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Sample records for neonatal familial evans

  1. Trends in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Maree, Carin; Downes, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered care in neonatal intensive care changed over the last decades. Initially, parents and infants were separated and parents were even being blamed for cau-sing infections in their infants. The importance, though, of the parents being the constant in the infant's life emerged and with that the importance of early bonding and attachment for the parents to take on their role and responsibi-lities as primary caregivers. Facilitation of family-centered care includes involving the parents in daily care activities, kangaroo care, developmental care, interaction and communication with the infant, as well as involving grandparents and siblings. Implementation of family-centered care requires appropriate policies, facilities and resources, education of all involved, and a positive attitude. PMID:27465463

  2. Caffey disease in neonatal period: the importance of the family!

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ana Rita; Moldovan, Oana; Azevedo, António; Moniz, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    A male newborn was apparently well until his second day of life, when increased irritability and a swelling in his right leg were noted. He was rooming-in with his mother since birth. On examination, a mass on the anterior surface of the right leg was noticed. The mass was firm, elongated, ill-defined, unmovable and painful at palpation. No overlying skin changes were seen. The newborn had a family history of neonatal bone swelling with resolution before the age of 2. Subsequent images showed hyperostosis in the diaphysis of the right tibia. After exclusion of other conditions such as trauma, osteomyelitis and congenital syphilis, the involvement of the tibial diaphysis, sparing the epiphyses and the benign course of the disease in family history, were indicative of Caffey disease. The genetic study confirmed this diagnosis. Caffey disease, although rare, should not be overlooked in the diagnostic approach to childhood bone swelling. PMID:23047998

  3. Caffey disease in neonatal period: the importance of the family!

    PubMed

    Prior, Ana Rita; Moldovan, Oana; Azevedo, António; Moniz, Carlos

    2012-10-09

    A male newborn was apparently well until his second day of life, when increased irritability and a swelling in his right leg were noted. He was rooming-in with his mother since birth. On examination, a mass on the anterior surface of the right leg was noticed. The mass was firm, elongated, ill-defined, unmovable and painful at palpation. No overlying skin changes were seen. The newborn had a family history of neonatal bone swelling with resolution before the age of 2. Subsequent images showed hyperostosis in the diaphysis of the right tibia. After exclusion of other conditions such as trauma, osteomyelitis and congenital syphilis, the involvement of the tibial diaphysis, sparing the epiphyses and the benign course of the disease in family history, were indicative of Caffey disease. The genetic study confirmed this diagnosis. Caffey disease, although rare, should not be overlooked in the diagnostic approach to childhood bone swelling.

  4. Family support and family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: origins, advances, impact.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Judith S; Cooper, Liza G; Blaine, Arianna I; Franck, Linda S; Howse, Jennifer L; Berns, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) has been increasingly emphasized as an important and necessary element of neonatal intensive care. FCC is conceptualized as a philosophy with a set of guiding principles, as well as a cohort of programs, services, and practices that many hospitals have embraced. Several factors drive the pressing need for family-centered care and support of families of infants in NICUs, including the increase in the number of infants in NICUs; growth in diversity of the population and their concurrent needs; identification of parental and familial stress and lack of parenting confidence; and gaps in support for families, as identified by parents and NICU staff. We explore the origins of and advances in FCC in the NICU and identify various delivery methods and aspects of FCC and family support in the NICU. We examine the research and available evidence supporting FCC in the NICU and offer recommendations for increased dissemination and for future study.

  5. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  6. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism. Effects of mutant gene dosage on phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, M R; Chou, Y H; Marx, S J; Steinmann, B; Cole, D E; Brandi, M L; Papapoulos, S E; Menko, F H; Hendy, G N; Brown, E M

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism is a rare life-threatening disorder characterized by very high serum calcium concentrations (> 15 mg/dl). Many cases have occurred in families with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, a benign condition transmitted as a dominant trait. Among several hypothesized relationships between the two syndromes is the suggestion that neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism is the homozygous form of familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. To test this hypothesis, we refined the map location of the gene responsible for familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia on chromosome 3q. Analyses in 11 families defined marker loci closely linked to the gene responsible for familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. These loci were then analyzed in four families with parental consanguinity and offspring with neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism. Each individual who was homozygous for loci that are closely linked to the gene responsible for familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia had neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism. The calculated odds of linkage between these disorders of > 350,000:1 (lod score = 5.56). We conclude that dosage of the gene defect accounts for these widely disparate clinical phenotypes; a single defective allele causes familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, while two defective alleles causes neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism. PMID:8132750

  8. Relational Communications Strategies to Support Family-Centered Neonatal Intensive Care.

    PubMed

    Benzies, Karen M

    2016-01-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units is intended to facilitate parental involvement, shared decision-making, and improved outcomes for infants and families. To support family-centered care, there are multiple interventions with different components and associated outcomes that have been described in the research literature. This evidence leaves many unanswered questions about how best to implement and evaluate strategies to enhance family-centered care. This article provides a brief overview of interventions designed to support family-centered care in neonatal intensive care units and offers an evidence-informed staff education strategy to enhance family-centered care. The evidence-informed relational communications strategies of circular pattern diagrams, questioning, and commendations are described, along with specific examples of how nurses can use them in in their day-to-day practice in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27465456

  9. Sodium-channel defects in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures.

    PubMed

    Heron, Sarah E; Crossland, Kathryn M; Andermann, Eva; Phillips, Hilary A; Hall, Allison J; Bleasel, Andrew; Shevell, Michael; Mercho, Suha; Seni, Marie-Helene; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Mulley, John C; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2002-09-14

    Ion-channel gene defects are associated with a range of paroxysmal disorders, including several monogenic epilepsy syndromes. Two autosomal dominant disorders present in the first year of life: benign familial neonatal seizures, which is associated with potassium-channel gene defects; and benign familial infantile seizures, for which no genes have been identified. Here, we describe a clinically intermediate variant, benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures, with mutations in the sodium-channel subunit gene SCN2A. This clinico-molecular correlation defines a new benign familial epilepsy syndrome beginning in early infancy, an age at which seizure disorders frequently have a sombre prognosis.

  10. Postdischarge Service Use by Families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Chia-Ling; Peterson, Carla A.; Shelley, Mack C., II

    2002-01-01

    A study examined patterns and predictors of service use by 85 families of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) graduates, specifically premature infants. Enabling variables (NICU contacts and follow-up services) and parents' perceptions of children's problems were major predictors of service use. No demographic characteristics predicted service…

  11. Measurement of Family-centered care perception and parental stress in a neonatal unit 1

    PubMed Central

    Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda Ferreira Gomes; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of the implementation of the Patient and Family-Centered Care Model on parents and healthcare perceptions and parental stress. Method: a quasi-experimental study developed in a neonatal unit of a university hospital in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, with the implementation of this model of care. Data collection were performed by two sample groups, one using non-equivalent groups of parents, and another using equivalent groups of healthcare professionals. The instruments Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Parent Brazilian Version, Perceptions of Family-Centered Care-Staff Brazilian Version and Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, were applied to 132 parents of newborns hospitalized and to 57 professionals. Results: there was a statistically significant improvement in the perceptions of the parents in most items assessed (p ≤0,05) and for the staff in relation to the family welcome in the neonatal unit (p = 0.041) and to the comprehension of the family's experience with the infant´s hospitalization (p = 0,050). There was a reduction in the average scores of parental stress, with a greater decrease in the Alteration in Parental Role from 4,2 to 3,8 (p = 0,048). Conclusion: the interventions improved the perceptions of parents and healthcare team related to patient and family-centered care and contributed to reducing parental stress. PMID:27508921

  12. Neonatal ethical issues: viability, advance directives, family centered care.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    Ethical issues in perinatal and NICU settings can arise from a variety of situations. This article focuses on issues surrounding viability and the incorporation of advance directives and family-centered care. Prenatal education about infant viability, probable scenarios, and parental involvement in decision-making are addressed. Considerations for advance directives for complex births and critical decisions at the time of birth are also discussed. Implications for nurses and suggested dialogue strategies are provided. PMID:21407121

  13. The Obstacles against Nurse-Family Communication in Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Pishva, Narjes; Jahanpour, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Communication is one of the key principles in Family-Centered Care (FCC). Studies have shown some drawbacks in communication between families and nurses. Therefore, the present study aimed to recognize the obstacles against nurse-family communication in FCC in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on 8 staff nurses in 2 NICUs affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected using 8 deep semi-structured interviews and 3 observations. Then, they were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in identification of 3 main categories and 7 subcategories. The first category was organizational factors with 2 subcategories of educational domain (inadequate education, lack of a system for nursing student selection, and poor professionalization) and clinical domain (difficult working conditions, lack of an efficient system for ongoing education and evaluation, and authoritarian management). The second category was familial factors with socio-cultural, psychological, and economic subcategories. The last category was the factors related to nurses with socio-cultural and psycho-physical subcategories. Conclusion: Identification of the obstacles against nurse-family communication helps managers of healthcare systems to plan and eliminate the challenges of effective communication. Besides, elimination of these factors leads to appropriate strategies in NICUs for effective application of FCC. PMID:26464837

