 mg g(-1) at 180 and 280 degrees C, respectively. Most amino acids attained highest yield at the reaction temperature range of 180-220 degrees C and 260-280 degrees C for raw and deoiled samples, respectively. The recovery of amino acids from deoiled squid viscera was about 1.5 times higher than that of raw squid viscera.

  16. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  17. 77 FR 58507 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Framework Adjustment 5 AGENCY... Adjustment 5 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan (MSB FMP), which was... classification society approved by the Coast Guard pursuant to 46 U.S.C. 3316(c), Maine State Sealer of...

  18. 77 FR 74159 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Framework Adjustment 7 AGENCY... on the longfin squid fishery from a catch cap to a discard cap in Framework Adjustment 7 to the... Adjustment 7, are available from: Dr. Christopher M. Moore, Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic...

  19. 75 FR 1024 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... for the Atlantic mackerel, squid, and butterfish (MSB) fisheries. This rulemaking could institute... amendment to the MSB Fishery Management Plan (FMP), which would consider catch shares for the Loligo and... in the upcoming amendment to the MSB FMP. Reaffirming the squid control date is intended to...

  20. Multi-terminal multi-junction dc SQUID for nanoscale magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Uri, Aviram; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is of major importance for the development of sensitive scanning nanoscale magnetometry tools. The high sensitivity of nanoSQUIDs is restricted, however, to only particular periodic values of the applied magnetic field, making accurate measurements at intermediate values of the field impossible. We present a theoretical investigation of a multi-terminal, multi-junction SQUID (mSQUID) that lifts this limitation by providing electrical means for a continuous shift of the quantum interference pattern with respect to the applied field. Analysis of 4-terminal, 4-junction and 3-terminal, 3-junction mSQUIDs shows that operation at maximum sensitivity can be obtained at any value of the magnetic field by applying control current to the extra terminals. The model describes the variation and the shift of the interference pattern as a function of the control currents, junction asymmetries, and the mSQUID inductance. The mSQUID is also shown to provide a direct measurement of the current-phase relations of superconducting junctions. The derived model provides a quantitative description of the recently developed multi-terminal nanoSQUID-on-tip.

  1. 77 FR 44172 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY: National... non-specified reserve to the initial total allowable catch of squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian... 679. The 2012 initial total allowable catch (ITAC) of squid in the BSAI was established as 361...

  2. Quantum analysis of a nonlinear microwave cavity-embedded dc SQUID displacement detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, P. D.; Blencowe, M. P.; Buks, E.

    2008-09-01

    We carry out a quantum analysis of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mechanical displacement detector, comprising a SQUID with mechanically compliant loop segment, which is embedded in a microwave transmission line resonator. The SQUID is approximated as a nonlinear current-dependent inductance, inducing an external flux tunable nonlinear Duffing self-interaction term in the microwave resonator mode equation. Motion of the compliant SQUID loop segment is transduced inductively through changes in the external flux threading SQUID loop, giving a ponderomotive radiation pressure-type coupling between the microwave and mechanical resonator modes. Expressions are derived for the detector signal response and noise, and it is found that a soft-spring Duffing self-interaction enables a closer approach to the displacement detection standard quantum limit, as well as cooling closer to the ground state.

  3. Technical and commerical challenges in high Tc SQUIDs and their industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device for measuring changes in magnetic flux. Since its discovery in the sixties, scientists have made consistent efforts to apply SQUID's to various applications. Instruments that are the most sensitive in their respective categories have been built, such as SQUID DC susceptometer that is now manufactured by Quantum Design, pico-voltmeter which could measure 10(exp -14) volts, and gravitational wave detectors. One of the most successful applications of SQUID's is in magnetoencephalography, a non-invasive technique for investigating neuronal activity in the living human brain. This technique employs a multi-channel SQUID magnetometer that maps the weak magnetic field generated by small current when information is processed in brain, and its performance is marvelous.

  4. Technical and commerical challenges in high Tc SQUIDs and their industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, D. F.

    1995-04-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device for measuring changes in magnetic flux. Since its discovery in the sixties, scientists have made consistent efforts to apply SQUID's to various applications. Instruments that are the most sensitive in their respective categories have been built, such as SQUID DC susceptometer that is now manufactured by Quantum Design, pico-voltmeter which could measure 10(exp -14) volts, and gravitational wave detectors. One of the most successful applications of SQUID's is in magnetoencephalography, a non-invasive technique for investigating neuronal activity in the living human brain. This technique employs a multi-channel SQUID magnetometer that maps the weak magnetic field generated by small current when information is processed in brain, and its performance is marvelous.

  5. Multiplexing of Hot-Electron Nanobolometers Using Microwave SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Day, Peter K.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    2009-12-01

    We have obtained the first data on the multiplexed operation of titanium hot-electron bolometers (HEB). Because of their low thermal conductance and small electron heat capacity nanobolometers are particularly interesting as sensors for far-infrared spectroscopy and mid- and near-IR calorimetry. However, the short time constant of these devices (˜μs at 300-400 mK) makes time domain or audio-frequency domain multiplexing impractical. The Microwave SQUID (MSQUID) approach pursued in this work uses dc SQUIDs coupled to X-band microresonators which are, in turn, coupled to a transmission line. We used a 4-element array of Ti HEBs operated at 415 mK in a He3 dewar with an optical fiber access. The microwave signal exhibited 10-MHz wide resonances at individual MSQUD frequencies between 9 GHz and 10 GHz. The resonance depth is modulated by the current through the bolometer via a change of the SQUID flux state. The transmitted signal was amplified by a cryogenic amplifier and downconverted to baseband using an IQ mixer. A 1-dB per Ω0/2 responsivity was sufficient for keeping the system noise at the level of ˜2 pA/Hz1/2. This is more than an order of magnitude smaller than phonon noise in the HEB. The devices were able to detect single near-IR photons (1550 nm) with a time constant of 3.5 μs. Follow-on work will scale the array to larger size and will address the microwave frequency signal generation and processing using a digital transceiver.

  6. Multiplexing of Hot-Electron Nanobolometers Using Microwave SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Day, Peter K.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    2009-01-01

    We have obtained the first data on the multiplexed operation of titanium hot-electron bolometers (HEB). Because of their low thermal conductance and small electron heat capacity nanobolometers are particularly interesting as sensors for far-infrared spectroscopy and mid- and near-IR calorimetry. However, the short time constant of these devices (approximately microseconds at 300-400 mK) makes time domain or audio-frequency domain multiplexing impractical. The Microwave SQUID (MSQUID) approach pursued in this work uses dc SQUIDs coupled to X-band microresonators which are, in turn, coupled to a transmission line. We used a 4-element array of Ti HEBs operated at 415 mK in a He3 dewar with an optical fiber access. The microwave signal exhibited 10-MHz wide resonances at individual MSQUD frequencies between 9 GHz and 10 GHz. The resonance depth is modulated by the current through the bolometer via a change of the SQUID flux state. The transmitted signal was amplified by a cryogenic amplifier and downconverted to baseband using an IQ mixer. A 1-dB per ??/2 responsivity was sufficient for keeping the system noise at the level of 2 pA/Hz1/2. This is more than an order of magnitude smaller than phonon noise in the HEB. The devices were able to detect single near- IR photons (1550 nm) with a time constant of 3.5 ?s. Follow-on work will scale the array to larger size and will address the microwave frequency signal generation and processing using a digital transceiver.

  7. Helium and neon in lunar ilmenites of different antiquities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from individual lunar ilmenite grains, approximately 100 micrometers in diameter, using a pulsed step-heating technique. Grains from lunar samples 71501 and 79035, believed to have been exposed to solar corpuscular radiation at greatly different times, were studied. The results found were consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to solar-wind-implanted gas, a second more deeply implanted component was present in both species of grains. Average isotopic ratios were determined giving equal weight to each of the particles. As found in depth studies employing chemical etching, both the He-3/He-4 and Ne-20/Ne-22 ratios were lower in the more deeply implanted gas than in the solar wind component. The He-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind component of the more ancient grains was lower than that in the more recently exposed ones, whereas no difference was found for the more deeply embedded He. In the deeply embedded component of the ancient grains, the He-4/Ne-20 ratio was approx. 2x that found in the more recently exposed grains. In the shallowly implanted component, the ratio varied greatly from grain to grain, preventing comparison with the solar wind elemental composition.

  8. Effect of helium-neon laser on musculoskeletal trigger points

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Mackler, L.; Bork, C.; Bourbon, B.; Trumbore, D.

    1986-07-01

    Cold lasers have been proposed recently as a therapeutic tool for treating a wide variety of pathological conditions, including wounds, arthritis, orthopedic problems, and pain. These proposed therapeutic effects largely have been unsubstantiated by research. A randomized, double blind study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser on the resistance of areas of skin overlying musculoskeletal trigger points. These areas usually demonstrate decreased skin resistance when compared with the surrounding tissue. Thirty patients with musculoskeletal trigger points were assigned randomly to either an experimental or a placebo group. In addition to standard physical therapy, each patient received three 15-second applications of a He-Ne laser or placebo stimulation from an identical unit that did not emit a laser. The results of a two-way analysis of covariance with one repeated measure showed a statistically significant increase (p less than .007) in skin resistance. This increase in an abnormal skin resistance pattern may accompany the resolution of pathological conditions.

  9. The thermal conductivity of neon, methane and tetrafluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millat, J.; Ross, M.; Wakeham, W. A.; Zalaf, M.

    1988-02-01

    New, absolute measurements of the thermal conductivity of neon (Ne), methane (CH 4) and tetrafluoromethane (CF 4) are reported for the temperature range 308 to 428 K at pressures up to 10 MPa. The data have an estimated accuracy of ±0.3%. A statistical analysis of the density dependence of the thermal conductivity has been employed to deduce the thermal conductivity of the gases in the limit of zero density and the firt density coefficient. For methane the first density coefficient is well represented by a correlation based on data for monatomic gases whereas for tetrafluoromethane the same correlation greatly underestimates the same coefficient. The thermal conductivity in the limit of zero density has been used in conjuction with other transport property data to deduce a consistent set of effective cross-sections for the two gases over all the range of temperature studied, based entirely on experiment. Among other quantities the collision number for rotational relaxation has been deduced and is shown to be significantly different between the two gases. Although the Mason-Monchick approximation is inappropriate for the evaluation of some of the effective cross-sections for the gases, a recent, very simple formulation of the kinetic theory of polyatomic gases provides a satisfactory description of the thermal conductivity data.

  10. Interstellar oxygen, nitrogen and neon in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Gloeckler, G.; Mall, U.; Von Steiger, R.; Galvin, A. B.; Ogilvie, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen and neon pick-up ions of interstellar origin were detected for the first time with the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer (SWICS) on board Ulysses. The interstellar origin of these ions is established by the following criteria: (a) they are singly charged, (b) they have the broad velocity distributions characteristic of pick-up ions, with an upper limit of twice the solar wind speed, (c) their relative abundance as a function of distance from the sun corresponds to the theoretical expectation, and (d) there is no relation to a planetary or cometary source. The interstellar abundance ratios He(+)/O(+), N(+)/O(+), Ne(+)/O(+) were investigated. At approximately 5.25 AU in the outermost part of Ulysses' trajectory He(+)/O(+) = 175(sup +70 sub -50) N(+)/O(+) = 0.13(sup +0.05 sub -0.05) and Ne(+)/O(+) = 0.18(sup +0.10 sub -0.07) were determined. For the interstellar gas passing through the termination region and entering the heliosphere (He/O)(sub 0) = 290(sup +190 sub -100), (N/O)(sub 0) = 0.13(sup +0.06 sub -0.06) and (Ne/O)(sub 0) = 0.20(sup +0.12 sub -0.09) were obtained from the pick-up ion measurements. Upper limits for the relative abundances of C(+) and C were also determined.

  11. Neon turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator for HTS power machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hirokazu; Hirokawa, M.; Yoshida, Shigeru; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hayashi, H.; Okamoto, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We developed a prototype turbo-Brayton refrigerator whose working fluid is neon gas. The refrigerator is designed for a HTS (High Temperature Superconducting) power transformer and its cooling power is more than 2 kW at 65 K. The refrigerator has a turboexpander and a turbo-compressor, which utilize magnetic bearings. These rotational machines have no rubbing parts and no oil-components. Those make a long maintenance interval of the refrigerator. The refrigerator is very compact because our newly developed turbo-compressor is volumetrically smaller than a displacement type compressor in same operating specification. Another feature of the refrigerator is a wide range operation capability for various heat-loads. Cooling power is controlled by the input-power of the turbo-compressor instead of the conventional method of using an electric heater. The rotational speed of the compressor motor is adjusted by an inverter. This system is expected to be more efficient. We show design details, specification and cooling test results of the new refrigerator in this paper.

  12. Pulsed jet dynamics of squid hatchlings at intermediate Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Stewart, William J; Thompson, Joseph T

    2009-05-01

    Squid paralarvae (hatchlings) rely predominantly on a pulsed jet for locomotion, distinguishing them from the majority of aquatic locomotors at low/intermediate Reynolds numbers (Re), which employ oscillatory/undulatory modes of propulsion. Although squid paralarvae may delineate the lower size limit of biological jet propulsion, surprisingly little is known about the hydrodynamics and propulsive efficiency of paralarval jetting within the intermediate Re realm. To better understand paralarval jet dynamics, we used digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed video to measure bulk vortex properties (e.g. circulation, impulse, kinetic energy) and other jet features [e.g. average and peak jet velocity along the jet centerline (U(j) and U(jmax), respectively), jet angle, jet length based on the vorticity and velocity extents (L(omega) and L(V), respectively), jet diameter based on the distance between vorticity peaks (D(omega)), maximum funnel diameter (D(F)), average and maximum swimming speed (U and U(max), respectively)] in free-swimming Doryteuthis pealeii paralarvae (1.8 mm dorsal mantle length) (Re(squid)=25-90). Squid paralarvae spent the majority of their time station holding in the water column, relying predominantly on a frequent, high-volume, vertically directed jet. During station holding, paralarvae produced a range of jet structures from spherical vortex rings (L(omega)/D(omega)=2.1, L(V)/D(F)=13.6) to more elongated vortex ring structures with no distinguishable pinch-off (L(omega)/D(omega)=4.6, L(V)/D(F)=36.0). To swim faster, paralarvae increased pulse duration and L(omega)/D(omega), leading to higher impulse but kept jet velocity relatively constant. Paralarvae produced jets with low slip, i.e. ratio of jet velocity to swimming velocity (U(j)/U or U(jmax)/U(max)), and exhibited propulsive efficiency [eta(pd)=74.9+/-8.83% (+/-s.d.) for deconvolved data] comparable with oscillatory/undulatory swimmers. As slip decreased with speed

  13. Determining the vibrations between sensor and sample in SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiessl, Daniel; Kirtley, John R.; Paulius, Lisa; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Ullah, Rahim R.; Holland, Connor M.; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Gibson, Gerald W.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2016-12-01

    Vibrations can cause noise in scanning probe microscopies. Relative vibrations between the scanning sensor and the sample are important but can be more difficult to determine than absolute vibrations or vibrations relative to the laboratory. We measure the noise spectral density in a scanning SQUID microscope as a function of position near a localized source of magnetic field and show that we can determine the spectra of all three components of the relative sensor-sample vibrations. This method is a powerful tool for diagnosing vibrational noise in scanning microscopies.

