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Sample records for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

  1. Severe intracranial haemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Morais, Sofia; Sevivas, Teresa; Veiga, Ricardo; Salvado, Ramon; Taborda, Adelaide

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a rare (1/1000–5000 births) life-threatening disorder, caused by fetomaternal incompatibility for a fetal human platelet alloantigen inherited from the father, with production of maternal alloantibodies against fetal platelets, leading to severe thrombocytopenia and potential bleeding. Intracranial haemorrhage is the most feared complication. This report presents the case of a term newborn infant, born from caesarean section after a normal pregnancy, presenting signs of skin bleeding with different ages. Obstetric history included a previous spontaneous abortion after amniocentesis. Severe thrombocytopenia (4×109/l platelets) was found and brain ultrasound showed multiple intracranial haemorrhages. Human platelet antigen (HPA) phenotyping showed maternal negative HPA-1a and paternal positive HPA-1a platelets. Strongly positive anti-HPA-1a and weakly positive anti-human leukocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Multiple platelet transfusions, intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid were given but favourable response was accomplished only after a compatible platelet transfusion. Brain MRI showed multiple subacute and chronic haemorrhages. PMID:22679192

  2. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: progress and ongoing debates.

    PubMed

    Bussel, James B; Primiani, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) is a result of a parental incompatibility of platelet-specific antigens and the transplacental passage of maternal alloantibodies against the platelet antigen shared by the father and the fetus. It occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is the most common cause of severe thrombocytopenia in fetuses and term neonates. As screening programs are not routinely performed, most affected fetuses are identified after birth when neonatal thrombocytopenia is recognized. In severe cases, the affected fetus is identified as a result of suffering from an in utero intracranial hemorrhage. Once diagnosed, AIT must be treated antenatally as the disease can be more severe in subsequent pregnancies. While there have been many advances regarding the diagnosis and treatment of AIT, it is still difficult to predict the severity of disease and which therapy will be effective.

  3. Taking a wider view on fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Bonstein, Lilach; Haddad, Nuhad

    2017-03-01

    In fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), platelets are destroyed by maternal antibodies directed against fetal/neonate antigens. Thrombocytopenia can be severe and lead to intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in about 10% of cases. Although three types of antigen groups, presented on platelets [ABO blood group antigens, human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and human platelet antigens (HPA)] are known to be implicated in immune platelet destruction, antibodies against HPA are most commonly involved in FNAIT and hence are the target of extensive research. Awareness of FNAIT by physicians as well as the availability of the most sensitive diagnostic methods capable of detecting a wide range of antibodies are crucial for the diagnosis of FNAIT and the prevention of severe thrombocytopenia and its bleeding risks in subsequent pregnancies. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-Nak(a).

    PubMed

    Kankirawatana, S; Kupatawintu, P; Juji, T; Veerakul, G; Ngerncham, S; Chongkolwatana, V; O'Charoen, R

    2001-03-01

    The accurate diagnosis of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is essential in the effective treatment of potentially serious bleeding in neonates. Reported here is a case of a full-term female baby who was delivered by vacuum extraction from a gravida 1 para 1 healthy mother. She presented with generalized petechiae and bilateral cephalhematoma, which she had had since birth. At 7 hours of life, she had an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and was found to have severe anemia and marked thrombo-cytopenia. Coagulation screening tests were normal. The diagnosis of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia was suspected, and maternal serum was collected for further study. The baby was treated with a single dose of hydrocortisone (10 mg/kg) and IVIG (400 mg/kg) while waiting for irradiated platelets from her mother. After 30 mL of a transfusion of maternal platelets, the baby's platelet count rose dramatically, from 15,000 to 162,000 per microL, and it remained stable at that level. She was discharged on the 10th hospital day in good condition. During the follow-up period of 8 months, her growth and development were satisfactorily normal, as well as her platelet count. A high-titered platelet antibody was detected in the maternal serum by use of a solid phase platelet adherence technique. The specificity of the platelet antibody was identified as anti-Nak(a) by the mixed passive hemagglutination test method. These findings suggested a diagnosis of NAIT caused by anti-Nak(a).

  5. Fetal/Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia: Pathogenesis, Diagnostics and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Brojer, Ewa; Husebekk, Anne; Dębska, Marzena; Uhrynowska, Małgorzata; Guz, Katarzyna; Orzińska, Agnieszka; Dębski, Romuald; Maślanka, Krystyna

    2016-08-01

    Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a relatively rare condition (1/1000-1/2000) that was granted orphan status by the European Medicines Agency in 2011. Clinical consequences of FNAIT, however, may be severe. A thrombocytopenic fetus or new-born is at risk of intracranial hemorrhage that may result in lifelong disability or death. Preventing such bleeding is thus vital and requires a solution. Anti-HPA1a antibodies are the most frequent cause of FNAIT in Caucasians. Its pathogenesis is similar to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-RhD antibodies, but is characterized by platelet destruction and is more often observed in the first pregnancy. In 75 % of these women, alloimmunization by HPA-1a antigens, however, occurs at delivery, which enables development of antibody-mediated immune suppression to prevent maternal immunization. As for HDN, the recurrence rate of FNAIT is high. For advancing diagnostic efforts and treatment, it is thereby crucial to understand the pathogenesis of FNAIT, including cellular immunity involvement. This review presents the current knowledge on FNAIT. Also described is a program for HPA-1a screening in identifying HPA-1a negative pregnant women at risk of immunization. This program is now performed at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine in cooperation with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education in Warsaw as well as the UiT The Arctic University of Norway.

  6. Prolonged thrombocytopenia in a child with severe neonatal alloimmune reaction and Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salva, Inês; Batalha, Sara; Maia, Raquel; Kjollerstrom, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) caused by maternal antibodies is the leading cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. A 1-month-old Caucasian girl was referred to our Hematology Clinic for persistent thrombocytopenia diagnosed after a bleeding episode. Diagnostic tests suggested FMAIT. Mild thrombocytopenia persisted for 18 months, and subsequent findings of dysmorphic facies, short stature and mild pulmonary stenosis led to the hypothesis of Noonan syndrome (NS), which was confirmed by genetic test. Other hematological abnormalities were excluded and she had no further bleeding episodes. This case illustrates the possibility of different diagnoses with the same clinical manifestations. The persistence of thrombocytopenia longer than expected associated with typical physical features led to the diagnosis of NS.

  7. Prenatal testing for hemolytic disease of the newborn and fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia - current status.

    PubMed

    Avent, Neil D

    2014-12-01

    Incompatibility of red cell and platelet antigens can lead to maternal alloimmunization causing hemolytic disease of the fetus & newborn and fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia respectively. As the molecular background of these polymorphisms emerged, prenatal testing using initially fetal DNA obtained from invasively obtained amniotic fluid or chorionic villus was implemented. This evolved into testing using maternal plasma as source of fetal DNA, and this is in routine use as a safe non-invasive diagnostic that has no risk to the fetus of alloimmunization or spontaneous miscarriage. These tests were initially applied to high risk pregnancies, but has been applied on a mass scale, to screen fetuses in D-negative pregnant populations as national screening programs. Fetal neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia management has had comparatively small take up in non-invasive testing for causative fetal platelet alleles (e.g., HPA-1A), but mass scale genotyping of mothers to identify at risk HPA-1b1b pregnancies and their treatment with prophylactic anti-HPA-1A is being considered in at least one country (Norway).

  8. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). PMID:27610256

  9. Characterisation of maternal human leukocyte antigen class I antibodies in suspected foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Refsum, E; Mörtberg, A; Dahl, J; Meinke, S; Auvinen, M-K; Westgren, M; Reilly, M; Höglund, P; Wikman, A

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the specificities and level of HLA class I antibodies in selected cases referred for suspected foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). FNAIT occurs in 1 : 1-2000 live births, whereas maternal immunisation against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I is common. Whether HLA class I antibodies alone can cause FNAIT is debatable. A total of 260 patient samples were referred between 2007 and 2012. Referrals with maternal HLA class I antibodies and no other cause for the neonatal thrombocytopenia were included for analysis (cases, n = 23). HPA-1a negative mothers were excluded. Control groups were screened positive mothers of healthy neonates (controls, n = 33) and female blood donors (blood donors, n = 19). LABScreen single antigen HLA class I beads was used for antibody analysis. Clinical records were reviewed for cases. All groups had broad antibody reactivity. Cases had more antibodies with high SFI levels compared with the controls (SFI>9999; medians 26, 6 and 0; P < 0·05) and higher overall median HLA-ABC and HLA-B SFI (P < 0·05). Many of the antibodies were reactive with rare alleles. When reviewing the clinical records, several of the cases had other contributing factors to the thrombocytopenia. There was no correlation between foetal platelet count and antibody levels. Mothers of thrombocytopenic neonates had higher levels of HLA class I antibodies compared with control groups of women with healthy children and female blood donors. However, clinical outcome and antibody response correlated poorly in the heterogeneous case group, indicating a multifactorial cause to the thrombocytopenia in the majority of cases. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  10. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2015-12-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs in c. 1 in 1000 births and is caused by maternal antibodies against human platelet alloantigens that bind incompatible fetal platelets and promote their clearance from the circulation. Affected infants can experience bleeding, bruising and, in severe cases, intracranial haemorrhage and even death. As maternal screening is not routinely performed, and first pregnancies can be affected, most cases are diagnosed at delivery of a first affected pregnancy. Unlike its erythrocyte counterpart, Haemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn, there is no prophylactic treatment for FNAIT. This report will review recent advances made in understanding the pathogenesis of FNAIT: the platelet alloantigens involved, maternal exposure and sensitization to fetal platelet antigens, properties of platelet Immunoglobulin G antibodies, maternal-fetal antibody transport mechanisms and efforts to develop an effective FNAIT prophylaxis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Antenatal management in fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Winkelhorst, Dian; Murphy, Michael F; Greinacher, Andreas; Shehata, Nadine; Bakchoul, Tamam; Massey, Edwin; Baker, Jillian; Lieberman, Lani; Tanael, Susano; Hume, Heather; Arnold, Donald M; Baidya, Shoma; Bertrand, Gerald; Bussel, James; Kjaer, Mette; Kaplan, Cécile; Kjeldsen-Kragh, Jens; Oepkes, Dick; Ryan, Greg

    2017-01-27

    Several strategies can be used to manage fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) in subsequent pregnancies. Serial fetal blood sampling (FBS) and intrauterine platelet transfusions (IUPT), and weekly maternal intravenous immunoglobulin infusion (IVIG), with or without additional corticosteroid therapy are common options, but the optimal management has not been determined. The aim of this systematic review was to assess antenatal treatment strategies for FNAIT. Four randomized controlled trials and twenty-two non-randomized studies were included. Pooling of results was not possible due to considerable heterogeneity. Most studies found comparable outcomes regarding the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage, regardless of antenatal management strategy applied; FBS, IUPT or IVIG with/without corticosteroids. There is no consistent evidence for the value of adding steroids to IVIG. Fetal blood sampling or intrauterine platelet transfusion resulted in a relatively high complication rate, consisting mainly of preterm emergency cesarean section, 11% per treated pregnancy in all studies combined. Overall, non-invasive management in pregnant mothers who have had a previous neonate with FNAIT is effective without the relatively high rate of adverse outcomes seen with invasive strategies. This systematic review suggests that first line antenatal management in FNAIT is weekly IVIG administration, with or without the addition of corticosteroids.

  12. LOW FREQUENCY HUMAN PLATELET ANTIGENS (HPA) AS TRIGGERS FOR NEONATAL ALLOIMMUNE THROMBOCYTOPENIA (NAIT)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julie A.; Gitter, Maria; Bougie, Daniel W.; Pechauer, Shannon; Hopp, Kathleen A.; Pietz, Brad; Szabo, Aniko; Curtis, Brian R.; McFarland, Janice; Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Twenty-four low frequency platelet antigens (HPAs) have been implicated as immunogens in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). We performed studies to define more fully how often these antigens trigger maternal immunization leading to NAIT. Study design and methods In a Phase 1 study, fathers of selected NAIT cases not resolved by serologic testing but thought to have a high likelihood of NAIT on clinical and serologic grounds were typed for low frequency HPAs (LFHPAs) by DNA sequencing. In a Phase 2 study, high-throughput methods were used to type fathers of 1067 consecutive unresolved NAIT cases for LFHPAs. Mothers of 1338 unresolved cases were also typed to assess the prevalence of LFHPAs in a population racially/ethnically similar to the fathers. Results In Phase 1, LFHPAs were identified in 16 of 244 fathers (6.55%). In Phase 2, LFPAs were found in only 28 of 1067 fathers (2.62%). LFHPAs were identified in 27 of 1338 maternal samples (2.01%). HPA-9bw was by far the most common LFHPA identified in the populations studied and was the only LFHPA that was significantly more common in fathers than in mothers of affected infants (P=0.02). Conclusions Maternal immunization against recognized LFHPAs accounts for only a small fraction of the cases of apparent NAIT not resolved by standard serologic testing. Typing of the fathers of such cases for LFHPAs is likely to be rewarding only when a maternal antibody specific for a paternal platelet glycoprotein is demonstrated and/or there is compelling clinical evidence for NAIT. PMID:24128174

  13. Platelets and platelet alloantigens: Lessons from human patients and animal models of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Vadasz, Brian; Chen, Pingguo; Yougbaré, Issaka; Zdravic, Darko; Li, June; Li, Conglei; Carrim, Naadiya; Ni, Heyu

    2017-01-01

    Platelets play critical roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Emerging evidence indicates that they are versatile cells and also involved in many other physiological processes and disease states. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a life threatening bleeding disorder caused by fetal platelet destruction by maternal alloantibodies developed during pregnancy. Gene polymorphisms cause platelet surface protein incompatibilities between mother and fetus, and ultimately lead to maternal alloimmunization. FNAIT is the most common cause of intracranial hemorrhage in full-term infants and can also lead to intrauterine growth retardation and miscarriage. Proper diagnosis, prevention and treatment of FNAIT is challenging due to insufficient knowledge of the disease and a lack of routine screening as well as its frequent occurrence in first pregnancies. Given the ethical difficulties in performing basic research on human fetuses and neonates, animal models are essential to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of FNAIT. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on platelets, hemostasis and thrombocytopenia with a focus on the advancements made in FNAIT by utilizing animal models.

  14. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia associated with maternal-fetal incompatibility for blood group B

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Brian R.; Fick, Andrea; Lochowicz, Andrew J.; McFarland, Janice G.; Ball, Robert H.; Peterson, Julie; Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blood group A and B antigens are expressed only weakly on platelets (PLTs) of most individuals but are very strongly expressed on PLTs from approximately 1 percent of normal subjects (Type II high expressers). The implications of this trait for transfusion medicine are undefined. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A family was studied in which two Group B infants were born with neonatal thrombocytopenia, whereas a third infant whose blood group was A2 had a normal PLT count at birth. RESULTS Serologic studies demonstrated a maternal antibody that reacted strongly with PLTs from the father and the two group B children in flow cytometry and with GPIIb/IIIa from their PLTs in solid-phase assays. No PLT-specific antibodies were detected in maternal serum sample, but it contained a high-titer immunoglobulin G antibody specific for blood group B. All PLT-reactive antibody in the mother’s serum was removed by absorption with pooled, washed group A and B red cells (RBCs). Studies with monoclonal anti-B and measurement of serum B-glycosyltransferase activity showed that the father and both group B children were Type II high expressers of blood group B. CONCLUSIONS The findings indicate that high-titer blood group antibodies acquired from the mother can cause thrombocytopenia in infants possessing the Type II high-expresser phenotype despite competition for antibody binding by blood group antigens expressed on RBCs and other tissues. PMID:18028270

  15. Anti-Human Platelet Antigen-1a Immunoglobulin G Preparation Intended to Prevent Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ying-Jan; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Björn; Kjaer, Mette; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a severe disease that is caused by maternal alloantibodies generated during pregnancy or at delivery as a result of incompatibility between maternal and fetal human platelet antigens (HPAs) inherited from the father. Antibody-mediated immune suppression using anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulins is thought to be able to prevent FNAIT caused by HPA-1a. A fractionation process to prepare anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) from human plasma was therefore developed. Anti-HPA-1a plasma was obtained from volunteer mothers who underwent alloimmunization against HPA-1a during a previous pregnancy. Plasma was cryoprecipitated and the supernatant treated with caprylic acid and solvent/detergent (S/D), purified by chromatography, nanofiltered, concentrated, and sterile-filtered. The anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin fraction was characterized for purity and safety. PAK12 and quantitative monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assays were used to detect anti-HPA-1a IgG. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) removal during nanofiltration was assessed by spiking experiments, using cell culture-derived reporter HCV and luciferase analysis. The caprylic acid treatment precipitated non-Ig proteins yielding a 90% pure Ig supernatant. S-HyperCel chromatography of the S/D-treated supernatant followed by HyperCel STAR AX provided high IgG recovery (>80%) and purity (>99.5%), and efficient IgA and IgM removal. Concentrations of complement factors C3 and C4 were < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/dL, respectively. The final IgG could be nanofiltered on Planova 20N under conditions removing more than 3 log HCV infectivity to baseline mock infection level, and concentrated to ca. 30 g/L. Proteolytic activity and thrombin generation were low in the final fraction. The Pak12 and MAIPA assays showed good recovery of anti-HPA-1a throughout the process. Clinical-grade HPA-1a IgG can be prepared using a process compliant with current quality requirements

  16. [Detection, diagnosis and analysis of the first case of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura associated with anti-HPA-5b in China].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Zhong, Zhou-Lin; Li, Li-Lan; Shen, Wei-Dong; Wu, Guo-Guang

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the detection and diagnosis of the neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura (NAITP) caused by anti-HPA-5b antibody. The platelet count and clinical manifestation in the newborn were examined. The HPA-1-21bw genotypes of the newborn and her parents were detected by multiple-PCR and DNA sequencing. The HPA-specific antibody in the sera of newborn and her mother were detected and identified by flow cytometry (FCM) and monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). The results indicated that the clinical manifestations of the newborn were lighter. The HPA genotyping showed that the genotype of the newborn was HPA-5ab, while that of her mother and father were HPA-5aa and HPA-5ab, respectively. The antibody against the platelet of newborn's father existed in the newborn's mother sera. The HPA antibody of the mother was identified as anti-HPA-5b. It is concluded that the newborn with neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura was caused by the antibody against HPA-5b.

  17. [Platelet transfusion role in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Petermann, R

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal immune thrombocytopenia represent less than 5% of cases of early thrombocytopenia (early-onset<72hours post-delivery). As in adults, thrombocytopenia in neonates is defined as a platelet count less than 150G/L. They are either auto- or allo-immune. Thrombocytopenia resulting from transplacental passage of maternal antibodies directed to platelet membrane glycoproteins can be severe. The major complication of severe thrombocytopenia is bleeding and particularly intra-cranial haemorrhage and neurologic sequelea following. However, auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenia have very different characteristics including the treatment management. In fact, this treatment is based on platelet transfusion associated or not to intravenous immunoglobulin administration. The purpose of this article is to remind platelet transfusion's place in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia in terms of recently published French guidelines and international practices.

  18. T-cell responses associated with neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: isolation of HPA-1a-specific, HLA-DRB3*0101-restricted CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Mette Kjaer; Skogen, Bjørn; Stuge, Tor B

    2009-04-16

    T-cell responses have been implicated in the development of HPA-1a-induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). However, HPA-1a-specific T cells have neither been isolated nor characterized. Here, we aimed to determine whether HPA-1a-specific T cells could be isolated from HPA-1a-immunized women. In the present study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from an HPA-1a-alloimmunized woman were cultured for weeks in the presence of HPA-1a peptide, labeled with CFSE, and assayed for antigen-specific proliferation. Individual proliferating cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and expanded in culture. Antigen specificity and HLA restriction were determined by cytokine secretion (enzyme-linked immunospot [ELISPOT]) and proliferation assays. Several CD3(+)CD4(+) T-cell clones were isolated that proliferated and secreted cytokines in response to HPA-1a peptide. Two of these clones have been established in long-term culture in our laboratory. Both of these recognize synthetic as well as naturally processed HPA-1a antigen, and the recognition is restricted by the MHC molecule HLA-DRB3*0101 that is strongly associated with NAIT. These HPA-1a-specific T-cell clones represent unambiguous evidence for the association of T-cell responses with NAIT, and they will serve as unique tools to elucidate the cellular immune response that may result in NAIT.

  19. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia can inhibit the binding of HPA-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Matthew; Lucas, Geoff; Calvert, Anthony; Bendukidze, Nina; Green, Frances; Kotecha, Krishna; Poles, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    A term baby with unexplained thrombocytopenia and a platelet (PLT) count of 14 × 10(9) /L (maternal PLT count was 200 × 10(9) /L) was investigated for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Serologic investigations were performed using the PLT immunofluorescence test (PIFT), monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens (MAIPA), and a bead-based assay (BBA) with maternal sera taken up to 56 days postdelivery. One serum sample was also separated into "immunoglobulin (Ig)M-rich" and "IgM-depleted" fractions and tested for PLT-specific antibodies. The family was genotyped for HPA. HPA-3a-specific IgM antibodies were detected in the PIFT and confirmed in the BBA. PLT-specific IgG HPA-3a antibodies were not detected in the MAIPA assay and BBA in the initial sample but were detected in both techniques in subsequent serum samples. Testing of IgM-rich and IgM-depleted fractions in the MAIPA assay revealed that IgG antibody binding of the IgM-depleted fraction was inhibited by approximately 50% when it was reconstituted with the IgM-rich fraction suggesting that the IgM antibodies blocked the binding of the IgG antibodies. This effect was not observed when the IgM-depleted fraction or untreated serum was diluted with elution buffer. Incompatibility for HPA-3 was identified between the mother and the infant. The infant received one HPA-1a, -5b negative neonatal PLT transfusion, and one random PLT transfusion, with satisfactory outcomes. Both units were later found to be HPA-3b3b. HPA-3a IgM antibodies can inhibit PLT-specific HPA-3a IgG antibodies in the MAIPA assay. © 2017 AABB.

  20. Alloimmune thrombocytopenia: state of the art 2006.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Richard L; Bussel, James B; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-10-01

    In alloimmune thrombocytopenia maternal immunoglobulin G anti-platelet alloantibodies cross the placenta and cause fetal thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis requires laboratory demonstration of incompatibility between a maternal and paternal platelet alloantigen, and detection of maternal antibody to the discordant paternal alloantigen. This disorder should be treated in utero because of its propensity to cause fetal intracranial bleeding. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin 1 gm/kg/wk to the mother is successful in substantially raising the platelet count in many fetuses, but this is most successful if the count is >20,000/mL3 at the time that the therapy is initiated. The addition of prednisone administered daily to the mother and/or increasing the dose of intravenous immunoglobulin has a therapeutic benefit in cases that have failed to respond to initial therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin alone. The only reliable noninvasive indicator of the potential for severe fetal thrombocytopenia is a history of an antenatal intracranial hemorrhage in a prior affected sibling. Because fetal blood sampling to determine the fetal platelet count may be associated with significant fetal morbidity, attempts are being made to derive a rational, non-invasive, stratified approach to patient-specific therapy of this disorder in affected pregnancies.

  1. Alloantibody against new platelet alloantigen (Lap(a)) on glycoprotein IIb is responsible for a case of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Wihadmadyatami, Hevi; Heidinger, Kathrin; Röder, Lida; Werth, Silke; Giptner, Astrid; Hackstein, Holger; Knorr, Martin; Bein, Gregor; Sachs, Ulrich J; Santoso, Sentot

    2015-12-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is caused by the destruction of platelets (PLTs) in the fetus or newborn by maternal PLT antibodies that crossed the placenta during pregnancy. In this study, we aim to elucidate the properties of a new PLT alloantigen (Lap(a)) that is associated with a severe case of FNAIT. Analysis of maternal serum with phenotyped PLTs by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens showed positive reaction against PLT glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa and HLA Class I expressed on paternal PLTs. In contrast to GPIIIa-reactive anti-HPA-1a, anti-Lap(a) alloantibodies precipitated predominantly GPIIb. Indeed, a point mutation G>C at Position 2511 located in Exon 25 of the ITGA2B gene was found in Lap(a)-positive donors. This mutation causes an amino exchange Gln>His at Position 806 located in the calf-2 domain of GPIIb. Lap(a)-positive individuals were not found in 300 random blood donors. Our expression study showed that anti-Lap(a) alloantibodies reacted with stable transfected HEK293 cells expressing the mutated GPIIb isoform (His806). CHO cells carrying this isoform, however, failed to react with anti-Lap(a) alloantibodies, indicating that Lap(a) epitopes depend on the Gln806 His mutation and the carbohydrate composition of the GPIIb. This mutation did not hamper the binding of anti-HPA-3a, which recognizes a point mutation (Ile843 Ser) located in calf-2 domain. Finally, we found that Lap(a) and some HPA-3a epitopes are sensitive to O-glycanase. This study not only underlines the relevance of rare HPAs on the pathomechanism of FNAIT, but also helps to understand the pitfalls of serologic assays to detect anti-GPIIb alloantibodies. © 2015 AABB.

  2. Blood group A mothers are more likely to develop anemia during antenatal intravenous immunoglobulin treatment of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraja, Madhavi; Jin, Jenny C; Manotas, Karen C; Vinograd, Cheryl A; Ferd, Polina; Gabor, Julia; Wissert, Megan; Berkowitz, Richard L; McFarland, Janice G; Bussel, James B

    2016-10-01

    Incompatibility between parental platelet (PLT) antigens may lead to sensitization of mother and development of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) resulting in fetal thrombocytopenia. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) with or without prednisone is the most effective, evidence-based antenatal treatment for subsequent FNAIT-affected pregnancies. IVIG infusion causes hemolysis in other settings, the degree depending upon patient blood groups (BGs). In ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194987, 102 pregnant women received randomized antenatal treatment: Arm A received 2 g/kg/week IVIG; Arm B received 1 g/kg/week IVIG + 0.5 mg/kg/day prednisone. This post hoc analysis explored BG and anemia in 69 FNAIT mothers treated with Arm A or Arm B without salvage treatment to explore the effects of IVIG and steroid treatment on development of anemia in these women. Mothers whose treatment changed, for example, those with insufficient or unknown fetal PLT response who received salvage therapy, were excluded. For Arm A, 17 of 21 (hemoglobin [Hb] < 10 g/dL) mothers with anemia but only three of 15 mothers without anemia had BG-A and/or BG-B (p = 0.0005). BG was unrelated to anemia in Arm B; only nine of 33 Arm B mothers became anemic during treatment. The mean decrease in Hb level in women with BG-non-O was 1.9 g/dL and in women with BG-O was 1.1 g/dL (p = 0.004). Anemia was not caused by iron deficiency; the lowest mean corpuscular volume was 79. FNAIT women with BG-non-O more frequently develop anemia secondary to high-dose IVIG infusion (2 g/kg/week), quite possibly from isohemagglutinin-mediated hemolysis; maternal Hb requires monitoring. IVIG at 1 g/kg/week did not cause anemia in women with BG-non-O; concomitant prednisone likely alleviated the IVIG effect. Maternal BG could influence selection of antenatal treatment for FNAIT. © 2016 AABB.

  3. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-10-10

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion.

  4. Fatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-HLA alloimmunization in a twin pregnancy: A very infrequent complication of assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Meler, Eva; Porta, Roser; Canals, Carme; Serra, Bernat; Lozano, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The most frequently involved antigen in severe fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the human platelet antigen 1a. Platelets express the HLA-A and B antigens on their membrane and some studies report that maternal anti-HLA class I antibody can also cause FNAIT. We report here a very unusual case of a first twin pregnancy produced in vitro by oocyte and semen donation where the mother developed markedly elevated HLA antibodies, in the absence of anti-platelet or anti-neutrophil antibodies, that provoked in one of the twins a profound thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage and a mild thrombocytopenia and neutropenia in the second twin lasting until the fourth month of life. In addition, anti-D alloimmunization provoked hemolytic disease of the newborn with intrauterus anemia detected in the first twin and post-natal anemia in the second twin that required red blood cell transfusion and phototherapy. We hypothesize that the complete HLA-incompatible twin pregnancy due to the oocyte donation might have contributed to the severity of the clinical manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A case of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia in the presence of both anti-HPA-4b and anti-HPA-5b antibody: clinical and serological analysis of the subsequent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Tomoko; Koh, Yangsook; Mimura, Kazuya; Nakayama, Kotarosumitomo; Hosokawa, Mika; Sakuragi, Mikiko; Morikawa, Tamayo; Nakao, Mayumi; Aochi, Hiroshi; Fukumori, Yasuo; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Nagamine, Keisuke; Kimura, Tadashi; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is induced by maternal alloantibodies raised against fetal platelet antigens inherited from the paternal parent. In contrast to Caucasians, in Asians, predominantly in Japanese, most frequently detected antibodies in NAIT are anti-HPA-4b and anti-HPA-5b. In some NAIT cases multiple alloantibodies are detected. In such cases it is very difficult to determine which antibody is the dominant antibody in NAIT. In this case report, we describe a NAIT case (first sibling) with severe thrombocytopenia and cephalhematoma in the presence of both anti-HPA-4b and anti-HPA-5b antibodies in the maternal serum. We carefully examined titers of anti-HPA antibodies during the subsequent pregnancy with HPA-4b-positive and HPA-5b-negative fetus determined by amniocentesis at gestational week 16. We administered IVIG (1 g/kg/w) to the mother from gestational week 32 to 35. The mother subsequently delivered a second sibling with normal platelet count by cesarean section. Although we could not completely rule out the involvement of anti-HPA-4b, our findings suggested that anti-HPA-5b was implicated in the NAIT in the first sibling.

  6. Neonatal thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion - a UK perspective.

    PubMed

    Carr, Robert; Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2015-01-01

    Five percent of newborn infants admitted to UK neonatal units during a recent study developed a platelet count <60 × 10(9)/l, and 60% of these were transfused platelets. This review summarises the common causes and mechanisms of thrombocytopenia in the newborn. Relevant evidence relating the platelet count to the risk of haemorrhage is reviewed, and current UK guidance on transfusion thresholds outlined. The UK policy for the provision of platelets for transfusion to neonates is described, including the particular requirements for neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia. Finally, we look towards the future and prospects for reducing the need to expose newborns to donor-derived platelets. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. A rare manifestation of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Jerónimo, Monica; Azenha, Cátia; Mesquita, Joana; Pereira, Dolores Faria

    2014-06-02

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from a fetomaternal incompatibility with maternal sensitisation against a fetal human platelet antigen (HPA) and antibodies transfer to the fetal circulation, leading to platelet destruction. The clinical presentation is variable and isolated intraocular haemorrhage is rare. We present the case of a male newborn, with intrauterine growth restriction, born at 29 weeks due to pre-eclampsia. He presented proptosis of the left eye, hyphaema and elevated intraocular pressure, with no other signs of haemorrhage. Severe thrombocytopaenia was found (27×10(9)/L). Perinatal infection and maternal thrombocytopaenia were excluded. Positive anti-HPA-1a and antihuman leucocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Platelet crossmatch between the father's platelets and mother's plasma was positive. Platelet transfusions and intravenous immunoglobulin were given with favourable response. This case highlights an unusual presentation of NAIT, which should be suspected in the presence of severe thrombocytopaenia in the first 24-72 h of life.

  8. Thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Malte; Sallmon, Hannes; Kling, Pamela J; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is widespread in preterm and term neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, with up to one-third of infants demonstrating platelet counts <150 × 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia may arise from maternal, placental or fetal/neonatal origins featuring decreased platelet production, increased consumption, or both mechanisms. Over the past years, innovations in managing neonatal thrombocytopenia were achieved from prospectively obtained clinical data on thrombocytopenia and bleeding events, animal studies on platelet life span and production rate and clinical use of fully automated measurement of reticulated platelets (immature platelet fraction). This review summarizes the pathophysiology of neonatal thrombocytopenia, current management including platelet transfusion thresholds and recent developments in megakaryopoietic agents. Furthermore, we propose a novel index score for bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic neonates to facilitate clinician's decision-making when to transfuse platelets.

  9. [The new paradigm of neonatal hemochromatosis: fetal alloimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Costaguta, Alejandro; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The classical model of neonatal hemochromatosis was based on the analogy with hereditary hemochromatosis. Medical treatment consisted on the antioxidant-chelator cocktail. The new hypothesis of an alloimmune origin of the process by which the pregnant woman mounts an IgG-based destructive response against fetal hepatocytes offers a pathogenic explanation, allowing treatment to be focused on the immunological aspects, with excellent results, and opens the possibility of preventive treatment in future pregnancies. This new paradigm produces a deep impact in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease, that should be called "fetal alloimmune hepatitis".

  10. Immune thrombocytopenia in severe neonatal infections.

    PubMed

    Tate, D Y; Carlton, G T; Johnson, D; Sorenson, R L; Nesbit, M; White, J; Thompson, T; Krivit, W

    1981-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia occurs frequently in newborn infants with sepsis, but the exact mechanism remains obscure in those infants who do not have evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Since recent work has suggested a possible immune mechanism for thrombocytopenia observed in adults with sepsis, we have investigated the role of platelet-associated immunoglobulin in severe neonatal infections. To detect PAIgG we use a method employing protein A and peroxidase-antiperoxidase as a labeled antibody. PAIgG was quantitated by phase contrast microscopy and expressed as a reactive index. Our control group included 16 normal newborn infants whose mean RI was 0.65 +/- 0.01 SE. In addition to the control group, five infants with nonimmune thrombocytopenia were included; their mean RI was 0.66 +/- 0.01 SE. Seventeen newborn infants with severe infections were assayed for PAIgG. Eight of nine infants with bacterial infections had increased RI, with a mean of 1.16 +/- 0.03 SE (P less than 0.01). Six of the eight infants with viral infections had elevated RI, with a mean of 1.23 +/- 0.03 SE (P less than 0.01). These findings suggest that an immune mechanism may be involved in the thrombocytopenia of severe neonatal infection.

  11. Red cell alloimmunization in RhD positive pregnant women and neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Sankaralingam, Prabakaran; Jain, Ashish; Bagga, Rashmi; Kumar, Praveen; Marwaha, Neelam

    2016-08-01

    The frequency of red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization in RhD positive pregnant women is not known in our population. We planned to determine its frequency and correlation with neonatal outcome. We included 1000 RhD positive pregnant women: 500 had 'normal pregnancy' (Group I) and another 500 had 'high risk pregnancy' (Group II). ABO and extended Rh phenotyping were done by tube technique, antibody screening and identification by gel technique. For alloimmunized women, the paternal and neonatal ABO and extended Rh typing were done. Neonatal direct antiglobulin test (DAT) was also done and their clinical outcome observed. The frequency of RBC alloimmunization was 0.7% (7/1000) and all these women were from group II (p = 0.015). The alloantibodies were anti-E (85.7%), anti-c (71.4%), anti-Cw (14.3%) and anti-S (14.3%). Also, 6 women had history of transfusion (p < 0.01). Of the 7 neonates born to alloimmunized mothers, 4 (57.14%) had a positive DAT. The mean duration of phototherapy was higher in the DAT positive neonates (p < 0.01) and 2 (50%) required exchange transfusion. Thus, the frequency of alloimmunization was 0.7% in RhD positive pregnant women. High risk pregnancies and antenatal patients having a history of blood transfusion should be considered for regular antibody screening.

  12. Neonatal Thrombocytopenia as a Consequence of Maternal Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kalagiri, Ram R.; Choudhury, Saiara; Carder, Timothy; Govande, Vinayak; Beeram, Madhava R.; Uddin, M Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (preE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension affecting a significant proportion of pregnant women worldwide and can cause detrimental effects in the mother and newborn. Some of the effects in the newborn include neonatal thrombocytopenia. Pertaining specifically to neonatal thrombocytopenia, several questions remain unanswered. Discussion According to the current literature, neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal preE is highly prevalent in the general population and the incidence is reported to be around 30% worldwide. This review gives an insight into the syndrome and summarizes the possible pathological mechanisms, the diagnostic approach, complications, and therapeutic interventions of neonatal thrombocytopenia. It also identifies the involvement of other cell lines, apart from platelets in the newborns. Furthermore, we suggest a future prospective study to investigate the pathogenesis of preE and plan a study involving animal models to come up with a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent preE and its various consequences in neonates. PMID:26929869

  13. Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Kunal; Mittal, Hema Gupta; Maria, Arti

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is common and is frequently seen in neonatal sepsis. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is likely to be missed unless a high index of suspicion is present. Changing of antibiotics for assumed nonresolution of sepsis may lead to persistent thrombocytopenia in a neonate if drug-induced thrombocytopenia is missed. Vancomycin-induced neonatal thrombocytopenia is rarely described in scientific literature. We describe a newborn who was diagnosed with early onset sepsis and vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia. Other causes of thrombocytopenia such as sepsis, alloimmune thrombocytopenia, thrombosis etc. were excluded. The platelet counts normalized within 72 h of stopping vancomycin. Vancomycin-induced IgM platelet antibodies could not be done in our case (due to financial constraints), but their absence does not exclude the diagnosis of vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia.

  14. Factors predictive of neonatal thrombocytopenia in pregnant women with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Matsubara, Kousaku; Takafuta, Toshiro; Shinzato, Isaku; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Iwata, Aya; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuhito; Fukaya, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    To determine predictive factors for neonatal thrombocytopenia in deliveries with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), we conducted a retrospective study at a tertiary hospital between 1997 and 2013. During this period, 30 women with ITP delivered 44 children. Neonatal thrombocytopenia (<100 × 10(9)/L) at birth was observed in seven neonates; four of these cases were severe (<50 × 10(9)/L). No cases were complicated by intracranial hemorrhage, and there was no neonatal mortality. Platelet counts at birth of neonates born to mothers, who had first been diagnosed with ITP during pregnancy were significantly higher than those born to mothers diagnosed with ITP before pregnancy. There were significant correlations between neonatal platelet counts in the first and second siblings at birth (P = 0.015) and at nadir (P = 0.035). Platelet counts of neonates born vaginally were significantly more likely to decline after birth than those delivered by cesarean section (13/16 vs. 10/23, P = 0.024). In conclusion, diagnosis of ITP before pregnancy was significantly associated with neonatal thrombocytopenia, and the platelet count of an older sibling is a strong predictor for that of the next baby. The delivery mode may be an indicator of the timing of platelet count nadir after birth.

  15. Thrombocytopenia, bleeding, and use of platelet transfusions in sick neonates.

    PubMed

    Stanworth, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    Survival rates for infants born prematurely have improved significantly, in part due to better supportive care such as RBC transfusion. The role of platelet transfusions in neonates is more controversial. Neonatal thrombocytopenia is common in premature infants. The primary causal factors are intrauterine growth restriction/maternal hypertension, in which the infant presents with thrombocytopenia soon after birth, and sepsis/necrotizing enterocolitis, which are the common morbidities associated with thrombocytopenia in neonates > 72 hours of age. There is no evidence of a relationship between platelet count and occurrence of major hemorrhage, and cardiorespiratory problems are considered the main etiological factors in the development of intraventricular and periventricular hemorrhage in the neonatal period. Platelet transfusions are used commonly as prophylaxis in premature neonates with thrombocytopenia. However, there is widespread variation in the pretransfusion thresholds for platelet count and evidence of marked disparities in platelet transfusion practice between hospitals and countries. Platelet transfusions are biological agents and as such are associated with risks. Unlike other patient groups, specifically patients with hematological malignancies, there have been no recent clinical trials undertaken comparing different thresholds for platelet transfusion in premature neonates. Therefore, there is no evidence base with which to inform safe and effective practice for prophylactic platelet transfusions. There is a need for randomized controlled trials to define the optimal use of platelet transfusions in premature neonates, who at present are transfused heavily with platelets.

  16. Recombinant HPA-1a antibody therapy for treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: proof of principle in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Nina; Hawkins, Louise; Grehan, Nicola; Cookson, Philip; Garner, Steve F.; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Evans, Amanda; Balan, Kottekkattu; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Armour, Kathryn L.; Clark, Mike R.; Williamson, Lorna M.

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, caused by the maternal generation of antibodies against fetal human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a), can result in intracranial hemorrhage and intrauterine death. We have developed a therapeutic human recombinant high-affinity HPA-1a antibody (B2G1Δnab) that competes for binding to the HPA-1a epitope but carries a modified constant region that does not bind to Fcγ receptors. In vitro studies with a range of clinical anti–HPA-1a sera have shown that B2G1Δnab blocks monocyte chemiluminescence by >75%. In this first-in-man study, we demonstrate that HPA-1a1b autologous platelets (matching fetal phenotype) sensitized with B2G1Δnab have the same intravascular survival as unsensitized platelets (190 hours), while platelets sensitized with a destructive immunoglobulin G1 version of the antibody (B2G1) are cleared from the circulation in 2 hours. Mimicking the situation in fetuses receiving B2G1Δnab as therapy, we show that platelets sensitized with a combination of B2G1 (representing destructive HPA-1a antibody) and B2G1Δnab survive 3 times as long in circulation compared with platelets sensitized with B2G1 alone. This confirms the therapeutic potential of B2G1Δnab. The efficient clearance of platelets sensitized with B2G1 also opens up the opportunity to carry out studies of prophylaxis to prevent alloimmunization in HPA-1a–negative mothers. PMID:23656729

  17. Recombinant HPA-1a antibody therapy for treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: proof of principle in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ghevaert, Cedric; Herbert, Nina; Hawkins, Louise; Grehan, Nicola; Cookson, Philip; Garner, Steve F; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Evans, Amanda; Balan, Kottekkattu; Ouwehand, Willem H; Armour, Kathryn L; Clark, Mike R; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-07-18

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, caused by the maternal generation of antibodies against fetal human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a), can result in intracranial hemorrhage and intrauterine death. We have developed a therapeutic human recombinant high-affinity HPA-1a antibody (B2G1Δnab) that competes for binding to the HPA-1a epitope but carries a modified constant region that does not bind to Fcγ receptors. In vitro studies with a range of clinical anti-HPA-1a sera have shown that B2G1Δnab blocks monocyte chemiluminescence by >75%. In this first-in-man study, we demonstrate that HPA-1a1b autologous platelets (matching fetal phenotype) sensitized with B2G1Δnab have the same intravascular survival as unsensitized platelets (190 hours), while platelets sensitized with a destructive immunoglobulin G1 version of the antibody (B2G1) are cleared from the circulation in 2 hours. Mimicking the situation in fetuses receiving B2G1Δnab as therapy, we show that platelets sensitized with a combination of B2G1 (representing destructive HPA-1a antibody) and B2G1Δnab survive 3 times as long in circulation compared with platelets sensitized with B2G1 alone. This confirms the therapeutic potential of B2G1Δnab. The efficient clearance of platelets sensitized with B2G1 also opens up the opportunity to carry out studies of prophylaxis to prevent alloimmunization in HPA-1a-negative mothers.

  18. Clinical and research issues in neonatal anemia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Sallmon, Hannes; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2012-02-01

    Anemia and thrombocytopenia are the most common hematological problems in neonates. Red blood cell (RBC) and platelet transfusions are the mainstays of therapy, but data to guide neonatal transfusion practices have been sparse. Recombinant hematopoietic growth factors represent another therapeutic alternative, but their use in this population requires a solid understanding of the developmental differences between fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Recently, follow-up studies from children randomized as neonates to either liberal or restrictive RBC transfusion approaches were published. Results of these studies have so far been contradictory and have generated more questions than answers. New developmental stage-specific problems associated with RBC transfusions were also uncovered, such as the transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis. Finally, two thrombopoietin (Tpo) mimetics were approved by the FDA for the treatment of adults with chronic immune thrombocytopenia, thus offering a novel potential therapeutic alternative for thrombocytopenic neonates. In this review, we will discuss the currently available data regarding neonatal RBC and platelet transfusion thresholds, as well as the potential limitations, and concerns associated with the use of erythropoietin and Tpo mimetics in this patient population. Finally, we will point out specific areas wherein additional research is critically needed.

  19. Gestational thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, K A

    2000-10-01

    Appropriate management of thrombocytopenia in the pregnant patient is important for the well-being of both mother and fetus. The healthy-appearing mother with mild thrombocytopenia may have either gestational benign thrombocytopenia, which does not produce fetal thrombocytopenia, or immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, which can produce fetal thrombocytopenia. These two types of pregnancy-associated thrombocytopenias can be differentiated. Gestational benign thrombocytopenia is initially discovered during pregnancy, and in these patients a reliable test for antiplatelet antibody is usually negative. Conversely, patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia may have a history of thrombocytopenia before the pregnancy, and these patients usually have a detectable antiplatelet antibody. The pregnancy patient who presents with a normal platelet count and a history of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia in a prior pregnancy or with a history of an infant of a close relative with NAT must be carefully monitored. Antiplatelet antibody assays performed on mother's and baby's blood will help determine if an antiplatelet antibody is present in maternal plasma, if the antibody reacts with the baby's platelets, and (with appropriate typing plasma) the antigenic specificity of the maternal and fetal platelets. In addition, antigenic typing of the father's platelets will help determine the risk of NAT in the current pregnancy. If a fetus is at risk for severe immune-mediated thrombocytopenia from either an autoantibody or an alloantibody, the fetal platelet count should be measured, if possible, from blood obtained by umbilical cord puncture. If the fetal platelet count is less than 50,000/microL or cannot be measured but is thought to have a high probability of being less than 50,000/microL, strong consideration should be given to a cesarean delivery.

  20. Prevalence and outcomes of thrombocytopenia in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Dahmane Ayadi, Imene; Ben Hamida, Emira; Youssef, Asma; Sdiri, Yosra; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2016-04-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is a common clinical problem in neonatal intensive care units, affecting about 20 to 35% of all admitted neonates. Even most episodes are mild or moderate, severe episodes could be life-threatening or responsible for sequelae. Objectives The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence, clinical diagnoses, and to determine risk factors for poor prognosis of thrombocytopenia in a neonatal intensive care unit. Methods We carried out a retrospective study in the neonatal intensive care unit of Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis, a tertiary neonatal care center, over a four years period (January 2010 to December 2013). All Neonates with at least one episode of confirmed thrombocytopenia were included. Poor prognosis was defined as death or intraventricular hemorrhage ≥ grade 2 in survivors. Results Of 808 admitted neonates, one hundred (12.4%) had presented at least one episode of confirmed thrombocytopenia, and 12 had presented two episodes of thrombocytopenia. A total of 112 episodes of thrombocytopenia were collected. Thrombocytopenia occurred in the first 3 days of life in 74.1% of cases. Thrombocytopenia was mild in 22.3%, moderate in 36.7% and severe in 41%. Intrauterine growth restriction was the most common cause of early thrombocytopenia. Nosocomial sepsis was the most common cause of late thrombocytopenia. We found that the outcomes of thrombocytopenic neonates depend on, birth weight, gestational age, platelet count, and the underlying cause. Conclusions Thrombocytopenia in neonates can be life-threatening, appropriate diagnosis, preventive and therapeutic approach is necessary to prevent death or neurological impairment.

  1. Developing recombinant HPA-1a–specific antibodies with abrogated Fcγ receptor binding for the treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ghevaert, Cedric; Wilcox, David A.; Fang, Juan; Armour, Kathryn L.; Clark, Mike R.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Williamson, Lorna M.

    2008-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is caused by maternal generation of antibodies specific for paternal platelet antigens and can lead to fetal intracranial hemorrhage. A SNP in the gene encoding integrin β3 causes a clinically important maternal-paternal antigenic difference; Leu33 generates the human platelet antigen 1a (HPA-1a), whereas Pro33 generates HPA-1b. As a potential treatment to prevent fetal intracranial hemorrhage in HPA-1a alloimmunized pregnancies, we generated an antibody that blocks the binding of maternal HPA-1a–specific antibodies to fetal HPA-1a1b platelets by combining a high-affinity human HPA-1a–specific scFv (B2) with an IgG1 constant region modified to minimize Fcγ receptor–dependent platelet destruction (G1Δnab). B2G1Δnab saturated HPA-1a+ platelets and substantially inhibited binding of clinical HPA-1a–specific sera to HPA-1a+ platelets. The response of monocytes to B2G1Δnab-sensitized platelets was substantially less than their response to unmodified B2G1, as measured by chemiluminescence. In addition, B2G1Δnab inhibited chemiluminescence induced by B2G1 and HPA-1a–specific sera. In a chimeric mouse model, B2G1 and polyclonal Ig preparations from clinical HPA-1a–specific sera reduced circulating HPA-1a+ platelets, concomitant with transient thrombocytopenia. As the Δnab constant region is uninformative in mice, F(ab′)2 B2G1 was used as a proof of principle blocking antibody and prevented the in vivo platelet destruction seen with B2G1 and polyclonal HPA-1a–specific antibodies. These results provide rationale for human clinical studies. PMID:18654666

  2. Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bleeding, you may need medicines or blood or platelet transfusions . Rarely, the spleen may need to be removed. Outlook Thrombocytopenia can be fatal, especially if the bleeding is severe or occurs in the brain. However, ... Rate This Content: ...

  3. Inhibition of HPA-1a alloantibody-mediated platelet destruction by a deglycosylated anti-HPA-1a monoclonal antibody in mice: toward targeted treatment of fetal-alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Bakchoul, Tamam; Greinacher, Andreas; Sachs, Ulrich J; Krautwurst, Annika; Renz, Harald; Harb, Habi; Bein, Gregor; Newman, Peter J; Santoso, Sentot

    2013-07-18

    Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is often caused by maternal alloantibodies against the human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a, which opsonizes fetal platelets (PLTs). Subsequent PLT destruction is mediated via the Fc part of the alloantibodies. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) SZ21 binds to the HPA-1a epitope and inhibits the binding of maternal alloantibodies. However, it also promotes complement activation and phagocytosis. Deglycosylation of antibodies abrogates the Fc-related effector functions. We modified the N-glycan of SZ21 by endoglycosidase F. The in vivo transplacental transport of N-glycan-modified (NGM)-SZ21 was not impaired. When injected into pregnant mice, both native-SZ21 and NGM-SZ21 were transported equally into fetal circulation (8.9% vs 8.7%, respectively, P = .58). Neither the binding properties of NGM-SZ21 to HPA-1a in surface plasmon resonance, nor the inhibition of anti-HPA-1a-induced PLT phagocytosis, were affected by N-glycan modification. NGM-SZ21 prevented PLT destruction induced by maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies in vivo in a mouse model (PLT clearance after 5 hours; 18% vs 62%, in the presence or absence of NGM-SZ21, respectively, P = .013). Deglycosylation of SZ21 abrogates Fc-effector functions without interfering with placental transport or the ability to block anti-HPA-1a binding. Humanized, deglycosylated anti-HPA-1a mAbs may represent a novel treatment strategy to prevent anti-HPA-1a-mediated PLT destruction in FNAIT.

  4. Neonatal Liver Failure and Congenital Cirrhosis due to Gestational Alloimmune Liver Disease: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rostirola Guedes, Renata; Kieling, Carlos Oscar; Rossato Adami, Marina; Cerski, Carlos Thadeu Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal liver failure (NLF) is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, presenting as acute liver failure and/or congenital cirrhosis. Many affected patients show antenatal signs of fetal injury. There are several causes of NLF and early diagnosis is mandatory to elucidate the etiology and determine a specific treatment or the best management strategy. Gestational alloimmune liver disease associated with neonatal hemochromatosis (GALD-NH) is a rare but potentially treatable cause of NLF. It should be considered in any neonate with fetal signs of disease and postnatal signs of liver failure with no other identifiable causes. GALD-NH is often diagnosed late and patients are therefore referred late to specialized centers, delaying treatment. This case highlights the consequences of late diagnosis and treatment of GALD-NH and emphasizes the importance of a high grade of suspicion of this disease in order to refer the patient to a specialized center soon enough to perform the appropriate treatment. PMID:28251010

  5. Detection of platelet alloimmunity with a platelet-associated IgG assay

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Bishop, J.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-06-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence PA-IgG assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets. The assay identified serum alloantibodies in 10 out of 14 multitransfused patients and for two of three infants with neonatal thrombocytopenia. The correct separation of all multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups by the PA-IgG assay was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. The allogeneic nature of the serum antibodies was demonstrated by progressive absorption of the antibody with increasing numbers of allogeneic platelets but not with autologous platelets. The sensitivity of the PA-IgG assay for detection of serum alloantibodies was superior to that of platelet aggregation, platelet serotonin release, and lymphocytotoxicity testing. In dilution experiments with alloimmune serum, elevated levels of serum PA-IgG could still be detected on donor platelets when platelet aggregation and serotonin release tests became negative. Platelet survival studies with selected platelets performed in the 10 alloimmunized, multitransfused patients confirmed the results of the PA-IgG assays, predicting alloimmunity to the donor platelets. In contrast, platelet aggregation, platelet serotonin release, and lymphocytotoxicity testing indicated alloimmunity for 50% or less of the patients. Reduced platelet survival times were also seen with HLA A- and HLA B-matched donor platelets when donor-recipient incompatibility was demonstrated by the PA-IgG assay. Thus the PA-IgG assay provides a sensitive method to detect serum platelet alloantibodies and may offer a technique in platelet crossmatching.

  6. Congenital thrombocytopenia in a neonate with an interstitial microdeletion of 3q26.2q26.31.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Arjan; Knegt, Lia; Gröschel, Stefan; Erpelinck, Claudia; Sanders, Mathijs; Delwel, Ruud; Kuijpers, Taco; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Interstitial deletions encompassing the 3q26.2 region are rare. Only one case-report was published this far describing a patient with an interstitial deletion of 3q26.2 (involving the MDS1-EVI1 complex (MECOM)) and congenital thrombocytopenia. In this report we describe a case of a neonate with congenital thrombocytopenia and a constitutional 4.52 Mb deletion of 3q26.2q26.31 including TERC and the first 2 exons of MECOM, involving MDS1 but not EVI1. The deletion was demonstrated by array-CGH on lymphocytes. Our report confirms that congenital thrombocytopenia can be due to a constitutional deletion of 3q26.2 involving MECOM. We suggest that in case of unexplained neonatal thrombocytopenia, with even just slight facial dysmorphism, DNA microarray on peripheral blood should be considered early in the diagnostic work-up.

  7. Current problems and future directions of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: summary of an NHLBI working group.

    PubMed

    Zimring, James C; Welniak, Lis; Semple, John W; Ness, Paul M; Slichter, Sherrill J; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2011-02-01

    In April 2010, a working group sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was assembled to identify research strategies to improve our understanding of alloimmunization caused by the transfusion of allogeneic blood components and to evaluate potential approaches to both reduce its occurrence and manage its effects. Significant sequelae of alloimmunization were discussed and identified, including difficulties in maintaining chronic transfusion of red blood cells and platelets, hemolytic disease of the newborn, neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and rejection of transplanted cells and tissues. The discussions resulted in a consensus that identified key areas of future research and developmental areas, including genetic and epigenetic recipient factors that regulate alloimmunization, biochemical specifics of transfused products that affect alloimmunization, and novel technologies for high-throughput genotyping to facilitate extensive and efficient antigen matching between donor and recipient. Additional areas of importance included analysis of unappreciated medical sequelae of alloimmunization, such as cellular immunity and its effect upon transplant and autoimmunity. In addition, support for research infrastructure was discussed, with an emphasis on encouraging collaboration and synergy of animal models biology and human clinical research. Finally, training future investigators was identified as an area of importance. In aggregate, this communication provides a synopsis of the opinions of the working group on the above issues and presents both a list of suggested priorities and the rationale for the topics of focus. The areas of research identified in this report represent potential fertile ground for the medical advancement of preventing and managing alloimmunization in its different forms and mitigating the clinical problems it presents to multiple patient populations. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. Sera from dams of calves with bovine neonatal pancytopenia contain alloimmune antibodies directed against calf leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Bart; Stuyven, Edith; Stuyvaert, Sabrina; Hostens, Miel; Dewulf, Jeroen; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Cox, Eric; Deprez, Piet

    2011-06-15

    Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a bleeding and pancytopenic syndrome in neonatal calves, which recently emerged all over Europe. The present study tested whether antibodies directed against calf leukocytes are present in sera from known BNP dams. Sera from BNP dams (n=11) were combined with leukocytes from 11 calves (5 BNP survivors and 6 controls). After adding a fluorescein conjugated F(ab')(2) fragment of rabbit anti-bovine IgG (H&L) the level of antibody binding was measured by flow cytometry. As control groups both sera from dams from BNP affected (n=48) as from unaffected (n=54) herds were combined with leukocytes from the same calves. With sera from BNP dams, antibody binding could be visualised by immunofluoresence in both peripheral blood as in bone marrow smears. Mean fluoresence intensity values of all leukocyte subpopulations were significantly higher for the BNP dams compared to both control groups (P<0.01). BNP dams showed significantly more antibody binding on multiple leukocyte subpopulations of both BNP survivors and control calves and this from cut off values of MFI 100 onwards (P<0.01). The BNP survivor calves reacted significantly more often with sera from the BNP dams than the control calves (P<0.01). In conclusion the present study supports the hypothesis that BNP is an immune-mediated disease.

  9. Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia: is this alloimmune syndrome caused by vaccine-induced alloreactive antibodies?

    PubMed

    Bastian, Max; Holsteg, Mark; Hanke-Robinson, Heidrun; Duchow, Karin; Cussler, Klaus

    2011-07-18

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP) is a new emerging disease observed since 2007 in Germany and neighbouring countries. The syndrome affects newborn calves and is characterized by pancytopenia, severe bleeding and high lethality. So far, a causative role of infectious or toxic agents has been ruled out. Instead, the syndrome is induced after ingestion of colostrum, the first milk that supplies the calf with maternal antibodies. In analogy to similar diseases in humans it has therefore been postulated that BNP is caused by alloreactive, maternal antibodies. There is a striking association between BNP and a previous vaccination of the respective dams with a particular vaccine against Bovine Virus Diarrhoea (BVD). This association has led to a suspension of the marketing authorisation for the vaccine, by the European Commission. The current study investigates the role of this vaccine in the pathogenesis of BNP. By flow cytometry we were able to demonstrate that sera of BNP dams (dams that gave birth to a BNP calf) harbour alloreactive antibodies binding to surface antigens on bovine leukocytes. A significantly weaker alloreactivity was observed with sera of non-BNP dams that have been vaccinated with the same vaccine but delivered healthy calves. No binding was seen with non-BVD-vaccinated control cows and animals that were vaccinated with other inactivated BVD vaccines so far not associated with BNP. The binding is functionally relevant, because opsonization of bovine leukocytes with alloantibodies led to an elevated cytophagocytosis by bovine macrophages. To test whether the vaccine induces alloreactive antibodies two strategies were employed: Guinea pigs were vaccinated with a panel of commercially available BVD-vaccines. Only the incriminated vaccine induced antibodies binding surface antigens on bovine leukocytes. Additionally, two calves were repeatedly vaccinated with the suspected vaccine and the development of alloreactivity was monitored. In dependence of

  10. Genotyping for human platelet alloantigen polymorphisms: applications in the diagnosis of alloimmune platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2008-09-01

    Molecular typing for platelet allelic polymorphisms was first made possible by discovery of the HPA-1a/1b single nucleotide polymorphism in 1989. Since then, six other biallelic human platelet antigen (HPA) systems have been determined and can be typed using genomic DNA. The introduction of polymerase chain reaction enabled development of several different assays including polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer, melting curve analysis by LightCycler, and 5'-nuclease assays. More recently, multiplex polymerase chain reaction has allowed for the development of high-throughput assays for genotyping large numbers of patients and blood donors for not only platelet gene polymorphisms but also for those of other blood cell genes. Platelet genotyping is a valuable tool in confirming platelet antigen specificities of alloantibodies detected in patient sera to complement the clinical history in the diagnosis of alloimmune platelet disorders such as fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura, and multiplatelet transfusion refractoriness. In addition, it has made possible prenatal platelet typing of the fetus in suspected cases of FNAIT and large-scale blood donor typing for provision of antigen-negative platelets to transfuse highly alloimmunized patients. Platelet genotyping may also someday prove important as an aid in determining the relative risk of patients for various thrombotic disorders.

  11. Perinatal Coxsackievirus B3 Infection with Transient Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akimune; Katata, Yu; Suzuki, Akira; Otani, Kanako; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kitaoka, Setsuko; Kumaki, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus (Cox) B is the second common picornaviruses, after echovirus, detected from children younger than 2 months of age. Neonates who present with Cox B3 infection in the first week are known to have severe illness such as myocarditis or menigoencephalitis. Severity is commonly associated with perinatal vertical transmission. Here, we report a neonatal case of Cox B3 infection with severe thrombocytopenia through horizontal transmission. The patient was a preterm infant born without asphyxia by selective cesarean section. From his 6(th) day of life, the patient had recurrent episodes of apnea. At that time, the laboratory investigations revealed a profound thrombocytopenia without any evidence of inflammation. Thus, neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) was suspected, and the patient received transfusion of immunoglobulin and platelets. Thereafter, the patient had no further episodes of apnea, and platelet counts of the patient increased gradually. Later, the possibility of NAIT was ruled out by the result of the platelet antigen genotyping of the patient and his parents. Culture obtained from his nasopharynx was positive for Cox B3. We thus speculate that the patient was exposed to the virus from his mother because she had a febrile episode at her 5(th) day after delivery, and her Cox B3 infection was confirmed by serology. Assuming that the thrombocytopenia was a complication of Cox B3 infection, the immunoglobulin transfusion might have provided a neutralizing antibody against Cox B3. It is important to consider the possibility of enterovirus infection as a differential diagnosis whenever unexplained thrombocytopenia was observed in neonates.

  12. Isolated anti-Ro/SSA thrombocytopenia: a rare feature of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Ben Hamida, Emira; Boukhris, Mohamed Riadh; Bezzine, Ahlem; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of isolated thrombocytopenia related to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. The mother was followed for unlabeled familial thrombocytopenia. The mother had positive anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. She was asymptomatic without skin lesions or other criteria neither of systemic lupus erythematosus nor other connective tissue disease. Pregnancy was uneventful. The postnatal examination was normal. On the first day of life, blood cells count showed thrombocytopenia at 40 x 10(9)/L. Within the second day of life, platelet level dropped to 20 x 10(9)/L. The management of thrombocytopenia included platelet transfusion and human immunoglobulin infusion. On the fifth day of life, there has been a drop in platelet count to 10 x 10(9)/L requiring renewed platelet transfusion and human immunoglobulin infusion. On the 10(th) of life platelets rate was stable around 60 x 10(9)/L. The infant had no evidence of cardiac, dermatologic or hepatobilary involvement initially or throughout follow up.

  13. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Palta, A; Dhiman, P

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia during pregnancy is quite common. Evaluation of blood counts of pregnant women has shown that thrombocytopenia is the second most common haematological problem in pregnancy, after anaemia. While mostly thrombocytopenia has no consequences for either the mother or the foetus, in some cases it is associated with substantial maternal and/or neonatal morbidity and mortality. It may result from a number of diverse aetiologies. Adequate knowledge of these causes will help the clinicians in making proper diagnosis and management of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia is essential to rule out any systemic disorders that may affect pregnancy management as thrombocytopenia can present as an isolated finding or in combination with underlying conditions. In this concise review, we have provided the overview of thrombocytopenia diagnosed during pregnancy.