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in benign familial neonatal convulsions: Identification of a new locus on chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; Leach, R.J.; O'Connell, P.; Ryan, S.G. ); Ward, K. )

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures in the first weeks of life. One locus for BFNC has been mapped to chromosome 20 in several pedigrees, but the authors have excluded linkage to chromosome 20 in one large kindred. In order to identify this novel BFNC locus, dinucleotide repeat markers distributed throughout the genome were used to screen this family. Maximum pairwise LOD scores of 4.43 were obtained with markers D8S284 and D8S256 on chromosome 8q. Multipoint analysis placed the BFNC locus in the interval spanned by D8S198-D8S274. This study establishes the presence of a new BFNC locus and confirms genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 1. Evans blue.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2014-02-01

    The history, origin, identity, chemistry and use of Evans blue dye are described along with the first application to staining by Herbert McLean Evans in 1914. In the 1930s, the dye was marketed under the name, Evans blue dye, which was profoundly more acceptable than the ponderous chemical name. PMID:23957706

  16. Obituary: David Stanley Evans, 1916-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Frank N.

    2005-12-01

    headquartered in Cape Town, South Africa. David had designed and built a Newtonian spectrograph for the 74-inch Radcliffe Telescope with which he measured the first southern galaxy redshifts. David and his family spent 1965-66 in Austin, Texas, where he was a National Science Foundation Senior Visiting Scientist at the University of Texas and McDonald Observatory. They moved permanently to Austin in 1968 and David became a Professor of Astronomy and Associate Director of McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin. At McDonald Observatory, R. E. Nather had devised a high-speed photometer capable of measuring millisecond time-scale changes in brightness and with Brian Warner, he invented "high-speed astronomy". This instrument caused Evans to revive his occultation program and, over the next twenty years, he produced the major part of the angular diameters of late-type stars with his students and collaborators. In addition, David and collaborators used the extensive collections of the University of Texas to write "Herschel at the Cape". David was also involved in observing the occultation of ? Sco by Jupiter in 1972 and in observing, during a solar eclipse in 1973, the gravitational deflections in the positions of stars whose light passes near to the Sun. The eclipse was observed from Mauritania, and the observations confirmed Einstein's prediction again. David Evans and his students studied late-type stars that have large star-spots and others that flare. In addition, they studied stars whose lunar occultation observations had revealed them to be double or even more than two stars. David Evans's major scientific contribution was an application of his stellar angular diameters to deduce the surface brightness of stars with the result that with suitable color indices one could use photometry to deduce the angular diameter of stars. This is applicable to stars which can never be occulted by the Moon, and its application to Cepheid variable stars has yielded their

  17. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P < .05). They also reported a higher level of empowerment (P < .05). Three months after discharge, the mothers in the FC group had a higher self-reported skill level for interpretation of the infant's signals and knowledge about breast-feeding (P < .05). Despite similar rate of breast-feeding at discharge, more infants in the FC group were breastfed 3 months after discharge (P < .05). An FC program in the NICU promoted better maternal confidence during the hospital stay and 3 months after discharge compared with traditional care.

  18. [Single-family rooms for neonatal intensive care units impacts on preterm newborns, families, and health-care staff. A systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Servel, A-C; Rideau Batista Novais, A

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the environment is an essential point in the care of preterm newborns. The design of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) (open-bay, single-patient room, single-family room) directly affects both the preterm newborns and their caregivers (parents, healthcare staff). The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of single-family rooms on the preterm newborn, its parents, and the staff. Single-family rooms improve outcome for the preterm newborn, with increasing parental involvement and better control of the environment (fewer inappropriate stimulations such as high levels of noise and illumination). This kind of NICU design also improves parental and staff satisfaction.

  19. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    PubMed

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice.

  20. Neonatal presentation of familial glucocorticoid deficiency with a MRAP mutation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhou, Rui; Fang, Yanlan; Jiang, Liqiong; Liang, Li; Wang, Chunlin

    2016-12-01

    Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which the adrenal cortex fails to respond appropriately to stimulation by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) to produce cortisol. The disease is characterized in laboratory testing by glucocorticoid deficiency and markedly elevated ACTH levels. FGD may present in infancy or early childhood with symptoms related to low cortisol and high ACTH, such as hyperpigmentation, severe hypoglycemia, failure to thrive and recurrent infections. Mutations in the MC2R accessory protein (MRAP) cause FGD types 2, which accounts for approximately 15-20% of FGD cases. Here, we report a female neonate of Chinese Han origin, who presented with noted hyperpigmentation at birth. Laboratory investigations revealed hypocortisolaemia (cortisol < 1.0 μg/dl) and elevated plasma ACTH (1051 pg/ml). She responded to hydrocortisone treatment. Genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis showing homozygous deletion (c. 106 + 1delG) in intron 3 of MRAP gene, a mutation already reported as responsible for FDG type 2. This mutation can cause complete lack of ACTH response thus explaining the early presentation in this case. Her parents and maternal grandmother were heterozygous for the same mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first Chinese Han patient reported with FGD type 2 due to a known MRAP mutation. PMID:27660747

  1. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome Is the Most Common Genetic Cause of Permanent Neonatal Diabetes in Consanguineous Families

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Patch, Ann-Marie; Minton, Jayne A. L.; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Edghill, Emma L.; Hussain, Khalid; Balafrej, Amina; Deeb, Asma; Buchanan, Charles R.; Jefferson, Ian G.; Mutair, Angham; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ellard, Sian

    2009-01-01

    Context and Objective: Mutations in EIF2AK3 cause Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS), a rare recessive disorder characterized by early-onset diabetes, skeletal abnormalities, and liver dysfunction. Although early diagnosis is important for clinical management, genetic testing is generally performed after the full clinical picture develops. We aimed to identify patients with WRS before any other abnormalities apart from diabetes are present and study the overall frequency of WRS among patients with permanent neonatal diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The coding regions of EIF2AK3 were sequenced in 34 probands with infancy-onset diabetes with a clinical phenotype suggestive of WRS (n = 28) or homozygosity at the WRS locus (n = 6). Results: Twenty-five probands (73.5%) were homozygous or compound heterozygous for mutations in EIF2AK3. Twenty of the 26 mutations identified were novel. Whereas a diagnosis of WRS was suspected before genetic testing in 22 probands, three patients with apparently isolated diabetes were diagnosed after identifying a large homozygous region encompassing EIF2AK3. In contrast to nonconsanguineous pedigrees, mutations in EIF2AK3 are the most common known genetic cause of diabetes among patients born to consanguineous parents (24 vs. < 2%). Age at diabetes onset and birth weight might be used to prioritize genetic testing in the latter group. Conclusions: WRS is the most common cause of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus in consanguineous pedigrees. In addition to testing patients with a definite clinical diagnosis, EIF2AK3 should be tested in patients with isolated neonatal diabetes diagnosed after 3 wk of age from known consanguineous families, isolated populations, or countries in which inbreeding is frequent. PMID:19837917

  2. Neonatal detection of the 35delG mutation of the GJB2 gene in families at risk for deafness.

    PubMed

    Bathelier, C; François, M; Lucotte, G

    2004-01-01

    About half of congenitally deaf children that have a recessively inherited sensorineural deafness are born from normal-hearing parents and have no risk factor for hearing loss. Mutation 35delG in the connexin-26 gene is in European populations the basis for around half of all recessively inherited prelingual sensorineural deafness. The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy and utility of the 35delG mutation of the connexin-26 gene analysis for neonates at familial risk, from DNA isolated from Guthrie newborn screening cards. Newborns who had consanguineous parent and/or a familial history of deafness underwent connexin-26 gene analysis from DNA isolated from Guthrie cards and two hearing screening tests (transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and auditory brainstem recordings). 24 newborns were includes in this pilot study; one of them is homozygous for the 35delG mutation and had abnormal hearing screening tests; all the others newborns had normal connexin gene and at least one normal hearing screening test. Detection on connexin-26 gene mutation is feasible in selected at-risk newborns on one additional blood spot on Guthrie card.

  3. 76 FR 7589 - Bob Evans Farms, Inc., an Ohio Corporation, a Subsidiary of Bob Evans Farms, Inc., a Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... November 3, 2010 (75 FR 67773). The workers produce sausage rolls and links. The petitioner alleged that... Employment and Training Administration Bob Evans Farms, Inc., an Ohio Corporation, a Subsidiary of Bob Evans... Assistance (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of Bob Evans Farms, Inc., an Ohio Corporation,...

  4. A case report of Evans Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dosi, R V; Ambaliya, A P; Patell, R D; Patil, R S; Shah, P J

    2012-01-01

    Evans Syndrome (ES) is the rare simultaneous or subsequent development of immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). It portends a poorer prognosis and a more aggressive line of management than either condition presenting alone. Here we report a case of a young female who presented with both bleeding and acute decompensated anemia. Although she was successfully treated, mystery still shrouds the etiology, pathophysiology, as well as line of management of this rare and enigmatic disease.