  14. Assessing the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems by means of food-web models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Marta; Navarro, Joan; Olson, Robert J.; Christensen, Villy

    2013-10-01

    We synthesized available information from ecological models at local and regional scales to obtain a global picture of the trophic position and ecological role of squids in marine ecosystems. First, static food-web models were used to analyze basic ecological parameters and indicators of squids: biomass, production, consumption, trophic level, omnivory index, predation mortality diet, and the ecological role. In addition, we developed various dynamic temporal simulations using two food-web models that included squids in their parameterization, and we investigated potential impacts of fishing pressure and environmental conditions for squid populations and, consequently, for marine food webs. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic levels in marine food webs and show a large trophic width, reflecting the versatility in their feeding behaviors and dietary habits. Models illustrated that squids are abundant organisms in marine ecosystems, and have high growth and consumption rates, but these parameters are highly variable because squids are adapted to a large variety of environmental conditions. Results also show that squids can have a large trophic impact on other elements of the food web, and top-down control from squids to their prey can be high. In addition, some squid species are important prey of apical predators and may be keystone species in marine food webs. In fact, we found strong interrelationships between neritic squids and the populations of their prey and predators in coastal and shelf areas, while the role of squids in open ocean and upwelling ecosystems appeared more constrained to a bottom-up impact on their predators. Therefore, large removals of squids will likely have large-scale effects on marine ecosystems. In addition, simulations confirm that squids are able to benefit from a general increase in fishing pressure, mainly due to predation release, and quickly respond to changes triggered by the environment. Squids may thus

  15. NEON Data Products: Supporting the Validation of GCOS Essential Climate Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroy, S. B.; Fox, A. M.; Metzger, S.; Thorpe, A.; Meier, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale ecological observation platform designed to collect and disseminate data that contributes to understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON will collect in-situ and airborne data over 60 sites across the US, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The NEON Biomass, Productivity, and Biogeochemistry protocols currently direct the collection of samples from distributed, gradient, and tower plots at each site, with sampling occurring either multiple times during the growing season, annually, or on three- or five-year centers (e.g. for coarse woody debris). These data are processed into a series of field-derived data products (e.g. Biogeochemistry, LAI, above ground Biomass, etc.), and when combined with the NEON airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR imagery, are used support validation efforts of algorithms for deriving vegetation characteristics from the airborne data. Sites are further characterized using airborne data combined with in-situ tower measurements, to create additional data products of interest to the GCOS community, such as Albedo and fPAR. Presented here are a summary of tower/field/airborne sampling and observation protocols and examples of provisional datasets collected at NEON sites that may be used to support the ongoing validation of GCOS Essential Climate Variables.

  16. National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) future role in US carbon cycling and budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loescher, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a National Science Foundation investment designed to observe the impacts of large-scale environment changes on the nation's ecosystems for 30 years with rigorous consistency. NEON does this through the construction (and operations) of new physical infrastructure and data infrastructure distributed across the North American Continent. This includes 47 terrestrial and 32 aquatic sites. Key to its design is its ability to provide ecosystem-scale carbon measurements of carbon stores, fluxes, processes—and the means to scale them from the local-to regional scales via remote sensed aircraft. NEON design NEON will be collecting these carbon data as a facility and providing openly providing them. NEON will not preform any high-level synthesis, rather the carbon data is an open resource for research, private and public communities, alike. Overall, these data are also harmonized with other international carbon-based infrastructures to facilitate cross-continental understanding and global carbon syntheses. Products, engagement and harmonization of data to facilitate syntheses will be discussed.

  17. Neon-Bearing Ammonium Metal Formates: Formation and Behaviour under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Collings, Ines E; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Hanfland, Michael; Paliwoda, Damian; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia

    2016-11-04

    The incorporation of noble gas atoms, in particular neon, into the pores of network structures is very challenging due to the weak interactions they experience with the network solid. Using high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that neon atoms enter into the extended network of ammonium metal formates, thus forming compounds Nex [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ]. This phenomenon modifies the compressional and structural behaviours of the ammonium metal formates under pressure. The neon atoms can be clearly localised within the centre of [M(HCOO)3 ]5 cages and the total saturation of this site is achieved after ∼1.5 GPa. We find that by using argon as the pressure-transmitting medium, the inclusion inside [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] is inhibited due to the larger size of the argon. This study illustrates the size selectivity of [NH4 ][M(HCOO)3 ] compounds between neon and argon insertion under pressure, and the effect of inclusion on the high-pressure behaviour of neon-bearing ammonium metal formates.

  18. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  19. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Penna, Stefania; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population.

  20. Scanning SQUID microscopy of local superconductivity in inhomogeneous combinatorial ceramics.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Mitra; Stir, Manuela; Kirtley, John R; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-11-24

    Although combinatorial solid-state chemistry promises to be an efficient way to search for new superconducting compounds, the problem of determining which compositions are strongly diamagnetic in a mixed-phase sample is challenging. By means of reactions in a system of randomly mixed starting components (Ca, Sr, Ba, La, Y, Pb, Bi, Tl, and Cu oxides), samples were produced that showed an onset of diamagnetic response above 115 K in bulk measurements. Imaging of this diamagnetic response in ceramic samples by scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM) revealed local superconducting areas with sizes down to as small as the spatial resolution of a few micrometers. In addition, locally formed superconducting matter was extracted from mixed-phase samples by magnetic separation. The analysis of single grains (d<80 μm) by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and bulk SQUID measurements allowed Tl2Ca3Ba2Cu4O12, TlCaBaSrCu2O(7-δ), BaPb(0.5)Bi(0.25)Tl(0.25)O(3-δ), TlBa2Ca2Cu3O9, Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8, and YBa2Cu3O7 phases to be identified. SSM, in combination with other diagnostic techniques, is therefore shown to be a useful instrument to analyze inhomogeneous reaction products in the solid-state chemistry of materials showing magnetic properties.

  1. Model of Auctioneer Estimation of Swordtip Squid (Loligo edulis) Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Eiji; Ezoe, Satoru; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hirano, Takayuki

    The knowledge of experienced auctioneers regarding the circulation of marine products is an essential skill and is necessary for evaluating product quality and managing aspects such as freshness. In the present study, the ability of an auctioneer to quickly evaluate the freshness of swordtip squid (Loligo edulis) at fish markets was analyzed. Evaluation characteristics used by an auctioneer were analyzed and developed using a fuzzy logic model. Forty boxes containing 247 swordtip squid with mantles measuring 220 mm that had been evaluated and assigned to one of five quality categories by an auctioneer were used for the analysis and the modeling. The relationships between the evaluations of appearance, body color, and muscle freshness were statistically analyzed. It was found that a total of four indexes of the epidermis color strongly reflected evaluations of appearance: dispersion ratio of the head, chroma on the head-end mantle and the difference in the chroma and brightness of the mantle. The fuzzy logic model used these indexes for the antecedent-part of the linguistic rules. The results of both simulation and evaluations demonstrate that the model is robust, with the predicted results corresponding with more than 96% of the quality assignments of the auctioneers.

  2. SQUID-Detected In Vivo MRI at Microtesla Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Moble, Michael; Myers, Whittier R; Lee, SeungKyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2005-06-01

    We use a low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to perform in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at magnetic fields around 100 microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies of about 5 kHz. In such low fields, broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines due to inhomogeneous magnetic fields and susceptibility variations of the sample are minimized, enabling us to obtain high quality images. To reduce environmental noise the signal is detected by a second-order gradiometer, coupled to the SQUID, and the experiment is surrounded by a 3-mm thick Al shield. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we prepolarize the samples in a field up to 100 mT. Three-dimensional images are acquired in less than 6 minutes with a standard spin-echo phase-encoding sequence. Using encoding gradients of {approx}100 {micro}T/m we obtain three-dimensional images of bell peppers with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 8 mm{sup 3}. Our system is ideally suited to acquiring images of small, peripheral parts of the human body such as hands and arms. In vivo images of an arm, acquired at 132 {micro}T, show 24-mm sections of the forearm with a resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} and a SNR of 10. We discuss possible applications of MRI at these low magnetic fields.

  3. Evolution of graded refractive index in squid lenses.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Alison M; Des Marais, David L; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Johnsen, Sönke

    2007-08-22

    A lens with a graded refractive index is required for vision in aquatic animals with camera-type eyes. This optical design entails a radial gradient of protein density, with low density in external layers and high density in internal layers. To maintain the optical stability of the eye, different material properties are required for proteins in different regions of the lens. In low-density regions of the lens where slight protein aggregation causes significant light scattering, aggregation must be minimized. Squid lens S-crystallin proteins are evolutionarily derived from the glutathione S-transferase protein family. We used biochemistry, optical modelling and phylogenetics to study the evolution and material properties of S-crystallins. S-crystallins are differentially expressed in a radial gradient, suggesting a role in refractive index. This gradient in S-crystallin expression is correlated with their evolutionary history and biochemistry. S-crystallins have been under positive selection. This selection appears to have resulted in stabilization of derived S-crystallins via mutations in the dimer interface and extended electrostatic fields. These derived S-crystallins probably cause the glassy organization and stability of low refractive index lens layers. Our work elucidates the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the production and maintenance of camera-like optics in squid lenses.

  4. Neural control of tuneable skin iridescence in squid

    PubMed Central

    Wardill, T. J.; Gonzalez-Bellido, P. T.; Crook, R. J.; Hanlon, R. T.

    2012-01-01

    Fast dynamic control of skin coloration is rare in the animal kingdom, whether it be pigmentary or structural. Iridescent structural coloration results when nanoscale structures disrupt incident light and selectively reflect specific colours. Unlike animals with fixed iridescent coloration (e.g. butterflies), squid iridophores (i.e. aggregations of iridescent cells in the skin) produce dynamically tuneable structural coloration, as exogenous application of acetylcholine (ACh) changes the colour and brightness output. Previous efforts to stimulate iridophores neurally or to identify the source of endogenous ACh were unsuccessful, leaving researchers to question the activation mechanism. We developed a novel neurophysiological preparation in the squid Doryteuthis pealeii and demonstrated that electrical stimulation of neurons in the skin shifts the spectral peak of the reflected light to shorter wavelengths (greater than 145 nm) and increases the peak reflectance (greater than 245%) of innervated iridophores. We show ACh is released within the iridophore layer and that extensive nerve branching is seen within the iridophore. The dynamic colour shift is significantly faster (17 s) than the peak reflectance increase (32 s), revealing two distinct mechanisms. Responses from a structurally altered preparation indicate that the reflectin protein condensation mechanism explains peak reflectance change, while an undiscovered mechanism causes the fast colour shift. PMID:22896651

  5. Superconductive combinational logic circuit using magnetically coupled SQUID array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanashi, Y.; Umeda, K.; Sai, K.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we propose the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits. One of the difficulties in designing superconductive single-flux-quantum (SFQ) digital circuits can be attributed to the fundamental nature of the SFQ circuits, in which all logic gates have latching functions and are based on sequential logic. The design of ultralow-power superconductive digital circuits can be facilitated by the development of superconductive combinational logic circuits in which the output is a function of only the present input. This is because superconductive combinational logic circuits do not require determination of the timing adjustment and clocking scheme. Moreover, semiconductor design tools can be used to design digital circuits because CMOS logic gates are based on combinational logic. The proposed superconductive combinational logic circuits comprise a magnetically coupled SQUID array. By adjusting the circuit parameters and coupling strengths between neighboring SQUIDs, fundamental combinational logic gates, including the AND, OR, and NOT gates, can be built. We have verified the accuracy of the operations of the fundamental logic gates by analog circuit simulations.

  6. Structural health monitoring of materials by high critical temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, M.; Ruosi, A.; Peluso, G.; Pepe, G. P.

    2002-08-01

    Nowadays, tailoring the material properties is essential for advanced product design in engineering systems. The need to provide key information about micro- and macro-structural behaviour of materials, without destructively sectioning the sample, has spurred the development of nondestructive evaluation methodologies. These techniques are required during material production, quality testing of components during manufacturing, and in-service inspection of structural integrity. To ensure the highest possible operational safety along with an economic efficiency, it is necessary to carry out inspections with a high sensitivity and a proven reliability. Due to its unparalleled magnetic field sensitivity over a wide frequency range and large dynamic range, SQUID-based nondestructive evaluation has unique advantages for materials and structures characterization. We will present an overview of eddy-current nondestructive analysis utilizing high Tc SQUIDs with an emphasis on examples relevant to the aeronautical industry. These include the detection of deep-lying defects in multi-layer structures of Al-Ti alloys and damage of extremely lightweight graphite/epoxy composites. Both of these can be successfully treated by this approach where conventional electromagnetic probes often fail. In addition some results based on the volume integral formulation, successfully developed to simulate the response of the system to different type of flaws in Al-alloy planar structures and to solve the inverse electromagnetic problem, will be shown.

  7. Complexity and Fly Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Grant; Murray, Joelle

    Complexity is the study of phenomena that emerge from a collection of interacting objects and arises in many systems throughout physics, biology, finance, economics and more. Certain kinds of complex systems can be described by self-organized criticality (SOC). An SOC system is one that is internally driven towards some critical state. Recent experimental work suggests scaling behavior of fly swarms-one of the hallmarks of an SOC system. Our goal is to look for SOC behavior in computational models of fly swarms.

  8. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z.; Han, S.G.; Wong, K.W.; Sun, G.F.

    1995-04-01

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A nondestructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUID`s and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUID`s. In this paper, the authors present their study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  9. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  10. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Subsonic radiation waves in neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loseva, T. V.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1989-02-01

    Numerical methods are used to investigate the propagation of plane subsonic radiation waves in neon from an obstacle in the direction opposite to the incident radiation of Nd and CO2 lasers. An analysis is made of the influence of the power density of the incident radiation (in the range 10-100 MW/cm2) and of the initial density of neon (beginning from the normal valuep ρ0 up to 10ρ0) on the various characteristics of subsonic radiation waves. It is shown that waves traveling in neon can provide an effective source of radiation with a continuous spectrum and an efficiency of ~ 12-27% in the ultraviolet range (with a characteristic photon energy ~ 5-10 eV).

  11. Solar wind neon from Genesis: implications for the lunar noble gas record.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Ansgar; Baur, Heinrich; Bochsler, Peter; Bühler, Fritz; Burnett, Donald S; Hays, Charles C; Heber, Veronika S; Jurewicz, Amy J G; Wieler, Rainer

    2006-11-17

    Lunar soils have been thought to contain two solar noble gas components with distinct isotopic composition. One has been identified as implanted solar wind, the other as higher-energy solar particles. The latter was puzzling because its relative amounts were much too large compared with present-day fluxes, suggesting periodic, very high solar activity in the past. Here we show that the depth-dependent isotopic composition of neon in a metallic glass exposed on NASA's Genesis mission agrees with the expected depth profile for solar wind neon with uniform isotopic composition. Our results strongly indicate that no extra high-energy component is required and that the solar neon isotope composition of lunar samples can be explained as implantation-fractionated solar wind.