  14. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  15. Practice Bulletin No. 181: Prevention of Rh D Alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    Advances in the prevention and treatment of Rh D alloimmunization have been one of the great success stories of modern obstetrics. There is wide variation in prevalence rates of Rh D-negative individuals between regions, for example from 5% in India to 15% in North America (1). However, high birth rates in low prevalence areas means Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality in countries without prophylaxis programs (1). In such countries, 14% of affected fetuses are stillborn and one half of live born infants suffer neonatal death or brain injury (1). The routine use of Rh D immune globulin is responsible for the reduced rate of red cell alloimmunization in more economically developed countries. First introduced in the 1970s, the postpartum administration of Rh D immune globulin reduced the rate of alloimmunization in at-risk pregnancies from approximately 13-16% to approximately 0.5-1.8% (2, 3). The risk was further reduced to 0.14-0.2% with the addition of routine antepartum administration (2, 3). Despite considerable proof of efficacy, there are still a large number of cases of Rh D alloimmunization because of failure to follow established protocols. In addition, there are new data to help guide management, especially with regard to weak D phenotype women. The purpose of this document is to provide evidence-based guidance for the management of patients at risk of Rh D alloimmunization.

  16. Practice Bulletin No. 181 Summary: Prevention of Rh D Alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    Advances in the prevention and treatment of Rh D alloimmunization have been one of the great success stories of modern obstetrics. There is wide variation in prevalence rates of Rh D-negative individuals between regions, for example from 5% in India to 15% in North America (1). However, high birth rates in low prevalence areas means Rh hemolytic disease of the newborn is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality in countries without prophylaxis programs (1). In such countries, 14% of affected fetuses are stillborn and one half of live born infants suffer neonatal death or brain injury (1). The routine use of Rh D immune globulin is responsible for the reduced rate of red cell alloimmunization in more economically developed countries. First introduced in the 1970s, the postpartum administration of Rh D immune globulin reduced the rate of alloimmunization in at-risk pregnancies from approximately 13-16% to approximately 0.5-1.8% (2, 3). The risk was further reduced to 0.14-0.2% with the addition of routine antepartum administration (2, 3). Despite considerable proof of efficacy, there are still a large number of cases of Rh D alloimmunization because of failure to follow established protocols. In addition, there are new data to help guide management, especially with regard to weak D phenotype women. The purpose of this document is to provide evidence-based guidance for the management of patients at risk of Rh D alloimmunization.

  17. The natural history of fetomaternal alloimmunization to the platelet-specific antigen HPA-1a (PlA1, Zwa) as determined by antenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Williamson, L M; Hackett, G; Rennie, J; Palmer, C R; Maciver, C; Hadfield, R; Hughes, D; Jobson, S; Ouwehand, W H

    1998-10-01

    Immunization against the human platelet antigen (HPA)-1 alloantigen is the most common cause of severe fetal and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Fetal therapy has substantial risks and its indications need better definition. Of 24,417 consecutive pregnant women, 618 (2.5%) were HPA-1a negative of whom 385 entered an observational study. All were HLA-DRB3*0101 genotyped and screened for anti-HPA-1a. Their partners and neonates were HPA-1 genotyped and the latter were assessed by cord blood platelet counts and cerebral ultrasound scans. Anti-HPA-1a was detected in 46 of 387 pregnancies (12.0%; 95% CI 8.7%-15.2%). All but one were HLA-DRB3*0101 positive (odds ratio 140; 95% CI 19-1035; P< .00001). One baby died in utero, and of 26 HPA-1a-positive babies born to women with persistent antenatal antibodies, 9 were severely thrombocytopenic (8 with a count <10 x 10(9)/L, 1 with a large porencephalic cyst), 10 were mildly thrombocytopenic, whereas 7 had normal platelet counts. Severe thrombocytopenia was significantly associated with a third trimester anti-HPA-1a titer >/= 1:32 (P = . 004), but was not observed in babies of women with either transient or postnatal-only antibodies. HPA-1a alloimmunization complicates 1 in 350 unselected pregnancies, resulting in severe thrombocytopenia in 1:1,200. HPA-1a and HLA-DRB3*0101 typing combined with anti-HPA-1a titration allows selection of the majority of pregnancies at risk of severe thrombocytopenia.

  18. Crystallographic structure of the human leukocyte antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: models of a directional alloimmune response and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Parry, Christian S; Gorski, Jack; Stern, Lawrence J

    2007-08-10

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin alphaII(B)betaIII glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the alphaII(B)betaIII 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 A. There are two alphabeta heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4(1)2(1)2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive "1-4-9" peptide binding motif. A beta57 Asp-->Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to alpha76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic beta37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  19. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  20. Prevention of Rh alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Fung Kee Fung, Karen; Eason, Erica; Crane, Joan; Armson, Anthony; De La Ronde, Sandra; Farine, Dan; Keenan-Lindsay, Lisa; Leduc, Line; Reid, Gregory J; Aerde, John Van; Wilson, R Douglas; Davies, Gregory; Désilets, Valérie A; Summers, Anne; Wyatt, Philip; Young, David C

    2003-09-01

    To provide guidelines on use of anti-D prophylaxis to optimize prevention of rhesus (Rh) alloimmunization in Canadian women. Decreased incidence of Rh alloimmunization and minimized practice variation with regards to immunoprophylaxis strategies. The Cochrane Library and MEDLINE were searched for English-language articles from 1968 to 2001, relating to the prevention of Rh alloimmunization. Search terms included: Rho(D) immune globulin, Rh iso- or allo-immunization, anti-D, anti-Rh, WinRho, Rhogam, and pregnancy. Additional publications were identified from the bibliographies of these articles. All study types were reviewed. Randomized controlled trials were considered evidence of highest quality, followed by cohort studies. Key individual studies on which the principal recommendations are based are referenced. Supporting data for each recommendation is briefly summarized with evaluative comments and referenced. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Genetics Committees of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the Evaluation of Evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. 1. Anti-D Ig 300 microg IM or IV should be given within 72 hours of delivery to a postpartum nonsensitized Rh-negative woman delivering an Rh-positive infant. Additional anti-D Ig may be required for fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) greater than 15 mL of fetal red blood cells (about 30 mL of fetal blood). Alternatively, anti-D Ig 120 microg IM or IV may be given within 72 hours of delivery, with testing and additional anti-D Ig given for FMH over 6 mL of fetal red blood cells (12 mL fetal blood). (I-A) 2. If anti-D is not given within 72 hours of delivery or other potentially sensitizing event, anti-D should be given as soon as the need is recognized, for up to 28 days after delivery or other potentially sensitizing event. (III-B) 3. There is poor evidence regarding inclusion or

  1. [Specificities of neonatal hemostasis and implications in pathologic situations].

    PubMed

    Gruel, Y

    2010-09-01

    The haemostasis of healthy newborn differs from those of normal adult but remains well balanced without bleeding or thrombosis. However, this equilibrium is unstable, and the neonate is exposed to acquired or inherited haemostasis disorders that necessitate to be early diagnosed in order to be appropriately treated. Several studies provided reference ranges for haemostatic components in the foetus, the newborn and throughout childhood. The particularities of neonatal haemostasis are therefore better defined and contribute to further understand the pathophysiology and characteristics of hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur in newborns. Some examples of the impact of age on haemostasis are: the risk of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is high in the first newborn of a woman at risk since the involved antigens are fully expressed by foetal platelets; the newborn is at risk for vitamin K deficiency with bleeding due to poor transport of vitamin K across the placenta and low levels of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, X; the diagnosis of some inherited coagulation deficiencies can be difficult in the newborn due to physiologically low levels of coagulation factors; thrombotic events are rare in the healthy neonate, despite physiologically very low levels of several coagulation inhibitors; the pharmacokinetic and effects of antithrombotic agents are influenced by the specificities of haemostasis in neonates. This review will discuss about the foetal development of haemostasis until birth, and some implications regarding the pathophysiology, the diagnosis and the treatment of bleeding disorders in the human neonate. (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of fetal and neonatal immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Sharon; Bussel, James B

    2015-01-01

    The fetoplacental interface plays a unique role in pathologies of the fetus and neonate, and is increasingly being recognized for effects on fetal and neonatal development that resonate into adulthood. In this review, we will use several exemplary disorders involving each of the 3 types of blood cells to explore the effect of perinatal insults on subsequent development of the affected cell line. We will present new data regarding outcomes of infants treated prenatally for fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and contrast these with outcomes of infants affected by hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We also will explore the differences between FNAIT and passively transferred antibodies, as seen in maternal idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Neonatal hemochromatosis is an example of a disease that previously was largely fatal, but whose newly discovered etiology as an immune-mediated perinatal disorder has resulted in development of highly effective treatment. Finally, we will examine the interplay between lymphopoiesis and the placenta in an effort to further explore the phenomenon of neutropenia in preeclampsia, whose etiology remains unknown.

  3. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  4. Understanding red blood cell alloimmunization triggers.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-12-02

    Blood group alloimmunization is "triggered" when a person lacking a particular antigen is exposed to this antigen during transfusion or pregnancy. Although exposure to an antigen is necessary for alloimmunization to occur, it is not alone sufficient. Blood group antigens are diverse in structure, function, and immunogenicity. In addition to red blood cells (RBCs), a recipient of an RBC transfusion is exposed to donor plasma, white blood cells, and platelets; the potential contribution of these elements to RBC alloimmunization remains unclear. Much attention in recent years has been placed on recipient factors that influence RBC alloantibody responses. Danger signals, identified in murine and human studies alike as being risk factors for alloimmunization, may be quite diverse in nature. In addition to exogenous or condition-associated inflammation, autoimmunity is also a risk factor for alloantibody formation. Triggers for alloimmunization in pregnancy are not well-understood beyond the presence of a fetal/maternal bleed. Studies using animal models of pregnancy-induced RBC alloimmunization may provide insight in this regard. A better understanding of alloimmunization triggers and signatures of "responders" and "nonresponders" is needed for prevention strategies to be optimized. A common goal of such strategies is increased transfusion safety and improved pregnancy outcomes.

  5. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastosonography of placenta in maternal red blood cell alloimmunization: a preliminary and descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Orkun; Karaman, Erbil; Arslan, Harun; Akbudak, Ibrahim; Yıldızhan, Recep; Kolusarı, Ali

    2017-01-31

    Maternal red blood cell alloimmunization is an important cause of fetal morbidity and mortality in the perinatal period, despite well-organized prophylaxis programs. The objective of the study was to evaluate placental elasticity by using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) in Rhesus (Rh) alloimmunized pregnant women with hydropic and nonhydropic fetuses and to compare those with healthy pregnant women. This case-control and descriptive study comprised twenty-eight healthy pregnant women, 14 Rh alloimmunized pregnant women with nonhydropic fetuses, and 16 Rh alloimmunized pregnant women with hydropic fetuses in the third trimester of pregnancy. Placental elasticity measurements were performed by ARFI elastosonography at the day of delivery. The maternal characteristics and neonatal outcomes of the patients were also noted. The highest mean placental ARFI scores were observed in Rh alloimmunized pregnant women with hydropic fetuses (1.13 m/s) (p=0.001). Healthy controls and Rh alloimmunized pregnant women with nonhydropic fetuses had similar mean placenta ARFI scores (0.84 m/s, 0.88 m/s, respectively) (p<0.05). Based on the present findings, the placenta becomes stiffer in Rh alloimmunized pregnancies complicated with hydrops fetalis. The increased placental ARFI scores may be a supplemental marker for adverse pregnancy outcomes, additional to Doppler evaluation of middle cerebral artery. This data should be confirmed with a large sample size and prospective studies by using serial measurements of ARFI elastosonography in maternal red blood cell alloimmunization.

  6. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  7. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  8. Maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are associated with reduced birth weight in thrombocytopenic neonates.

    PubMed

    Dahl, J; Husebekk, A; Acharya, G; Flo, K; Stuge, T B; Skogen, B; Straume, B; Tiller, H

    2016-02-01

    In this comparative cross-sectional study, possible associations between maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies and birth weight in neonatal thrombocytopenia are explored. Although commonly detected in pregnancies and generally regarded as harmless, it has been suggested that such antibodies might be associated with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). As a link between FNAIT due to human platelet antigen 1a-specific antibodies and reduced birth weight in boys has previously been demonstrated, we wanted to explore whether maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies might also affect birth weight. To examine this, suspected cases of FNAIT referred to the Norwegian National Unit for Platelet Immunology during the period 1998-2009 were identified. Pregnancies where the only finding was maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were included. An unselected group of pregnant women participating in a prospective study investigating maternal-fetal hemodynamics at the University Hospital North Norway during the years 2006-2010 served as controls. Twenty-nine percent of controls had anti-HLA class I antibodies. The thrombocytopenic neonates had a significantly lower adjusted birth weight (linear regression, P=0.036) and significantly higher odds of being small for gestational age (OR=6.72, P<0.001) compared with controls. Increasing anti-HLA class I antibody levels in the mother were significantly associated with lower birth weight and placental weight among thrombocytopenic neonates, but not among controls. These results indicate that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in thrombocytopenic neonates are associated with reduced fetal growth. Further studies are needed to test if placental function is affected.

  9. Pyrazinamide induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Surya; Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Vaibhav; Anand, Sunish C.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of certain antitubercular drugs and is characterized by rapid destruction of platelets whenever offending drug is taken by a susceptible person. We report a case of pyrazinamide-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient receiving anti tubercular drugs. PMID:20711377

  10. Perinatal survival and procedure-related complications after intrauterine transfusion for red cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Deka, Dipika; Dadhwal, Vatsla; Sharma, Aparna K; Shende, Unnati; Agarwal, Sumita; Agarwal, Ramesh; Vanamail, Perumal

    2016-05-01

    To study the perinatal survival and procedure-related (PR)complications after intrauterine transfusions in red cell alloimmunization. Prospective data of 102 women with Rh-alloimmunized pregnancy undergoing intrauterine intravascular transfusion for fetal anemia, from January 2011 to October 2014 were analyzed. Main outcome measures were perinatal survival and procedure-related (PR) complications. A total of 303 intrauterine transfusions were performed in 102 women. Of 102 fetuses, 22 were hydropic at first transfusion. The mean period of gestation and hematocrit at first transfusion was 26.9 ± 3.3 weeks (range 19.7-33.8 weeks) and 17 ± 7.82 % (range 5.7-30 %), respectively. Average number of transfusions was 2.97 (range 1-7) per patient. Overall survival was 93 % and mean period of gestation at delivery was 34.5 ± 1.94 (range 28.3-37.4) weeks. Mean hematocrit at delivery was 36.9 ± 8.77 % (range 10-66 %). Fetal death occurred in four cases (3PR), neonatal death occurred in three cases (2PR). Emergency cesarean delivery after transfusion was performed in four pregnancies. The total PR complication rate was 2.97 %, resulting in overall PR loss in 1.65 % per procedure. Our results compare favorably with other studies published in the literature. Intravascular transfusion is a safe procedure improving perinatal survival in fetuses with anemia due to Rh-alloimmunization.

  11. Challenges of alloimmunization in patients with haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Chou, Stella T; Liem, Robert I; Thompson, Alexis A

    2012-11-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions can be life-sustaining in chronic inherited anaemias, such as thalassaemia, and the indications for blood transfusions in patients with sickle cell disease continue to expand. Complications of transfusions, such as allosensitization, can create significant medical challenges in the management of patients with haemoglobinopathies. This review summarizes key findings from the medical literature related to alloimmunization in haemoglobinopathies and examines potential measures to mitigate these risks. Areas where future studies are needed are also addressed.

  12. Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, P.; Majoos, F.; Perrotta, A.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia occurred concurrently in five patients; in a sixth, thyrotoxicosis developed after successful treatment of the thrombocytopenia. Correction of the hyperthyroidism was followed by a variable pattern of clinical response. In one case with mild asymptomatic thrombocytopenia spontaneous complete remission occurred. Two patients required adrenocorticosteroids to control severe thrombocytopenic purpura during the period of hyperthyroidism, after which complete remission occurred. Another patient with severe symptomatic thrombocytopenia remains with a partially compensated thrombocytolytic state but is without purpura and off all therapy. A fifth patient required splenectomy for drug-resistant thrombocytopenia and remains critically dependent on immunosuppressive therapy. The sixth patient had a relapse of immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent development of thyrotoxicosis but platelet count spontaneously returned to normal after correction of the hyperthyroidism. Pregnancy in two of these six patients was not associated with recurrence of either hyperthyroidism or thrombocytopenia. Management of symptomatic purpura in adults with co-existent hyperthyroidism may differ from that customarily employed since adrenocorticosteroid therapy may need to be extended until euthyroidism has been established before proceeding to splenectomy. When surgery is necessary, the risk of thyrotoxic storm should be anticipated, and the patient appropriately premedicated. PMID:6494085

  13. Hematological complications of neonatal lupus: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mwe Mwe; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Silverman, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is a common clinical problem and may be a result of maternal and/or fetal conditions. We present a young patient with thrombocytopenia as a result of neonatal lupus, a passively acquired autoimmune disease. The diagnosis was suspected on the basis of the presence of a facial rash. This case highlights the characteristic eruption of neonatal lupus and an underappreciated cause of neonatal thrombocytopenia for the pediatric hematologist. We also review the hematological complications of neonatal lupus.

  14. Two sibling cases of hydrops fetalis due to alloimmune anti-CD36 (Nak a) antibody.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Satoru; Cho, Kazutoshi; Chiba, Hitoshi; Azuma, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Toshiko; Yamaguchi, Miki; Sato, Shin-ichiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Yamada, Hideto; Minakami, Hisanori; Ariga, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2006-02-01

    Two female sibling cases, who were born to a CD36 deficient mother, were presented with Coombs' test-negative hydrops. The alloimmune anti-CD36 (Nak(a)) antibody was accidentally found in the mother's serum after an episode of anaphylactic shock with thrombocytopenia, which occurred in an individual receiving fresh frozen plasma prepared from the mother's donated blood. The mother was then diagnosed as having type II CD36 deficiency, lacking CD36 on both platelets and monocytes, while both of her daughters were CD36 positive. Analyses of the CD36 gene revealed that the mother was a compound heterozygote for the CD36 gene mutation with a novel C --> T transition at nt 1366 in exon 12, corresponding to Arg386Trp, and a known 12bp deletion at nt 1438-1449 in exon 13. On the other hand, both patients, who showed half the normal level of CD36 on platelets and monocytes, were heterozygote with one mutation at Arg386Trp. The anti-CD36 antibody in the mother seemed to be responsible for the hydrops fetalis observed in her daughters, because the IgG isolated from the mother's serum showed suppressive effects on the CFU-E colony formation of CD34+ cells from a control donor. This is the first case report of hydrops fetalis caused by an alloimmune anti-CD36 antibody.

  15. Ultraviolet B irradiation in the prevention of alloimmunization in a dog platelet transfusion model.

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Abrams, Kraig; Gettinger, Irena; Christoffel, Todd; Gaur, Lakshmi; Latchman, Yvette; Nelson, Karen; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2016-06-01

    Alloimmune platelet (PLT) refractoriness remains a significant problem for chronically transfused patients with thrombocytopenia. In a dog PLT transfusion model, we evaluated ultraviolet B irradiation (UV-B) of donor PLTs-either alone or in combination with centrifuge leukoreduction (C-LR) or filtration leukoreduction (F-LR)-to prevent refractoriness to donor PLTs and to induce tolerance to standard (STD) PLTs from the same donor or to tertiary donors. Recipient acceptance rates for C-LR donor PLT transfusions were 14%, F-LR were 33%, and UV-B irradiated were 45% with no significant differences among the treatments given to the donor's PLTs. Adding UV-B irradiation to C-LR or F-LR PLTs increased acceptance rates to 50 and 68% (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05), respectively, comparing single treatments to the combined treatments. After a recipient had accepted any type of UV-B-treated donor PLTs, specific tolerance to subsequent transfusions of the same donor's STD PLTs averaged 65%. Nonspecific tolerance to third-party donor's STD PLTs averaged 36% if they had accepted their initial donor's treated PLTs but was only 4% (p < 0.001) if they had rejected these PLTs. Combining UV-B irradiation with a method of leukoreduction produces additive effects on prevention of alloimmune PLT refractoriness. © 2016 AABB.

  16. [Spontaneous antepartal RhD alloimmunization].

    PubMed

    Studničková, M; Holusková, I; Durdová, V; Kratochvílová, T; Strašilová, P; Marková, I; Lubušký, M

    2015-12-01

    Assess the incidence of spontaneous antepartal RhD alloimmunization in RhD negative pregnant women with an RhD positive fetus. Clinical study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School and University Hospital Olomouc. A total of 906 RhD negative women with an RhD positive fetus and without the presence of anti-Dalloantibodies at the beginning of pregnancy were examined. Always it was a singleton pregnancy, RhD blood group of the pregnant women was assessed in the 1st trimester of pregnancy, RhD status of the fetus was determined after delivery. Screening for irregular antierythrocyte antibodies was performed in all women in the 1st trimester of pregnancy, at 28-32 weeks gestation and immediately prior to delivery at 38-42 weeks gestation. Screening for irregular antierythrocyte antibodies was performed also at 6 months following delivery in all cases of positive antibodies before delivery. Antibody screening was performed using the indirect antiglobulin (LISS/NAT) and enzyme (papain) test with their subsequent identification using a panel of reference erythrocytes by column agglutination method Dia-Med. After delivery, the volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage was assesed in all RhD negative women and RhD alloimmunization prophylaxis was performed by administering the necessary IgG anti-D dose; none of the women were administered IgG anti-D antepartally. During screening for irregular antierythrocyte antibodies at 28-32 weeks gestation, anti-D alloantibodies were diagnosed in 0.2% of the women (2/906); immediately prior to the delivery at 38-42 weeks gestation, anti-D alloantibodies were diagnosed in 2.3% of the women (21/906) and repeatedly even at 6 months following delivery (21/157). In 82.7% of the women (749/906), examination at 6 months following delivery was not performed, therefore in these women spontaneous antepartal RhD alloimmunization cannot reliably be ruled out. Alloimmunization may not be diagnosed yet at term of delivery. If anti

  17. How Is Thrombocytopenia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... be used if treatment with medicines doesn't work. This surgery mostly is used for adults who have immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). However, medicines often are ... National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  18. Neonatal hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Whitington, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as "self" and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies.

  19. Neonatal hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Purves, Erica

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex subspecialty of pediatric hematology, combining the unique aspects of the maternal/fetal relationship, the delicate balance of coagulation factors, and the distinctive physiologic conditions of the newborn period. The objective of this article is to briefly review specific hematologic disorders that commonly present in the newborn period. Alloimmune cytopenias, polycythemia, thrombosis and bleeding associated with vitamin K deficiency will be discussed through a focus on pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, current treatment strategies, and implications for nursing care.

  20. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Severin, T; Sutor, A H

    2001-06-01

    As in adult patients, heparin is used for prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolism in newborns, children, and adolescents. Patients receiving heparin are potentially at risk to develop heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). HIT type II has been extensively described in the adult population; only a few reports address HIT type II in pediatric patients (total of 15 neonates, 4 young children, 12 older children and adolescents). The available data are discussed, and the case of a patient with recurrent thrombosis and HIT type II without thrombocytopenia is presented. The review of the literature reveals that HIT type II occurs especially in neonates and adolescents, corresponding to the two age peaks of thrombosis in pediatric patients. Risk factors for thrombosis include hereditary factors, immobilization, and surgery. HIT complications are severe and partly lead to life-threatening thromboembolism. In three patients, an increasing heparin demand was found. In five cases, thrombocytopenia was absent. Heparin was replaced mostly by danaparoid sodium; in three patients hirudin was used as an alternative anticoagulant. HIT type II represents a potentially dangerous complication of heparin therapy in pediatric patients and should be taken into consideration whenever heparin is given for prophylactic or therapeutic use in newborns, children, or adolescents.

  1. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  2. Immunoglobulin administration to fetuses with anemia due to alloimmunization to D.

    PubMed

    Ulm, B; Kirchner, L; Svolba, G; Jilma, B; Deutinger, J; Bernaschek, G; Panzer, S

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine fetal tolerance of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), given directly at the time of intravascular transfusion, and its effects on fetal hemolysis and pregnancy outcome in the setting of alloimmunization to D. Thirteen consecutive D+ fetuses requiring transfusion for maternal alloimmunization received high-dose IVIG (1.0 g/kg) and red cell transfusions. Twenty-four previous, consecutive fetuses with maternal anti-D served as controls. The schedules for subsequent transfusions were the same in the two groups. High-dose IVIG was well tolerated by all fetuses. In the IVIG group, daily decreases in hematocrit were smaller than those in controls after the second administration of IVIG (mean hematocrit decrease, 0.72 percent/day vs. 1.45 percent/day; p = 0.007). No significant difference was found in the total number of fetal transfusions, the gestational age at delivery, the duration of neonatal intensive care, the number of neonates requiring postnatal transfusion therapy, and perinatal mortality. In this small pilot study, direct administration to fetuses of IVIG with red cell transfusions was well tolerated and appeared to have a beneficial effect on fetal hemolysis.

  3. [Intrauterine transfusión in alloimmunization Rh in México 1987-2008].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Robles, Luis Javier; Gómez-Partida, Guillermo; Guevara-Rubio, Guillermo; Velázquez-Gómez, Leonora

    2010-09-01

    Diagnosis, care and prevention of hemolytic disease in fetuses and newborns is the most prominent historical example of a successful medical procedure aimed to abate perinatal morbidity and mortality caused by a disease which for centuries was described only unknown origin. To review the perinatal outcome with intrauterine transfusion (IUT) in severe alloimmunization RhD over 21 years in a referral center of Mexico. The overall survival rate of fetuses and the relations with gestational age, and presence or absence of hydrops was analyzed. The authors present data about alloimmunization and a historical synopsis about IUT in México. A retrospective study was conducted from January 1, 1987, to January 31, 2008. It was collected only RhD immunizations. Primary outcome variables included gestational age and presence or absence of hydrops, type and number of IUT in each case, and we studied fetal and neonatal morbidity. A total of 531 IUTs were performed in 150 fetuses. Severe hydrops was found at start of intrauterine treatment in 67 cases (45%). The survival rate was closely related to absence or presence of hydrops (88 and 60%), respectively. There were 123 liveborn fetuses and the procedure-related fetal loss rate was low (1.9%). This study confirmed good outcome with IUT for fetal anemia and the loss rate was low and similar to another publications. The hydrops was the principal factor in the survival rate because late detection and referral of fetuses is critical for fetal and neonatal outcome.

  4. [Leptospirosis and thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Issa, N; Guisset, O; Mourissoux, G; Gabinski, C; Camou, F

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by the spirochete Leptospira interrogans. The spectrum of symptoms reported in leptospirosis is extremely broad. Thrombocytopenia is common during the acute phase of leptospirosis but its pathophysiological mechanism remains not well defined. We report a 56-year-old man hospitalized for severe sepsis with acute kidney injury and liver failure. Because of the recent flood of his house, we suspected leptospirosis. The diagnosis was rapidly confirmed. Blood tests revealed thrombocytopenia at 9 G/L associated with hyperferritinemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Cytological examination of bone marrow showed abundance of megakaryocytes and hemophagocytosis which confirmed the diagnosis of hemophagocytic syndrome. Clinical symptoms resolved and blood tests returned to normal values in the same time. We suggest that hemophogocytosis is a possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and that examination of bone marrow should be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Alloimmunization among transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Badiei, Zahra; Ravarian, Mehrangiz; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Daluei, Mohammad Khajeh

    2009-07-01

    Thalassemia is a common hemoglobin disorder in Iran and one of the major public health problems. Although blood transfusions are lifesavers for thalassemia patients, they may be associated with some complications especially erythrocyte alloimmunization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of red blood cell alloantibodies and to determine types of these antibodies among multiple-transfused thalassemic patients. A total of 313 thalassemia patients in the northeast of Iran, who received regular blood transfusion, were included in this study. Screening of antibodies was performed on fresh serum of all patients and then antibodies were identified in patients' serum that had positive antibody screening test using a panel of recognized blood group antigens. We identified 12 alloantibodies in 9 patients (2.87%) that all were against Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens (D, C, E). Three patients developed 2 antibodies, and others had one antibody. The most common alloantibodies were Anti-D (88.88%) and followed by Anti-C and Anti-E. Higher frequency of alloimmunization was observed in female, Rh negative and splenectomized patients. This study showed that evaluation of the packed cells for Rh (C, E) from the start of transfusion can be helpful in decreasing the rate of alloantibody synthesis.

  6. Alloimmunization among transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Badiei, Zahra; Ravarian, Mehrangiz; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Daluei, Mohammad Khajeh

    2009-01-01

    Background: Thalassemia is a common hemoglobin disorder in Iran and one of the major public health problems. Although blood transfusions are lifesavers for thalassemia patients, they may be associated with some complications especially erythrocyte alloimmunization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of red blood cell alloantibodies and to determine types of these antibodies among multiple-transfused thalassemic patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 313 thalassemia patients in the northeast of Iran, who received regular blood transfusion, were included in this study. Screening of antibodies was performed on fresh serum of all patients and then antibodies were identified in patients’ serum that had positive antibody screening test using a panel of recognized blood group antigens. Results: We identified 12 alloantibodies in 9 patients (2.87%) that all were against Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens (D, C, E). Three patients developed 2 antibodies, and others had one antibody. The most common alloantibodies were Anti-D (88.88%) and followed by Anti-C and Anti-E. Higher frequency of alloimmunization was observed in female, Rh negative and splenectomized patients. Conclusion: This study showed that evaluation of the packed cells for Rh (C, E) from the start of transfusion can be helpful in decreasing the rate of alloantibody synthesis. PMID:20808654

  7. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... navigation Home Page Search Home Health Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Share: Email ... known as primary immune thrombocytopenia . Immune thrombocytopenia following bacterial or viral infection is considered primary because the ...

  8. Recipient-derived HPA-1a antibodies: a cause of prolonged thrombocytopenia after unrelated donor stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Geoff; Culliford, Steven; Green, Frances; Sidra, Gamal; Calvert, Anthony; Green, Ann; Harrison, Penny; Harvey, John; Allen, Dave; Smillie, David; Masurekar, Ashish; Marks, David; Russell, Nigel; Massey, Edwin

    2010-02-01

    Patients with human platelet antigen (HPA) specific antibodies in cases of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and platelet (PLT) refractoriness derive clinical benefit from the use of HPA-selected PLTs. This study describes three patients with underlying diagnoses of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and myelodysplasia, respectively, who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with unrelated donors matched at the HLA-A, B, C, Dr, and DQ loci but who failed to achieve an adequate PLT count. Investigation using PLT immunofluorescence test, monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens assay, and genotyping revealed the presence of recipient-derived HPA-1a antibodies. In two patients, anti-HPA-1a was detected post-BMT and in the third patient, anti-HPA-1a was detected during pre-BMT chemotherapy. Despite apparent 100% engraftment of donor cells, the patients' PLT counts failed to recover 9-10 months posttransplant. The patients remained PLT-transfusion dependent and failed to achieve satisfactory increments following random donor or HLA-matched PLT transfusions. After the identification of HPA-1a antibodies, the patients were supported by HPA-1a(-) PLTs and satisfactory posttransfusion PLT increments were obtained. These cases illustrate that HPA-1a antibodies may remain detectable for 10 months following apparently successful donor engraftment and the disappearance of recipient-derived HLA antibodies. The prolonged persistence of recipient-derived PLT-specific antibodies following BMT has to our knowledge not been described previously. HPA-1a antibodies were associated with protracted PLT-transfusion dependence and significant hemorrhagic complications. Appropriate and timely laboratory investigation for HPA-specific antibodies followed by transfusion support with HPA-selected PLTs provided the cornerstone of the hemostatic management in these cases.

  9. Predictive factors of perinatal mortality in transfused fetuses due to maternal alloimmunization: what really matters?

    PubMed

    Osanan, Gabriel Costa; Silveira Reis, Zilma Nogueira; Apocalypse, Isabela Gomes; Lopes, Ana Paula Brum; Pereira, Alamanda Kfoury; da Silva Ribeiro, Orquidea Maria; Vieira Cabral, Antônio Carlos

    2012-08-01

    Alloimmunization is the main cause of fetal anemia. There are not many consistent analyses associating antenatal parameters to perinatal mortality in transfused fetuses due to maternal alloimmunization. The study aimed to determine the prognostic variables related to perinatal death. A cohort study analyzed 128 fetuses treated with intrauterine transfusion (IUT), until the early neonatal period. Perinatal mortality was associated with prognostic conditions related to prematurity, severity of fetal anemia and IUT procedure by univariated logistic regression. Multiple logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratio (OR) for adjusting the hemoglobin deficit at the last IUT, gestational age at birth, complications of IUT, antenatal corticosteroid and hydrops. Perinatal mortality rate found in this study was 18.1%. The hemoglobin deficit at the last IUT (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.04-1.53), gestational age at birth (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.38-0.74) and the presence of transfusional complications (OR: 5.43, 95% CI: 142-20.76) were significant in predicting fetal death. Perinatal mortality prediction in transfused fetuses is not associated only to severity of anemia, but also to the risks of IUT and prematurity.

  10. Babesiosis-associated immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Narurkar, Roshni; Mamorska-Dyga, Aleksandra; Agarwal, Anup; Nelson, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common feature of babesiosis. The mechanism for thrombocytopenia in babesiosis remains elusive. We report a case of babesiosis with severe new onset immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). In addition to antibiotics treatment for babesiosis, ITP therapy was administered. ITP in the present case was most likely triggered by the babesia infection. The severity of ITP in this case was not proportional to the severity of parasitemia. The neoantigen triggering the autoimmune response in babesiosis requires further characterization. PMID:28217703

  11. Intravenous drug use is associated with alloimmunization in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lappen, Justin R; Stark, Sydney; Gibson, Kelly S; Prasad, Mona; Bailit, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Anecdotal evidence has suggested an association of intravenous drug abuse with alloimmunization; however, published data are limited to case reports. The purpose of this study was to determine whether women with a history of intravenous drug abuse have an increased risk of alloimmunization. A retrospective cohort study was performed with the use of data from a single-center blood bank and perinatal database from 2008-2014. Blood bank data were used to identify women with alloimmunization, which was defined as a positive antibody screen in pregnancy not due to naturally occurring antibodies, agglutinins, autoantibodies, or Rh immunoglobulin administration. Intravenous drug abuse was ascertained from a comprehensive database that has captured all drug abuse in pregnancy since 2008. For women who contributed >1 pregnancy to the database, only the most recent pregnancy was included. The rates of alloimmunization among women with a history of intravenous drug abuse and general obstetric populations were calculated and compared. The distribution of alloantibody types, proportion of Rh-group alloantibodies, and patient Rh status were assessed for intravenous and non-intravenous drug abuse-associated alloimmunization. Characteristics and outcomes between intravenous and non-intravenous drug abuse-associated alloimmunization were assessed for women with clinically significant alloantibodies. Alloimmunization was more common in women with a history of intravenous drug abuse (11/305 women; 3.6%) compared to women without a history of intravenous drug abuse (288/16,022 women; 1.8%; relative risk, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.62). Needle-sharing was present in 7 and suspected in 4 women with an intravenous drug abuse history. Among women with a history of intravenous drug abuse, none had a history of transfusion or traditional risk factor for alloimmunization. The distribution of alloantibodies was different between intravenous drug abuse- and non-intravenous drug

  12. Altered heme-mediated modulation of dendritic cell function in sickle cell alloimmunization

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yunfeng; Shi, Patricia; Mitchell, W. Beau; Cohen, Devin; Chou, Stella T.; Manwani, Deepa; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Transfusions are the main treatment for patients with sickle cell disease. However, alloimmunization remains a major life-threatening complication for these patients, but the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of alloimmunization is not known. Given the chronic hemolytic state characteristic of sickle cell disease, resulting in release of free heme and activation of inflammatory cascades, we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory response to heme is compromised in alloimmunized sickle patients, increasing their risk of alloimmunization. Heme-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from both non-alloimmunized sickle patients and healthy donors inhibited priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ type 1 T cells, and exhibited significantly reduced levels of the maturation marker CD83. In contrast, in alloimmunized patients, heme did not reverse priming of pro-inflammatory CD4+ cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells or their maturation. Furthermore, heme dampened NF-κB activation in non-alloimmunized, but not in alloimmunized monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Heme-mediated CD83 inhibition depended on Toll-like receptor 4 but not heme oxygenase 1. These data suggest that extracellular heme limits CD83 expression on dendritic cells in non-alloimmunized sickle patients through a Toll-like receptor 4-mediated pathway, involving NF-κB, resulting in dampening of pro-inflammatory responses, but that in alloimmunized patients this pathway is defective. This opens up the possibility of developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent sickle cell alloimmunization. PMID:27229712

  13. Altered heme-mediated modulation of dendritic cell function in sickle cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yunfeng; Shi, Patricia; Mitchell, W Beau; Cohen, Devin; Chou, Stella T; Manwani, Deepa; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-09-01

    Transfusions are the main treatment for patients with sickle cell disease. However, alloimmunization remains a major life-threatening complication for these patients, but the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of alloimmunization is not known. Given the chronic hemolytic state characteristic of sickle cell disease, resulting in release of free heme and activation of inflammatory cascades, we tested the hypothesis that anti-inflammatory response to heme is compromised in alloimmunized sickle patients, increasing their risk of alloimmunization. Heme-exposed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from both non-alloimmunized sickle patients and healthy donors inhibited priming of pro-inflammatory CD4(+) type 1 T cells, and exhibited significantly reduced levels of the maturation marker CD83. In contrast, in alloimmunized patients, heme did not reverse priming of pro-inflammatory CD4(+) cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells or their maturation. Furthermore, heme dampened NF-κB activation in non-alloimmunized, but not in alloimmunized monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Heme-mediated CD83 inhibition depended on Toll-like receptor 4 but not heme oxygenase 1. These data suggest that extracellular heme limits CD83 expression on dendritic cells in non-alloimmunized sickle patients through a Toll-like receptor 4-mediated pathway, involving NF-κB, resulting in dampening of pro-inflammatory responses, but that in alloimmunized patients this pathway is defective. This opens up the possibility of developing new therapeutic strategies to prevent sickle cell alloimmunization. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  14. Guidance on platelet transfusion for patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nahirniak, Susan; Slichter, Sherrill J; Tanael, Susano; Rebulla, Paolo; Pavenski, Katerina; Vassallo, Ralph; Fung, Mark; Duquesnoy, Rene; Saw, Chee-Loong; Stanworth, Simon; Tinmouth, Alan; Hume, Heather; Ponnampalam, Arjuna; Moltzan, Catherine; Berry, Brian; Shehata, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia are at an increased risk for hemorrhage and alloimmunization to platelets. Updated guidance for optimizing platelet transfusion therapy is needed as data from recent pivotal trials have the potential to change practice. This guideline, developed by a large international panel using a systematic search strategy and standardized methods to develop recommendations, incorporates recent trials not available when previous guidelines were developed. We found that prophylactic platelet transfusion for platelet counts less than or equal to 10 × 10(9)/L is the optimal approach to decrease the risk of hemorrhage for patients requiring chemotherapy or undergoing allogeneic or autologous transplantation. A low dose of platelets (1.41 × 10(11)/m2) is hemostatically as effective as higher dose of platelets but requires more frequent platelet transfusions suggesting that low-dose platelets may be used in hospitalized patients. For outpatients, a median dose (2.4 × 10(11)/m2) may be more cost-effective to prevent clinic visits only to receive a transfusion. In terms of platelet products, whole blood-derived platelet concentrates can be used interchangeably with apheresis platelets, and ABO-compatible platelet should be given to improve platelet increments and decrease the rate of refractoriness to platelet transfusion. For RhD-negative female children or women of child-bearing potential who have received RhD-positive platelets, Rh immunoglobulin should probably be given to prevent immunization to the RhD antigen. Providing platelet support for the alloimmunized refractory patients with ABO-matched and HLA-selected or crossmatched products is of some benefit, yet the degree of benefit needs to be assessed in the era of leukoreduction.

  15. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nissar

    2011-01-01

    In the last 7 decades heparin has remained the most commonly used anticoagulant. Its use is increasing, mainly due to the increase in the number of vascular interventions and aging population. The most feared complication of heparin use is heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). HIT is a clinicopathologic hypercoagulable, procoagulant prothrombotic condition in patients on heparin therapy, and decrease in platelet count by 50% or to less than 100,000, from 5 to 14 days of therapy. This prothrombotic hypercoagulable state in HIT patient is due to the combined effect of various factors, such as platelet activation, mainly the formation of PF4/heparin/IgG complex, stimulation of the intrinsic factor, and loss of anticoagulant effect of heparin. Diagnosis of HIT is done by clinical condition, heparin use, and timing of thrombocytopenia, and it is confirmed by either serotonin release assay or ELISA assay. Complications of HIT are venous/arterial thrombosis, skin gangrene, and acute platelet activation syndrome. Stopping heparin is the basic initial treatment, and Direct Thrombin Inhibitors (DTI) are medication of choice in these patients. A few routine but essential procedures performed by using heparin are hemodialysis, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, and Cardiopulmonary Bypass; but it cannot be used if a patient develops HIT. HIT patients with unstable angina, thromboembolism, or indwelling devices, such as valve replacement or intraaortic balloon pump, will require alternative anticoagulation therapy. HIT can be prevented significantly by keeping heparin therapy shorter, avoiding bovine heparin, using low-molecular weight heparin, and stopping heparin use for flush and heparin lock.

  16. Pathobiology of secondary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cines, Douglas B.; Liebman, Howard; Stasi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) remains a diagnosis of exclusion both from nonimmune causes of thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenia that develops in the context of other disorders (secondary immune thrombocytopenia). The pathobiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the diverse causes of secondary ITP differ from each other and from primary ITP, so accurate diagnosis is essential. Immune thrombocytopenia can be secondary to medications or to a concurrent disease, such as an autoimmune condition (eg, systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], antiphospholipid antibody syndrome [APS], immune thyroid disease, or Evans syndrome), a lymphoproliferative disease (eg, chronic lymphocytic leukemia or large granular T-lymphocyte lymphocytic leukemia), or chronic infection, eg, with Helicobacter pylori, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Response to infection may generate antibodies that cross-react with platelet antigens (HIV, H pylori) or immune complexes that bind to platelet Fcγ receptors (HCV) and platelet production may be impaired by infection of megakaryocyte bone marrow-dependent progenitor cells (HCV and HIV), decreased production of thrombopoietin (TPO), and splenic sequestration of platelets secondary to portal hypertension (HCV). Sudden and severe onset of thrombocytopenia has been observed in children after vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella or natural viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and varicella zoster virus. This thrombocytopenia may be caused by cross-reacting antibodies and closely mimics acute ITP of childhood. Proper diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder, where necessary, play an important role in patient management. PMID:19245930

  17. Ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Chiva, E; Díaz-Rangel, M; Monsalve-Naharro, J Á; Cuesta-Montero, P; Catalá-Ripoll, J V; García-Martínez, E M

    2017-05-27

    Ceftazidime is an antibiotic belonging to the group of third generation cephalosporins, frequently used in clinical practice for its broad antibacterial spectrum. A case report is presented on a 78-year-old man who entered the intensive care unit due to respiratory failure secondary to nosocomial pneumonia in the postoperative period of a laparoscopic hepatic bisegmentectomy for a hepatocarcinoma. It required invasive mechanical ventilation and was treated with ceftazidime, developing a progressive decrease in platelet count after the onset of this drug and after re-exposure to it, not coinciding with the introduction of other drugs. The adverse reaction was reported to the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system and according to the Naranjo algorithm the causal relationship was probable. Since no case of ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia was found in the literature, we consider knowledge of it relevant as an adverse effect to be taken into account given its potential severity, especially when it cannot be explained by other causes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Persistent intestinal bleeding due to severe CMV-related thrombocytopenia in a preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Spaggiari, Eugenio; Cattelani, Chiara; Roversi, Maria Federica; Pecorari, Monica; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2017-04-11

    The optimal threshold for neonatal platelet transfusions in sick newborns is still uncertain. We report a congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in a premature neonate with severe thrombocytopenia who subsequently presented with necrotizing enterocolitis and intestinal bleeding. The baby recovered after platelet transfusions were discontinued and the therapy was switched from intravenous ganciclovir to oral valganciclovir. We discuss both measures, speculating on the key role of platelet transfusions.

  19. Prevention of HLA alloimmunization: role of leukocyte depletion and UV-B irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, E. L.

    1990-01-01

    HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of the platelet refractory state. The stimulus for HLA alloimmunization is believed to derive from incompatibility between the recipient's lymphocytes and the passenger donor lymphocytes contained in transfused red cells or platelet concentrates. Two techniques to prevent post-transfusion HLA alloimmunization include filtration, which physically removes the donor lymphocytes, and UV-B irradiation, which renders the donor leukocytes biologically inactive. The role of these two techniques in the prevention of HLA alloimmunization is the focus of this review. PMID:2293501

  20. Prevention of HLA alloimmunization: Role of leukocyte depletion and UV-B irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, E.L. )

    1990-09-01

    HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of the platelet refractory state. The stimulus for HLA alloimmunization is believed to derive from incompatibility between the recipient's lymphocytes and the passenger donor lymphocytes contained in transfused red cells or platelet concentrates. Two techniques to prevent post-transfusion HLA alloimmunization include filtration, which physically removes the donor lymphocytes, and UV-B irradiation, which renders the donor leukocytes biologically inactive. The role of these two techniques in the prevention of HLA alloimmunization is the focus of this review.42 references.

  1. Understanding the Mechanisms of Platelet Alloimmunization and Its Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    platelets. 2009 Annual Report: W81XWH-07-1-0S78 -4- TABLE 1 Recipients Acceptance of That Became Treatment Donor Platelets Platelet Of Donor... treatments . Since these treatments have different modes of preventing platelet alloimmunization (Le., removing the allostimulatory wbc’s by F-LR versus...with the Caridian8CT Corporation who has developed a technique to inactivate bacteria, viruses, and white cells using UV-A irradiation plus riboflavin

  2. Influenza vaccination and humoral alloimmunity in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Pieter; Aubert, Vincent; Sugamele, Rocco; Aubert, John-David; Venetz, Jean-Pierre; Meylan, Pascal; Pascual, Manuel; Manuel, Oriol

    2014-09-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. However, concerns have been raised about the impact of vaccination on antigraft alloimmunity. We evaluated the humoral alloimmune responses to influenza vaccination in a cohort of SOT recipients between October 2008 and December 2011. Anti-HLA antibodies were measured before and 4-8 weeks after influenza vaccination using a solid-phase assay. Overall, 169 SOT recipients were included (kidney = 136, lung = 26, liver = 3, and combined = 4). Five (2.9%) of 169 patients developed de novo anti-HLA antibodies after vaccination, including one patient who developed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) 8 months after vaccination. In patients with pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies, median MFI was not significantly different before and after vaccination (P = 0.73 for class I and P = 0.20 for class II anti-HLA antibodies) and no development of de novo DSA was observed. Five episodes of rejection (2.9%) were observed within 12 months after vaccination, and only one patient had de novo anti-HLA antibodies. The incidence of development of anti-HLA antibodies after influenza vaccination in our cohort of SOT recipients was very low. Our findings indicate that influenza vaccination is safe and does not trigger humoral alloimmune responses in SOT recipients. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  3. [Cellular mechanisms implicated in anti-erythrocyte alloimmunization].

    PubMed

    Ansart-Pirenne, H; Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F

    2005-06-01

    In many clinical situations patients are dependent on blood transfusions. Occurrence of alloimmunization to blood group antigens (BGA) complicates the transfusion strategy and may be involved in clinical transfusion stalemate situations. B cell differentiation into antibody-secreting plasma cells is triggered by antigen and requires helper T cells which produce cytokines. Although antibodies implicated in BGA alloimmunization have been studied for many years, little is known about helper T cell responses that drive their production. Few studies on BGA specific T cell responses have been published today. This review summarizes the new developments in the field of cellular mechanisms implicated into antibody production. The definition of immunodominant peptides derived from RhD and Jk(a) BGAs, the cytokine patterns induced and the HLA class II molecules implicated in their presentation are analyzed. A tolerogenic route for RhD immunodominant peptides is experimented. Identification of such immunodominant peptides, the cytokine patterns induced and the HLA class II molecules implicated in their presentation, would facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies including the specific control of alloimmunization with peptide antigen tolerogens or the ex-vivo induction of regulatory T cells.

  4. Differences between Newborn and Adult Mice in Their Response to Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongbo; Slayton, William B.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Bailey, Matthew; Sallmon, Hannes; Sola-Visner, Martha C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sick neonates frequently develop severe thrombocytopenia. Objective and Methods: In order to test the ability of fetal mice to increase their megakaryocyte size and ploidy in response to thrombocytopenia, we injected an antiplatelet antibody (MWReg30) into pregnant mice daily for 7 days, and into nonpregnant adult mice to serve as controls. After that time, platelet counts were obtained and megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, liver, and spleen were stained with anti-von Willebrand factor antibody, individually measured, and quantified. Results Our study demonstrated that megakaryocytopoiesis in newborn mice shares many features of human fetal/neonatal megakaryocytopoiesis, including the small size of megakaryocytes. In response to thrombocytopenia, adult mice increased megakaryocyte volume and concentration, primarily in the spleen. Newborn mice, in contrast, increased the megakaryocyte concentration in the spleen, but exhibited no increase in megakaryocyte volume in any of the organs studied. In fact, the megakaryocyte mass was significantly lower in the bone marrow of thrombocytopenic neonates than in age-matched controls. Conclusions We concluded that fetuses have a limited ability to increase their megakaryocyte mass in response to consumptive thrombocytopenia, compared to adult mice. These observations provide further evidence for the existence of biological differences between fetal/neonatal and adult megakaryocytopoiesis. PMID:20134184

  5. Thrombocytosis following thrombocytopenia in man

    PubMed Central

    Ogston, D.; Dawson, Audrey A.

    1969-01-01

    Observations are presented on the changes in the platelet count of patients during the treatment of Addisonian pernicious anaemia with vitamin B12, of thrombocytopenic purpura with prednisone, and of malignant disease with methotrexate. In each of these clinical situations, thrombocytopenia was succeeded, after a delay of a number of days, by a phase of thrombocytosis. PMID:5392350

  6. Thrombocytopenia: A Destruction of Platelets.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Edythe M

    Platelets, or megakaryocytes, are irregular, disk-shaped cell fragments circulating in the blood. They are a primary component in maintaining hemostasis. Low platelet counts, or thrombocytopenia, leave patients at an increased risk of hemorrhage. This article discusses various etiologies of disorders of low platelets and current therapies for management.

  7. Varicella infection complicated by marked thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Shibusawa, Motoharu; Motomura, Sayuri; Hidai, Hiroko; Tsutsumi, Hisasi; Fujita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of adult varicella complicated by marked thrombocytopenia. A 49-year-old woman presented with fever and rash for 3 days. Blood examination revealed marked thrombocytopenia (2.7 × 10(4)/μL). Varicella infection was diagnosed after elevated levels of varicella zoster virus IgM and IgG antibodies were observed 2 weeks later. In this case, thrombocytopenia was due to varicella infection, and the mechanism was estimated to be non-immunological. Because varicella infection complicated by thrombocytopenia may result in fatal bleeding, thrombocytopenia in patients with varicella warrants close attention.

  8. Selection of donor platelets for alloimmunized patients using a platelet-associated IgG assay

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence platelet-associated immunoglobulin-G (PA-IgG) assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets in 8/12 multitransfused patients and to perform platelet crossmatching in the 8 alloimmunized patients. The correct separation of multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. For 5 alloimmunized patients, compatible and incompatible donor platelets were demonstrated by PA-IgG crossmatching and were confirmed by platelet survival studies. With the other 3 alloimmunized patients, only Pa-IgG incompatible donor platelets were found. Survival studies with 5 of these incompatible donor platelets showed markedly reduced survival times on 4 occasions. Pa-IgG compatible donor platelets survived 3.5 to 8.7 days, while Pa-IgG incompatible platelets showed survival times of 0.1 to 2.4 days.

  9. Neonatal acute liver failure: a diagnosis challenge.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mirta; Álvarez, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal acute liver failure is a rare, very severe disease with a high rate of mortality. It is clinically and etiologically different from acute liver failure seen in older children and adults. Coagulopathy with an international normalized ratio ≥ 3 is the critical parameter that defines it. The most common causes are fetal alloimmune hepatitis, previously called neonatal hemochromatosis, viral infections, metabolic disorders, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. There is a group of treatable diseases that require a very early diagnosis for the prescription of an adequate treatment. Patients should be immediately referred to a specialized facility where pediatric liver transplantation is available to implement such therapeutic alternative, if indicated.

  10. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) in Pediatric Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  11. Current management of immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Neunert, Cindy E

    2013-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune-mediated condition that results from antibody-mediated destruction of platelets and impaired megakaryocyte platelet production. ITP patients exhibit severe thrombocytopenia and are at risk for significant hemorrhage. Few randomized trials exist to guide management of patients with ITP. Ultimately, each patient requires an individualized treatment plan that takes into consideration the platelet count, bleeding symptoms, health-related quality of life, and medication side effects. This article provides an up-to-date review of management strategies drawing on links between the expanding amounts of clinical trial data and associated biology studies to enhance understanding of the disease heterogeneity with regard to the complex pathogenesis and response to treatment.

  12. Alloimmunization prevents the migration of transfused indium-111-labeled granulocytes to sites of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, J.P.; Schiffer, C.A.; Johnston, G.S.; Papenburg, D.; Daly, P.A.; Aisner, J.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    111In-labeled granulocytes were used to study the effects of histocompatibility factors on the migration of transfused granulocytes to infected sites. Fourteen alloimmunized and 20 nonalloimmunized patients received approximately 10(8) 111In-labeled granulocytes from ABO-compatible, non-HLA-matched donors, and scans were performed over known infected sites. All 14 alloimmunized patients had lymphocytotoxic antibody (LCTAb) and required HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Of the nonalloimmunized patients, 20/20 had positive scans at sites of infection. None of the 20 had LCTAb, 0/17 had a positive lymphocytotoxic crossmatch (LCTXM) with the donor, and 3/18 had a positive leukoagglutinin crossmatch (LAXM). Thus, histocompatibility testing was not found to be important in nonalloimmunized patients. In contrast, only 3/14 alloimmunized patients had positive scans at sites of infection (p . 0.00001 compared to nonalloimmunized patients). One of 3 had a positive LCTXM and 2/3 had a positive LAXM. Of the alloimmunized patients, 10/11 with negative scans had a positive LCTXM and 8/11 had a positive LAXM. Labeled granulocytes failed to reach sites of infection in 11/14 (78%) alloimmunized patients, demonstrating that histocompatibility factors can be of major importance in affecting the outcome of granulocyte transfusions. Granulocytes from random donors are unlikely to be effective in alloimmunized patients. The lack of an adequate crossmatching technique is a major problem limiting the ability to provide granulocyte transfusions for alloimmunized patients.

  13. Thrombocytopenia associated with environmental exposure to polyurethane

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, A.D. )

    1991-10-01

    Few chemicals in the environment have been implicated as causes of isolated thrombocytopenia, and the evidence is usually less than convincing because the patients were not rechallenged with the chemical in vivo. In the present paper, a child is reported with the onset of thrombocytopenia in temporal association with environmental exposure to polyurethane. Five years after the initial thrombocytopenia had resolved, an inadvertent in vivo rechallenge with environmental polyurethane resulted in recurrence of the thrombocytopenia. This recurrence, together with the fact that only 1-4% of cases of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in children recur, provided strong evidence for a causal role for the polyurethane exposure in this patient's thrombocytopenia. In summary, environmental exposure to polyurethane should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acquired thrombocytopenia in childhood.

  14. Why does my patient have thrombocytopenia?

    PubMed

    Wong, Ellice Y; Rose, Michal G

    2012-04-01

    Thrombocytopenia, usually defined as a platelet count of less than 150,000/μL, is a common reason for a hematology consult in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. In most patients, the cause of the thrombocytopenia can be identified and treated. This article reviews the clinical approach to the patient with thrombocytopenia, the mechanisms that underlie it, and the laboratory tests available to investigate it. A practical approach to the investigation and management of thrombocytopenia in the clinical settings commonly encountered by the hematology consultant is then described.

  15. ANKRD26 normocytic thrombocytopenia: a family report.

    PubMed

    Vincenot, Anne; Hurtaud-Roux, Marie-Françoise; René, Olivier; Binard, Sylvie; Fenneteau, Odile; Schlegel, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    We report the identification of a new case of familial non syndromic severe thrombocytopenia. Bleeding was mild and no extra-haematological symptoms were found. Platelet morphology was normal as well as the quantitative expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins. Platelet functions could not be studied due to the intensity of the thrombocytopenia. Molecular analysis identified a mutation located in the promoter of the ankyrin repeat domain 26 (ANKRD26) gene, c.-127A>T, recently reported to be responsible of normocytic thrombocytopenia, but also of a possible increased risk of leukemia/myelodysplasia. Actual knowledge on this new type of inherited thrombocytopenia is also presented.

  16. Blood transfusion and alloimmunization in patients with thalassemia: multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Azarkeivan, Azita; Ansari, Shahla; Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein; Hajibeigy, Bashir; Maghsudlu, Mahtab; Nasizadeh, Soheila; Shaigan, Mojgan; Toolabi, Abdolmajid; Salahmand, Mitra

    2011-09-01

    One of transfusion's side effects is alloimmunization against red blood cell (RBC) antigens. Early diagnosis by antibody screening is an important step in the detection of these alloantibodies. The authors studied the frequency of alloimmunization in thalassemic patients of 4 centers (2 adult and 2 pediatric centers) and compared the rates in children (up to 15 years) and adults. Antibody screening tests were performed by gel method according to its standard pattern and respective program. In positive cases, antibody identification test by gel method was performed. Eight hundred thirty-five patients were studied; 548 (65.6%) were adults (mean age = 24.5), and 287 (34.4%) cases were pediatrics (mean age = 10.05). Of these patients, 74.1% had no history of transfusion reaction, whereas 21 (2.5%) had hemolytic complications. Seventy-eight (9.3%) exhibited allergic symptoms, and 117 (14%) cases experienced febrile reactions during transfusion. Antibody screening showed positive results in 22 pediatric cases (7.7%) and 79 adults (14.4%); 72 (71.3%), 19 (18.8%), 3 (3%), and 1 (1%) cases exhibited single, double, triple, and autoantibodies, respectively. Anti-Kell antibody was seen in 34 (33.7%) cases, anti-D was seen in 11 (10.9%) cases, and anti-E in was seen in 10 (9.9%) cases. The authors observed 8 anti-D+C (7.9%) cases, 1 anti-D+E (1%), 3 anti-Kell+E, 3 anti-Kell+Kpa (3%), and 1 anti-Kell+D double antibodies. These antibodies were also a combination of Rh subgroups or Rh and Kell subgroups. The authors observed meaningful relations between history of transfusion reactions and age with antibody screening results (P = .005). Based on alloantibodies types, more than two thirds of them were Rh subgroups and Kell groups. Phenotype determination of RBCs before beginning chronic blood transfusion and careful cross-matching with Kell and Rh subgroups in addition to ABO may help reduce alloimmunization in chronic transfusion patients.

  17. Role of Heat Shock Protein 70 in Innate Alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    This article briefly describes our own experience with the proven demonstration of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in reperfused renal allografts from brain-dead donors and reflects about its potential role as a typical damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) in the setting of innate alloimmunity. In fact, our group was able to demonstrate a dramatic up-regulation of HSP70 expression after postischemic reperfusion of renal allografts. Of note, up-regulation of this stress protein expression, although to a lesser extent, was already observed after cold storage of the organ indicating that this molecule is already induced in the stressed organism of a brain-dead donor. However, whether or not the dramatic up-regulation of HSP70 expression contributes to mounting an innate alloimmune response cannot be judged in view of these clinical findings. Nevertheless, HSP70, since generated in association with postischemic reperfusion-induced allograft injury, can be called a typical DAMP – as can every molecule be termed a DAMP that is generated in association with any stressful tissue injury regardless of its final positive or negative regulatory function within the innate immune response elicited by it. In fact, as we discuss in this article, the context-dependent, even contradistinctive activities of HSP70 reflect the biological phenomenon that, throughout evolution, mammals have developed an elaborate network of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms, which provide balance between defensive and protective measures against unwarranted destruction of the host. In this sense, up-regulated expression of HSP70 in an injured allograft might reflect a pure protective response against the severe oxidative injury of a reperfused donor organ. On the other hand, up-regulated expression of this stress protein in an injured allograft might reflect a (futile) attempt of the innate immune system to restore homeostasis with the aim to eliminate the “unwanted foreign allograft

  18. Regulatory B cells (CD19(+)CD38(hi)CD24(hi)) in alloimmunized and non-alloimmunized children with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Asmaa M; Elsayh, Khalid I; Saad, Khaled; Embaby, Mostafa; Ali, Ahmed M

    2016-03-01

    β-Thalassemia major (BTM) is considered the most common hemoglobinopathy in Egypt and is one of the major health problems in our locality. We investigated the frequency of B-regulatory cells (CD19(+)CD38(hi)CD24(hi)); (Bregs) among polytransfused alloimmunized and non-alloimmunized children with BTM. The study included 110 polytransfused pediatric patients with β-thalassemia major. Clinical and transfusion records of all studied patients were reviewed. Indirect antiglobulin test was performed to detect the presence of alloantibodies. We used flow cytometry for detection of CD19(+)CD38(hi)CD24(hi) regulatory B cells. Alloimmunization was detected in 35.5% of thalassemic patients (39/110). The analysis of our data showed a significantly higher frequency of Bregs (CD19(+)CD38(hi)CD24(hi)) in the peripheral blood of both alloimmunized and non-alloimmunized patients as compared to healthy controls. Our data showed that the frequencies of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) Bregs cells were significantly increased in children with BTM. Our data suggested that Bregs cells could play a role in the clinical course of BTM. The relationship of Bregs to immune disorders in BTM children remains to be determined. Further longitudinal study with a larger sample size is warranted to explore the mechanisms of Breg cells in the disease process in BTM patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [THE FETAL MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY PEAK SYSTOLIC VELOCITY AS A PEDICTOR OF FETAL ANEMIA IN RH-ALLOIMMUNIZED PREGNANCY].

    PubMed

    Markov, D; Pavlova, E; Atanassova, D; Diavolov, V; Hitrova, S; Vakrilova, L; Pramatarova, T; Slancheva, B; Ivanov, St

    2015-01-01

    Rh-isoimmunization is a pathological condition in which the fetal red blood cells of a Rh (+) fetus are destroyed by the isoantibodies of a Rh (-) woman sensitized in a previous event. Despite of the wide spread implementation of anti D-gammaglobolin prophylaxis this is still the most common cause for fetal anemia. Recently, sonographic measurement of the fetal middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity (MCA-PSV) has been shown to be an accurate non-invasive test to predict low fetal hemoglobin levels. We present a case report of Rh-alloimmunized pregnancy with moderate fetal anemia, followed-up by weekly MCA-PSV measurements. A 37-year-old Rh (-) negative gravida 3, para 1, without anti-D gammaglobolin prophylaxis in her previous pregnancies, presented at 27+0 weeks of gestation (w.g.) for a routine third trimester scan. Subsequent ultrasound measurements of MCA-PSV confirmed a progressive increase of the peak systolic velocities from 40 to 80 cm/sec, as well as a gradual rise in the anti-D titers. The evidence of developing fetal anemia necessitated elective Caesarean section performed at 35 wg. The neonate was admitted in the intensive care unit and required resuscitation, one exchange blood transfusion and several courses of phototherapy. The patient was discharged two weeks post partum. There is a strong correlation between the high peak systolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery (MCA-PSV) and the low levels of fetal hemoglobin. The high sensitivity and positive predictive value concerning the development of fetal anemia, as well as its good repeatability, makes this non-invasive test a valuable asset in the management of all pregnancies complicated by severe Rh-alloimmunization.