  5. Letter to the Editor: Robert W. Evans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A.

    2000-12-01

    I read the Letters page of the latest issue of the JBAA (2000 October) with some amusement. My very good friend Bob Evans had, according to the letter header, not only been elevated to the clergy, but had also transferred his nationality from Kiwi to Aussie. While he'll probably overlook the religious error he may not be so sanguine about being mistaken for an Australian.

  6. Integrating family-centered developmental assessment and intervention into routine care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J M; Conliffe-Torres, S

    1996-06-01

    Incorporating developmental intervention into routine practices requires time available during caregiving for continued infant assessment and intervention and requires time after and between caregiving for relief of infant distress. In an era of health-care reform, reorganization, and restructuring, this added caregiver time appears unavailable. However, nurses need to work together in meeting the developmental challenges of the NICU. Further research needs to be done to validate which interventions are appropriate for which babies and with what medical procedures. In addition, collaboration and sharing of responsibilities and resources with all care providers needs to be investigated. Moreover, research needs to be done that acknowledges that the environment of the NICU is also a world in which many adults work and live a large portion of their daily life. This environment must be supportive of their social needs as well as the needs of the high-risk infant. There are many pieces to the puzzle of providing developmentally supportive caregiving in the NICU. The number of different issues increases the complexity of changing the standard of care: Infant, family, environment. Each has its own challenges. However, with sensitivity, a collaborative approach, and a sincere effort to change, neonatal health-care professionals can integrate developmental practices into the NICU. PMID:8637813

  7. Clustering of malformations in the families of South American oral cleft neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Menegotto, B G; Salzano, F M

    1991-01-01

    The relatives of 741 newborn children with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL +/- P), of 115 with isolated cleft palate (CP), and of equal numbers of appropriate controls were screened for the presence of the same or different malformations. The main findings were as follows. (1) The frequency of familial cases of CL +/- P (17.3%) was much higher than the prevalence of this malformation among the relatives of controls (0.5%). (2) The sibs of CL +/- P subjects showed a higher prevalence of this condition than their parents (2.9% v 1.6%). (3) The degree of genetic determination of this condition should be high (70 to 74%), and the data in general favour a multifactorial model of inheritance, with different thresholds between sexes. However, the action of dominant genes cannot be excluded since selection or dominant genes or both could be postulated to explain the parent/sib difference. (4) The frequency of other malformations was also significantly raised in the families of CL +/- P probands, as compared to controls (12.1% v 6.2%). (5) The prevalence of these other malformations was higher among sibs (1.6%) than parents (0.7%) of CL +/- P babies. (6) A general susceptibility to malformations and different exposure to selective agents may explain these latter findings. (7) None of the comparisons involving CP children yielded significant results. PMID:2002479

  8. Early frameshift mutation in PIGA identified in a large XLID family without neonatal lethality.

    PubMed

    Belet, Stefanie; Fieremans, Nathalie; Yuan, Xuan; Van Esch, Hilde; Verbeeck, Jelle; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Brett R; Hu, Hao; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Brodsky, Robert A; Froyen, Guy

    2014-03-01

    The phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA) protein is a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor pathway. Germline mutations in PIGA located at Xp22.2 are thought to be lethal in males. However, a nonsense mutation in the last coding exon was recently described in two brothers with multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 2 (MCAHS2) who survived through birth likely because of the hypomorphic nature of the truncated protein, but died in their first weeks of life. Here, we report on a frameshift mutation early in the PIGA cDNA (c.76dupT; p.Y26Lfs*3) that cosegregates with the disease in a large family diagnosed with a severe syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability. Unexpectedly, CD59 surface expression suggested the production of a shorter PIGA protein with residual functionality. We provide evidence that the second methionine at position 37 may be used for the translation of a 36 amino acids shorter PIGA. Complementation assays confirmed that this shorter PIGA cDNA was able to partially rescue the surface expression of CD59 in a PIGA-null cell line. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that the early frameshift mutation in PIGA produces a truncated hypomorph, which is sufficient to rescue the lethality in males but not the MCAHS2-like phenotype.

  9. Skin tumors in aging Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Adeleh; Loya, Theresa; Lee, Jeffrey L

    2002-06-01

    We report 25 cases of skin neoplasm observed among 30 Long Evans rats serving as controls in a psychosocial behavioral study conducted in the Vivarium at Charles R. Drew University, Los Angeles, CA. The animals were 10 weeks old at the beginning of the study. All the skin tumors developed at 18 to 26 months of age and slowly enlarged over a period of 9 months. Multiple nodules occurred in 8 males and 6 females. None of the tumors regressed. The tumors were located around the hind leg and dorso-medial area and measured 1 to 2 cm. Physical examination revealed firm well demarcated dermal masses. Most of the tumor nodules were intradermal, and some had a central ulcerated or keratin-filled core. Microscopic examination performed on some of the tumors showed findings of classic Keratoacanthoma, whereas others showed histologic features suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma. These findings indicate a high rate (83%) of spontaneous skin neoplasms among aging Long Evans rats. To our knowledge, such a high rate of skin neoplasms in aged rodents has not been described in the literature. Furthermore, further studies should be undertaken to confirm these findings and to assess whether these rodents might serve as a model for studying the alterations in the immune system with aging.

  10. Family centered maternity care: its relationship to perinatal regionalization and neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Swartz, W H; Swartz, J V

    1976-09-01

    For several months prior to birth a major portion of a family's attention, conversation, thought, and often worry, is directed toward the idea of a new child. This prolonged attention and anticipation contribute to making childbirth an emotionally charged experience. In psychological terms, it is therefore a critical period of peak motivation for learning, and a time to peak susceptibility to reinforcement. Theory, reason, and scientific evidence indicate thng with childbirth and early postpartum experiences, can significantly affect subsequent parental behaviors, the child's central environment influence. Evidence strongly suggests that these parental attitudes and behaviors so crucial to the child's ultimate well-being are learned rather than derived instinctually, and therefore they are malleable and can be taught, directed, and corrected. Through education and reinforcement it is possible to encourage parental behaviors and child interactions which are products of feelings of control, competence, accomplishment, understanding, and caring. Similarly we can recognize and work toward replacing attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that express fear, worry, and insecurity about the child. Over the past 50 years major changes have occurred in the practice of obstetrics and newborn pediatrics. Other major changes will necessarily occur as we move toward perinatal regionalization. Changes instigated solely on physiologic data can have unrecognized collateral effects on the psychological component of the childbirth experience. All concerned health care personnel, especially obstetricians and pediatricians, can insist that the importance of desirable mother-father-child interactions be recognized and that practices fostering them be afforded a high priority. I would like to endorse a comment from a recent article by Richmond concerning the advent of behavioral pediatrics by adding that behavioral obstetrics is also "an idea whose time has arrived".

  11. Family centered maternity care: its relationship to perinatal regionalization and neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Swartz, W H; Swartz, J V

    1976-09-01

    For several months prior to birth a major portion of a family's attention, conversation, thought, and often worry, is directed toward the idea of a new child. This prolonged attention and anticipation contribute to making childbirth an emotionally charged experience. In psychological terms, it is therefore a critical period of peak motivation for learning, and a time to peak susceptibility to reinforcement. Theory, reason, and scientific evidence indicate thng with childbirth and early postpartum experiences, can significantly affect subsequent parental behaviors, the child's central environment influence. Evidence strongly suggests that these parental attitudes and behaviors so crucial to the child's ultimate well-being are learned rather than derived instinctually, and therefore they are malleable and can be taught, directed, and corrected. Through education and reinforcement it is possible to encourage parental behaviors and child interactions which are products of feelings of control, competence, accomplishment, understanding, and caring. Similarly we can recognize and work toward replacing attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that express fear, worry, and insecurity about the child. Over the past 50 years major changes have occurred in the practice of obstetrics and newborn pediatrics. Other major changes will necessarily occur as we move toward perinatal regionalization. Changes instigated solely on physiologic data can have unrecognized collateral effects on the psychological component of the childbirth experience. All concerned health care personnel, especially obstetricians and pediatricians, can insist that the importance of desirable mother-father-child interactions be recognized and that practices fostering them be afforded a high priority. I would like to endorse a comment from a recent article by Richmond concerning the advent of behavioral pediatrics by adding that behavioral obstetrics is also "an idea whose time has arrived". PMID:963936

  12. GESTATIONAL MERCURY VAPOR EXPOSURE AND DIET CONTRIBUTE TO MERCURY ACCUMULATION IN NEONATAL RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of pregnant Long-Evans rats to elemental mercury (Hg0) vapor resulted in a significant

    accumulation of Hg in tissues of neonates. Because elevated Hg in neonatal tissues may adversely

    affect growth and development, we were interested in how rapidly Hg was...