  12. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface.

  13. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O → H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex.

  14. Development of an image processing system in splendid squid quality classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunee, Niyada; Chaiprapat, Supapan; Waiyagan, Kriangkrai

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural products typically exhibit high variance in quality characteristics. To assure customer satisfaction and control manufacturing productivity, quality classification is necessary to screen off defective items and to grade the products. This article presents an application of image processing techniques on squid grading and defect discrimination. A preliminary study indicated that surface color was an efficient determinant to justify quality of splendid squids. In this study, a computer vision system (CVS) was developed to examine the characteristics of splendid squids. Using image processing techniques, squids could be classified into three different quality grades as in accordance with an industry standard. The developed system first sifted through squid images to reject ones with black marks. Qualified squids were graded on a proportion of white, pink, and red regions appearing on their bodies by using fuzzy logic. The system was evaluated on 100 images of squids at different quality levels. It was found that accuracy obtained by the proposed technique was 95% compared with sensory evaluation of an expert.

  15. NEON: Developing a Platform for Regional to Continental Scale Biological Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, J.

    2004-05-01

    Climate variation, introductions of alien species, and patterns of land use are some of the important interacting drivers of biological change that are affecting our nation's ecosystems. Many of these drivers operate over large spatial and temporal scales, and our understanding of how these phenomena interact to drive biological change is limited by our inability to link traditionally local and short-term ecological approaches to larger and longer scales. Similarly, our ability to forecast such changes and respond to their consequences is constrained. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a proposed shared-use research and education platform intended to improve our capacity to understand and predict biological phenomena operating from regional to continental scales. NEON is envisioned as a system of field and laboratory-based facilities distributed across the United States, which will provide the physical infrastructure and human capabilities necessary to coordinate and integrate research and education campaigns on the following types of issues: (1) biodiversity, species composition, and ecosystem functioning; (2) ecological aspects of biogeochemical cycles; (3) ecological implications of climate change; (4) ecology and evolution of infectious disease; (5) invasive species; and (6) land use and habitat alteration. Themes such as data sharing, multidisciplinary collaboration, and the development of technologies for sensing, forecasting, and visualizing biological information are central to the NEON concept. Development of the NEON science plan and the design of the network itself are proceeding through a variety of workshops and community planning meetings. A national project office is expected to form toward the end of 2004 to lead the development and creation of NEON. Ultimately, the project office will reside within an independent national organization devoted to the coordinated operation of NEON for the scientific community.

  16. Big Data and Ecological Forecasting: Integrating NEON Observational and Sensor Data from Reach to Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Goodman, K. J.; Lunch, C. K.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to forecast the response of varied ecosystems to changes in climate and land use will be crucial for the management of resources and ecosystem services. Ecological forecasting presents many significant challenges within each of the aspects of data capture, assimilation, and modeling. High space-time resolution sampling is required to address the challenges of scaling from the site level to the continent. Determining the uncertainty of data used for model input and parameterization is critical for constraining the model for accurate representation. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is poised to greatly expand the scale and availability of biogeochemical and aquatic ecological data. NEON is a continental-scale facility designed to collect and disseminate data that addresses the impacts of climate change, land-use, and invasive species on ecosystem structure and function. Using a combination of standardized observational sampling and sensor measurements, NEON will provide a rich source of biogeochemical and biophysical data from 34 aquatic and 47 terrestrial sites spatially distributed across the US, including Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico for 30 years. Sites were selected to be representative of major ecosystems and maximize scalability. In addition to standardizing measurements, NEON is determining the quantitative uncertainty of each data product making them well suited to constrain models. NEON aquatic data will not only serve to baseline aquatic ecology in major ecosystems but also presents opportunities to bolster Hydrologic Models as well as incorporate aquatic biogeochemical cycling into Land Surface Models. Here we present examples of published and provisional data currently available from deployed aquatic sites, as well as an overview of the full scope and release schedule of the open source ecological data to be published on the NEON web portal. Several use cases, such as whole stream metabolism, groundwater exchange, high

  17. Fabrication of MgB 2 nanobridge dc SQUIDs by focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Hak; Lee, Soon-Gul; Kyung Seong, Won; Nam Kang, Won

    2010-12-01

    We have studied fabrication of MgB2 intragrain nanobridge dc SQUIDs by a focused ion beam (FIB) patterning technique. Not only the nanobridges as Josephson elements but the SQUID loop was patterned by FIB. The beam voltage was 30 kV and the beam current was 0.9 nA for the SQUID loop and 1.5 pA for the nanobridges. Each bridge had a nominal width and length of about 100 nm and a thickness of 650 nm. The SQUID loop had a 3 μm × 3 μm hole with a 2 μm average linewidth. The zero-field superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of the SQUID was 37 K. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the SQUID showed large excess currents at all temperatures with a small portion of a resistively-shunted-junction (RSJ) component which increases as temperature approaches Tc. At low temperatures, the I-V curves exhibit a large heating effect with a second transition step, which is believed to be due to the transition of a grain boundary near the nanobridge. The SQUID showed well-behaving modulation properties at all temperatures with a modulation depth of more than 30 μV at 33.5 K and 110 μV at 15 K. These results together with our previous results on the intergrain nanobridge dc SQUID suggest that fabrication of dc SQUIDs based on FIB-patterned MgB2 nanobridges is highly tolerant of fabrication conditions.

  18. Aminoglycoside-induced damage in the statocyst of the longfin inshore squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Scharr, Alexandra L; Mooney, T Aran; Schweizer, Felix E; Ketten, Darlene R

    2014-08-01

    Squid are a significant component of the marine biomass and are a long-established model organism in experimental neurophysiology. The squid statocyst senses linear and angular acceleration and is the best candidate for mediating squid auditory responses, but its physiology and morphology are rarely studied. The statocyst contains mechano-sensitive hair cells that resemble hair cells in the vestibular and auditory systems of other animals. We examined whether squid statocyst hair cells are sensitive to aminoglycosides, a group of antibiotics that are ototoxic in fish, birds, and mammals. To assess aminoglycoside-induced damage, we used immunofluorescent methods to image the major cell types in the statocyst of longfin squid (Doryteuthis pealeii). Statocysts of live, anesthetized squid were injected with either a buffered saline solution or neomycin at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 3.0 mmol l(-1). The statocyst hair cells of the macula statica princeps were examined 5 h post-treatment. Anti-acetylated tubulin staining showed no morphological differences between the hair cells of saline-injected and non-injected statocysts. The hair cell bundles of the macula statica princeps in aminoglycoside-injected statocysts were either missing or damaged, with the amount of damage being dose-dependent. The proportion of missing hair cells did not increase at the same rate as damaged cells, suggesting that neomycin treatment affects hair cells in a nonlethal manner. These experiments provide a reliable method for imaging squid hair cells. Further, aminoglycosides can be used to induce hair cell damage in a primary sensory area of the statocyst of squid. Such results support further studies on loss of hearing and balance in squid.

  19. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold.

  20. Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 30-tesla magnet design is studied which calls for forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. The design also requires suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures through use of magnet coils enclosed in a pressure vessel which is maintained at the critical pressure of liquid neon. This high pressure reduces the possibility of the system flow instabilities which may occur at low pressures. The forced convection heat transfer data presented were obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid to flow vertically through a resistance heated, instrumented tube.

  1. Economic Impact of Stable Flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dynamic model was created to estimate the economic impact of stable flies on livestock production. Based upon a nationwide average of 10 stable flies per animal for 3 months per year, the model estimates the impact of stable flies to be $543 million to the dairy industry, $1.34 billion to pasture ...

  2. Fly on the Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Dave; Korpan, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a peer observation program at the University of Victoria called the Lecture Club. The observers are not interactive during the class--they are the proverbial flies on the wall. The paper identifies the program as self-developmental, discussing the attributes of this learning-to-teach and peer-sharing…

  3. Wisdom from the fly.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Leila E; Larschan, Erica N

    2014-11-01

    Arguably, almost all research in Drosophila can be considered basic research, yet many of the most essential and fundamental concepts of human genetics were first decoded in the fly. Although the fly genome, which is organized into only four chromosomes, is approximately one-twentieth the size of the human genome, it contains roughly the same number of genes, and up to 75% of human disease-related genes have Drosophila homologues [1]. The fly was prized for its simplicity and utility even before such compelling homology with humans was apparent. Since Thomas Hunt Morgan began his seminal experiments over a century ago (Table 1), the Drosophila system has revealed countless key mechanisms by which cells function, including the factors that maintain chromatin and the signaling pathways that control cell fate determination and organism development. More recently, the fly has emerged as a critical neurobiological tool and disease model for a range of genetic disorders. In this review, we present a brief retrospective of Drosophila as an indispensable genetic system and discuss some of the many contributions, past and present, of this facile system to human genetics.

  4. Flying High with Spring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an art activity for first grade that uses multicolor scratch paper. Explains that students make scratch-drawings of bird nests, then, as a class, discuss types of birds and bird positions (such as sitting or flying), and finally each creates a bird to add to the nest. (CMK)

  5. Pregnancy and Flying Duties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Division U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory Joy of new life temperamentally unfit to fly and prone to panic in any calamity." In the 1930s, Amelia ...One of my greatest joys has been Earhart said, "Men do not believe us capable." delivering babies for aircrew members and In 1939, women were barred

  6. Protein synthesis in a solitary benthic cephalopod, the Southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica).

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris G; Lynch, Kerri A; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A

    2009-06-01

    Rates of protein synthesis were measured in the whole body and tissues of southern dumpling squid Euprymna tasmanica to validate the use of a flooding-dose of (3)H phenylalanine for the measurement of protein synthesis with different size squid and to make a preliminary investigation into the effects of feeding regime. In smaller (2.8+/-0.5 g, mean+/-SE) and larger (14.8+/-2.2 g) squid whole body fractional rates of protein synthesis were 9.45+/-1.21 and 1.49+/-0.29% d(-1), respectively. Differences in total whole body protein content meant there was no difference in absolute rates of whole body protein synthesis between the larger and smaller squid. In larger squid, fractional rates of protein synthesis were significantly higher in the digestive gland (9.24+/-1.63% d(-1)) than in the arm tissue (1.43+/-0.31% d(-1)), which were significantly higher than in the anterior (0.56+/-0.13% d(-1)) and posterior (0.36+/-0.04% d(-1)) mantle. In smaller squid there were no differences in protein synthesis between tissues and high individual variation, due to differences in feeding, was a likely cause. Consequently, the effect of feeding regime on protein synthesis was compared between two groups of individually held squid: daily-feeding and minimal-feeding squid. The daily-feeding squid had significantly higher feed intake, gained mass and had a significantly higher growth rate than the minimal-feeding squid which lost mass. Whole body protein synthesis was significantly higher in the daily-feeding squid as was the protein content of the digestive gland, anterior and posterior mantle. There were few other differences in indices of protein metabolism. Individual squid showed differences in growth and protein metabolism, and there were significant relationships between growth rate and both rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Thus, higher individual growth was a consequence of increased protein synthesis, decreased protein degradation and, therefore, increased

  7. A SQUID-based microwave cavity search for dark-matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S J; Carosi, G; Hagmann, C; Kinion, D; van Bibber, K; Hotz, M; Rosenberg, L; Rybka, G; Hoskins, J; Hwang, J; Sikivie, P; Tanner, D B; Bradley, R; Clarke, J

    2009-10-21

    Axions in the {mu}eV mass range are a plausible cold dark matter candidate and may be detected by their conversion into microwave photons in a resonant cavity immersed in a static magnetic field. The first result from such an axion search using a superconducting first-stage amplifier (SQUID) is reported. The SQUID amplifier, replacing a conventional GaAs field-effect transistor amplifier, successfully reached axion-photon coupling sensitivity in the band set by present axion models and sets the stage for a definitive axion search utilizing near quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers.

  8. Development of a High-Tc SQUID-Based System for Neurophysiology Studies In-Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnelind, Per; Tarte, Ed; Winkler, Dag; Hanse, Eric

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a system based on a high-Tc SQUID (HTS) sensor for measurements of the neuromagnetic field generated by neurons inside tissue slices. SQUIDs have successfully been measured inside the system. The system white noise level is lower than 7 pT/Hz{1/2}, which is only slightly higher than previously reported 4.5 pT/Hz{1/2} for the same kind of SQUID measured inside a superconducting shield.

  9. 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance of p-nitrotoluene using a high-Tc rf SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Tachiki, M.; Itozaki, H.

    2007-03-01

    Using a high-Tc radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf SQUID), we successfully detected nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at about 887 kHz for 14N in p-nitrotoluene (PNT). A normal metal transformer made of copper wire was used to improve the sensitivity of the high-Tc rf SQUID and pulse-controlled rf switches and cross diodes were inserted in the transformer to reduce the influence of the strong excitation field. The preliminary results for NQR detection using the high-Tc SQUID had a similar signal-to-noise ratio to that of using a low noise preamplifier.

  10. A SQUID readout system for a superconducting gyroscope. [superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A design of a read out system for a superconducting gyroscope to be used in an orbiting gyroscope relativity experiment is discussed. The 'London Moment' of the superconducting rotor, which lies along the spin axis of the rotor, will be measured with a SQUID-type magnetometer. The SQUID will be built around the gyro rotor, with a very close spacing to give an inductance between 10 millionths and 1 millionth Hy. A SQUID of this design should resolve 2.07 times 10 to the minus 19th weber. The angular resolution of the gyroscope will then be 0.0035 arc-second, which is sufficient for the intended experiment.

  11. Design of frequency domain multiplexing of TES signals by multi-input SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Masui, Kensuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Morooka, Toshimitsu; Nakayama, Satoshi; Takei, Yoh

    2006-04-01

    In frequency-domain Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexing for Transition Edge Sensor (TES) readout, a magnetic field summation method utilizing multi-input SQUIDs has a fundamental merit of small degradation of signal-to-noise ratio. Independent wiring without common impedance avoids the cross talk current, and the current induced by magnetic coupling between the input coils is suppressed by the direct feedback at the summing point. A multi-input SQUID which has 8 input coils has been fabricated and requirements for Flux Locked Loop (FLL) circuits are summarized.

  12. Frequency-domain multiplex with eight-input SQUID and readout electronics over 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, K.; Takei, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kimura, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2006-04-01

    In a magnetic summation method, TES and SQUID driving circuits are isolated and thus small crosstalk and stray impedance are expected. Since a FLL circuit with a large bandwidth and a small noise level is required for a SQUID, we designed and produced an electronics to meet our design of multiplexing with an 8-input SQUID. The FLL circuit achieved an open loop-gain bandwidth product of 8 MHz with 1 m wire length, which is enough for a TES to be operated with a bias current of 70 μA, and a noise level of 30 pA/√{Hz}.

  13. An annotated checklist of the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Tabanidae includes the horse flies, deer flies, and yellow flies and is considered a significant pest of livestock throughout the United States, including Florida. Tabanids can easily become a major pest of man, especially salt marsh species which are known to readily feed on humans and o...