  20. Neonatal acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sarah A; Whitington, Peter F

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal acute liver failure (NALF) is a rare disease about which there is little published data; however, NALF is an extremely important condition as it is distinct from acute liver failure seen in older children and adults. First, unlike acute liver failure in older patients, NALF can be diagnosed in an infant with cirrhosis. This is due to the fetal-neonatal continuum of liver disease, or the principle that neonatal liver failure may be the result of a liver disease that began in utero. Further differences exist in the mechanism of disease, diagnostic principles, and the common etiologies of NALF when compared with pediatric and adult acute liver failure. This review will address many of the distinguishing features of NALF and focus on the most common etiologies of NALF, including gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD), the most common cause of NALF. Additionally, this review will provide insight into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare condition. Liver Transplantation 22 677-685 2016 AASLD. © 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Zika Virus Infection Associated With Severe Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Tyler M; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Bello-Pagán, Melissa I; Rivera, Aidsa; Pastula, Daniel M; Salinas, Jorge L; Martínez Mendez, Jose H; Méndez, Mónica; Powers, Ann M; Waterman, Stephen; Rivera-García, Brenda

    2016-11-01

    We report two patients that developed severe thrombocytopenia after Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. The first patient had 1000 platelets/μL and died after multiple hemorrhages. The second patient had 2000 platelets/μL, had melena and ecchymoses, and recovered after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin. ZIKV may be associated with immune-mediated severe thrombocytopenia.

  2. Managing thrombocytopenia associated with cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuter, David J

    2015-04-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in cancer patients. Aside from bleeding risk, thrombocytopenia limits chemotherapy dose and frequency. In evaluating thrombocytopenic cancer patients, it is important to assess for other causes of thrombocytopenia, including immune thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, infection, drug reaction, post-transfusion purpura, and thrombotic microangiopathy. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia varies greatly depending on the treatment used; the highest rates of this condition are associated with gemcitabine- and platinum-based regimens. Each chemotherapy agent differs in how it causes thrombocytopenia: alkylating agents affect stem cells, cyclophosphamide affects later megakaryocyte progenitors, bortezomib prevents platelet release from megakaryocytes, and some treatments promote platelet apoptosis. Thrombopoietin is the main regulator of platelet production. In numerous studies, recombinant thrombopoietin raised the platelet count nadir, reduced the need for platelet transfusions, reduced the duration of thrombocytopenia, and allowed maintenance of chemotherapy dose intensity. Two thrombopoietin receptor agonists now available, romiplostim and eltrombopag, are potent stimulators of platelet production. Although few studies have been completed to demonstrate their ability to treat chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia, these agents may be useful in treating this condition in some situations. Chemotherapy dose reduction and platelet transfusions remain the major treatments for affected patients.

  3. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: a general review.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Joseph M

    2007-01-01

    Unfractionated heparin is widely used for numerous clinical situations. A well-known adverse effect of heparin exposure is thrombocytopenia. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a clinicopathologic syndrome that can be associated with severe complications and significant mortality. The pathophysiology of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia includes an immune-mediated reaction to heparin that activates platelets and results in an acquired hypercoagulability. Diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia should incorporate clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory testing for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia antibodies. Therapy should include discontinuation of heparin, initiation of a direct thrombin inhibitor, and eventually therapy with warfarin (only after the platelet count is at least 100 x 10(9)/L).

  4. Thrombocytopenia in cardiovascular patients: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Matthai, William H

    2005-02-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in cardiovascular patients, but the etiology and management of this condition may be different than those in other populations. Around the time that percutaneous coronary interventions are performed, the drugs most commonly associated with thrombocytopenia are the glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and heparin. Thienopyridines only rarely cause thrombocytopenia. Patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes may be exposed to prolonged heparin infusions, GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors, and thienopyridines. After open-heart surgery, as opposed to other surgical procedures, the platelet count falls, primarily due to platelet damage and destruction in the bypass circuit and hemodilution. Heparin is the most common drug to be implicated in thrombocytopenia in ICU patients. Determining the etiology for the low platelet count is important for the implementation of appropriate management. The use of a direct thrombin inhibitor in treatment should be considered early if a diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is possible.

  5. Management of thrombocytopenia in advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gangireddy, V G R; Kanneganti, P C; Sridhar, S; Talla, S; Coleman, T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (defined as a platelet count <150×10(9)) is a well-known complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and has been observed in 76% to 85% of patients. Significant thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50×10(9) to 75×10(9)) occurs in approximately 13% of patients with cirrhosis. Thrombocytopenia can negatively impact the care of patients with severe liver disease by potentially interfering with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Multiple factors can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia including splenic platelet sequestration, immunological processes, bone marrow suppression by chronic viral infection, and reduced levels or activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin. The present review focuses on the etiologies and management options for severe thrombocytopenia in the setting of advanced liver disease.

  6. Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. The Nlrp3 Inflammasome Does Not Regulate Alloimmunization to Transfused Red Blood Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gibb, David R; Calabro, Samuele; Liu, Dong; Tormey, Christopher A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Hod, Eldad A; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C

    2016-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are essential for patients with hematological disorders and bone marrow failure syndromes. Despite ABO matching, RBC transfusions can lead to production of alloantibodies against "minor" blood group antigens. Non-ABO alloimmunization is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality in the U.S. Despite its clinical importance, little is known about the immunological factors that promote alloimmunization. Prior studies indicate that inflammatory conditions place patients at higher risk for alloimmunization. Additionally, co-exposure to pro-inflammatory pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) promotes alloimmunization in animal models, suggesting that RBC alloimmunization depends on innate immune cell activation. However, the specific innate immune stimuli and sensors that induce a T cell-dependent alloantibody response to transfused RBCs have not been identified. The NLRP3 inflammasome senses chemically diverse PAMPs and damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including extracellular ATP and iron-containing heme. We hypothesized that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by endogenous DAMPs from RBCs promotes the alloimmune response to a sterile RBC transfusion. Using genetically modified mice lacking either NLRP3 or multiple downstream inflammasome response elements, we ruled out a role for the NLRP3 inflammasome or any Caspase-1 or -11 dependent inflammasome in regulating RBC alloantibody production to a model antigen. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by recipient inflammatory state at time of transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Booth, Garrett S; Miles, Megan; Du, Liping; Koyama, Tatsuki; Meier, Emily Riehm; Luban, Naomi L C

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are at increased risk of red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Recipient inflammatory state at time of transfusion has been shown to regulate alloimmunization in murine models, but evidence is lacking in SCD patients. We retrospectively studied a cohort of alloimmunized SCD patients to determine the influence of pro-inflammatory SCD-related complications at time of transfusion on alloimmunization. For each transfusion, the presence of pro-inflammatory state, degree of RBC antigen matching, unit age, storage solution and alloantibody detection date were ascertained. Transfusion-associated pro-inflammatory events were compared between transfusions resulting and not resulting in new alloantibodies. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Fifty-two patients received 3166 pre-storage leuco-reduced transfusions of which 128 resulted in alloantibodies. Transfusions during inflammatory events were associated with increased alloantibody risk on univariate and multivariate analysis; acute chest syndrome and vaso-occlusive crisis showed strongest associations with alloimmunization. Increased antigen matching demonstrated a protective effect on alloimmunization (univariate and multivariate analysis). Although an association was seen between citrate-phosphate-dextrose (adenine) stored units and alloimmunization on univariate analysis, no effect was found on multivariate analysis. Identifying recipient pro-inflammatory states at time of transfusion that promote alloimmunization can impact RBC unit selection decisions for SCD patients at risk for alloimmunization.

  9. Is exchange transfusion a possible treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis?

    PubMed

    Timpani, Giuseppina; Foti, Francesca; Nicolò, Antonino; Nicotina, Pier Antonio; Nicastro, Emanuele; Iorio, Raffaele

    2007-11-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare congenital disorder of the liver associated to a poor prognosis. Liver transplantation is often required, since no effective medical treatment has been found. Despite mounting evidence of an alloimmune etiology of this condition, exchange transfusion has never been proposed as a specific treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis. Here we describe two siblings affected by neonatal hemochromatosis. The first, a female, died at 18 days of severe coagulopathy and acute renal failure, diagnosed as affected by neonatal hemochromatosis only when the second sibling was suspected as being affected by the same disease. The second child showed a rapidly worsening coagulopathy which was treated with two exchange transfusions, followed by rapid clinical and laboratory improvement, before reaching a definite diagnosis of neonatal hemochromatosis. He is healthy at present after a follow-up of 12 months. Although exchange transfusion has never been considered as treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis, this case suggests that it could be a feasible treatment option for children affected by this disease, as for other alloimmune conditions.

  10. Predictors of Red Cell Alloimmunization in Kurdish Multi Transfused Patients with Hemoglobinopathies in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Muqdad M N; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Alnaqshabandi, Rubad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are significant health problems in Iraq, including its Northern Kurdistan region. One of the essential components of management of these disorders is regular lifelong blood transfusions. The latter is associated with several complications including red cell alloimmunization. No study has looked at the frequency of alloimmunization and its associations in the country. To address the latter issue, 401 multi transfused patients [311 with β-thalassemia (β-thal) syndrome and 90 with sickle cell disease], registered at a large thalassemia care center in Iraqi Kurdistan had their records reviewed, and their sera tested for atypical antibodies using screening and extended red cell panels. Red cell alloimmunization was detected in 18 patients (4.5%) with a total of 20 alloantibodies, while no autoantibodies were detected. The most frequent alloantibody was anti-E, followed by anti-D, anti-K, anti-C(w), anti-C, anti-c and anti-Le(a). Ethnicity was an important predictor of alloimmunization, while age at start of transfusion (>2 vs. ≤2 years) (p = 0.005), Rhesus D (RhD) negative status (p = 0.0017) and history of previous transfusion reactions (p = 0.007) showed a statistically significant higher rate of alloimmunization. However, patients' age, gender, number of units transfused, underlying diagnosis and splenectomy were not significantly associated with alloimmunization. Based on our observations, measures to reduce alloimmunization rates may include extended matching for Rhesus and Kell antigens and early initiation of blood transfusions.

  11. Low incidence of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: The Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A.; O'Brien, Kerry L.; Murphy, Michael F.; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A.; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5%±2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥28 days following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010-2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1.44%; 95%CI 0.58-2.97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 days (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  12. Clinical data, clinicopathologic findings and outcome in dogs with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, S A; Huang, A A; Raskin, R E; Weng, H-Y; Scott-Moncrieff, J C

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify distinguishing characteristics between dogs diagnosed with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and those diagnosed with presumed primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. Presenting clinical and clinicopathologic data and outcomes were compared between the two groups. Retrospective study performed on seven client-owned dogs diagnosed with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and 34 client-owned dogs with primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. All dogs in the amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia group were anaemic on presentation with a median haematocrit of 23% (range 9·4 to 36), while the primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopoenia group had a median presenting haematocrit of 35% (range 10 to 53). Dogs with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia had a median of five (range 4 to 7) clinical signs of bleeding compared to a median of three (range 0 to 6) in the primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia group with 86% (6 of 7) of amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia dogs requiring a blood transfusion compared to 41% (14 of 34) of primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia dogs. Six of the seven amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia dogs did not survive to discharge, while only five of the 34 primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia dogs did not survive to discharge. The clinical presentation of dogs with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia is similar, but dogs with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia had a more severe clinical course compared to primary peripheral immune-mediated thrombocytopenia dogs. The prognosis for dogs with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia is poor. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to respond to foreign invaders and immune problems such as infections, eczema, and autoimmune disorders can occur. Learn more about the gene associated with X-linked thrombocytopenia WAS Related Information What is a gene? What is a ...

  14. Profound thrombocytopenia after primary exposure to eptifibatide.

    PubMed

    Norgard, Nicholas B; Badgley, Brian T

    2010-01-01

    Eptifibatide is a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist used to reduce the incidence of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. A minority of patients given eptifibatide develop acute, profound thrombocytopenia (<20,000 cells/mm(3)) within a few hours of receiving the drug. This case report discusses a patient who developed profound thrombocytopenia within hours of receiving eptifibatide for the first time. The Naranjo algorithm classified the likelihood that this patient's thrombocytopenia was related to eptifibatide as probable. Profound thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but clinically important complication of eptifibatide. This case report emphasizes the importance of monitoring platelet counts routinely at baseline and within 2-6 hours of eptifibatide administration.

  15. Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis. A case with heart failure and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Keller, L; Bluhm, J F

    1979-03-01

    An examination of the skin in a nine day old infant revealed multiple cherry-red superficial hemangiomas, which progressively increased in size and number. At the age of three weeks these skin lesions involved the scalp, trunk, extremities, palms, soles, and buccal mucous membranes. In addition, similar lesions of the liver and gastrointestinal tract were found. Steroids and irradiation were tried with limited success. Finally, hepatic artery ligation was successful in eliminating the heart failure.

  16. T-cell alloimmunity and chronic allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Niloufar; Afzali, Behdad; Atalar, Kerem; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I

    2010-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the standard treatment to improve both the quality of life and survival in patients with various end-stage organ diseases. The primary barrier against successful transplantation is recipient alloimmunity and the need to be maintained on immunosuppressive therapies with associated side effects. Despite such treatments in renal transplantation, after death with a functioning graft, chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Recipient recognition of donor histocompatibility antigens, via direct, indirect, and semidirect pathways, is critically dependent on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and elicits effector responses dominated by recipient T cells. In allograft rejection, the engagement of recipient and donor cells results in recruitment of T-helper (Th) cells of the Th1 and Th17 lineage to the graft. In cases in which the alloresponse is dominated by regulatory T cells (Tregs), rejection can be prevented and the allograft tolerated with minimum or no immunosuppression. Here, we review the pathways of allorecognition that underlie CAD and the T-cell effector phenotypes elicited as part of the alloresponse. Future therapies including depletion of donor-reactive lymphocytes, costimulation blockade, negative vaccination using dendritic cell subtypes, and Treg therapy are inferred from an understanding of these mechanisms of allograft rejection.

  17. MHC II on Transfused Murine Blood is Not Required for Alloimmunization Against MHC I

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Christopher R.; Cadwell, Chantel M.; Smith, Nicole H.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Zimring, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Transfusion of allogeneic platelet products can result in antibodies against donor MHC I antigens, leading to a refractory state to subsequent platelet transfusions. However, there is disagreement in the field regarding the molecular mechanisms of humoral alloimmunization. One hypothesis states that donor MHC II is a requirement for alloimmunization. However, other studies have suggested that donor MHC I is alone sufficient and MHC II is not required. Materials and Methods We utilized a mouse model of anti-MHC I alloimmunization to transfused blood, which employed donors with a complete deletion of all MHC II genes. BALB/c (H-2d) recipients were transfused with blood from either C57BL/6 (H-2b) or MHC II null donors on a C57BL/6 background. Anti-MHC I alloimmunization was monitored by indirect immunofluorescence. Results Recipients of either wild type or MHC II null blood produced equivalent humoral responses against donor MHC I antigens. However, there was variation in the relative amounts of IgG subclasses. Conclusion These data reject the hypothesis that donor MHC II expression is required for alloimmunization to MHC I antigens. PMID:20546207

  18. Red blood cell alloimmunization among sickle cell Kuwaiti Arab patients who received red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Reem; Al Shemmari, Salem; Al-Bashir, Abdulaziz

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in the Arabian Gulf region. Most cases require a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, increasing the potential for RBC alloantibody development. The incidence of RBC alloimmunization among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients is not yet known. This study retrospectively assessed the effect of using two different matching protocols on the incidence of alloimmunization among multiply transfused Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients. A total of 233 Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 110) received RBC transfusion through standard ABO- and D-matched nonleukoreduced blood; Group 2 (n = 123) received RBCs matched for ABO, Rh, and K1 poststorage-leukoreduced blood. Multivariate analysis was performed on the factors associated with RBC alloimmunization and antibody specificity. Sixty-five percent of patients in Group 1 developed clinically significant RBC alloantibody with an increased prevalence in females; in patients in Group 2, 23.6% developed RBC alloantibodies (p = 0.01). In Group 1, 72 patients (65.5%) had alloantibodies directed against Rh and Kell systems (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis further confirmed the results, showing that blood transfusion type and sex have significant effects on the rate of alloimmunizations. This study confirms the importance of selecting RBCs matched for Rh and Kell to reduce the risk of alloimmunizations among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients.

  19. Uric acid increases cellular and humoral alloimmunity in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Sounidaki, Maria; Antoniadi, Georgia; Antoniadis, Nikolaos; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2017-05-05

    Hyperuricemia is common among kidney transplant recipients and has been associated with worse graft outcome. Since episodes of acute cellular rejection and chronic humoral rejection contribute to decreased graft survival, in this study the effect of uric acid on cellular and humoral alloimmunity was evaluated. Cellular alloimmunity was assessed by cell proliferation in two-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). For assessing humoral alloimmunity we developed a method in which humoral alloimmunity was induced in one-way MLR. Then the de novo production of alloantibodies was measured with an antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay, in which supernatants from the above MRLs were used against resting PBMC similar to the stimulator cells of the above MLRs. Uric acid at a concentration above its crystallization threshold increased cellular proliferation in two-way MLRs. Supernatants from one-way MLRs performed in the presence of uric acid were more cytotoxic against PBMC from individuals that had conferred the stimulator cells for the above MLRs. Uric acid increases both cellular and humoral alloimmunity in human PBMC. These results offer a possible pathogenetic mechanism for the observed relation between hyperuricemia and worse kidney allograft survival. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoantibody formation in the alloimmunized red blood cell recipient: clinical and laboratory implications.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, M S; Procter, J L; Lottenberg, R; Kitchens, C S; Klein, H G

    2001-01-22

    Alloimmunization to erythrocyte antigens is a well-characterized complication in heavily transfused patients. Less well recognized, however, is the frequency of autoantibody formation in these previously alloimmunized patients. The autoantibodies are heterogeneous and of variable clinical significance. We describe the clinical history, laboratory evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment in 4 patients who developed autoantibodies in temporal association with alloantibody formation. In one case, the autoantibody found on routine screening had no clinical significance. In another case, the autoantibody made accurate blood typing and subsequent transfusion exceedingly difficult. Two patients experienced hemolysis as a consequence of the autoantibody. The management of both patients included supportive measures, while one patient required glucocorticosteroids and red blood cell transfusion. We review the published literature concerning autoimmunization in the transfused alloimmunized host. The spectrum of clinical consequences is important for the general practitioner to recognize, as these complications may occur during routine blood transfusions.

  1. Protective Effect of HLA-DQB1 Alleles Against Alloimmunization in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fasano, Ross; Riggs, Michael; Fortier, Catherine; Andrew; Campbell, D.; Charron, Dominique; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Luban, Naomi L.C.; Vukmanovic, Stanislav; Tamouza, Ryad

    2015-01-01

    Background Alloimmunization or the development of alloantibodies to Red Blood Cell (RBC) antigens is considered one of the major complications after RBC transfusions in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and can lead to both acute and delayed hemolytic reactions. It has been suggested that polymorphisms in HLA genes, may play a role in alloimmunization. We conducted a retrospective study analyzing the influence of HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 genetic diversity on RBC-alloimmunization. Study design Two-hundred four multi-transfused SCD patients with and without RBC-alloimmunization were typed at low/medium resolution by PCR-SSO, using IMGT-HLA Database. HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 allele frequencies were analyzed using logistic regression models, and global p-value was calculated using multiple logistic regression. Results While only trends towards associations between HLA-DR diversity and alloimmunization were observed, analysis of HLA-DQ showed that HLA-DQ2 (p=0.02), -DQ3 (p=0.02) and -DQ5 (p=0.01) alleles were significantly higher in non-alloimmunized patients, likely behaving as protective alleles. In addition, multiple logistic regression analysis showed both HLA-DQ2/6 (p=0.01) and HLA-DQ5/5 (p=0.03) combinations constitute additional predictor of protective status. Conclusion Our data suggest that particular HLA-DQ alleles influence the clinical course of RBC transfusion in patients with SCD, which could pave the way towards predictive strategies. PMID:26476208

  2. Study of alloimmunization and autoimmunization in Iranian β-thalassemia major patients

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Kambiz; Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thalassemia is one of the most common monogenic disorders characterized by reduced production of globin chains. Although regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusion support is the main treatment for these patients, it may be associated with complications such as RBC alloimmunization. Aim: The study aimed to determine the incidence of alloimmunization and autoimmunization to RBC antigens in β-thalassemia major patients from Zanjan, Zanjan Province, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 49 β-thalassemia major patients comprising 24 females and 25 males (mean age: 18.59 ± 8.16 years; range: 2-40 years) from Northwest Iran were included in a cross-sectional study. Alloantibody screening and identification were done using 3-cell and 10-cell reagent red blood cells, respectively. Autoantibody detection was performed using direct Coomb's test. Results: The incidence of alloimmunization was 16.32% with 10 alloantibodies identified in 8 patients. The most common clinically significant alloantibody identified in alloimmunized patients was anti-Kell (K-antigen) (60%) followed by anti-Rhesus (Rh) (E, c-antigens). The rate of alloimmunization was significantly lower in patients transfused with leukoreduced RBCs compared with those transfused with nonleukoreduced RBCs (9.53% vs 57.14%, P = 0.001). There was no significant correlation between alloantibody formation and the age, gender, hemoglobin levels, number of transfused units, and splenectomy. Conclusion: Transfusion of leukoreduced and phenotypically matched red blood cells for Kell (K) and Rh (E, c) antigens may help reduce the alloimmunization rate in Iranian β-thalassemia major patients. Moreover, autoimmunization to RBC antigens was rare in our patients. PMID:27011679

  3. Alloimmunization and erythrocyte autoimmunization in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients of predominantly asian descent.

    PubMed

    Singer, S T; Wu, V; Mignacca, R; Kuypers, F A; Morel, P; Vichinsky, E P

    2000-11-15

    The development of hemolytic alloantibodies and erythrocyte autoantibodies complicates transfusion therapy in thalassemia patients. The frequency, causes, and prevention of this phenomena among 64 transfused thalassemia patients (75% Asian) were evaluated. The effect of red blood cell (RBC) phenotypic differences between donors (mostly white) and Asian recipients on the frequency of alloimmunization was determined. Additional transfusion and patient immune factors were examined. 14 (22%) of 64 patients (75% Asian) became alloimmunized. A mismatched RBC phenotype between the white population, comprising the majority of the donor pool, and that of the Asian recipients, was found for K, c, S, and Fyb antigens, which accounts for 38% of the alloantibodies among Asian patients. Patients who had a splenectomy had a higher rate of alloimmunization than patients who did not have a splenectomy (36% vs 12.8%; P =.06). Erythrocyte autoantibodies, as determined by a positive Coombs test, developed in 25% or 16 of the 64 patients, thereby causing severe hemolytic anemia in 3 of 16 patients. Of these 16, 11 antibodies were typed immunoglobulin G [IgG], and 5 were typed IgM. Autoimmunization was associated with alloimmunization and with the absence of spleen (44% and 56%, respectively). Transfused RBCs had abnormal deformability profiles, more prominent in the patients without a spleen, which possibly stimulated antibody production. Transfusion of phenotypically matched blood for the Rh and Kell (leukodepleted in 92%) systems compared to blood phenotypically matched for the standard ABO-D system (leukodepleted in 60%) proved to be effective in preventing alloimmunization (2.8% vs 33%; P =.0005). Alloimmunization and autoimmunization are common, serious complications in Asian thalassemia patients, who are affected by donor-recipient RBC antigen mismatch and immunological factors.

  4. Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Sickle Cell Disease: Listen to Your Ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Lee, Sally A.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization occurs in approximately 30% of transfused sickle cell disease patients compared to 2–5% of all transfusion recipients. Because RBC transfusion is an important part of therapy in sickle cell disease, the need for additional antigen matching once alloimmunization occurs is problematic and leads to therapeutic limitations. Thus, identification of risk factors would benefit this patient population. Genome-wide analyses, in particular, methods which take into account genetic ancestry such as admixture mapping, could identify molecular markers which could be used to identify immune responders to transfusion. PMID:25670930

  5. Alloimmune responses and atherosclerotic disease after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ducloux, Didier; Courivaud, Cécile; Bamoulid, Jamal; Bisaccia, Vincent; Roubiou, Caroline; Crepin, Thomas; Gaugler, Béatrice; Laheurte, Caroline; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Chalopin, Jean-Marc; Saas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to exogenous antigens causes accumulation of proinflammatory CD57(+)CD28(-) hyperactivated CD8(+) T cells that may promote atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that persistent alloimmune responses may induce immune activation and contribute to posttransplant atherosclerosis. This hypothesis was tested in a single-center cohort of 577 kidney transplant patients. Propensity score analysis was performed to address potential confounding variables by indication. Immune exhaustion was studied in subcohort of 103 patients. Five hundred seventy-seven consecutive renal transplant recipients were included. Seventy-seven atherosclerotic events (AE) (12.3%) occurred during a mean follow-up of 7 years. The cumulative incidence of AE increased with the number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (18%, 10%, and 5% in patients with 5-6, 3-4, and 0-2 mismatches, respectively; P=0.012). Human leukocyte antigen mismatch number (hazards ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.66, for each supplementary mismatch; P=0.005) was an independent risk factor for AE. In the propensity score match analysis, having received a well-matched kidney conferred a reduced risk of AE (hazards ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.95; P=0.044). We observed a significant correlation between HLA mismatch numbers and circulating CD57(+)CD28(-) CD8(+) T cells (R=0.31; P=0.017). These CD8(+) T cells were more frequent in patients with more HLA mismatches (P<0.0001). Overall, our results suggest that chronic allogeneic stimulation participates to accelerated atherosclerosis observed after transplantation.

  6. Effects of maternal hypertension on the neonatal haemogram in southern Nigeria: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Okoye, Helen C; Eweputanna, Lisa I; Korubo, Kaladada I; Ejele, Oseikhuemen A

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to compare the hematological parameters in neonates of hypertensive mothers with those of normotensive mothers, and also to compare the incidence of polycythaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in both groups. This was a hospital-based case control study. Three milliliters of cord blood from neonates of women with hypertension in pregnancy and those of normotensive pregnant women were sampled for haemogram parameters using a 3-part autoanalyser. Haematocrit and white blood cell differentials were done manually. Data were analysed using SPSS version 16. A total of 200 neonates were recruited, comprising 100 neonates of mothers with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and 100 neonates of normotensive mothers. The mean haematocrit was significantly higher in neonates of hypertensive mothers than those of normotensive mothers. The neutrophil and platelet counts of neonates of hypertensive mothers were significantly lower than those of normotensive mothers. The incidences of polycythaemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia were found to be 8%, 15%, and 38% among neonates of hypertensive mothers and 0%, 2%, and 8% among neonates of normotensive mothers, respectively. These incidences were significantly different between the groups. There was a positive association between hypertension in pregnancy and neonatal polycythaemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Haematological parameters of neonates of mothers with hypertension in pregnancy should be properly evaluated and monitored to reduce the chances of developing complications associated with these abnormalities.

  7. Thrombophilia in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond S M; Bakshi, Kalpana; Brainsky, Andres

    2015-01-01

    An increased risk of thromboembolic events among patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia has been reported but is still not fully understood. A thrombophilia panel (factors suspected/known to denote a thrombophilic state or indicate activation of the clotting cascade) was measured in previously treated patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia enrolled in an eltrombopag trial to assess potential thrombophilia risk markers. Of 167 patients, 136 (81%) had abnormal levels of at least 1 known or suspected thrombosis risk marker or coagulation cascade activation marker. Six patients reported thromboembolic events, and all of these patients had at least two abnormal analytes in the thrombophilia panel. The presence of multiple baseline thrombophilia risk markers support the theory that chronic immune thrombocytopenia is a pro-thrombotic disease.

  8. Hepatitis and thrombocytopenia: markers of dengue mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Smitha; Bhatt, Arun N; Mathew, Celine Thalappillil; Ittyachen, Abraham M

    2017-04-01

    Dengue fever is of great concern to public health in India as it contributes significantly to the burden of healthcare. The aim of our study was to measure mortality in dengue and its association with hepatitis and thrombocytopenia. Our study was performed in a tertiary care setting in the state of Kerala in southern India. Adult patients admitted in the year 2013 were included. Among 1308 confirmed dengue patients, the mortality rate was 1.76%. Hepatitis and thrombocytopenia were present in over 80% of all patients, but severe hepatitis was seen in 11.4% and severe thrombocytopenia in 9.3%. These were markers of fatal outcome. Other factors significantly associated with mortality were age >60 years, male sex, diabetes and the presence of any co-morbidity.

  9. Prevalence and characterization of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy in Indian women.

    PubMed

    Nisha, Singh; Amita, Dhakad; Uma, Singh; Tripathi, A K; Pushplata, Sankhwar

    2012-06-01

    To find the prevalence and causes of thrombocytopenia during pregnancy. An analytical prospective observational study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, CSMMU, Lucknow. 1079 antenatal women screened for thrombocytopenia and investigated for cause and management strategies and fetomaternal outcome were recorded. Prevalence of thrombocytopenia was 8.8%. Gestational thrombocytopenia was seen in 64.2%, obstetric in 22.1% and medical in 13.68% cases. Mean platelet count in controls was lower with a significant fall (P < 0.001) in the platelet count as pregnancy advanced. Hypertensive and hepatic disorders were the most common obstetric causes of thrombocytopenia. Mode of delivery was not affected by thrombocytopenia. Maternal morbidity and mortality was seen only in medical and obstetric thrombocytopenia. The low platelet counts and declining trend with increasing gestational age predispose Indian women to risk of thrombocytopenia and a routine platelet count is suggested.

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocytopenia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocytopenia? Mild to serious bleeding causes the main signs and symptoms of thrombocytopenia. Bleeding can occur inside your body (internal bleeding) ...

  11. Acute stent thrombosis associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and abciximab-induced profound thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Tarun W; Pappy, Reji; Hennebry, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a wellknown complication after exposure to heparin products. Profound thrombocytopenia has also been reported with the use of abciximab, a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonist, which is used during percutaneous coronary intervention. Acute stent thrombosis is a rare but serious complication of HIT. We report an unusual case of acute stent thrombosis with concomitant heparin- and abciximab-induced profound thrombocytopenia and discuss the subsequent treatment strategies. Prompt identification and management of this disorder is critically important to avoid devastating complications.

  12. Heparin induced thrombocytopenia: diagnosis and management update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, I; Majeed, A; Powell, R

    2007-01-01

    Heparin‐induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a potentially devastating immune mediated adverse drug reaction caused by the emergence of antibodies that activate platelets in the presence of heparin. Despite thrombocytopenia, bleeding is rare; rather, HIT is strongly associated with thromboembolic complications involving both the arterial and venous systems. A number of laboratory tests are available to confirm the diagnosis; however, when HIT is clinically suspected, treatment should not be withheld pending the result. Fortunately, therapeutic strategies have been refined, and new and effective therapeutic agents are available. Treatment options are focused on inhibiting thrombin formation or direct thrombin inhibition. Warfarin should not be used until the platelet count has recovered. PMID:17823223

  13. Current therapies in primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Pels, Salley G

    2011-09-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) has long been characterized as an autoimmune disease that exhibits antibody-mediated destruction of platelets. Many of the therapies have targeted reducing the antibody production and/or the platelet destruction process within the reticuloendothelial system, including steroids, immunoglobulin, anti-RhD immunoglobulin, splenectomy, and rituximab. Relatively new insights into the pathophysiology of this disorder have led to the introduction of new therapies, such as the use of thrombopoietic agents to enhance platelet production. This review outlines many of the most commonly used therapeutic agents for the treatment of severe thrombocytopenia associated with both newly diagnosed and chronic ITP. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  14. Frequency and Specificity of Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Chilean Transfused Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caamaño, José; Musante, Evangelina; Contreras, Margarita; Ulloa, Hernán; Reyes, Carolina; Inaipil, Verónica; Saavedra, Nicolás; Guzmán, Neftalí

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Alloimmunization is an adverse effect of blood transfusions. In Chile, alloimmunization frequency is not established, and for this reason the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies in Chilean transfused subjects. Methods Records from 4,716 multi-transfused patients were analyzed. In these patients, antibody screening was carried out prior to cross-matching with a commercially available two-cell panel by the microcolum gel test, and samples with a positive screen were analyzed for the specificity of the alloantibody with a 16-cell identification panel. Results The incidence of RBC alloimmunization in transfused patients was 1.02% (48/4,716) with a higher prevalence in women (40/48). We detected 52 antibodies, the most frequent specificities identified were anti-E (30.8%), anti-K (26.9%), anti-D (7.7%), and anti-Fya (5.8%). The highest incidence of alloantibodies was observed in cancer and gastroenterology patients. Conclusion The data demonstrated a low alloimmunization frequency in Chilean transfused patients, principally associated with antibodies anti-E, anti-K, anti-D, and anti-Fya. PMID:25960709

  15. Bronchial epithelial injury in the context of alloimmunity promotes lymphocytic bronchiolitis through hyaluronan expression

    PubMed Central

    Stober, Vandy P.; Szczesniak, Christopher; Childress, Quiana; Heise, Rebecca L.; Bortner, Carl; Hollingsworth, John W.; Neuringer, Isabel P.; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial injury is often detected in lung allografts, however, its relation to rejection pathogenesis is unknown. We hypothesized that sterile epithelial injury can lead to alloimmune activation in the lung. We performed adoptive transfer of mismatched splenocytes into recombinant activating gene 1 (Rag1)-deficient mice to induce an alloimmune status and then exposed these mice to naphthalene to induce sterile epithelial injury. We evaluated lungs for presence of alloimmune lung injury, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and hyaluronan expression, examined the effect of ER stress induction on hyaluronan expression and lymphocyte trapping by bronchial epithelia in vitro, and examined airways from patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and normal controls histologically. We found that Rag1-deficient mice that received mismatched splenocytes and naphthalene injection displayed bronchial epithelial ER stress, peribronchial hyaluronan expression, and lymphocytic bronchitis. Bronchial epithelial ER stress led to the expression of lymphocyte-trapping hyaluronan cables in vitro. Blockade of hyaluronan binding ameliorated naphthalene-induced lymphocytic bronchitis. ER stress was present histologically in >40% of bronchial epithelia of BOS patients and associated with subepithelial hyaluronan deposition. We conclude that sterile bronchial epithelial injury in the context of alloimmunity can lead to sustained ER stress and promote allograft rejection through hyaluronan expression. PMID:24748604

  16. Severe Thrombocytopenia after Zika Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2016

    PubMed Central

    Boyer Chammard, Timothée; Schepers, Kinda; Breurec, Sébastien; Messiaen, Thierry; Destrem, Anne-Laure; Mahevas, Matthieu; Soulillou, Adrien; Janaud, Ludovic; Curlier, Elodie; Herrmann-Storck, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia during or after the course of Zika virus infection has been rarely reported. We report 7 cases of severe thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic signs and symptoms in Guadeloupe after infection with this virus. Clinical course and laboratory findings strongly suggest a causal link between Zika virus infection and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. PMID:27997330

  17. Severe Thrombocytopenia after Zika Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2016.

    PubMed

    Boyer Chammard, Timothée; Schepers, Kinda; Breurec, Sébastien; Messiaen, Thierry; Destrem, Anne-Laure; Mahevas, Matthieu; Soulillou, Adrien; Janaud, Ludovic; Curlier, Elodie; Herrmann-Storck, Cécile; Hoen, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia during or after the course of Zika virus infection has been rarely reported. We report 7 cases of severe thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic signs and symptoms in Guadeloupe after infection with this virus. Clinical course and laboratory findings strongly suggest a causal link between Zika virus infection and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia.

  18. Alloimmunization in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Thalassemia: Experience of a Single Centre in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Alkindi, Salam; AlMahrooqi, Saba; AlHinai, Sumaiya; AlMarhoobi, Ali; Al-Hosni, Saif; Daar, Shahina; Fawaz, Naglaa; Pathare, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is an integral part of the supportive care for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassaemia. The hazard of red cell alloimmunization, however, is one of the main complications of this therapy. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of red cell alloimmunization in Omani patients with sickle cell anaemia and thalassemia. Methods This study included 262 patients whose historical transfusion records were available. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with thalassaemia who were attending the day care unit for regular transfusions, and 133 SCD patients admitted at our hospital were included in this study. The Diamed® gel system was used for the screening and identification of atypical antibodies. Results The rate of alloimmunization in SCD patients was 31.6% (n=42, 95%CI, 24.87–40.66), whereas in patients with thalassaemia it was 20% (n=26; 95%CI, 13.9–27.6). Antibodies to E, e, C, c, D, K, S, Fyª, Kpª, Jkª and Cw were observed; 85% of the patients were also immunised with Rh and Kell antigens. Considering the two groups together, 8 developed nonspecific antibodies and 12 developed more than one antibody. Conclusions Red cell transfusions were associated with a significant risk of alloimmunization. It is, therefore, imperative to perform an initial extended red cell phenotyping for both donors and recipients, and carefully select ABO, Rh and Kell matched donors. The higher incidence of alloimmunization in SCD patients is related to the inherent SCD-specific inflammatory state. PMID:28293401

  19. Alloimmune Activation Promotes Anti-Cancer Cytotoxicity after Rat Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A.; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in a specific condition where the immune response is potentially directed against both allogeneic and cancer antigens. We have investigated the level of anti-cancer immunity during allogeneic immune response. Dark Agouti-to-Lewis and Lewis-to-Lewis rat liver transplantations were performed and the recipients anti-cancer immunity was analysed at the time of alloimmune activation. The occurrence of rejection in the allogeneic recipients was confirmed by a shorter survival (p<0.01), increased liver function tests (p<0.01), the presence of signs of rejection on histology, and a donor-specific ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction. At the time of alloimmune activation, blood mononuclear cells of the allogeneic group demonstrated increased anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), which was related to an increased natural killer (NK) cell frequency (p<0.05) and a higher monocyte/macrophage activation level (p<0.01). Similarly, liver NK cell anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), and liver monocyte/macrophage activation levels (p<0.01) were also increased. The alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity was mediated through the NKG2D receptor, whose expression was increased in the rejected graft (p<0.05) and on NK cells and monocyte/macrophages. NKG2D ligands were expressed on rat HCC cells, and its inhibition prevented the alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity. Although waiting for in vivo validation, alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation appears to be linked to increased frequencies and levels of activation of NK cells and monocyte/macrophages, and is at least in part mediated through the NKG2D receptor. PMID:24651497

  20. Alloimmune activation promotes anti-cancer cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in a specific condition where the immune response is potentially directed against both allogeneic and cancer antigens. We have investigated the level of anti-cancer immunity during allogeneic immune response. Dark Agouti-to-Lewis and Lewis-to-Lewis rat liver transplantations were performed and the recipients anti-cancer immunity was analysed at the time of alloimmune activation. The occurrence of rejection in the allogeneic recipients was confirmed by a shorter survival (p<0.01), increased liver function tests (p<0.01), the presence of signs of rejection on histology, and a donor-specific ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction. At the time of alloimmune activation, blood mononuclear cells of the allogeneic group demonstrated increased anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), which was related to an increased natural killer (NK) cell frequency (p<0.05) and a higher monocyte/macrophage activation level (p<0.01). Similarly, liver NK cell anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), and liver monocyte/macrophage activation levels (p<0.01) were also increased. The alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity was mediated through the NKG2D receptor, whose expression was increased in the rejected graft (p<0.05) and on NK cells and monocyte/macrophages. NKG2D ligands were expressed on rat HCC cells, and its inhibition prevented the alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity. Although waiting for in vivo validation, alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation appears to be linked to increased frequencies and levels of activation of NK cells and monocyte/macrophages, and is at least in part mediated through the NKG2D receptor.

  1. Can the Interval Between Antibody Identifications be Increased for Alloimmunized Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Cheryl; Avecilla, Scott T.; Garbaini, Jennifer; Degtyaryova, Diana; Lo, Dian; Chang, Dustin Y.M.; Cushing, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Background New alloantibody formation is unpredictable in patients who have been previously alloimmunized. Pretransfusion testing is designed to detect these antibodies while antibody identification (ABI) techniques are designed to identify the specificity of the antibody. Pretransfusion testing intervals are prescribed by regulatory and accrediting agencies, intervals for ABI in alloimmunized patients are not. Our institution evaluated the safety of increasing the interval from every 72-hours to 14-days. The current 72-hour interval was chosen at our institution to align with AABB standard 5.14.3.2 which requires a pretransfusion specimen drawn within 3-days of the scheduled transfusion for potentially immunized patients. Study Design and Methods Over 2 years, all ABI entries in the laboratory information system were screened. All cases of alloimmunized patients with an additional antibody specificity that developed within 14-days of a previous ABI were reviewed and confirmed by four transfusion medicine physicians. Results Initially, 8948 entries were screened. Thirty patients were identified to have formed 33 newly identified clinically significant alloantibodies within 14-days. After further categorization, only 13 antibodies (0.15% of all ABI, 0.47% of alloimmunized patients examined) were deemed to be newly formed clinically significant antibodies that would have led to a change in transfusion practice. Discussion Retrospective analysis of ABI results over a 2-year period revealed that 0.47% of previously alloimmunized patients that have samples for pretransfusion testing develop a new clinically significant alloantibody in 14-days or less. While there would be significant resource advantages to increasing the duration between repeat ABI, it does not outweigh the risk of a potential hemolytic transfusion reaction. PMID:26456540

  2. Primary autoimmune myelofibrosis with severe thrombocytopenia mimicking immune thrombocytopenia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jian; Matayoshi, Shu; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Morihiro; Hagihara, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with bone marrow fibrosis not accompanied by well-established autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, or malignant diseases, are considered to have primary autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF). Primary AIMF has been reported to follow a benign course and responds well to treatment with immunosuppressive agents. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is also an autoimmune disorder characterized by antiplatelet-antibody-mediated thrombocytopenia in the absence of other causes of thrombocytopenia. We herein present a rare case of a female patient who was diagnosed with primary AIMF. The patient presented with severe thrombocytopenia, which was initially misdiagnosed as ITP. The symptoms of the disease resolved completely following steroid treatment. After withdrawal of the treatment at 1 year from the diagnosis, the bone marrow examination showed no evidence of bone marrow fibrosis or other abnormalities. To date, the patient has been followed up for 2 years without evidence of disease. PMID:28105358

  3. Autologous platelet-labeling in thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Vinazzer, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies performed with peripheral platelets obtained from 6 male volunteers aged 23 to 29 years revealed an extraordinary dependence of labeling efficiency on incubation time and platelet concentration after {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling. Since the monitoring of in vivo-platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia may cause problems due to insufficient labeling results and homologous platelets may show a different in vivo behaviour to autologous ones, we have searched for the minimal amount of platelets necessary to allow appropriate labeling and imaging in patients with thrombocytopenia. In 15 patients with untreated thrombocytopenia aged 14 to 79 years demonstrating a mean peripheral platelet count of 2.509 +/- 1.45 x 10(4) cells/microliters autologous {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling was performed. The results indicate that approximately 1 x 10(8) (concentrated) platelets/ml are necessary to obtain an adequate labeling efficiency and recovery. This platelet concentration can be easily achieved by drawing one more Monovette of whole blood per each 5 x 10(4) platelets/microliter peripheral platelet count less than 2 x 10(5)/microliter. It is concluded, that calculation of the required number of platelets in advance, variation of the blood volume drawn and the volume of incubation buffer allow informative, qualitative and quantitative results using autologous platelets. The method presented effectively circumvents the requirement of homologous platelets for radiolabeling in thrombocytopenia.

  4. Phytochemicals as potential therapeutics for thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Manasa, K; Soumya, R; Vani, R

    2016-04-01

    Medical knowledge has always relied on plants as the main sources of important beneficial compounds. Many species have been recognized to have medicinal properties and beneficial impact on health, e.g. antioxidant activity, digestive stimulation action, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, hypolipidemic, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic potential. This review focuses on the promising role of plants and their products in attenuating thrombocytopenia, a common and complex bleeding disorder. When the platelet count decreases below 150,000/µl, it causes thrombocytopenia. This bleeding disorder is observed in 2.5 % of the normal population. The risk of spontaneous muco-cutaneous bleeding and life threatening intracranial haemorrhage or gastrointestinal bleeding increases rapidly when the platelet count decreases below 10,000/µl. The inability to provide supportive treatment to increase the platelet counts often proves fatal to patients. Currently, treatment for thrombocytopenia includes use of drugs or splenectomy or platelet transfusions, in severe cases. Recently, studies have shown platelet augmenting activity of various plant extracts. The effectiveness, toxicity and side effects of the phytochemicals have to be critically evaluated in clinical trials. An in depth understanding of the role and mechanism of these phytochemicals would lead to their successful implementation in treatment and management of thrombocytopenia and other related bleeding disorders.

  5. Thrombocytopenia in lambs fed with bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, B E

    1993-03-01

    Artificially reared lambs, fed with bovine colostrum, died within 48 hours after birth, showing thrombocytopenia and extensive haemorrhages on autopsy. The mechanism behind was not fully understood, but experimental immunization of young cattle against sheep red blood cells, carried out five years earlier on the same farm, may have played a role.

  6. Chicken pox associated thrombocytopenia in adults.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nadir; Anwar, Masood; Majeed, Irfan; Tariq, Waheed Uz Zaman

    2006-04-01

    To determine the frequency and magnitude of thrombocytopenia associated with chicken pox in adults. Observational descriptive study. Combined Military Hospital, Attock, from July 2003 to June 2004. All patients of age 15 years and above with history of fever, followed by appearance of the typical vesicular chicken pox rash, were inducted after informed consent. Two milliliters of whole blood was collected on day 1 of admission, and blood counts were performed. Patients were admitted and given 800 mg oral acyclovir, 5 times/day, for 7 days, in addition to symptomatic treatment. Patients were followed till 8 weeks. A total of 410 patients of chicken pox were received, out of which 270 were included. Age of patients ranged between 15 and 40 years with median age of 21 years. Platelet count on the day of admission ranged between 29 x 10(9)/L to 513 x 10(9)/L, mean platelet count 178 x 10(9)/L. Platelet count < 150 x 10(9)/L was detected in 80/270 (30%) patients. Platelet count in thrombocytopenia patients was from 29 x 10(9)/L to 149 x 10(9)/L with mean 121 x 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia recovered within 02 weeks in 78/80 (97%) patients. In 2 patients, thrombocytopenia recovered in 3 weeks. None of the patients developed purpuric spots, ecchymosis or bleeding manifestations. Thrombocytopenia in chicken pox is a common entity. Platelet count remains above 25 x 10(9) /L, which is usually not associated with bleeding manifestations. None of the patients in this series developed purpura. No specific pattern of total leukocyte counts was predictive of the progression or regression in platelet count.

  7. Neonatal outcome after fetal anemia managed by intrauterine transfusion.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, C; Rakza, T; Thomas, D; Wibaut, B; Vaast, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V

    2015-11-01

    In-utero transfusion is now well under control and improves the survival of foetuses monitored for fetal anemia with a survival rate of more than 80 %. The aim was to evaluate short-term neonatal outcome after fetal severe anemia managed by intrauterine transfusions. We did a retrospective study of all neonates born after management of severe fetal anemia (n = 93) between January 1999 and January 2013 in our regional center. The two main causes of anemia were maternal red blood cell alloimmunization (N = 81, 87 %) and Parvovirus B19 infection (N = 10, 10.8 %). In the alloimmunization group, phototherapy was implemented in 85.2 % of cases with a maximum level of bilirubin of 114.4 ± 60.7 (mg/dl). Transfusion and exchange transfusion were, respectively, required in 51.9 % and in 34.6 % of cases. One neonate presented a convulsive episode, and we observed three neonatal deaths. In the parvovirus group, none of the child had anemia at birth and no management was necessary. Contemporary management of Rhesus disease is associated with encouraging neonatal outcomes. In case of Parvovirus infection, no specific management is necessary at. But, in all cases of fetal anemia, children should be followed up with particular attention to neurologic development. • In-utero transfusion is now well under control and improves the survival of fetuses monitored for fetal anemia. • Limited studies are available on the effect of IUT on postnatal outcome in infants with a history of fetal anemia. What is New: • Contemporary management of severe Rhesus disease is associated with encouraging neonatal outcomes. • The majority of infants can be managed with phototherapy and a limited number of top-up transfusions and exchange transfusions. In case of Parvovirus infection, the short-term neonatal outcome is excellent.

  8. Emerging science, emerging ethical issues: who should fund innate alloimmunity-suppressing drugs?

    PubMed

    Land, W G; Gutmann, Th; Daar, A S

    2008-01-01

    An emerging body of evidence suggests that the innate immune system plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Any injury to the donor organ, e.g. the reperfusion injury, induces an inflammatory milieu in the allograft which appears to be the initial event for activation of the innate immune system. Injury-induced intragraft damage- associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are recognized by donor-derived and recipient-derived, TLR4/2-bearing immature dendritic cells (iDCs). After recognition, these cells mature and initiate allorecognition/alloactivation in the lymphoid system of the recipient. Indeed, the key "innate" event, leading to activation of the adaptive alloimmune response, is the injury-induced, TLR4-triggered, and NFkappaB-mediated maturation of DCs ("innate alloimmunity"). Time-restricted treatment of innate immune events would include 1) treatment of the donor during organ removal, 2) in-situ/ex-vivo treatment of the donor organs alone, and 3) treatment of the recipient during allograft reperfusion and immediately postoperatively. Treatment modalities would include 1) minimization of the oxidative allograft injury with the use of antioxidants; 2) prevention of the TLR4-triggered maturation of DCs with the use of TLR4-antagonists; 3) inhibition of complement activation with the use of complement inhibiting agents. According to data from clinical and experimental studies it can be assumed that successful suppression of innate alloimmune events results in either subsequent significant reduction in, or even complete avoidance of the currently applied adaptive alloimmunity-suppressing drugs. However, in view of the time-restricted period of treatment, and the fear to potentially destroy its own business with currently applied alloimmunity-suppressing drugs, the pharmaceutical industry is still, but quite legitimately, reluctant to invest in the high cost of clinical development of those drugs for transplant patients because there are no marketing interests

  9. Treatments for hematologic malignancies in contrast to those for solid cancers are associated with reduced red cell alloimmunization

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Dorothea; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Tijmensen, Janneke; Middelburg, Rutger A.; de Haas, Masja; de Vooght, Karen M.K.; van de Kerkhof, Daan; Visser, Otto; Péquériaux, Nathalie C.V.; Hudig, Francisca; van der Bom, Johanna G.

    2017-01-01

    Red cell alloimmunization may induce severe hemolytic side effects. Identification of risk-modifying conditions will help tailor preventative strategies. This study aims to quantify the associations of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers with red cell alloimmunization in patients receiving red cell transfusions. We performed a nested multicenter case-control study in a source population of 24,063 patients receiving their first and subsequent red cell transfusions during an 8-year follow-up period. Cases (n=505), defined as patients developing a first transfusion-induced red cell alloantibody, were each compared with 2 non-alloimmunized controls (n=1010) who received a similar number of red cell units. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, we evaluated the association of various malignancies and treatment regimens with alloimmunization during a delineated 5-week risk period. The incidence of alloimmunization among patients with acute (myeloid or lymphoid) leukemia and mature (B- or T-cell) lymphoma was significantly reduced compared to patients without these malignancies: adjusted relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 (range 0.19–0.68) and 0.30 (range 0.12–0.81). Associations were primarily explained by immunosuppressive treatments [RR for (any type of) chemotherapy combined with immunotherapy 0.27 (95%CI: 0.09–0.83)]. Alloimmunization risks were similarly diminished in allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplanted patients (RR 0.34, 95%CI: 0.16–0.74), at least during the six months post transplant. Alloimmunization risks of patients with other hematologic diseases or solid cancers, and their associated treatment regimens were similar to risks in the general transfused population. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to malignancies in general, hemato-oncological patients treated with dose-intensive regimens have strongly diminished risk of red cell alloimmunization. PMID:27634204

  10. Treatments for hematologic malignancies in contrast to those for solid cancers are associated with reduced red cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Evers, Dorothea; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Tijmensen, Janneke; Middelburg, Rutger A; de Haas, Masja; de Vooght, Karen M K; van de Kerkhof, Daan; Visser, Otto; Péquériaux, Nathalie C V; Hudig, Francisca; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-01-01

    Red cell alloimmunization may induce severe hemolytic side effects. Identification of risk-modifying conditions will help tailor preventative strategies. This study aims to quantify the associations of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers with red cell alloimmunization in patients receiving red cell transfusions. We performed a nested multicenter case-control study in a source population of 24,063 patients receiving their first and subsequent red cell transfusions during an 8-year follow-up period. Cases (n=505), defined as patients developing a first transfusion-induced red cell alloantibody, were each compared with 2 non-alloimmunized controls (n=1010) who received a similar number of red cell units. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, we evaluated the association of various malignancies and treatment regimens with alloimmunization during a delineated 5-week risk period. The incidence of alloimmunization among patients with acute (myeloid or lymphoid) leukemia and mature (B- or T-cell) lymphoma was significantly reduced compared to patients without these malignancies: adjusted relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 (range 0.19-0.68) and 0.30 (range 0.12-0.81). Associations were primarily explained by immunosuppressive treatments [RR for (any type of) chemotherapy combined with immunotherapy 0.27 (95%CI: 0.09-0.83)]. Alloimmunization risks were similarly diminished in allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplanted patients (RR 0.34, 95%CI: 0.16-0.74), at least during the six months post transplant. Alloimmunization risks of patients with other hematologic diseases or solid cancers, and their associated treatment regimens were similar to risks in the general transfused population. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to malignancies in general, hemato-oncological patients treated with dose-intensive regimens have strongly diminished risk of red cell alloimmunization.

  11. Drug-Immune Thrombocytopenia with Thrombosis versus Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia: A Critical Clinical Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jafar, Hassan; Al-Yousef, Anas; Al-Shatti, Somaya; Al-Banwan, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a type of drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP). DITP is a rare and challenging clinical issue, especially when it is associated with thrombosis. A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our institution with end-stage renal failure. She received heparin for hemodialysis. Six days later, she became febrile and was treated with vancomycin and amikacin antibiotics. Two days after starting the vancomycin, she developed severe thrombocytopenia with extensive gangrenous deep vein thrombosis in her right leg, which required a below-the-knee amputation. The HIT test yielded positive results when heparin was already stopped, but her platelet count did not regenerate even after 3 months of heparin-free treatment. Courses of vancomycin treatment were given during several febrile episodes over the long period of severe thrombocytopenia. The patient was given both anti-immune thrombocytopenia and anticoagulant treatments because of both severe persistent thrombocytopenia and recurrent thrombotic episodes. The patient died as a result of severe thrombocytopenia, recurrent infection, and blood loss from the amputation site. Vancomycin is known to cause DITP, thrombosis, and immune complexes. DITP is a bleeding disorder, whereas HIT is a controversial thrombotic disorder. HIT tests can be influenced by cross-reacting antibodies and many other factors. Thus, there is no single method that can be considered 100% effective in confirming the HIT diagnosis. Anticoagulants must be used with great caution in patients with suspected DITP. Treatment of HIT-positive cases requires both clinical correlation and experience rather than reliance on HIT tests alone. PMID:26266247

  12. Hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, J D; Filip, D J; Watts, J C

    1975-05-01

    The syndrome of hereditary thrombocytopenia, deafness, and renal disease was manifest in at least eight members in three generations of a family. They had a lifelong history of bleeding, usually as epistaxis, bilateral sensorineural deafness starting in late childhood or the teenage years, and persistent proteinuria with varying degrees of renal dysfunction. Two members died at a young age, one from central nervous system hemorrhage, the other from chronic renal failure. Splenectomy and steroid therapy have been of transient benefit. There was dominant inheritance of the syndrome. Hematologic studies showed thrombocytopenia, large platelets, and megakaryocytic hyperplasia of the bone marrow. In contrast to a previous report, our studies showed that affected members had normal in-vitro platelet function and normal ultrastructural platelet morphology. At autopsy, histologic changes in the kidney of one affected family member were indistinguishable from those reported in classic hereditary nephritis with nerve deafness (Alport's syndrome).

  13. Miliary tuberculosis presenting with hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D. W.; Donevan, R. E.; Copland, G. M.; Ibbott, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman with miliary tuberculosis had moderately severe hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and very severe thrombocytopenia without other hematologic abnormalities. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, prednisone, vincristine and fluid restriction and recovered completely. The SIADH may have been a response by the posterior pituitary to a decrease in intravascular volume resulting from the extensive pulmonary disease or associated hypoxia, or the tuberculous lung may have released ADH or an ADH-like substance. The thrombocytopenia may have resulted from a direct or indirect toxic effect of infection or, less likely, the tuberculosis may have activated latent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:991033

  14. Clinical updates in adult immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Michele P; Gernsheimer, Terry B

    2017-05-25

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in 2 to 4/100 000 adults and results in variable bleeding symptoms and thrombocytopenia. In the last decade, changes in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disorder have led to the publication of new guidelines for the diagnosis and management of ITP and standards for terminology. Current evidence supports alternatives to splenectomy for second-line management of patients with persistently low platelet counts and bleeding. Long-term follow-up data suggest both efficacy and safety, in particular, for the thrombopoietin receptor agonists and the occurrence of late remissions. Follow-up of patients who have undergone splenectomy for ITP reveals significant potential risks that should be discussed with patients and may influence clinician and patient choice of second-line therapy. Novel therapeutics are in development to address ongoing treatment gaps. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. [Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. New therapeutical options].

    PubMed

    Seculini Patiño, Carina E; Tabares, Aldo H

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated adverse reaction due to antibodies to a multimolecular complex of heparin and platelet factor 4 (PF4) characterized by moderate thrombocytopenia and paradoxical arterial or venous thrombosis. It is a relatively infrequent complication related to the administration of any type of heparin. In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization or coronary artery by-pass graft the prevalence of HIT is higher than in other clinical settings. Recognizing clinical and laboratory features of HIT allow immediate discontinuation of heparin and the use of alternative anticoagulants to avoid serious thrombotic complications. In this review, we summarize different therapeutic options for the treatment of HIT with special emphasis on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACS) such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. DOACS might represent a therapeutic alternative for HIT treatment.

  16. CFU-MK assay for acute thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Parent-Massin, Dominique; Sibiril, Yann

    2008-08-01

    In this unit, protocols to culture human platelet progenitors (Colony Forming Unit-Megakaryocyte; CFU-M) with or without toxicants are described. Platelet progenitors are obtained from human umbilical cord blood. After separation of mononuclear cells, the cell suspension can be cryopreserved or plated immediately. Megakaryocytes are identified by immunocytochemistry. Test chemicals are added to the culture medium before cells are plated. Megakaryocytes are scored after 12 days of culture. IC(10), IC(50) and IC(90) can be calculated by comparison to control cultures. A predictive model is proposed to evaluate the hazard of thrombocytopenia induced by chemicals. When IC(50) and IC(90) are below C(max) in humans, the likelihood of thrombocytopenia is strong.

  17. Thrombocytopenia and fever: not just another infection….

    PubMed

    Sriskandarajah, Priya; Davies, Rhys

    2016-05-12

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a high-grade, aggressive disease that typically presents with widespread lymphadenopathy and active 'B' symptoms, making it easy to recognise and manage. However, a small proportion of patients can present with no evidence of lymphadenopathy or organomegaly, with the disease confined to the bone marrow; this presentation is also known as 'Primary Bone Marrow DLBCL'. Subsequently, diagnosis can be a challenge, resulting in delayed treatment and an overall poorer prognosis. Given the rarity of this disease, we wished to describe a patient who presented initially with fevers associated with isolated thrombocytopenia and was later diagnosed with this condition. Unfortunately, due to the aggressive nature of this disease, subsequent treatment was unsuccessful. Overall, we felt that in future cases of fevers with thrombocytopenia, clinicians should include this rare lymphoma subtype as part of the differential diagnosis, as early identification and treatment can be associated with a favourable outcome.

  18. Current management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cosmi, Benilde

    2015-12-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune adverse reaction to heparin (both unfractionated and low-molecular-weight), which is mediated by the formation of IgG antibodies against platelet factor 4-heparin complexes. The IgG/platelet factor 4 immunocomplexes activate platelets with resulting thrombocytopenia, which is not associated with bleeding, but with paradoxical life-threatening thrombotic complications, for coagulation activation. HIT diagnosis requires the assessment of pre-test clinical probability in combination with the measurement of platelet activating antibodies against platelet factor 4-heparin complexes with immunological and functional assays. When HIT is diagnosed, any form of heparin should be stopped and a non-heparin alternative anticoagulant should be started. Argatroban and danaparoid are currently the only drugs licensed for HIT, with different country availability. Bivalirudin is an option in cardiac surgery and procedures in HIT patients.

  19. Treatment of D alloimmunization in pregnancy with plasmapheresis and intravenous immune globulin: case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández Alba, Juan J; León, Raquel; González-Macías, Carmen; Paz, Antonio; Prado, Fabiana; Moreno, Luis J; Torrejón, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of D alloimmunization occurs between 0.15% and 0.4%. The anti-D can cross the placenta and cause hemolysis and fetal anemia. At present, a Doppler study of the middle cerebral artery allows the monitoring of the degree of fetal anemia. The treatment in cases of moderate to severe anemia in fetuses of less than 34-35 weeks of gestation is intrauterine transfusion via cordocentesis. However, with high titers of anti-D, in the absence of fetal anemia it is possible to modulate the maternal immune response by plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin administration. We present a case report of an Rh(D) alloimmunized pregnancy treated with plasmapheresis followed by intravenous immunoglobulin administration. We performed a caesarean section at 31 weeks, 5 days of gestation. The hemoglobin at birth was 13.8 g/dl and hematocrit 40.8%. Intrauterine transfusion was not necessary.