  13. Differential regulation of Krüppel-like factor family transcription factor expression in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes: effects of endothelin-1, oxidative stress and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Timothy E; Butler, Matthew J; Marshall, Andrew K; Tham, El Li; Sugden, Peter H; Clerk, Angela

    2008-06-01

    Krüppel-like transcription factors (Klfs) modulate fundamental cell processes. Cardiac myocytes are terminally-differentiated, but hypertrophy in response to stimuli such as endothelin-1. H2O2 or cytokines promote myocyte apoptosis. Microarray studies of neonatal rat myocytes identified several Klfs as endothelin-1-responsive genes. We used quantitative PCR for further analysis of Klf expression in neonatal rat myocytes. In response to endothelin-1, Klf2 mRNA expression was rapidly increased ( approximately 9-fold; 15-30 min) with later increases in expression of Klf4 and Klf6 ( approximately 5-fold; 30-60 min). All were regulated as immediate early genes (cycloheximide did not inhibit the increases in expression). Klf5 expression was increased at 1-2 h ( approximately 13-fold) as a second phase response (cycloheximide inhibited the increase). These increases were transient and attenuated by U0126. H2O2 increased expression of Klf2, Klf4 and Klf6, but interleukin-1beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha downregulated Klf2 expression with no effect on Klf4 or Klf6. Of the Klfs which repress transcription, endothelin-1 rapidly downregulated expression of Klf3, Klf11 and Klf15. The dynamic regulation of expression of multiple Klf family members in cardiac myocytes suggests that, as a family, they are actively involved in regulating phenotypic responses (hypertrophy and apoptosis) to extracellular stimuli.

  14. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long-Evans Rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola M A; Fox, James G

    2015-12-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  15. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long–Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola MA; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365

  16. 11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Architect's rendering of the Arcade Building by Furness, Evans and Co., from Moses King's Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, published 1902 for the City's 220th birthday - Arcade Building, Fifteenth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 2), Manchester, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 2), Manchester, 1873 (PL XXIX top); illustration of full milll, as enlarged to south. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  18. Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 1), Manchester, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 1), Manchester, 1873 (PL XXI); illustration of turbine and belt system. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  19. Lethal neonatal rigidity and multifocal seizure syndrome--report of another family with a BRAT1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Straussberg, Rachel; Ganelin-Cohen, Esther; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassah; Tzur, Shay; Behar, Doron M; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-03-01

    We describe two siblings born to consanguineous Arab-Muslim parents who presented in early infancy with myoclonic seizures, hypertonia and contractures, arrested head growth, inability to swallow, and bouts of apnea-bradycardia, culminating in cardiac arrest and death. Whole-genome sequencing yielded a c.1173delG mutation in the BRAT1 gene. Three recent reports identified mutations in the same gene in three infants from three Amish sibships, one Mexican neonate and two Japanese siblings with similar clinical manifestations. The authors speculated that the destabilization of the encoded protein may underlie the catastrophic epilepsy and corticobasal neuronal degeneration. We suggest that BRAT1 be added to the growing list of genes that are related to severe early infantile (neonatal) epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25500575

  20. 76 FR 7832 - Evans Solutions, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments, Protests, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Evans Solutions, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting... Intention. b. Docket No: DI10-20-000. c. Date Filed: September 21, 2010. d. Applicant: Evans Solutions, LLC...). h. Applicant Contact: Reginald Evans, Evans Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 1303, Sumter, SC...

  1. Computerized tomographic study of normal Evans index in adult Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Hamidu, Ahmed Umdagas; Olarinoye-Akorede, Sefiya Adebanke; Ekott, David Solomon; Danborno, Barnabas; Mahmud, Muhammad Raj; Balogun, Muhammad Shakir

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of degree of ventricular enlargement should be based on established indices rather than on personal experience as this is highly subjective. Our aim was to establish normal values for Evans index in a Nigerian adult population as none has been found in the Nigerian medical literature. Materials and Methods: Axial computerized tomographic brain scans of 488 normal subjects were reviewed retrospectively. Of them, 319 (65.36%) of the patients were males and 169 (34.63%) were females; their ages ranged from 18 to 84 years with a mean age of 37.26 years. The images were acquired using a multi-slice GE Sigma excite scanner. Evans index was measured as the linear ratio of the total width of the frontal horns of the cerebral lateral ventricles to the maximum intracranial diameter. Results: The mean value for Evans index for the studied population was 0.252 ± 0.04. The EI increased with age and it was slightly higher among males. The difference in Evans value in males and females was not statistically significant. Individuals above 60 years old had the highest Evans values in both sexes. Conclusion: This study has established ranges of normal value for Evans index in a Nigerian population. It agrees with the diagnostic cut-off value of > 0.3 for hydrocephalus and it compares well with that of the Caucasians. PMID:25552852

  2. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  3. Family Nurture Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Improves Social-Relatedness, Attention, and Neurodevelopment of Preterm Infants at 18 Months in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Martha G.; Firestein, Morgan R.; Austin, Judy; Hane, Amie A.; Stark, Raymond I.; Hofer, Myron A.; Garland, Marianne; Glickstein, Sara B.; Brunelli, Susan A.; Ludwig, Robert J.; Myers, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preterm infants are at high risk for adverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes. Family Nurture Intervention (FNI) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is designed to counteract adverse effects of separation of mothers and their preterm infants. Here, we evaluate effects of FNI on neurobehavioral outcomes. Methods: Data…

  4. The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care and European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Fulbrook, Paul; Latour, Jos; Albarran, John; de Graaf, Wouter; Lynch, Fiona; Devictor, Denis; Norekvål, Tone

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, and the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. PMID:17919981

  5. Risk estimates for neonatal myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Glånz, A; Fråser, F C

    1984-01-01

    Children who inherit the autosomal dominant gene for myotonic dystrophy from their mother rather than their father may develop the severe neonatal type rather than the late onset type. The families of 22 neonatal type probands and 59 late onset type probands were studied to determine the risk of occurrence and recurrence of the neonatal type. The frequency of the neonatal type in sibs of neonatal type probands was 29%, or 37% if cases of neonatal deaths are counted as affected. This is significantly higher than the 6% of the neonatal type found in the offspring of affected women not ascertained through a child with the neonatal type. These data suggest that certain women carrying the gene for myotonic dystrophy are predisposed to have children affected with the neonatal type rather than the late onset type. The female near relatives of these women do not seem to share this predisposition. The data should be useful for genetic counseling. PMID:6748014

  6. Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 1), Manchester, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy from Evan Leigh's Modern Cotton Spinning (Vol 1), Manchester, 1873 (PL XX); illustration used by eminent British textile engineer to exemplify the ultimate development in American cotton mill technology. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  7. Integrated Psychological Services in the Greeley-Evans Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, R. Brett; Hoover, Michael; Young, Mary; Obrzut, Ann; D'Amato, Rik Carl; Copeland, Ellis P.

    2006-01-01

    Integrated school psychological services were implemented 12 years ago in the Greeley-Evans Public Schools by combining the positions of school psychologist and school social worker and placing each professional in an elementary school full-time. After 5 years, services were expanded to secondary schools such that all schools had a full-time…

  8. Thiazole orange positive platelets in a dog with Evans' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michimoto, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomotaka; Suzuki, Kumiko; Watari, Toshihiro; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2004-10-01

    We examined transition for the percentage of reticulated platelets (RP%) and platelet count in a canine case of Evans' syndrome. The result demonstrated that measurement of the RP% can be useful in evaluating platelet production in the bone marrow and response to treatment.

  9. Measurement of plasma volume by means of 59Fe-labelled dextran and Evans blue compared.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R J; Mills, I H

    1970-05-01

    The apparent volumes of distribution of Evans blue and (59)Fe-dextran were determined in 18 studies.(59)Fe-dextran volume was 5% lower than Evans blue volume, a highly significant difference. The rate of loss of (59)Fe dextran from the circulation was significantly less than that of Evans blue.

  10. Measurement of plasma volume by means of 59Fe-labelled dextran and Evans blue compared

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. J.; Mills, Ivor H.

    1970-01-01

    The apparent volumes of distribution of Evans blue and 59Fe-dextran were determined in 18 studies. 59Fe-dextran volume was 5% lower than Evans blue volume, a highly significant difference. The rate of loss of 59Fe dextran from the circulation was significantly less than that of Evans blue. PMID:4914280

  11. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  12. Robley Evans and what physics can do for medicine.

    PubMed

    Adelstein, S J

    2001-06-01

    When asked, in 1936 by J. Howard Means, Chief of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, whether radioiodine could be produced for thyroid studies, Karl T. Compton, President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, referred the question to Robley Evans of the physics department. In response, Evans formed a team from the fields of physics and medicine that produced 128I for animal studies and, subsequently on a cyclotron dedicated to medical purposes, 130I for human uptake measurements and the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Much of what we have learned about iodine kinetics and the radioiodine therapy of Graves's disease stems from these early seminal reports. The cooperation between physicists and physicians that made their accomplishments possible stands as a model example for interdisciplinary collaboration.