  14. New aspects of the extraction of chitin from squid pens.

    PubMed

    Chaussard, Géraldine; Domard, Alain

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we studied the extraction of beta chitin from squid pens. The characterization by ICP of the raw material confirmed the significant absence of calcium carbonate and then the possibility to definitely avoid a step of demineralization responsible for chain degradation. The kinetics studies associated with the extraction of lipid parts showed the important role played by the latter structures on the limitation of the protein extraction by a simple treatment in an aqueous solution of 1 M NaOH. The role of various parameters such as the size of the particles, time and number of steps, and the concentration in sodium hydroxide was studied. The determination of the molecular characteristics (molecular weight and degree of acetylation) allowed us to define the optimal conditions of deproteinization in relation with the best preservation of these characteristics.

  15. A digital filtering scheme for SQUID based magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xue-Min; Ren, Yu-Feng; Yu, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Chen, Geng-Hua; Zhang, Li-Hua; Yang, Qian-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Considering the properties of slow change and quasi-periodicity of magnetocardiography (MCG) signal, we use an integrated technique of adaptive and low-pass filtering in dealing with two-channel MCG data measured by high Tc SQUIDs. The adaptive filter in the time domain is based on a noise feedback normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm and the low-pass filter with a cutoff at 100Hz in the frequency domain characterized by Gaussian functions is combined with a notch at the power line frequency. In this way, both relevant and irrelevant noises in original MCG data are largely eliminated. The method may also be useful for other slowly varying quasi-periodical signals.

  16. Ammonium Ion Currents in the Squid Giant Axon

    PubMed Central

    Binstock, Leonard; Lecar, Harold

    1969-01-01

    Voltage-clamp studies on intact and internally perfused squid giant axons demonstrate that ammonium can substitute partially for either sodium or potassium. Ammonium carries the early transient current with 0.3 times the permeability of sodium and it carries the delayed current with 0.3 times the potassium permeability. The conductance changes observed in voltage clamp show approximately the same time course in ammonium solutions as in the normal physiological solutions. These ammonium ion permeabilities account for the known effects of ammonium on nerve excitability. Experiments with the drugs tetrodotoxin (TTX) and tetraethyl ammonium chloride (TEA) demonstrate that these molecules block the early and late components of the current selectively, even when both components are carried by the same ion, ammonium. PMID:5767336

  17. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-03-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  18. The transition from stiff to compliant materials in squid beaks.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W; Waite, J Herbert

    2008-03-28

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  19. SQUID-Detected Microtesla MRI in the presence of Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Han, Song-I.; Myers, Whittier; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2006-09-06

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at fields of 1 T and above, the presence of a metal insert can distort the image because of susceptibility differences within the sample and modification of the radiofrequency fields by screening currents. Furthermore, it is not feasible to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or acquire a magnetic resonance image if the sample is enclosed in a metal container. Both problems can be overcome by substantially lowering the NMR frequency. Using a microtesla imaging system operating at 2.8 kHz, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the signal detector, we have obtained distortion-free images of a phantom containing a titanium bar and three-dimensional images of an object enclosed in an aluminum can; in both cases high-field images are inaccessible.

  20. An integrated DC SQUID gradiometer for biomagnetic application

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanagi, M.; Kasai, N.; Nakanishi, M.; Kosaka, S.; Kado, H.; Chinone, K.; Higuchi, M.

    1989-03-01

    The first order off-diagonal gradiometer was fabricated and tested. The gradiometer consisted of two field pickup coils, and a planar type DC SQUID with two superconducting loops connected in parallel, two multi-turn input coils and a modulation-feedback coil. The size of the pickup coils was 6x6 mm/sup 2/ with a base line of 8 mm. The overall size of the gradiometer was 15x7.5 mm/sup 2/. The resolution of the magnetic field gradient of the gradiometer increased from 11 to 1.8 pT/m..sqrt..Hz, corresponding to frequencies from 1 Hz to 600 hz. The resolution became nearly white in a frequency range above 600 Hz. The intrinsic balance of the gradiometer was better than 1000 ppm for the field perpendicular to its plane.

  1. Multichannel DC SQUID sensor array for biomagnetic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, H.E.; Daalmans, G.M.; Bar, L.; Bommel, F.; Paulus, A.; Uhl, D.; Weisse, H.J. ); Schneider, S.; Seifert, H.; Reichenberger, H.; Abraham-Fuchs, K. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a biomagnetic multichannel system for medical diagnosis of brain and heart KRENIKON has been developed. 37 axial 2st order gradiometers - manufactured as flexible superconducting printed circuits - are arranged in a circular flat array of 19 cm diameter. Additionally, 3 orthogonal magnetometers are provided. The DC SQUIDs are fabricated in all-Nb technology, ten on a chip. The sensor system is operated in a shielded room with two layers of soft magnetic material and one layer of Al. The every day noise level is 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at frequencies above 10 Hz. Within 2 years of operation in a normal urban surrounding, useful clinical applications have been demonstrated (e.g. for epilepsy and heart arrhythmias).

  2. Anatomical basis for camouflaged polarized light communication in squid

    PubMed Central

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Hanlon, Roger T

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Camouflage is a means to defeat visual detection by predators, whereas visual communication involves a signal that is conspicuous to a receiver (usually a conspecific). However, most intraspecific visual signals are also conspicuous to predators, so that signalling can lead to the serious consequence of predation. Could an animal achieve visual camouflage and simultaneously send a hidden visual message to a conspecific? Here, we present evidence that the polarized aspect of iridescent colour in squid skin is maintained after it passes through the overlying pigmented chromatophores, which produce the highly evolved—and dynamically changeable—camouflaged patterns in cephalopods. Since cephalopods are polarization sensitive, and can regulate polarization via skin iridescence, it is conceivable that they could send polarized signals to conspecifics while staying camouflaged to fish or mammalian predators, most of which are not polarization sensitive. PMID:17148271

  3. Evaluation Of Algorithms For A Squid Detector Neuromagnetic Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Richard; Jeffe, Brian; Singh, Manbir; Brechner, Ricardo

    1987-01-01

    The SQUID based biomagnetometer has been widely used to measure the external magnetic field produced by neural activity. In this paper we consider the viability of using this data to reconstruct three dimensional neuromagnetic images (NMI) of an equivalent electrical current distribution within the brain which would produce the measured magnetic field. The fundamental limitations on this mode of imaging are evaluated and possible physical models and mathematical formulations of the problem are proposed. Several algorithms often used in medical image reconstruction are applied to the problem and their performance evaluated. We conclude that the reconstruction problem is highly ill-posed, and that conventional image reconstruction algorithms are inadequate for 3-D NMI. A class of solutions we call 'minimum dipole' is shown to provide more accurate reconstructions of simple current distributions.

  4. Synchronization of networked Jahn-Teller systems in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    We consider the nonlinear effects in a Jahn-Teller (JT) system of two coupled resonators interacting simultaneously with a flux qubit using coupled SQUIDs. A two-frequency description of JT system that inherits the networked structure of both nonlinear Josephson junctions and harmonic oscillators is employed to describe the synchronous structures in a multifrequency scheme. Eigenvalue spectrum is used to show the switch between the effective single mode and two mode configuration in terms of frequency difference. The Rabi supersplitting is investigated by the spectral response of JT systems in different coupling regimes. Second-order coherence functions are employed to investigate antibunching effects in resonator mode. Synchronous structure between correlations of privileged mode and qubit is obtained in localization-delocalization and photon blockade regime controlled by the population imbalance.

  5. O fly, where art thou?

    PubMed

    Grover, Dhruv; Tower, John; Tavaré, Simon

    2008-10-06

    In this paper, the design of a real-time image acquisition system for tracking the movement of Drosophila in three-dimensional space is presented. The system uses three calibrated and synchronized cameras to detect multiple flies and integrates the detected fly silhouettes to construct the three-dimensional visual hull models of each fly. We used an extended Kalman filter to estimate the state of each fly, given past positions from the reconstructed fly visual hulls. The results show that our approach constructs the three-dimensional visual hull of each fly from the detected image silhouettes and robustly tracks them at real-time rates. The system is suitable for a more detailed analysis of fly behaviour.

  6. High-Tc SQUID Magnetometers for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diiorio, Mark; Yang, Kai-Yueh; Yoshizumi, Shozo; Haupt, Steven; Haran, Don; Koch, Roger; Lathrop, Dan; Trammel, Hoke

    1998-03-01

    We have developed high-Tc SQUID magnetometers for use in a variety of industrial applications. Relatively inexpensive direct-coupled magnetometers have been developed for low-frequency applications including fetal-magnetocardiography. A manufacturable process has been developed to reproducibly fabricate high-resistance (up to 6 Ω) SNS step-edge junctions with YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x as the superconductor and Ag-Au alloy as the normal metal. Magnetic field sensitivities at 77K of 22 ft/Hz^1/2 at 1 KHz and 32 ft/Hz^1/2 at 1 Hz have been achieved in a well-shielded laboratory environment. Current effort is focused on operation in an unshielded environment using flux dams(Milliken et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 71 1857 (1997)) in conjunction with narrow superconducting pickup coils placed in parallel. An integrated magnetometer process has also been optimized for use in high-frequency applications. The integrated megnetometer utilizes two layers of YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x and one layer of deposited SrTiO_3, all on the same 24 mm x 5 mm substrate. The applications under development include the detection of the explosive material in non-metallic land mines using nuclear quadrupole resonance as well as the non-destructive evaluation of non-metallic composites using nuclear magnetic resonance. For operation in the MHz regime, these applications demand a high quality insulator layer and a robust SQUID that can withstand high current transients.

  7. Investigating Impact Demagnetization Through Laser Impacts and SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Weiss, B. P.; Boustie, M.; Rochette, P.; Lima, E. A.; Fong, L. E.; Baudenbacher, F.

    2005-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts may play a crucial role in the magnetic records of many extraterrestrial bodies (asteroids, Mars, the Moon...). The understanding of demagnetization by hypervelocity impacts is crucial for the interpretation of planetary magnetic anomalies and of the paleomagnetic signal of meteorites. We propose an innovative approach to investigate the effects of impacts on the remanent magnetization of geologic materials. It consists of the combination of pulsed laser impacts and room temperature scanning SQUID microscopy. Laser impacts, besides being non-destructive, can reach several hundreds of GPa and allow well-calibrated modeling of shock wave propagation within the impacted samples. High-resolution SQUID microscopy allows mapping of the magnetic field with an unprecedented spatial resolution of about 100 μm. We present the shock modeling and magnetic field data obtained for two laser impacts on a magnetite-bearing basalt sample. Magnetic measurements evidence a demagnetized area at the impact locations, and we show that, for a single laser shot, high-resolution magnetic measurements combined with high-resolution impact modeling provide a continuous relation between the demagnetization intensity and the peak pressure suffered by the sample [see Gattacceca et al., Geology, in press]. This promising technique will allow the investigation of the demagnetization behavior of a variety of geological materials upon impacts. The planned development of this methodology on samples with varied well-characterized magnetic properties and mineralogy, as well as experiments in a controlled, non zero magnetic field, should provide strong insights to the understanding of the magnetization of extraterrestrial materials (interpretation of the magnetic anomalies of Mars and the Moon, as well as the deciphering of the paleomagnetic signal of meteorites) and of terrestrial impact structures.

  8. Taming the SQUID: How a nuclear physics education (mostly) helped my career in applied physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    My degree is in experimental nuclear physics, specifically studying the interaction of pions with nuclei. But after graduation I accepted a post-doctoral research position with a team based on applications of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to the study of the human brain. Despite knowing nothing about the brain or SQUIDs to start with, I have gone on to enjoy a career in applications of the SQUID and other sensors to the detection of weak magnetic fields in a variety of problems from brain studies (magnetoencephalography) to ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance for detection of explosives and illicit material. In this talk I will present some background on SQUIDs and their application to the detection of ultra-weak magnetic fields of biological and non-biological origin. I will also provide a little insight into what it has been like to use a nuclear physics background to pursue other types of science.

  9. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jin; Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HHP at 200, 400 or 600MPa) on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles during 10-day storage at 4°C were investigated. HHP increased the concentrations of Cl(-) and volatile compounds, reduced the level of PO4(3-), but did not affect the contents of 5'-uridine monophosphate (UMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in squids on Day 0. At 600MPa, squids had the highest levels of 5'-adenosine monophosphate, Cl(-) and lactic acid, but the lowest contents of CMP and volatile compounds on Day 10. Essential free amino acids and succinic acids were lower on Day 0 than on Day 10. HHP at 200MPa caused higher equivalent umami concentration (EUC) on Day 0, and the EUC decreased with increasing pressure on Day 10. Generally, HHP at 200MPa was beneficial for improving EUC and volatile compounds of squids.

  10. Metallic Contaminant Detection System for Industrial Products by High TC SQUID Magnetic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Otani, Takeyoshi; Suzuki, Shuichi

    High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system for detection of magnetic foreign matter in industrial products was developed. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products, such as lithium ion batteries. The outer dimension of metallic particles less than 100 microns cannot be detected by conventional X-ray imaging. Therefore, we developed a detection system based on high-Tc SQUID microscopes with a high-performance magnetic shield. Using SQUID microscopes with a 0.5 mm-thick vacuum window was proposed. This design enables the SQUID to approach an object to be measured as close as 1 mm and enhances the sensitivity. A new magnetic shield with sleeves was carefully designed and built. As a result, we could successfully measure a small iron particle with 100 μm. This detection level was hard to achieve by conventional X-ray detection methods.

  11. Development of high-throughput fabrication process of HTS SQUID for 51-ch MCG system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, A.; Saitoh, K.; Yokosawa, K.; Suzuki, D.; Seki, Y.; Kandori, A.; Tsukada, K.

    2005-10-01

    A high-throughput high-Tc SQUID fabrication process that can provide the appropriate number of SQUIDs for a 51-channel magnetocardiograph (MCG) has been developed. A new deposition system-based on a pulsed-laser-deposition technique to increase the process throughput in fabricating superconducting YBa2Cu3Oy thin films-was developed. In this system, nine superconducting thin films are successively deposited on bicrystal substrates in one deposition sequence. A mask aligner, which was customized for the bicrystal substrate, was also developed. This system enables mask alignment for the bicrystal grain boundary without the need for preprocessing to visualize it. In addition, the magnetometer pattern was designed to improve the yield for magnetometer fabrication. In this directly coupled magnetometer, four SQUIDs were connected with the same pickup coil. Accordingly, the yield of magnetometer could be enhanced by selecting the best SQUID among the four.

  12. Effect of coupling line design on the performance of direct coupled high-Tc SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Seon; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Park, Yong Ki

    2004-03-01

    YBCO dc SQUID magnetometers based on bicrystal Josephson junctions on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates have been fabricated. We have designed 16-parallel-loop pickup coil SQUID magnetometers with 50 μ m line width for use under a magnetically disturbed environment. The magnetometers exhibit stable flux locked loop operation under magnetically very noisy laboratory environment. We modified the coupling scheme between pickup coil and SQUID washer to replace the conventional narrow and long interconnection lines to reduce the residual inductance of the coupling lines. With the coupling line modification the effective area increased more than 12%. Finally, we could obtain optimized direct coupled YBCO SQUID magnetometer design having field sensitivity B_Φ of 4.5 nT/Φ 0 and magnetic field noise BN of 30 fT/Hz^1/2 measured at 100 Hz.