  20. Intermittent cyclophosphamide treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Brian; Maxwell, Ian; Hryniuk, William

    1974-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intermittently rather than daily to 14 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Eight patients responded and six did not. In those who responded the rise in platelet count was rapid, and in all patients the lack of toxicity was striking. Intermittent cyclophosphamide seems effective in some cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and is safe, at least in the short term. Controlled trials would be required to prove that intermittent is better than daily administration. PMID:4473260

  1. Immune thrombocytopenia: No longer ‘idiopathic’

    PubMed Central

    McCRAE, KEITH

    2012-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder. Its pathogenesis involves both accelerated platelet destruction and impaired platelet production. First-line agents are usually effective initially but do not provide long-term responses. Splenectomy remains an effective long-term therapy, as does rituximab (Rituxan) in a subset of patients. Thrombopoietic agents offer a new alternative, although their place in the overall management of ITP remains uncertain. PMID:21632906

  2. Thrombocytopenia in Plasmodium vivax Malaria: How Significant?

    PubMed Central

    Muley, Arti; Lakhani, Jitendra; Bhirud, Saurabh; Patel, Abhinam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Thrombocytopenia is frequently noticed with P. falciparum malaria but is less reported and studied with P. vivax. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, SBKS MI & RC, Pipariya. We included patients who were diagnosed with vivax malaria. The data regarding their clinical and hematological profile was collected and analysed. Result. A total of 66 patients were included. 42 (63%) had platelet count <100000/mm3. Mean platelet count was 1,18,650, range being 8000/mm3–6,10,000/mm3. Amongst those with thrombocytopenia, 16 (38.09%) had anemia, 14 (33.33%) had serum creatinine >1.2 gm/dL, 15 (35.71%) had jaundice (s. bilirubin > 1.2), 2 (4.76%) had altered sensorium, 6 (14.28%) had ARDS, 2 needed ventilator support, and 1 expired. Amongst those with normal platelet count, 5 (20.83%) had anemia and 1 had jaundice whereas none had elevated s. creatinine, altered sensorium, or lung involvement. Conclusion. Thrombocytopenia is now being seen more commonly with vivax malaria. Patients with platelet count <1 lac/cumm have more severe disease. PMID:25045358

  3. Thrombocytopenia in Plasmodium vivax Malaria: How Significant?

    PubMed

    Muley, Arti; Lakhani, Jitendra; Bhirud, Saurabh; Patel, Abhinam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Thrombocytopenia is frequently noticed with P. falciparum malaria but is less reported and studied with P. vivax. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, SBKS MI & RC, Pipariya. We included patients who were diagnosed with vivax malaria. The data regarding their clinical and hematological profile was collected and analysed. Result. A total of 66 patients were included. 42 (63%) had platelet count <100000/mm(3). Mean platelet count was 1,18,650, range being 8000/mm(3)-6,10,000/mm(3). Amongst those with thrombocytopenia, 16 (38.09%) had anemia, 14 (33.33%) had serum creatinine >1.2 gm/dL, 15 (35.71%) had jaundice (s. bilirubin > 1.2), 2 (4.76%) had altered sensorium, 6 (14.28%) had ARDS, 2 needed ventilator support, and 1 expired. Amongst those with normal platelet count, 5 (20.83%) had anemia and 1 had jaundice whereas none had elevated s. creatinine, altered sensorium, or lung involvement. Conclusion. Thrombocytopenia is now being seen more commonly with vivax malaria. Patients with platelet count <1 lac/cumm have more severe disease.

  4. Lower alloimmunization rates in pediatric sickle cell patients on chronic erythrocytapheresis compared to chronic simple transfusions.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Shannon Kelly; Garcia, Alicia; Hagar, Ward; Gildengorin, Ginny; Quirolo, Keith; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2012-12-01

    Erythrocytapheresis (ECP), automated red blood cell exchange, is increasingly being used for chronic transfusion therapy in sickle cell disease (SCD) as it is an isovolumetric transfusion, is more effective in lowering hemoglobin (Hb)S, and can limit iron overload. Because ECP requires increased blood exposure compared to simple transfusions there is concern for increased transfusion complications, including alloimmunization. We compared alloimmunization rates between patients receiving simple or exchange chronic transfusions. Data were retrospectively collected for 45 SCD patients (n = 23 simple, n = 22 ECP) on a chronic transfusion program as of December 2010 to determine the rate of antibody formation (antibodies formed per 100 units transfused). The 45 patients received 10,949 units and formed six new alloantibodies during the study period (1994-2010); therefore, the overall alloimmunization rate was 0.055 alloantibodies per 100 U. There were three antibodies formed in three patients on ECP, one allo (anti-rh(i) ) and two autoantibodies. There were six antibodies in four patients on a simple transfusion program, five allo (anti-Le(a) , M, D, C, and Kp(a) ) and one autoantibody. The ECP group received significantly more blood (338.5 units/patient vs. 152.2 units/patient, p = 0.001). The rate of antibody formation (auto plus allo) was 0.040 antibodies per 100 U in the ECP group and 0.171 antibodies per 100 U in the simple transfusion group (p = 0.04). The alloantibodies formed per 100 units was 0.013 in the ECP group and 0.143 in the simple transfusion group (p = 0.03). Chronic ECP should be considered in patients requiring optimal management of HbS levels and iron burden. Concerns about increased alloimmunization with ECP may be unjustified. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. Red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients awaiting kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Silvia Fernandes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Gláucia Maria; da Silva, Sonia Leite; Alves, Tânia Maria de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Ilana Farias; Ribeiro, Thyciana Rodrigues; Cavalcante, Maria do Carmo Serpa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients with chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplantation. Methods In this cross-sectional and prospective study, the serum of 393 chronic kidney disease patients on a transplant waiting list in Ceará, Northeastern Brazil were tested for red cell and leukocyte antibodies. In addition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Results The average age in the sample of 393 patients was 34.1 ± 14 years. Slightly more than half (208; 52.9%) were male. The average numbers of transfusions and gestations were 3.1 ± 3.3 and 1.6 ± 6, respectively. One third (33.6%) were alloimmunized: 78% with leukocyte antibodies, 9.1% with red cell antibodies and 12.9% with both. Red cell antibodies were detected in 29 cases (7.4%), 17 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001). The most frequently detected red cell antibodies belonged to the Rh (24.1%) and Kell (13.8%) blood group systems. Leukocyte antibodies were detected in 30.5% of cases, 83 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001) and were more reactive to panel reactive antibodies (p-value < 0.0001). The mean alloreactivity to panel reactive antibodies was 47.7 ± 31.2%. Conclusion Chronic kidney disease patients on the transplant waiting list in Ceará, Brazil, display high rates of red cell (7.4%) and leukocyte (30.5%) alloimmunization. In this sample, alloimmunization was significantly associated with the number of transfusions and gender. PMID:23904808

  6. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Desai, Payal C; Deal, Allison M; Pfaff, Emily R; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M; Park, Yara A; Ataga, Kenneth I

    2015-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14-27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71-7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66-35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding.

  7. Alloimmunization to red cells in thalassemics: emerging problem and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Richa; Singh, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Bharat; Rusia, Usha

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the magnitude of red cell alloimmunization in regularly transfused patients with thalassemia major and analyse factors responsible for development of antibodies. This cross sectional study was conducted on 116 thalassemics receiving regular transfusions. All the patients underwent antibody screening. Patients with positive antibody screen were further tested for antibody identification. The data was analysed to find out the frequency, pattern and factors influencing red cell alloimmunization secondary to multiple transfusions. Mean age of the patients was 14 years (range 1.5-27 years). Red cell alloantibodies were found in 11 patients (9.48%). In four (36%) patients first transfusion was given before 6 months of age and in seven (64%) patients, first transfusion was given after two years of age. The interval between consecutive transfusions varied from 18 to 35 days. The most common antibody was Anti-E found in 4 (36.4%) patients, followed by Anti-K (three patients, 27.2%), Anti-Kp(a) (two patients, 18.2%) and Anti-C(w) (two patients, 18.2%). The interval from first transfusion to antibody development varied from 1.5 to 14 years. None of the eight out of 116 patients, who underwent splenectomy showed any antibody development. The rate of red cell alloimmunization was found to be 9.48% in thalassemics receiving regular transfusions. The incidence of alloantibody development was higher if first transfusion was received at more than 2 years of age. Early institution of red cell transfusions and Rh and Kell phenotyping followed by provision of matched blood could prevent alloimmunization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Rh (D) alloimmunization and pregnancy. Analysis of the causes after prophylaxis introduction].

    PubMed

    Furundarena, J R; Ibisate, A; Burguete, Y; González de Langarica, E; González, N; Urquiza, R; Mendizabal, A; Hernando, N; Pérez Clausell, C

    1999-12-01

    Prenatal and postnatal prophylaxis of the Rh (D) haemolytic disease of the newborn have clearly reduced the number of cases but still there are alloimmunizations. All cases detected in our Hospital in the last 24 years have been reviewed and possible causes analyzed. From a total of 10,332 deliveries in Rh (D) negative women we have detected 114 anti-D in 86 women. In 74 women anti-D was the only antibody and in 12 there were more antibodies. Data were managed in 3-year periods and we see a progressive decrease in the incidence of alloimmunization with a minimum of 0.03 per 1000 pregnancies in the period 89-91 and a posterior progression to an incidence of 0.12 in the last 3-year period 95-97. The causes were: pregnancies before 1970 in 31, incorrect prophylaxis in 12, despite a correct prophylaxis in 6, previous pregnancies without complete information about the prophylaxis in 13, previous transfusion in 6, previous pregnancies or transfusion in 8 and indetermined in 10. It is desirable to reduce at minimum the number of Rh (D) alloimmunizations by strictly following the prophylaxis protocols.

  9. Immune modulation and lack of alloimmunization following transfusion with pathogen-reduced platelets in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Rachael P; Muench, Marcus O; Heitman, John W; Inglis, Heather C; Law, Jacqueline P; Marschner, Susanne; Goodrich, Raymond P; Norris, Philip J

    2013-11-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic blood products can lead to alloimmunization, impacting success of subsequent transfusions and solid organ transplants. Pathogen reduction using riboflavin and ultraviolet B (UVB) light has been shown to eliminate the immunogenicity of white blood cells (WBCs) in vitro through down regulation of surface adhesion molecules, effectively blocking cell-cell conjugation and direct presentation. We sought to determine if this loss of immunogenicity is extended in vivo where indirect presentation of allogeneic antigens can occur. BALB/cJ mice were transfused with either untreated or riboflavin and UVB-treated C57Bl/6J platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing WBCs. Circulating alloantibody and allospecific splenocyte cytokine responses were measured. Pathogen reduction of allogeneic WBC-enriched PRP using riboflavin and UVB light before transfusion prevented alloimmunization, with a loss of both alloantibody generation and priming of secondary cytokine responses ex vivo. When mice given treated transfusions were subsequently given untreated transfusions, they produced normal levels of alloantibodies but had reduced secondary cytokine responses ex vivo. This immune modulation was antigen specific and was dependent on the presence of WBCs in the treated product. UVB plus riboflavin treatment of WBC-enriched PRP effectively blocks alloimmunization and modulates immune responses to subsequent exposures. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Thrombocytopenia in hypertensive disease of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Habas, Elmukhtar; Rayani, Amnna; Ganterie, Ramadan

    2013-04-01

    Thrombocytopenia is defined as a platelet count of less than 150 × 10(3) μl. It is commonly diagnosed and has attracted more interest from the researchers in pregnant women during the last 20 years, especially in hypertensive pregnant women. To assess the incidence of thrombocytopenia in hypertensive pregnant women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Five hundred forty-four pregnant women were included in this study from a total of 10,272 admitted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Tripoli Medical Center during January-August 2007. Frequent blood pressure monitorings and full blood counts were performed in several medical follow ups. They were not known to be HBV, HCV, or HIV positive women before pregnancy, and none was reported to have evidence of HBV, HCV, or HIV upon performing HBs-Ag, anti-HCV antibody, or HIV-antigen positive tests. Data were arranged in Excel Microsoft program version 2010, and statistically analyzed by SPSS windows program version 17. Five hundred and forty-four women were hypertensive according to WHO hypertension definition criteria. Sixty-seven women had only one reading of high blood pressure, while 39 women fulfilled HELP syndrome criteria (hemolysis elevated liver enzymes low platelet). These 39 women were excluded from the study. Therefore, only 438 pregnant women remained eligible for the study. The mean age was (32.56 ± 1.5), with their ages ranging between 18 and 49 years. Most of the included women were primigravida 179 (39 %), gravid 2, para one were 72 (16.4 %), and the rest were gravid 3 or more (42.6 %). The blood pressure was 140-160/90-110 mmHg in 365 women (83.4 %), and 73 women (16.7 %) had blood pressure readings more than 160/110 mmHg. Mean platelets count was (206.49 × 10(3)/μl ± 3.35), and ranged between (41.0 - 449.0 × 10(3)/μl). Thrombocytopenia (less than 150 × 10(3)/μl) was recorded in 103 women (23.5 %). All pregnancy cases were delivered safely with no fetal

  11. Thrombocytopenia and Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, Valeria; Bettini, Laura R; Barboni, Chiara; Cereda, Anna; Mariani, Milena; Spinelli, Marco; Gervasini, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Biondi, Andrea; Jankovic, Momcilo; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the cohesion complex and its regulators. The syndrome is characterized by multiple organ system abnormalities, pre- and post-natal growth retardation and typical facial features. Thrombocytopenia is a reduction in platelet count to <150 × 10(9)  L. It can be caused by congenital or acquired decreased production, increased destruction, or sequestration of platelets. In recent years, several papers reported thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenia in patients affected by CdLS. In 2011, Lambert et al. estimated the risk of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura in CdLS patients to be 31-633 times greater than in the general population. We describe the incidence of thrombocytopenia in 127 Italian CdLS patients, identifying patients with transient or persistent thrombocytopenia, but a lower incidence of true idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

  12. Corticosteroids compared with intravenous immunoglobulin for the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongmei; Shehata, Nadine; Ye, Xiang Y; Gregorovich, Sandra; De France, Bryon; Arnold, Donald M; Shah, Prakesh S; Malinowski, Ann Kinga

    2016-09-08

    Treatment options for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in pregnancy are limited, and evidence to guide management decisions is lacking. This retrospective study of singleton pregnancies from 2 tertiary centers compared the effectiveness of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and corticosteroids in treatment of ITP. Data from 195 women who had 235 pregnancies were reviewed. Treatment was not required in 137 pregnancies (58%). Of the remaining 98 pregnancies in 91 women, 47 (48%) were treated with IVIg and 51 were treated with corticosteroids as the initial intervention. Mean maternal platelet count at birth did not differ between groups (IVIg 69 × 10(9)/L vs corticosteroids 77 × 10(9)/L; P = .71) nor did the proportion of mothers who achieved a platelet count response (IVIg 38% vs corticosteroids 39%; P = .85). There were no fatal or severe maternal, fetal, or neonatal hemorrhages. Of 203 neonates in whom platelet counts were available, 56 (28%) had a birth platelet count <150 × 10(9)/L and 18 (9%) had platelet counts <50 × 10(9)/L. Nadir platelet counts for most affected neonates occurred at birth, although for some neonates, nadir platelet counts occurred up to 6 days postnatally. Intracranial hemorrhage was noted in 2 neonates (nadir platelet counts were 135 and 18 × 10(9)/L). There were no neonatal deaths. The majority of pregnant women with a history of ITP did not require treatment, and neonatal outcomes were comparable for mothers who received IVIg or corticosteroids for treatment of maternal ITP. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Persistent thrombocytopenia in a case of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, N D; Carter, G K

    1991-09-15

    Persistent thrombocytopenia was detected in a horse with equine infectious anemia (EIA). The thrombocytopenia was considered to be immune-mediated, developing secondary to infection with EIA virus. Epistaxis, petechial hemorrhages, subcutaneous hematomas, and edema resolved after treatment with corticosteroids; however, the owners requested that the mare by euthanatized because of infection with EIA virus. Although clinical signs attributable to immune-mediated thrombocytopenia may resolve with appropriate treatment, horses with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia secondary to EIA have a guarded to grave prognosis, because of the risk of recurrence and transmission of the EIA virus.

  14. Estimation of combat-related blood group alloimmunization and delayed serologic transfusion reactions in U.S. military veterans.

    PubMed

    Tormey, Christopher A; Stack, Gary

    2009-05-01

    The goals of this study were to estimate blood group alloimmunization arising from combat-related transfusion and the prevalence of delayed serologic transfusion reactions (DSTRs) in military veteran patients. Blood group alloantibodies documented in the transfusion records at a Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center were categorized according to whether they developed before ("pre-existing") or during ("hospital-acquired") VA care and whether they were associated with anamnestic immune responses. Combat-related alloantibodies were estimated by adding anamnestic to pre-existing antibodies, revealing that 256 veterans made 322 combat-related alloantibodies. The combat-related alloimmunization rate was 1.37% (256/18,750), and combat-related alloantibodies represented 55.8% (322/577) of total alloantibodies. The highest rate of combat-related alloimmunization was observed in World War II-era veterans. Approximately 11.2% (25/224) of veterans with hospital-acquired antibodies experienced a DSTR due to prior alloimmunization. In conclusion, combat-related alloimmunization accounted for more than half of antibodies in military veterans and was a predisposing factor for DSTRs.

  15. Thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and role of platelet transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jayashree; Suryavanshi, Moushumi

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The study was designed to find out the incidence of thrombocytopenia in leptospirosis and to correlate thrombocytopenia with other parameters like renal failure, hepatic failure and bleeding manifestation like adult respiratory distress syndrome and to assess the role of platelet transfusion. Materials and Methods: 50 cases of leptospirosis during the month of July and August 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Criteria for selection were Lepto Tek Dri - dot test positive cases of the clinically suspected cases of Leptospirosis. Degree of thrombocytopenia was categorized as severe, moderate and mild. Presence of thrombocytopenia was clinically correlated with parameters like renal dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction and hemorrhagic manifestations (mainly ARDS). Role of platelet transfusion was assessed with reference to presence and degree of thrombcytopenia and hemorrhagic manifestations. Results: Out of total 50 patients 26 were male and 24 were females. Major bleeding manifestation in the form of ARDS was seen in 15 (30%) of patients. 28 (56%) patients had thrombocytopenia and 22 (44%) patients had normal platelet counts. Total number of patients with renal dysfunction was 24 (48%). Only four (18.18%) patients with normal platelet counts had renal dysfunction while 20 (71.42%) patients with thrombocytopenia had renal dysfunction. Only two (9.09%) patients with normal platelet counts and 48 (46.42%) patients with thrombocytopenia had hepatorenal dysfunction. Total number of patients with ARDS was 15 (30%). Of these two (13.33%) had normal platelet count while 13 (86.6%) patients were thrombocytopenic. Total 47 units of platelets were transfused to 12 patients in our study. Of these seven patients with severe thrombocytopenia required total 28 units, two patients with moderate thrombocytopenia required total seven units and patients with mild thrombocytopenia were transfused total 12 units of platelets. Conclusion: It is important to anticipate and recognize

  16. Quetiapine-induced leucopenia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Shankar, B Ravi

    2007-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs can cause neutropenia, which can progress to life-threatening agranulocytosis if drug therapy is not interrupted. The newer atypical antipsychotics are reputedly without adverse hematological effects. Quetiapine is a recently introduced atypical antipsychotic. It is a dibenzothiazepine derivative and shows similarities with clozapine in that it is characterized by high 5-HT(2)-relative-to-DA(2) receptor affinity. Although adverse effects are usually mild, the author reports here a case of leucocytopenia and thrombocytopenia with quetiapine treatment that required its discontinuation.

  17. Gammaherpesvirus latency induces antibody-associated thrombocytopenia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael L.; Burkum, Claire E.; Lanzer, Kathleen G.; Roberts, Alan D.; Pinkevych, Mykola; Itakura, Asako; Kummer, Lawrence W.; Szaba, Frank M.; Davenport, Miles P.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Woodland, David L.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Blackman, Marcia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesviruses establish lifelong latency. Viral recrudescence can lead to the development of cancers, immunoproliferative disorders, transplantation complications, and thrombocytopenia. Although platelet-specific autoantibodies have been reported in patients infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the mechanisms by which thrombocytopenia is induced remain unclear, as do the relative contributions of lytic viral replication and latent viral gene expression. The human gammaherpesviruses are tightly restricted in their ability to infect other mammals, so they are difficult to study in live animal models. Here we show that infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV68), a rodent-specific pathogen closely related to EBV, induces the production of platelet-binding antibodies and causes thrombocytopenia. Infection of antibody-deficient mice does not lead to thrombocytopenia, indicating the platelet decrease is mediated by antibody. Additionally, infection with a latency-null recombinant γHV68 does not induce thrombocytopenia, suggesting factors associated with viral latency drive the infection-induced antibody-mediated thrombocytopenia. These studies describe an important animal model of gammaherpesvirus-induced autoimmune thrombocytopenia and demonstrate that this pathology is mediated by antibody and dependent on viral latency. This model will allow studies of the underlying mechanisms of disease progression and the testing of therapeutic strategies for the alleviation of virus-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:23245703

  18. A difficult diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma due to immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Silvia; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Magro, Gaetano; D'Amico, Salvatore; La Spina, Milena; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Meli, Mariaclaudia; Moscheo, Carla; Russo, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a rare clinical presentation of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma with immune thrombocytopenia. Diagnostic biopsy of the abdominal mass was performed after administration of intravenous immunoglobulins, steroids, and platelet transfusion. Concomitant thrombocytopenia complicated the whole diagnosis work up and the initial management of neoplasia. PMID:25838909

  19. When and how to treat childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer D

    2016-06-16

    Childhood immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune process resulting in an isolated thrombocytopenia that puts the child at risk for bleeding and can negatively impact quality of life. Pharmacologic intervention aims to stabilize the platelet count, with the goal of achieving hemostasis and maximizing health-related quality of life.

  20. Management of thrombocytopenia due to liver cirrhosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Beppu, Toru; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Baba, Hideo

    2014-03-14

    Thrombocytopenia is a common complication in liver disease and can adversely affect the treatment of liver cirrhosis, limiting the ability to administer therapy and delaying planned surgical/diagnostic procedures because of an increased risk of bleeding. Multiple factors, including splenic sequestration, reduced activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin, bone marrow suppression by chronic hepatitis C virus infection and anti-cancer agents, and antiviral treatment with interferon-based therapy, can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia in cirrhotic patients. Of these factors, the major mechanisms for thrombocytopenia in liver cirrhosis are (1) platelet sequestration in the spleen; and (2) decreased production of thrombopoietin in the liver. Several treatment options, including platelet transfusion, interventional partial splenic embolization, and surgical splenectomy, are now available for severe thrombocytopenia in cirrhotic patients. Although thrombopoietin agonists and targeted agents are alternative tools for noninvasively treating thrombocytopenia due to liver cirrhosis, their ability to improve thrombocytopenia in cirrhotic patients is under investigation in clinical trials. In this review, we propose a treatment approach to thrombocytopenia according to our novel concept of splenic volume, and we describe the current management of thrombocytopenia due to liver cirrhosis.

  1. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  2. A novel RNAseq-assisted method for MHC class I genotyping in a non-model species applied to a lethal vaccination-induced alloimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Demasius, Wiebke; Weikard, Rosemarie; Hadlich, Frieder; Buitkamp, Johannes; Kühn, Christa

    2016-05-17

    MHC class I genotyping is essential for a wide range of biomedical, immunological and biodiversity applications. Whereas in human a comprehensive MHC class I allele catalogue is available, respective data in non-model species is scarce in spite of decades of research. Taking advantage of the new high-throughput RNA sequencing technology (RNAseq), we developed a novel RNAseq-assisted method (RAMHCIT) for MHC class I typing at nucleotide level. RAMHCIT is performed on white blood cells, which highly express MHC class I molecules enabling reliable discovery of new alleles and discrimination of closely related alleles due to the high coverage of alleles with reads. RAMHCIT is more comprehensive than previous methods, because no targeted PCR pre-amplification of MHC loci is necessary, which avoids preselection of alleles as usually encountered, when amplification with MHC class I primers is performed prior to sequencing. In addition to allele identification, RAMHCIT also enables quantification of MHC class I expression at allele level, which was remarkably consistent across individuals. Successful application of RAMHCIT is demonstrated on a data set from cattle with different phenotype regarding a lethal, vaccination-induced alloimmune disease (bovine neonatal pancytopenia), for which MHC class I alleles had been postulated as causal agents.

  3. HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele is primarily associated with the Diego a alloimmunization in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Baleotti, Wilson; Ruiz, Marcelo Ortega; Fabron, Antonio; Castilho, Lilian; Giuliatti, Silvana; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The Diego blood group presents a major polymorphic site at Residue 854, causing a proline (Di(b) antigen) to leucine (Di(a) antigen) substitution. Di(a) alloimmunization has been observed among Asian and Native South American populations. Considering that Brazilians represent a genetically diverse population, and considering that we have observed a high incidence of Di(a) alloimmunization, we typed HLA-DRB1 alleles in these patients and performed in silico studies to investigate the possible associated mechanisms. We studied 212 alloimmunized patients, of whom 24 presented immunoglobulin G anti-Di(a) , 15 received Di(a+) red blood cells and were not immunized, and 1008 were healthy donors. HLA typing was performed using commercial kits. In silico analyses were performed using the TEPITOPEpan software to identify Diego-derived anchor peptide binding to HLA-DRB1 molecules. Residue alignment was performed using the IMGT/HLA for amino acid identity and homology analyses. HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele was overrepresented in Di(a) -alloimmunized patients compared to nonimmunized patients and to healthy donors. Two motifs were predicted to be potential epitopes for Di(a) alloimmunization, the WVVKSTLAS motif was predicted to bind several HLA-DR molecules, and the FVLILTVPL motif exhibited highest affinity for the HLA-DRB1*07:01 molecule. Pocket 4 of the DRB1*07:01 molecule contained specific residues not found in other HLA-DRB1 molecules, particularly those at Positions 13(Y), 74(Q), and 78(V). Individuals carrying the HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele present an increased risk for Di(a) alloimmunization. The identification of susceptible individuals and the knowledge of potential sensitization peptides are relevant approaches for transfusion care, diagnostic purposes, and desensitization therapies. © 2014 AABB.

  4. Rh(O)D immune globulin products for prevention of alloimmunization during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Samuel L; Tichy, Eric M

    2015-02-15

    The pharmacologic properties of Rhesus (Rh) immune globulin (RhIG) and clinical data on its effectiveness in preventing Rh-antigen alloimmunization in pregnant women are reviewed. RhIG is a human plasma derivative that targets red blood cells (RBCs) positive for Rh(O) antigen (also called D antigen). In the United States and other countries, the widespread use of RhIG has markedly reduced the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), a devastating condition caused by D-antigen sensitization of a pregnant woman via exposure to fetal RBCs (usually during detachment of the placenta in labor) that results in a maternal immune response leading to severe hemolysis in the fetus. Routine administration of RhIG at 26-30 weeks' gestation and again within 72 hours of delivery has been shown to be highly effective in preventing maternal Rh alloimmunization, with very low rates of D-antigen sensitization (in the range of 0-2.2%) reported in multiple studies of at-risk women. The four RhIG products currently available in the United States have common clinical indications but differ in certain attributes. Pharmacists can play an important role in guiding other clinicians on the rationale for the use of RhIG, important differences between products, and appropriate timing of RhIG therapy. Routine administration of RhIG to women at risk for Rh alloimmunization is clinically effective and has made HDFN a rare clinical event. The available RhIG products are not the same and should be carefully reviewed to ensure that they are administered safely. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Severe Rh alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus managed with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin and intrauterine transfusion: A case report.

    PubMed

    Houston, Brett L; Govia, Rachelle; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M; Reid, Gregory J; Hadfield, Marie; Menard, Chantalle; Noyd, Jocelyn; Main, Susan; Zarychanski, Ryan

    2015-12-01

    Rh alloimmunization remains a potentially devastating complication of pregnancy, with fetal anemia causing hydrops and intrauterine death. Intrauterine transfusion is the standard treatment, but is particularly dangerous before 20 weeks gestation. When the need for intrauterine transfusion is anticipated early in pregnancy, immune-modulating therapies such as plasmapheresis and IVIG have been used to delay transfusion to a later gestational age. We report a 35-year-old G5P1 Rh(D)-negative woman with severe Rh alloimmunization managed successfully with sequential plasmapheresis, intravenous immune globulin and intrauterine transfusion. The optimal plasmapheresis treatment protocol and incremental benefit of IVIG remains unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Rh alloimmunization in pregnant women, a look to diagnosis and therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Lambertino, José R; Villegas, Silvia M

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the onset of immunoglobulin antiD, many of the fetuses of mothers negative for the antigen "D" developing severe disease, history of prenatal diagnosis of alloimmunization is the perfect example of constructive effort by a diagnosis in order to identify cases in need of therapy to decrease morbidity and increase survival with the least number of invasive procedures and reducing the risks associated with them. Today it is difficult to determine the true prevalence of the disease in our environment, but the understanding of the pathophysiology has helped the evolution of diagnostic tests and better treatment approach to positively impact the evolution of the disease.

  7. Pattern and prevelence of alloimmunization in multiply transfused patients with sickle cell disease in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kangiwa, Umar; Ibegbulam, Obike; Ocheni, Sunday; Madu, Anazoeze; Mohammed, Ndakosu

    2015-01-01

    Blood transfusion is central in the prevention and treatment of certain chronic complications of sickle cell disease. It is indispensible in correcting anaemias as well as in the practice of exchange blood transfusion. These gains are largely limited by formation of allo-antibodies. Several studies demonstrated varying frequencies of allo-immunization in various patient groups. The effect of the racial differences between the donor and recipient pool, which has been subsumed in this study, has continuously created a confounding effect on the results of previous studies. This study was aimed at determining the pattern and frequency of allo-immunization in multiply transfused sickle cell patients, in a racially matched donor and recipient population. This was a cross-sectional case-controlled study involving 80 Nigerian sickle cell disease patients who had received three or more units of packed red cells in the within 4 weeks of the study and 40 controls (who were SCD that had not been transfused in their life time). Antibody screening and identification was done using the Diamed microtyping system. Frequency of allo-immunization was determined to be 18.7 % (15/80) among the previously transfused and 5 % (15/120) in all sickle cell disease patients. Auto-antibodies were detected in 1.25 % of the study group and 2.5 % of the control, and all reacted with the Kell and Lutheran blood group antigens. The pattern of allo-antibodies found showed; 46.7 % Rhesus, 40 % Kell, while Lutheran and Duffy 13.3 %, each. Sickle cell disease patients are particularly susceptible to development of allo-antibodies despite racial similarities between the donor and recipient population. The most common allo-antibodies are Rhesus, Kell and Lutheran and Duffy respectively in order of decreasing frequency. Development of auto-antibodies seems to be independent of blood transfusion in sickle cell disease with possibly different pathogenetic mechanism. Policy on extended red cell

  8. Jacobsen syndrome without thrombocytopenia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoğlu, Burçin; Donma, M Metin; Nişli, Kemal; Paketçi, Cem; Karasu, Erkut; Ozdilek, Burcu; Mintaş, Nuriye Ece

    2013-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JS), a rare disorder with multiple dysmorphic features, is caused by the terminal deletion of chromosome 11q. Typical features include mild to moderate psychomotor retardation, trigonocephaly, facial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, and thrombocytopenia, though none of these features are invariably present. The estimated occurrence of JS is about 1/100,000 births. The female/male ratio is 2:1. The patient admitted to our clinic at 3.5 years of age with a cardiac murmur and facial anomalies. Facial anomalies included trigonocephaly with bulging forehead, hypertelorism, telecanthus, downward slanting palpebral fissures, and a carp-shaped mouth. The patient also had strabismus. An echocardiogram demonstrated perimembranous aneurysmatic ventricular septal defect and a secundum atrial defect. The patient was <3rd percentile for height and weight and showed some developmental delay. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensive gliotic signal changes in periventricular cerebral white matter, and leukodystrophy was suspected. Chromosomal analysis of the patient showed terminal deletion of chromosome 11. The karyotype was designated 46, XX, del(11) (q24.1). A review of published reports shows that the severity of the observed clinical abnormalities in patients with JS is not clearly correlated with the extent of the deletion. Most of the patients with JS had short stature, and some of them had documented growth hormone deficiency, or central or primary hypothyroidism. In patients with the classical phenotype, the diagnosis is suspected on the basis of clinical findings: intellectual disability, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis must be confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. For patients who survive the neonatal period and infancy, the life expectancy remains unknown. In this report, we describe a patient with the clinical features of JS without thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported from Turkey.

  9. Thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients with severe clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Eric M; Moses, Maggie C; Park, Lawrence P; Woods, Christopher W; Arepally, Gowthami M

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea and colitis. The incidence and prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia as related to mode of acquisition (hospital vs. community), NAP1/027 strain, and disease severity has not been examined. We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of all adult inpatients from 2013 to 2014 diagnosed with CDI during their hospitalization to document the incidence/prevalence of thrombocytopenia and associated outcomes. Severe disease was defined by a composite endpoint of inpatient death, death within 30 days of discharge, presence of septic shock, or need for colectomy during hospitalization. Of the 533 patients diagnosed with CDI, moderate thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100 × 10(9)/L at time of CDI diagnosis) was present in 15 % of the total cohort and incident thrombocytopenia developed in 3 % of patients after admission. Thrombocytopenia was more common in hospital-acquired disease and associated with increased length of stay, but was not associated with treatment failure. Those with moderate thrombocytopenia were more likely to have severe disease, after controlling for white blood cell count, albumin, and creatinine. Moderate thrombocytopenia is associated with poor prognosis and is a potential risk stratification tool for severe CDI.

  10. Risk factors for ganciclovir-induced thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Shigemi, Akari; Ikawa, Kazuro; Kanazawa, Naoko; Fujisaki, Yuko; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Ganciclovir is a nucleoside guanosine analogue that exhibits therapeutic activity against human cytomegalovirus infection, and is primarily excreted via glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion. The adverse effects induced by ganciclovir therapy are generally of a hematological nature and include thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Low marrow cellularity and elevated serum creatinine have been identified as risk factors for ganciclovir-induced neutropenia. However, the risk factors for thrombocytopenia have yet to be determined. Therefore, this study investigated patients administered ganciclovir to determine the risk factors for thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Thrombocytopenia occurred in 41 of these patients (30.6%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified three independent risk factors for thrombocytopenia: cancer chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR)=3.1), creatinine clearance (<20 mL/min) (OR=12.8), and the ganciclovir dose (≥12 mg/kg/d) (OR=15.1). Leukopenia occurred in 36 patients (28.6%), and white blood cell count (<6000 cells/mm(3)) (OR=3.7) and the ganciclovir dose (≥12 mg/kg/d) (OR=7.8) were identified as risk factors. These results demonstrated that several factors influenced the occurrence of ganciclovir-induced thrombocytopenia and leukopenia, and suggest that special attention should be paid to patients receiving cancer chemotherapy with a low creatinine clearance (<20 mL/min) and high dose (≥12 mg/kg/d) in order to avoid ganciclovir-induced thrombocytopenia.

  11. A novel canine model of immune thrombocytopenia: has immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) gone to the dogs?

    PubMed

    LeVine, Dana N; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Brooks, Marjory B; Nordone, Shila K; Bellinger, Dwight A; Jones, Sam L; Fischer, Thomas H; Oglesbee, Stephen E; Frey, Kahlina; Brinson, Nicole S; Peters, Allison P; Marr, Henry S; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Bussel, James B; Key, Nigel S

    2014-10-01

    Canine immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is analogous to human ITP, with similar platelet counts and heterogeneity in bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. With a goal of ultimately investigating this bleeding heterogeneity, a canine model of antibody-mediated ITP was developed. Infusion of healthy dogs with 2F9, a murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody to the canine platelet glycoprotein GPIIb (a common target of autoantibodies in ITP) resulted in profound, dose-dependent thrombocytopenia. Model dogs developed variable bleeding phenotypes, e.g. petechiae and haematuria, despite similar degrees of thrombocytopenia. 2F9 infusion was not associated with systemic inflammation, consumptive coagulopathy, or impairment of platelet function. Unexpectedly however, evaluation of cytokine profiles led to the identification of platelets as a potential source of serum interleukin-8 (IL8) in dogs. This finding was confirmed in humans with ITP, suggesting that platelet IL8 may be a previously unrecognized modulator of platelet-neutrophil crosstalk. The utility of this model will allow future study of bleeding phenotypic heterogeneity including the role of neutrophils and endothelial cells in ITP. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune Thrombocytopenia and Obesity: Predictive Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Ehab; Pakra, Mohammed Al

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic refractory immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is defined as the failure of any modality to maintain the platelet count above 20 × 103/μL for an appreciable time without unacceptable toxicity. To date, certain predictive factors have been associated with refractory ITP. However, none of the published studies has declared the possible association between obesity and refractory ITP. Case Reports: We present the cases of 3 children with ITP who failed to achieve remission on different therapeutic approaches including rituximab, vincristine, and romiplostim. The 3 children had obesity as a common feature. Conclusion: We present these cases to propose a possible association between obesity and refractoriness of ITP to different therapeutic approaches and to emphasize the need for further study to establish whether a causal relationship exists. PMID:28331458

  14. [Current treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Lozano, María L; Vicente, Vicente

    2014-05-06

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia, also termed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by premature platelet destruction and impaired platelet production. Traditional treatment of ITP has predominantly consisted of immune suppression and/or modulation. However, the understanding of the immune mediated impairment of platelet production has led to the development of new treatments that target the thrombopoietin receptor, promoting formation of megakaryocytes and increasing platelet counts. Best practice for the management of ITP has not yet been established because data from comparative studies are lacking. While some disagreement might still remain among experts concerning therapy (when, who, and how should be treated), in recent years different evidence-based practice guidelines have been published to assist healthcare professionals in the diagnosis and treatment of ITP. This review describes the current treatment landscape of ITP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Alarmins and Their Receptors as Modulators and Indicators of Alloimmune Responses.

    PubMed

    Matta, B M; Reichenbach, D K; Blazar, B R; Turnquist, H R

    2017-02-01

    Cell damage and death releases alarmins, self-derived immunomodulatory molecules that recruit and activate the immune system. Unfortunately, numerous processes critical to the transplantation of allogeneic materials result in the destruction of donor and recipient cells and may trigger alarmin release. Alarmins, often described as damage-associated molecular patterns, together with exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns, are potent orchestrators of immune responses; however, the precise role that alarmins play in alloimmune responses remains relatively undefined. We examined evolving concepts regarding how alarmins affect solid organ and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes and the mechanisms by which self molecules are released. We describe how, once released, alarmins may act alone or in conjunction with nonself materials to contribute to cytokine networks controlling alloimmune responses and their intensity. It is becoming recognized that this class of molecules has pleotropic functions, and certain alarmins can promote both inflammatory and regulatory responses in transplant models. Emerging evidence indicates that alarmins and their receptors may be promising transplantation biomarkers. Developing the therapeutic ability to support alarmin regulatory mechanisms and the predictive value of alarmin pathway biomarkers for early intervention may provide opportunities to benefit graft recipients. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize target HLA specificities expressed on cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, J; Nakajima, F; Kamada, H; Tadokoro, K; Nagai, T; Satake, M

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, which are involved in the development of transfusion-related side effects such as transfusion-related lung injury, are sometimes found in males without a history of alloimmunization (eg, transplantation and transfusion). Whether HLA antibodies in male donors can interact with their target HLA specificities expressed on cells have not been completely investigated. The HLA antibodies detected in 7 male donors were characterized. Flow cytometry and immunocomplex capture fluorescence analysis were performed to evaluate the ability of these antibodies to bind with target HLA specificities expressed on cells. The association of these antibodies with complement was examined using anti-C1q antibody. Sustainability of HLA antibodies over time was compared in 26 male vs 57 female donors. The antibodies from all 7 donors recognized intact HLA molecules coated onto microbeads. The antibodies in 2 of 7 donors also recognized their target HLA specificities expressed on cells. Furthermore, the antibodies in one of these 2 donors showed HLA specificities that involved complement binding. Twenty-one of 26 initially positive male donors had turned negative for HLA antibody at least 1 year after their initial positive screening, whereas HLA antibody positivity was maintained for a long time in most female donors. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize their target HLA specificities on cells and that could potentially modify molecular events in affected cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Risk and prognosis of adult primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Henrik; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Nørgaard, Mette

    2012-04-01

    Adult immune thrombocytopenia was previously considered a benign disease affecting young people and with a low risk of severe bleeding. This view was challenged by studies published during the past decade, as the median age of adult immune thrombocytopenia patients has been found to be 55-60 years and the incidence increases with age. Recent studies reported that mortality and morbidity are increased compared with the general population. In this review, we describe patient-specific factors associated with the outcome of disease, the clinical course of immune thrombocytopenia including the potential adverse impact of some treatments and finally the overall prognosis.

  18. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, Shandong Province, China, 2011.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hong-Ling; Zhao, Li; Zhai, Shenyong; Chi, Yuanyuan; Cui, Feng; Wang, Dongxu; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Yan; Yu, Hao; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease in China. The incidence and clinical and laboratory characteristics of SFTS are not clearly defined. During May 22-October 2, 2011, a total of 24 patients with fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia were clinically diagnosed as having SFTS in Yiyuan County, Shandong Province, China. We conducted laboratory tests for these SFTS patients. SFTS virus (SFTSV) infection was confirmed in 22 patients by using reverse transcription PCR and ELISA by acute-phase and convalescent-phase serum samples. Clinical and laboratory manifestations included fever (100%), gastrointestinal symptoms (91%), myalgia (55%), chills (41%), thrombocytopenia (100%), and leukopenia (95%).

  19. The Influence of Clinical and Biological Factors on Transfusion-Associated Non-ABO Antigen Alloimmunization: Responders, Hyper-Responders, and Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Gehrie, Eric A; Tormey, Christopher A

    2014-11-01

    In the context of transfusion medicine, alloimmunization most often refers to the development of antibodies to non-ABO red blood cell (RBC) antigens following pregnancy, transfusion, or transplantation. The development of RBC alloantibodies can have important clinical consequences, particularly in patients who require chronic transfusions. It has been suggested that alloimmunization is more common in some clinical circumstances and patient populations than in others. As such, individuals that develop alloantibodies are frequently referred to as 'responders' in the medical literature. In contrast, individuals that do not develop alloantibodies despite repeated exposures to non-self blood group antigens have been referred to as 'non-responders'. The purpose of this article is to review the phenomenon of RBC alloimmunization in the context of responders and non-responders to: i) establish a basic framework for alloimmunization as reported across several diverse patient populations; ii) more fully explore literature reports which support the concept of responders/non-responders regarding blood group antigen alloimmunization; iii) summarize the mechanisms that have been shown to predispose an individual to alloimmunization to determine how these factors may differentiate 'responders' from 'non-responders'; and iv) briefly discuss some practical approaches to prevent alloimmunization in patients who may be prone to alloantibody development.

  20. Fetal and neonatal anemia associated with anti-Jr(a) : a case report showing a poorly hemolytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Naoko; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Nagamine, Keisuke; Oshida, Machiko; Kashiwagi, Hirokazu; Koyama, Shinsuke; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Tadashi

    2011-08-01

    Although recently published case reports suggest the significance of Jr(a) alloimmunization in the obstetric setting, the involved mechanism still remains unclear. Here we report a case of severe fetal and neonatal anemia associated with anti-Jr(a) alloimmunization, which was successfully managed using Doppler assessment of peak systolic velocity of the fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA-PSV). A Japanese woman with anti-Jr(a) (titer 1024) was referred to our department at 20 weeks' gestation. As fetal MCA-PSV exceeded 1.5 multiple of median, labor was induced and a female neonate of 1998 g was delivered vaginally at 33 weeks and 5 days of gestation. The infant's hematocrit and hemoglobin levels were 25.4% and 82 g/L, respectively, but her total bilirubin level (15 µmol/L; 0.9 mg/dL) and reticulocyte counts (4.5%) were low. During the course, the infant showed no apparent signs of hemolysis. Jr(a) alloimmunization should be recognized as a possible cause of fetal anemia with no direct hemolytic process. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2011 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Neonatal jaundice.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Pat

    2012-06-01

    Neonatal jaundice lasting greater than 2 weeks should be investigated. Pale stools and dark or yellow urine are evidence of liver disease, which should be urgently investigated. The neonatal hepatitis syndrome has many causes, and a structured approach to investigation is mandatory. It should be possible to confirm or exclude biliary atresia within one week, so that definitive surgery is not delayed unnecessarily. Babies with the neonatal hepatitis syndrome should have vigorous fat-soluble vitamin supplementation, including parenteral vitamin K if coagulation is abnormal. The prognosis for infants with idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and multifactorial cholestasis is excellent.

  2. Neonatal anemia.

    PubMed

    Aher, Sanjay; Malwatkar, Kedar; Kadam, Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Neonatal anemia and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal anemia can be due to blood loss, decreased RBC production, or increased destruction of erythrocytes. Physiologic anemia of the newborn and anemia of prematurity are the two most common causes of anemia in neonates. Phlebotomy losses result in much of the anemia seen in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW). Accepting a lower threshold level for transfusion in ELBW infants can prevent these infants being exposed to multiple donors.

  3. A Case of Fenofibrate-Induced Immune Thrombocytopenia: First Report.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Dimitris I; Massa, Eleni V

    2015-09-01

    Fenofibrate is widely prescribed as a hypolipidemic drug and is well tolerated by most patients. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed severe immune thrombocytopenia while on fenofibrate treatment. Clinical features included spontaneous bruising on the feet and hands, a purpuric rash, and menorrhagia. All the laboratory results were normal except for the finding of isolated thrombocytopenia. The subsequent evolution was favorable after fenofibrate removal and with the administration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) plus corticosteroids. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is briefly reviewed, and a possible mechanism responsible for causing this side effect of fenofibrate is suggested. This is the first reported case of fenofibrate-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

  4. Thrombocytopenia, Platelet Transfusion, and Outcome Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jun Liong; Hisamuddin, Syafiah Hanis; O'Sullivan, Aoife; Chan, Grace; McCormick, P Aiden

    2016-05-01

    Thrombocytopenia affects patients undergoing liver transplantation. Intraoperative platelet transfusion has been shown to independently influence survival after liver transplantation at 1 and 5 years. We examined the impact of thrombocytopenia and intraoperative platelet transfusion on short-term graft and overall survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). A total of 399 patients undergoing first OLT were studied. Graft and overall survival in patients with different degrees of thrombocytopenia and with or without intraoperative platelet transfusion were described. The degree of thrombocytopenia prior to OLT did not affect graft or overall survival after transplant. However, graft survival in patients receiving platelets was significantly reduced at 1 year (P= .023) but not at 90 days (P= .093). Overall survival was significantly reduced at both 90 days (P= .040) and 1 year (P= .037) in patients receiving platelets. We conclude that a consistently lower graft and overall survival were observed in patients receiving intraoperative platelet transfusion.

  5. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Presenting with Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang-Bum; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging febrile illness. While many kinds of severe complications including acute renal failure have been reported, rhabdomyolysis is rarely reported in association with SFTS. A 54-year-old female farmer was admitted with fever and diffuse myalgia. Laboratory finding showed thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, azotemia, extremely elevated muscle enzyme levels and myoglobinuria. We describe a fatal case of rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure complicated by SFTS. PMID:28271645

  6. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated to thrombocytopenia: an issue to consider?

    PubMed Central

    De Keukeleire, Steven; Muylle, Kristoff; Tsoumalis, Georgios; Vermeulen, Stefan; Vogelaers, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Summary Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is probably the most common endocrine disorder of the parathyroid glands, causing hypercalcemia. It is diagnosed often in persons with elevated serum calcium levels. However, hematological manifestations, such as thrombocytopenia are less known. In this case we describe the possible association of PHPT with reversible thrombocytopenia after parathyroidectomy. This hematological abnormality can be included in the spectrum of possible causes, including seemingly non-specific symptoms, in the decision tree towards surgical assessment. PMID:28740534

  7. Prevalence of Thrombocytopenia and Its Association with Serum Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Lu, Leihong; Zhan, Yiqiang; Yu, Jinming; Sui, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of thrombocytopenia and its association with serum magnesium in a nationally representative cohort. A total of 8478 participants aged 18 years and over were recruited in a cross-sectional survey. Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet count less than 150 × 10(9)/L. Multivariable logistic regression models were applied to examine the association between serum magnesium and thrombocytopenia. The prevalence of thrombocytopenia in total was 16.5% with 18.8% for men and 14.4% for women (P < 0.0001), respectively. Compared with men in the first quartile of serum magnesium, the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for those in the second, third, and fourth quartiles of serum magnesium were 0.96 (0.75, 1.21), 0.78 (0.62, 0.98), and 0.82 (0.65, 1.04), respectively, after adjusting for multiple confounders. Likewise, the corresponding ORs (95% CIs) were 0.80 (0.63, 1.01), 0.79 (0.62, 0.99), and 0.65 (0.51, 0.84) in women. When serum magnesium was treated as a continuous variable, each one standard deviation increase of magnesium was associated with 12 and 8% lower risk of thrombocytopenia in men and women, respectively. Serum magnesium was inversely associated with thrombocytopenia, and the association was slightly different in men compared with that in women.

  8. Eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia leading to acute stent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Döme A; Bokori, György; Faluközy, József; Bujáky, Csaba; Fogarassy, György; Veress, Gábor; Aradi, Dániel

    2016-04-01

    A 71-year old female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 3 h of symptom onset. She was preloaded with 300 mg aspirin and 600 mg clopidogrel before PCI. Coronary angiogram showed occlusion of the right coronary artery. During PCI, eptifibatide was initiated due to the large thrombus burden. Few hours after the procedure, on eptifibatide infusion, a severe drop in platelet count was observed (from 210,000/μl to 35,000/μl) and the infusion was discontinued. One hour later, still under eptifibatide effect and with severe thrombocytopenia, acute stent thrombosis developed. Lack of prior heparin exposure, quick onset of thrombocytopenia made heparin induced thrombocytopenia improbable that was later excluded by specific immunoassay. However, platelet function testing suggested that eptifibatide induced thrombocytopenia was mediated by activating autoantibodies since platelet reactivity was paradoxically very high at the time of stent thrombosis but decreased radically with eptifibatide washout. The patient was successfully managed without further complications on the basis of platelet function data obtained in the subsequent days. This rare subtype of thrombocytopenia highlights that not only platelet count but also platelet function should be closely monitored in case of severe thrombocytopenia to better balance bleeding and thrombosis.

  9. The pathophysiology of thrombocytopenia in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Oscar; Feldman, David M; Diakow, Marla; Sigal, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the most common hematological abnormality encountered in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). In addition to being an indicator of advanced disease and poor prognosis, it frequently prevents crucial interventions. Historically, thrombocytopenia has been attributed to hypersplenism, which is the increased pooling of platelets in a spleen enlarged by congestive splenomegaly secondary to portal hypertension. Over the past decade, however, there have been significant advances in the understanding of thrombopoiesis, which, in turn, has led to an improved understanding of thrombocytopenia in cirrhosis. Multiple factors contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia and these can broadly be divided into those that cause decreased production, splenic sequestration, and increased destruction. Depressed thrombopoietin levels in CLD, together with direct bone marrow suppression, result in a reduced rate of platelet production. Thrombopoietin regulates both platelet production and maturation and is impaired in CLD. Bone marrow suppression can be caused by viruses, alcohol, iron overload, and medications. Splenic sequestration results from hypersplenism. The increased rate of platelet destruction in cirrhosis also occurs through a number of pathways: increased shear stress, increased fibrinolysis, bacterial translocation, and infection result in an increased rate of platelet aggregation, while autoimmune disease and raised titers of antiplatelet immunoglobulin result in the immunologic destruction of platelets. An in-depth understanding of the complex pathophysiology of the thrombocytopenia of CLD is crucial when considering treatment strategies. This review outlines the recent advances in our understanding of thrombocytopenia in cirrhosis and CLD. PMID:27186144

  10. Thrombopoietin: a potential diagnostic indicator of immune thrombocytopenia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Yajing; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Panpan; Jing, Fangmiao; Kong, Zhangyuan; Zhou, Hai; Qiu, Jihua; Li, Lizhen; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether the serum thrombopoietin levels in pregnancy-associated immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) differ from those in gestational thrombocytopenia, and reveal the possibility of thrombopoietin serving as a marker for differential diagnosis. Serum thrombopoietin concentration was determined in ITP in pregnancy (n = 35), gestational thrombocytopenia (n = 31), healthy pregnancy (n = 32), age-matched nonpregnant ITP (n = 32) and nonpregnant healthy controls (n = 35) by ELISA. The serum thrombopoietin level of ITP in pregnancy (1283 ± 646 pg/mL) was significantly higher than gestational thrombocytopenia (187 ± 64 pg/mL) (P < 0.01), although the platelet counts of these two disorders may overlap. Twenty-nine of 35 patients with ITP in pregnancy had thrombopoietin values >500 pg/mL, whereas none of the gestational thrombocytopenia patients' thrombopoietin levels exceeded 500 pg/mL. In addition, ITP in pregnancy presented a markedly higher thrombopoietin level than nonpregnant ITP (88 ± 41 pg/mL) (P < 0.01), indicating that the pathogenesis of pregnant and nonpregnant ITP was different. Our findings suggest that measurement of serum thrombopoietin concentration provides valuable diagnostic information for differentiating ITP in pregnancy from gestational thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin represents a reliable marker for ITP in pregnancy. PMID:26840092

  11. Thrombopoietin: a potential diagnostic indicator of immune thrombocytopenia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Yajing; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Panpan; Jing, Fangmiao; Kong, Zhangyuan; Zhou, Hai; Qiu, Jihua; Li, Lizhen; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-02-16

    To evaluate whether the serum thrombopoietin levels in pregnancy-associated immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) differ from those in gestational thrombocytopenia, and reveal the possibility of thrombopoietin serving as a marker for differential diagnosis. Serum thrombopoietin concentration was determined in ITP in pregnancy (n = 35), gestational thrombocytopenia (n = 31), healthy pregnancy (n = 32), age-matched nonpregnant ITP (n = 32) and nonpregnant healthy controls (n = 35) by ELISA. The serum thrombopoietin level of ITP in pregnancy (1283 ± 646 pg/mL) was significantly higher than gestational thrombocytopenia (187 ± 64 pg/mL) (P < 0.01), although the platelet counts of these two disorders may overlap. Twenty-nine of 35 patients with ITP in pregnancy had thrombopoietin values >500 pg/mL, whereas none of the gestational thrombocytopenia patients' thrombopoietin levels exceeded 500 pg/mL. In addition, ITP in pregnancy presented a markedly higher thrombopoietin level than nonpregnant ITP (88 ± 41 pg/mL) (P < 0.01), indicating that the pathogenesis of pregnant and nonpregnant ITP was different. Our findings suggest that measurement of serum thrombopoietin concentration provides valuable diagnostic information for differentiating ITP in pregnancy from gestational thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin represents a reliable marker for ITP in pregnancy.

  12. A novel in vivo regulatory role of P-glycoprotein in alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Atsushi; Schatton, Tobias; Frank, Natasha Y.; Ueno, Takuya; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Pendse, Shona S.; Margaryan, Armen; Grimm, Martin; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Frank, Markus H.

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is required for adaptive immunity through defined functions in T cell activation and antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation. The potential role of P-gp as an in vivo regulator of alloimmunity is currently unknown. Here we show that P-gp blockade prolongs graft survival in a murine heterotopic cardiac allotransplantation model through in vivo inhibition of the T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine IFN-γ and the Th2 product IL-4, and via downregulation of the APC-expressed positive costimulatory molecule CD80. In vitro, the P-gp antagonist PSC833, a non-calcineurin-inhibitory cyclosporine A analogue, specifically inhibited cellular efflux of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 in wild-type CD3+ T cells and MHC class II+ APCs but not their P-gp knockout counterparts that lacked rhodamine-123 efflux capacity. Additionally, P-gp blockade significantly inhibited murine alloimmune T cell activation in a dose-dependent fashion. In vivo, P-gp blockade significantly prolonged graft survival in Balb/c recipients of C57BL/6 cardiac allografts from 8.5±0.5 to 11.7±0.5 days (P<0.01), similar in magnitude to the effects of monotherapy with cyclosporine A. Moreover, P-gp blockade, compared to controls, attenuated intragraft expression of CD3 and CD80, but not CD86, and inhibited IFN-γ and IL-4 production (P<0.05). In the setting of systemic CD86 inhibition, P-gp blockade suppressed IFN-γ and IL-4 production significantly further (to 98%and 89% inhibition, respectively) compared to either P-gp or anti-CD86 blockade alone, and markedly prolonged allograft survival compared to anti-CD86 blockade alone (40.5±4.6 vs. 22.5±2.6 days, respectively, P<0.01). Our findings define a novel in vivo regulatory role of P-gp in alloimmunity and identify P-gp as a potential therapeutic target in allotransplantation. PMID:20230790

  13. [Neonatal dengue in Peru: a case report].

    PubMed

    Silva Delgado, Hermann; Ruiz Ríos, Juan Carlo; Vela Barbarán, Erick Leray; Rengifo Del Aguila, Deicy; García M, María; Rodríguez Benavides, Luis; Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    We present the case of a full-term female newborn, whose mother died seven days postpartum from multi-organ failure due to severe dengue confirmed by NS1 antigen detection and positive IgM. The newborn did not have any complication, but at the fourth day of life she developed fever, jaundice, signs of plasma leakage, thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, ascitis, and others signs of systemic inflammation response syndrome. She fully recovered with supportive treatment. The RT-PCR test of a peripheral blood sample revealed a positive result for the dengue virus serotype 2, confirming the first case of neonatal dengue reported in Peru.

  14. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  15. Mycophenolate mofetil therapy for severe immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alice; Neave, Lucy; Solanki, Shalini; Westwood, John Paul; Terrinonive, Ilaria; McGuckin, Siobhan; Kothari, Jaimal; Cooper, Nichola; Stasi, Roberto; Scully, Marie

    2015-11-01

    Severe immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) presents a clinical challenge. Second-line treatment options are variable without a precise protocol. We present 46 severe ITP patients treated with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), retrospectively identified from three London teaching hospitals. Data was collected on patient demographics, co-morbidities and previous treatment strategies. Our key interest was whether there was a sustained response in platelet count to MMF. Patients included 27 males and 19 females whose ages ranged from 19 to 93 years old (median 52·5 years). Twenty-nine had primary ITP and 17 had secondary ITP, a third of whom had viral-associated disease. The standard dose of MMF was 1 g/day. Twenty-four patients (52%) responded with 15 (33%) achieving a complete response. No active viral-associated ITP patients demonstrated a response to MMF, although numbers were small (n = 4). We were not able to demonstrate a difference between responders and non-responders based on gender, age, previous therapies or time since diagnosis of ITP. Three of four previously splenectomized patients responded, two achieving complete response. We conclude that MMF is a useful steroid-sparing immunosuppressant to be considered in the second-line or later treatment of ITP.

  16. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Gessner, J Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît; Vestweber, Dietmar; Goerge, Tobias

    2015-07-27

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients.

  17. Prevalence of primary immune thrombocytopenia in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Deirdra R; Beebe, Laura A; Neas, Barbara R; Vesely, Sara K; Segal, Jodi B; George, James N

    2012-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in Oklahoma regardless of age, clinical characteristics, insurance status, and source of health care. Patients with ITP were identified by the administrative code ICD-9-CM 287.3 in Oklahoma hematologists' offices for a 2-year period, 2003-2004. Prevalence was estimated separately for children (<16 years old) and adults because of their distinct clinical characteristics. Oklahoma census data for 2000 was used as the denominator. Eighty-seven (94%) of 93 eligible Oklahoma hematologists participated; 620 patients with ITP were identified. The average annual prevalences were as follows: 8.1 (95% CI: 6.7-9.5) per 100,000 children, 12.1 (95% CI: 11.1-13.0) per 100,000 adults, and 11.2 (95% CI: 10.4-12.0) per 100,000 population. Among children and adults less than age 70 years, the prevalence was greater among women. Among adults aged 70 years and older, the prevalence was greater among men. The highest prevalence of ITP was among men age 80 years and older. These data document for the first time the prevalence of ITP regardless of age, clinical characteristics, insurance status, and source of health care. The methodology developed for this prevalence analysis may be adaptable for epidemiologic studies of other uncommon disorders which lack specific diagnostic criteria and are treated primarily by medical specialists. Am. J. Hematol. 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-05-17

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA.

  19. Effect of Persistent Thrombocytopenia on Mortality in Surgical Critical Care Patients: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qin; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Li, Guanwei; Anjum, Nadeem; Hu, Dong; Li, Yuan; Wu, Xiuwen; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Yunzhao; Li, Jieshou

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common among surgical critically ill patients. The relationship between the duration of thrombocytopenia and mortality is not well studied. This retrospective 12-month cohort study was designed to evaluate the association between persistent thrombocytopenia and mortality among surgical critically ill patients to determine the risk factors for persistent thrombocytopenia. The study included adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) at our institution. Patients with a diagnosis of thrombocytopenia were identified from a prospective critical care database. We defined patients with persistent thrombocytopenia as those with thrombocytopenia lasting more than 7 consecutive days. The primary outcome of this study was 28-day mortality and the secondary outcomes were lengths of SICU stay and hospital stay. Fifty-one patients experienced persistent thrombocytopenia and 71 experienced nonpersistent thrombocytopenia. Among patients with persistent thrombocytopenia, mortality was significantly higher, and SICU and hospital stays were longer than those with nonpersistent thrombocytopenia. Risk factor analysis failed to predict which patients with thrombocytopenia would develop into persistent thrombocytopenia. Persistent thrombocytopenia is a clinically significant disorder and is associated with poorer outcomes. Future studies are needed to further define this process.

  20. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life and Behavioral Functioning after Intrauterine Transfusion for Alloimmune Anemia.