  13. Closet addiction in fiction: the search for Christiana Evans.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Gay

    2007-01-01

    Mary Ann Evans, who would later become the great nineteenth-century novelist George Eliot, takes up in her first three works of fiction a discussion of the use of alcohol in her own culture. However, it is in "Adam Bede" (1859) that a significant portion of the discussion (the alcoholism of one female character in particular) is so deliberately closeted -- so backgrounded -- that the structure of the text becomes a slippery portrait, not only of the extent to which the culturally pervasive alcoholism of women was persistently denied, but of Eliot's own mother's hidden substance abuse. An important minor character in "Adam Bede," identified by more than one biographer as having a kinship to Eliot's mother Christiana Evans, shows all the signs and symptoms of alcoholism, a phenomenon which even the story's narrator appears to be hiding from the reader.

  14. An Assessment of Evans' Unified Field Theory I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehl, Friedrich W.

    2008-01-01

    Evans developed a classical unified field theory of gravitation and electromagnetism on the background of a spacetime obeying a Riemann-Cartan geometry. This geometry can be characterized by an orthonormal coframe ϑ α and a (metric compatible) Lorentz connection Γ α β . These two potentials yield the field strengths torsion T α and curvature R α β . Evans tried to infuse electromagnetic properties into this geometrical framework by putting the coframe ϑ α to be proportional to four extended electromagnetic potentials mathcal{A}^{α } ; these are assumed to encompass the conventional Maxwellian potential A in a suitable limit. The viable Einstein-Cartan (-Sciama-Kibble) theory of gravity was adopted by Evans to describe the gravitational sector of his theory. Including also the results of an accompanying paper by Obukhov and the author, we show that Evans’ ansatz for electromagnetism is untenable beyond repair both from a geometrical as well as from a physical point of view. As a consequence, his unified theory is obsolete.

  15. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  16. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  17. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  18. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  19. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  20. Tosta Evans, 1953 (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae): a new species from northeast Brazil, first description of the female of Tosta tosta Evans, 1953, and placement of the genus within Achlyodini.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Ricardo Russo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins

    2015-08-11

    A new species of Tosta Evans, 1953 from northeast Brazil is described: T. pseudospeculum Siewert, Mielke & Casagrande, sp. nov. Additionally, the female of Tosta tosta Evans, 1953, the type species of the genus, is described for the first time. Illustrations of adults and male and female genitalia for all studied species are provided, as well as a discussion of the placement of the genus within the tribe Achlyodini.

  1. Neonatal Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Whitington, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as “self” and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies. PMID:25755519

  2. Mechanisms contributing to the regional haemodynamic effects of neurotensin in conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bachelard, H.; Gardiner, S. M.; Kemp, P. A.; Bennett, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. The regional haemodynamic effects of i.v. bolus doses of neurotensin (10-1000 ng) were assessed in conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats chronically instrumented with miniaturized, pulsed Doppler probes. 2. Neurotensin caused increases in blood pressure, together with dose-related tachycardias and constrictions in the renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The tachycardia elicited by the 1000 ng dose of neurotensin was preceded by a transient bradycardia. 3. In the presence of phentolamine, the pressor effect of neurotensin (1000 ng) was converted into a hypotensive effect, accompanied by reduced tachycardic and constrictor responses in the renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The tachycardia was not preceded by a bradycardia. 4. In the presence of phentolamine and propranolol, the pressor and bradycardic responses to neurotensin were unaffected, whereas the tachycardia was abolished. The renal vasconstrictor effect was smaller, while the constrictions in the superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds were not different from those in untreated rats. 5. In rats neonatally treated with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.), the pressor effects elicited by neurotensin (300 and 1000 ng) were reduced as were the constrictor responses in the renal (at the dose of 300 ng), superior mesenteric (at the dose of 300 ng) and hindquarters (at both doses) vascular beds. The bradycardia elicited by neurotensin (1000 ng) was absent, whereas the tachycardia was potentiated. 6. The results indicate that in conscious, intact rats neurotensin appears to exert cardiovascular influences through activation of sympathoadrenal mechanisms and also through non-adrenergic effects on the heart, renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The latter effects appear to involve capsaicin-sensitive nerves. PMID:1596682

  3. Mechanisms contributing to the regional haemodynamic effects of neurotensin in conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1992-01-01

    1. The regional haemodynamic effects of i.v. bolus doses of neurotensin (10-1000 ng) were assessed in conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats chronically instrumented with miniaturized, pulsed Doppler probes. 2. Neurotensin caused increases in blood pressure, together with dose-related tachycardias and constrictions in the renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The tachycardia elicited by the 1000 ng dose of neurotensin was preceded by a transient bradycardia. 3. In the presence of phentolamine, the pressor effect of neurotensin (1000 ng) was converted into a hypotensive effect, accompanied by reduced tachycardic and constrictor responses in the renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The tachycardia was not preceded by a bradycardia. 4. In the presence of phentolamine and propranolol, the pressor and bradycardic responses to neurotensin were unaffected, whereas the tachycardia was abolished. The renal vasconstrictor effect was smaller, while the constrictions in the superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds were not different from those in untreated rats. 5. In rats neonatally treated with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.), the pressor effects elicited by neurotensin (300 and 1000 ng) were reduced as were the constrictor responses in the renal (at the dose of 300 ng), superior mesenteric (at the dose of 300 ng) and hindquarters (at both doses) vascular beds. The bradycardia elicited by neurotensin (1000 ng) was absent, whereas the tachycardia was potentiated. 6. The results indicate that in conscious, intact rats neurotensin appears to exert cardiovascular influences through activation of sympathoadrenal mechanisms and also through non-adrenergic effects on the heart, renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. The latter effects appear to involve capsaicin-sensitive nerves.

  4. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  5. [Dermatomiositis and evans syndrome associated with HTLV-1 infection].

    PubMed

    Loja-Oropeza, David; Zavala-Flores, Ernesto; Vilca-Vasquez, Maricela

    2016-03-01

    A 55-year-old female patient, born in Ayacucho, with a history of dermatomyositis for 3 years, who received irregular treatment with prednisone. Two months prior to admission, she presented with autoinmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The patient received methylprednisolone pulse therapy and packed red blood cells transfusions. Upon admission, she was drowsy, with a poor overall status, marked weight loss, dehydration, with presence of livedo reticularis in her lower extremities, and onychodystrophy and onycholysis on the toes of both feet. Western blot test was positive for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The patient evolved with recurrent hypoglycemia. Therefore, we report a case of dermatomyositis and Evans syndrome in the context of an HTLV-1 infection.

  6. [Dermatomiositis and evans syndrome associated with HTLV-1 infection].

    PubMed

    Loja-Oropeza, David; Zavala-Flores, Ernesto; Vilca-Vasquez, Maricela

    2016-03-01

    A 55-year-old female patient, born in Ayacucho, with a history of dermatomyositis for 3 years, who received irregular treatment with prednisone. Two months prior to admission, she presented with autoinmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The patient received methylprednisolone pulse therapy and packed red blood cells transfusions. Upon admission, she was drowsy, with a poor overall status, marked weight loss, dehydration, with presence of livedo reticularis in her lower extremities, and onychodystrophy and onycholysis on the toes of both feet. Western blot test was positive for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The patient evolved with recurrent hypoglycemia. Therefore, we report a case of dermatomyositis and Evans syndrome in the context of an HTLV-1 infection. PMID:27384637

  7. Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This document contains the fourth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency. "The Family and Delinquency" (LaMar T. Empey) systematically reviews and weighs the evidence to support prominent theories on the origins of…

  8. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  9. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  10. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  11. Straight talk with...James Ironside. [Interviewed by Jon Evans].

    PubMed

    Ironside, James

    2009-08-01

    Would you entrust your brain to a bank? Well, many people do after they die, and such brain banks-often funded by government agencies or disease charities-are essential for neuroscience research. They collect and store the healthy and diseased brain specimens that neuroscientists need to explore neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and autism. Each brain bank typically has a limited supply of samples and tends to operate fairly independently. This means that researchers often have to trawl through numerous brain banks to find their desired specimens. Furthermore, there is a general shortage of brain samples. To help resolve these issues in the UK, James Ironside, professor of clinical neuropathology at the University of Edinburgh, was appointed in June as the director of the new UK Brain Banks Network. An expert in human prion diseases, particularly Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Ironside knows all about brain banks. He established the Brain and Tissue Bank at the UK's National CJD Surveillance Unit and is involved in the Sudden Death Brain and Tissue Bank at the University of Edinburgh. Jon Evans recently caught up with Ironside to discuss his new leadership position and how the brain network will benefit neuroscience research.

  12. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  13. Robert Leslie Evans: A Real-Life Model for Tayo in Silko's "Ceremony"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The book "Ceremony" by Leslie Marmon Silko was written about the main character, Tayo, who was patterned after Robert Leslie Evans life. Tayo, a young American, was a prisoner of the Japanese during World War II.

  14. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  15. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families.