  13. Enhanced Dynamic Range in N-SQUID Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddins, A.; Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Toyli, D. M.; Vijay, R.; Minev, Z.; Siddiqi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneously providing high gain and nearly quantum-limited noise performance, superconducting parametric amplifiers (paramps) have been used successfully for high fidelity qubit readout, quantum feedback, and microwave quantum optics experiments. The Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier (LJPA) consists of a capacitively shunted SQUID coupled to a transmission line to form a nonlinear resonator. Like other paramps employing a resonant circuit, the LJPA's dynamic range-a potentially key ingredient for multiplexing-is limited. Simple theory predicts that the dynamic range can be increased without any reduction in bandwidth or gain by distributing the resonator nonlinearity over a series array of SQUIDs. We fabricated such array devices with up to 5 SQUIDs and observed a clear increase in the critical power for bifurcation about which parametric gain occurs. We discuss in detail amplifier performance as a function of the number of SQUIDs in the array. This research was supported by the Army Research Office under a QCT grant.

  14. A shot in the dark: same-sex sexual behaviour in a deep-sea squid.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Bush, Stephanie L; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-04-23

    Little is known about the reproductive habits of deep-living squids. Using remotely operated vehicles in the deep waters of the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we have found evidence of mating, i.e. implanted sperm packages, on similar body locations in males and females of the rarely seen mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis deletron. Equivalent numbers of both sexes were found to have mated, indicating that male squid routinely and indiscriminately mate with both males and females. Most squid species are short-lived, semelparous (i.e. with a single, brief reproductive period) and promiscuous. In the deep, dark habitat where O. deletron lives, potential mates are few and far between. We suggest that same-sex mating behaviour by O. deletron is part of a reproductive strategy that maximizes success by inducing males to indiscriminately and swiftly inseminate every conspecific that they encounter.

  15. High-gain weakly nonlinear flux-modulated Josephson parametric amplifier using a SQUID array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Schmitt, V.; Bertet, P.; Vion, D.; Wustmann, W.; Shumeiko, V.; Esteve, D.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed and measured a high-gain quantum-limited microwave parametric amplifier based on a superconducting lumped LC resonator with the inductor L including an array of eight superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). This amplifier is parametrically pumped by modulating the flux threading the SQUIDs at twice the resonator frequency. Around 5 GHz, a maximum gain of 31 dB, a product amplitude gain × bandwidth above 60 MHz, and a 1 dB compression point of -123 dBm at 20 dB gain are obtained in the nondegenerate mode of operation. Phase-sensitive amplification-deamplification is also measured in the degenerate mode and yields a maximum gain of 37 dB. The compression point obtained is 18 dB above what would be obtained with a single SQUID of the same inductance, due to the smaller nonlinearity of the SQUID array.

  16. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    SciTech Connect

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    in MRI using laser polarized noble gases such as {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe (10-12). Hyperpolarized gases were used successfully to image the human lung in fields on the order of several mT (13-15). To overcome the sensitivity loss of Faraday detection at low frequencies, ultrasensitive magnetometers based on the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) (16) are used to detect NMR and MRI signals (17-24). Recently, SQUID-based MRI systems capable of acquiring in vivo images have appeared. For example, in the 10-mT system of Seton et al. (18) signals are coupled to a SQUID via a superconducting tuned circuit, while Clarke and coworkers (22, 25, 26) developed a system at 132 {micro}T with an untuned input circuit coupled to a SQUID. In a quite different approach, atomic magnetometers have been used recently to detect the magnetization (27) and NMR signal (28) of hyperpolarized gases. This technique could potentially be used for low-field MRI in the future. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of MRI in microtesla fields detected with SQUIDs. The principles of SQUIDs and NMR are briefly reviewed. We show that very narrow NMR linewidths can be achieved in low magnetic fields that are quite inhomogeneous, with illustrative examples from spectroscopy. After describing our ultralow-field MRI system, we present a variety of images. We demonstrate that in microtesla fields the longitudinal relaxation T{sub 1} is much more material dependent than is the case in high fields; this results in a substantial improvement in 'T{sub 1}-weighted contrast imaging'. After outlining the first attempts to combine microtesla NMR with magnetoencephalography (MEG) (29), we conclude with a discussion of future directions.

  17. X-ray heating of a neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, R.; Lockard, T.; Mayes, D.; Loisel, G.; Bailey, J.; Rochau, G.; Abdallah, J.

    2016-10-01

    In experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories a cm-scale cell filled with neon gas was driven by the burst of broadband x-rays emitted at the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch turning the gas into a photoionized plasma. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the plasma. The time-integrated data show a highly-ionized neon plasma with a rich line absorption spectrum that permits the extraction of the ionization distribution. Data analysis produced ground and low excited state areal densities and from the ratio of first-excited to ground state populations in Li-like neon a temperature of 19 +/- 4eV was extracted to characterize the x-ray heating of the plasma. To interpret this observation, we have performed modeling calculations of the spectral distribution of the x-ray drive, self-consistent modeling of electron and atomic kinetics, and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We found that to compute electron temperatures consistent with observation the details of the photon-energy distribution of the drive, x-ray attenuation through the cell window, and non-equilibrium collisional-radiative neon atomic kinetics need to be taken into account. This work was sponsored by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Fundamental Science Program.

  18. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-22

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/microm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to (137)Cs gamma-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/microm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/mum showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among gamma-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not.

  19. Continental-Scale Stable Isotope Measurements at NEON to Address Ecological Processes Across Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Goodman, K. J.; Hinckley, E. S.; West, J. B.; Williams, D. G.; Bowen, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a national-scale research platform. The overarching goal of NEON is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on aspects of continental-scale ecology (such as biodiversity, biogeochemistry, infectious diseases, ecohydrology, etc.). NEON focuses explicitly on questions that relate to grand challenges in environmental science, are relevant to large regions, and would otherwise be very difficult to address with traditional ecological approaches. The use of stable isotope approaches in ecological research has grown steadily during the last two decades. Stable isotopes at natural abundances in the environment trace and integrate the interaction between abiotic and biotic components across temporal and spatial scales. In this poster, we will present the NEON data products that incorporate stable isotope measurements in atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic ecosystems in North America. We further outline current questions in the natural sciences community and how these data products can be used to address continental-scale ecological questions, such as the ecological impacts of climate change, terrestrial-aquatic system linkages, land-atmosphere exchange, landscape ecohydrological processes, and linking biogeochemical cycles across systems. Specifically, we focus on the use of stable isotopes to evaluate water availability and residence times in terrestrial systems, as well as nutrient sources to terrestrial systems, and cycling across ecosystem boundaries.

  20. Experimental verification of dynamics modulation in a periodically-driven neon glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P. M.; Koepke, M. E.; Gunell, H.

    2010-11-01

    Two ionization wave modes in a driven neon glow discharge alternate as the dominant mode as their response to the driving force alternates between spatiotemporal and temporal periodic pulling. This phenomenon, termed dynamics modulation, was first noted by Koepke, Weltmann, and Selcher [1], who saw two limited but representative cases and proposed a mechanism [2] by which it occurs. Dynamics modulation is reproduced experimentally in a neon glow discharge plasma. The system is periodically driven near a non-dominant mode using a narrow-band ring dye laser tuned to a wavelength near the metastable neon transition at 588.35 nm. A spatially-fixed photodiode with a narrow band filter that selectively passes the primary neon spectral line at 640 nm is used to acquire the time series of luminosity oscillations. These experimental data are used to verify the proposed mechanism and explore the resulting implications for spontaneous unidirectional mode transitions that occur with a change in discharge current.[4pt] [1] M. E. Koepke, K.-D. Weltmann, and C. A. Selcher, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 40, 1716 (1995).[0pt] [2] K. -D. Weltmann, M. E. Koepke, and C. A. Selcher, Phys. Rev. E 62, 2773, (2000).

  1. Neon Lights up a Controversy: The Solar Ne/O Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Nasraoui, K.; Roames, J. K.; Lippner, L. A.; Garst, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The standard solar model was so reliable that it could predict the existence of the massive neutrino. Helioseismology measurements were so precise that they could determine the depth of the convection zone. This agreement between theory and observation was the envy of all astrophysics-until recently, when sophisticated three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations of the solar atmosphere reduced the metal content by a factor of almost 2. Antia & Basu suggested that a higher value of the solar neon abundance, ANe/AO=0.52, would resolve this controversy. Drake & Testa presented evidence in favor of this idea from a sample of 21 Chandra stars with enhanced values of the neon abundance, ANe/AO=0.41. In this Letter, we have analyzed solar active region spectra from the archive of the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission, a NASA mission from the 1980s, as well as full-Sun spectra from the pioneering days of X-ray astronomy in the 1960s. These data are consistent with the standard neon-to-oxygen abundance value, ANe/AO=0.15 (Grevesse & Sauval). We conclude, therefore, that the enhanced-neon hypothesis will not resolve the current controversy.

  2. Charge exchange fast neutral measurement with natural diamond detectors in neon plasma on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, T.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A. V.

    2003-03-01

    Charge exchange (CX) fast neutral spectra produced by ion cyclotron resonance frequency hydrogen minority heating in neon and helium majority plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection were measured with perpendicular Natural Diamond Detectors during the fifth campaign in 2002 on large helical devices (LHDs). It was observed that there were differences between fast neutral spectra shapes in neon plasma and those in helium of the same discharge condition with similar plasma parameters. Dominant CX processes in neon and helium plasmas were studied for ionization components from outside of the last closed flux surface. High-energy proton spectra were obtained by taking account of each charge state distribution and responsible charge exchange cross sections. The high-energy proton tail formations in both plasmas were similar for the same heating regime. The relaxation time tendencies of the effective temperatures of a high-energy proton have also shown no differences, indicating that the acceleration and confinement of energetic ions in LHDs are similar in neon and helium plasmas.

  3. Foods of northern fulmars associated with high-seas drift nets in the transitional region of the North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, Patrick J.; Walker, William; Ostrom, Peggy H.

    1997-01-01

    We examined digestive tract contents and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in breast muscles of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) salvaged from squid and large-mesh drift nets in the transitional North Pacific. Lantern fishes (Myctophidae) were the principal prey item found in the digestive tracts. Pieces of unidentified fishes (probably Pacific pomfret Brama japonica) and shredded squid tissue (probably neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartrami) indicate scavenging at fishing operations. Although soft-bodied prey such as Velella were not found in the digestive tracts, δ 15N values suggest that fulmars may feed heavily on such low trophic-level animals.

  4. Helium-neon laser irradiation stimulates migration and proliferation in melanocytes and induces repigmentation in segmental-type vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Yu, Chia-Li; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chiou, Min-Hsi

    2003-01-01

    Low-energy helium-neon lasers (632.8 nm) have been employed in a variety of clinical treatments including vitiligo management. Light-mediated reaction to low-energy laser irradiation is referred to as biostimulation rather than a thermal effect. This study sought to determine the theoretical basis and clinical evidence for the effectiveness of helium-neon lasers in treating vitiligo. Cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts were irradiated with 0.5-1.5 J per cm2 helium-neon laser radiation. The effects of the helium-neon laser on melanocyte growth and proliferation were investigated. The results of this in vitro study revealed a significant increase in basic fibroblast growth factor release from both keratinocytes and fibroblasts and a significant increase in nerve growth factor release from keratinocytes. Medium from helium-neon laser irradiated keratinocytes stimulated [3H]thymidine uptake and proliferation of cultured melanocytes. Furthermore, melanocyte migration was enhanced either directly by helium-neon laser irradiation or indirectly by the medium derived from helium-neon laser treated keratinocytes. Thirty patients with segmental-type vitiligo on the head and/or neck were enrolled in this study. Helium-neon laser light was administered locally at 3.0 J per cm2 with point stimulation once or twice weekly. The percentage of repigmented area was used for clinical evaluation of effectiveness. After an average of 16 treatment sessions, initial repigmentation was noticed. Marked repigmentation (>50%) was observed in 60% of patients with successive treatments. Basic fibroblast growth factor is a putative melanocyte growth factor, whereas nerve growth factor is a paracrine factor for melanocyte survival in the skin. Both nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor stimulate melanocyte migration. It is reasonable to propose that helium-neon laser irradiation clearly stimulates melanocyte migration and proliferation and mitogen release for melanocyte growth

  5. Role of Geometry on the Color of Flux Noise in dc SQUIDs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Note © 2011 . Published in IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity , Vol. 21, (3), Ed. 0 (2011), (Ed. ). DoD Components reserve a royalty-free...56204.4-PH-CSQ 856 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY , VOL. 21, NO. 3, JUNE 2011 Role of Geometry on the Color of Flux Noise in dc SQUIDs F...our conclusions in Section VII. Drung et al. [14] reported similar variations in at the same Applied Superconductivity Conference. II. SQUID GEOMETRY

  6. Micro-SQUID technique for studying the temperature dependence of switching fields of single nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirion, C.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Jamet, M.; Dupuis, V.; Mélinon, P.; Pérez, A.; Mailly, D.

    2002-04-01

    An improved micro-SQUID technique is presented allowing us to measure the temperature dependence of the magnetisation switching fields of single nanoparticles well above the critical superconducting temperature of the SQUID. Our first measurements on 3 nm cobalt nanoparticle embedded in a niobium matrix are compared to the Néel Brown model describing the magnetisation reversal by thermal activation over a single anisotropy barrier.

  7. High-T(sub c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1990-01-01

    In the Laboratory a high-T(sub c) one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  8. A novel quadruple excitation in high-Tc SQUID-based non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X. Y.; Ren, Y. F.; Li, J. W.; Yu, H. W.; Chen, G. H.; Yang, Q. S.

    2006-02-01

    A high-Tc SQUID-based non-destructive evaluation (NDE) system has been set up in our laboratory. The SQUID was made on a 24° bicystal SrTiO3 substrate. A novel quadruple excitation coil was proposed for the first time and applied in the artificial holes in the aluminium multilayer structure in a noisy unshielded environment. The experimental data shows that it has good balance and is very effective at detecting small hole defects.