    PubMed

    van Klink, Jeanine M M; Lindenburg, Irene T M; Inklaar, Marloes J; Verduin, Esther; Koopman, Hendrik M; van Kamp, Inge L; Schonewille, Henk; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    To assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and behavioral functioning in children and adolescents treated before birth with intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion for alloimmune anemia. Cross-sectional cohort study conducted at the Dutch referral center for the management of fetal alloimmune anemia. Follow-up data were available for 285 children at a mean age of 10.5 years (range, 3-21.5 years) with a response rate for questionnaires of 97%. Child-, adolescent-, and parent-rated HRQOL was evaluated with The Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research Child/Adult Quality of Life Questionnaire (TACQOL/TAAQOL). Parents reported on behavioral functioning with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Scores were compared with Dutch norm data. Significantly lower scores were reported by parents of children 6-11 years of age compared with Dutch norms on 3 scales: cognitive functioning, social functioning, and positive emotions (P < .00, P = .02, and P = .04). In children aged 8-11 years only the cognitive functioning scale score was significantly lower compared with Dutch norms (P = .01). The children aged 12-15 years reported higher scores on the negative emotions scale (P = .02). When corrected for multiple testing, only the parent-rated cognitive functioning scale remained significant (P < .001). Regarding the HRQOL scores of adolescents aged ≥16 years, no differences were detected. Overall, behavioral difficulties were reported in 37/246 (15%) children aged 3-16 years, and were associated with maternal educational levels (P < .001). Parents reported lower scores on cognitive functioning in their children aged 6-11 years compared with norms. Behavioral difficulties were more prevalent than norms, and were associated with maternal educational level. Outcomes of children after intrauterine intravascular blood transfusion were quite good overall. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neonatal medications.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert M; Stiers, Justin; Buchi, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is reaching epidemic proportions related to perinatal use of opioids. There are many approaches to assess and manage NAS, including one we have outlined. A standardized approach is likely to reduce length of stay and variability in practice. Circumcision is a frequent, painful procedure performed in the neonatal period. The rationale for providing analgesia is presented as well as a review of methods. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics have expanded our understanding of diseases and their drug therapy. Some applications of pharmacogenomics to the neonatal period are presented, along with pediatric challenges of developmental expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  3. Thrombocytopenia in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Sumit; Upadhyay, Smrity; Banjade, Rashmi; Dhakal, Prajwal; Khanal, Nabin; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major problem. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, with auto-immunogenicity, direct bone marrow suppression, hypersplenism, decreased production of thrombopoietin and therapeutic adverse effect all contributing to thrombocytopenia in different measures. The greatest challenge in the care of chronic HCV patients with thrombocytopenia is the difficulty in initiating or maintaining IFN containing anti-viral therapy. Although at present, it is possible to avoid this challenge with the use of the sole Direct Antiviral Agents (DAAs) as the primary treatment modality, thrombocytopenia remains of particular interest, especially in cases of advanced liver disease. The increased risk of bleeding with thrombocytopenia may also impede the initiation and maintenance of different invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. While eradication of HCV infection itself is the most practical strategy for the remission of thrombocytopenia, various pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic options, which vary in their effectiveness and adverse effect profiles, are available. Sustained increase in platelet count is seen with splenectomy and splenic artery embolization, in contrast to only transient rise with platelet transfusion. However, their routine use is limited by complications. Different thrombopoietin analogues have been tried. The use of synthetic thrombopoietins, such as recombinant human TPO and pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMDGF), has been hampered by the development of neutralizing antibodies. Thrombopoietin-mimetic agents, in particular, eltrombopag and romiplostim, have been shown to be safe and effective for HCV-related thrombocytopenia in various studies, and they increase platelet count without eliciting any immunogenicity Other treatment modalities including newer TPO analogues-AMG-51, PEG-TPOmp and AKR-501, recombinant

  4. Platelets for neonatal transfusion - study 2: a randomised controlled trial to compare two different platelet count thresholds for prophylactic platelet transfusion to preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Curley, Anna; Venkatesh, Vidheya; Stanworth, Simon; Clarke, Paul; Watts, Timothy; New, Helen; Willoughby, Karen; Khan, Rizwan; Muthukumar, Priya; Deary, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is a common and important clinical problem in preterm neonates. A trial assessing clinically relevant outcomes in relation to the different platelet count thresholds used to trigger transfusion has never been undertaken in preterm neonates with severe thrombocytopenia. Platelets for Neonatal Transfusion - Study 2 (PlaNeT-2) aims to assess whether a higher prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold is superior to the lower thresholds in current standard practice in reducing the proportion of patients who have a major bleed or die up to study day 28. PlaNeT-2 is a two-stage, randomised, parallel-group, superiority trial. PlaNet-2 compares clinical outcomes in preterm neonates (<34 weeks' gestation at birth) randomised to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions to maintain platelet counts at or above either 25 × 10(9)/l or 50 × 10(9)/l. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of patients who either die or experience a major bleed up to and including study day 28. A total of 660 infants will be randomised. This trial will help define optimal platelet transfusion support for severely thrombocytopenic preterm neonates by evaluating the risks and benefits of two different prophylactic neonatal platelet transfusion thresholds. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and thrombocytopenia in the pregnant hispanic population.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Aaron; Wing, Deborah A; Ouzounian, Joseph G; Miller, David A; Lee, Richard H

    2012-12-01

    An association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and thrombocytopenia has been demonstrated in the literature in a non-pregnant population. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not there is a similar association in the third trimester of pregnancy in a Hispanic population. This is a secondary analysis of 82 pregnant Hispanic women with and without hyperemesis gravidarum who underwent serologic evaluation for H. pylori IgG. Results of complete blood counts obtained in the third trimester were analysed for thrombocytopenia. Of the 82 subjects who had H. pylori testing, 54 subjects had both serum H. pylori IgG results and third trimester platelet levels. The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was 11.1% (6/54). Thirty-six subjects were seropositive for H. pylori IgG and 18 subjects were seronegative. Of the 36 subjects who were H. pylori seropositive, four (11.1%) developed thrombocytopenia compared to three of 18 (16.7%) H. pylori seronegative subjects (P = 0.67). There was no difference between the groups in their mean platelet values (205 K/cu mm vs. 212 K/cu mm, P = 0.69). In this limited study, we found no association between H. pylori and thrombocytopenia in the pregnant Hispanic population.

  6. Megakaryocyte impairment by eptifibatide-induced antibodies causes prolonged thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Fuerll, Birgitt; Zinke, Heike; Müllejans, Bernd; Krüger, William; Michetti, Noemi; Motz, Wolfgang; Schwertz, Hansjörg

    2009-08-06

    Glycoprotein (GP) IIbIIIa inhibitors are used in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes. Transient immune-mediated acute thrombocytopenia is a recognized side effect of GPIIbIIIa inhibitors. We provide evidence that GPIIbIIIa inhibitor-induced antibodies can affect megakaryocytes in the presence of eptifibatide. In a patient with acute coronary syndrome, acute thrombocytopenia occurred after a second exposure to eptifibatide 20 days after the initial treatment. Despite the short half-life of eptifibatide (t(1/2) = 2 hours), thrombocytopenia less than 5 x 10(9)/L and gastrointestinal and skin hemorrhage persisted for 4 days. Glycoprotein-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed eptifibatide-dependent, GPIIbIIIa-specific antibodies. Bone marrow examination showed predominance of early megakaryocyte stages, and platelet transfusion resulted in an abrupt platelet count increase. Viability of cultured cord blood-derived megakaryocytes was reduced in the presence of eptifibatide and patient IgG fraction. These findings can be explained by impaired megakaryocytopoiesis complicating anti-GPIIbIIIa antibody-mediated immune thrombocytopenia. This mechanism may also apply to some patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenia.

  7. Thrombocytopenia: diagnosis with flow cytometry and antiplatelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guerra, João Carlos de Campos; Kanayama, Ruth Hissae; Nozawa, Sonia Tsukasa; Ioshida, Márcia Regina; Takiri, Irina Yoko; Lazaro, Robson José; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Rosenfeld, Luiz Gastão Mange; Guerra, Celso Carlos de Campos; Bacal, Nydia Strachman

    2011-06-01

    To identify antiplatelet antibodies by flow cytometry (direct method) in patients with thrombocytopenia. Between January 1997 and March 2004 a total of 15100 patients were referred to the Centro de Hematologia de São Paulo for hematological investigation of several diagnoses (anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, adenomegaly, leukemia and others). Of those, 1057 were referred because of thrombocytopenia and were divided into two groups: Group Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, with no identifiable cause; and Group Other thrombocytopenia, which included low normal platelet counts cause to be established, hepatitis C and HIV infection, hypersplenism, EDTA-induced artifacts, laboratory error, and other causes. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping was done in 115 cases to identify platelet autoantibodies (direct method). Of the total number of patients, 1057 (7%) presented low platelet counts, 670 were females (63.4%) and age range of one to 75 years. Of the 115 cases (9.7%) submitted to immunophenotyping, the results were positive in 40% and the test was inconclusive in 5%. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was found in 52% of patients, more often in women. Hepatitis C virus infection was found in 7% and HIV infection in 1%. Low normal platelet counts were found in 17%, laboratory errors in 6%, and laboratory artifacts in 1% of cases. Platelet autoantibodies were found in 76.9% of all idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura cases. It was negative in 83.3% of the low normal counts. antiplatelet autoantibodies when present help to diagnose idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. When absent, suggest other causes of thrombocytopenia.

  8. Cefepime-associated thrombocytopenia in a critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Lim, Phin Phin; Chong, Chee Ping; Aziz, Noorizan Abdul

    2011-12-01

    Cefepime-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare adverse event (incidence <1.0%), based on data from clinical trials. However, there is limited post-marketing surveillance documentation on thrombocytopenia associated with cefepime. We describe a 45-year-old male who was admitted to the intensive care unit after allegedly being hit by a large metal bar in the right upper chest and shoulder. Rhabdomyolysis secondary to the trauma, pneumothorax, acute renal failure, and nosocomial sepsis were subsequently diagnosed. Four days after intravenous cefepime initiation, the patient developed thrombocytopenia with platelet count dropping from 102 × 10(3)/μL to 15 × 10(3)/μL. Cefepime was discontinued and the platelet count normalized to 140 × 10(3)/μL after 6 days. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a possible relationship between the patient's thrombocytopenia and cefepime therapy. Although cefepime-induced thrombocytopenia is rare, clinicians should be alert to this potential adverse effect among critically ill patients.

  9. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  10. French retrospective multicentric study of neonatal hemochromatosis: importance of autopsy and autoimmune maternal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Heissat, Sophie; Bouvier, Raymonde; Fabre, Monique; Baruteau, Julien; Broue, Pierre; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Debray, Dominique; Debiec, Hanna; Ronco, Pierre; Guigonis, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare disease that causes fetal loss and neonatal death in the 1st weeks of life and is one of the most common causes of liver failure in the neonate. The diagnosis is mostly made retrospectively, based on histopathologic features of severe liver fibrosis associated with hepatic and extrahepatic siderosis. Several etiologies may underlie this phenotype, including a recently hypothesized gestational alloimmune disease. Fifty-one cases of liver failure with intrahepatic siderosis in fetuses and neonates were analyzed retrospectively. Maternal and infant data were collected from hospitalization and autopsy reports. All available slides were reviewed independently by 3 pathologists. Immunologic studies were performed on maternal sera collected immediately after delivery. The diagnosis of neonatal haemochromatosis was retained in 33 cases, including 1 case with Down syndrome and 1 case with myofibromas. Liver siderosis was inversely proportional to fibrosis progression. In fetuses, iron storage was more frequent in the thyroid than in the pancreas. Perls staining in labial salivary glands was positive in 1 of 5 cases. Abnormal low signal intensity by magnetic resonance imaging was detected in the pancreas in 2 of 7 cases. Renal tubular dysgenesis was observed in 7 of 23 autopsy cases. Chronic villitis was seen in 7 of 15 placentas. Half of the mothers presented with an autoimmune background and/or autoantibodies in their sera. Our work highlights the importance of autopsy in cases of neonatal hemochromatosis and marshals additional data in support of the hypothesis that neonatal hemochromatosis could reflect maternal immune system dysregulation.

  11. Neonatal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P G; Anninos, P; Kotini, A; Koutlaki, N; Garas, A; Galazios, G

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the validity of magnetocardiography (MCG) in the estimation of neonatal cardiac rhythm using a single channel superconductive quantum interference device (SQUID). Our study population consisted of 50 neonates who were delivered normally between 37-41 weeks of gestation from clinically uncomplicated pregnancies. There was also a neonate included in the study in which the diagnosis of "hypoplastic left heart syndrome" was demonstrated by U/S Doppler examination. Maternal age ranged from 18 to 39 years (mean=29.15, SD=6.13). Our study results revealed 44 neonates with normal cardiac rhythm, four with ventricular tachycardia (VT), one with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and extrasystolic beats and one with bradycardia. The neonate with the hypoplastic left heart syndrome presented frequent episodes of ventricular bigeminy in the magnetocardiographic trace. M-mode echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of the seven cases of arrhythmia in our study group. Results gained from the study lead us to believe that MCG could provide clinical practice with a non-invasive, rapid and easy to perform method, which could be used as an adjunct to conventional methods for the evaluation of neonatal cardiac rhythm.

  12. Specificity and isotype of Rh specific antibodies produced by human B-cell lines established from alloimmunized Rh negative women.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Roya Payam Khaja; Bahrami, Zahra Samadi; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Ramzi, Fereshteh; Razavi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Fazel

    2005-10-01

    Despite the successful outcome of anti-D prophylaxis program, alloimmunization still occurs. The aim of this study was to examine the specificity and isotype of anti-Rh antibodies in plasma samples of Rh negative alloimmunized individuals and to study the same parameters in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from the same donors. Specificity of anti-Rh antibodies was determined in plasma of nine alloimmunized subjects by direct hemagglutination using a panel of known RBC genotypes and isotype of specific antibodies were identified by an antigen specific ELISA. Similar methods were employed to determine specificity and isotype of antibodies produced by Rh specific LCLs established from four donors. LCLs were generated by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from each donor followed by their culture over a feeder of human fetal fibroblasts. Upon emergence of lymphoblastoid cells, culture supernatants were assayed for presence of Rh specific antibody by hemagglutination assay. Anti-D was the predominant antibody in both plasma samples and among the 128 established LCLs; however, antibodies to other Rh specificities namely C and E were also produced. The isotype of anti-Rh antibody in all plasma samples was found to be IgG, predominantly IgG1, combined in 7 samples with IgM. Similarly 76%, 9.2% and 14.8% of LCLs were determined to produce antibody of IgG, IgM and of both isotypes, respectively. The data supported that the D antigen is the immunodominant component of the Rh system as indicated by the in vitro and in vivo profiles of Rh specificities in our alloimmunized subjects.

  13. Quinine-induced thrombocytopenia following intravenous use of heroin

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, D.J.; Walker, R.H.; Kolins, M.D.; Wilner, F.M.; Aster, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a 22-year-old man after intravenous use of heroin. A high-titer, quinine-dependent, platelet-specific antibody was detected in his serum using lysis of normal platelets labeled with chromium 51 and an electroimmunoassay for measurement of platelet-associated IgG. The antibody was specific for quinine and failed to react with platelets in the presence of quinidine hydrochloride or two structural analogues of heroin. Quinine, a common adulterant found in heroin, was detected in the patient's blood and urine. On the basis of these observations, the patient was judged to have quinine-induced immunologic thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first to confirm that quinine used as an adulterant can induce immunologic thrombocytopenia following an injection of heroin.

  14. Severe Thrombocytopenia During Dolutegravir-containing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakaharai, Kazuhiko; Miyajima, Makiko; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Akihiro; Hosaka, Yumiko; Horino, Tetsuya; Hori, Seiji

    2017-08-15

    A 56-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and cytomegalovirus infection presented with thrombocytopenia after starting antiretroviral therapy, which included dolutegravir (DTG). Although good control of the human immunodeficiency virus and cytomegalovirus infections was achieved, the patient's thrombocytopenia persisted. The patient's platelet count decreased to ≤50,000/μL even after the cessation of valganciclovir, which can cause bone marrow suppression. At five months after starting antiretroviral therapy, DTG was replaced by ritonavir-boosted darunavir. Soon after, his platelet count improved and was maintained at a level of >100,000/μL. This is the first reported case of severe thrombocytopenia during DTG-containing antiretroviral therapy.

  15. Severe thrombocytopenia in hantavirus-induced nephropathia epidemica.

    PubMed

    Latus, J; Kitterer, D; Segerer, S; Artunc, F; Alscher, M D; Braun, N

    2015-02-01

    Nephropathia epidemica is a milder form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, caused by Puumala virus. The clinical picture is characterized by a rapid loss of renal function (acute kidney injury) and thrombocytopenia. The purpose of the current analysis was to compare the clinical course of patients presenting with or without severe thrombocytopenia. In 47 out of 456 patients with acute nephropathia epidemica, the nadir count of thrombocytes was available for the acute course of the disease. The clinical course of these patients was further analyzed. No major bleeding (e.g., intracranial bleeding or gastrointestinal bleeding) occurred in either group. Creatinine peak levels were higher and proteinuria was more frequently present in the severely thrombocytopenic group. In conclusion, severe thrombocytopenia is common in nephropathia epidemica and is associated with a more severe course of the disease; however, bleeding complications are rare.

  16. Causes of thrombocytopenia in chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

    PubMed

    Osada, Makoto; Kaneko, Makoto; Sakamoto, Minoru; Endoh, Masumi; Takigawa, Koichi; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu; Satoh, Kaneo; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-06-01

    We retrospectively studied 89 patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including 50 chronic hepatitis (CH) cases, 18 liver cirrhosis (LC) cases, and 21 LC with hepatocellular carcinoma (LC + HCC) cases, with regard to various factors related with thrombocytopenia. The platelet count decreased with the stage advancement of liver diseases. Multiple regression analysis revealed that splenomegaly and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were explanatory variables that correlated with thrombocytopenia. Splenomegaly appears to be the most responsible factor, although there are a considerable number of thrombocytopenic cases without splenomegaly, suggesting other factors may also be responsible. The vWF level is inversely correlated with the platelet count. Soluble thrombomodulin, a marker of endothelial dysfunction, increases with the advancement of liver fibrosis. It is positively correlated with vWF and inversely with the platelet count. Our present results imply that vascular endothelial dysfunction is also involved in thrombocytopenia during chronic HCV infection.

  17. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; Kaliszewski, James; Marques, Marisa B; Saif, M Wasif; Nabelle, Lisle; Blank, Jules; McFarland, Janice G; Aster, Richard H

    2006-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia developing in the course of chemotherapy for malignant disease is usually attributed to drug-induced marrow suppression and/or marrow replacement by tumor. We describe two patients who developed severe thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic symptoms while being treated with oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and leukovorin for metastatic colon cancer in whom platelet destruction appears to have been caused by oxaliplatin-dependent antibodies specific for the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex (alpha(IIb)/beta(3) integrin). Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) should be considered in patients who experience a sudden, isolated drop in platelet levels while being treated with chemotherapeutic agents, especially when adequate numbers of megakaryocytes are present in the bone marrow.

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S.; Phalen, E.; Threatte, G.; Londe, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications of radiation-induced hemopoietic suppression by acute thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Immediately before or after exposure to sublethal irradiation, mice were given a single injection of anti-mouse platelet serum (APS), normal heterologous serum, neuraminidase (N'ase), or saline, or no further treatment was provided. Hemopoiesis was evaluated by blood cell counts, hematocrits, and incorporation of (75Se)selenomethionine into platelets. APS and N'ase induced an acute thrombocytopenia from which there was partial recovery before the platelet count started to fall from the radiation. During the second post-treatment week, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis were greater in mice that received APS or N'ase in addition to radiation than in control irradiated mice. Differences in leukopoiesis were not apparent. Therefore, both thrombocytopoiesis and erythropoiesis appeared to be responsive to a stimulus generated by acute thrombocytopenia in sublethally irradiated mice.

  19. Relapsed hydroxychloroquine induced thrombocytopenia in a systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    PubMed

    Antón Vázquez, Vanesa; Pascual, Luis; Corominas, Héctor; Giménez Torrecilla, Isabel

    Hydroxychloroquine is used in the long-term therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although considered to be a safe treatment, side effects have been documented. An uncommon side effect is thrombocytopenia. In order to establish the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia secondary to Hydroxychloroquine, non-pharmacological causes must be ruled out and it is necessary to determine a recurrence after re-exposure to the drug. We present one case of severe thrombocytopenia occurring in a patient with SLE undergoing treatment with Hydroxychloroquine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. [Prevention of Rh (D) alloimmunization in Rh (D) negative women in pregnancy and after birth of Rh (D) positive infant].

    PubMed

    L'ubuský, M; Procházka, M; Krejcová, L; Vetr, M; Santavý, J; Kudela, M

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this review was to assess the effects of antenatal anti-D immunoglobulin on the incidence of Rhesus D alloimmunization when given to Rh-negative women without anti-D antibodies and assess the effects of giving anti-D to Rhesus negative women, with no anti-D antibodies, who had given birth to a Rhesus positive infant. A review article. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Medical Genetics and Fetal Medicine, University Hospital, Olomouc, Ministry of Health, Czech Republic. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, refence lists of relevant articles and bibliographies. The risk of Rhesus D alloimmunization during or immediately after a first pregnancy is about 1%. Administration of 100 microg (500 IU) anti-D to women in their first pregnancy can reduce this risk to about 0.2% without, to date, any adverse effects. Anti-D, given within 72 hours after childbirth, reduces the risk of RhD alloimmunization in Rhesus negative women who have given birth to a Rhesus positive infant. However the evidence on the optimal dose is limited.

  1. Resolution of alloimmunization and refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a multi-transfused beta-thalassemia major patient.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Jain, Neelesh

    2014-07-01

    Beta-thalassemia is one of the most prevalent autosomal disorders, which affect more than 400,000 newborn per year worldwide. In India, the carrier rate of beta-thalassemia varies from 3-17%. The overall rate of alloimmunization in thalassemia patients has been reported to be 5-30% in the world, which is mostly contributed by the alloimmunization to minor blood group antigen. Among Asians, the incidence of red cell alloimmunization is 22%. The recommended treatment for beta-thalassemia major is regular blood transfusion every 3 to 4 weeks. The development of anti-red cell antibodies (alloantibodies and/or autoantibodies) can significantly complicate transfusion therapy. Alloantibodies are commonly associated with red cell hemolysis. Red cell autoantibodies appear less frequently, but they can result in clinical hemolysis called autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), and in difficulty in cross-matching blood. Patients with autoantibodies may have a higher transfusion rate and often require immunosuppressive drugs or alternative treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody).

  2. Rapid-Onset Thrombocytopenia Following Piperacillin-Tazobactam Reexposure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Dong; Tourigny, Jean-François; Roy, Renaud; Brouillette, Denis

    2015-12-01

    Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare but serious adverse event that has been associated with multiple drugs including β-lactams. Although it mostly occurs with prolonged medication use, some cases of rapid-onset thrombocytopenia have been reported. We describe the case of a 69-year-old man who developed severe and immediate thrombocytopenia following reexposure to piperacillin-tazobactam in the critical care setting. He received a 6-day course of piperacillin-tazobactam for a possible pneumonia immediately after cardiac surgery. During this course of therapy, his platelet count decreased (fluctuating between 69 × 10(3) /mm(3) and 104 × 10(3) /mm(3) ) and then progressively increased after completion of the antibiotic to 340 × 10(3) /mm(3) on postoperative day 15. Ten days after the antibiotic course was completed (postoperative day 16), the patient developed new signs of infection (fever and neutrophilia), and piperacillin-tazobactam was restarted. Eight hours after reintroducing the antibiotic, his platelet count dropped from 317 × 10(3) /mm(3) to 7 × 10(3) /mm(3) . After reviewing all the medications administered to the patient as well as other potential causes of thrombocytopenia, and given the chronology of events, piperacillin-tazobactam was suspected as the most likely offending agent and was therefore replaced by meropenem on postoperative day 17. The patient's platelet count began to rise 2 days after discontinuation of piperacillin-tazobactam and reached 245 × 10(3) /mm(3) by postoperative day 30. No spontaneous bleeding or thrombosis occurred while the patient was thrombocytopenic. Use of the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between the patient's development of thrombocytopenia and piperacillin-tazobactam therapy. This case highlights the severity and swiftness in which drug-induced thrombocytopenia may present in the context of cardiac surgery.

  3. Tirofiban-Induced Thrombocytopenia Occurring with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; El Karak, Fady; Araji, Assem; El Rassy, Elie

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man, with severe refractory Crohn's disease, presented with acute coronary syndrome that required angioplasty. He developed severe tirofiban-induced thrombocytopenia (TIT) heralded by type I allergic reaction that required steroids and a combination of antihistamine H1 and antihistamine H2 for symptomatic management. The thrombocytopenia spontaneously resolved uneventfully in 48 hours thereafter. This case report suggests a possible association between TIT and inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, strict monitoring of the platelet count is required in patients who develop allergic reactions to tirofiban. PMID:27144035

  4. Does Helicobacter pylori eradication play a role in immune thrombocytopenia?

    PubMed

    Llovet, Valentina; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-09-05

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been implicated as trigger or disease modifier in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). So, eradication treatment for this agent could have clinical benefits. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews comprising 40 studies addressing the question of this article overall, including one randomized controlled trial. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded Helicobacter eradication might decrease risk of bleeding in patients with immune thrombocytopenia but the certainty of the evidence is low.

  5. Positioning new treatments in the management of immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald M

    2013-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a syndrome characterized by low platelet counts and an increased risk of bleeding. For most children, ITP is a self-limiting disease; however, for some children and most adults, thrombocytopenia can become chronic. Newer therapies for ITP include rituximab and thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists. Rituximab is a useful second-line therapy and may be splenectomy-sparing. Thrombopoeitin receptor agonists have demonstrated large treatment effects with respect to increasing platelet levels; however, they require maintenance dosing. This review summarizes how these new agents might be positioned in the management of patients with chronic ITP. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Positioning New Treatments in the Management of Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a syndrome characterized by low platelet counts and an increased risk of bleeding. For most children, ITP is a self-limiting disease; however, for some children and most adults, thrombocytopenia can become chronic. Newer therapies for ITP include rituximab and thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists. Rituximab is a useful second-line therapy and may be splenectomy-sparing. Thrombopoeitin receptor agonists have demonstrated large treatment effects with respect to increasing platelet levels; however, they require maintenance dosing. This review summarizes how these new agents might be positioned in the management of patients with chronic ITP. PMID:23109488

  7. Non-classical FCGR2C haplotype is associated with protection from red blood cell allo-immunization in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Meinderts, Sanne M; Sins, Joep W R; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q; Geissler, Judy; Tanck, Michael W; Bruggeman, Christine; Biemond, Bart J; Rijneveld, Anita W; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis H; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Habibi, Anoosha; van Bruggen, Robin; Kuijpers, Taco W; Pirenne, France; van den Berg, Timo K

    2017-09-12

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are of vital importance in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, a major complication of transfusion therapy is allo-immunization. The low-affinity Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), expressed on immune cells, are important regulators of antibody responses. Genetic variation in FCGR genes has been associated with various auto- and allo-immune diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between genetic variation of FCGR and RBC allo-immunization in SCD. In this case-control study, DNA samples from 2 cohorts of transfused SCD patients were combined (France and the Netherlands). Cases had a positive history of allo-immunization, having received ≥1 RBC unit. Controls had a negative history of allo-immunization, having received ≥20 RBC units. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variation of the FCGR2/3 gene cluster were studied in a FCGR-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay. Frequencies were compared using logistic regression. Two-hundred-seventy-two patients were included (130 controls, 142 cases). The non-classical open reading frame in the FCGR2C gene (FCGR2C.nc-ORF) was strongly associated with a decreased allo-immunization risk (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.11-0.64). This association persisted when only including controls with exposure to ≥100 units (OR 0.30, CI 0.11-0.85), and appeared even stronger when excluding cases with Rh or K antibodies only (OR 0.19, CI 0.06-0.59). In conclusion, SCD patients with the FCGR2Cnc-ORF polymorphism have over a threefold lower risk for RBC allo-immunization compared to patients without this mutation. This protective effect was strongest for exposure to antigens other than the immunogenic Rh or K antigens. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  8. Identifying drugs that cause acute thrombocytopenia: an analysis using 3 distinct methods.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jessica A; Li, Xiaoning; Hauben, Manfred; Aster, Richard H; Bougie, Daniel W; Curtis, Brian R; George, James N; Vesely, Sara K

    2010-09-23

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is often suspected in patients with acute thrombocytopenia unexplained by other causes, but documenting that a drug is the cause of thrombocytopenia can be challenging. To provide a resource for diagnosis of DITP and for drug safety surveillance, we analyzed 3 distinct methods for identifying drugs that may cause thrombocytopenia. (1) Published case reports of DITP have described 253 drugs suspected of causing thrombocytopenia; using defined clinical criteria, 87 (34%) were identified with evidence that the drug caused thrombocytopenia. (2) Serum samples from patients with suspected DITP were tested for 202 drugs; drug-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies were identified for 67 drugs (33%). (3) The Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System database was searched for drugs associated with thrombocytopenia by use of data mining algorithms; 1444 drugs had at least 1 report associated with thrombocytopenia, and 573 (40%) drugs demonstrated a statistically distinctive reporting association with thrombocytopenia. Among 1468 drugs suspected of causing thrombocytopenia, 102 were evaluated by all 3 methods, and 23 of these 102 drugs had evidence for an association with thrombocytopenia by all 3 methods. Multiple methods, each with a distinct perspective, can contribute to the identification of drugs that can cause thrombocytopenia.

  9. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  10. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  11. Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Cholestatic jaundice is a common presenting feature of neonatal hepatobiliary and metabolic dysfunction. Any infant who remains jaundiced beyond age 2 to 3 weeks should have the serum bilirubin level fractionated into a conjugated (direct) and unconjugated (indirect) portion. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is never physiologic or normal. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis is extensive, and a step-wise approach based on the initial history and physical examination is useful to rapidly identify the underlying etiology. Early recognition of neonatal cholestasis is essential to ensure timely treatment and optimal prognosis. Even when specific treatment is not available, infants who have cholestasis benefit from early medical management and optimization of nutrition. Future studies are necessary to determine the most reliable and cost-effective method of universal screening for neonatal cholestasis. PMID:24244109

  12. Global DNA methylation in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dhas, Benet Bosco; Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Bhat, Vishnu; Newton, Banupriya; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-04-01

    To find out whether gDNA methylation can be used as a diagnostic/prognostic method for neonatal sepsis. The study was conducted in the neonatal division of a tertiary care referral hospital. Fifty one newborns as cases and thirty seven newborns as controls were enrolled in the study. Using 5-mC DNA ELISA method, the percentage of genomic DNA methylated in these newborns was established. Highly significant difference in percentage of gDNA methylated was found between the cases and controls (Cases: 2.4 ± 0.39; 2.07 ± 0.35; P < 0.0001). Culture proven and possible cases were also significantly distinguishable (P < 0.05). No significant differences in methylation were observed in terms of gestational age, birth weight and outcomes such shock, thrombocytopenia, except for renal failure. The index results showed that genomic DNA methylation varies significantly among newborns with sepsis (clinical, probable and culture positive) and without sepsis. Although the global DNA methylation was not a highly sensitive diagnostic method, this study reveals that DNA methylation might play a vital role in neonatal sepsis susceptibility. Identification of the specific differentially methylated genes might serve as a promising future diagnostic/prognostic marker for neonatal sepsis.

  13. Severe neonatal hemolysis due to a maternal antibody to the low-frequency Rh antigen C(w).

    PubMed

    May-Wewers, Julie; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Moore, Ellen Kay; Blackall, Douglas P

    2006-05-01

    C(w) is a low-frequency antigen in the Rh blood group system with a prevalence of approximately 2% in whites. Although anti-C(w) is not an uncommon antibody in pregnancy (0.1% incidence), clinically significant hemolytic disease of the newborn is highly unusual. We report the case of an infant with severe hyperbilirubinemia and persistent anemia due to a high-titer maternal C(w) antibody. The medical literature relating to maternal C(w) alloimmunization and neonatal outcome is also reviewed. In addition, recommendations are made regarding the management of pregnancies and newborns complicated by antibodies to C(w).

  14. Eptifibatide-Induced Thrombocytopenia--When Inhibitor Turns Killer.

    PubMed

    Pothineni, Naga Venkata; Watts, Thomas E; Ding, Zufeng; Dai, Yao; Deshmukh, Abhishek J

    2016-01-01

    Eptifibatide is a commonly and widely used drug for management of acute coronary syndrome and during percutaneous coronary intervention. It is usually well tolerated with no major adverse effects. We report a rare case of life-threatening thrombocytopenia secondary to eptifibatide along with a literature review of available evidence.

  15. Intracerebral hemorrhage caused by varicella-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo, Jairo; Castellanos, María Fernanda; Omaña, Claudia Rosa; Chaín, Miguel; Villamizar, Sergio

    2016-02-16

    We present the case of a previously healthy 44-years-old man with chickenpox, severe thrombocytopenia, mucosal hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with platelets and high doses of steroids. He recovered although with persistent left homonymous hemianopsia and epilepsy, which were controlled with medication.

  16. Linkage between the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia and thrombopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kunishima, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is defined as a status in which platelet numbers are reduced. Imbalance between the homeostatic regulation of platelet generation and destruction is 1 potential cause of thrombocytopenia. In adults, platelet generation is a 2-stage process entailing the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into mature megakaryocytes (MKs; known as megakaryopoiesis) and release of platelets from MKs (known as thrombopoiesis or platelet biogenesis). Until recently, information about the genetic defects responsible for congenital thrombocytopenia was only available for a few forms of the disease. However, investigations over the past 15 years have identified mutations in genes encoding >20 different proteins that are responsible for these disorders, which has advanced our understanding of megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms can be categorized as (1) defects in MK lineage commitment and differentiation, (2) defects in MK maturation, and (3) defect in platelet release. Using these developmental stage categories, we here update recently described mechanisms underlying megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis and discuss the association between platelet generation systems and thrombocytopenia. PMID:26787737

  17. Innate Immune Cells Induce Hemorrhage in Tumors during Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Carbo, Carla; Demers, Mélanie; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Goerge, Tobias; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are crucial regulators of tumor vascular homeostasis and continuously prevent tumor hemorrhage through secretion of their granules. However, the reason for tumor bleeding in the absence of platelets remains unknown. Tumors are associated with inflammation, a cause of hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia. Here, we investigated the role of the inflamed tumor microenvironment in the induction of tumor vessel injury in thrombocytopenic mice. Using s.c. injections of vascular endothelial growth factor or tumor necrosis factor-α combined with depletion of neutrophils, we demonstrate that enhancing the opening of endothelial cell junctions was not sufficient to cause bleeding in the absence of platelets; instead, induction of tissue hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia required recruitment of leukocytes. Immunohistology revealed that thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage occurs at sites of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation. Mice deficient in β2 or β3 integrins, which have decreased neutrophil and/or macrophage infiltration in their tumor stroma, were protected from thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage, indicating that, in the absence of platelets, stroma-infiltrating leukocytes induced tumor vessel injury. This injury was independent of reactive oxygen species generation and of complement activation, as suggested by the persistence of tumor hemorrhage in C3- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-deficient thrombocytopenic mice. Our results show that platelets counteract tumor-associated inflammation and that the absence of this platelet function elicits vascular injuries by tumor-infiltrating innate immune cells. PMID:19729481

  18. Eltrombopag for Treatment of Thrombocytopenia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Takuya; Fuji, Shigeo; Okinaka, Keiji; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kim, Sung-Won; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Persistent thrombocytopenia is a common complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eltrombopag is an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist whose efficacy against persistent thrombocytopenia after allogeneic HCT has not been well characterized. This retrospective study evaluated the safety and efficacy of eltrombopag in 12 consecutive patients with persistent thrombocytopenia after allogeneic HCT. Eltrombopag was started at 12.5 mg once daily and the dose was increased by 12.5 mg daily every week until platelet counts exceeded 50,000/μL. Five patients had prolonged isolated thrombocytopenia (PIT) and 7 patients had secondary failure of platelet recovery (SFPR). The cumulative incidence rate of successful platelet recovery to ≥50,000/μL without transfusion support was 60% in PIT patients and 71% in SFPR patients. No patients discontinued the drug because of adverse events or intolerability. Notably, the rate of platelet recovery was higher (100% versus 58%; P = .0017) and recovery was faster (median, 33 days versus 137 days; P = .0078) in patients with normal numbers of bone marrow megakaryocytes before starting eltrombopag than in those with decreased numbers of megakaryocytes. Eltrombopag is a promising treatment for both PIT and SFPR after allogeneic HCT. The number of megakaryocytes in bone marrow before eltrombopag treatment may predict the response to eltrombopag.

  19. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia accompanied by mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Esme, Hidir; Sahin, Onder; Sezer, Murat; Fidan, Fatma; Unlu, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia, which was described in 1989, is thought to represent a hypersensitivity reaction to unidentified inhaled antigens. Here, we present a case of a marble mine worker with acute eosinophilic pneumonia complicated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17128696

  20. RBC alloimmunization in blood transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Nikrooz, P; Kashef, S; Jamalian, N; Davatolhagh, Z

    2007-10-01

    beta-thalassemia is considered a severe, progressive anemia, which needs regular transfusions for life expectancy. One of the most important complications of regular blood transfusions may be alloimmunization, which increases the need for transfusion. This study was performed to investigate the production of red cell alloantibodies in beta-thalassemia patients in Shiraz, southern Iran. Blood sampling was performed among 711 beta-thalassemia patients in Dastgheib hospital in 2002-2004. Direct and indirect coombs tests were performed to check the auto and alloantibodies and a panel test was conducted to detect the type of alloantibodies. Auto and alloantibodies were observed among 1.7% and 5.3% of patients, respectively. The most common alloantibodies were Anti-kell (50%) > Anti-Rh (D) (15.8%) > Anti-Rh (E) (10.5%). All the patients who had developed alloantibody were in the age group of 6 years or more. So for decreasing the rate of alloantibody synthesis, we should crossmatched the packed cells for minor blood groups especially for kell and Rh(E) in addition to major blood groups from the start of transfusion.

  1. A case of severe Rh (D) alloimmunization pregnant woman delivery an infant with limited treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhao

    2013-10-01

    A 35-year-old woman with histories of frequent failed pregnancies was pregnant after having five plasma exchange procedures during which she was given Rh (D) positive plasma as replacement and her anti-D antibody titer went from 512 to 1024. Antenatal surveillance of the fetus showed no abnormality. At 36 weeks gestation she delivered an infant who initially had no significant clinical problems but was severely anemic on the following days. Using exchange transfusion and blood transfusions the infant's hemoglobin was normal at 4 months of age. Thus, the Rh (D) status of donor plasma should be considered when used as the replacement in plasma exchange for Rh (D) negative women. Severe Rh (D) alloimmunization pregnant woman may delivery an infant who seem in good condition at birth. If severe Rhesus isoimmunisation of the infant is confirmed, whole blood exchange should be done as early as possible and the infant must be considered to be at risk for late anemia. Clinical judgment plays a vital role in the decision to transfuse red cells or not. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bim Regulates Alloimmune-Mediated Vascular Injury Through Effects on T Cell Activation and Death

    PubMed Central

    von Rossum, Anna; Enns, Winnie; Shi, Yu P.; MacEwan, Grace E.; Malekesmaeli, Mehrnoush; Brinkman, Ryan; Choy, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bim is a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein known to down-regulate immune responses and to also be required for antigen-induced T cell activation. However, it is not known how the effect of Bim on these offsetting processes determines the outcome of allogeneic immune responses. We have defined the role of Bim in regulating alloantigen-driven T cell responses in a model of vascular rejection. Approach and Results Bim was required for proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells, and for IL-2 production, in T cells stimulated with alloantigen in vitro. Moreover, a partial reduction in Bim expression was sufficient to attenuate T cell activation whereas a complete elimination of Bim was required to prevent CD4 T cell death in response to cytokine withdrawl. When alloimmune-mediated vascular rejection was examined using an aortic interposition model, there was significantly less intimal thickening in Bim+/−, but not Bim−/−, graft recipients. T cell proliferation in response to allograft arteries was significantly reduced in both Bim+/− and Bim−/− mice, but cell death was attenuated only in Bim−/− animals. Conclusions Bim controls both T cell activation and death in response to alloantigen stimulation. These processes act cooperatively to determine the outcome of immune responses in allograft arteries. PMID:24700126

  3. Bim regulates alloimmune-mediated vascular injury through effects on T-cell activation and death.

    PubMed

    von Rossum, Anna; Enns, Winnie; Shi, Yu P; MacEwan, Grace E; Malekesmaeli, Mehrnoush; Brinkman, Ryan; Choy, Jonathan C

    2014-06-01

    Bim is a proapoptotic Bcl-2 protein known to downregulate immune responses and to also be required for antigen-induced T-cell activation. However, it is not known how the effect of Bim on these offsetting processes determines the outcome of allogeneic immune responses. We have defined the role of Bim in regulating alloantigen-driven T-cell responses in a model of vascular rejection. Bim was required for proliferation of CD4 and CD8 T cells, and for interleukin-2 production, in T cells stimulated with alloantigen in vitro. Moreover, a partial reduction in Bim expression was sufficient to attenuate T-cell activation, whereas a complete elimination of Bim was required to prevent CD4 T-cell death in response to cytokine withdrawl. When alloimmune-mediated vascular rejection was examined using an aortic interposition model, there was significantly less intimal thickening in Bim(+/-), but not Bim(-/-), graft recipients. T-cell proliferation in response to allograft arteries was significantly reduced in both Bim(+/-) and Bim(-/-) mice, but cell death was attenuated only in Bim(-/-) animals. Bim controls both T-cell activation and death in response to alloantigen stimulation. These processes act cooperatively to determine the outcome of immune responses in allograft arteries. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Specificity of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cell Function in Alloimmunity1

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Sandner, Sigrid; Habicht, Antje; Mariat, Christophe; Kenny, James; Degauque, Nicolas; Zheng, Xin Xiao; Strom, Terry B.; Turka, Laurence A.; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (TRegs) are critical for the acquisition of peripheral allograft tolerance. However, it is unclear whether TRegs are capable of mediating alloantigen-specific suppressive effects and, hence, contributing to the specificity of the tolerant state. In the current report we have used the ABM TCR transgenic (Tg) system, a C57BL/6-derived strain in which CD4+ T cells directly recognize the allogeneic MHC-II molecule I-Abm12, to assess the capacity of TRegs to mediate allospecific effects. In these mice, 5–6% of Tg CD4+ T cells exhibit conventional markers of the TReg phenotype. ABM TRegs are more effective than wild-type polyclonal TRegs at suppressing effector immune responses directed against I-Abm12 alloantigen both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, they are incapable of suppressing responses directed against third-party alloantigens unless these are expressed in the same allograft as I-Abm12. Taken together, our results indicate that in transplantation, TReg function is dependent on TCR stimulation, providing definitive evidence for their specificity in the regulation of alloimmune responses. PMID:16365425

  5. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  6. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... better the outcome. Possible Complications Complications may include: Disability Death When to Contact a Medical Professional Seek medical help right away for an infant that shows symptoms of neonatal sepsis. Prevention Pregnant women may need preventive antibiotics if they have: Chorioamnionitis ...

  7. Neonatal hematology.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Miron, Jose; Miller, Jacob; Vogel, Adam M

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex and dynamic process in the pediatric population. Surgeons frequently encounter hematologic issues regarding hemostasis, inflammation, and wound healing. This publication provides a surgeon-directed review of hematopoiesis in the newborn, as well as an overview of the current understanding of their hemostatic profile under normal and pathologic conditions. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  9. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence for the specificity for platelet HPA-1a alloepitope and the presenting HLA-DR52a of diverse antigen-specific helper T cell clones from alloimmunized mothers.

    PubMed

    Rayment, Rachel; Kooij, Taco W; Zhang, Wei; Siebold, Christian; Murphy, Mike F; Allen, Dave; Willcox, Nick; Roberts, David J

    2009-07-01

    Maternal alloantibodies against the human platelet Ag (HPA)-1a allotype of the platelet beta(3) integrin GpIIb/IIIa can cause severe fetal or neonatal hemorrhage. Almost all anti-HPA-1a-immune mothers are homozygous for HPA-1b and carry HLA-DR52a (DRB3*0101). The single Pro(33) -->Leu substitution (HPA-1b-->HPA-1a) was previously predicted to create a binding motif for HLA-DR52a that can lead to alloimmunization. We have isolated six CD4(+) T cell clones from three such mothers, which all respond to intact HPA-1a(+), but not HPA-1b(+), platelets. We used them to define the "core" and "anchor" residues of this natural T cell epitope. Molecular modeling based on a recently published crystal structure can explain the preferential presentation of the Leu(33) (but not Pro(33) variant) by HLA-DR52a rather than the linked HLA-DR3 or the allelic DR52b. The modeling also predicts efficient anchoring at position 33 by several alternative hydrophobic alpha-amino acids; indeed, a recently identified variant with Val(33) is presented well to two clones, and is therefore potentially alloimmunogenic. Finally, these HPA-1a-specific T cell clones use a variety of T cell receptors, but all have a "Th1" (IFN-gamma-producing) profile and are suitable for testing selective immunotherapies that might be applicable in vivo.

  11. Study of red blood cell alloimmunization risk factors in multiply transfused thalassemia patients: role in improving thalassemia transfusion practice in Fayoum, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazik, Abeer Mohamed; Elshafie, Shahira Morsy; El Said, Manal Niazi; Ezzat Ahmed, Ghada M; Al-Gamil, Al-Kassem Ahmed; El Nahhas, Mona Gamal Mostafa; Sady, Ahmed Ali Badie

    2016-09-01

    β-Thalassemia is considered the most common chronic hemolytic anemia in Egypt. Alloimmunization can lead to serious clinical complications in transfusion-dependent patients. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and types of alloantibodies, and, in addition, to study the risk factors that might influence alloimmunization in multiply transfused thalassemia patients in Fayoum, Egypt, with the goal that this study could help minimize some of the transfusion-associated risks in those patients. A total of 188 multiply transfused thalassemia patients attending Fayoum University Hospital were analyzed. Alloantibody identification was performed by DiaMed-ID microtyping system. Alloimmunization prevalence was 7.98%. The most common alloantibody was D-related; anti-D was the most frequent alloantibody found in eight of the 188 patients (4.25 %), followed by anti-C in two patients (1.1%), anti- E in two (1.1 %), anti-c in two (1.1 %), anti-Fya in two (1.1%), anti-K in one (0.53 %), and an unknown antibody in one patient (0.53%). Higher rates of alloimmunization were found in female patients, in patients with β-thalassemia intermedia, in splenectomized patients, in D- patients, and in patients who started blood transfusion after 3 years of age. The study reemphasizes the need for cost-effective strategy for thalassemia transfusion practice in developing countries. Red blood cell antigen typing before transfusion and issue of antigen-matched or antigen-negative blood can be made available to alloimmunized multiply transfused patients. Early institution of transfusion therapy after diagnosis is another means of decreasing alloimmunization. © 2016 AABB.

  12. Effects of in-vitro adult platelet transfusions on neonatal hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Chavda, Chaitanya; Lampa, Michael; Michelson, Alan D.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is frequent among neonates, and 20-25% of affected infants are treated with platelet transfusions. These are frequently given for mild thrombocytopenia (platelets 50-100×109/L), largely due to the known hyporeactivity of neonatal platelets. In tests of primary hemostasis, however, neonates have shorter bleeding and closure times (CTs) than adults. This has been attributed to their higher hematocrits, higher von Willebrand factor (VWF) concentrations, and predominance of longer VWF polymers. Objective To determine whether the “transfusion” of adult (relatively hyper-reactive) platelets into neonatal blood results in a hypercoagulable profile. Methods Cord blood (CB) and adult peripheral blood (PB) were separated (using a modified buffy-coat method) to generate miniaturized platelet concentrates (PCs) and thrombocytopenic blood. PB- and CB-derived PCs (n=7 per group) were then “transfused” in-vitro into thrombocytopenic CB and PB. The effects of autologous vs. allogeneic (developmentally mismatched) “transfusions” were evaluated using whole blood aggregometry, platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), and thromboelastography (TEG). Results Adult platelets aggregated significantly better than neonatal platelets in response to TRAP, ADP and collagen, regardless of the blood into which they were transfused. The “transfusion” of adult platelets into thrombocytopenic CB resulted in shorter CTs-Epi (PFA-100) and higher clot strength and firmness (TEG), compared to “transfusion” of neonatal autologous platelets. Conclusions In vitro “transfusion” of adult platelets into neonatal blood results in shorter CTs than “transfusion” with neonatal platelets. Our findings should raise awareness of the differences between the neonatal and adult hemostatic system and the potential “developmental mismatch” associated with platelet transfusions on neonatal hemostasis. PMID:21320282

  13. The novel costimulatory programmed death ligand 1/B7.1 pathway is functional in inhibiting alloimmune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Riella, Leonardo V; Chock, Susanne; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yuan, Xueli; Paterson, Alison M; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Vanguri, Vijay; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rodig, Scott J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Chandraker, Anil; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2011-08-01

    The programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1)/programmed death 1 (PD1) costimulatory pathway plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses as well as in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. It has been demonstrated recently that PDL1 also can bind B7.1 to inhibit T cell responses in vitro. Using the bm12 into B6 heart transplant model, we investigated the functional significance of this interaction in alloimmune responses in vivo. PD1 blockade unlike PDL1 blockade failed to accelerate bm12 allograft rejection, suggesting a role for an additional binding partner for PDL1 other than PD1 in transplant rejection. PDL1 blockade was able to accelerate allograft rejection in B7.2-deficient recipients but not B7.1-deficient recipients, indicating that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 was important in inhibiting rejection. Administration of the novel 2H11 anti-PDL1 mAb, which only blocks the PDL1-B7.1 interaction, aggravated chronic injury of bm12 allografts in B6 recipients. Aggravated chronic injury was associated with an increased frequency of alloreactive IFN-γ-, IL-4-, and IL-6-producing splenocytes and a decreased percentage of regulatory T cells in the recipients. Using an in vitro cell culture assay, blockade of the interaction of PDL1 on dendritic cells with B7.1 on T cells increased IFN-γ production from alloreactive CD4(+) T cells, whereas blockade of dendritic cell B7.1 interaction with T cell PDL1 did not. These data indicate that PDL1 interaction with B7.1 plays an important role in the inhibition of alloimmune responses in vivo and suggests a dominant direction for PDL1 and B7.1 interaction.

  14. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by the delay between Toll-like receptor agonist injection and transfusion.

    PubMed

    Elayeb, Rahma; Tamagne, Marie; Bierling, Philippe; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Vingert, Benoît

    2016-02-01

    Murine models of red blood cell transfusion show that inflammation associated with viruses or methylated DNA promotes red blood cell alloimmunization. In vaccination studies, the intensity of antigen-specific responses depends on the delay between antigen and adjuvant administration, with a short delay limiting immune responses. In mouse models of alloimmunization, the delay between the injection of Toll-like receptor agonists and transfusion is usually short. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of Toll-like receptor 3 agonist administration affects red blood cell alloimmunization. Poly(I:C), a Toll-like receptor 3 agonist, was administered to B10BR mice at various time points before the transfusion of HEL-expressing red blood cells. For each time point, we measured the activation of splenic HEL-presenting dendritic cells, HEL-specific CD4(+) T cells and anti-HEL antibodies in serum. The phenotype of activated immune cells depended on the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-dependent inflammation. The production of anti-HEL antibodies was highest when transfusion occurred 7 days after agonist injection. The proportion of HEL-presenting CD8α(+) dendritic cells producing interleukin-12 was highest in mice injected with poly(I:C) 3 days before transfusion. Although the number of early-induced HEL-specific CD4(+) T cells was similar between groups, a high proportion of these cells expressed CD134, CD40 and CD44 in mice injected with poly(I:C) 7 days before transfusion. This study clearly shows that the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-induced inflammation influences the immune response to transfused red blood cells.

  15. Use of 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet-A pretreated platelet concentrates to prevent alloimmunization against class I major histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Grana, N.H.; Kao, K.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The use of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and UV-A irradiation to inactivate contaminating donor leukocytes in platelet concentrates and to prevent primary alloimmunization against donor class I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens in mice was investigated. CBA/CaH-T6J mice with the H2k haplotype and BALB/cByJ mice with the H2d haplotype were used as donors and recipients, respectively. The mixed leukocyte reaction between these two strains of mice showed that treatment of spleen cells with 500 ng/mL 8-MOP and 5J/cm2 UV-A inhibited 99% of responder and 92% of stimulator function. There was no measurable loss of platelet aggregating activity after the treatment. After two weekly transfusions of platelets without any treatment, 93% of control mice (n = 15) developed anti-H2k antibody. In contrast, only 33% of mice (n = 15) receiving platelets treated with 8-MOP and UV-A became alloimmunized. After six weekly platelet transfusions, all mice became alloimmunized. Nevertheless, the mean titers of anti-H2k antibody in sera of the treated groups were significantly lower than the control groups. One hour posttransfusion recoveries of 51Cr-labeled donor platelets were also higher in mice transfused with the treated platelets. Thus, the pretreatment of platelet concentrates with 8-MOP and UV-A irradiation effectively reduced the alloantigenicity of class I MHC molecules. The implication of this finding in relation to the mechanism by which donor leukocytes allosensitize recipients is discussed.

  16. Pre- and Post-Transfusion Alloimmunization in Dogs Characterized by 2 Antiglobulin-Enhanced Cross-match Tests.

    PubMed

    Goy-Thollot, I; Giger, U; Boisvineau, C; Perrin, R; Guidetti, M; Chaprier, B; Barthélemy, A; Pouzot-Nevoret, C; Canard, B

    2017-09-01

    When dogs are transfused, blood compatibility testing varies widely but may include dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 1 typing and rarely cross-matching. Prospective study to examine naturally occurring alloantibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) and alloimmunization by transfusion using 2 antiglobulin-enhanced cross-match tests. Eighty client-owned anemic, 72 donor, and 7 control dogs. All dogs were typed for DEA 1 and some also for DEA 4 and DEA 7. Major cross-match tests with canine antiglobulin-enhanced immunochromatographic strip and gel columns were performed 26-129 days post-transfusion (median, 39 days); some dogs had an additional early evaluation 11-22 days post-transfusion (median, 16 days). Plasma from alloimmunized recipients was cross-matched against RBCs from 34 donor and control dogs. The 2 cross-match methods gave entirely concordant results. All 126 pretransfusion cross-match results for the 80 anemic recipients were compatible, but 54 dogs died or were lost to follow up. Among the 26 recipients with follow-up, 1 dog accidently received DEA 1-mismatched blood and became cross-match-incompatible post-transfusion. Eleven of the 25 DEA 1-matched recipients (44%) became incompatible against other RBC antigens. No naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 alloantibodies were detected in DEA 7- dogs. The antiglobulin-enhanced immunochromatographic strip cross-match and laboratory gel column techniques identified no naturally occurring alloantibodies against RBC antigens, but a high degree of post-transfusion alloimmunization in dogs. Cross-matching is warranted in any dog that has been previously transfused independent of initial DEA 1 typing and cross-matching results before the first transfusion event. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Platelet counts, MPV and PDW in culture proven and probable neonatal sepsis and association of platelet counts with mortality rate.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mirza Sultan; Waheed, Abdul

    2014-05-01

    To determine frequency of thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis, the MPV (mean platelet volume) and PDW (platelet distribution width) in patients with probable and culture proven neonatal sepsis and determine any association between platelet counts and mortality rate. Descriptive analytical study. NICU, Fazle Omar Hospital, from January 2011 to December 2012. Cases of culture proven and probable neonatal sepsis, admitted in Fazle Omar Hospital, Rabwah, were included in the study. Platelet counts, MPV and PDW of the cases were recorded. Mortality was documented. Frequencies of thrombocytopenia (< 150000/mm3) and thrombocytosis (> 450000/mm3) were ascertained. Mortality rates in different groups according to platelet counts were calculated and compared by chi-square test to check association. Four hundred and sixty nine patients were included; 68 (14.5%) of them died. One hundred and thirty six (29%) had culture proven sepsis, and 333 (71%) were categorized as probable sepsis. Thrombocytopenia was present in 116 (24.7%), and thrombocytosis was present in 36 (7.7%) cases. Median platelet count was 213.0/mm3. Twenty eight (27.7%) patients with thrombocytopenia, and 40 (12.1%) cases with normal or raised platelet counts died (p < 0.001). Median MPV was 9.30, and median PDW was 12.30. MPV and PDW of the patients who died and who were discharged were not significantly different from each other. Thrombocytopenia is a common complication of neonatal sepsis. Those with thrombocytopenia have higher mortality rate. No significant difference was present between PDW and MPV of the cases who survived and died.

  18. Fas ligand enhances hematopoietic cell engraftment through abrogation of alloimmune responses and nonimmunogenic interactions.

    PubMed

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Yolcu, Esma S; Stein, Jerry; Kaplan, Ofer; Yaniv, Isaac; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-06-01

    Early after transplantation, donor lineage-negative bone marrow cells (lin(-) BMC) constitutively upregulated their expression of Fas ligand (FasL), suggesting an involvement of the Fas/FasL axis in engraftment. Following the observation of impaired engraftment in the presence of a dysfunctional Fas/FasL axis in FasL-defective (gld) donors or Fas-defective (lpr) recipients, we expressed a noncleavable FasL chimeric protein on the surface of donor lin(-) BMC. Despite a short life span of the protein in vivo, expression of FasL on the surface of all the donor lin(-) BMC improved the efficiency of engraftment twofold. The FasL-coated donor cells efficiently blunted the host alloimmune responses in primary recipients and retained their hematopoietic reconstituting potential in secondary transplants. Surprisingly, FasL protein improved the efficiency of engraftment in syngeneic transplants. The deficient engraftment in lpr recipients was not reversed in chimeric mice with Fas(-) stroma and Fas(+) BMC, demonstrating that the host marrow stroma was also a target of donor cell FasL. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are insensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis and thus can exploit the constitutive expression of FasL to exert potent veto activities in the early stages of engraftment. Manipulation of the donor cells using ectopic FasL protein accentuated the immunogenic and nonimmunogenic interactions between the donor cells and the host, alleviating the requirement for a megadose of transplanted cells to achieve a potent veto effect. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  19. [Neonatal intussusception].

    PubMed

    Cuervo, J L

    2015-01-13

    Intussusception in infants and young children is a relatively common entity with a well defined clinical picture and a favorable outcome in most cases.The neonatal intussusceptions is extremely rare and does not have a well-defined clinical picture since its clinical manifestations vary according to the gestational time it occurs, the response of the injured intestine and the gestational age of the child concerned. Two new cases of neonatal intussusceptions are presented and a review of the world literature is performed. Given the stage of intussusceptions (pre- or postnatal) occurs and gestational age of the affected infant (preterm or term), there are three entities with clinical characteristics, topography and evolution rather different: prenatal or intrauterine intussusception, postnatal intussusception in the preterm and postnatal intussusception in the term infant.

  20. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia: A Comprehensive Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Salter, Benjamin S; Weiner, Menachem M; Trinh, Muoi A; Heller, Joshua; Evans, Adam S; Adams, David H; Fischer, Gregory W

    2016-05-31

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a profoundly dangerous, potentially lethal, immunologically mediated adverse drug reaction to unfractionated heparin or, less commonly, to low-molecular weight heparin. In this comprehensive review, the authors highlight heparin-induced thrombocytopenia's risk factors, clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic principles, and treatment. The authors place special emphasis on the management of patients requiring procedures using cardiopulmonary bypass or interventions in the catheterization laboratory. Clinical vigilance of this disease process is important to ensure its recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. Misdiagnosis of the syndrome, as well as misunderstanding of the disease process, continues to contribute to its morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulmonary Embolism in Patients With Acute Leukemia and Severe Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Samuel W.; Stein, Matthew N.; Hoak, John C.

    1981-01-01

    While pulmonary thromboembolism has been reported in patients with acute leukemia complicated by severe thrombocytopenia, it has been studied infrequently and its pathogenesis remains imprecisely understood. Findings of 80 consecutive autopsies of patients with acute leukemia showed that three had pulmonary thromboembolism. All three patients had been severely thrombocytopenic and had received numerous platelet transfusions. Serial sections of thrombi were evaluated with electron microscopy. In no instance were platelet aggregates detected. However, Candida organisms were prominent in thrombotic specimens from each patient. These findings suggest that thromboembolism in such patients may involve occult fungal infection. Because pulmonary thromboembolism can complicate the course of acute leukemia and severe thrombocytopenia, it should be considered when clinical data suggest its occurrence. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7257386

  2. Clinical manifestations of the thrombocytopenia and absent radii (TAR) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gounder, D S; Pullon, H W; Ockelford, P A; Nicol, R O

    1989-10-01

    Six patients with the classical features of the TAR syndrome were diagnosed at birth. In one case an older sibling was also affected. The characteristic features of foreshortened forearms and radially deviated hands were noted in all cases at presentation and confirmed radiologically. With one exception skeletal abnormalities of the lower limbs were also present. Varying degrees of thrombocytopenia were present at birth with three of the five patients having platelet counts below 50 x 10(9)/L. Bone marrow examination was performed in two patients and revealed an absence of normal megakaryocytes. Two patients with severe thrombocytopenia had bleeding complications during infancy requiring transfusion support. Severe gastroenteritis occurred in two patients, in one of whom it was attributed to cow's milk intolerance. In all patients the platelet count has risen progressively since birth. Orthopedic surgical procedures have been performed without hemorrhagic complications.

  3. Valproic-acid-induced thrombocytopenia and hepatotoxicity: discontinuation of treatment?

    PubMed

    Lackmann, Gerd-Michael

    2004-02-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old boy with long-term sodium valproate (valproic acid; VPA) therapy who suddenly developed clinically relevant thrombocytopenia and signs of hepatotoxicity. Reduction of the VPA dosage led to clinical and laboratory parameter improvement, while discontinuation of therapy was not necessary. The current practice of the management of VPA-induced side effects is discussed in view of the current recommendations from the literature. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Congenital hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis presenting as thrombocytopenia in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Ashley; Owen, William; Prose, Neil; Parikh, Suhag; Thornburg, Courtney

    2015-05-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a disease caused by dysregulation and hyperactivation of the immune system, and can be familial or acquired. HLH presenting in infancy can be rapidly fatal if not promptly recognized and treated. Congenital HLH can be caused by various genetic mutations or part of immunodeficiency syndromes. We present an infant with Griscelli syndrome and familial HLH with atypical genetic mutations, presenting as thrombocytopenia on the first day of life, cured with chemotherapy and unrelated cord blood transplant.

  5. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Presenting with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Gyeongmin; Lim, Ji-Hun; Kim, Hawk; Park, Sun-Whan; Lee, Won-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the newly discovered SFTS Bunyavirus, and there have been no case reports of SFTS patients presenting with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in the English literature. We report a case of SFTS presenting with HLH in a 73-year-old immunocompetent male farmer. Although the patient had poor prognostic factors for SFTS, such as old age and central nervous system symptoms, he recovered fully with supportive care. PMID:27883371

  6. Sports Participation in Children and Adolescents with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjusha; Lambert, Michele P; Breakey, Vicky; Buchanan, George R; Neier, Michelle; Neufeld, Ellis J; Kempert, Pamela; Neunert, Cindy E; Nottage, Kerri; Klaassen, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    We surveyed 278 pediatric hematologists/oncologists regarding how children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are counseled for participation in sports. Results show substantial variation in physician perception of contact risk for different sports, and the advice offered about restriction of sport activities of affected children. Many physicians recommend restriction of sports when platelet counts are under 50 × 10(9) /L. Such restriction may affect the child's quality of life despite their having an overall benign disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: the role of platelets genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Pamela, Scarparo; Anna Maria, Lombardi; Elena, Duner; Giovanni, Malerba; Emanuele, Allemand; Silvia, Vettore; Carmen, Blumentritt; Andreas, Greinacher; Fabrizio, Fabris

    2013-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a severe complication of heparin therapy, characterized by thrombocytopenia and an increased risk for thrombotic complications secondary to the formation of IgG antibodies (Ab), recognizing a complex of heparin (H) and PF4. Using the 4T clinical score for HIT and the presence of heparin-associated Ab assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and heparin-induced platelet aggregation, we define the phenotype of three groups of patients: 51 H/PF4/Ab patients with antibodies and without thrombocytopenia; 50 patients with thrombocytopenia (HIT) and 53 patients with thrombosis (HITT). In these patients we studied four polymorphisms: FcγRIIA-H131R, GpIIb/IIIa-HP-1, PECAM1-L125V (in linkage-disequilibrium with S563N and R670G), and FcγRIIIA-F158V, to understand if these variations may influence the different phenotypes of the patients. There were no difference in genotype or allele frequencies between controls and the three groups of patients. Afterward, we created a genotype score for multiple risk alleles for thrombosis considering as risk genotype FcγRIIA R/R131, HPA-1a/b, and PECAM1-V/V125. These polymorphisms were overrepresented in HITT patients, ascertained by a permutation test (10 000 replicates) p = 0.0198 for the two-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) model and p = 0.0119 for the three-SNP model. The calculated odds ratio for thrombosis was 4.01[CI: 2.30-6.96] in the case of the presence of two at risk genotypes and 8.002 [CI: 4.59-13.93] if all the three at risk genotypes were present. In conclusion these polymorphisms could contribute to the risk of thrombotic complications in HIT.