  16. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, Antonio; Cimaz, Rolando; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2002-12-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB), defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0-27 d after birth), is a rare disorder closely linked to transplacental transport of maternal antibodies anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. These antibodies may induce a myocarditis, or interact directly with calcium channel proteins with disturbance of transmembrane signaling at the level of the conduction tissue, or interfere with apoptosis. Depending on the severity of the process, the fetus may die in utero or a few days after birth or survive to the perinatal period and have a near-normal life; in most survivors a pace-maker must be implanted. Skin lesions, haematological disorders, and hepatic cholestasis are other transient clinical features of the syndrome. Sinus bradycardia and QT interval prolongation may be observed as well in babies born from anti-Ro/SSA positive mothers. The risk of recurrence of complete block ranges from 10-17%. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Their long-term outcome generally is more reassuring than previously assumed and arthralgias and dry eyes are the most common symptoms. A standard therapy for blocks detected in utero still does not exist. The prevalence of complete CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women and with known connective-tissue disease was 2%. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 2 wk starting from the 16 wk gestation, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women.

  17. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  18. X-linked mental retardation with neonatal hypotonia in a French family (MRX15): Gene assignment to Xp11.22-Xp21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, M.; Dessay, B.; Ayrault, A.D.

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX 15). Hypotonia in infancy was the most remarkable physical manifestation. The severity of mental deficiency was variable among the patients, but all of them had poor or absent speech. Significant lod scores at a recombination fraction of zero were detected with the marker loci DXS1126, DXS255, and DXS573 (Zmax = 2.01) and recombination was observed with the two flanking loci DXS164 (Xp21.1) and DXS988 (Xp11.22), identifying a 17 cM interval. This result suggests a new gene localization in the proximal Xp region. In numerous families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX), the corresponding gene has been localized to the paracentromeric region in which a low recombination rate impairs the precision of mapping. 58 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. [The Evans case and the right not to be forced to reproduce].

    PubMed

    Alkorta Idiakez, Itziar

    2006-01-01

    The article analyses the ruling of the European Court of Human Rights, Evans v. United Kingdom, of March 7, 2006 (application no. 6339/05) from the perspective of the nature and the effects of a consent together with the conservation and disposal of cryopreserved embryos. Several prevailing normative models are studied in order to look at the disposal of embryos and to test its legal consistency. As a conclusion and basing it on the Evans case, there is a proposition to distinguish between the acts of disposal of spare embryos from IVF programs and the deposit of embryos as a way to prevent lack of fertility.

  20. Internet resources for neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, S

    1999-03-01

    The availability of health information over the Internet has exploded in recent years. Nurses can use the Internet to access information to support professional and clinical interests and join in dialogues with colleagues around the world. The Internet can also be used to identify resources for clients and their families. As with any other information resource, Internet sites must be evaluated for accuracy, currency, and objectivity. The article describes examples of Internet resources and discussion forums for neonatal nurses, use of search engines to find and retrieve information about specific topics, and evaluation of World Wide Web sites.

  1. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF TCDD ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG EVANS RATS: A TWO GENERATIONAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated variable effects on mammary gland development in rat offspring exposed to TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1 ug/kg, gavage) on day 15 of gestation. We have characterized these effects in Long Evans rats, in both one and two-generational...

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROACETONITRILE ADMINISTERED IN CORN OIL TO PREGNANT LONG-EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. When administered by gavage to pregnant Long-Evans rats in a medium-chain triglyceride vehicle, tricaprylin oil (Tricap), at a volume of 10 ml/kg, TCAN induced ...

  3. EVALUATION OF SENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS IN LONG EVANS RATS GESTATIONALLY EXPOSED TO MERCURY (HGO) VAPOR.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to mercury vapor (Hg0) has been reported to result in sensory disturbances. Developmental exposure to toxicants may result in long-lasting changes in neural function. This manuscript describes the lack of effect of gestational exposure of Long Evans rats to Hg0 on ...

  4. Predatory Odor Disrupts Social Novelty Preference in Long-Evans Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Layton, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of predatory odor (cat urine) on social novelty preference in Long-Evans rats. Adult male subjects encountered a juvenile conspecific at training, were exposed to either clean cat litter (control) or litter soiled with cat urine (predatory odor), and were tested for social novelty preference. While the…

  5. EVALUATION OF FERTILIZATION FOLLOWING OVULATORY DELAY WITH THIRAM IN THE LONG-EVANS HOODED RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of fertilization following ovulatory delay with thiram in the Long-Evans Hooded Rat

    1TE Stoker, 1* S Jeffay, and 1 SD Perreault.

    1Gamete and Early Embryogenesis Biology Branch and 2 Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, R...

  6. Academic Writing in Context: Implications and Applications. Papers in Honour of Tony Dudley-Evans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewings, Martin, Ed.

    The papers in this volume were collected to honor T. Dudley-Evans on his retirement from the University of Birmingham. They explore a number of themes of current interest to those engaged in English language teaching and academic writing. The papers are: (1) Introduction (Martin Hewings); (2) Distance and Refined Selves: Educational Tensions in…

  7. Stability of Periodic Solutionsof Conservation Laws with Viscosity:Analysis of the Evans Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, M.; Zumbrun, K.

    We establish instability of periodic traveling waves arising in conservation laws featuring phase transition. The analysis uses the Evans function framework introduced by R.A. Gardner in the periodic case. The main new tool is a periodic generalization of the stability index introduced by Gardner and Zumbrun in the traveling front or pulse case.

  8. Computing the Evans function via solving a linear boundary value ODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Colin; Nguyen, Rose; Ventura, Nathaniel; Barker, Blake; Sandstede, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Determining the stability of traveling wave solutions to partial differential equations can oftentimes be computationally intensive but of great importance to understanding the effects of perturbations on the physical systems (chemical reactions, hydrodynamics, etc.) they model. For waves in one spatial dimension, one may linearize around the wave and form an Evans function - an analytic Wronskian-like function which has zeros that correspond in multiplicity to the eigenvalues of the linearized system. If eigenvalues with a positive real part do not exist, the traveling wave will be stable. Two methods exist for calculating the Evans function numerically: the exterior-product method and the method of continuous orthogonalization. The first is numerically expensive, and the second reformulates the originally linear system as a nonlinear system. We develop a new algorithm for computing the Evans function through appropriate linear boundary-value problems. This algorithm is cheaper than the previous methods, and we prove that it preserves analyticity of the Evans function. We also provide error estimates and implement it on some classical one- and two-dimensional systems, one being the Swift-Hohenberg equation in a channel, to show the advantages.

  9. POSTNATAL DISPOSITION OF TCDD IN LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    POSTNATAL DISPOSITION OF TCDD IN LONG EVANS RATS FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE.
    J J Diliberto', J T Hamm'.2, F McQuaid', and L S Birnbaum'. 'US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD, RTP, NC; 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.
    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenz...

  10. BROMATE-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN LONG-EVANS RAT KIDNEYS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Bromate-Induced Transcriptional Changes in Long-Evans Rat Kidneys.

    Ozone disinfection of surface waters containing bromide ion (Br-) results in the oxidation of bromide to bromate, which can be found in finished drinking water as a by-product. Potassium bromate (KBrO3)...

  11. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hammer, S G; Lewan, R B

    1988-01-01

    We report an infant with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency. The initial approach involved rapid evaluation, phototherapy, and close monitoring of serum bilirubin levels. Follow-up included maintenance on folic acid, monitoring blood counts, and educating the parents about the course of pyruvate kinase deficiency, especially aplastic crisis. We suggest that the informed family practitioner can manage neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and pyruvate kinase deficiency with referrals at critical times to pediatric or surgical specialists. The practitioner must be able to recognize quickly the need for exchange transfusion for severe jaundice and for blood transfusions or splenectomy when significant anemia or aplastic crisis occurs.

  12. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  13. Redirecting treatment during neonatal transport.

    PubMed

    Dulkerian, Susan J; Douglas, Webra Price; Taylor, Renee McCraine

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal transport teams comprise multidisciplinary health care providers who are skilled in patient care, communication and customer service, and equipment mechanics. They are extensively trained in resuscitation and stabilization, preparing for accelerating care, and their focus is preservation of life. In any situation focused on caring for critically ill patients, ethical issues and questions may arise. For instance, is it compassionate and/or cost-effective to separate mothers and infants when continuing/accelerating care is futile, and when and how should care be redirected from acute and lifesaving care to comfort care and bereavement support for the family? The knowledge and skills required to address such situations and communicate and participate in a redirection of care may not be adequately emphasized in the preparation of the professionals responsible for stabilizing and transporting critically ill newborns. This article raises issues relating to transport and redirecting care such as eligibility for transport, parental request and consent, separation of mothers and infants, palliative and bereavement care, ethical considerations, competitive transport environment, and customer service. A shared mental model is essential. The focus of this article is not to provide answers to all of these issues, but to highlight the complexity of the topic of redirecting treatment during neonatal transport. Redirecting treatment needs to be discussed, and health care professionals should be prepared during their transport team training. Each family and situation must be approached individually, with the acceptance that there will always be more questions than answers. PMID:21540683

  14. Neonatal leukaemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Handler, M Z; Schwartz, R A

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal leukaemia cutis is a significant neoplasm that may represent a cutaneous manifestation of systemic leukaemia, usually of myeloblastic type. Rarely, it may be or appear to be limited to skin, in which case it is called neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis. By definition, it presents within the first 4 weeks of life and often has a 'blueberry muffin baby' appearance of magenta coloured nodules affecting almost any area of the skin, usually sparing mucous membranes, palms and soles. This clinical pattern is more commonly associated with neonatal infections such rubella and toxoplasmosis, and may be evident with other neonatal neoplasms such as neuroblastoma. Due to the morbidity associated with chemotherapy and reported cases of spontaneous remission without systemic progression in those with neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis without 11q23 translocation, the authors not treating the child with chemotherapy, but to simply monitor for fading of the violaceous nodules, and watch for possible signs of systemic leukaemia.