  9. Foraging ecology and movement patterns of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, John C.; Elliger, Carl; Baltz, Ken; Gillespie, Graham E.; Gilly, William F.; Ruiz-Cooley, R. I.; Pearse, Devon; Stewart, Julia S.; Matsubu, William; Walker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    From 2002 to 2010, the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) has been regularly encountered in large numbers throughout the California Current System (CCS). This species, usually found in subtropical waters, could affect coastal pelagic ecosystems and fisheries as both predator and prey. Neither the abundance of jumbo squid nor the optimal ocean conditions in which they flourish are well known. To understand better the potential impacts of this species on both commercial fisheries and on food-web structure we collected nearly 900 specimens from waters of the CCS, covering over 20° of latitude, over a range of depths and seasons. We used demographic information (size, sex, and maturity state) and analyzed stomach contents using morphological and molecular methods to best understand the foraging ecology of this species in different habitats of the CCS. Squid were found to consume a broad array of prey. Prey in offshore waters generally reflected the forage base reported in previous studies (mainly mesopelagic fishes and squids), whereas in more coastal waters (shelf, shelf break and slope habitats) squid foraged on a much broader mix that included substantial numbers of coastal pelagic fishes (Pacific herring and northern anchovy, as well as osmerids and salmonids in northern waters) and groundfish (Pacific hake, several species of rockfish and flatfish). We propose a seasonal movement pattern, based on size and maturity distributions along with qualitative patterns of presence or absence, and discuss the relevance of both the movement and distribution of jumbo squid over space and time. We find that jumbo squid are a generalist predator, which feeds primarily on small, pelagic or mesopelagic micronekton but also on larger fishes when they are available. We also conclude that interactions with and potential impacts on ecosystems likely vary over space and time, in response to both seasonal movement patterns and highly variable year-to-year abundance of the squid themselves.

  10. Characterization of the Bacterial Diversity in Indo-West Pacific Loliginid and Sepiolid Squid Light Organs

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo; Gorman, Clayton; Chavez, Alba A.; Willie, Shantell

    2013-01-01

    Loliginid and sepiolid squid light organs are known to host a variety of bacterial species from the family Vibrionaceae, yet little is known about the species diversity and characteristics among different host squids. Here we present a broad-ranging molecular and physiological analysis of the bacteria colonizing light organs in loliginid and sepiolid squids from various field locations of the Indo-West Pacific (Australia and Thailand). Our PCR-RFLP analysis, physiological characterization, carbon utilization profiling, and electron microscopy data indicate that loliginid squid in the Indo-West Pacific carry a consortium of bacterial species from the families Vibrionaceae and Photobacteriaceae. This research also confirms our previous report of the presence of Vibrio harveyi as a member of the bacterial population colonizing light organs in loliginid squid. pyrH sequence data were used to confirm isolate identity, and indicates that Vibrio and Photobacterium comprise most of the light organ colonizers of squids from Australia, confirming previous reports for Australian loliginid and sepiolid squids. In addition, combined phylogenetic analysis of PCR-RFLP and 16S rDNA data from Australian and Thai isolates associated both Photobacterium and Vibrio clades with both loliginid and sepiolid strains, providing support that geographical origin does not correlate with their relatedness. These results indicate that both loliginid and sepiolid squids demonstrate symbiont specificity (Vibrionaceae), but their distribution is more likely due to environmental factors that are present during the infection process. This study adds significantly to the growing evidence for complex and dynamic associations in nature and highlights the importance of exploring symbiotic relationships in which non-virulent strains of pathogenic Vibrio species could establish associations with marine invertebrates. PMID:22885637

  11. Gradiometer Using Middle Loops as Sensing Elements in a Low-Field SQUID MRI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2009-01-01

    A new gradiometer scheme uses middle loops as sensing elements in lowfield superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This design of a second order gradiometer increases its sensitivity and makes it more uniform, compared to the conventional side loop sensing scheme with a comparable matching SQUID. The space between the two middle loops becomes the imaging volume with the enclosing cryostat built accordingly.

  12. Molecular identification of anisakid nematodes third stage larvae isolated from common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyobudi, Eko; Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Choi, Kwangho; Lee, Sung Il; Lee, Chung Il; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of Genus Anisakis nematode larvae in marine fishes and cephalopods is epidemiologically important because Anisakis simplex larval stage can cause a clinical disease in humans when infected hosts are consumed raw. Common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) from Korean waters were investigated for anisakid nematodes infection during 2009˜2011. In total, 1,556 larvae were collected from 615 common squids and 732 of them were subsequently identified by PCR-RFLP analysis of ITS rDNA. Depending on the sampling locations, the nematode larvae from common squid showed different prevalence, intensity and species distribution. A high prevalence (P) and mean intensity (MI) of infection were observed in the Yellow Sea (n = 250, P = 86.0%, MI = 5.99 larvae/host) and the southern sea of Korea (n = 126, P = 57.1%, MI = 3.36 larvae/host). Anisakis pegreffii was dominantly found in common squid from the southern sea (127/ 140, 90.7%) and the Yellow Sea (561/565, 98.9%). In contrast, the P and MI of infection were relatively low in the East Sea (n = 239, P = 8.37%, MI = 1.25 larvae/host). A. pegreffii was not found from the East Sea and 52.0% (13/25) of the nematodes were identified as A. simplex. Most of them were found in the body cavity or digestive tract of common squid, which are rarely consumed raw by humans. Considering the differenences in anisakid nematode species distribution and their microhabitat in common squid, it remains unclear whether common squid plays an important role in the epidemiology of human anisakis infection in Korea. Further extensive identification of anisakid nematodes in common squid, with geographical and seasonal information will be necessary.

  13. Distribution of the Euryhaline Squid Lolliguncula brevis in Chesapeake Bay: Effects of Selected Abiotic Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-31

    significant aquatic habitats where cephalopods are poorly represented. One notable squid, the brief squid Lolliguncula brevis, is the only species of... cephalopod frequently found in low-salinity estuaries (Vecchione 1991a), where it tolerates salinities as low as 8.5‰ for brief periods (Laughlin...effects of selected abiotic factors I. K. Bartol1,*, R. Mann2, M. Vecchione3 1Department of Organismic Biology, Ecology, and Evolution , University of

  14. NEON Collaborative Data Collection Campaign at Pacific South West Site in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Musinsky, J.; Petroy, S. B.; Wasser, L. A.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Serbin, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that will collect biological, chemical and geophysical data over the continental United States in order to study biodiversity, landcover change, climate change and invasive species. In June 2013, a large-scale data collection took place over NEON's Pacific South West (PSW) site 17 in CA, USA. Data were collected in the San Joaquin Experimental Range and the Sierra National Forest. NEON's AOP (Airborne Observation Platform) acquired high spatial resolution hyperspectral data (~1m pixels), waveform lidar, discrete lidar, and RGB imagery over all three sites. A field team simultaneously collected atmospheric and vegetation inventory data, including tree locations, height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), species, and spectral data. The NEON collect was centered within a collaboration of multiple research entities, including NASA, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Massachusetts (Boston; UMB, and Lowell; UML), Boston University (BU), and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UWM). NASA's AVIRIS and MASTER sensors were flown over a wider area encompassing the NEON sites, with AVIRIS acquiring hyperspectral data (224 bands) at approximately 30m spatial resolution, and MASTER acquiring multispectral thermal data (50 bands) at approximately 50m spatial resolution. These data will be downscaled to approximate theoretical HyspIRI data (60m spatial resolution) as part of a large collection of preparatory research. Concurrently, a variety of university teams were active in the field: RIT collected ground-based lidar, leaf area index (LAI), herbaceous biomass measurements, wide-angle photographs, and spectral measurements. Data were collected over 20 80x80m sites, centered on existing 20x20m NEON sites. This data set will be used to inform synthetic scene design and to study the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on pixel-level spectral response; The BU, UMB, and UML

  15. Flies with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vanhauwaert, Roeland; Verstreken, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is an incurable neurodegenerative disease. Most cases of the disease are of sporadic origin, but about 10% of the cases are familial. The genes thus far identified in Parkinson's disease are well conserved. Drosophila is ideally suited to study the molecular neuronal cell biology of these genes and the pathogenic mutations in Parkinson's disease. Flies reproduce quickly, and their elaborate genetic tools in combination with their small size allow researchers to analyze identified cells and neurons in large numbers of animals. Furthermore, fruit flies recapitulate many of the cellular and molecular defects also seen in patients, and these defects often result in clear locomotor and behavioral phenotypes, facilitating genetic modifier screens. Hence, Drosophila has played a prominent role in Parkinson's disease research and has provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  16. Test What You Fly?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolies, Don

    2002-01-01

    It was the first time on any NASA project I know of that all the instruments on an observatory came off for rework or calibration after the full range of environmental tests, and then were reintegrated at the launch center without the benefit of an observatory environmental retest. Perhaps you've heard the expression, 'Test what you fly, fly what you test'? In theory, it's hard to argue with that. In this case, I was willing to take the risk of not testing what I flew. As the project manager for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission, I was the one who ultimately decided what risks to take, just as it was my responsibility to get buy-in from the stakeholders.

  17. Test What You Fly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolies, Don

    2002-10-01

    It was the first time on any NASA project I know of that all the instruments on an observatory came off for rework or calibration after the full range of environmental tests, and then were reintegrated at the launch center without the benefit of an observatory environmental retest. Perhaps you've heard the expression, 'Test what you fly, fly what you test'? In theory, it's hard to argue with that. In this case, I was willing to take the risk of not testing what I flew. As the project manager for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission, I was the one who ultimately decided what risks to take, just as it was my responsibility to get buy-in from the stakeholders.

  18. Cost Index Flying

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    continually alter applicable cost indexes . Computed KC-10 Cost Index Equation Using the dollar figures given above, our CI equation reads : CI = CT / C...COST INDEX FLYING GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER John M. Mirtich, Major, USAF AFIT/IMO/ENS/11-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED

  19. Fly-scan ptychography

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; ...

    2015-03-13

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems.

  20. Flying Saucer? Aliens?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    No, it's not a flying saucer, it is the domed top to a 70 foot long vacuum tank at the Lewis Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. The three technicians shown here in protective clothing had just emerged from within the tank where they had been cleaning in the toxic mercury atmosphere, left after ion engine testing in the tank. Lewis has since been renamed the John H. Glenn Research Center.

  1. Squid-derived chitin oligosaccharides are a chemotactic signal during colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Mark J; Schaefer, Amy L; Brennan, Caitlin A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-07-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae ("vibrios"), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone.

  2. Structural elements of the signal propagation pathway in squid rhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Minoru; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Suwa, Makiko

    2011-05-19

    Squid and bovine rhodopsins are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that activate Gq- and Gt-type G-proteins, respectively. To understand the structural elements of the signal propagation pathway, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of squid and bovine rhodopsins plus a detailed sequence analysis of class A GPCRs. The computations indicate that although the geometry of the retinal is similar in bovine and squid rhodopsins, the important interhelical hydrogen bond networks are different. In squid rhodopsin, an extended hydrogen bond network that spans ∼13 Å to Tyr315 on the cytoplasmic site is present regardless of the protonation state of Asp80. In contrast, the extended hydrogen bond network is interrupted at Tyr306 in bovine rhodopsin. Those differences in the hydrogen bond network may play significant functional roles in the signal propagation from the retinal binding site to the cytoplasmic site, including transmembrane helix (TM) 6 to which the G-protein binds. The MD calculations demonstrate that the elongated conformation of TM6 in squid rhodopsin is stabilized by salt bridges formed with helix (H) 9. Together with the interhelical hydrogen bonds, the salt bridges between TM6 and H9 stabilize the protein conformation of squid rhodopsin and may hinder the occurrence of large conformational changes that are observed upon activation of bovine rhodopsin.

  3. Multiplexed HTS rf SQUID magnetometer array for eddy current testing of aircraft rivet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, S.; Krause, H.-J.; Wolters, N.; Lomparski, D.; Wolf, W.; Schubert, J.; Kreutzbruck, M. v.; Allweins, K.

    2002-05-01

    Using three rf SQUID magnetometers, a multiplexed SQUID array was implemented. The SQUIDs are positioned in line with 7 mm spacing and operated using one feedback electronics with sequential read out demodulation at different radio frequencies (rf). The cross-talk between SQUID channels was determined to be negligible. To show the performance of the SQUID array, eddy current (EC) measurements of aluminum aircraft samples in conjunction with a differential (double-D) EC excitation and lock-in readout were carried out. With computer-controlled continuous switching of the SQUIDs during the scan, three EC signal traces of the sample are obtained simultaneously. We performed measurements with an EC excitation frequency of 135 Hz to localize an artificial crack (sawcut flaw) of 20 mm length in an aluminum sheet with 0.6 mm thickness. The flaw was still detected when covered with aluminum of up to 10 mm thickness. In addition, measurements with varying angles between scanning direction and flaw orientation are presented.

  4. Voltage-current and voltage-flux characteristics of asymmetric high TC DC SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, I. L.; Greenberg, Ya. S.; Schultze, V.; Ijsselsteijn, R.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of transfer functions and flux shifts of 20 on-chip high TC DC SQUIDs half of which were made purposely geometrically asymmetric. All of these SQUIDs were fabricated using standard high TC thin-film technology and they were single layer ones, having 140 nm thickness of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x film deposited by laser ablation onto MgO bicrystal substrates with 24° misorientation angle. For every SQUID the parameters of its intrinsic asymmetry, i.e., the density of critical current and resistivity of every junction, were measured directly and independently. We showed that the main reason for the on-chip spreading of SQUIDs’ voltage-current and voltage-flux characteristics was the intrinsic asymmetry. We found that for SQUIDs with a relative large inductance ( L > 120 pH) both the voltage modulation and the transfer function were not very sensitive to the junctions asymmetry, whereas SQUIDs with smaller inductance ( L ≃ 65-75 pH) were more sensitive. The results obtained in the paper are important for the implementation in the sensitive instruments based on high TC SQUID arrays and gratings.

  5. Material properties of Pacific hake, Humboldt squid, and two species of myctophids in the California Current.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kaylyn N; Warren, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    Material properties of the flesh from three fish species (Merluccius productus, Symbolophorus californiensis, and Diaphus theta), and several body parts of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) collected from the California Current ecosystem were measured. The density contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.9919-1.036), squid soft body parts (mantle, arms, tentacle, braincase, eyes; 1.009-1.057), and squid hard body parts (beak and pen; 1.085-1.459). Effects of animal length and environmental conditions on nekton density contrast were investigated. The sound speed contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.986-1.027) and Humboldt squid mantle and braincase (0.937-1.028). Material properties in this study are similar to values from previous studies on species with similar life histories. In general, the sound speed and density of soft body parts of fish and squid were 1%-3% and 1%-6%, respectively, greater than the surrounding seawater. Hard parts of the squid were significantly more dense (6%-46%) than seawater. The material properties reported here can be used to improve target strength estimates from acoustic scattering models, which could increase the accuracy of biomass estimates from acoustic surveys for these nekton.

  6. Magnetic Nanoparticle Characterization Using Nano-SQUID based on Niobium Dayem Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R.; Esposito, E.; Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Russo, M.; Cannas, C.; Peddis, D.; Fiorani, D.