  8. [Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    2010-04-01

    Management, outcome, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of immune thrombocytopenia are controversial. Several guidelines stating different experts' opinions have been published; however, no worldwide consensus regarding the management of the disease has been reached yet. This guideline defines diagnostic criteria, states initial laboratory tests, establishes differential diagnosis, develops topics concerning outcome and prognosis, and enumerates available treatments for acute and chronic disease, as well as for management of life-threatening bleeding.

  9. Towards Developing a Scoring System for Febrile Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Prasita; Chauhan, Shaylika; Samel, Dinesh

    2016-02-01

    The authors wished to develop a scoring system for evaluating patients presenting with febrile thrombocytopenia for risk stratification, predicting patient outcome and optimization of care especially in resource poor countries. 1. To decide a protocol in the management of patients with fever and thrombocytopenia. 2. To develop screening or therapeutic guidelines (early warning score-EWS) in febrile thrombocytopenic patients and decide about therapeutic interventions. 1. To decide a protocol in the management of patients with fever and thrombocytopenia. 2. To develop screening or therapeutic guidelines (early warning score-EWS) in febrile thrombocytopenic patients and decide about therapeutic interventions. Retrospective study and development of a bedside scoring system based on Platelet Count, Temperature, Respiratory Rate, Blood Pressure. Pulse, CNS, Respiratory, Hematological, Hepatic and Renal complications in a central civic hospital and teaching institute in India. All patients > 18 years presenting with fever and thrombocytopenia with platelet count of < 150 × 109/L. Number of patients requiring platelet transfusions decreases when total risk score is used for risk stratification and for transfusing platelets as against the platelet count at admission. Patients who died in our study had a platelet count at presentation between 20,000- 1,00,000 though their total risk score was 17 and 18 respectively; hence platelet count alone should not be relied upon for platelet transfusion. Irrespective of the number of platelets transfused the prognosis is poor as the total risk score increases. The platelet count is not the only indicator of transfusion. When we use total risk score instead of platelet count for classifying patients who need transfusions, number of patients who fall in severe risk category needing immediate transfusion reduces and haphazard use of platelets can be avoided. Patient outcome (death/survival), occurrence of complications and hematological

  10. Evaluation of the risks of chemotherapy in dogs with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Finlay, J; Wyatt, K; Black, M

    2017-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is commonly encountered in veterinary oncology. Currently, there are no standard guidelines regarding the administration of chemotherapy to the patients with thrombocytopenia. This observational epidemiological cohort study aimed to determine whether thrombocytopenic dogs were at increased risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects (vomiting, diarrhoea, inappetence) or haemorrhage following administration of standard doses of chemotherapy. The adverse effects following 77 prospectively identified episodes of thrombocytopenia (platelet count, <200 000 µL(-1) ) were compared with the adverse effects experienced in a retrospective cohort (platelet count >200 000 µL(-1) ), and evaluated by statistical analysis. Overall, there was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects or haemorrhage between thrombocytopenic and control dogs. The control group of dogs with lymphoma were statistically more likely to experience vomiting as an adverse effect of chemotherapy (P = 0.028). The results presented here showed no evidence for an increased risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects or haemorrhage in thrombocytopenic dogs after receiving standard doses of chemotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Thrombocytopenia induced by rifampicin not previously sensitized: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Neino Mourtala Mohamed, A; Tummino, C; Gouitaa, M; Chanez, P

    2013-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia induced by rifampicin in the absence of prior sensitization is exceptional, especially when it occurs in a patient without risk factors. We report the case of a patient aged 25 years with no past history of medical, surgical or knowledge of having taken rifampicin previously, who was hospitalized for treatment of thrombocytopenic purpura occurring after the initiation of fixed combination quadruple therapy (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) for pulmonary tuberculosis. The biological pretreatment and therapeutic education had not been made. The patient presented with thrombocytopenic purpura 30000/mm(3) on day 9 after the initiation of treatment. The platelet count returned to normal 10 days after discontinuation of treatment. We elected not to reintroduce rifampicin given the strong likelihood that it was responsible for this complication. We conducted a phased reintroduction of isoniazid, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. No recurrence of the thrombocytopenia occurred. Thus, the diagnosis of rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia appears to have been confirmed and the patient tolerated the remainder of their treatment well.

  12. Thrombopoetin receptor agonist therapy in thrombocytopenia: ITP and beyond.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alice; Westwood, John Paul; Laskou, Faidra; McGuckin, Siobhan; Scully, Marie

    2017-03-14

    Eltrombopag is well established in treatment of severe immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and is increasingly commonplace in second-line management. A role is also suggested for both bridging therapy for surgery, as well as treating thrombocytopenia due to non-immune aetiologies. We present the largest single-centre experience with eltrombopag, with our cohort of 62 patients. Patients with severe ITP (n = 34) had 91·2% response, which was sustained over a median of 18·5 months. In 41·4% of ITP cases (n = 14), complete response (CR- platelet count >100 × 10(9) /l) was achieved and in 2 cases, therapy was stopped and CR maintained. In our bridging group (n = 15) with a higher baseline platelet count, 93·3% achieved a CR. In the non-ITP group (n = 13), a response was achieved in 76·9%. In all groups, side effects were transient, with the drug discontinued in 2 patients due to minor complications (rash, nausea, diarrhoea). We conclude that eltrombopag is both effective and well tolerated as therapy in severe ITP. It is also advantageous in ITP patients who do not normally require therapy, but need a temporary platelet count boost pre-procedure. Furthermore, there are potentially far wider implications for the use of eltrombopag in counteracting thrombocytopenia beyond ITP, which merit further investigation.

  13. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770

  14. Hepatitis B Leading to Megaloblastic Anemia and Catastrophic Peripheral Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Sarfraz, Tariq; Khan, Raja Ghayas; Rafe, Abdul; Rasool, Ghulam; Ahmed, Kamran Nazir

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) typically causes chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is associated with a variety of extrahepatic complications. We herein, present a rare extrahepatic complication of HBV infection. A 32-year man presented with melena, bleeding from gums and fever. Peripheral blood examination revealed anemia, macrocytosis and severe thrombocytopenia. His hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was positive but deoxyribonucleic acid (HBV DNA) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was negative. Other hepatitis, human immune deficiency virus (HIV), dengue, and autoimmune serology were negative. Bone marrow examination revealed megaloblastic erythropoiesis. There was mild to moderate reduction of megakaryocytes in bone marrow, which was not compatible with severe peripheral thrombocytopenia. His response to cyanocobalamin and folic acid was remarkable for myeloid cell lines and moderate for erythroid cell lines, but poor to platelet counts. Platelet counts gradually improved to safe limits with eltrombopag, likely reflecting autoimmune pathogenesis for thrombocytopenia. This case report highlights multiple targets of HBV infection with associated multiple pathogenetic mechanisms.

  15. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome: a clinical genetic study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, K; Howell, R; Bottani, A; Ancliff, P; Brunner, H; Verschuuren-Bemel..., C; Vernon, E; Brown, K; Newbury-Ecob, R

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to describe this condition, but it was Hall et al in 1969 who reported the first major series of patients. Since then most reports have been based on single or small numbers of cases. We report the results of a clinical study looking at the phenotype of 34 patients with TAR syndrome. All cases had a documented thrombocytopenia and bilateral radial aplasia, 47% had lower limb anomalies, 47% cow's milk intolerance, 23% renal anomalies, and 15% cardiac anomalies. Congenital anomalies not previously described in association with TAR syndrome included facial capillary haemangiomata, intracranial vascular malformation, sensorineural hearing loss, and scoliosis. Karyotype analysis, chromosome breakage studies including premature centromeric separation and fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies looking for a deletion of chromosome 22q11 were undertaken. Two abnormal karyotypes were identified. PMID:12471199

  16. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia complicating support by the Berlin Heart.

    PubMed

    Eghtesady, Pirooz; Nelson, David; Schwartz, Steven M; Wheeler, Derek; Pearl, Jeffrey M; Cripe, Linda H; Manning, Peter B

    2005-01-01

    Since 1992, miniaturized pulsatile air-driven ventricular assist devices (VADs), "Berlin Heart," have been used at many institutions (36 cases in North America in 19 different institutions) for pediatric use. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT II) is a significant complication rarely reported in the setting of adult VAD support; no similar report exists concerning pediatric VAD support. We report on a 13-month-old, 8.1 kg girl who required LVAD support for cardiogenic shock of unclear etiology. The patient had a history of multiple surgical repairs for correction of complex congenital heart disease consisting of a series of left heart obstructive lesions (Shone's complex). Despite aggressive ventilatory and inotropic support, the patient continued to deteriorate and subsequently required extracorporeal life support. After 7 days of conventional venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a 10 ml Berlin Heart VAD was implanted. After implantation, the patient developed persistent low-grade fever of unclear etiology, gradual thrombocytopenia, and deterioration of renal function. On postimplant day 10, the pump required replacement because of concerns about an inlet valve thrombus; the explanted device demonstrated a nearly occlusive clot not appreciable from external inspection. Simultaneously, HIT II was diagnosed as a result of hematology workup for persistent thrombocytopenia. We discuss the unique challenges posed by HIT II complicating pediatric VAD support and in relation to the heparin coating of the device.

  17. Platelet antibody in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombocytopenias

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    Platelet-associated immunoglobulin was measured by the use of fluorescent anti-1gG antibody. The method is simple, rapid, and sensitive and provides a precise quantitive assay of bound (direct) and free (indirect) 1gG with platelet specificity. We have evaluated this test in 30 normal volunteers and in 50 patients with immune and nonimmune, treated and untreated thrombocytopenias. All patients with immune thrombocytopenias (acute and chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus) having platelet counts < 100,000/..mu..l had elevated levels of platelet-bound 1gG and 86% had also positive results in the indirect assay. All patients with nonimmunological thrombocytopenias showed normal results in the direct and indirect assay of platelet-associated immunoglobulin. In patients studied repeatedly during the course of their illness, an inverse relation was found between platelet count and level of platelet-bound 1gG. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presented clear exceptions to this rule. Investigations of the absorbability of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies showed that this assay can readily differentiate between these two antibody species and can also identify specificities of alloantibodies.

  18. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with neonatal onset.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Khamis Butt, Umar Bin; Mannan, Jovaria

    2014-05-01

    We describe 2 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is a rare disorder of auto-immunity, chronic persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and hyper gamma globulinemia (1gG, 1gA). Both cases presented in neonatal period which is a rare age of presentation in this disease. A 20 days old female neonate presented with respiratory symptoms which rapidly progressed needing ventilatory support. There was hepatomegaly and no auscultatory findings in the chest. Serial CBCs (complete blood counts) showed persistent leucocytosis with predominant lymphocytosis. Her chest X-ray showed left sided consolidation which responded poorly to antibiotics. Her prompt clinical response to steroids raised the suspicion of autoimmunity and the diagnosis was established after a negative bone marrow examination for leukemia and a positive result for ALPS on flow cytometry. The second case presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia starting in neonatal period followed by persistent lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent infections which responded poorly to antibiotics. Diagnosis was delayed due to low index of suspicion, and finally achieved with multiple radiological studies, histopathology and flow cytometry.

  19. Simian Retrovirus 4 Induces Lethal Acute Thrombocytopenia in Japanese Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Nakagawa, So; Miura, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2001-2002, six of seven Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) died after developing hemorrhagic syndrome at the Kyoto University Primate Research Institute (KUPRI). While the cause of death was unknown at the time, we detected simian retrovirus 4 (SRV-4) in samples obtained from a similar outbreak in 2008-2011, during which 42 of 43 Japanese macaques died after exhibiting hemorrhagic syndrome. In this study, we isolated SRV-4 strain PRI-172 from a Japanese macaque showing severe thrombocytopenia. When inoculated into four Japanese macaques, the isolate induced severe thrombocytopenia in all within 37 days. We then constructed an infectious molecular clone of strain PRI-172, termed pSR415, and inoculated the clone-derived virus into two Japanese macaques. These animals also developed severe thrombocytopenia in just 31 days after inoculation, and the virus was reisolated from blood, bone marrow, and stool. At necropsy, we observed bleeding from the gingivae and subcutaneous bleeding in all animals. SRV-4 infected a variety of tissues, especially in digestive organs, including colon and stomach, as determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, we identified the SRV-4 receptor as ASCT2, a neutral amino acid transporter. ASCT2 mRNA was expressed in a variety of tissues, and the distribution of SRV-4 proviruses in infected Japanese macaques correlated well with the expression levels of ASCT2 mRNA. From these results, we conclude that the causative agent of hemorrhagic syndrome in KUPRI Japanese macaques was SRV-4, and its receptor is ASCT2. IMPORTANCE During two separate outbreaks at the KUPRI, in 2001-2002 and 2008-2011, 96% of Japanese macaques (JM) that developed an unknown hemorrhagic syndrome died. Here, we isolated SRV-4 from a JM developing thrombocytopenia. The SRV-4 isolate and a molecularly cloned SRV-4 induced severe thrombocytopenia in virus-inoculated JMs within 37 days. At necropsy, we

  20. Diabetic ketoacidosis preceding thrombocytopenia associated multiple organ failure in a child.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kamakshya P; Scott, L Keith

    2011-01-05

    Thrombocytopenia associated multiple organ failure is a rare but increasingly recognized condition in children. Diabetic ketoacidosis preceding thrombocytopenia associated multiple organ failure is previously unreported in pediatric patients. A 12-year-old female presented with diabetic ketoacidosis along with acute pancreatitis. She further developed thrombocytopenia and renal failure over the next two days. Although hemolytic uremic syndrome/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura spectrum was considered, the clinical picture seemed most consistent with thrombocytopenia associated multiple organ failure. The patient was treated with serial therapeutic plasma exchanges and made a complete recovery. A high index of suspicion of thrombocytopenia associated multiple organ failure is required in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis or pancreatitis who present with thrombocytopenia and renal failure. Plasma exchange is a life-saving intervention in such cases.

  1. Ciprofloxacin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia: No cross-reactivity with gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Sim, D W; Yu, J E; Jeong, J; Koh, Y-I

    2017-08-08

    Fluoroquinolone-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia is uncommon, and no reports of cross-reactivity among fluoroquinolones exist. Here, we describe a case of ciprofloxacin-induced immune thrombocytopenia with no cross-reactivity with gemifloxacin. A 77-year-old woman showed profound thrombocytopenia immediately after two ciprofloxacin injections for pneumonia. Platelet counts recovered rapidly after ciprofloxacin discontinuation. She had experienced thrombocytopenia after ciprofloxacin administration 4 years earlier, which was assumed to be ciprofloxacin-induced immune-related. Interestingly, no thrombocytopenia occurred following the subsequent exposure to another fluoroquinolone, gemifloxacin. No cross-reactivity occurred between ciprofloxacin and gemifloxacin in this fluoroquinolone-induced immune thrombocytopenia case. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Heparin-Related Thrombocytopenia Triggered by Severe Status of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shihoko; Ando, Taiki; Oda, Keisuke; Sugita, Manabu; Maeda, Kunimi; Nakiri, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A patient with severe lupus nephritis developed thrombocytopenia during treatment with high-dose steroids. In addition to viral- or disease-induced cytopenia, the pathology was believed to arise from diverse contributing factors, such as thrombotic microangiopathy and heparin-related thrombocytopenia (HIT). By combining plasma exchange therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, we successfully controlled the SLE activity and improved the thrombocytopenia. An antecedent bacterial infection or SLE activity is believed to have contributed to the concurrent HIT. PMID:27699076

  3. Interferon-α induced severe thrombocytopenia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Han, Da-Kang; Lu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of severe thrombocytopenia following pegylated interferon-α 2a (Peg-IFN-α 2a) treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and summarize the clinical characteristics of 16 cases of IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia and its immune-mediated mechanism. Discontinuation of IFN-α and early administration of immunosuppressants are the effective therapy for IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:20238410

  4. Thrombocytopenia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Clinical Manifestations, Treatment, and Prognosis in 230 Patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin-Hee; Soh, Moon-Seung; Ahn, Young-Hwan; Um, Yoo-Jin; Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the clinical characteristics and prognosis according to severity of thrombocytopenia and response to treatment for thrombocytopenia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).We retrospectively evaluated 230 SLE patients with thrombocytopenia, and reviewed their clinical data and laboratory findings. Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet counts under 100,000/mm, and patients were divided into 3 thrombocytopenia groups according to severity: mild (platelet counts >50,000/mm), moderate (>20,000/mm, ≤50,000/mm), and severe (≤20,000/mm). Clinical characteristics, treatments, and prognoses were compared among the groups. Furthermore, complete remission of thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet counts >100,000/mm after treatment.There was no significant difference in clinical or laboratory findings among the groups according to severity of thrombocytopenia. However, hemorrhagic complications were more frequent in severe thrombocytopenia (P < 0.001) and mortality was also higher (P = 0.001). Complete remission was achieved in 85.2% of patients. The clinical characteristics and modality of treatment did not differ between the patients with and without complete remission. Mortality in patients with complete remission (1.5%) was significantly lower than in those without complete remission (29.4%, P < 0.001). Survival was significantly higher in patients with complete remission from thrombocytopenia (odds ratio = 0.049, 95% confidence interval: 0.013-0.191, P < 0.001).The severity of thrombocytopenia in SLE patients can be a useful independent prognostic factor to predict survival. Moreover, complete remission of thrombocytopenia after treatment is an important prognostic factor. The severity of thrombocytopenia and response to treatment should be closely monitored to predict prognosis in SLE patients.

  5. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  6. Inhibition of erythroid progenitor cells by anti-Kell antibodies in fetal alloimmune anemia.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J I; Manning, M; Warwick, R M; Letsky, E A; Murray, N A; Roberts, I A

    1998-03-19

    In alloimmune anemia of the newborn, the level of hemolysis caused by the presence of antibodies to antigens of the Kell blood-group system is less than that caused by antibodies to the D antigen of the Rh blood-group system, and the numbers of reticulocytes and normoblasts in the baby's circulation are inappropriately low for the degree of anemia. These findings suggest that sensitization to Kell antigens results in suppression of fetal erythropoiesis as well as hemolysis. We compared the growth in vitro of Kell-positive and Kell-negative hematopoietic progenitor cells from cord blood in the presence of human monoclonal anti-Kell antibodies and anti-D antibodies and serum from women with anti-Kell antibodies. The growth of Kell-positive erythroid progenitor cells (erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units) from cord blood was markedly inhibited by monoclonal IgG and IgM anti-Kell antibodies in a dose-dependent fashion (range of concentrations, 0.2 to 20 percent), but monoclonal anti-D antibodies had no effect. The growth of these types of cells from Kell-negative cord blood was not affected by either type of antibody. Neither monoclonal anti-Kell antibodies nor monoclonal anti-D antibodies inhibited the growth of granulocyte or megakaryocyte progenitor cells from cord blood. Serum from 22 women with anti-Kell antibodies inhibited the growth of Kell-positive erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units but not of Kell-negative erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units (P<0.001 for the difference between groups). The maternal anti-Kell antibodies had no inhibitory effects on granulocyte-macrophage or mega-karyocyte progenitor cells from cord blood. Anti-Kell antibodies specifically inhibit the growth of Kell-positive erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units, a finding that supports the hypothesis that these antibodies cause fetal anemia by suppressing erythropoiesis at the progenitor-cell level.

  7. Increased perinatal loss after intrauterine transfusion for alloimmune anaemia before 20 weeks of gestation.

    PubMed

    Lindenburg, I T M; van Kamp, I L; van Zwet, E W; Middeldorp, J M; Klumper, F J C M; Oepkes, D

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate and compare perinatal outcome after intrauterine transfusions (IUT) performed before and after 20 weeks of gestation. To analyse contributing factors. Retrospective analysis. The Dutch referral centre for fetal therapy. IUTs for fetal alloimmune anaemia. Fetuses were divided into two groups: fetuses requiring the first IUT before 20 weeks of gestation (Group 1) and those in which the IUTs started after 20 weeks (Group 2). The cause of perinatal loss was classified as procedure-related (PR) or not procedure-related (NPR). The cohort was divided into two periods to describe the change of perinatal loss over time. Perinatal loss of fetuses requiring the first IUT before 20 weeks of gestation, compared with perinatal loss later in gestation. A total of 1422 IUTs were performed in 491 fetuses. Perinatal loss rate in Group 1 was higher (7/29 24% versus 35/462 8%, P = 0.002). Especially NPR was higher for IUTs performed before 20 weeks (4/37 11% versus 19/1385 1%, P < 0.001). Kell alloimmunisation was overrepresented in Group 1 (7/29 24% versus 52/462 11%, P = 0.04). In a multivariate regression analysis, only hydrops was independently associated with perinatal loss (P = 0.001). In recent years, a decline in total perinatal loss was found (36/224 16% versus 6/267 2%, P < 0.001), but perinatal loss in Group 1 did not decline (4/224 1.8% versus 3/267 1.1%, P = 0.5). Perinatal loss after IUT performed before 20 weeks of gestation is increased compared with loss after IUT performed later in gestation. In addition, we confirmed earlier observations that hydrops is a major contributor to adverse outcome. Early and timely detection and treatment may prevent hydrops and improve outcome. © 2013 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2013 RCOG.

  8. Enoxaparin can be used safely in patients with severe thrombocytopenia due to intensive chemotherapy regimens.

    PubMed

    Herishanu, Yair; Misgav, Mudi; Kirgner, Ilya; Ben-Tal, Ofira; Eldor, Amiram; Naparstek, Ella

    2004-07-01

    Treatment with intensive chemotherapy regimens is frequently complicated by severe thrombocytopenia. During the period of severe thrombocytopenia, anticoagulant treatment is not uncommonly indicated for thromboembolic events or thromboprophylaxis in these patients. We report 10 hematological patients treated with intensive chemotherapy protocols that were anticoagulated with enoxaparin for catheter related central venous thrombosis and thromboprophylaxis. During the period of severe thrombocytopenia the dosages of enoxaparin were reduced and no major bleeding occurred. Based on our experience we suggest that reduced dosages of low molecular weight heparins may be used relatively safely during transient severe thrombocytopenia.

  9. Additional red blood cell alloantibodies after blood transfusions in a nonhematologic alloimmunized patient cohort: is it time to take precautionary measures?

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Henk; van de Watering, Leo M G; Brand, Anneke

    2006-04-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is common in transfused patients. Most studies report on the rate of alloimmunization in chronically transfused patients, which can be as high as 60 percent. Less is known on the incidence of clinically relevant antibodies in accidentally transfused patients. Because the probability of repeat transfusion increases with longer life expectancy, it was wondered to which extend non-chronically transfused alloimmunized patients are prone to form additional antibodies after repeat transfusion events. A 20-year retrospective multicenter study was performed analyzing additional alloantibody formation, against the RH, KEL, FY, JK, and MNS blood group systems. After additional transfusions, 21.4 percent of 653 patients produced additional antibodies, resulting in 157 new antibody specificities. At the end of the study 33.4 percent of patients had multiple antibodies. Eighty of 140 patients (57%) who formed additional antibodies did so after one transfusion episode of a median of 2 units of RBCs. Based on the antigen profile of 316 patients, 83 percent of antibodies could have been prevented by extended matching for the C, E, c, K, Fy(a), and Jk(a) antigens. Considering the current available donors in our region, 1 to 10 percent of potential donors would be available for 39 percent of patients and greater than 10 percent of potential donors for 61 percent of patients. It has been shown that nonhematooncologic alloimmunized patients are high antibody responders, with a more than 20 times increased risk to form antibodies compared to first-time alloimmunization risk. If extended matching for C, c, E, K, Fy(a), and Jk(a) antigens in the future is considered, this group should be taken into account.

  10. Banking of pluripotent adult stem cells as an unlimited source for red blood cell production: potential applications for alloimmunized patients and rare blood challenges.

    PubMed

    Peyrard, Thierry; Bardiaux, Laurent; Krause, Claire; Kobari, Ladan; Lapillonne, Hélène; Andreu, Georges; Douay, Luc

    2011-07-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is now considered a well-settled and essential therapy. However, some difficulties and constraints still occur, such as long-term blood product shortage, blood donor population aging, known and yet unknown transfusion-transmitted infectious agents, growing cost of the transfusion supply chain management, and the inescapable blood group polymorphism barrier. Red blood cells can be now cultured in vitro from human hematopoietic, human embryonic, or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The highly promising hiPSC technology represents a potentially unlimited source of RBCs and opens the door to the revolutionary development of a new generation of allogeneic transfusion products. Assuming that in vitro large-scale cultured RBC production efficiently operates in the near future, we draw here some futuristic but realistic scenarios regarding potential applications for alloimmunized patients and those with a rare blood group. We retrospectively studied a cohort of 16,486 consecutive alloimmunized patients (10-year period), showing 1 to 7 alloantibodies with 361 different antibody combinations. We showed that only 3 hiPSC clones would be sufficient to match more than 99% of the 16,486 patients in need of RBC transfusions. The study of the French National Registry of People with a Rare Blood Phenotype/Genotype (10-year period) shows that 15 hiPSC clones would cover 100% of the needs in patients of white ancestry. In addition, one single hiPSC clone would meet 73% of the needs in alloimmunized patients with sickle cell disease for whom rare cryopreserved RBC units were required. As a result, we consider that a very limited number of RBC clones would be able to not only provide for the need for most alloimmunized patients and those with a rare blood group but also efficiently allow for a policy for alloimmunization prevention in multiply transfused patients.

  11. [Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II: reexposure to heparin].

    PubMed

    Matthies, B; Bürger, T; Koch, B; Böck, M

    1999-10-29

    At the age of 55 years a now 70-year-old man had his aortic valve replaced by a prosthetic (Björk-Shiley) valve, and 11 years later a VDD pacemaker had been implanted. 18 months before the latest admission he had been hospitalized for treatment of staphylococcal endocarditis involving the aortic prothesis. At that time thrombocytopenia developed during heparin administration, diagnosed clinically and with the heparin-induced platelet activity (HIPA) test as type II heparin induced thrombocytopenia. His latest admission was for the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease of the right leg (Fontaine stage IIb). Right popliteal and pedal pulses were not palpable. He was able to walk pain-free for only 70 m. Doppler sonography demonstrated an arm-leg index on the right of 0.7. Angiography revealed marked stenosis in the right superficial femoral artery and a filiform stenosis in the right popliteal artery. Both stenoses were relieved by percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty, in the course of which 5000 IU heparin were administered as a bolus intraarterially. Postoperative anticoagulation was maintained for 2 days with recombinant hirudin. There was no evidence of platelet reduction or heparin-induced antibodies despite the renewed infusion of heparin. Single re-administration of heparin in a patient who had developed a type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia several years before does not necessarily lead to a booster of antibodies and thus to a reduction of platelets in the peripheral blood. It is a moot point whether the course in this case was an exception or the rule.

  12. Interferon-β therapy and risk of thrombocytopenia in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Koudriavtseva, Tatiana; Plantone, Domenico; Renna, Rosaria; Mandoj, Chiara; Giannarelli, Diana; Mainero, Caterina

    2015-12-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a well-described adverse event of several disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in multiple sclerosis (MS). On the other hand, an increased prevalence of MS has been reported in patients with immune thrombocytopenia. In this retrospective, cross-sectional, case-control study we evaluated in a heterogeneous MS cohort: (1) the prevalence of thrombocytopenia in comparison with sex- and age-matched controls; (2) the relationship between thrombocytopenia and patients' demographic, clinical characteristics; (3) the risk for thrombocytopenia in relation to DMT. 187 consecutive MS patients [51 males, mean age (±SD) 44.5 ± 10.7 years] and 200 controls (56 males, mean age 45.5 ± 12 years) were included. Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet count lower than normal laboratory values (130-400 × 10(9)/L). The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was significantly higher in MS patients than in controls (7 vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.04). Thrombocytopenia was present only in relapsing-remitting MS cases, and significantly associated with lower EDSS (p = 0.002) and with a trend for shorter disease duration (p = 0.06). It was more frequent in patients on high-dose interferon-β therapy compared with those on low-dose interferon-β therapy, other therapies or untreated patients (p = 0.02). High-dose interferon-β therapy was associated with more than eightfold increase in the risk for thrombocytopenia (odds ratio 8.60, 95 % confidence interval: 1.01-74.48 adjusted for EDSS, disease duration and type of disease). The prevalence of thrombocytopenia was increased in MS patients treated with DMT. High-dose interferon-β therapy is the variable most strongly associated with thrombocytopenia.

  13. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  14. [Latest Advance of Study on Pathogenesis of Immune Thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is recognized as a multifactorial cell-specific autoimmune disorder, and its pathogenesis is still not very clear. Traditional concept suggests that the platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies is the pathophysiology mechanism of ITP, while many studies in recent years have shown that the abnormities of T lymphocyte, dendritic cell (DC), natural killer cell (NK), cytokine, programmed cell death (PCD), oxidative stress (OS), infection, pregnancy and drugs etc play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP. Since the study of ITP has made a series of important achievements in recent years, this review focuses on the latest advance of studies on pathogenesis of ITP.

  15. Immune-mediated mechanism for thrombocytopenia after Loxosceles spider bite.

    PubMed

    Levin, Carina; Bonstein, Lilach; Lauterbach, Roy; Mader, Rivka; Rozemman, Dganit; Koren, Ariel

    2014-08-01

    Loxoscelism, characterized by high fever, vomiting, malaise, a dermonecrotic lesion, and thrombocytopenia, was diagnosed in a 3-year-old female. Clinical laboratory and dermatological signs are described. Blood test showed a transient hypercoagulable state and the presence of IgG antibodies against platelets, suggesting an immune-mediated mechanism for platelet destruction, in addition to the direct toxic effect of the spider venom. The finding of platelet antibodies after a Loxosceles spider bite has not been previously reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  17. Neonatal lupus with atypical cardiac and cutaneous manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sofia; Santos, Isabel Cristina; Pereira, Dolores Faria; Mimoso, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is a rare, passively acquired autoimmune disease, caused by maternal autoantibodies. The most common manifestations are skin rash and congenital heart block. Cutaneous manifestations may be present at birth, but often develop within a few weeks after delivery. Congenital heart block may present as bradycardia in utero or during physical examination at birth. Approximately 40–60% of mothers are asymptomatic when the infants are diagnosed. We present a case of a child, born with erythematosus lesions in the face, scalp, trunk, limbs and nodules/papules on the palmar and plantar surfaces. He also had hepatosplenomegaly and thrombocytopenia. Echocardiography showed hyperechoic lesions on the anterior papilar muscle of the left ventricle and on the lateral cusp of the tricuspid valve. The mother had unexplained fever and vasculitic lesions in her hands and feet. Antinuclear antibodies, anti-SSa/Ro and anti-SSb/La were positive in the mother and child, making the diagnosis of neonatal lupus. PMID:23839605

  18. Brain ultrasound findings in neonates treated with intrauterine transfusion for fetal anaemia.

    PubMed

    Leijser, Lara M; Vos, Nikki; Walther, Frans J; van Wezel-Meijler, Gerda

    2012-09-01

    The main causes of severe fetal anaemia are red-cell allo-immunization, parvo B19 virus infection and feto-maternal haemorrhage. Treatment consists of intrauterine transfusion (IUT). Neuro-imaging studies in surviving neonates treated with IUT are scarce. To assess if neonates treated with IUT for fetal anaemia are at risk for cerebral injury, report the incidence and severity of brain ultrasound (US) abnormalities and explore the relation between brain US findings and perinatal parameters and neurological outcome. Brain US scans of neonates born alive between 2001 and 2008 with at least one IUT were retrospectively reviewed and classified as normal, mildly or moderately/severely abnormal. Incidences of abnormalities were calculated for full-term and preterm neonates. Presence and severity of abnormalities were related to clinical and IUT related parameters and to neurological outcome around 2 years of age (adverse: moderate or severe disability; favourable: normal or mild disability). A total of 127 neonates (82 born preterm) were included. Median number of IUTs was 3 (range 1-6) and of brain US 2 (1-6). Median gestational age and weight at birth were 36.6 (26.0-41.1) weeks and 2870 (1040-3950)g. In 72/127 (57%) neonates ≥1 abnormality was seen on brain US, classified as moderate/severe in 30/127 (24%). Neurological outcome was adverse in 5 infants. Presence of brain US abnormalities was not significantly related to any of the perinatal parameters or to neurological outcome. Neonates undergoing IUT for fetal anaemia are at high risk of brain injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inherited Thrombocytopenia with a Different Type of Gene Mutation: A Brief Literature Review and Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary thrombocytopenias are rare bleeding disorders, which cause a deficiency of platelets in early infancy. This group of disorders is sometimes associated with abnormal phenotypes, like absence of radius. Diagnosis of this type of thrombocytopenia is usually difficult; other causes of thrombocytopenia, such as immune disorders and infections, must be ruled out. The symptoms of hereditary thrombocytopenia also vary from seldom and mild to severe bleeding and occasionally may first occur in late childhood. In this group of patients, we must differentiate heritable disorders from the acquired types of thrombocytopenia, like immune thrombocytopenic purpura. It is also important to watch for pitfalls to avoid unnecessary and potentially hazardous treatment. Herein, we briefly review the recent literature on hereditary thrombocytopenia and then present the cases of two referred patients. The first case had suffered from persistent thrombocytopenia since early infancy and was diagnosed with congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, while the other patient presented with Wiskott - Aldrich syndrome. PMID:28203325

  20. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    During 2013–2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. PMID:27767921

  1. Persistent immune thrombocytopenia heralds the diagnosis of Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Keith A; Burton, M Caroline

    2017-01-01

    A 63 year old female was admitted for investigation of worsening renal insufficiency. During hospitalization she developed persistent immune thrombocytopenia refractory to supportive or immunosuppressive treatment. She was diagnosed with Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis and thrombocytopenia resolved with anti-mycobacterial therapy.

  2. Mutational inhibition of c-Myb or p300 ameliorates treatment-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Douglas J.; Kile, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb and coregulator p300 have a key role in maintaining production of controlled numbers of megakaryocytes and platelets. In mice, mutations in c-Myb or p300 cause thrombocytosis in otherwise wild-type animals and can ameliorate the thrombocytopenia in mice lacking the thrombopoietin receptor, c-Mpl, a model for human congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia. To examine whether inhibition of c-Myb/p300 is effective in other models of thrombocytopenia, the effect of the c-MybPlt4 mutation on thrombocytopenia associated with reduced platelet life span in Bcl-XPlt20/Plt20 mice was assessed, as were responses in c-MybPlt4 and/or p300Plt6 mutant mice to thrombocytopenia associated with antiplatelet antibodies, chemotherapy, or bone marrow transplantation. Homozygosity of the c-MybPlt4 allele ameliorated thrombocytopenia associated with reduced platelet life span, and c-MybPlt4/+ mice exhibited more rapid than normal recovery from thrombocytopenia caused by antiplatelet serum or bone marrow transplantation. Recovery to pretreatment platelet levels was unaltered in 5-fluorouracil–treated c-MybPlt4/+ mice relative to wild-type controls, but enhanced platelet production during subsequent thrombocytosis was evident. More modest enhancement of platelet recovery after 5-fluorouracil or bone marrow transplantation was also evident in p300Plt6/+ animals. The data suggest potential utility of c-Myb/p300 as a target for therapeutic intervention in thrombocytopenia of diverse origins. PMID:19252138

  3. Seroprevalence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Hedgehog from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Liu, Miao-Miao; Luo, Li-Mei; Zhao, Li; Wen, Hong-Ling; Zhang, Zhen-Tang; Liu, Jian-Wei; Xue, Zai-Feng; Ma, Dong-Qiang; Ding, Shu-Jun; Lei, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2017-05-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, an emerging hemorrhagic fever, is caused by severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), a tick-borne bunyavirus. Information regarding SFTSV animal hosts is very limited. In this study, we showed that 64% (9/14) of hedgehogs in Shandong Province, China were seropositive to SFTSV antibody, suggesting that hedgehog could be a vertebrate parasitifer for SFTSV.

  4. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-11-01

    During 2013-2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

  5. Platelets in the neonatal period: developmental differences in platelet production, function, and hemostasis and the potential impact of therapies.

    PubMed

    Sola-Visner, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem among sick neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Frequently, platelet transfusions are given to thrombocytopenic infants in an attempt to decrease the incidence or severity of hemorrhage, which is often intracranial. Whereas there is very limited evidence to guide platelet transfusion practices in this population, preterm infants in the first week of life (the highest risk period for bleeding) are nearly universally transfused at higher platelet counts than older infants or children. To a large extent, this practice has been influenced by the observation that neonatal platelets are hyporeactive in response to multiple agonists in vitro, although full-term infants exhibit normal to increased primary hemostasis. This apparently paradoxical finding is due to factors in the neonatal blood that enhance the platelet-vessel wall interaction and counteract the platelet hyporeactivity. Relatively few studies have evaluated the platelet function and primary hemostasis of preterm infants, the subset of neonates at highest risk of bleeding and those most frequently transfused. Current understanding of platelet production and function in preterm and full-term neonates, how these factors affect their response to thrombocytopenia and their primary hemostasis, and the implications of these developmental differences to transfusion medicine are reviewed herein.

  6. Immunity to Polyomavirus BK Infection: Immune Monitoring to Regulate the Balance between Risk of BKV Nephropathy and Induction of Alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, Michela; Basso, Sabrina; Gagliardone, Chiara; Potenza, Leonardo; Verrina, Enrico; Luppi, Mario; Zecca, Marco; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Ginevri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy (PyVAN) is the main infectious cause of allograft damage after kidney transplantation. A number of studies revealed an association between the presence of BKV-specific cellular immunity and BK viral clearance, with patients failing to recover specific T cells progressing to PyVAN. Evolution to allograft dysfunction can be prevented by restoration of BKV-specific immunity through a stepwise reduction of maintenance immunosuppressive drugs. Prospective monitoring of BK viral load and specific immunity, together with B-cell alloimmune surveillance, may allow a targeted modification/reduction of immunosuppression, with the aim of obtaining viral clearance while preventing graft injury due to deposition of de novo donor-specific HLA antibodies and late/chronic antibody-mediated allograft injury. Innovative, immune-based therapies may further contribute to BKV infection prevention and control. PMID:24000288

  7. Clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenia associated with autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Shiju; Sun, Yuechi; Lin, Qingyan; Liao, Xining; Zhang, Junhui; Luo, Jiao; Qian, Hongyan; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To clarify clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) subsets associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Five thousand five hundred twenty patients were reviewed retrospectively. One hundred four ITP patients were included for analysis. Clinical manifestations at first thrombocytopenic episode were recorded. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS) accounted for a large part in AIDs associated with secondary ITP. SLE-ITP, pSS-ITP, and primary ITP (pITP) patients were different in several aspects in clinical and immunological characteristics. A subgroup of patients in pITP patients with some obvious autoimmune features (defined as AIF-ITP) such as positive ANA but failing to meet the diagnosis criteria now used for a specific kind of connective tissue diseases were also different with other pITP patients in some immunological features, indicating the difference in the pathogenesis mechanism of those autoimmune featured ITP patients. ITP patients were heterogeneous in clinical characteristics. Further study about the different pathogenesis of ITP subsets especially those AIF-ITP patients who only presented with thrombocytopenia will help us have a better understanding of pathogenesis of ITP and a better management of ITP patients. PMID:27977588

  8. Invasive Thymoma with Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kiyoki, Yusuke; Ueda, Sho; Yamaoka, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Seiich; Inagaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a case involving a 67-yearold female patient who was referred to our hospital due to severe anemia (hemoglobin, 5.0 g/dL), thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 0.6 × 104/μL), and a mediastinal shadow with calcification noted on X-ray. On admission, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected, and bone marrow biopsy revealed few megakaryocytes and severely reduced numbers of erythroid cells. The diagnosis was thymoma with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAMT). On Day 8 of admission, the patient received immunosuppressive therapy together with cyclosporine for the 2 severe hematologic diseases, which were stabilized within 2 months. Subsequently, total thymectomy was performed. The diagnosis of the tumor invading the left lung was invasive thymoma, Masaokakoga stage III. The histological diagnosis was World Health Organization type AB. Thymoma accompanied with PRCA and AAMT is very rare, and, based on our case, immunotherapeutic therapy for the hematologic disorders should precede surgical intervention. PMID:28053696

  9. Histones induce rapid and profound thrombocytopenia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Ashish A.

    2011-01-01

    Histones are released from dying cells and contribute to antimicrobial defense during infection. However, extracellular histones are a double-edged sword because they also damage host tissue and may cause death. We studied the interactions of histones with platelets. Histones bound to platelets, induced calcium influx, and recruited plasma adhesion proteins such as fibrinogen to induce platelet aggregation. Hereby fibrinogen cross-linked histone-bearing platelets and triggered microaggregation. Fibrinogen interactions with αIIbβ3 integrins were not required for this process but were necessary for the formation of large platelet aggregates. Infused histones associated with platelets in vivo and caused a profound thrombocytopenia within minutes after administration. Mice lacking platelets or αIIbβ3 integrins were protected from histone-induced death but not from histone-induced tissue damage. Heparin, at high concentrations, prevented histone interactions with platelets and protected mice from histone-induced thrombocytopenia, tissue damage, and death. Heparin and histones are evolutionary maintained. Histones may combine microbicidal with prothrombotic properties to fight invading microbes and maintain hemostasis after injury. Heparin may provide an innate counter mechanism to neutralize histones and diminish collateral tissue damage. PMID:21700775

  10. Fatal thrombocytopenia: A rare case with possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A 22 year old male presented with breathlessness on exertion, ecchymosis, jaundice and features of worsening right heart failure for the last fifteen days. On physical examination, he had a mid diastolic murmur in the tricuspid area and an ejection systolic murmur in the pulmonary area. Bone marrow histopathology report showed an increased in megakaryocytes count. Routine investigations reports were normal. Echocardiography and computerized tomography (CT) revealed a single mobile large intra cardiac mass originating from the right atrium and causing dynamic obstruction of the right ventricular inflow and outflow tract. Associated fatal thrombocytopenia did not respond to intravenous steroids or platelet transfusion. Patient could not be operated because of very low platelet count, and died during hospital stay before excision biopsy could be done. Pathological autopsy was not done. This is a rare case, as the fatal thrombocytopenia observed here was the result of mechanical effects like frictional and shear force, which can be attributed to the physical presence of a large intra cardiac mass resulting in obstruction to flow. PMID:22629036

  11. A rare case of acyclovir-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Jasmine; Wu, Fang; Kamboj, Rahul; Suzue, Kimiko; Khosla, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Acyclovir is used for its potent antiviral properties for the mucocutaneous herpes, herpes zoster, herpes encephalitis, and genital herpes simplex. The drug has a very wide distribution involving almost every organ of the body, with excretion into the urine. Urine analysis, kidney function, liver function, and complete blood counts are some of the monitoring parameters. The active triphosphate form of the drug inhibits DNA synthesis and viral replication by competing with deoxyguanosine triphosphate for viral DNA polymerase and being incorporated into viral DNA. Because the drug is only absorbed by the cells that are virus infected, acyclovir has minimal side effects at therapeutic doses. However, at high intravenous infusions, severe central nervous system (malaise), gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting), renal (elevated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine), hepatic (elevated liver enzymes), and skin dyscrasias have been found to occur. There have been few case reports of bone marrow suppression and only one case report so far of acyclovir-related isolated thrombocytopenia. Whether there is any further association between acyclovir and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome is the next dilemma if such an association is established. Here, the authors present a case report of a 58-year-old man with acquired immune deficiency syndrome on highly active antiretroviral therapy who went into severe thrombocytopenia on starting acyclovir.

  12. Thrombocytopenia impairs host defense during murine Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Schouten, Marcel; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Brands, Xanthe; Schultz, Marcus J; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. In patients, thrombocytopenia is correlated with an adverse outcome of pneumonia. Platelets can modulate the host response to infection in several ways, that is, by facilitating clot formation, production of antimicrobial proteins, and interaction with neutrophils. We studied the effect of thrombocytopenia during murine pneumococcal pneumonia. Animal study. University research laboratory. Mice. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae. Platelets were depleted by anti-mouse thrombocyte serum; controls received nonimmunogenic serum. In separate studies, mice were treated with the platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibitor clopidogrel or placebo. Thrombocytopenic mice (platelet counts < 1% of uninfected controls) showed a reduced survival during pneumococcal pneumonia (27% vs 75% among controls; p = 0.003), which was associated with higher bacterial loads in lungs, spleen, and blood. Thrombocytopenic mice showed enhanced coagulation activation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes) in plasma. Proinflammatory cytokine levels were higher in plasma but not in lungs of thrombocytopenic mice. Although clopidogrel treatment strongly prolonged the bleeding time, it did not impact on bacterial loads during pneumococcal pneumonia. Platelets play a protective role during pneumococcal pneumonia independent of their aggregation.

  13. Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Acute and Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dorgalaleh, Akbar; Mahmudi, Mohammad; Tabibian, Shadi; Khatib, Zahra Kashani; Tamaddon, Gholam Hossein; Moghaddam, Esmaeil Sanei; Bamedi, Taregh; Alizadeh, Shaban; Moradi, Eshagh

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute renal failure describes as a syndrome by rapid decline in the ability of the kidney to eliminate waste products, regulate acid–base balance, and manage water homeostasis. When this impairment is prolonged and entered chronic phase, erythropoietin secretion by this organ is decreasing and toxic metabolic accumulates and causes hematological changes include decrease of HCT, MCV and RBC and platelet counts. This study evaluates present of anemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with acute and chronic renal failure. Materials and Methods This study conducted on 132 patients with renal impairment and also 179 healthy individuals as two separated control groups. Initially patients with renal problem were tested and after confirmation of impairment, patients were divided in two groups, acute with less than 3 months and chronic with more than 3 months renal failure, based on duration of the disease. Then complete blood count performed for each patient and finally obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results Comparison between 96 patients with acute and 36 patients with chronic renal failure revealed that severity of anemia (HCT, Hb and MCV) between these two groups were statistically high in comparison with control groups (P > 0.05) but thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic renal failure was statistically different from control and the acute ones (P < 0.001). Conclusion It was recommended that in patients with chronic renal failure, to prevent the risk of bleeding, platelet count should be checked periodically. PMID:24505541

  14. Bilateral lower extremity gangrene requiring amputation associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brian P; Lawrence, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Heparin is a common cause of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients. Between 10% and 15% of patients receiving therapeutic doses of heparin develop thrombocytopenia. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) can cause severe bleeding and thrombosis owing to intravascular platelet aggregation. HIT must be distinguished from other causes of thrombocytopenia. Importantly, heparin use is often associated with an early fall in the platelet count that usually occurs within the first 4 days of initiation and recovers without cessation of heparin treatment. This nonimmune heparin-associated thrombocytopenia has not been found to be associated with thrombosis and does not necessitate discontinuation of heparin. The authors present a case report of a 70-year-old man who received heparin therapy following aortic tissue valve replacement and aortic root repair with graft and developed bilateral lower extremity arterial clots 6 days postoperatively in the setting of positive heparin antibody titers. Ultimately the patient required bilateral above-knee amputations.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and thrombocytopenia: a single-institution experience in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Gómez, Roberto A; Parra-Ortega, Israel; Martínez-Barreda, Carlos; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2007-01-01

    The association between gastrointestinal H. pylori infection and thrombocytopenia was studied in a single institution in Mexico, over a 5-year period. In 99 individuals with H. pylori infection, the prevalence of thrombocytopenia was 14%, whereas in 23 consecutive patients with chronic refractory thrombocytopenic purpura, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 60%, this figure being similar to that informed in the general population of Mexico (66%); the association between thrombocytopenia and H. pylori infection was not significant. In 14 patients who were found to have both thrombocytopenia and H. pylori infection, eradication treatment was given and the platelet count recovered in three. It is not still clear if detection of H. pylori infection should be routinely included in the initial workup of chronic thrombocytopenia.

  16. Thrombocytopenia associated with Mycoplasma pneumonia during pregnancy: case presentation and approach for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Aiko; Mimura, Kazuya; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia during pregnancy has many different causes, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae is not usually considered one of the several pathogens that induce thrombocytopenia. Herein, we present a case of severe thrombocytopenia that was associated with M. pneumoniae during pregnancy. The patient experienced fever, cough, and cytopenia with M. pneumoniae-specific IgM antibody increasing from 40-fold to 160-fold during the 2 weeks of illness. A diagnosis was made after excluding other diseases that cause thrombocytopenia. The patient was successfully treated with azithromycin hydrate, and she delivered a healthy newborn without any complications. Pregnant women who are infected with M. pneumoniae during pregnancy may develop severe and fatal thrombocytopenia. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment lead to early recovery.

  17. Risk factors associated with intraventricular hemorrhage in extremely premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jonathan C; Javed, M Jawad; Hocker, James R; Wang, Huaping; Tarantino, Michael D

    2017-09-08

    : Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a significant cause of morbidity in extremely premature infants despite many advances in neonatal intensive care. We conducted an institutional retrospective review aimed to correlate risk factors associated with IVH. Clinical variables reported to the Vermont-Oxford Network on less than 30 weeks gestational age infants over a 5-year period were evaluated with Pearson's chi-square and multivariate logistic regression. Of 618 infants born less than 30-week gestational age, 178 (28.8%) experienced IVH. Of those less than 1000 g, 105 (36.5%) of 288 infants experienced IVH. Multivariate analysis revealed that thrombocytopenia [odds ratio (OR) 2.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-3.19, P = 0.0020] and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ± intubation at delivery (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02, P = 0.0162) were independently associated with IVH. Among infants less than 1000 g, thrombocytopenia (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.22-3.60, P = 0.0077) and CPR ± intubation at delivery (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.10-3.68, P = 0.0229) were also significantly associated with IVH. IVH is a complex phenomenon with many contributing risk factors. In our study, infants less than 30-week gestational age and less than 1000 g revealed thrombocytopenia and CPR ± intubation in delivery room were independently associated with IVH. These data should alert clinicians to those neonates most likely to suffer IVH.

  18. CD44 Antibodies and Immune Thrombocytopenia in the Amelioration of Murine Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Patrick J.; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7), also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics. PMID:23785450

  19. Hepatitis B infection is associated with an increased incidence of thrombocytopenia in healthy adults without cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Joo, E-J; Chang, Y; Yeom, J-S; Lee, Y-G; Ryu, S

    2017-03-01

    The association between HBV infection and incident thrombocytopenia among subjects without cirrhosis or splenomegaly is unknown. Therefore, we sought to elucidate the association between HBV infection and the development of thrombocytopenia in a large cohort of apparently healthy men and women. A cohort study was performed in 122 200 participants without liver cirrhosis or splenomegaly who underwent comprehensive health examinations and were followed until December 2014. HBV infection was defined by the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) at baseline. Thrombocytopenia was defined as a platelet count <150 000/μL. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident thrombocytopenia. HBsAg was positive in 4857 of 122 200 subjects (4.0%) at baseline. During 883 983 person-years of follow-up, 2037 incident cases of thrombocytopenia were identified (incident rate 2.3 per 1000 person-years). HBsAg-positive subjects had a higher incidence of thrombocytopenia than did healthy controls (11.2 vs 1.9 per 1000 person-years, respectively). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) for incident thrombocytopenia comparing HBsAg-positive to HBsAg-negative subjects was 5.71 (5.10-6.38). Strong associations between HBsAg positivity and thrombocytopenia were consistently observed across prespecified subgroups. In this large cohort study of an apparently healthy population, HBsAg positivity was strongly and independently associated with incident thrombocytopenia, indicating that mechanisms of thrombocytopenia other than portal hypertension may exist in healthy HBV carriers.

  20. Thrombocytopenia as a thrombotic risk factor in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies without disease criteria.

    PubMed

    Demetrio Pablo, Rosalia; Muñoz, Pedro; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Calvo, Vanesa; Riancho, Leyre; Martínez-Taboada, Victor Manuel

    2017-05-10

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired immune disorder defined by the presence of thrombosis (arterial and/or venous) and/or pregnancy morbidity along with the presence of positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). There is a clear relationship between aPL and some events not included in the clinical criteria, including haematologic. a) to study the probability of developing clinical APS in patients with positive aPL and thrombopenia; b) to identify potential risk factors for thrombosis, and c) to study the association between thrombocytopenia and aPL. A retrospective study of 138 patients with positive aPL without fulfilling clinical criteria for APS. Thrombocytopenia was defined as a platelet count≤100,000/μl. Patients with other causes of thrombocytopenia were excluded. Seventeen of the 138 (12%) patients in the study had thrombocytopenia. The mean platelet count was 60,000/μl. The risk of developing thrombocytopenia was higher in smokers (OR 2.8; P=.044), in those with lupus anticoagulant (OR 13.5; P<.001) and those with higher burden of aPL (OR 50.8; P<.001). After a mean follow-up of 146±60.3 months, 5 patients with thrombocytopenia (29.4%) developed thrombosis. In our series, the incidence of thrombocytopenia is 12%. aPL-positive patients who develop thrombocytopenia have a potential risk of developing thrombosis. Tobacco could be a risk factor for thrombocytopenia. Autoantibodies load is a risk factor for the development of thrombocytopenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Neonatal euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate.

  2. [Neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Burón Martínez, E; Aguayo Maldonado, J

    2006-11-01

    At birth approximately 10 % of term or near-term neonates require initial stabilization maneuvers to establish a cry or regular breathing, maintain a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute (bpm), and good color and muscular tone. About 1 % requires ventilation and very few infants receive chest compressions or medication. However, birth asphyxia is a worldwide problem and can lead to death or serious sequelae. Recently, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published new guidelines on resuscitation at birth. These guidelines review specific questions such as the use of air or 100 % oxygen in the delivery room, dose and routes of adrenaline delivery, the peripartum management of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and temperature control. Assisted ventilation in preterm infants is briefly described. New devices to improve the care of newborn infants, such as the laryngeal mask airway or CO2 detectors to confirm tracheal tube placement, are also discussed. Significant changes have occurred in some practices and are included in this document.

  3. The risks of using allogeneic cell lines for vaccine production: the example of Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Benedictus, Lindert; Bell, Charlotte R

    2017-01-01

    Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a hemorrhagic disease that emerged in calves across Europe in 2007. Its occurrence is attributed to immunization of the calf's mother with a vaccine produced using an allogeneic cell line. Vaccine-induced alloantibodies specific for major-histocompatibility class I antigens are transferred from the mother to the calf via colostrum, leading to profound depletion of peripheral blood and bone marrow cells that is often fatal. Areas covered: Pubmed and Web of Science were used to search for literature relevant to BNP and the use of allogeneic vaccine cell lines. Following a review of the pathology and pathogenesis of this novel condition, we discuss potential risks associated with the use of allogeneic vaccine cell lines. Expert commentary: Although BNP is associated with a specific vaccine, it highlights safety concerns common to all vaccines produced using allogeneic cell lines. Measures to prevent similar vaccine-induced alloimmune-mediated adverse events in the future are discussed.

  4. [Neonatal hemochromatosis: Another entity that is no longer orphan. Advances in the diagnosis and management of the main cause of neonatal acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Molera Busoms, C; Quintero Bernabeu, J; Martín de Carpi, J

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the neonatal period. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to iron overload in hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues. New evidence has emerged during the last few years as regards its alloimmune etiology, which have had an important repercussion on the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of these patients. Treatment with immunoglobulins and exchange transfusions has radically changed the prognosis without liver transplant. Another great success has been the preventive use of immunoglobulin in pregnant women with a past history of neonatal hemochromatosis, thus decreasing the rate of disease recurrence up to 70%. This new paradigm has led to an entity with a poor prognosis becoming a curable disease if diagnosed and treated early. Nevertheless, a large widespread ignorance of the disease persists, with medical implications that result in significant health problems, due to the delayed referral of these patients to specialized centers. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Thrombocytopenia in Plasmodium vivax Malaria Is Related to Platelets Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Helena Cristina C.; Lopes, Stefanie C. P.; Pimentel, João Paulo D.; Nogueira, Paulo A.; Costa, Fábio T. M.; Siqueira, André M.; Melo, Gisely C.; Monteiro, Wuelton M.; Malheiro, Adriana; Lacerda, Marcus V. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although thrombocytopenia is a hematological disorder commonly reported in malarial patients, its mechanisms are still poorly understood, with only a few studies focusing on the role of platelets phagocytosis. Methods and Findings Thirty-five malaria vivax patients and eight healthy volunteers (HV) were enrolled in the study. Among vivax malaria patients, thrombocytopenia (<150,000 platelets/µL) was found in 62.9% (22/35). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in thrombocytopenic patients as compared to non- thrombocytopenic patients (p = 0.017) and a negative correlation was found between platelet count and MPV (r = −0.483; p = 0.003). Platelets from HV or patients were labeled with 5-chloromethyl fluorescein diacetate (CMFDA), incubated with human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and platelet phagocytosis index was analyzed by flow cytometry. The phagocytosis index was higher in thrombocytopenic patients compared to non-thrombocytopenic patients (p = 0.042) and HV (p = 0.048). A negative correlation was observed between platelet count and phagocytosis index (r = −0.402; p = 0.016). Platelet activation was assessed measuring the expression of P-selectin (CD62-P) in platelets’ surface by flow cytometry. No significant difference was found in the expression of P-selectin between thrombocytopenic patients and HV (p = 0.092). After evaluating the cytokine profile (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17) in the patients’ sera, levels of IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ were elevated in malaria patients compared to HV. Moreover, IL-6 and IL-10 values were higher in thrombocytopenic patients than non-thrombocytopenic ones (p = 0.044 and p = 0.017, respectively. In contrast, TNF-α levels were not different between the three groups, but a positive correlation was found between TNF-α and phagocytosis index (r = −0.305; p = 0.037). Conclusion/Significance Collectively, our findings indicate that platelet

  6. Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease and in thalassaemia: current status, future perspectives and potential role of molecular typing.

    PubMed

    Matteocci, A; Pierelli, L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are a milestone in the treatment for sickle cell anaemia (SSA) and for thalassaemia. RBC alloimmunization remains a major challenge of chronic transfusion therapy, and it can lead to adverse life-threatening events. The alloimmunization risk could depend on multiple factors such as the number of transfusions and, most of all, the genetic background. Different ethnic groups are predisposed to immunization because of a significant degree of RBC antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient. There is no universal agreement and standards for the most appropriate selection of RBC units in chronically transfused subjects. Current practice only deals with compatibility of ABO, Rh and K antigens. Molecular RBC antigenic matching extended to other blood group systems is an innovative strategy to ensure a better quality and effectiveness of transfusion therapy.

  7. TIGIT-positive circulating follicular helper T cells display robust B-cell help functions: potential role in sickle cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Zhong, Hui; Pham, Petra; Friedman, David; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2015-11-01

    T follicular helper cells are the main CD4(+) T cells specialized in supporting B-cell responses, but their role in driving transfusion-associated alloimmunization is not fully characterized. Reports of T follicular helper subsets displaying various markers and functional activities underscore the need for better characterization/identification of markers with defined functions. Here we show that a previously unidentified subset of human circulating T follicular helper cells expressing TIGIT, the T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory domains, exhibit strong B-cell help functions. Compared to the subset lacking the receptor, T follicular helper cells expressing this receptor up-regulated co-stimulatory molecules and produced higher levels of interleukins (IL-21 and IL-4) critical for promoting B-cell activation/differentiation. Furthermore, this subset was more efficient at inducing the differentiation of B cells into plasmablasts and promoting immunoglobulin G production. Blocking antibodies abrogated the B-cell help properties of receptor-expressing T follicular helper cells, consistent with the key role of this molecule in T follicular helper-associated responses. Importantly, in chronically transfused patients with sickle cell anemia, we identified functional differences of this subset between alloimmunized and non-alloimmunized patients. Altogether, these studies suggest that expression of the T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and immunoreceptor tyro-sine-based inhibitory domains not only represents a novel circulating T follicular helper biomarker, but is also functional and promotes strong B-cell help and ensuing immunoglobulin G production. These findings open the way to defining new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in modulating humoral responses in alloimmunization, and possibly vaccination, autoimmunity and immune deficiencies. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Thrombocytopenia-Associated Multiple Organ Failure and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung C; Cruz, Miguel A; Carcillo, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    Thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure (TAMOF) is a clinical phenotype that encompasses a spectrum of syndromes associated with disseminated microvascular thromboses, such as the thrombotic microangiopathies thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP/HUS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Autopsies findings in TTP, HUS, or DIC reveal specific findings that can differentiate these 3 entities. Von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS-13 play a central role in TTP. Shiga toxins and the complement pathway are vital in the development of HUS. Tissue factor is the major protease that drives the pathology of DIC. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common feature in patients with TAMOF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Mechanisms in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP)

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Anne; Kapur, Rick; Semple, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by low platelet counts. The pathogenesis of ITP remains unclear although both antibody-mediated and/or T cell-mediated platelet destruction are key processes. In addition, impairment of T cells, cytokine imbalances, and the contribution of the bone marrow niche have now been recognized to be important. Treatment strategies are aimed at the restoration of platelet counts compatible with adequate hemostasis rather than achieving physiological platelet counts. The first line treatments focus on the inhibition of autoantibody production and platelet degradation, whereas second-line treatments include immunosuppressive drugs, such as Rituximab, and splenectomy. Finally, third-line treatments aim to stimulate platelet production by megakaryocytes. This review discusses the pathophysiology of ITP and how the different treatment modalities affect the pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:28208757

  10. [Electronic platelet counting with particular reference to thrombocytopenias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kuse, R; Burmeister, H; Hausmann, K

    1977-09-29

    Platelet counts in platelet-rich plasma without hematocrit dependent correction were performed by following rapid and simple steps: 1. pre-dilution of 20 microliter of whole blood by an isotonic solution 1:25; 2. stabilized low-speed centrifugation with 55 g for 5 minutes; 3. final dilution 1 : 5000; 4. enumeration by use of a TOA platelet counter PL-100 which has been technically improved in comparison to similar machines. Erroneously high results were obtained after a too short or too low centrifugation. As reason for this artifical small pulses due to disturbances of the flow patterns around the aperture (so-called vortex-effect) can be assumed having been caused by large-volumed erythrocytes and leukocytes in the suspension. The routinely used procedure was reliable for all platelet ranges, especially in thrombocytopenias between 100 X 10(9)/l and 25 X 10(9)l. In lower ranges comparisons with visual counts are essential.

  11. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombotic sequelae: a review.

    PubMed

    Goor, Yoav; Goor, Odelia; Eldor, Amiram

    2002-08-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) occurs in 1-5% of patients treated with heparin. The pathogenesis involves the formation of antibodies to heparin-platelet factor 4 complexes, and the major clinical sequelae are thrombotic. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical and laboratory data. Treatment consists of stopping heparin, but, insofar as the risk of thrombosis remains high, treatment by alternative antithrombotic agents is indicated. Most clinical experience has been with danaparoid sodium and hirudin. The use of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) in subsequent HIT episodes has been described, but is not recommended, especially with the introduction of new agents, such as oral thrombin inhibitors and pentasaccharides, which are hoped to reduce the use of heparins and the occurrence of HIT.