  15. Modeling Ethanol Decomposition on Transition Metals: A Combined Application of Scaling and Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter A.; Simonetti, Dante A.; Kandoi, Shampa; Kunkes, Edward L.; Dumesic, James A.; Norskov, Jens K.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2009-04-29

    Applying density functional theory (DFT) calculations to the rational design of catalysts for complex reaction networks has been an ongoing challenge, primarily because of the high computational cost of these calculations. Certain correlations can be used to reduce the number and complexity of DFT calculations necessary to describe trends in activity and selectivity across metal and alloy surfaces, thus extending the reach of DFT to more complex systems. In this work, the well-known family of Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations, connecting minima with maxima in the potential energy surface of elementary steps, in tandem with a scaling relation, connecting binding energies of complex adsorbates with those of simpler ones (e.g., C, O), is used to develop a potential-energy surface for ethanol decomposition on 10 transition metal surfaces. Using a simple kinetic model, the selectivity and activity on a subset of these surfaces are calculated. Experiments on supported catalysts verify that this simple model is reasonably accurate in describing reactivity trends across metals, suggesting that the combination of BEP and scaling relations may substantially reduce the cost of DFT calculations required for identifying reactivity descriptors of more complex reactions.

  16. Differential effects of neonatal handling on anxiety, corticosterone response to stress, and hippocampal glucocorticoid and serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Durand, M; Sarrieau, A; Aguerre, S; Mormède, P; Chaouloff, F

    1998-05-01

    Neonatal handling (during the first 3 weeks of age) has been reported by others to diminish the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responsivity to stress in adult Long Evans rats, an effect involving a serotonin (5-HT)2A receptor-mediated increase in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. In addition, handled animals may also display enduring reductions in anxiety-related behaviours, including in the elevated plus-maze. We have thus analysed the aforementioned neuroendocrine and behavioural consequences of neonatal stress in male and female adult Lewis rats, a strain characterised by its high anxiety and its hyporesponsive HPA axis. Plasma corticosterone, but not behavioural, responses to an elevated plus-maze test were decreased in handled rats. Besides, hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and GR binding capacities were not different between handled and non-handled Lewis rats, an observation which could be extended to our adult Long Evans rats. Lastly, neither hippocampal nor cortical 5-HT2A receptor binding capacities in adult Lewis rats were affected by prior handling. In keeping with the failure to detect early handling-induced increases in hippocampal GR binding in 3-week old Lewis and Long Evans rats, the present study reinforces past findings indicating that environmental and genetic factors are crucial variables in the neonatal handling paradigm.

  17. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  18. Neonatal hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Margaret A

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal hearing screening can be performed using reliable and reproducible methods. Intervention before the age of 6 months with hearing aids and appropriate educational support services will give the infant the best possible opportunity to develop language. Potential barriers to efficient implementation of a neonatal hearing screening program include access to appropriate and timely diagnostic and support services and insurance to cover the services. Without universal neonatal hearing screening, many children with hearing loss will be missed, which will have a direct negative impact on their speech, language, educational, and social development. PMID:12809324

  19. Teaching antenatal counseling skills to neonatal providers.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Theophil A; Watson, Katie L; Boss, Renee D

    2014-02-01

    Counseling a family confronted with the birth of a periviable neonate is one of the most difficult tasks that a neonatologist must perform. The neonatologist's goal is to facilitate an informed, collaborative decision about whether life-sustaining therapies are in the best interest of this baby. Neonatologists are trained to provide families with a detailed account of the morbidity and mortality data they believe are necessary to facilitate a truly informed decision. Yet these complicated and intensely emotional conversations require advanced communication and counseling skills that our current fellowship-training strategies are not adequately providing. We review educational models for training neonatology fellows to provide antenatal counseling at the threshold of viability. We believe that training aimed at teaching these skills should be incorporated into the neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship. The optimal approaches for teaching these skills remain uncertain, and there is a need for continued innovation and outcomes-based research.

  20. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, Veronique E J; Stam, Edo D; Welborn, Kathleen M; Sas, Theo C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease.

  1. Drug Screening in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2016-01-01

    Gestational substance exposure continues to be a significant problem. Neonates may be exposed to various substances including illicit drugs, prescription drugs, and other legal substances that are best not used during pregnancy because of their potential deleterious effects as possible teratogens or their potential to create dependence and thus withdrawal in the neonate. Screening the newborn for gestational substance exposure is important for both acute care and early intervention to promote the best possible long-term outcomes. This column provides insight into what is known about the extent of substance use by pregnant women, an overview of neonatal biologic matrices for drug testing, and a discussion of the legal implications of neonatal substance screening. PMID:27636697

  2. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  3. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  4. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of readiness for neonatal resuscitation in low-risk maternity settings is challenging. The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) algorithm is a community standard in the United States; yet training is biannual, and exposure to enough critical events to be proficient at timely implementation of the algorithm and the advanced procedures is rare. Evidence supports hands-free leadership to help prevent task saturation and communication to promote patient safety. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation involves the addition of remote, expert NRP leadership (a NICU-based neonatal nurse practitioner) via camera link to augment effectiveness of the low-risk birth center team. Unanticipated outcomes to report include faster times to transfer initiation and neuroprotective cooling. The positive impact of remote NRP leadership could lead to use of telemedicine to support teams at birthing centers throughout the United States as well as around the world.

  5. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Pet, Gillian C

    2015-09-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This article explores some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury is discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  6. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and KCNQ3 proteins are active in nerve cells (neurons) in the brain, where they transport potassium ions ... signal called the M-current, which prevents the neuron from continuing to send signals to other neurons. ...

  7. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  8. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons.

  9. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  10. Plasma volume methodology: Evans blue, hemoglobin-hematocrit, and mass density transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for measuring absolute levels and changes in plasma volume are presented along with derivations of pertinent equations. Reduction in variability of the Evans blue dye dilution technique using chromatographic column purification suggests that the day-to-day variability in the plasma volume in humans is less than + or - 20 m1. Mass density determination using the mechanical-oscillator technique provides a method for measuring vascular fluid shifts continuously for assessing the density of the filtrate, and for quantifying movements of protein across microvascular walls. Equations for the calculation of volume and density of shifted fluid are presented.

  11. Celiac disease with Evans syndrome and isolated immune thrombocytopenia in monozygotic twins: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Roganovic, Jelena

    2016-04-01

    Celiac disease is a multisystem immune-mediated disorder caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The clinical presentation is characterized by a multitude and diversity of symptoms and complications. The coexistence of celiac disease with other autoimmune disorders has been established, most frequently with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis. The association of celiac disease with immune-mediated hematologic conditions has been rarely reported. This case study describes a pair of identical twin sisters with celiac disease associated with Evans syndrome in one sibling, and with isolated immune thrombocytopenia in the other. PMID:27312169

  12. Pharmacokinetics of azidothymidine during late pregnancy in Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Little, B B; Bawdon, R E; Christmas, J T; Sobhi, S; Gilstrap, L C

    1989-09-01

    Azidothymidine (Zidovudine) is used to treat symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection. It has the ability to reverse seropositivity as well as decrease serum viral titers, and perhaps decrease potential for transmission of the virus. An animal model (pregnant Long-Evans rats) was used to investigate the potential for placental transmission of azidothymidine. The drug crosses the placenta to reach concentrations in the placenta and fetus that are comparable to 75% and 58%, respectively, of those in the maternal serum by 2 hours after administration. By 4 to 6 hours after administration azidothymidine concentrations in the placenta and fetal liver significantly exceed maternal concentrations.

  13. Illuminance of neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Moseley, M J; Fielder, A R

    1990-07-01

    We have measured the illuminance (brightness) of seven neonatal units during both the day and the night. When the units were lit solely by fluorescent tubes the mean illuminance was 348 lux (range 192-690). During the day the mean illuminance was 470 lux (range 236-905). The high dependency regions in four of the seven units were significantly brighter than the corresponding low dependency nurseries at all times. In two of these units there is a policy of reducing the amount of artificial light in the low dependency areas at night, and in these the normal mean illuminance was 50 lux. We have measured the general levels of illumination to which a neonate might be exposed; the ocular exposure to light of a neonate depends, however, on both physical and biological factors and more research is required before an accurate estimate can be made.