    Magnetic nano-sensors based on niobium dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) for nanoparticle characterization are presented. The SQUIDs consists of two Dayem bridges of 90 nm x 250 nm and loop area of 4, 1 and 0.55 μm2. The SQUIDs were designed to have a hysteretic current-voltage characteristic in order to work as a magnetic flux-current transducer. Current-voltage characteristics, critical current as a function of the external magnetic field and switching current distributions were performed at liquid helium temperature. A critical current modulation of about 20% and a current-magnetic flux transfer coefficient (responsivity) of 30 μA/Φ0 have been obtained, resulting in a magnetic flux resolution better than 1 mΦ0. In order to show the effectiveness of sensor for nanomagnetism applications, we performed measurements with and without magnetic nanoparticles on the SQUID loop applying a magnetic field parallel to the SQUID plane. In this configuration the magnetic flux coupled to the SQUID is mainly due to the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles can be easily detected and their response to magnetic field studied. Measurements has been performed on Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition method with a nominal particle size of 8 nm. Some examples of magnetization measurements were recorded at low temperature after Zero Field Cooling.

  7. Identification of four squid species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaona; Dai, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Squids are distributed worldwide, including many species of commercial importance, and they are often made into varieties of flavor foods. The rapid identification methods for squid species especially their processed products, however, have not been well developed. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) systems based on specific primers and TaqMan probes have been established for rapid and accurate identification of four common squid species (Ommastrephes bartramii, Dosidicus gigas, Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus) in Chinese domestic market. After analyzing mitochondrial genes reported in GenBank, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene was selected for O. bartramii detection, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for D. gigas and T. Pacificus detection, ATPase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene for I. Argentinus detection, and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA) gene for designing Ommastrephidae-specific primers and probe. As a result, all the TaqMan systems are of good performance, and efficiency of each reaction was calculated by making standard curves. This method could detect target species either in single or mixed squid specimen, and it was applied to identify 12 squid processed products successfully. Thus, it would play an important role in fulfilling labeling regulations and squid fishery control.

  8. Single SQUID multiplexer for arrays of voltage-biased superconducting bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Richards, P.L.; Skidmore, J.T.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe a frequency domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. In order to avoid the accumulation of Johnson noise in the summing loop, a tuned bandpass filter is inserted in series with each sensor. For a 32-channel multiplexer for Voltage-biased Superconducting Bolometer (VSB) with a time constant {approx}1msec, we estimate that bias frequencies in the range from {approx}500kHz to {approx}600kHz are practical. The major limitation of our multiplexing scheme is in the slew rate of a readout SQUID. We discuss a ''carrier nulling'' technique which could be used to increase the number of sensors in a row or to multiplex faster bolometers by reducing the required slew rate for a readout SQUID.

  9. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, R C; Nishiguchi, M K

    2007-10-01

    Luminescent bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (Bacteria: γ-Proteobacteria) are commonly found in complex, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We utilized sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA, luciferase α-subunit (luxA) and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapA) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships between 63 strains of Vibrio bacteria, which included representatives from different environments as well as unidentified luminescent isolates from loliginid and sepiolid squid from Thailand. A combined phylogenetic analysis was used including biochemical data such as carbon use, growth and luminescence. Results demonstrated that certain symbiotic Thai isolates found in the same geographic area were included in a clade containing bacterial species phenotypically suitable to colonize light organs. Moreover, multiple strains isolated from a single squid host were identified as more than one bacteria species in our phylogeny. This research presents evidence of species of luminescent bacteria that have not been previously described as symbiotic strains colonizing light organs of Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squids, and supports the hypothesis of a non-species-specific association between certain sepiolid and loliginid squids and marine luminescent bacteria.

  10. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: I. General Properties andNoise Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate the characteristics and noise performance of rf Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) by solving the corresponding Langevin equations numerically and optimizing the model parameters with respect to noise energy. After introducing the basic concepts of the numerical simulations, we give a detailed discussion of the performance of the SQUID as a function of all relevant parameters. The best performance is obtained in the crossover region between the dispersive and dissipative regimes, characterized by an inductance parameter {beta}{prime}{sub L} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} {approx} 1; L is the loop inductance, I{sub 0} the critical current of the Josephson junction, and {phi}{sub 0} the flux quantum. In this regime, which is not well explored by previous analytical approaches, the lowest (intrinsic) values of noise energy are a factor of about 2 above previous estimates based on analytical approaches. However, several other analytical predictions, such as the inverse proportionality of the noise energy on the tank circuit quality factor and the square of the coupling coefficient between the tank circuit and the SQUID loop, could not be well reproduced. The optimized intrinsic noise energy of the rf SQUID is superior to that of the dc SQUID at all temperatures. Although for technologically achievable parameters this advantage shrinks, particularly at low thermal fluctuation levels, we give an example for realistic parameters that leads to a noise energy comparable to that of the dc SQUID even in this regime.

  11. NEON: High Frequency Monitoring Network for Watershed-Scale Processes and Aquatic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Fitzgerald, M.; Parker, S. M.; Roehm, C. L.; Goodman, K. J.; Bohall, C.; Utz, R.

    2014-12-01

    Networked high frequency hydrologic and water quality measurements needed to investigate physical and biogeochemical processes at the watershed scale and create robust models are limited and lacking standardization. Determining the drivers and mechanisms of ecological changes in aquatic systems in response to natural and anthropogenic pressures is challenging due to the large amounts of terrestrial, aquatic, atmospheric, biological, chemical, and physical data it requires at varied spatiotemporal scales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale infrastructure project designed to provide data to address the impacts of climate change, land-use, and invasive species on ecosystem structure and function. Using a combination of standardized continuous in situ measurements and observational sampling, the NEON Aquatic array will produce over 200 data products across its spatially-distributed field sites for 30 years to facilitate spatiotemporal analysis of the drivers of ecosystem change. Three NEON sites in Alabama were chosen to address linkages between watershed-scale processes and ecosystem changes along an eco-hydrological gradient within the Tombigbee River Basin. The NEON Aquatic design, once deployed, will include continuous measurements of surface water physical, chemical, and biological parameters, groundwater level, temperature and conductivity and local meteorology. Observational sampling will include bathymetry, water chemistry and isotopes, and a suite of organismal sampling from microbes to macroinvertebrates to vertebrates. NEON deployed a buoy to measure the temperature profile of the Black Warrior River from July - November, 2013 to determine the spatiotemporal variability across the water column from a daily to seasonal scale. In July 2014 a series of water quality profiles were performed to assess the contribution of physical and biogeochemical drivers over a diurnal cycle. Additional river transects were performed

  12. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  13. A digital flux-locked loop for high temperature SQUID magnetometer and gradiometer systems with field cancellation

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Bracht, R.; Flynn, E.R.

    1996-12-01

    The SQUID sensor is typically operated in a null detector mode where an analogue flux-locked-loop, FLL, provides a negative feedback to maintain linear operation. The modulated SQUID signal is amplified, filtered, demodulated, and integrated in the FLL. The resulting analog signal is a measure of the magnetic field and noise at the SQUID and is also fed back to the modulation and feedback (M & F) coil to null the flux at the SQUID to maintain the linear operating point. Thus, the FLL output signal is proportional to the change in magnetic field at the SQUID pickup coil, provided the slew rate and dynamic range of the SQUID and FLL system are not exceeded. The goal of the work is to advance technologies needed for a practical fieldable SQUID biomagnetic sensor. We used HTC SQUIDs to realize the benefits noted above. We also implemented the FLL algorithm on a digital-signal-processor (DSP) to realize a number of benefits including (1) software control of noise filtering and background rejection to enable unshielded use of SQUID sensors, (2) flux quanta countin and resetting SQUID operating point to increase system slew rate and dynamic range, (3) programmable FLL adaptable to numerous specific applications, (4) digital signal output (up to 32-bit precision), and (5) reduced FLL package cost. This paper presents results of external signal rejection for a sensor system using HTC SQUIDs, preamplifier circuit, and DSP FLL designed and built at our laboratory. We also note a companion paper in these proceedings and other references to the use of DSP in SQUID applications.

  14. Pest Control on the "Fly"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    FlyCracker(R), a non-toxic and environmentally safe pesticide, can be used to treat and control fly problems in closed environments such as milking sheds, cattle barns and hutches, equine stables, swine pens, poultry plants, food-packing plants, and even restaurants, as well as in some outdoor animal husbandry environments. The product can be applied safely in the presence of animals and humans, and was recently permitted for use on organic farms as livestock production aids. FlyCracker's carbohydrate technology kills fly larvae within 24 hours. By killing larvae before they reach the adult stages, FlyCracker eradicates another potential breeding population. Because the process is physical-not chemical-flies and other insects never develop resistance to the treatment, giving way to unlimited use of product, while still keeping the same powerful effect.

  15. Multielemental analysis of purpleback flying squad using high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, H; Kohno, H; Kannan, K; Tsumura, A; Yamasaki, S I

    2001-08-01

    Forty-four elements were analyzed in 21 tissues of purpleback flying squid, Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis, by high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES). Greater concentrations of V, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ag, Cd, Pb, and Bi were found in liver, pancreas, and ink sac than in other tissues. Ink sac concentrated remarkable levels of Ca and Sr in addition to the above-mentioned elements. Several alkalis, alkaline earth, and rare earth elements preferentially accumulated in muscle. Among the hard tissues, accumulation of V and U in beak, Ni, Zn, and Cd in gladius and Cr in skin was prominent. K, Rb, Cs, Pb, Bi and some transition elements (V, Co, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the livers of adult than in juvenile squids. Sodium, alkaline earth, and rare earth elements were higher in the livers of juveniles than in adult squids.

  16. Potential enhanced ability of giant squid to detect sperm whales is an exaptation tied to their large body size.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke; Oufiero, Christopher E; Martin, Christopher H; McGee, Matthew D; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-10-15

    It has been hypothesized that sperm whale predation is the driver of eye size evolution in giant squid. Given that the eyes of giant squid have the size expected for a squid this big, it is likely that any enhanced ability of giant squid to detect whales is an exaptation tied to their body size. Future studies should target the mechanism behind the evolution of large body size, not eye size. Reconstructions of the evolutionary history of selective regime, eye size, optical performance, and body size will improve the understanding of the evolution of large eyes in large ocean animals.

  17. Mechanism study of high browning degree of mantle muscle meat from Japanese common squid Todarodes pacificus during air-drying.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jie-Ting; Kaido, Toshiki; Kasukawa, Masaru; Zhong, Chan; Sun, Le-Chang; Okazaki, Emiko; Osako, Kazufumi

    2015-06-01

    Mantle meat from the Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus) browns more than other squid meats during air-drying. The factors contributing to the browning of Japanese common squid, long-finned squid (Photololigo edulis) and bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) were studied in boiled and raw meat both before and after air-drying. Dried raw meat from the Japanese common squid browned more than dried boiled meat (b(∗) value, from 4.7 to 28.5). The results from SDS-PAGE showed significant degradation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) suggesting that protease activity in raw Japanese common squid meat was higher than in the other two species. The concentration of arginine (1932.0mg/100g) and ribose (28.8μmol/g) in Japanese common squid meat was higher than in the other two species. These results suggest that high protease activity and high concentrations of arginine and ribose increase the browning discoloration of Japanese common squid during air-drying.

  18. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies.

  19. Blood feeding behavior of the stable fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable fly is a fly that looks similar to a house fly but both sexes are blood feeders. Blood is required for successful fertilization and development of eggs. Bites are painful but there is usually no pain after the fly stops feeding. The stable fly is a persistent feeder and will continue trying t...

  20. Optical parameters of the tunable Bragg reflectors in squid

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Amitabh; DeMartini, Daniel G.; Eck, Elizabeth; Morse, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Cephalopods (e.g. octopus, squid and cuttlefish) dynamically tune the colour and brightness of their skin for camouflage and communication using specialized skin cells called iridocytes. We use high-resolution microspectrophotometry to investigate individual tunable Bragg structures (consisting of alternating reflectin protein-containing, high-refractive index lamellae and low-refractive index inter-lamellar spaces) in live and chemically fixed iridocytes of the California market squid, Doryteuthis opalescens. This subcellular, single-stack microspectrophotometry allows for spectral normalization, permitting use of a transfer-matrix model of Bragg reflectance to calculate all the parameters of the Bragg stack—the refractive indices, dimensions and numbers of the lamellae and inter-lamellar spaces. Results of the fitting analyses show that eight or nine pairs of low- and high-index layers typically contribute to the observed reflectivity in live cells, whereas six or seven pairs of low- and high-index layers typically contribute to the reflectivity in chemically fixed cells. The reflectin-containing, high-index lamellae of live cells have a refractive index proportional to the peak reflectivity, with an average of 1.405 ± 0.012 and a maximum around 1.44, while the reflectin-containing lamellae in fixed tissue have a refractive index of 1.413 ± 0.015 suggesting a slight increase of refractive index in the process of fixation. As expected, incremental changes in refractive index contribute to the greatest incremental changes in reflectivity for those Bragg stacks with the most layers. The excursions in dimensions required to tune the measured reflected wavelength from 675 (red) to 425 nm (blue) are a decrease from ca 150 to 80 nm for the high-index lamellae and from ca 120 to 50 nm for the low-index inter-lamellar spaces. Fixation-induced dimensional changes also are quantified, leading us to suggest that further microspectrophotometric analyses of this iridocyte

  1. Optical parameters of the tunable Bragg reflectors in squid.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Amitabh; Demartini, Daniel G; Eck, Elizabeth; Morse, Daniel E

    2013-08-06

    Cephalopods (e.g. octopus, squid and cuttlefish) dynamically tune the colour and brightness of their skin for camouflage and communication using specialized skin cells called iridocytes. We use high-resolution microspectrophotometry to investigate individual tunable Bragg structures (consisting of alternating reflectin protein-containing, high-refractive index lamellae and low-refractive index inter-lamellar spaces) in live and chemically fixed iridocytes of the California market squid, Doryteuthis opalescens. This subcellular, single-stack microspectrophotometry allows for spectral normalization, permitting use of a transfer-matrix model of Bragg reflectance to calculate all the parameters of the Bragg stack-the refractive indices, dimensions and numbers of the lamellae and inter-lamellar spaces. Results of the fitting analyses show that eight or nine pairs of low- and high-index layers typically contribute to the observed reflectivity in live cells, whereas six or seven pairs of low- and high-index layers typically contribute to the reflectivity in chemically fixed cells. The reflectin-containing, high-index lamellae of live cells have a refractive index proportional to the peak reflectivity, with an average of 1.405 ± 0.012 and a maximum around 1.44, while the reflectin-containing lamellae in fixed tissue have a refractive index of 1.413 ± 0.015 suggesting a slight increase of refractive index in the process of fixation. As expected, incremental changes in refractive index contribute to the greatest incremental changes in reflectivity for those Bragg stacks with the most layers. The excursions in dimensions required to tune the measured reflected wavelength from 675 (red) to 425 nm (blue) are a decrease from ca 150 to 80 nm for the high-index lamellae and from ca 120 to 50 nm for the low-index inter-lamellar spaces. Fixation-induced dimensional changes also are quantified, leading us to suggest that further microspectrophotometric analyses of this iridocyte

  2. Vision in flying insects.

    PubMed

    Egelhaaf, Martin; Kern, Roland

    2002-12-01

    Vision guides flight behaviour in numerous insects. Despite their small brain, insects easily outperform current man-made autonomous vehicles in many respects. Examples are the virtuosic chasing manoeuvres male flies perform as part of their mating behaviour and the ability of bees to assess, on the basis of visual motion cues, the distance travelled in a novel environment. Analyses at both the behavioural and neuronal levels are beginning to unveil reasons for such extraordinary capabilities of insects. One recipe for their success is the adaptation of visual information processing to the specific requirements of the behavioural tasks and to the specific spatiotemporal properties of the natural input.