  12. Romiplostim as early treatment of immune thrombocytopenia with severe immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Palandri, Francesca; Polverelli, Nicola; Lifrieri, Francesca; Catani, Lucia; Giannini, Maria Benedetta; Baccarani, Michele; Vianelli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are the standard therapeutic approach for immune thrombocy-topenia (ITP). Their prolonged use may increase the risk of infectious complications, particularly when the patient is already at higher infectious risk. In this setting, the use of drugs with a mechanism of action alternative to immunosuppression, like thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TRAs), may find particular indication. We report the unique case of a patient with severe immunodeficiency and ITP, who experienced a serious infectious complication while on steroids treatment, and who was successfully treated with Romiplostim second-line. The present experience supports the effectiveness and safety of TRAs as early treatment of ITP patients with drug-induced immunodeficiency or with active infections. PMID:22826792

  13. Dabigatran approaching the realm of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a serious, immune mediated complication of exposure to unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin. Though rare, it is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality that requires immediate change to alternative anticoagulants for the prevention of life-threatening thrombosis. The direct thrombin inhibitors lepirudin and argatroban are currently licensed for the treatment of HIT. Dabigatran, a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) with a similar mechanism of action and effective use in other indications, has recently been proposed as another therapeutic option in cases of HIT. This review serves as an introduction to using dabigatran for this purpose, detailing the clinical aspects of its administration, evidence of its performance compared to other anticoagulants, and the preliminary reports of HIT successfully treated with dabigatran. As the literature on this develops, it will need to include clinical trials that directly evaluate dabigatran against the other NOACs and current treatment options. PMID:27382551

  14. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  15. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  16. Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis using a hematological scoring system.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Mittal, M; Jaganathan, G

    2001-09-01

    To assess the utility of the hematologic scoring system (HSS) of Rodwell et al for the early detection of neonatal sepsis. Analysis of the peripheral smear findings according to the HSS by a pathologist blinded to the infection status of the neonate. One hundred and three high risk neonates having predisposing perinatal factors or clinical suspicion of sepsis. Analysis of the hematologic profiles in the light of the HSS found that an abnormal immature to total neutrophil (1:T) ratio followed by an abnormal immature to mature neutrophil (1:M) ratio were the most sensitive indicators in identifying infants with sepsis. These two criteria along with thrombocytopenia (< 1,50,000/cm3) had a high negative predictive value over 94%. The study also found that the higher the score the greater the certainty of sepsis being present. The HSS is simple, quick, cost effective and readily available tool in the early-diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and could provide a guideline to decisions regarding antibiotic therapy.

  17. The Incidence of Thrombocytopenia in Children with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Michele P.; Jackson, Laird G.; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Mani; Krantz, Ian D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia was first reported in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) by Froster in 1993. Despite early reports, thrombocytopenia has been rarely reported in this disorder. We performed a retrospective analysis of a large cohort of patients with CdLS. We calculated prevalence of thrombocytopenia in 3 subsets of this cohort: the entire cohort (n=1740), a subset of subjects with substantial clinical records (n=695) and a subset of subjects with clinical information regarding platelet counts (n=85). This analysis revealed that 15 have had thrombocytopenia (18% of those with available blood counts); seven had Immune ThrombocytoPenia (ITP). The reported prevalence of pediatric ITP is between 5-13 per 100,000 persons. The prevalence of ITP in this cohort is between 7/1740 and 7/85, giving a relative risk of ITP of between 30 (CI 12 to 77) and 633 (CI 259-1549). Contrary to the reported cases in the literature, none of our patients have had progression of the thrombocytopenia nor have they developed other cytopenias. All 15 patients with thromobocytopenia had CdLS based on clinical criteria. Of the 10 patients tested for mutations in NIBPL, eight had mutations identified. These data support an increased incidence of thrombocytopenia and ITP in CdLS. Subsequently, patients are at risk for spontaneous hemorrhage, and likely increased risk secondary to the high frequency of self-injurious behavior. Although further studies are needed to better define the scope of the problem and to define the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia in CdLS, we would recommend screening for thrombocytopenia upon diagnosis and at five-year intervals thereafter. PMID:21204208

  18. The in vivo inactivation of MASTL kinase results in thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Jan; Gandhi, Manish J.; Shafizadeh, Ebrahim; Langer, Nathaniel B.; Pierce, Eric L.; Paw, Barry H.; Gilligan, Diana M.; Drachman, Jonathan G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective A missense mutation in the Microtubule Associated Serine/Threonine Like kinase gene (MASTL, FLJ14813) on human chromosome 10 was previously linked to a novel form of autosomal dominant inherited thrombocytopenia in a single pedigree. The mutation results in an amino acid change from glutamic acid at position 167 to aspartic acid and segregates perfectly with thrombocytopenic individuals within this extended family. The phenotype is characterized by mild thrombocytopenia with an average platelet count of 60,000 platelets per microliter of blood. We wanted to determine the expression and localization of MASTL, as well as its role in developing thrombocytes using an in vivo model system. Methods Northern blot analysis allowed us to examine expression patterns. Morpholino knockdown assays in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were employed to determine in vivo contribution to thrombocyte development. Transient expression in BHK cells resulted in localization of both the wild type and E167D mutant forms of MASTL kinase to the nucleus. Results Northern blot analysis indicates that MASTL mRNA is restricted in its expression to hematopoietic and cancer cell lines. A transient knockdown of MASTL in zebrafish results in deficiency of circulating thrombocytes. Transient expression of recombinant MASTL kinase in vitro demonstrates localization to the nucleus. Conclusions: Functional studies presented here demonstrate a direct relationship between the transient knockdown of the MASTL kinase expression and the reduction of circulating thrombocytes in zebrafish. This transient knockdown of MASTL in zebrafish correlates with a decrease in the expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, c-mpl, and the CD41 platelet adhesion protein, GpIIb, but has no effect on essential housekeeping zebrafish gene, EF1α. PMID:19460416

  19. No red cell alloimmunization or change of clinical outcome after using fresh frozen cancellous allograft bone for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty: a follow up study.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Falk; Straub, Matthias; Schäfer, Richard; Kluba, Torsten; Ipach, Ingmar

    2012-09-25

    Possible immunization to blood group or other antigens and subsequent inhibition of remodeling or incorporation after use of untreated human bone allograft was described previously. This study presents the immunological, clinical and radiological results of 30 patients with acetabular revisions using fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft. AB0-incompatible (donor-recipient) bone transplantation was performed in 22 cases, Rh(D) incompatible transplantation in 6 cases. The mean follow up of 23 months included measuring Harris hip score and radiological examination with evaluation of remodeling of the bone graft, implant migration and heterotopic ossification. In addition, all patients were screened for alloimmunization to Rh blood group antigens. Compared to the whole study group, there were no differences in clinical or radiological measurements for the groups with AB0- or Rh(D)-incompatible bone transplantation. The mean Harris Hip Score was 80.6. X-rays confirmed total remodeling of all allografts with no acetabular loosening. At follow up, blood tests revealed no alloimmunization to Rh blood group donor antigens. The use of fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft in acetabular revision is a reliable supplement to reconstruction. The risk of alloimmunization to donor-blood group antigens after AB0- or Rh-incompatible allograft transplantation with a negative long-term influence on bone-remodeling or the clinical outcome is negligible.

  20. Allo-immunization elicits CCR5 antibodies, SDF-1 chemokines, and CD8-suppressor factors that inhibit transmission of R5 and X4 HIV-1 in women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Underwood, J; Vaughan, R; Harmer, A; Doyle, C; Lehner, T

    2002-09-01

    Studies in humans suggest that allo-immunization induces CC-chemokines, CD8-suppressor factors (SF) and anti-HIV immunity. Here we report that allo-immunization with unmatched leucocytes from partners of women with recurrent spontaneous abortion elicits specific antibodies to the CCR5 receptor. Such antibodies inhibit replication of M-tropic HIV-1 (R5) and MIP-1beta-mediated chemotaxis. These CCR5 antibodies were also found in the sera of multiparous women that were naturally immunized by semi-allogeneic fetal antigens. The specificity of these antibodies was demonstrated by adsorption with CCR5 transfected HEK-293 cells, a baculovirus CCR5 preparation and a peptide of the 2nd extra-cellular loop of CCR5. Allo-immunization also stimulated increased concentrations of the CXC chemokine, SDF-1alpha and CD8-SF that inhibit T-tropic HIV-1 (X4) replication. We suggest that allo- immunization may elicit (a) CC chemokines, CCR5 antibodies and CD8-SF that inhibit M-tropic HIV-1 infection and (b) the CXC chemokine SDF-1alpha and CD8-SF that inhibit T-tropic HIV-1 infection.

  1. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. PMID:24599546

  2. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C; Kile, Benjamin T; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2014-05-29

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. A child with split-hand/foot associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) and thrombocytopenia maps to chromosome region 17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ganger, Rudolf; Rötzer, Katharina M; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2014-09-01

    We describe a-2-year-old boy who presented with a neonatal history of thrombocytopenia associated with a constellation of limb malformations mimicking split hand/foot malformation with long bone deficiency (SHFLD) syndrome. Limb malformations consisted of unilateral monodactyly with radial aplasia, unilateral split foot and bilateral club foot. Tibial aplasia of one limb and tibial hypoplasia of the other limb were notable. Partial agenesis of the sacrum was additional skeletal malformation. Craniofacial features included dense thick scalp hair, narrow frontal area, thick eye-brows, deep-set eyes, depressed nasal bridge, and small overhanging nasal tip, full-cheeks, and large ears. Array-CGH showed duplication of the short arm of chromosome 17p13.3 in the boy and his father, respectively. The father was free from any skeletal abnormalities, though he shares similar craniofacial dysmorphic features like his son. In addition, a paternal sib (uncle of the proband) manifested a phenotype similar to that of the proband. To the best of our knowledge the overall phenotypic and genotypic characterizations were consistent but not completely compatible with the traditional type of TAR syndrome or with SHFLD syndrome. We report on what might be a novel variant of SHFLD associated with transient thrombocytopenia, dysmorphic facial features, and a constellation of bone malformations.

  4. Anticoagulation with Bivalirudin during Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in a Patient with Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Agamemnon; Fitzmaurice, Mary; Caldwell, Constance; Natividad, Kris; Plestis, Konstadinos A.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a well-recognized complication of anticoagulation with heparin. We present the case of a patient with recent heparin-induced thrombocytopenia who subsequently needed surgery on an emergency basis for acute type A aortic dissection. This article reports the successful use of bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor, as an alternative to heparin throughout cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. We contend that bivalirudin is a safe alternative to heparin when performing surgery for aortic dissection and should be considered as an option for use in patients who present with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:25593533

  5. Anticoagulation with bivalirudin during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in a patient with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Pericleous, Agamemnon; Sadek, Mostafa; Fitzmaurice, Mary; Caldwell, Constance; Natividad, Kris; Plestis, Konstadinos A

    2014-12-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a well-recognized complication of anticoagulation with heparin. We present the case of a patient with recent heparin-induced thrombocytopenia who subsequently needed surgery on an emergency basis for acute type A aortic dissection. This article reports the successful use of bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor, as an alternative to heparin throughout cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. We contend that bivalirudin is a safe alternative to heparin when performing surgery for aortic dissection and should be considered as an option for use in patients who present with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

  6. Acute intracranial hemorrhage secondary to thrombocytopenia: CT appearances unaffected by absence of clot retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.N.; Taber, K.H.; Hayman, L.A. )

    1994-02-01

    To describe the in vivo CT appearance of acute intracerebral blood clots formed from anemic platelet-depleted blood. Three patients with intracerebral hemorrhage secondary only to thrombocytopenia were examined with CT within 2 1/2 hours after the onset of clinical symptoms. There were no unusual CT features found in the intracerebral hemorrhages of patients with only thrombocytopenia. Specifically, a hyperdense zone(s) surrounded by areas of decreased density was identified. Clot retraction (which cannot occur in patients with severe thrombocytopenia) is not necessary for the CT appearance of acute intracerebral hemorrhage. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Severe steroid-resistant thrombocytopenia secondary to cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Takashi; Kubota, Yasushi; Wakayama, Kazuo; Kimura, Shinya

    2012-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia secondary to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is rare in immunocompetent hosts. We describe a case of severe thrombocytopenia secondary to CMV infection in an immunocompetent 30-year-old man who presented with pyrexia and bleeding tendency. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was made following hematological and serological testing, and bone marrow aspiration. Acute CMV infection was confirmed by serological testing, antigenemia, and detection of CMV-DNA. Corticosteroid therapy was ineffective and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was therefore administered. This resulted in immediate recovery of the platelet count and cessation of nasal bleeding. Early IVIG administration should be considered in steroid-resistant cases.

  8. Eltrombopag Use in Thrombocytopenia for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of a Gastric Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Tonya; Martin, Beth; Rouse, Robert V.; Soetikno, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia is a contraindication for therapeutic endoscopy due to the risk of bleeding. Platelet transfusions can temporarily increase platelet count, but are difficult to administer in the 2 weeks following endoscopic resection, during which the patient is at high risk for delayed bleeding. We present the use of a novel thrombopoietin receptor agonist, eltrombopag, to sustain platelet levels for the safe and complete endoscopic submucosal dissection of a gastric carcinoid in a patient with severe thrombocytopenia due to cirrhosis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We performed complete and safe endoscopic removal of a gastric carcinoid after correcting the thrombocytopenia. PMID:26157896

  9. Romiplostin may revert the thrombocytopenia in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2011-03-01

    The thrombocytopenia ensuing during acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is multifactorial and may significantly compromise the prognosis of the patient; non-immune persistent thrombocytopenia has been considered as an adverse prognostic factor in GVHD. We describe here the case of a 10-year-old girl who developed steroid-refractory thrombocytopenia and who responded promptly to the subcutaneous delivery of romiplostin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the usefulness of the peptibody in the setting of GVHD.

  10. Guillain-Barré syndrome with associated thrombocytopenia: prompt response to combined corticosteroid and immunoglobulin treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbanese, U; Martinuzzi, A; Possamai, C; Romeo, G; Possamai, G; Trubian, L

    1998-02-01

    We report a case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation, associated at its presentation with thrombocytopenia, in a 50-year-old woman. She was treated with immunoglobulin, and short-term corticosteroids for thrombocytopenia. In spite of the severe presentation we observed a very good and rapid recovery, which could have been determined by the therapeutic association. The incidence of thrombocytopenia in GBS patients could be underestimated, and should be kept in mind in order to avoid hemorrhagic complications.

  11. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow's triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the coagulation proteins as

  12. Neonatal and Perinatal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amira M; Morris, Shaun K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-08-01

    Lack of success in achieving considerable reductions in neonatal mortality is a contributory factor in failing to achieve Millennium Development Goal 4.2.6 million neonates still die each year, with preterm birth and infections the two leading causes. Maternal infections and environmental and infant factors influence acquisition of viral and bacterial infections in the perinatal and neonatal period. Scaling up evidence-based interventions addressing maternal risk factors and underlying causes could reduce neonatal infections by 84%. The emergence of new infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance present public health challenges that must be addressed to achieve substantial reductions in neonatal mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  14. Bilateral lower extremity gangrene requiring amputation associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brian P; De Ugarte, Daniel A; Reil, Todd D; Beseth, Bryce D; Lawrence, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Heparin use, both prophylactically and therapeutically, is prevalent among hospitalized patients. Patients on heparin may develop a thrombocytopenia that is self-limited. Fewer patients develop a heparin-induced thrombocytopenia that can cause severe bleeding and thrombosis owing to intravascular platelet aggregation. The authors present a case report of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient who underwent aortic arch and aortic valve replacement that resulted in bilateral above-knee amputations. The patient developed limb ischemia related to heparin-associated thrombosis, but had a delay in antibody seroconversion. Early and accurate diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia requires a high clinical suspicion and may be present despite the absence of serum antibodies.

  15. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosiane V; Malvezi, Aparecida D; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Rizzo, Luiz V; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease.

  16. Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia: incidence, clinical features, laboratory testing, and pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DIIT) is a relatively uncommon adverse reaction caused by drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that react with platelet membrane glycoproteins only when the implicated drug is present. Although more than 100 drugs have been associated with causing DIIT, recent reviews of available data show that carbamazepine, eptifibatide, ibuprofen, quinidine, quinine, oxaliplatin, rifampin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and vancomycin are probably the most frequently implicated. Patients with DIIT typically present with petechiae, bruising, and epistaxis caused by an acute, severe drop in platelet count (often to <20,000 platelets/pL). Diagnosis of DIIT is complicated by its similarity to other non-drug-induced immune thrombocytopenias, including autoimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness, and must be differentiated by temporal association of exposure to a candidate drug with an acute, severe drop in platelet count. Treatment consists of immediate withdrawal of the implicated drug. Criteria for strong evidence of DIIT include (1) exposure to candidate drug-preceded thrombocytopenia; (2) sustained normal platelet levels after discontinuing candidate drug; (3) candidate drug was only drug used before onset of thrombocytopenia or other drugs were continued or reintroduced after resolution of thrombocytopenia, and other causes for thrombocytopenia were excluded; and (4) reexposure to the candidate drug resulted in recurrent thrombocytopenia. Flow cytometry testing for DDAbs can be useful in confirmation of a clinical diagnosis, and monoclonal antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing can be used to determine the platelet glycoprotein target(s), usually GPIIb/IIIa or GPIb/IX/V, but testing is not widely available. Several pathogenic mechanisms for DIIT have been proposed, including hapten, autoantibody, neoepitope, drug-specific, and quinine-type drug mechanisms. A recent proposal

  17. Azathioprine for treatment of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in two horses.

    PubMed

    Humber, K A; Beech, J; Cudd, T A; Palmer, J E; Gardner, S Y; Sommer, M M

    1991-09-01

    Azathioprine, a thiopurine antimetabolite used in the treatment of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in human beings and dogs, was used in 2 cases of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in horses that failed to respond to corticosteroid therapy alone. Platelet counts were increased to acceptable values in both horses. One horse returned to a successful racing career, and the other was euthanatized after developing renal disease and mild laminitis.

  18. Acute immune-mediated thrombocytopenia due to oxaliplatin administration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filippo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Buzzoni, Roberto; Bajetta, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced acute thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare side effect that may occur immediately after oxaliplatin infusion. This potentially fatal reaction is immune mediated and can be anticipated by mild hemorrhagic signs during previous administrations. This is the first report of acute thrombocytopenia occurring during adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer with oxaliplatin. Clinicians should be aware of this adverse event in order to prevent possible serious consequences and stop further oxaliplatin administration.

  19. Usefulness of thrombocytopenia at admission as a prognostic marker in native valve left-sided infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Carlos; Vilacosta, Isidre; Fernández, Cristina; López, Javier; Sarriá, Cristina; Olmos, Carmen; Vivas, David; Sáez, Carmen; Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Ortiz, Carlos; San Román, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    In-hospital mortality of patients with infective endocarditis (IE) remains exceedingly high. Quick recognition of parameters accurately identifying high-risk patients is of paramount importance. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence and severity of thrombocytopenia at presentation and its prognostic impact in patients with native valve left-sided IE. We studied a cohort of 533 consecutive episodes of native valve left-sided IE prospectively recruited. We distinguished 2 groups: group I (n = 175), episodes who had thrombocytopenia at admission, and group II (n = 358) gathered all the episodes who did not. Thrombocytopenia at admission was defined as a platelet count of <150,000/μl. No differences were found in the need for surgery, but in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with thrombocytopenia (p <0.001). Mortality rate was associated with the degree of thrombocytopenia (p <0.001). In the multivariable analysis, thrombocytopenia at admission was an independent predictor of higher mortality (p = 0.002). A synergistic interaction between thrombocytopenia and Staphylococcus aureus on mortality risk was also observed (p = 0.04). In conclusion, thrombocytopenia at admission is an early risk marker of increased mortality in patients with native valve left-sided IE. Mortality rates increased with increasing severity of thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia at admission should be used as an early marker for risk stratification in patients with native valve IE to identify those at risk of complicated in-hospital evolution and increased mortality.

  20. Monoclonal IgG can ameliorate immune thrombocytopenia in a murine model of ITP: an alternative to IVIG.

    PubMed

    Song, Seng; Crow, Andrew R; Freedman, John; Lazarus, Alan H

    2003-05-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used to treat immune thrombocytopenia resulting from a variety of autoimmune and nonautoimmune diseases such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and posttransfusion purpura. IVIG is a limited resource and although considered safe, may nevertheless carry some risk of transferring disease. Its high cost makes monoclonal antibodies, capable of mimicking the clinical effects of IVIG, highly desirable. We show here, using a murine model of ITP, that selected monoclonal antibodies can protect against thrombocytopenia. SCID mice were pretreated with 1 of 21 monoclonal antibodies before induction of thrombocytopenia by antiplatelet antibody. Four antibodies reacted with the CD24 antigen on erythrocytes. Two antibodies were of the IgM class, and although one IgM antibody caused a minimal degree of anemia (P <.05), neither antibody ameliorated immune thrombocytopenia. One of 2 anti-CD24 antibodies of the IgG class ameliorated immune thrombocytopenia and blocked reticuloendothelial system function at the same doses that protected against thrombocytopenia. Some antibodies reactive with other circulating cell types also protected against immune-mediated thrombocytopenia while no antibody without a distinct target antigen in the mice was protective. Protective monoclonal antibodies significantly prevented thrombocytopenia at down to a 1000-fold lower dose (200 microg/kg) as compared with standard IVIG treatment (2 g/kg). It is concluded that monoclonal IgG with specificity for a circulating cellular target antigen may provide an alternative therapeutic approach to treating immune thrombocytopenia.

  1. Heparin induced thrombocytopenia in critically ill: Diagnostic dilemmas and management conundrums

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Green, Cameron; Botha, John; Tran, Huy

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is often noted in critically ill patients. While there are many reasons for thrombocytopenia, the use of heparin and its derivatives is increasingly noted to be associated with thrombocytopenia. Heparin induced thrombocytopenia syndrome (HITS) is a distinct entity that is characterised by the occurrence of thrombocytopenia in conjunction with thrombotic manifestations after exposure to unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin. HITS is an immunologic disorder mediated by antibodies to heparin-platelet factor 4 (PF4) complex. HITS is an uncommon cause of thrombocytopenia. Reported incidence of HITS in patients exposed to heparin varies from 0.2% to up to 5%. HITS is rare in ICU populations, with estimates varying from 0.39%-0.48%. It is a complex problem which may cause diagnostic dilemmas and management conundrum. The diagnosis of HITS centers around detection of antibodies against PF4-heparin complexes. Immunoassays performed by most pathology laboratories detect the presence of antibodies, but do not reveal whether the antibodies are pathological. Platelet activation assays demonstrate the presence of clinically relevant antibodies, but only a minority of laboratories conduct them. Several anticoagulants are used in management of HITS. In this review we discuss the incidence, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of HITS. PMID:26261772

  2. Factors predicting persistent thrombocytopenia after living donor liver transplantation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Hayashida, Shintaro; Suda, Hiroko; Ohya, Yuki; Lee, Kwang-Jong; Takeichi, Takayuki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2011-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common after LT for pediatric end-stage liver diseases. Seventy-six pediatric patients (≤15 yr old) who underwent LDLT were evaluated for the incidence and predictive factors of post-transplant thrombocytopenia (PLT <100, 000/mm(3) ). The prevalence of thrombocytopenia at two wk and at 12 months post-transplant was 22/76 (28.9%) and 11/62 (17.7%), respectively. Thrombocytopenia at two wk after LDLT was significantly associated with age at transplant, preoperative PLT, GRWR, acute rejection, and CMV infection in univariate analysis. Moreover, preoperative PLT, GRWR, and acute rejection had a strong correlation in multivariate analysis. Thrombocytopenia at 12 months after LDLT was associated only with preoperative PLT. We also demonstrated that vascular complications caused thrombocytopenia and that successful treatment recovered the PLT. These results showed that, in addition to considering the preoperative PLT, post-operative monitoring of platelets is very helpful for the early detection of adverse events related to the graft liver in pediatric liver transplant patients. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Entecavir-Associated Thrombocytopenia in a Decompensated Cirrhotic Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoli; Chen, Liyu; Yang, Jingyu; Feng, Ping

    2016-03-01

    Drug-associated thrombocytopenia is common and curable, but there were few reports about entecavir-associated thrombocytopenia.We report here a case of a 65-year-old female patient with decompensated cirrhosis. The patient developed a fatal thrombocytopenia while under entecavir treatment. After she received entecavir treatment for 4 days, the patient's platelet count dropped significantly to 1 × 10/L, accompanied with a manifestation of mild sclera bleeding. All diagnostic data suggested an entecavir-induced immunological thrombocytopenia. The patient eventually fully recovered after treated with daily intravenous immunoglobulin infusions.Actually, there were only a handful of reports that children or adults with chronic hepatitis B developed a thrombocytopenia due to nucleoside analogue medication. Timeliness of intravenous immunoglobulin infusion could stop the fatal bleeding for patients with entecavir-associated immunological thrombocytopenia. Hence, early diagnosis and treatment are recommended. Our case suggested that the platelet count should be monitored regularly in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with underline immunological disease while treated with ETV.

  4. Cyclosporin A in the treatment of refractory immune thrombocytopenia purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, B; Cividalli, G; Freeman, A; Yatziv, S; Koren, G; Baruchel, S

    2001-05-01

    Patients with refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia do not respond to standard therapy with high-dose corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and splenectomy. We describe the cases of two patients with refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia treated with oral cyclosporin A (CsA) to evaluate the efficacy of this alternative therapy. Blood pressure and hepatic and renal function were in the normal range before initiation of treatment. Induction therapy with pulses of high-dose methylprednisolone was used for 3 consecutive days to improve the initial immune suppression. Gradual dose reduction of CsA, according the platelet count, minimized the long-term adverse effects of CsA. Oral CsA with pulses of high-dose methylprednisolone induced remission of the thrombocytopenia. Gradual weaning of CsA over months, according the platelet count, produced no observable adverse effects of the CsA. Rapid dose reduction caused thrombocytopenia, which resolved with higher dosages of CsA. Our cases show the efficacy of CsA for refractory immune thrombocytopenia. This therapeutic option with oral CsA as an additional salvage option may avoid splenectomy and the adverse effects of long-term corticosteroids. Larger clinical investigations are necessary to establish the indications and therapeutic regimen for CsA in immune thrombocytopenia.

  5. Proton pump induced thrombocytopenia: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kallam, Avyakta; Singla, Abhishek; Silberstein, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are not widely recognized as a cause of drug-induced thrombocytopenia. Literature is mainly confined to case reports and has been insufficient to explore the possibility that this adverse event may be attributed to a class effect of PPI therapy. We present a case where platelet counts dropped from 177 (×10(3) per mm(3)) to 47 (×10(3) per mm(3)) within 6 days after the patient was switched from omeprazole to pantoprazole. There have been case reports of thrombocytopenia caused by PPIs; however, this is noted to be extremely rare. In our case, the patient developed thrombocytopenia on two separate occasions of exposure to pantoprazole, which resolved after stopping the medicine, thus providing definite proof of pantoprazole causing thrombocytopenia. Moreover, the patient did not have thrombocytopenia with omeprazole, thus suggesting that thrombocytopenia with PPIs might be an individual drug effect rather than a class effect. This occurrence has been reported in three other case reports as well. From the nine case reports that we have reviewed, direct causal relationship was found in a few reports only. It has been hypothesized that this adverse effect may be immune mediated, but further investigations are still needed to identify the exact pathogenesis.

  6. The use of indium-111 oxine platelet scintigraphy and survival studies in pediatric patients with thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, V.P.; Shulkin, B.L.; Coates, G.; Andrew, M. )

    1989-11-01

    We have utilized {sup 111}In-labeled heterologous platelets to investigate the mechanism of thrombocytopenia in ten children. From the scintigraphic findings, platelet survival times, and clinical information, thrombocytopenia was ascribed to decreased production or to increased destruction. Two patients were found to have bone marrow production defects. Two patients with hemangiomas were studied. In one, the hemangioma was shown not to be the cause of thrombocytopenia. In the second, the hemangioma was proven the source of platelet destruction, but was much more extensive than clinically evident. In both, surgical manipulation of the hemangioma was avoided. Six additional patients had thrombocytopenia due to accelerated destruction. In four, the spleen was shown responsible. In two, however, the spleen was shown not to be responsible for the low platelet counts, and splenectomy was avoided. Thus, {sup 111}In-platelet scintigraphy and survival studies are valuable in the classification and management of childhood thrombocytopenia. We believe that this study should be performed, when possible, in any child with thrombocytopenia where the mechanism is unclear or the therapeutic intervention involves splenectomy or resection of a hemangioma.

  7. Reverse Genetics System for Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Benjamin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Aqian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Dexin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that was first reported in China in 2009. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral genome showed that SFTS virus represents a new lineage within the Phlebovirus genus, distinct from the existing sandfly fever and Uukuniemi virus groups, in the family Bunyaviridae. SFTS disease is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, chills, joint pain, myalgia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and some hemorrhagic manifestations with a case fatality rate of about 2 to 15%. Here we report the development of reverse genetics systems to study STFSV replication and pathogenesis. We developed and optimized functional T7 polymerase-based M- and S-segment minigenome assays, which revealed errors in the published terminal sequences of the S segment of the Hubei 29 strain of SFTSV. We then generated recombinant viruses from cloned cDNAs prepared to the antigenomic RNAs both of the minimally passaged virus (HB29) and of a cell culture-adapted strain designated HB29pp. The growth properties, pattern of viral protein synthesis, and subcellular localization of viral N and NSs proteins of wild-type HB29pp (wtHB29pp) and recombinant HB29pp viruses were indistinguishable. We also show that the viruses fail to shut off host cell polypeptide production. The robust reverse genetics system described will be a valuable tool for the design of therapeutics and the development of killed and attenuated vaccines against this important emerging pathogen. IMPORTANCE SFTSV and related tick-borne phleboviruses such as Heartland virus are emerging viruses shown to cause severe disease in humans in the Far East and the United States, respectively. Study of these novel pathogens would be facilitated by technology to manipulate these viruses in a laboratory setting using reverse genetics. Here, we report the generation of infectious SFTSV from cDNA clones and demonstrate that the behavior of recombinant viruses

  8. Mechanisms of Alloimmunization and Subsequent Bone Marrow Transplantation Rejection Induced by Platelet Transfusion in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Seema R; Smith, Nicole H; Kapp, Linda; Zimring, James C

    2015-01-01

    For many non-malignant hematological disorders, HLA-matched bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is curative. However, due to lack of neoplasia, the toxicity of stringent conditioning regimens is difficult to justify, and reduced-intensity conditioning is used. Unfortunately, current reduced-intensity regimens have high rates of BMT rejection. We have recently reported in a murine model that mHAs on transfused platelet products induce subsequent BMT rejection. Most non-malignant hematological disorders require transfusion support prior to BMT and the rate of BMT rejection in humans correlates to the number of transfusions given. Herein, we perform a mechanistic analysis of platelet transfusion induced BMT rejection and report that unlike exposure to alloantigens during transplantation, platelet transfusion primes alloimmunity but does not stimulate full effector function. Subsequent BMT is itself an additional and distinct immunizing event, which does not induce rejection without antecedent priming from transfusion. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are required for priming during platelet transfusion, but only CD8+ T cells are required for BMT rejection. In neither case are antibodies required for rejection to occur. PMID:22300526

  9. High multi-cytokine levels are not a predictive marker of alloimmunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    PubMed

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Fasano, Ross M; Miles, Megan R; Pinto, Ligia A; Luban, Naomi L C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2014-07-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) receive multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for both prevention of and therapy for disease-related complications. In some patients, transfusion results in development of both allo- and auto-antibodies to RBC antigens. What precipitates the antibody formation is currently unclear. It has been hypothesized that a pro-inflammatory state preceding the therapeutic transfusion may be a predisposing factor. Plasma levels of ten cytokines were evaluated upon recruitment to the study of 83 children with SCD undergoing therapeutic RBC transfusions. The levels of cytokines were correlated with development of anti-RBC antibodies prior, or during seven years post recruitment. Twelve subjects displayed significantly higher levels of all cytokines examined, with pro-, as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Surprisingly, the elevated levels of cytokines were preferentially found in patients without anti-RBC allo- and/or auto-antibodies. Further, presence of high cytokine levels was not predictive of anti-RBC antibody development during the subsequent seven year follow up. These data suggest that the increased concentration of multiple cytokines is not a biomarker of either the presence of or susceptibility to the development of RBC alloimmunization.

  10. Thrombocytopenia in dogs induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor: increased destruction of circulating platelets.

    PubMed

    Nash, R A; Burstein, S A; Storb, R; Yang, W; Abrams, K; Appelbaum, F R; Boone, T; Deeg, H J; Durack, L D; Schuening, F G

    1995-09-01

    Administration of recombinant canine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) to normal dogs in previous studies induced an increase in peripheral blood neutrophils and a dose-dependent decrease in platelet counts. In six dogs that received the highest tested dose of rcGM-CSF (50 micrograms/kg/d) for a minimum of 12 days, the mean nadir of the platelet count was 46,000/microL (range, 4,000 to 91,000/microL) on day 9 +/- 1.1 after starting therapy, compared with a mean baseline platelet count of 398,000/microL (range, 240,000 to 555,000/microL). In three dogs, survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets was reduced from a mean of 4.9 days to 1.3 days during the administration of rcGM-CSF. Biodistribution studies with gamma camera imaging indicated that there was an increase in mean hepatic uptake during the administration of rcGM-CSF, from 15% to 44% of the total injected 111In-labeled platelets at 2 hours, whereas splenic uptake was not significantly changed. In contrast, in two evaluable dogs who were recipients of 111In-labeled platelets from matched allogeneic donors receiving rcGM-CSF, platelet survival was not reduced and no increased hepatic uptake was noted. A third dog became alloimmunized to the matched donor platelets and was not evaluable. Immunohistologic studies of liver and spleen were performed with monoclonal antibodies specific for canine gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin in dogs treated with rcGM-CSF and compared with untreated controls. On treatment, a marked reduction of platelets in the red pulp of the spleen was evident, and in general, the presence of platelet antigen in the liver was unchanged. Therefore, platelets were not being sequestered, but destroyed in the liver and spleen. The platelet antigens, P-selectin and gpIIb/IIIa, were identified in association with Kupffer cells in the liver, but no difference in the number of distribution of these Kupffer cells was found between controls and rcGM-CSF-treated dogs. In the

  11. Role of Laparoscopic Splenectomy in Elderly Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Valentina; Rosamilio, Rosa; Serio, Bianca; Di Crescenzo, Rosa Maria; Rossi, Francesca; De Paulis, Amato; Pilone, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The management of older patients with chronic primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is still very challenging because of the fragility of older patients who frequently have severe comorbidities and/or disabilities. Corticosteroid-based first-line therapies fail in most of the cases and patients require a second-line treatment, choosing between rituximab, thrombopoietin-receptor agonists and splenectomy. The choice of the best treatment in elderly patients is a compromise between effectiveness and safety and laparoscopic splenectomy may be a good option with a complete remission rate of 67% at 60 months. But relapse and complication rates remain higher than in younger splenectomized ITP patients because elderly patients undergo splenectomy with unfavorable conditions (age >60 year-old, presence of comorbidities, or multiple previous treatments) which negatively influence the outcome, regardless the hematological response. For these reasons, a good management of concomitant diseases and the option to not use the splenectomy as the last possible treatment could improve the outcome of old splenectomized patients. PMID:28352821

  12. Long-term complications of splenectomy in adult immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Lan-Huong; Mahévas, Matthieu; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Limal, Nicolas; Languille, Laetitia; Dumas, Guillaume; Khellaf, Mehdi; Bierling, Philippe; Michel, Marc; Godeau, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The recent large decrease in splenectomy use for chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is partly due to still-unsolved questions about long-term safety. We performed the first single-center exposed/unexposed cohort study evaluating the long-term incidence of splenectomy complications in patients with primary ITP. Overall, 83 patients who underwent splenectomy more than 10 years ago (exposed) were matched with 83 nonsplenectomized patients (unexposed) on the date of ITP diagnosis ±5 years, age and gender. After a median follow-up of 192 months (range 0.5–528), 43 patients (52%) achieved overall response after splenectomy. Splenectomized patients experienced more venous thromboembolism (VTE) than controls (n = 13 vs n = 2, P = 0.005). On multivariate analysis, splenectomy was an independent risk factor of VTE (hazard ratio = 4.006, P = 0.032 [95% confidence interval: 1.13–14.21]). Splenectomized patients presented more severe infections on long-term follow-up: all required hospitalization, and 5/26 (19%) infections led to severe sepsis or septic shock and to death for 3 cases (none in controls). However, the incidence of malignancy was similar in both groups, as was cardiovascular risk, which appeared to be related more to ITP than splenectomy. Finally, splenectomy did not significantly decrease overall survival. Despite the risk of thrombosis and severe sepsis, splenectomy remains an effective and curative treatment for ITP. PMID:27902585

  13. Low-level light treatment ameliorates immune thrombocytopenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingke; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Mei X.

    2017-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated acquired bleeding disorder characterized by abnormally low platelet counts. We reported here the ability of low-level light treatment (LLLT) to alleviate ITP in mice. The treatment is based on noninvasive whole body illumination 30 min a day for a few consecutive days by near infrared light (830 nm) transmitted by an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LLLT significantly lifted the nadir of platelet counts and restored tail bleeding time when applied to two passive ITP models induced by anti-CD41 antibody. The anti-platelet antibody hindered megakaryocyte differentiation from the progenitors, impaired proplatelet and platelet formation, and induced apoptosis of platelets. These adverse effects of anti-CD41 antibody were all mitigated by LLLT to varying degrees, owing to its ability to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in megakaryocytes and preserve mitochondrial functions in platelets in the presence of the antibody. The observations argue not only for contribution of mitochondrial stress to the pathology of ITP, but also clinical potentials of LLLT as a safe, simple, and cost-effective modality of ITP.

  14. Aberrant expression of RUNX3 in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Liu, Yun; Wu, Yulu; Li, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Feng; Xia, Yuan; Yao, Haina; Chu, Peipei; Li, Hongchun; Ma, Ping; Li, Depeng; Li, Zhenyu; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu

    2015-09-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease, characterized by dysregulation of cellular immunity. Previous studies demonstrated that immune imbalance between Th1 and Th2 was associated with the pathogenesis of ITP. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a member of the runt domain-containing family of transcription factors and plays an important role in the regulation of T cell differentiation into Th1 cells. Whether RUNX3 was involved in the pathogenesis of ITP remains unclear. In this study, 47 active ITP patients, 18 ITP with remission and 26 age and gender matched healthy control were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from ITP and control for isolation of RNA and plasma which were used to measure mRNA level of RUNX3 and T-box transcription factor (T-bet) by quantitative real-time PCR and interferon γ (IFN-γ) plasma level by ELISA. Meanwhile, protein was also extracted from PBMCs for Western blot analysis of RUNX3 expression. Our results showed a significantly higher expression of RUNX3, T-bet and plasma level of IFN-γ in active ITP patients compared to control. No differences were observed between ITP with remission and control. Furthermore, a positive correlation of RUNX3 with T-bet was found in active ITP patients. In conclusion, aberrant expression of RUNX3 was associated with the pathogenesis of ITP and therapeutically targeting it might be a novel approach in ITP treatment.

  15. Use of eltrombopag for secondary immune thrombocytopenia in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    González-López, Tomás J; Alvarez-Román, María T; Pascual, Cristina; Sánchez-González, Blanca; Fernández-Fuentes, Fernando; Pérez-Rus, Gloria; Hernández-Rivas, José A; Bernat, Silvia; Bastida, José M; Martínez-Badas, María P; Martínez-Robles, Violeta; Soto, Inmaculada; Olivera, Pavel; Bolaños, Estefanía; Alonso, Rafael; Entrena, Laura; Gómez-Nuñez, Marta; Alonso, Arancha; Yera Cobo, María; Caparrós, Isabel; Tenorio, María; Arrieta-Cerdán, Esther; Lopez-Ansoar, Elsa; García-Frade, Javier; González-Porras, José R

    2017-09-01

    Eltrombopag is a second-line treatment in primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). However, its role in secondary ITP is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of eltrombopag in secondary ITP in daily clinical practice. Eighty-seven secondary ITP patients (46 with ITP secondary to autoimmune syndromes, 23 with ITP secondary to a neoplastic disease subtype: lymphoproliferative disorders [LPDs] and 18 with ITP secondary to viral infections) who had been treated with eltrombopag were retrospectively evaluated. Forty-four patients (38%) had a platelet response, including 40 (35%) with complete responses. Median time to platelet response was 15 days (95% confidence interval, 7-28 days), and was longer in the LPD-ITP group. Platelet response rate was significantly lower in the LPD-ITP than in other groups. However, having achieved response, there were no significant differences between the durable response of the groups. Forty-three patients (49·4%) experienced adverse events (mainly grade 1-2), the commonest being hepatobiliary laboratory abnormalities. There were 10 deaths in this case series, all of which were related to pre-existing medical conditions. In routine clinical practice, eltrombopag is effective and well-tolerated in unselected patients with ITP secondary to both immune and infectious disorders. However, the response rate in LPD-ITP is low. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Low-level light treatment ameliorates immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingke; Zhang, Qi; Li, Peiyu; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an immune-mediated acquired bleeding disorder characterized by abnormally low platelet counts. We reported here the ability of low-level light treatment (LLLT) to alleviate ITP in mice. The treatment is based on noninvasive whole body illumination 30 min a day for a few consecutive days by near infrared light (830 nm) transmitted by an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LLLT significantly lifted the nadir of platelet counts and restored tail bleeding time when applied to two passive ITP models induced by anti-CD41 antibody. The anti-platelet antibody hindered megakaryocyte differentiation from the progenitors, impaired proplatelet and platelet formation, and induced apoptosis of platelets. These adverse effects of anti-CD41 antibody were all mitigated by LLLT to varying degrees, owing to its ability to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in megakaryocytes and preserve mitochondrial functions in platelets in the presence of the antibody. The observations argue not only for contribution of mitochondrial stress to the pathology of ITP, but also clinical potentials of LLLT as a safe, simple, and cost-effective modality of ITP. PMID:27901126

  17. State of the art - how I manage immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nichola

    2017-03-10

    The management of patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is rapidly evolving. Over the last 15 years, a number of novel treatments have improved practice, with many steroid-sparing agents and a reduction in the progression to splenectomy. Although this has improved clinical care, many therapeutic challenges remain. There is no diagnostic test, no biomarkers to direct treatment and few comparative studies to help management decisions. Development of up to date guidelines is difficult with little high-grade evidence. First line treatment continues to be steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) although both are often poorly tolerated and not curative. Common second line treatments include rituximab, immunosuppressive agents, such as azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil, and the thrombopoietin receptor agonists romiplostim and eltrombopag. There are no comparative studies to decide between these agents and treatment is generally individualized, depending on comorbidity. Use of splenectomy has declined and is generally reserved for patients with chronic disease, although the exact position of splenectomy is subject to debate. Further understanding of the cause of disease in individual patients may help guide treatment. Randomized controlled studies of common treatments and novel treatments for refractory patients are urgently needed.

  18. Advances in the pathophysiology of primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Perera, María; Garrido, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Classically, immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was thought to be caused by the destruction and insufficient production of platelets, as mediated by autoantibodies. More recently other immune mechanisms that contribute to the disease have been discovered. This review attempts to address the main unresolved questions in ITP. We review the most current knowledge of the pathophysiology of ITP. Immunological effects of available therapies are also described. The trigger may be a loss of tolerance due to molecular mimicry with cross-reaction of antibodies arising from infectious agents or drugs, genetic factors, and/or platelet Toll receptors. This loss of tolerance activates autoreactive effector B and T lymphocytes, which in turn initiates platelet destruction, mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2/IL-17) by T helper (Th) cells (Th1/Th17). Th2 (anti-inflammatory) and regulatory B (Breg) and Treg cells are also inhibited (with decrease in IL-10/TGF-β), which leads to the disease becoming chronic. Some isotypes of autoantibodies may increase the bleeding risk. Corticosteroids, rituximab, and thrombopoietin receptor agonists (A-TPOs) all increase levels of Tregs and TGF-β. The A-TPOs also increase Breg levels, which could explain why complete remission has been seen in some cases. A better understanding of the immunomodulatory effects of each ITP therapy is needed to best manage the disease.

  19. [Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of primary immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Vicente García, Vicente; Fernández, Antonio; López, M Fernanda; Grande, Carlos; Jarque, Isidro; Martínez, Rafael; Mingot, María Eva; Monteagudo, Emilio; Ribera, Josep M A; Valcárcel, David

    2012-03-17

    The consensus document on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of primary immune thrombocytopenia was developed in 2010 by specialists with recognized expertise in this disease under the auspices of the Spanish Society of Hematology and Hemotherapy and the Spanish Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, with the aim to adapt to Spain the recommendations of the recently published international consensus documents. The decision to start treatment is based on bleeding manifestations and platelet count (<20×10(9)/L). The first-line treatment is corticosteroids, albeit for a limited period of 4-6 weeks. The addition of intravenous immunoglobulin is reserved to patients with severe bleeding. Splenectomy is the most effective second-line treatment. For patients refractory to splenectomy and those with contraindications or patient refusal, the new thrombopoietic agents are the drugs of choice due to their efficacy and excellent safety profile. The other treatment options have highly variable response rates, and the absence of controlled studies does not allow to establish clear recommendations. Monitoring should be individualized. In patients without active treatment, blood counts are recommended every 3-6 months, and the patient should be instructed to consult in case of bleeding, surgery or invasive procedure and pregnancy. In most of the pediatric population, the disease tends to spontaneous remission. High-dose corticosteroids in short course and intravenous immunoglobulin are the treatment of choice. Second- and further-line treatments should be monitored in specialized centers.

  20. Cyclosporin A for persistent or chronic immune thrombocytopenia in children.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anthony P Y; Cheuk, Daniel K L; Lee, Ana H Y; Lee, Pamela P W; Chiang, Alan K S; Ha, S Y; Tsoi, W C; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2016-10-01

    Twenty percent of children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) develop a chronic course where treatment strategy is less established. Cyclosporin A (CSA) has been shown to be effective in small series of children with chronic ITP and might reduce the need for chronic steroid therapy and/or splenectomy. We reviewed consecutive patients below 18 years old with persistent or chronic ITP treated with CSA in our unit between January 1998 and June 2015. Thirty patients (14 boys and 16 girls) were included. The median age at initial diagnosis of ITP was 5 years (range 0.5-16.2 years). CSA was started at a median of 13.9 months (range 3.4-124 months) after initial diagnosis and given for a median duration of 9.3 months (range 0.2-63.9 months). The median platelet count before commencement was 12 × 10(9)/L (range 4-199 × 10(9)/L). The median dose of CSA was 6 mg/kg/day (range 2.4-7.5 mg/kg/day). Complete response (CR) or response (R) was achieved in 17 patients (57 %), and 7 (23 %) had sustained response. Side effects (most commonly hirsutism) were tolerable and reversible. CSA appeared effective in about half of persistent or chronic ITP patients and safe as a second-line agent in managing these children.

  1. How we manage immune thrombocytopenia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Godeau, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    With prolonged life expectancy, immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is frequent in elderly people. In this setting, ITP diagnosis is challenging because of the concern about an underlying myelodysplastic syndrome. Studies of older adults are lacking, and recommendations for treatment are based mainly on expert opinion. The therapeutic strategy differs from that for younger patients and must take into account the greater risk of bleeding and thrombosis, presence of comorbidities, possible impaired cognitive performance or poor life expectancy and concomitant medications, such as anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. Steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy remain the first-line treatments in elderly patients, but prolonged treatment with steroids should be avoided and IVIg treatment may lead to renal failure. Splenectomy is less effective than in young patients and risk of thrombosis is increased. Severe co-morbidities can also contraindicate surgery. Therefore, other second-line treatments are frequently preferred. Danazol and dapsone can be an option for the less severe ITP form. Rituximab is a good option except in patients with a history of infection or with hypogammaglobulinaemia. Thrombopoietin agonists are attractive, especially for patients with severe comorbidities or with limited life expectancy but the risk of thrombosis is a concern. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  3. Use of therapeutic plasma exchange in children with thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure in the Turkish thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure network.

    PubMed

    Sevketoglu, Esra; Yildizdas, Dincer; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur; Kihtir, Hasan Serdar; Kendirli, Tanil; Bayraktar, Suleyman; Carcillo, Joseph A

    2014-10-01

    Thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure can lead to high mortality in critically ill children, possibly related to consequences of thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma exchange therapy may improve thrombotic microangiopathy. The purpose of this observational cohort study is to describe whether there is an association between use of plasma exchange therapy and outcome in the Turkish thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure network. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis in patients with thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure at three different PICUs comparing those who received plasma exchange (+) plus standard therapies with those who did not receive plasma exchange (-) and only received standard therapies. Among 42 of the enrolled patients with thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure, all had a primary or secondary sepsis diagnosis. Fifteen received plasma exchange therapy (PE [+] group) and 27 received standard medical treatment without plasma exchange (PE [-] group). The mean age was 17.69 months (8.24-54.22) in the PE (+) group and 13.46 months (6.47-20.55) in the PE (-) group. Age (p = 0.232), gender (p = 0.206), thrombocyte count (p = 0.09), Organ Failure Index score (p = 0.111), and pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (p = 0.177) at admission were not statistically different between groups. The overall 28-day mortality was higher in the PE (-) group (70.37%) compared with the PE (+) group (26.67%) (univariate p = 0.006; multivariate controlling for pediatric logistic organ dysfunction, Organ Failure Index, Pediatric Risk of Mortality scores, and neurological failure p = 0.048). Length of stay was increased in the PE (+) group (p = 0.004). The positive association found between use of plasma exchange therapy and improved survival supports the potential of this therapy in Turkish children with thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure. The positive, although less so, associated treatment effect

  4. Thrombocytopenia after aortic valve replacement with freedom solo bioprosthesis: a propensity study.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Alessandro; Rusinaru, Dan; Petitprez, Benoit; Marticho, Paul; Vaida, Ioana; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Caus, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    The incidence of postoperative thrombocytopenia after aortic valve replacement with the Freedom Solo bioprosthesis remains unclear. This propensity-matched study was carried out to evaluate the incidence and clinical impact of thrombocytopenia in patients receiving the Freedom Solo bioprosthesis. Patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with a Freedom Solo or Carpentier-Edwards Perimount pericardial prosthesis at our institution between 2006 and 2008 were screened retrospectively. Exclusion criteria included double valve replacement, redo surgery, and active endocarditis. Two hundred six patients were considered eligible for this analysis. Using propensity scores 36 matched pairs of patients with a Freedom Solo or Perimount bioprosthesis were obtained. The primary end point was the occurrence of postoperative thrombocytopenia. Secondary end points were postoperative thromboembolic or hemorrhagic events and 30-day mortality. Before matching, severe thrombocytopenia (<30 x 10(9) platelets/L) occurred in 22% of patients with a Freedom Solo bioprosthesis and 1% with a Perimount bioprosthesis (p < 0.0001), thromboembolic or hemorrhagic events occurred in 3% and 2%, respectively (p = 0.37), and 30-day mortality was 4% and 6%, respectively (p = 0.48). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative platelet count (p = 0.01) and Freedom Solo (p < 0.0001) as independent risk factors for severe postoperative thrombocytopenia. After matching, severe thrombocytopenia occurred in 25% and 3% of patients with Freedom Solo and Perimount bioprostheses, respectively (p < 0.0001), thromboembolic or hemorrhagic events occurred in 0%, and 30-day mortality was 3% and 6%, respectively (p = 0.99). The risk of thrombocytopenia was high after Freedom Solo implantation. However, this complication was not related to any deleterious events in our study population. Copyright (c) 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Providing ABO-identical platelets and cryoprecipitate to (almost) all patients: approach, logistics, and associated decreases in transfusion reaction and red blood cell alloimmunization incidence.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Kelly F; Howk, Nedda; Masel, Debra S; Thayer, Mark; Refaai, Majed A; Kirkley, Scott A; Heal, Joanna M; Blumberg, Neil

    2012-03-01

    There are multiple benefits to transfusing only ABO-identical blood components. Historically our institution routinely transfused ABO-nonidentical platelets (PLTs) and cryoprecipitate to surgical patients. In April 2005, we implemented a policy of transfusing only ABO-identical components whenever feasible, regardless of outdating or logistic considerations. Technical staff closely monitored product usage and adjusted blood center orders based on recent utilization and planned transfusions. When unable to provide ABO-identical PLTs, ABO-compatible PLTs were washed to remove incompatible plasma. Data on outdating were collected for 18 months before and after implementation. We compared transfusion reaction and red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization incidence for 4 years preceding (2001-2004) and subsequent (2006-2009) to implementation. In the year after implementation, only 11 of 410 surgical patients received ABO-nonidentical PLTs (2.7%). There was a 5.6% increase in outdating of PLTs. Transfusing ABO-identical components was associated with significant reductions in febrile (-46%; 8.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 components; p < 0.0001) and allergic transfusion reactions (-23%; from 7.0 to 5.4 per 10,000 components; p = 0.025). A progressive reduction in de novo RBC alloimmunization incidence also occurred (-50% by 2009; p = 0.03). Providing ABO-identical PLTs to almost all patients was feasible in our setting by changing ordering and inventorying procedures and making the ABO-identical policy a staff priority. Unexpected and striking reductions in febrile and allergic reactions and RBC alloimmunization were observed, of uncertain causal relationship to this ABO policy change, which will require further study. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Detection of Antileukocytic Antibodies in Blood Serum using Lymphocytes and Latex Microspheres Carrying HLA-Antigens upon Alloimmunization of Women with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E O; Nikolaeva, M A; Golubeva, E L; Vtorushina, V V; Van'ko, L V; Khodzhaeva, Z S; Krechetova, L V

    2016-03-01

    Anti-HLA-antibodies were detected using cross-reaction of blood serum with allogenic T and B cells and latex microspheres coated with HLA-I and HLA-II antigens. HLA+ and HLA-sera obtained from women before and after allogeneic immunization were tested. The results obtained by these methods significantly differed. The test with latex microspheres detected antibodies to HLA-I and HLA-II antigens with high sensitivity and specificity and can be used for assessment of clinical significance of alloantibody detection when using alloimmunization in the therapy of gestation disorders.

  7. Treatment and Prevention of Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Dans, Antonio L.; Moores, Lisa K.; Bona, Robert; Davidson, Bruce L.; Schulman, Sam; Crowther, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an antibody-mediated adverse drug reaction that can lead to devastating thromboembolic complications, including pulmonary embolism, ischemic limb necrosis necessitating limb amputation, acute myocardial infarction, and stroke. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Among the key recommendations for this article are the following: For patients receiving heparin in whom clinicians consider the risk of HIT to be > 1%, we suggest that platelet count monitoring be performed every 2 or 3 days from day 4 to day 14 (or until heparin is stopped, whichever occurs first) (Grade 2C). For patients receiving heparin in whom clinicians consider the risk of HIT to be < 1%, we suggest that platelet counts not be monitored (Grade 2C). In patients with HIT with thrombosis (HITT) or isolated HIT who have normal renal function, we suggest the use of argatroban or lepirudin or danaparoid over other nonheparin anticoagulants (Grade 2C). In patients with HITT and renal insufficiency, we suggest the use of argatroban over other nonheparin anticoagulants (Grade 2C). In patients with acute HIT or subacute HIT who require urgent cardiac surgery, we suggest the use of bivalirudin over other nonheparin anticoagulants or heparin plus antiplatelet agents (Grade 2C). Conclusions: Further studies evaluating the role of fondaparinux and the new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of HIT are needed. PMID:22315270

  8. The financial impact of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Maureen A; Koerber, John M; Fitzgerald, Maureen; Mattson, Joan C

    2008-09-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an adverse drug reaction that increases patient morbidity and mortality. The financial impact of HIT to an institution is thought to be significant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the financial impact of HIT. A case-control study was employed. Case patients were identified as newly diagnosed HIT patients. Control subjects were matched by diagnosis-related group, primary diagnosis code, primary procedure code, and hospital admission date. The financial/decision support database of the hospital was queried to identify the matched control subjects, total cost, and reimbursement. The determination of financial impact included the total profit or (total loss) and the backfill effect (ie, the lost operating margin resulting from increased length of stay). Length of stay and mortality were compared. Data from 22 case patients and 255 control subjects were analyzed. On average, HIT case patients incurred a financial loss of $14,387 per patient and an increase in length of stay of 14.5 days. When confining the analysis to only Medicare case patients (n = 17) and Medicare control subjects, case patients incurred a financial loss of $20,170 per case and an increase in length of stay of 15.8 days. Depending on the occupancy rate of the institution, additional financial loss could result from the backfill effect. Mortality was not significantly affected. For an institution that sees 50 new cases of HIT per year, the projected annual financial impact ranges from approximately $700,000 to $1 million. Institutions with high bed occupancy rates may see an additional loss from the backfill effect.

  9. [Effect of thrombopoietin II on exsanguine thrombocytopenia mouse death rate].

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Zhong, L; Zhong, X

    2001-09-01

    To study the effect of thrombopoietin II (TPO II) on the exsanguine thrombocytopenia mouse death rate. After the normal peripheral platelet counts were done on the samples obtained from the tail vein of purebred Babl/c mice before experiment, the purified ligand I of TPO II, artificial compound ligand II of TPO II and rhTPO were injected intraperitoneally once a day for 7 days. On d 7 and d 14, platelet counts were performed on 0.5 ml samples obtained from the supra-orbital vein, with the condition of the mouse death monitored daily. On d 7, ligand I of TPO II group platelet counts were higher than that of the negative control group (P < 0.05), while not being significantly different from that of rhTPO group (P > 0.05). On d 14, the platelet counts of two TPO II groups increased significantly as compared with the negative control group (P < 0.01), showing no significant difference from that of rhTPO group (P > 0.05). Moreover, the platelet counts of mice in two TPO II groups and the positive group had shown an increasing tendency in the days following experiment. In addition, mouse death occurred in all groups of mice following their phlebotomy from the supraorbital vein on d 7. But the death rate of negative control group was evidently higher than that of any other groups (P < 0.05). TPO II's biological activity obviously increases platelet production, thereby reducing the exsanguine thrombopenia mouse death rate.

  10. Consequences of treating false positive heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Marler, Jacob; Unzaga, Jessica; Stelts, Sundae; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2015-11-01

    Identification of patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is encumbered by false positive enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA) antibody results, therefore a serotonin release assay (SRA) is used for confirmation. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that increasing the optical density (OD) threshold (currently at 0.4) of the antibody test enhances the positive predictive value. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of patients who were ELISA antibody positive but SRA negative, and the costs and bleeding events associated with alternative anticoagulant treatment. We hypothesized that treating patients with a positive ELISA antibody OD value of <1.0 would result in increased cost and bleeding risk. This retrospective chart review was conducted on adult hospitalized patients from 2011 to 2013. Patients with positive ELISA antibodies (OD of 0.4-1.0) and an SRA result were included. Eighty-five patients were identified with positive antibodies (average OD of 0.66), 100 % of which were found to be SRA negative. A total of 59 patients (69 %) received alternative anticoagulants. The average duration of treatment was 3.1 days, and 4 patients (4.7 %) experienced a bleeding event. The cost of testing and laboratory monitoring was $36,346 and the cost of the alternative anticoagulants totaled $47,179. The total cost was $83,525, with an average total cost per patient of $982. This study adds to the body of literature suggesting treatment should only be initiated if the OD is one or greater. The high false positive rate caused increased cost and some bleeding events.

  11. An improbable and unusual case of thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaymon; Patel, Preeti; Ahmed, Zohair

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening medical emergency which may be difficult to recognize given the wide spectrum in which it presents. A delay in treatment may be catastrophic as untreated cases of TTP have a mortality rate exceeding 90%. Given the high fatality rate of untreated TTP and its range of presenting symptoms, we present our unusual case of TTP in a post-splenectomy patient with early treatment and positive outcome. This case describes a 54-year-old female who presented with hematuria and gingival bleeding, followed by the development of a bilateral lower extremity petechial rash. Her past medical history was significant for multiple episodes of TTP, the last of which resulted in a splenectomy and a 20-year history of remission thereafter. On exam, she was alert, well appearing, and neurologically intact. Her only significant finding was a bilateral lower extremity petechial rash. Laboratory studies revealed mild anemia and thrombocytopenia, an elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and a decreased haptoglobin. Peripheral smear showed poikilocytosis, helmet cells, and schistocytes. Corticosteroid therapy was promptly initiated, her platelets were monitored closely, and she underwent urgent therapeutic plasma exchange. Due to the risk of significant morbidity and mortality that may result from delayed treatment of TTP as well as the significant variations of presentation, TTP requires a consistently high index of suspicion. Our patient suffered multiple relapses of TTP within a 30-year span, underwent splenectomy in early adulthood, and presented with atypical symptoms during her most recent relapse illustrating how persistent TTP can be as well as how unusually it may present. Providers should be aware of the vast spectrum of presentation and remember that TTP may recur following splenectomy despite prolonged remission. PMID:27609730

  12. FC gamma receptor polymorphisms in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Pavkovic, Marica; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Karanfilski, Oliver; Cevreska, Lidija; Stojanovic, Aleksandar

    2017-09-23

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune blood disease of unknown etiology. The aim of our study was to investigate a possible role of FCGR2A and FCGR3A polymorphisms in the development of primary ITP. We analyzed 125 adult patients with ITP and 120 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed by using PCR-RFLP methods. Our results showed significantly higher frequency of high-affinity FCGR3A-158V allele in patients with ITP compared with control subjects (47.2% versus 37.5%; p = 0.037). We did not find significant differences in the genotype distribution or allele frequencies for FCGR2A-131H/R between patients and controls, p = 0.652 and p = 0.478. In the groups of patients with unresponsive and responsive ITP we found significantly different genotype distribution and allele frequencies for FCGR3A, p = 0.036 and p = 0.008 respectively. There was no significant difference in genotype and allele frequencies for FCGR2A between these two groups of patients. Our results confirmed that the combination of high-affinity FCGR2A-131H and FCGR3A-158V allele was more common in patients with ITP than in controls (55% versus 40%; p = 0.024). Our results suggest possible role of FCGR3A polymorphism in the etiology, development and clinical outcome of ITP, but larger prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

  13. Management of Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is common and often fatal in extremely premature neonates. In the last decade, the therapeutic armamentarium for IC has markedly expanded; however, the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of most antifungal agents in premature neonates are unknown. We will review the major systemic antifungal agents in clinical use. PMID:9849983

  14. Detection rate of blood group alloimmunization based on real-world testing practices and kinetics of antibody induction and evanescence.

    PubMed

    Stack, Gary; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-11-01

    Failure to detect non-ABO blood group alloantibodies places patients at risk for hemolytic reactions. Suboptimal alloantibody detection could result from posttransfusion testing performed too early, too late, or not at all. Testing performed too early may precede antibody induction, while testing performed too late could miss antibodies that have evanesced. Taking these factors into account, our goal was to determine the percentage of alloantibodies detected with real-world testing practices. The alloantibody detection rate in a general hospital setting was determined based on the frequency and timing of antibody testing after red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and rates of antibody induction and evanescence. Intervals to follow up testing after RBC transfusions (n = 561 RBC units in 100 random patients) were determined retrospectively. Best-fit lines and equations for antibody induction and evanescence were computed on previously published data. Nearly half (271/561; 48.3%) of RBC infusions had either no follow-up antibody screen or testing too soon (<30 days) after transfusion to detect alloimmunization. Of the remaining RBC units, 10.3% (58/561) had follow-up testing 30 to 112 days posttransfusion, 28.7% (161/561) were followed up at more than 112 days, and 12.7% (71/561) were tested at both 30 to 112 days and more than 112 days. By inputting these timing data into best-fit line equations for antibody induction and evanescence, we calculated an alloantibody detection rate of 31.6%. Posttransfusion antibody testing was inadequately timed for optimal alloantibody detection. Real-world compatibility testing was predicted to detect less than one-third of non-ABO antibodies, thereby exposing patients to risks of mismatched transfusion. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Complications in neonatal surgery.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Caty, Michael G

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal surgery is recognized as an independent discipline in general surgery, requiring the expertise of pediatric surgeons to optimize outcomes in infants with surgical conditions. Survival following neonatal surgery has improved dramatically in the past 60 years. Improvements in pediatric surgical outcomes are in part attributable to improved understanding of neonatal physiology, specialized pediatric anesthesia, neonatal critical care including sophisticated cardiopulmonary support, utilization of parenteral nutrition and adjustments in fluid management, refinement of surgical technique, and advances in surgical technology including minimally invasive options. Nevertheless, short and long-term complications following neonatal surgery continue to have profound and sometimes lasting effects on individual patients, families, and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. KIR2DS2 as predictor of thrombocytopenia secondary to pegylated interferon-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Juarez, A; Gonzalez, R; Frias, M; Manzanares-Martín, B; Rodriguez-Cano, D; Perez-Camacho, I; Gordon, A; Cuenca, F; Camacho, A; Pineda, J A; Peña, J; Rivero, A

    2016-03-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) as a marker for the development of thrombocytopenia secondary to Peg-interferon (IFN) therapy in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Patients were naive to HCV treatment, receiving a first course of Peg-IFN/Ribavirin combination therapy. Total platelet count (cells ml(-1)) was determined at each visit, determining platelet decline from baseline to weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 after starting therapy. The end point of the study was development of thrombocytopenia, defined as a platelet count of <1 50 000 cells ml(-1). Fifty-eight HIV/HCV co-infected patients were included in the study, of whom 20 (34.4%) developed thrombocytopenia. The absence of KIR2DS2 was associated with higher and faster rate of thrombocytopenia (54.2% vs 22.5%; P=0.012; 6.6 vs 10.3 weeks; P=0.008). The absence of KIR2DS2 was associated with a greater decline in platelet count and development of thrombocytopenia during Peg-IFN treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 15 March 2016; doi:10.1038/tpj.2016.19.

  17. Acute Severe Thrombocytopenia Occurring After Administration of Eptifibatide Postpones Emergent Coronary Artery Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Brent T.; Olund, Timothy J.; Pagel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Eptifibatide is a platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) receptor antagonist that inhibits fibrinogen binding to the activated GP IIb/IIIa site and prevents platelet-platelet interaction and clot formation. GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors improve outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome. Thrombocytopenia is a complication of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors, but severe thrombocytopenia is unusual. Most reported cases of severe thrombocytopenia after eptifibatide occurred in patients with acute coronary syndrome. The authors describe a patient who developed acute profound thrombocytopenia after receiving eptifibatide before emergent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Case Presentation A 67-year-old man with a normal platelet count (220 K/uL) developed atrial fibrillation, left bundle branch block, and respiratory insufficiency consistent with acute coronary syndrome two days after colectomy. He received eptifibatide during cardiac catheterization, where three-vessel coronary artery disease was encountered. Emergent coronary artery surgery was planned, but the platelet count before surgery was 2 K/uL. Eptifibatide was discontinued, surgery was postponed, and acute coronary syndrome was treated with intraaortic balloon counterpulsation. Conclusions The authors describe the second reported case of eptifibatide-induced severe thrombocytopenia associated with cardiac surgery. In this case, discontinuation of eptifibatide and transfusion of apheresis platelets increased the platelet count (137 K/uL) the following day, and the patient subsequently underwent successful coronary artery surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:27843778

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia with secondary qualitative function defects.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C; Futterer, Jane; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; MacDonald, David; Simpson, Michael A; Sanchez-Guiú, Isabel; Drake, Sian; Bem, Danai; Leo, Vincenzo; Fletcher, Sarah J; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Allsup, David; Biss, Tina; Bolton-Maggs, Paula Hb; Collins, Peter; Curry, Nicola; Grimley, Charlotte; James, Beki; Makris, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Pavord, Sue; Talks, Katherine; Thachil, Jecko; Wilde, Jonathan; Williams, Mike; Harrison, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Mundell, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Daly, Martina E; Watson, Steve P; Morgan, Neil V

    2016-10-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormally low platelet counts which can be associated with abnormal bleeding. Next-generation sequencing has previously been employed in these disorders for the confirmation of suspected genetic abnormalities, and more recently in the discovery of novel disease-causing genes. However its full potential has not yet been exploited. Over the past 6 years we have sequenced the exomes from 55 patients, including 37 index cases and 18 additional family members, all of whom were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study. All patients had inherited or sustained thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology with platelet counts varying from 11×10(9)/L to 186×10(9)/L. Of the 51 patients phenotypically tested, 37 (73%), had an additional secondary qualitative platelet defect. Using whole exome sequencing analysis we have identified "pathogenic" or "likely pathogenic" variants in 46% (17/37) of our index patients with thrombocytopenia. In addition, we report variants of uncertain significance in 12 index cases, including novel candidate genetic variants in previously unreported genes in four index cases. These results demonstrate that whole exome sequencing is an efficient method for elucidating potential pathogenic genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia. Whole exome sequencing also has the added benefit of discovering potentially pathogenic genetic variants for further study in novel genes not previously implicated in inherited thrombocytopenia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Antiphospholipid Syndrome in a Pregnant Female Presenting with Severe Thrombocytopenia and Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Kunal; Katyal, Virender; Arya, Suvrat; Shrama, Meha

    2015-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is defined by the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with recurrent venous or arterial thromboembolism or pregnancy morbidity. Antithrombotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment given the high risk of recurrent thromboembolism that characterizes this condition. Despite the prothrombotic nature of APS, thrombocytopenia is present in a proportion of patients, which can complicate management and limit the use of antithrombotic therapy. The mechanism of APS-associated thrombocytopenia is multifactorial and its relation to thrombotic risk is poorly characterized. The presence of thrombocytopenia does not appear to reduce thrombotic risk in patients with APS, who can develop thromboembolic complications necessitating antithrombotic treatment. In these cases, treatment of the thrombocytopenia may be necessary to facilitate administration of antithrombotic agents. We present such a pregnant lady with history of recurrent pregnancy losses who presented with severe thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations, who was subsequently diagnosed to have antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. She was initially managed with steroids and when her platelet counts improved, antithrombotic therapy was started. She delivered an uneventful and successful pregnancy outcome without any complications during follow-up. PMID:25722728

  20. Mechanisms and etiologies of thrombocytopenia in the intensive care unit: impact of extensive investigations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is common in the intensive care unit. Potential mechanisms and etiologies behind this phenomenon are multiple and often entangled. We assessed the effect of a systematic approach, using routinely available tests, on the proportion of patients in whom the mechanism (primary objective) and etiology (secondary objective) of thrombocytopenia in a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) could be identified. Methods Before-and-after study of all patients with thrombocytopenia was used. ‘Before’ group had no intervention. New standard operating procedures for thrombocytopenia management were introduced. In the ‘After’ group, bone marrow aspiration; determination of fibrinogen dosage, prothrombin time, factor V, D-dimers; assay of fibrin monomers, ferritin, triglycerides, lactic acid dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, vitamin B12, folates, reticulocytes, haptoglobin, and bilirubin were performed. Results In the Before group (n = 20), the mechanism (central, peripheral, or mixed) was identified in 10 % versus 83% in After group (n = 23) (p < 0.001) (48% peripheral, 35% mixed). Before intervention, ≥1 etiology was identified in 15% versus 95.7% in the After group (p < 0.001). Conclusions Systematic and extensive investigation using routine tests highlights the mechanisms and etiology of thrombocytopenia in most cases. PMID:25593741

  1. Polyethylene glycol modification of adenovirus reduces platelet activation, endothelial cell activation, and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Sean E; Mok, Hoyin; Gushiken, Francisca C; Lopez, Jose A; Barry, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the complications for in vivo administration of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors after intravenous injection. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of Ad5-induced thrombocytopenia and how these effects are attenuated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of Ad5 (Ad-PEG). After intravenous injection, accelerated platelet loss was observed in Ad-injected mice but not in their Ad-PEG-injected counterparts. This platelet loss induced by Ad5 corresponded with increases in coagulation D-dimer levels, splenomegaly, and, later, production of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. In contrast, these responses were blunted or ablated after injection of Ad-PEG. Ad5 activated both platelets and endothelial cells directly in vitro as evidenced by induction of P-selectin and the formation of von Willebrand factor-platelet strings and in vivo as evidenced by the induction of E-selectin messenger RNA. PEGylation blunted these observed activations. These data suggest that Ad5 may induce thrombocytopenia by direct activation of endothelial cells in addition to its direct effects on platelets. This link provides an important clue for the understanding of the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia associated with Ad5. Given that PEGylation blunted interactions of Ad with platelets and endothelial cells, reduced D-dimer formation, reduced thrombocytopenia, and reduced splenomegaly, these data suggest that this simple vector modification may have utility to improve the safety of Ad vectors for human gene therapy.

  2. Management of Thrombocytopenia in Chronic Liver Disease: Focus on Pharmacotherapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Maan, Raoel; de Knegt, Robert J; Veldt, Bart J

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 × 10(9)/L) often complicates chronic liver disease, impeding optimal management of these patients. The prevalence of this manifestation ranges from 6% among non-cirrhotic patients with chronic liver disease to 70% among patients with liver cirrhosis. It has also been shown that the severity of liver disease is associated with both prevalence and level of thrombocytopenia. Its development is often multifactorial, although thrombopoietin is thought to be a major factor. The discovery of and ability to clone thrombopoietin led to new treatment opportunities for this clinical manifestation. This review discusses data on the three most important thrombopoietin receptor agonists: eltrombopag, avatrombopag, and romiplostim. Currently, only eltrombopag is approved for usage among patients with thrombocytopenia and chronic hepatitis C virus infection in order to initiate and maintain interferon-based antiviral treatment. Nevertheless, the optimal management of hematologic abnormalities among patients with chronic liver disease, and its risk for bleeding complications, is still a matter of discussion. Thrombocytopenia definitely contributes to hemostatic defects but is often counterbalanced by the enhanced presence of procoagulant factors. Therefore, a thorough assessment of the patient's risk for thrombotic events is essential when the use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists is considered among patients with chronic liver disease and thrombocytopenia.

  3. The role of eltrombopag in the management of hepatitis C virus-related thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Danish, Fazal-I-Akbar; Yasmin, Saeeda

    2013-01-01

    Eltrombopag is a 2nd generation thrombopoietin-receptor agonist. It binds with the thrombopoietin-receptors found on the surfaces of the megakaryocytes & increases platelet production. Many recent studies have suggested a potential role for this novel agent in the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with hepatitis-C infection. Studies have shown that adjunct treatment with Eltrombopag can help avoid dose reductions/withdrawals of pegylated interferon secondary to thrombocytopenia. It may also have a role in priming up platelet levels to help initiate antiviral therapy. Similarly, chronic liver disease patients with thrombocytopenia who need to undergo an invasive procedure may be potential candidates for short two-week courses of eltrombopag in the periprocedural period to help reduce the risk of bleeding. Besides the price (deemed very expensive and probably not cost-effective), there are some legitimate concerns about the safety profile of this novel agent (most importantly, portal vein thrombosis, bone marrow fibrosis and hepatotoxicity). In this article, the potential role of eltrombopag in the context of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related thrombocytopenia is reviewed. To write this article, a MEDLINE search was conducted (1990 to November 2012) using the search terms "eltrombopag," "HCV," and "thrombocytopenia."

  4. Whole exome sequencing identifies genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia with secondary qualitative function defects

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C.; Futterer, Jane; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; MacDonald, David; Simpson, Michael A.; Sanchez-Guiú, Isabel; Drake, Sian; Bem, Danai; Leo, Vincenzo; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Allsup, David; Biss, Tina; Bolton-Maggs, Paula HB; Collins, Peter; Curry, Nicola; Grimley, Charlotte; James, Beki; Makris, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Pavord, Sue; Talks, Katherine; Thachil, Jecko; Wilde, Jonathan; Williams, Mike; Harrison, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Mundell, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Daly, Martina E.; Watson, Steve P.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormally low platelet counts which can be associated with abnormal bleeding. Next-generation sequencing has previously been employed in these disorders for the confirmation of suspected genetic abnormalities, and more recently in the discovery of novel disease-causing genes. However its full potential has not yet been exploited. Over the past 6 years we have sequenced the exomes from 55 patients, including 37 index cases and 18 additional family members, all of whom were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study. All patients had inherited or sustained thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology with platelet counts varying from 11×109/L to 186×109/L. Of the 51 patients phenotypically tested, 37 (73%), had an additional secondary qualitative platelet defect. Using whole exome sequencing analysis we have identified “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” variants in 46% (17/37) of our index patients with thrombocytopenia. In addition, we report variants of uncertain significance in 12 index cases, including novel candidate genetic variants in previously unreported genes in four index cases. These results demonstrate that whole exome sequencing is an efficient method for elucidating potential pathogenic genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia. Whole exome sequencing also has the added benefit of discovering potentially pathogenic genetic variants for further study in novel genes not previously implicated in inherited thrombocytopenia. PMID:27479822

  5. Corticosteroid in the treatment of moderate to severe thrombocytopenia due to leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Alian, Shahriar; Asghari, Hasan; Najafi, Narges; Davoudi, Alireza; Yazdani, Jamshid

    2014-10-01

    Thrombocytopenia is associated with a bad prognosis in Leptospirosis. We investigated the effect of corticosteroids to improve thrombocytopenia due to leptospirosis. In a clinical trial, all patients admitted with leptospirosis in Razi Hospital of Ghaemshahr, north of Iran were enrolled in a 2-year study. Totally, 56 patients with moderate to severe thrombocytopenia were randomized to control and treatment groups. The treatment group received corticosteroid (prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day for maximum one week) in addition to the standard antibiotic therapy. There was no significant difference regarding age and gender between the two groups (P = 0.254, P = 0.789, respectively). The mean duration to improve thrombocytopenia was 4.41 ± 0.197 days in the treatment group and 5.72 ± 0.318 days in the control group, which was significantly different (P = 0.003). Duration of hospitalization in the treatment group was 5.24 ± 0.244 days and 6.23 ± 0.329 days in the control group, which was significantly different (P = 0.028). The two groups had no significant difference regarding mortality, intubation, level of platelet, duration of ICU admission and pulmonary, renal or hepatic involvement. Corticosteroid therapy decreased the length of hospitalization only in severe subgroup thrombocytopenia, but not in the moderate subgroup.

  6. Corticosteroid in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Thrombocytopenia Due to Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Shahriar; Asghari, Hasan; Najafi, Narges; Davoudi, Alireza; Yazdani, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thrombocytopenia is associated with a bad prognosis in Leptospirosis. Objectives: We investigated the effect of corticosteroids to improve thrombocytopenia due to leptospirosis. Patients and Methods: In a clinical trial, all patients admitted with leptospirosis in Razi Hospital of Ghaemshahr, north of Iran were enrolled in a 2-year study. Totally, 56 patients with moderate to severe thrombocytopenia were randomized to control and treatment groups. The treatment group received corticosteroid (prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day for maximum one week) in addition to the standard antibiotic therapy. Results: There was no significant difference regarding age and gender between the two groups (P = 0.254, P = 0.789, respectively). The mean duration to improve thrombocytopenia was 4.41 ± 0.197 days in the treatment group and 5.72 ± 0.318 days in the control group, which was significantly different (P = 0.003). Duration of hospitalization in the treatment group was 5.24 ± 0.244 days and 6.23 ± 0.329 days in the control group, which was significantly different (P = 0.028). The two groups had no significant difference regarding mortality, intubation, level of platelet, duration of ICU admission and pulmonary, renal or hepatic involvement. Conclusions: Corticosteroid therapy decreased the length of hospitalization only in severe subgroup thrombocytopenia, but not in the moderate subgroup. PMID:25763200

  7. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Clabough, D L; Gebhard, D; Flaherty, M T; Whetter, L E; Perry, S T; Coggins, L; Fuller, F J

    1991-11-01

    An adult horse infected with a virulent, cell culture-adapted strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) developed cyclical thrombocytopenia in which the nadir of platelet counts coincided with peak febrile responses. In order to investigate the mechanism of thrombocytopenia during acute febrile episodes, four adult horses were experimentally infected with the wild-type Wyoming strain of EIAV. Platelet counts decreased from baseline as rectal temperature increased. Serum reverse transcriptase activity increased above background levels in all horses, coincident with increase in rectal temperature. All horses developed an EIAV-specific immune response detectable by Western immunoblot by postinfection day 10. Increases in platelet-associated immunoglobulins G and M were detectable by direct fluorescent-antibody test and flow cytometric assay. Viral replication in bone marrow megakaryocytes was not detectable by in situ hybridization. Results suggest an immune-mediated mechanism of thrombocytopenia in horses infected with EIAV. Despite an inability to identify virion particles in association with platelet-bound antibody, the cyclical nature of the thrombocytopenia and the occurrence of a marked cell-free viremia concomitant with fever and thrombocytopenia suggest immune complex deposition on platelets. We propose that clearance of virus and antibody-coated platelets from the peripheral circulation by hepatic Kupffer cells and splenic macrophages may target infectious virus particles, in the form of immune complexes, to host cells most permissive for in vivo viral replication.

  8. The contribution of mouse models to the understanding of constitutional thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Léon, Catherine; Dupuis, Arnaud; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2016-01-01

    Constitutional thrombocytopenias result from platelet production abnormalities of hereditary origin. Long misdiagnosed and poorly studied, knowledge about these rare diseases has increased considerably over the last twenty years due to improved technology for the identification of mutations, as well as an improvement in obtaining megakaryocyte culture from patient hematopoietic stem cells. Simultaneously, the manipulation of mouse genes (transgenesis, total or conditional inactivation, introduction of point mutations, random chemical mutagenesis) have helped to generate disease models that have contributed greatly to deciphering patient clinical and laboratory features. Most of the thrombocytopenias for which the mutated genes have been identified now have a murine model counterpart. This review focuses on the contribution that these mouse models have brought to the understanding of hereditary thrombocytopenias with respect to what was known in humans. Animal models have either i) provided novel information on the molecular and cellular pathways that were missing from the patient studies; ii) improved our understanding of the mechanisms of thrombocytopoiesis; iii) been instrumental in structure-function studies of the mutated gene products; and iv) been an invaluable tool as preclinical models to test new drugs or develop gene therapies. At present, the genetic determinants of thrombocytopenia remain unknown in almost half of all cases. Currently available high-speed sequencing techniques will identify new candidate genes, which will in turn allow the generation of murine models to confirm and further study the abnormal phenotype. In a complementary manner, programs of random mutagenesis in mice should also identify new candidate genes involved in thrombocytopenia. PMID:27478199

  9. Establishment of a congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia model and a thrombocyte-specific reporter line in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Zhang, Y; Zhou, R; Zheng, Y; Zhao, L; Huang, M; Zhang, X; Leung, A Y H; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y

    2016-11-29

    Mutations in the human myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL) protein gene are known to cause congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (CAMT). The prognosis of this heritable disorder is poor and bone marrow transplantation is the only effective treatment. Here, by using the TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nuclease) technology, we created a zebrafish mpl mutant to model human CAMT. Disruption of zebrafish mpl lead to a severe reduction in thrombocytes and a high bleeding tendency, as well as deficiencies in adult hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We further demonstrated that thrombocytopenia in mpl mutant zebrafish was caused by impaired Tpo/Mpl/Jak2 signaling, resulting in reduced proliferation of thrombocyte precursors. These results indicate that mpl mutant zebrafish develop thrombocytopenia resembling the human CAMT. To utilize fully zebrafish to study thrombocyte biology and thrombocytopenia disorders, we generated a transgenic reporter line Tg(mpl:eGFP)smu4, in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was driven by the mpl promoter. Detailed characterization of Tg(mpl:eGFP)smu4 fish confirmed that the thrombocyte lineage was specifically marked by GFP expression. In conclusion, we generated the first transmissible congenital thrombocytopenia zebrafish model mimicking human CAMT and a thrombocyte-specific transgenic line. Together with Tg(mpl:eGFP)smu4, mpl mutant zebrafish provide a useful tool for drug screening and study of thrombocytopoiesis.Leukemia advance online publication, 29 November 2016; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.320.

  10. Antiplatelet drug induced isolated profound thrombocytopenia in interventional cardiology: a review based on individual case reports.

    PubMed

    Höchtl, Thomas; Pachinger, Linda; Unger, Gerhard; Geppert, Alexander; Wojta, Johann; Harenberg, Job; Huber, Kurt

    2007-08-01

    A combination antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel, aspirin, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and heparins is routinely used as adjunct therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). As all substances inhibit platelet function, bleeding and thrombocytopenia may occur. We report on three patients who developed isolated profound thrombocytopenia (platelet count of < 20,000/mm(3)) within 24 h after initiation of combination antiplatelet and antithrombotic therapy during a 1 year observation period in 443 consecutive patients undergoing PCI and stent implantation. The data from our cardiology unit revealed an incidence of an isolated profound thrombocytopenia in 0.7% of all patients on combination antithrombotic therapy and in 1.5% of patients with GPIIb/IIIa-blockers. In all three cases with isolated profound thrombocytopenia GPIIb/IIIa-blockers were found to be the causative agents. Negative results of HIT-assays excluded heparin induced thrombocytopenia type II. Despite the extremely low platelet count no severe bleeding was observed and in all cases platelet counts normalized within 3-4 days without specific interventions except discontinuation of the responsible agent. These findings are discussed in conjunct with an overview of the recent literature.

  11. A Case Report of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia after Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keisuke; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Fukumoto, Takumi; Kido, Masahiro; Takebe, Atsushi; Tanaka, Motofumi; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Toyama, Hirochika; Asari, Sadaki; Goto, Tadahiro; Ku, Yonson

    2016-06-16

    There are few descriptions of severe thrombocytopenia during the early postoperative period after liver transplantation, and these have not been fully documented in the literature. Here, we report a case of drug-induced thrombocytopenia requiring transfusion of blood products after living donor liver transplantation. We determined that this was not caused by the interferon-free anti-viral therapy but by tacrolimus A 61-year-old woman with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis and hepatorenal syndrome underwent living donor liver transplantation using a left lobe graft from her son. After transplantation, immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus and steroid. Seven weeks after transplantation, interferon-free therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was started. Thirteen days thereafter, hepatitis C virus tested negative. However, the platelet count had begun to gradually decrease just before starting anti-viral therapy. Daclatasvir and asunaprevir were stopped because this was suspected to be a side-effect of these drugs, but the patient nonetheless went on to develop severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count 17,000/μL), which needed transfusions. Now suspecting tacrolimus as the inducer of this side effect, we changed to cyclosporin, after which the platelet count gradually recovered. Viral markers were still not detectable up to 2 months after discontinuation of the antiviral drugs. We conclude that when severe thrombocytopenia occurs, possible drug-induced thrombocytopenia as well as other disorders must be investigated.

  12. The role of eltrombopag in the management of hepatitis C virus-related thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Danish, Fazal-i-Akbar; Yasmin, Saeeda

    2013-01-01

    Eltrombopag is a 2nd generation thrombopoietin-receptor agonist. It binds with the thrombopoietin-receptors found on the surfaces of the megakaryocytes & increases platelet production. Many recent studies have suggested a potential role for this novel agent in the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with hepatitis-C infection. Studies have shown that adjunct treatment with Eltrombopag can help avoid dose reductions/withdrawals of pegylated interferon secondary to thrombocytopenia. It may also have a role in priming up platelet levels to help initiate antiviral therapy. Similarly, chronic liver disease patients with thrombocytopenia who need to undergo an invasive procedure may be potential candidates for short two-week courses of eltrombopag in the periprocedural period to help reduce the risk of bleeding. Besides the price (deemed very expensive and probably not cost-effective), there are some legitimate concerns about the safety profile of this novel agent (most importantly, portal vein thrombosis, bone marrow fibrosis and hepatotoxicity). In this article, the potential role of eltrombopag in the context of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related thrombocytopenia is reviewed. To write this article, a MEDLINE search was conducted (1990 to November 2012) using the search terms “eltrombopag,” “HCV,” and “thrombocytopenia.” PMID:24696622

  13. Thrombocytopenia in MDS: epidemiology, mechanisms, clinical consequences and novel therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Morrone, K; Kambhampati, S; Will, B; Steidl, U; Verma, A

    2016-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is commonly seen in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients, and bleeding complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Thrombocytopenia is an independent factor for decreased survival and has been incorporated in newer prognostic scoring systems. The mechanisms of thrombocytopenia are multifactorial and involve a differentiation block of megakaryocytic progenitor cells, leading to dysplastic, hypolobated and microscopic appearing megakaryocytes or increased apoptosis of megakaryocytes and their precursors. Dysregulated thrombopoietin (TPO) signaling and increased platelet destruction through immune or nonimmune mechanisms are frequently observed in MDS. The clinical management of patients with low platelet counts remains challenging and approved chemotherapeutic agents such as lenalidomide and azacytidine can also lead to a transient worsening of thrombocytopenia. Platelet transfusion is the only supportive treatment option currently available for clinically significant thrombocytopenia. The TPO receptor agonists romiplostim and eltrombopag have shown clinical activity in clinical trials in MDS. In addition to thrombopoietic effects, eltrombopag can inhibit leukemic cell proliferation via TPO receptor-independent effects. Other approaches such as treatment with cytokines, immunomodulating drugs and signal transduction inhibitors have shown limited activity in selected groups of MDS patients. Combination trials of approved agents with TPO agonists are ongoing and hold promise for this important clinical problem.

  14. Antiphospholipid syndrome in a pregnant female presenting with severe thrombocytopenia and bleeding.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Kunal; Katyal, Virender; Arya, Suvrat; Shrama, Meha

    2015-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is defined by the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with recurrent venous or arterial thromboembolism or pregnancy morbidity. Antithrombotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment given the high risk of recurrent thromboembolism that characterizes this condition. Despite the prothrombotic nature of APS, thrombocytopenia is present in a proportion of patients, which can complicate management and limit the use of antithrombotic therapy. The mechanism of APS-associated thrombocytopenia is multifactorial and its relation to thrombotic risk is poorly characterized. The presence of thrombocytopenia does not appear to reduce thrombotic risk in patients with APS, who can develop thromboembolic complications necessitating antithrombotic treatment. In these cases, treatment of the thrombocytopenia may be necessary to facilitate administration of antithrombotic agents. We present such a pregnant lady with history of recurrent pregnancy losses who presented with severe thrombocytopenia and bleeding manifestations, who was subsequently diagnosed to have antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. She was initially managed with steroids and when her platelet counts improved, antithrombotic therapy was started. She delivered an uneventful and successful pregnancy outcome without any complications during follow-up.

  15. More on the thrombocytopenia of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Gazca, Juan Carlos; Nuñez-Cortes, Ana Karen; Mendez-Huerta, Mariana Alicia; Cantero-Fortiz, Yahveth; Orea-Martinez, Juan Gerardo; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2017-06-01

    Using only serologic determinations, we have previously found that thrombocytopenia presents in less than one half of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Employing a more accurate method to define the presence of NAFLD, serologic determinations (Fibromax®) coupled with liver transient elastography (TE/Fibroscan®), we have prospectively studied a group of 211 individuals with a suspicion of a liver disease. NAFLD was identified in 81 individuals. In 48 persons another causes of liver damage were identified and discarded from further analysis. A subset of 33 patients with NAFLD without liver fibrosis or cirrhosis was analyzed. In eight of them (24%), thrombocytopenia (less than 150 × 10(9)/l platelets) was identified. The presence of thrombocytopenia in this subset of persons was associated with overweight, was usually mild, above 50 × 10(9)/l, was not associated to mucocutaneous bleeding and did not require treatment. NAFLD should be considered as a cause of mild thrombocytopenia. Our initial observation has been confirmed and defined more precisely. Additional studies are needed to further define more features of the thrombocytopenia of NAFLD, as well as its mechanisms.

  16. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  17. Neonatal Brain Tumors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bodeliwala, Shaam; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Daljit

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors in neonatal age group is uncommon comparing with older children and adults. In older children brain tumors are commonly infratentorial, where as in neonates, they are supratentorial. Though extracranial tumors are commoner in neonates, brain tumors cause 5-20% deaths approximately. We are presenting a review on brain tumors in neonates. PMID:28770127

  18. [A Case of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia Resulting from Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taiki; Nagai, Kagami; Sanada, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from advanced transverse colon cancer. Thus, a local resection was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was started. Sixteen courses were carried out without problems. However, he complained of chills and chest discomfort 2 hours after beginning the 17th course of chemotherapy. Laboratory data showed remarkable thrombocytopenia, and platelet-associated IgG level was high. After administration of steroids and platelet transfusions, the platelet count improved. Therefore, we diagnosed drug-induced thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to oxaliplatin (L-OHP). Since then, sLV5FU2 therapy was started, and the patient received the whole adjuvant chemotherapy without problems. Thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to L-OHP is a relatively rare side effect. We herein report this case with a review of the relevant literature.

  19. Severe thrombocytopenia in a child with typhoid fever: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al Reesi, Mohammed; Stephens, Glenn; McMullan, Brendan

    2016-11-30

    Although thrombocytopenia is common in typhoid fever, its course, response to treatment, and need for specific therapies such as platelet transfusion are not well characterized. We report a case of typhoid fever in a 4-year-old Asian male returned traveler, admitted with prolonged fever and found to have severe thrombocytopenia (platelets 16 × 10(9)/L). Despite appropriate antibiotic therapy, his platelet recovery was slow, but did not lead to complications and he did not require platelet transfusion. There is no consensus in the medical literature guiding the optimal management of severe thrombocytopenia in typhoid fever, but it may improve with conservative management, as in our case. The epidemiology and management of this condition merits further research to guide clinical practice.

  20. Immediate transient thrombocytopenia at the time of alemtuzumab infusion in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Usha; Kaunzner, Ulrike; Foster, Stacyann; Vartanian, Timothy; Perumal, Jai S

    2017-03-01

    Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody approved for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Although Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) has been reported as a secondary autoimmune phenomenon following alemtuzumab infusion, immediate thrombocytopenia during the infusion has not been reported. We report transient, reversible, self-limiting acute-onset thrombocytopenia during the first course with alemtuzumab. In total, 3 of 22 paitents developed mild self-limited bruising associated with a drop in platelet count from their baseline during the intial 5-day course of alemtuzumab. Upon chart review, all 22 patients who received alemtuzumab developed an immediate mostly asymptomatic drop in platelet count which returned to normal within 2 months post-infusion.

  1. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and thrombocytopenia following Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Dabbagh, Omar; Al-Muhaizae, Muhammad; Dhalaan, Hesham; Chedrawi, Aziza

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) causes a broad spectrum of disease in humans with several clinical syndromes and is ubiquitous, infecting more than 95% of the world's population. Central Nervous System (CNS) disease alone associated with Epstein-Barr virus rarely occurs in previously healthy individuals. Systemic viral illness in children and complications are rare, but may occur. In few cases, it is associated with a variety of CNS and hematological complications like acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, transverse myelitis, neuropsychiatric syndrome, GBS, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia and they usually respond to immunotherapy. We report previously healthy boy, who presented with left sided weakness, headache and thrombocytopenia following EBV infection. The thrombocytopenia was resistant to intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone but responded well to Rituximab.

  2. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively.

  3. Neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Serane, V Tiroumourougane; Kurian, Ommen

    2008-09-01

    To study the substance misuse in pregnant mothers and its impact on their newborns. Case note review of the study population was undertaken. Infants of mothers who had taken substance of misuse were monitored regularly using Finnegan's score and treatment initiated based on a pre-existing protocol. The parameters that were studied included maternal drug habits, antenatal problems, and neonatal epidemiology with particular reference to growth, neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), its severity and management. Out of 32 neonates, 28 had developed neonatal withdrawal requiring treatment. The earliest presentation of NAS was at six hours and the average time of presentation of NAS was 26 hours. The dose of methadone taken by the mother related well with the likelihood of development of NAS. The most common symptoms noted at the time of diagnosis were irritable cry, increased tone, tachypnea, sleeplessness and tremor. Majority of neonates born to mothers on methadone exhibit neonatal abstinence syndrome and require pharmacological treatment. Neonates who had not exhibited symptoms of drug withdrawal within the first 3 days of life are unlikely to present with NAS requiring treatment.

  4. Neonatal outreach simulation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Bobbi J; Manhas, Deepak

    2016-11-01

    Numerous factors contribute to neonatal morbidity and mortality, and inexperienced providers managing crisis situations is one major cause. Simulation-based medical education is an excellent modality to employ in community hospitals to help refine and refresh resuscitation skills of providers who infrequently encounter neonatal emergencies. Mounting evidence suggests that simulation-based education improves patient outcomes. Academic health centers have the potential to improve neonatal outcomes through collaborations with community hospital providers, sharing expertise in neonatal resuscitation and simulation. Community outreach programs using simulation have been successfully initiated in North America. Two examples of programs are described here, including the models for curricular development, required resources, limitations, and benefits. Considerations for initiating outreach simulation programs are discussed. In the future, research demonstrating improved neonatal outcomes using outreach simulation will be important for personnel conducting outreach programs. Neonatal outreach simulation is a promising educational endeavor that may ultimately prove important in decreasing neonatal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Review of neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aatif M

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) presents some of the most difficult challenges in EEG interpretation. It differs significantly in many ways from EEG of older children and adults. Technologically, acquisition of a neonatal EEG is significantly more difficult and different than an adult EEG. There are numerous features that are age-specific and change almost week-to-week in the preterm infant. Some features may be normal at one age and abnormal if they persist for several weeks. Many of these features also have different implications in neonates as compared to older individuals. These issues mandate a different approach to neonatal EEG interpretation. In this article an overview of neonatal EEG is presented. After a brief discussion of relevant technical issues, various normal EEG features encountered in neonates are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the ontogeny of EEG, starting from the age of viability to the first few months of life. A description of various abnormalities follows. Finally, an approach to analysis of a neonatal EEG is presented.

  6. Recessive thrombocytopenia likely due to a homozygous pathogenic variant in the FYB gene: case report.

    PubMed

    Hamamy, Hanan; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Al-Allawi, Nasir; Muhsin, Abdulrahman A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2014-12-17

    Inherited thrombocytopenias (IT) are a heterogeneous group of rare diseases characterized by a reduced number of blood platelets. The frequency of IT is probably underestimated because of diagnostic difficulties and because not all the existing forms have as yet been identified, with some patients remaining without a definitive diagnosis. Exome Sequencing has made possible the identification of almost all variants in the coding regions of protein-coding genes, thereby providing the opportunity to identify the disease causing gene in a number of patients with indefinite diagnoses, specifically in consanguineous families. Familial thrombocytopenia with small size platelets was present in several members of a highly consanguineous family from Northern Iraq. Genotyping of all affected, their unaffected siblings and parents, followed by exome sequencing revealed a strong candidate loss of function variant in a homozygous state: a frameshift mutation in the FYB gene. The protein encoded by this gene is known to be a cytosolic adaptor molecule expressed by T, natural killer (NK), myeloid cells and platelets, and is involved in platelet activation and controls the expression of interleukin-2. Knock-out mice were reported to show isolated thrombocytopenia. Inherited thrombocytopenias differ in their presentation, associated features, and molecular etiologies. An accurate diagnosis is needed to provide appropriate management as well as counseling for the individuals and their family members. Exome sequencing may become a first diagnostic tool to identify the molecular basis of undiagnosed familial IT. In this report, the clinical evaluation combined with the power and efficiency of genomic analysis defined the FYB gene as the possible underlying cause of autosomal recessive thrombocytopenia with small platelet size. This is the first report linking pathogenic variants in FYB and thrombocytopenia in humans.

  7. Immune thrombocytopenia in adults: a prospective cohort study of clinical features and predictors of outcome

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Nordon, Clémentine; Michel, Marc; Viallard, Jean-François; Adoue, Daniel; Magy-Bertrand, Nadine; Durand, Jean-Marc; Quittet, Philippe; Fain, Olivier; Bonnotte, Bernard; Morin, Anne-Sophie; Morel, Nathalie; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Khellaf, Mehdi; Perlat, Antoinette; Sacre, Karim; Lefrere, François; Abenhaim, Lucien; Godeau, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This prospective observational cohort study aimed to explore the clinical features of incident immune thrombocytopenia in adults and predictors of outcome, while determining if a family history of autoimmune disorder is a risk factor for immune thrombocytopenia. All adults, 18 years of age or older, recently diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia were consecutively recruited across 21 hospital centers in France. Data were collected at diagnosis and after 12 months. Predictors of chronicity at 12 months were explored using logistic regression models. The association between family history of autoimmune disorder and the risk of developing immune thrombocytopenia was explored using a conditional logistic regression model after matching each case to 10 controls. One hundred and forty-three patients were included: 63% female, mean age 48 years old (Standard Deviation=19), and 84% presented with bleeding symptoms. Median platelet count was 10×109/L. Initial treatment was required in 82% of patients. After 12 months, only 37% of patients not subject to disease-modifying interventions achieved cure. The sole possible predictor of chronicity at 12 months was a higher platelet count at baseline [Odds Ratio 1.03; 95%CI: 1.00, 1.06]. No association was found between outcome and any of the following features: age, sex, presence of either bleeding symptoms or antinuclear antibodies at diagnosis. Likewise, family history of autoimmune disorder was not associated with incident immune thrombocytopenia. Immune thrombocytopenia in adults has been shown to progress to a chronic form in the majority of patients. A lower platelet count could be indicative of a more favorable outcome. PMID:27229715

  8. Mothers at risk of alloimmunization to the Rh (D) antigen and availability of gamma-globulin at the Mexican Institute of Social Security.

    PubMed

    Zavala, C; Salamanca, F

    1996-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn develops mainly when an Rh negative (D-) mother becomes sensitized and produces anti-Rh positive (anti-D) antibodies capable of hemolysing D+ fetal erythrocytes. Maternal alloimmunization can be prevented by the administration of anti-D gamma-globulin immediately after the birth of each Rh positive child. In order to identify the frequency of prevention of alloimmunization at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), the amount of mothers at risk of sensitization from 1985 to 1995 was estimated from Rh and ABO blood group frequencies and with the number of deliveries and abortions at the Medical Institutions. Also, information in regard to the dose of gamma-globulin units purchased by the Institute of Social Security from 1985 to 1993 was obtained. The number of mothers at risk steadily increased from 16,616 in 1985 to 21,071 in 1995, amounting to a total of 203,203 in the 10-year period, while only 120,800 gamma-globulin units were purchased in that same period. The findings in this study suggest the need to define reasonable policies for the acquisition of gamma-globulin lots to prevent alloisoimmunization of mothers at risk.

  9. Thrombocytopenia in cirrhosis: Impact of fibrinogen on bleeding risk

    PubMed Central

    Thakrar, Sonali V; Mallett, Susan V

    2017-01-01

    robust assessment of bleeding-risk in thrombocytopenia and cirrhosis. PMID:28293381

  10. Incidence and risk factors of thrombocytopenia in patients receiving intermittent antiretroviral therapy: a substudy of the ANRS 106-window trial.

    PubMed

    Bouldouyre, Marie-Anne; Charreau, Isabelle; Marchou, Bruno; Tangre, Philippe; Katlama, Christine; Morlat, Philippe; Meiffredy, Vincent; Vittecoq, Daniel; Bierling, Philippe; Aboulker, Jean-Pierre; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2009-12-01

    Incidence and risk factors for thrombocytopenia in patients discontinuing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have not been fully investigated. Well-suppressed patients on HAART were randomized to continuous (CT) or intermittent therapy (IT) for 96 weeks. Incidence of thrombocytopenia (<150 x 10(3) platelets/mm(3)) was assessed and multivariate analysis performed to identify baseline predictors. Correlations were assessed between platelet, CD4, CD8 T-cell counts, and viral load after treatment interruption. Three hundred ninety-one patients were included, with a median baseline platelet count of 243,000/mm(3). The incidence of thrombocytopenia at week 96 was significantly higher in the IT versus the CT arm (25.4% versus 9.8%, respectively, P < 0.001) and median time to thrombocytopenia was 9 weeks. In multivariate analysis, the IT strategy: odds ratio (OR) = 4.1 (2.1-7.9; P < 0.0001), a history of thrombocytopenia: OR = 11.9 (2.4-57.9; P = 0.002), and a low baseline platelet count: OR = 3.4 (2.3-5.1; P < 0.0001) were associated with an increased risk of thrombocytopenia. Also, after treatment interruption, changes from baseline in platelet counts were correlated with changes in CD4 T-cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels (P < 0.001 for both). Intermittent therapy is associated with a high incidence of thrombocytopenia, especially among patients with low platelet counts and a history of thrombocytopenia.

  11. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  12. Severe Thrombocytopenia and Acute Cytomegalovirus Colitis during Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Furuhata, Masanori; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Nishiki, Shingo; Sasaki, Shugo; Suganuma, Akihiko; Imamura, Akifumi; Ajisawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 25-year-old man who was referred to our hospital due to acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis. The initial blood tests showed that the patient had concurrent primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and severe thrombocytopenia. Raltegravir-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was initiated without the use of ganciclovir or corticosteroids and resulted in a rapid clinical improvement. Platelet transfusions were only necessary for a short period, and subsequent colonoscopy revealed a completely healed ulcer. This case implies that ART alone could be effective for treating severe thrombocytopenia during primary HIV and CMV coinfection. PMID:27980271

  13. Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia: a case report of pediatric twins undergoing matched unrelated bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Amulya A N; Gourde, Julia A; Marri, Preethi; Galardy, Paul J; Khan, Shakila P; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2015-05-01

    Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (CAMT) is a rare inherited disorder that presents with thrombocytopenia in infancy and evolves into bone marrow failure over time. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant remains the only curative treatment option. We report our experience with identical twin sisters diagnosed with CAMT and treated successfully with matched unrelated donor bone marrow transplants. Before the transplant, 1 twin developed pancytopenia, whereas the other had a relatively benign clinical course. Choice of conditioning regimens was based on their pretransplant bone marrow cellularity and presence or absence of panyhypoplasia. Both twins tolerated the procedure well with no significant complications.

  14. Immune Thrombocytopenia as a Presenting Manifestation of Tuberculosis- Challenge in Resource Constraint Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Dhir, Varun; Singh, Surjit

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis can infect almost any organ of our body leading to various presentations and its complication. Various haematological manifestations of tuberculosis are well known. But isolated thrombocytopenia and Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) in patients with tuberculosis is very rare. Here we report a case of young man who presented with acute onset of bleeding manifestations in the form of epistaxis and macroscopic haematuria with platelets count of 5×109/L. The patient was diagnosed to have ITP along with clinical and radiological evidence of active tuberculosis. The patient was treated with Anti Tubercular Therapy (ATT) along with Intravenous (IV) pulse of methyl prednisolone followed by tapering dose of oral prednisolone. PMID:27891377

  15. Cardiopulmonary bypass with bivalirudin in type II heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Stephanie B; Acsell, Jeffrey R; Crumbley, Arthur J; Uber, Walter E

    2004-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia poses significant challenges. Inadequate pharmacokinetic profiles, monitoring, reversibility, and availability often limit alternative anticoagulation strategies. Bivalirudin, a semisynthetic direct thrombin inhibitor, was recently approved for use in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Its unique properties, including a relatively short half-life, an anticoagulation effect that closely correlates with activated clotting time, and an alternate metabolic pathway for elimination, make bivalirudin an attractive agent for cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with type II heparin induced-thrombocytopenia. We report our experience using bivalirudin in 2 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

  16. Regulation of platelet heterogeneity: effects of thrombocytopenia on platelet volume and density.

    PubMed

    Corash, L; Mok, Y; Levin, J; Baker, G

    1990-03-01

    We have examined the effects of variable degrees of acute thrombocytopenia on platelet levels, mean platelet volume (MPV), and buoyant density after induction of thrombocytopenia by platelet antiserum (PAS) in mice with or without spleens. Mice were studied serially 10-16, 36, 48, 60-64, 84, 108, 144, 180, 228, 276, 348-360, 372, and 516 h after PAS treatment. MPV and platelet count (PC) x 10(6)/microliters for normal intact mice (n = 136) were 4.7 +/- 0.3 fl (SD) and 1.69 +/- 0.52 (SD), respectively. Twelve hours after PAS-induced severe thrombocytopenia (PC less than 0.05 x 10(6)/microliters), MPV increased significantly (p less than 0.01) to 6.4 fl, was maximal at 36 h (8.2 fl), remained elevated until 144 h following PAS treatment, and then returned to normal. Platelet density decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) 64 h after PAS treatment and returned to normal at 144 h. Hematocrits of repeatedly bled intact control mice decreased from 45% to 30%, accompanied by thrombocytosis (maximal PC 2.24 x 10(6)/microliters) without significant changes in either MPV or platelet density. Moderate thrombocytopenia (PC 0.1-0.2 x 10(6)/microliters) in intact mice produced significantly (p less than 0.05) increased MPV, at 5.7 fl 12 h after PAS treatment, with a peak MPV of 7.6 fl (p less than 0.001) at 36 h; MPV returned to normal at 84 h. Platelet density decreased (p less than 0.001) 12 h after PAS treatment and returned to baseline at 228 h. Control splenectomized mice (n = 185) had an MPV of 5.0 fl +/- 0.7 fl and a PC of 2.14 +/- 0.6 x 10(6)/microliters. Comparably severe and moderate thrombocytopenia in splenectomized mice produced alterations in platelet count, MPV, and density similar to those in intact mice, although maximal MPV and the degree of rebound thrombocytosis after severe thrombocytopenia were more marked in splenectomized mice. In response to reduction of the platelet mass in both intact and splenectomized mice, MPV increased in proportion to the

  17. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by disseminated intravascular coagulation and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Machida, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Makoto; Taguchi, Hirokuni

    2002-11-01

    A 71-year-old man was diagnosed as having an abdominal aortic aneurysm when he was treated for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Three years later, he developed severe thrombocytopenia and had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) that was associated with the inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). The coagulation abnormalities were corrected by low-molecular weight heparin, however the platelet count remained low. Bone marrow showed normocellularity with an increase of immature and mature forms of megakaryocytes. Platelet-associated IgG level was high. These findings suggested that the patient had severe thrombocytopenia caused by unusual complications of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and IAAA-associated DIC.

  18. Thrombocytopenia in Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and mixed infection malaria: a study from Bikaner (Northwestern India).

    PubMed

    Kochar, Dhanpat Kumar; Das, Ashis; Kochar, Abhishek; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Tanwar, Gajanand Singh; Gupta, Anjana; Pakalapati, Deepak; Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Sanjay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence, relation and magnitude of thrombocytopenia in different species of malaria are not clearly defined. This study included 1,064 patients admitted with malaria to study thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150,000 /cumm) in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) and Plasmodium vivax (Pv) mono infection and mixed infection (Pf + Pv). The species diagnosis was done by peripheral blood film (PBF) and rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Validation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done only in patients with severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count <20,000 /cumm). The breakup of patients was 525 (49.34%) Pf, 460 (43.23%) Pv and 79 (7.42%) mixed malaria (Pf + Pv). Thrombocytopenia was observed in 24.6% (262/1064) patients. The risk was greatest in the mixed infections in comparison to monoinfection individually (43.04% [34/79]; mixed vs Pv monoinfection: Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.675 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.029-2.726], p < 0.0366; mixed vs Pf monoinfection: OR=3.911 [95% CI 2.367-6.463], p < 0.0001). Pv monoinfection (31.09% [143/460]) had greater risk compared to Pf monoinfection (16.19% [85/525]; OR = 2.335 [95% CI 1.722-3.167], p < 0.0001). The occurrence of severe thrombocytopenia was also higher in Pv monoinfection (18.18% [26/143]) in comparison to either Pf monoinfection (10.59% [9/85], OR = 1.877 (95% CI 0.834-4.223)) or mixed infection (11.76% [4/34]; OR = 1.667 (95% CI 0.540-5.142) but this association was statistically not significant. Six patients (3 Pv, 2 Pf and 1 mixed) developed severe epistaxis requiring platelet transfusion. There was no relation between parasite density and platelet count as many patients with severe thrombocytopenia had parasite density similar to patients without thrombocytopenia. We found that the association of thrombocytopenia was statistically more significant with P. vivax monoinfection as compared to P. falciparum.

  19. Acute Thrombocytopenia: An Unusual Complication Occurring After Drug-Eluting Microspheres Transcatheter Hepatic Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Poggi, Guido; Quaretti, Pietro; Montagna, Benedetta Sottotetti, Federico Tagliaferri, Barbara Pozzi, Emma Amatu, Alessio Pagella, Chiara; Bernardo, Giovanni

    2011-02-15

    Image-guided transcatheter hepatic chemoembolization (TACE) is accepted worldwide as an effective treatment for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors, colorectal carcinomas, and uveal melanomas. Although the technique is relatively safe, it has been associated with several complications. We report the cases of two patients with colorectal liver metastases who developed acute thrombocytopenia a few hours after TACE. To our knowledge, acute thrombocytopenia occurring after TACE with drug-eluting microspheres has not yet been reported. Here we discuss the hypothetical etiopathogenetic mechanisms.

  20. Eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia: with thrombosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation immediately after left main coronary artery percutaneous coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tempelhof, Michael W; Benzuly, Keith H; Fintel, Dan; Krichavsky, Marc Z

    2012-01-01

    Early clinical trials of eptifibatide did not show a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, more recent literature has suggested a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Although the true incidence and the pathophysiology of these associations are unknown, the development of these events can be life-threatening. Herein, we describe the case of a patient who experienced acute onset of profound thrombocytopenia, developing thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. This paper adds to the few previous reports of cases that suggested an association between thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and the administration of eptifibatide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the medical literature that associates the new onset of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with the administration of eptifibatide. We also provide a subject review.

  1. Infection with a respiratory virus before hematopoietic cell transplantation is associated with alloimmune-mediated lung syndromes.

    PubMed

    Versluys, Birgitta; Bierings, Marc; Murk, Jean Luc; Wolfs, Tom; Lindemans, Caroline; Vd Ent, Kors; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2017-07-15

    Alloimmune-mediated lung syndromes (allo-LSs) are life-threatening complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Respiratory virus (RV) has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis. We studied the relation between RV DNA/RNA detection in the upper/lower airways before HCT and the occurrence of allo-LSs. We retrospectively analyzed all HCT recipients between 2004 and 2014, in whom real-time PCR for RV was performed in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid before HCT. The main outcome of interest was the presence of an allo-LS, which was defined as idiopathic pneumonia syndrome or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Other outcomes were overall survival and treatment-related mortality. We used Cox proportional hazard models, logistic regression models, and Fine-Gray competing risk regression for analyses. One hundred seventy-nine children (median age, 6.8 years) were included. RVs were found in 61% (41% in BAL fluid/NPAs and 20% in NPAs only). Rhinovirus was the most frequently detected RV (42%). Allo-LSs occurred in 13%. RV positivity in BAL fluid was a predictor for allo-LSs (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.4-10.7; P = .01), whereas RV positivity in NPAs only was not. No other predictors were found. Grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease related to steroid treatment shows a trend toward a protective effect (odds ratio, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.3; P = .08). Allo-LSs significantly increased treatment-related mortality (52% ± 10% in allo-LSs and 20% ± 4% in non-allo-LSs, P = .007). These results show that pre-HCT BAL fluid RV positivity was a predictor for allo-LSs. Screening for RVs before HCT might identify patients at risk for allo-LSs. This could have implications for prevention and treatment and might subsequently influence the outcomes of HCT. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eve A

    2003-10-01

    Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia in an infant indicates neonatal liver disease. This neonatal hepatitis syndrome has numerous possible causes, classified as infective, anatomic/structural, metabolic, genetic, neoplastic, vascular, toxic, immune and idiopathic. Any infant who is jaundiced at 2-4 weeks old needs to have the serum conjugated bilirubin measured, even if he/she looks otherwise well. If conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is present, a methodical and comprehensive diagnostic investigation should be performed. Early diagnosis is critical for the best outcome. In particular, palliative surgery for extrahepatic biliary atresia has the best chance of success if performed before the infant is 8 weeks old. Definitive treatments available for many causes of neonatal hepatitis syndrome should be started as soon as possible. Alternatively, liver transplantation may be life saving. Supportive care, especially with attention to nutritional needs, is important for all infants with neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

  3. Maternal and neonatal tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58 000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  4. Monitoring neonates for ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Garinis, Angela C; Kemph, Alison; Tharpe, Anne Marie; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik; McEvoy, Cynthia; Steyger, Peter S

    2017-06-22

    Neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at greater risk of permanent hearing loss compared to infants in well mother and baby units. Several factors have been associated with this increased prevalence of hearing loss, including congenital infections (e.g. cytomegalovirus or syphilis), ototoxic drugs (such as aminoglycoside or glycopeptide antibiotics), low birth weight, hypoxia and length of stay. The aetiology of this increased prevalence of hearing loss remains poorly understood. Here we review current practice and discuss the feasibility of designing improved ototoxicity screening and monitoring protocols to better identify acquired, drug-induced hearing loss in NICU neonates. A review of published literature. We conclude that current audiological screening or monitoring protocols for neonates are not designed to adequately detect early onset of ototoxicity. This paper offers a detailed review of evidence-based research, and offers recommendations for developing and implementing an ototoxicity monitoring protocol for young infants, before and after discharge from the hospital.

  5. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  6. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  7. [Neonatal lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Mayet, W J; Hermann, E; Bachmann, M; Poralla, T; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1989-01-01

    The neonatal lupus erythematosus syndrome, first described by McCuistion and Schoch in 1954, is associated with characteristic skin lesions and congenital heart block in the new-born, and the presence of Ro-(SSA), La-(SSB), or RNP antibodies in mothers and infants. A transplacental transference of maternal autoantibodies is discussed as possible pathophysiologic mechanism in neonatal lupus. The symptoms, the onset, and recently published pathogenetic concepts are reviewed.

  8. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  9. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sandra E.; Pet, Gillian C.

    2015-01-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This chapter will explore some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury will be discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  10. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SLFN14 mutations underlie thrombocytopenia with excessive bleeding and platelet secretion defects

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sarah J.; Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C.; Bem, Danai; Drake, Sian; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Guiú, Isabel Sánchez; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Simpson, Michael A.; Daly, Martina E.; Motwani, Jayashree; Collins, Peter W.; Watson, Steve P.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a group of disorders that are characterized by a low platelet count and are sometimes associated with excessive bleeding that ranges from mild to severe. We evaluated 36 unrelated patients and 17 family members displaying thrombocytopenia that were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets (GAPP) study. All patients had a history of excessive bleeding of unknown etiology. We performed platelet phenotyping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) on all patients and identified mutations in schlafen 14 (SLFN14) in 12 patients from 3 unrelated families. Patients harboring SLFN14 mutations displayed an analogous phenotype that consisted of moderate thrombocytopenia, enlarged platelets, decreased ATP secretion, and a dominant inheritance pattern. Three heterozygous missense mutations were identified in affected family members and predicted to encode substitutions (K218E, K219N, and V220D) within an ATPase-AAA-4, GTP/ATP-binding region of SLFN14. Endogenous SLFN14 expression was reduced in platelets from all patients, and mutant SLFN14 expression was markedly decreased compared with that of WT SLFN14 when overexpressed in transfected cells. Electron microscopy revealed a reduced number of dense granules in affected patients platelets, correlating with a decreased ATP secretion observed in lumiaggregometry studies. These results identify SLFN14 mutations as cause for an inherited thrombocytopenia with excessive bleeding, outlining a fundamental role for SLFN14 in platelet formation and function. PMID:26280575

  12. SLFN14 mutations underlie thrombocytopenia with excessive bleeding and platelet secretion defects.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sarah J; Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C; Bem, Danai; Drake, Sian; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Guiú, Isabel Sánchez; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Simpson, Michael A; Daly, Martina E; Motwani, Jayashree; Collins, Peter W; Watson, Steve P; Morgan, Neil V

    2015-09-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a group of disorders that are characterized by a low platelet count and are sometimes associated with excessive bleeding that ranges from mild to severe. We evaluated 36 unrelated patients and 17 family members displaying thrombocytopenia that were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets (GAPP) study. All patients had a history of excessive bleeding of unknown etiology. We performed platelet phenotyping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) on all patients and identified mutations in schlafen 14 (SLFN14) in 12 patients from 3 unrelated families. Patients harboring SLFN14 mutations displayed an analogous phenotype that consisted of moderate thrombocytopenia, enlarged platelets, decreased ATP secretion, and a dominant inheritance pattern. Three heterozygous missense mutations were identified in affected family members and predicted to encode substitutions (K218E, K219N, and V220D) within an ATPase-AAA-4, GTP/ATP-binding region of SLFN14. Endogenous SLFN14 expression was reduced in platelets from all patients, and mutant SLFN14 expression was markedly decreased compared with that of WT SLFN14 when overexpressed in transfected cells. Electron microscopy revealed a reduced number of dense granules in affected patients platelets, correlating with a decreased ATP secretion observed in lumiaggregometry studies. These results identify SLFN14 mutations as cause for an inherited thrombocytopenia with excessive bleeding, outlining a fundamental role for SLFN14 in platelet formation and function.

  13. Management of Platelet Transfusion Therapy in Patients With Blood Cancer or Treatment-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-21

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematologic and Lymphocytic Disorder; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Primary Myelofibrosis; Secondary Myelofibrosis; T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Thrombocytopenia; Venous Thromboembolism

  14. Meropenem-induced immune thrombocytopenia and the diagnostic process of laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Cai, Guang-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Liu, Feng-Xia; Ma, Jin-Qi; Liu, Hong; Nie, Xin-Min; Gui, Rong

    2017-08-07

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is a serious, life-threatening clinical syndrome, the diagnosis of which is consistently difficult. In this report, we present a case of DITP caused by meropenem that was confirmed by laboratory tests. A 59-year-old male patient developed severe thrombocytopenia 8 days after the administration of meropenem and cefoperazone-sulbactam. After other causes were ruled out, DITP was suspected. Drug-induced platelet (PLT) antibodies were detected by enzyme immunoassay, flow cytometry, and monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens (MAIPA). All these tests were performed in the presence and absence of the associated drugs. PLT antibodies were detected in the patient's serum only in the presence of meropenem. MAIPA experiments demonstrated that glycoprotein IIb/IIIa was the binding site of the meropenem-induced PLT antibodies. Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia should be considered in cases of acute thrombocytopenia in patients undergoing meropenem treatment. Clinicians should be cognizant of DITP, and a definitive diagnosis should be pursued, if feasible. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Immune Thrombocytopenia and JAK2V617F Positive Essential Thrombocythemia: Literature Review and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wróbel, T.; Zduniak, K.; Podolak-Dawidziak, M.; Rybka, J.; Biedroń, M.; Sawicki, M.; Kuliczkowski, K.

    2017-01-01

    We present the case where immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) sequentially appeared in the space of twenty-one years of follow-up. Impaired platelet production is present in both diseases, but clinical presentation and treatment are different. On the basis of this case history a possible role of autoimmunity as a predisposing factor to myeloproliferation has been discussed. PMID:28808591

  16. Immune Thrombocytopenia and JAK2V617F Positive Essential Thrombocythemia: Literature Review and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sobas, M A; Wróbel, T; Zduniak, K; Podolak-Dawidziak, M; Rybka, J; Biedroń, M; Sawicki, M; Dybko, J; Kuliczkowski, K

    2017-01-01

    We present the case where immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) sequentially appeared in the space of twenty-one years of follow-up. Impaired platelet production is present in both diseases, but clinical presentation and treatment are different. On the basis of this case history a possible role of autoimmunity as a predisposing factor to myeloproliferation has been discussed.

  17. Thrombocytopenia impairs host defense in gram-negative pneumonia-derived sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Claushuis, Theodora A M; Albersen, Bregje J A; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-12-11

    Thrombocytopenia is a common finding in sepsis and associated with a worse outcome. We used a mouse model of pneumonia-derived sepsis caused by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae to study the role of platelets in host response to sepsis. Platelet counts (PCs) were reduced to less than a median of 5 × 10(9)/L or to 5 to 13 × 10(9)/L by administration of a depleting antibody in mice infected with Klebsiella via the airways. Thrombocytopenia was associated with strongly impaired survival during pneumonia-derived sepsis proportional to the extent of platelet depletion. Thrombocytopenic mice demonstrated PC-dependent enhanced bacterial growth in lungs, blood, and distant organs. Severe thrombocytopenia resulted in hemorrhage at the primary site of infection, but not in distant organs. PCs of 5 to 13 × 10(9)/L were sufficient to largely maintain hemostasis in infected lungs. Thrombocytopenia did not influence lung inflammation or neutrophil recruitment and did not attenuate local or systemic activation of coagulation or the vascular endothelium. PCs <5 × 10(9)/L even resulted in enhanced coagulation and endothelial cell activation, which coincided with increased proinflammatory cytokine levels. In accordance, low PCs in whole blood enhanced Klebsiella-induced cytokine release in vitro. These data suggest that platelets play an important role in host defense to Klebsiella pneumosepsis.

  18. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome in Patients Suspected of Having Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Wi, Yu Mi; Woo, Hye In; Park, Dahee; Lee, Keun Hwa; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    To determine prevalence of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome in South Korea, we examined serum samples from patients with fever and insect bite history in scrub typhus-endemic areas. During the 2013 scrub typhus season, prevalence of this syndrome among patients suspected of having scrub typhus was high (23.0%), suggesting possible co-infection.

  19. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome in Japan and Public Health Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Kazuko; Umeki, Kazunori; Nakajima, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    A fatal case of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome was reported in Japan in 2013. The ensuing process of public communication offers lessons on how to balance public health needs with patient privacy and highlights the importance of multilateral collaborations between scientific and political communities. PMID:25695132

  20. Inherited thrombocytopenia: novel insights into megakaryocyte maturation, proplatelet formation and platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ben; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study of patients with inherited bleeding problems is a powerful approach in determining the function and regulation of important proteins in human platelets and their precursor, the megakaryocyte. The normal range of platelet counts in the bloodstream ranges from 150 000 to 400 000 platelets per microliter and is normally maintained within a narrow range for each individual. This requires a constant balance between thrombopoiesis, which is primarily controlled by the cytokine thrombopoietin (TPO), and platelet senescence and consumption. Thrombocytopenia can be defined as a platelet count of less than 150 000 per microliter and can be acquired or inherited. Heritable forms of th