  3. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Flying by Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Frederic J.; Antreasian, Peter G.; Ardalan, Shadan M.; Criddle, Kevin E.; Ionasescu, Rodica; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Roth, Duane C.; Thompson, Paul F.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft encounters the massive Titan about once every month. These encounters are essential to the mission as Titan is the only satellite of Saturn that can provide enough gravity assist to shape the orbit tour and allow outstanding science for many years. From a navigation point of view, these encounters provide many challenges, in particular those that fly close enough to the surface for the atmospheric drag to perturb the orbit. This paper discusses the dynamics models developed to successfully navigate Cassini and determine its trajectory. This includes the moon's gravity pull with its second degree zonal harmonics J2, the attitude thrust control perturbations and the acceleration of drag.

  5. Flying over decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeller, Judith; Issler, Mena; Imamoglu, Atac

    Levy flights haven been extensively used in the past three decades to describe non-Brownian motion of particles. In this presentation I give an overview on how Levy flights have been used across several disciplines, ranging from biology to finance to physics. In our publication we describe how a single electron spin 'flies' when captured in quantum dot using the central spin model. At last I motivate the use of Levy flights for the description of anomalous diffusion in modern experiments, concretely to describe the lifetimes of quasi-particles in Josephson junctions. Finished PhD at ETH in Spring 2015.

  6. Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 112 Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å (Web, free access)   Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å contains wavelengths and intensities for about 5600 lines in the region 4330 Å. An atlas plot of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed.

  7. Opportunities and Challenges for Education and Outreach at NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network), a new NSF Large Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gram, W.; Henderson, S.; Wasser, L. A.; Goehring, L.

    2015-12-01

    As a new NSF Large Facility, NEON (the National Ecological Observatory Network) collects continental-scale ecological and environmental data to support research and education on large-scale ecological processes. The Observatory provides data, infrastructure and educational resources to scientific, educational and general public audiences. We designed NEON's Education and Outreach (E & O) activities to meet several high-level goals, including (1) facilitating public understanding of ecological science, (2) providing tools to use NEON data, (3) educating the next generation of ecologists, and (4) enhancing diversity within the ecological community. The suite of activities we developed ranges from online resources for using NEON data to a Citizen Science project to traditional undergraduate internship programs and workshops for graduate students/early career scientists. The NEON Construction Project represents one of the first large facilities that included E & O activities as set of deliverables with defined requirements in parallel to other components of construction. This approach proved to be both an opportunity to build a multifaceted E & O program in collaboration with NEON science and engineering, and a challenge as competing priorities sometimes left E & O resource development teams without necessary technical expertise. The result, however, is a robust suite of online educational resources, citizen science opportunities, and in-person training programs. Early evaluation efforts have helped us fine tune our programming to meet the needs of target audiences, including diverse undergraduate students, graduate students, scientists, faculty, edcuators, and citizen scientists. Moving into Operations, we envision an evolving suite of resources and programs that further NEON's mission and engage audiences in "doing science," both by using NEON data in a diversity of contexts and participating in our citizen science opportunities.

  8. NEON: Contributing continental-scale long-term environmental data for the benefit of society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, B.; Aulenbach, S.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a NSF funded national investment in physical and information infrastructure. Large-scale environmental changes pose challenges that straddle environmental, economic, and social boundaries. As we develop climate adaptation strategies at the Federal, state, local, and tribal levels, accessible and usable data are essential for implementing actions that are informed by the best available information. NEON's goal is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on continental-scale ecology by providing physical and information infrastructure. The NEON framework will take standardized, long-term, coordinated measurements of related environmental variables at each of its 62 sites across the nation. These observations, collected by automated instruments, field crews, and airborne instruments, will be processed into more than 700 data products that are provided freely over the web to support research, education, and environmental management. NEON is envisioned to be an integral component of an interoperable ecosystem of credible data and information sources. Other members of this information ecosystem include Federal, commercial, and non-profit entities. NEON is actively involved with the interoperability community via forums like the Foundation for Earth Science Information Partners and the USGS Community for Data Integration in a collective effort to identify the technical standards, best practices, and organizational principles that enable the emergence of such an information ecosystem. These forums have proven to be effective innovation engines for the experimentation of new techniques that evolve into emergent standards. These standards are, for the most part, discipline agnostic. It is becoming increasingly evident that we need to include socio-economic and public health data sources in interoperability initiatives, because the dynamics of coupled

  9. Microtransplantation of cellular membranes from squid stellate ganglion reveals ionotropic GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Limon, Agenor; Palma, Eleonora; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    The squid has been the most studied cephalopod, and it has served as a very useful model for investigating the events associated with nerve impulse generation and synaptic transmission. While the physiology of squid giant axons has been extensively studied, very little is known about the distribution and function of the neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate inhibitory transmission at the synapses. In this study we investigated whether γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activates neurotransmitter receptors in stellate ganglia membranes. To overcome the low abundance of GABA-like mRNAs in invertebrates and the low expression of GABA in cephalopods, we used a two-electrode voltage clamp technique to determine if Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with cell membranes from squid stellate ganglia responded to GABA. Using this method, membrane patches containing proteins and ion channels from the squid's stellate ganglion were incorporated into the surface of oocytes. We demonstrated that GABA activates membrane receptors in cellular membranes isolated from squid stellate ganglia. Using the same approach, we were able to record native glutamate-evoked currents. The squid's GABA receptors showed an EC(50) of 98 μmol l(-1) to GABA and were inhibited by zinc (IC(50) = 356 μmol l(-1)). Interestingly, GABA receptors from the squid were only partially blocked by bicuculline. These results indicate that the microtransplantation of native cell membranes is useful to identify and characterize scarce membrane proteins. Moreover, our data also support the role of GABA as an ionotropic neurotransmitter in cephalopods, acting through chloride-permeable membrane receptors.

  10. Flying in, Flying out: Offshore Teaching in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seah, Wee Tiong; Edwards, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the relatively new phenomenon of university education faculties offering offshore education. The analogy, "flying in, flying out" captures the intensity of such offshore experiences for visiting academics, and contrasts their professional experiences against expatriate academics. This paper reports on case studies of…

  11. Fly ash quality and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B.; Beer, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  12. Distribution of rhodopsin and retinochrome in the squid retina

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The cephalopod retina contains two kinds of photopigments, rhodopsin and retinochrome. For many years retinochrome has been thought to be localized in the inner segments of the visual cells, whereas rhodopsin is in the outer segments. However, it is now clear that retinochrome can be extracted also from fragments of outer segments. In the dark- adapted retina of Loligo pealei retinochrome is distributed half-and- half in the inner and outer segments. Todarodes pacificus contains much more retinochrome than Loligo, and it is more abundant in the outer than in the inner segments. The outer segments of Loligo contain retinochrome and metarhodopsin in addition to rhodopsin, whether squids are kept in the dark or in the light. But there is extremely little metarhodopsin (about 3% of rhodopsin) even in light-adapted eyes. The inner segments contain only retinochrome, and much less in the light than in the dark. On the other hand, retinochrome in the outer segments increases markedly during light adaptation. These facts suggest the possibility that some retinochrome moves forward from the inner to the outer segments during light adaptation and there reacts with metarhodopsin to promote regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:6620

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: SQUID sensor array configurations for magnetoencephalography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, J.; Robinson, S. E.

    2002-09-01

    Electrophysiological activity in the human brain generates a small magnetic field from the spatial superposition of individual neuronal source currents. At a distance of about 15 mm from the scalp, the observed field is of the order of 10-13 to 10-12 T peak-to-peak. This measurement process is termed magnetoencephalography (MEG). In order to minimize instrumental noise, the MEG is usually detected using superconducting flux transformers, coupled to SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors. Since MEG signals are also measured in the presence of significant environmental magnetic noise, flux transformers must be designed to strongly attenuate environmental noise, maintain low instrumental noise and maximize signals from the brain. Furthermore, the flux transformers must adequately sample spatial field variations if the brain activity is to be imaged. The flux transformer optimization for maximum brain signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requires analysis of the spatial and temporal properties of brain activity, the environmental noise and how these signals are coupled to the flux transformer. Flux transformers that maximize SNR can detect the smallest brain signals and have the best ability to spatially separate dipolar sources. An optimal flux transformer design is a synthetic higher-order gradiometer based on relatively short-baseline first-order radial gradiometer primary sensors.

  14. Squid Pen Chitin Chitooligomers as Food Colorants Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Huang, Chih-Ting; Dzung, Nguyen Anh; Wang, San-Lang

    2015-01-01

    One of the most promising applications of chitosanase is the conversion of chitinous biowaste into bioactive chitooligomers (COS). TKU033 chitosanase was induced from squid pen powder (SPP)-containing Bacillus cereus TKU033 medium and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography. The enzyme was relatively more thermostable in the presence of the substrate and had an activity of 93% at 50 °C in a pH 5 buffer solution for 60 min. Furthermore, the enzyme used for the COS preparation was also studied. The enzyme products revealed various mixtures of COS that with different degrees of polymerization (DP), ranging from three to nine. In the culture medium, the fermented SPP was recovered, and it displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 96%) for the disperse dyes than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazne (Y4). Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR) analysis proved that the adsorption of the dyes onto fermented SPP was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that fermented SPP was a favorable adsorber and could be employed as low-cost alternative for dye removal in wastewater treatment. PMID:25608726

  15. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin; Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J.; Ling, D. C.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2014-08-15

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10{sup −7} T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K.

  16. Detection System for Metallic Contaminants by Eight-Channel SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Ohtani, T.; Suzuki, S.

    2012-03-01

    We developed a magnetic contaminant detection system for industrial products such as electrode foils of lithium ion battery employing eight high-Tc SQUID gradiometers. The system was based on pre-magnetization of a contaminant in an object under test by means of permanent magnets of 0.5 T, which magnetization direction was horizontal, in order to suppress the edge effect from the object composed of magnetic material. The object was conveyed to pass under the eight-channel gradiometer array, in which a pair of four gradiometers was aligned in two rows to cover target foils of several tens mm in width. The magnetization from the contaminant in the object was detected by the gradiometers of averaged flux white noise level of 25 μphi0/Hz1/2. In case that an iron ball passed just under one gradiometer, an iron ball of about phi30 μm in diameter was successfully detected with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) of 5. From measurement results using an iron ball of about 100 μm in diameter, it was demonstrated that the system had a detectable range of 70 mm in width. There results suggest that the system is a promising tool for the quality control of lithium ion batteries.

  17. High-Tc SQUID gradiometer system for immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öisjöen, F.; Magnelind, P.; Kalabukhov, A.; Winkler, D.

    2008-03-01

    A high-Tc dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) gradiometer was developed for magnetic immunoassays where magnetic nanoparticles are used as markers to detect biological reactions. The gradiometer was fabricated on a 5 × 10 mm2 SrTiO3 bicrystal substrate and has a gradiometer resolution of 2.1 pT cm-1 Hz-1/2. A magnetic signal was detected from a sample of 1 µl of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a 40 mg ml-1 solution kept in a microcavity fabricated on Si wafers with Si3N4 membranes using MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical-systems) technology. It was found that volumes as small as 0.3 nl in principle would be detectable with our present device. This corresponds to a total number of particles of 2.2 × 107. The estimated average dipole moment per particle is 4.8 × 10-22 A m2. We are aiming at reading out immunoassays by detecting the Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles, and we also intend to integrate MEMS technology into our system.

  18. Sodium movements in perfused squid giant axons. Passive fluxes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, E; Canessa-Fischer, M

    1968-08-01

    Sodium movements in internally perfused giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were studied with varying internal sodium concentrations and with fluoride as the internal anion. It was found that as the internal concentration of sodium was increased from 2 to 200 mM the resting sodium efflux increased from 0.09 to 34.0 pmoles/cm(2)sec and the average resting sodium influx increased from 42.9 to 64.5 pmoles/cm(2)sec but this last change was not statistically significant. When perfusing with a mixture of 500 mM K glutamate and 100 mM Na glutamate the resting efflux was 10 +/- 3 pmoles/cm(2)sec and 41 +/- 10 pmoles/cm(2)sec for sodium influx. Increasing the internal sodium concentration also increased both the extra influx and the extra efflux of sodium due to impulse propagation. At any given internal sodium concentration the net extra influx was about 5 pmoles/cm(2)impulse. This finding supports the notion that the inward current generated in a propagated action potential can be completely accounted for by movements of sodium.

  19. Jumbo squid beaks: inspiration for design of robust organic composites.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Li, Youli; Waite, J Herbert; Zok, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The hard tissues found in some invertebrate marine organisms represent intriguing paradigms for robust, lightweight materials. The present study focuses on one such tissue: that comprising the beak of the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). Its main constituents are chitin fibers (15-20wt.%) and histidine- and glycine-rich proteins (40-45%). Notably absent are mineral phases, metals and halogens. Despite being fully organic, beak hardness and stiffness are at least twice those of the most competitive synthetic organic materials (notably engineering polymers) and comparable to those of Glycera and Nereis jaws. Furthermore, the combination of hardness and stiffness makes the beaks more resistant to plastic deformation when in contact with blunt abrasives than virtually all metals and polymers. The 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine and abundant histidine content in the beak proteins as well as the pigmented hydrolysis-resistant residue are suggestive of aromatic cross-linking. A high cross-linking density between the proteins and chitin may be the single most important determinant of hardness and stiffness in the beak. Beak microstructure is characterized by a lamellar arrangement of the constituents, with a weak interface that promotes crack deflection and endows the structure with high fracture toughness. The susceptibility of this microstructure to cracking along these interfaces from contact stresses at the external surface is mitigated by the presence of a protective coating.

  20. Six steps in quality intervention development (6SQuID)

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Daniel; Wimbush, Erica; Jepson, Ruth; Doi, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Improving the effectiveness of public health interventions relies as much on the attention paid to their design and feasibility as to their evaluation. Yet, compared to the vast literature on how to evaluate interventions, there is little to guide researchers or practitioners on how best to develop such interventions in practical, logical, evidence based ways to maximise likely effectiveness. Existing models for the development of public health interventions tend to have a strong social-psychological, individual behaviour change orientation and some take years to implement. This paper presents a pragmatic guide to six essential Steps for Quality Intervention Development (6SQuID). The focus is on public health interventions but the model should have wider applicability. Once a problem has been identified as needing intervention, the process of designing an intervention can be broken down into six crucial steps: (1) defining and understanding the problem and its causes; (2) identifying which causal or contextual factors are modifiable: which have the greatest scope for change and who would benefit most; (3) deciding on the mechanisms of change; (4) clarifying how these will be delivered; (5) testing and adapting the intervention; and (6) collecting sufficient evidence of effectiveness to proceed to a rigorous evaluation. If each of these steps is carefully addressed, better use will be made of scarce public resources by avoiding the costly evaluation, or implementation, of unpromising interventions. PMID:26573236