  14. Evans blue dye adjuvant enhances delayed hypersensitivity while blocking immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D W; Crowle, A J

    1981-01-01

    Evans blue dye functions as an adjuvant with protein antigens in saline to induce cell-mediated immunological responses in mice. But when used to help induce cell-mediated tuberculoimmunity, it decreased mouse resistance to tuberculosis instead of helping induce immunity. This paradox was investigated. As could be expected from previous work with other antigens, the dye did promote induction of delayed hypersensitivity in mice to tuberculoprotein when injected in saline with killed tubercle bacilli. Peritoneal macrophages from mice injected with the dye responded normally to migration inhibition factor. Morphologically, these cells were moderately "activated" compared with similar cells taken from untreated mice. However, such cells incubated with tuberculosis growth inhibition lymphokine in an in vitro test for tuberculoimmunity did not express tuberculoimmunity, whereas macrophages from untreated mice did. Therefore, Evans blue dye did promote induction of cell-mediated immunological responses and tuberculoimmunity in lymphocytes, but under the conditions used in these experiments, it also blocked expression of tuberculoimmunity by macrophages. PMID:7012002

  15. Clastic facies and diagenesis, Lewis-Evans interval in Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaves, A.W.; Bat, D.

    1988-01-01

    Subsurface maps of the Lewis and Evans sandstone-facies tracts (Chester Group) on the northern shelf of the Black Warrior basin document two distinct deltaic depositional systems, each having a source area from the Mid-Dontinent interior. Within the Lewis genetic interval, six dip-elongate, river-dominated, cratonic delta lobes comprise the principal coarse-grained clastic units. However, in the higher Evans interval, five strike-elongate (cuspate) wave-dominated lobes are present on the northwestern rim of the basin. Petrographic evidence from four Mississippi cores associated with delta-plain and delta-front facies in the two sandstone unites indicates a dominance of monocrystalline quartz and chert rock fragments and a relative absence of orogenic indicators such as polycrystalline quartz, muscovite, and metamorphic rock fragments. Porosity development results largely from the formation of moldic secondary porosity and enlarged intergranular porosity. Primary porosity is occluded by the precipitation of quartz overgrowths and early calcite cement. Secondary moldic porosity was generated through the dissolution of feldspars and shale fragments. Enlarged intergranular porosity resulted from the dissolution of detrital illite matrix. Secondary porosity itself is partially occluded by authigenic kaolinite and illite, as well as by late-stage pyrite and dolomite.

  16. Hepatocyte transplantation in the Long Evans Cinnamon rat model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon Mee; Vo, Kim; Lallier, Michel; Cloutier, Alexis-Simon; Brochu, Pierre; Alvarez, Fernando; Martin, Steven R

    2006-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD), caused by a mutation in the P-type copper transporting ATPase (Atp7b) gene, results in excessive accumulation of copper in the liver. Long Evans Cinnamon rats (LEC) bear a mutation in the atp7b gene and share clinical characteristics of human WD. To explore hepatocyte transplantation (HT) as therapy for metabolic liver diseases, 8-week-old LEC rats (n = 12) were transplanted by intrasplenic injection of hepatocytes from donor Long Evans (LE) rats. Immunosuppression was maintained with intraperitoneal tacrolimus. The success of HT was monitored at 24 weeks of life. Serum aminotransferases and bilirubin peaked at 14-21 weeks in both HT rats and nontransplanted controls, but at 24 weeks, survival was 97% in LEC-HT versus 63% in controls. All transplanted rats showed restored biliary copper excretion and reduced liver iron concentration associated with increased ceruloplasmin oxidase activity. Liver tissue expressed atp7b mRNA (11.9 +/- 13.6%) indicative of engraftment of normal cells in 7 of 12 HT rats, associated with a reduced liver copper concentration compared to untreated LEC rats. Periportal islets of normal appearing hepatocytes, recognized by atp7b antibody, were observed in transplanted livers while lobular host cells showed persistent pleomorphic changes and inflammatory infiltrates. In conclusion, transplantation of normal hepatocytes prevented fulminant hepatitis, reduces chronic inflammation, and improved 6-month survival in LEC rats. Engraftment of transplanted cells, which express atp7b mRNA, repopulated the recipient liver with normal functional capacity.

  17. Role of copper accumulation in spontaneous renal carcinogenesis in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, K; Chone, Y; Satake, N; Akagi, A; Ohnishi, T; Suzuki, Y; Izumi, K

    1999-04-01

    Spontaneous renal cell tumors in totals of 223 male and female Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats of 51-120 weeks old, 157 male F344 rats of 51-120 weeks old, and 14 male Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats of 51-70 weeks old were examined histologically. The incidences of renal cell tumors increased with age in male and female LEC rats, but no tumors developed in F344 or LEA rats. Dilated atypical tubules of the kidneys were observed at high incidence in aged LEC rats. Copper staining of LEC rat kidneys showed a positive reaction in proximal tubules of the cortex and the outer stripe of the medulla. The renal copper concentration of LEC rats reached a peak in the period of necrotizing hepatitis with renal tubular necrosis, and was higher than that in F344 rats for up to 106 weeks. In contrast, the renal iron concentration of LEC rats was lower than that in F344 rats except in the period of necrotizing hepatitis. Long-term treatment of LEC rats with D-penicillamine, a copper-chelating agent, inhibited accumulation of copper, but not iron, in the kidneys, and inhibited the development of karyomegaly of proximal tubules and dilated atypical tubules. These results suggest that persistent copper accumulation after toxic necrosis of tubules is the major cause of spontaneous renal carcinogenesis in LEC rats.

  18. Context Matters: Commentary on Papers by Aschieri, Chudzik, Evans, and Fantini.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses articles by Aschieri, Chudzik, Evans, and Fantini (this issue) that address cultural considerations in Therapeutic Assessment (TA). The importance of the cultural context in which a TA is conducted is highlighted. Among the themes highlighted are the conceptualization of psychology, and more specifically psychological assessment, as a culture in and of itself and the importance of shame (Aschieri), the way the cultural values influence the practice of assessment (Chudzik), the importance of understanding the meaning of one's experience within their culture (Evans), and the role of subcultural differences (Fantini). The role of culture is seen as an important variable across these articles that explore varied conceptualizations and influences on assessment psychology. Cultural sensitivity and responsivity is seen as a crucial factor in the avoidance of misalliances. The articles in this special section are viewed as important contributions to the TA literature and demonstrate how the TA paradigm can help assessors overcome potential cultural influences that could affect the benefit of a psychological assessment. PMID:27672708

  19. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  20. The Mount Evans batholith in the Colorado Front Range: revision of its age and reinterpretation of its structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Reed, J.C.; Dewitt, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Mount Evans batholith is composed of a main phase of massive to conspicuously foliated monzogranite and granodiorite and undeformed aplite and pegmatite. The Mount Evans batholith was previously considered to be part of the 1.7 Ga Routt Plutonic Suite. New U-Pb zircon ages on four samples (granodiorite, monzogranite, and granite), however, indicate that the batholith was emplaced at 1442 ?? 2 Ma and belongs to the Berthoud Plutonic Suite. Most of the batholith has igneous textures and structures, except in the vicinity of the Idaho Springs-Ralston shear zone where those features are tectonically recrystallized and foliated. The Mount Evans batholith is anomalous in composition and structure compared to most other 1.4 Ga plutons of the southwestern US. The differences probably reflect different sources of partial melting; the specific tectonic setting where rocks of such disparate origin are temporally and spatially juxtaposed is not understood. -from Authors

  1. Joint reproductive autonomy: does Evans v Amicus Healthcare Ltd provide for a gender-neutral approach to assisted reproductive rights?

    PubMed

    Allin, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Assisted reproductive technology encompasses methods of achieving pregnancy by artificial or partially artificial means. Whilst these methods are more commonly used by couples suffering from problems of infertility, some forms of assistance are employed by fertile couples, for example pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. The overall regulatory framework in the UK is predominantly found in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. The usual rules relating to consent and autonomy apply and were discussed in depth in Evans v Amicus Healthcare Ltd and later in Evans v United Kingdom. This paper considers whether the Evans litigation envisages the possibility of further encouraging joint autonomy in the use of zygotes and whether there is a continuing right to autonomy by the party not bearing the pregnancy.

  2. Persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Mathew, P M; Young, J M; Abu-Osba, Y K; Mulhern, B D; Hammoudi, S; Hamdan, J A; Sa'di, A R

    1988-03-01

    Over a 3-year period, the diagnosis of persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism (PNH) was made in seven infants, from an unselected cohort of 18,726 births, all of Saudi Arabian origin. Thus the incidence of PNH was one in 2,675 births. The high incidence, associated consanguinity, and occurrence in siblings suggest that PNH may be inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder.

  3. Neonatal antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares Rolim, A M; Castro, M; Santiago, M B

    2006-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a clinical entity characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, adverse obstetric outcome and the presence of antibodies against phospholipids in serum or plasma. The objective of the present study is to describe a rare case of APS that occurred in a neonate born from a patient previously diagnosed as primary APS. A male, preterm born twin infant, whose mother had been diagnosed as primary APS, developed thrombocytopenia, livedo reticularis, pericardial effusion and thrombosis of the left subclavian and external jugular veins concomitantly with severe respiratory tract infection soon after his delivery, that culminated with his death two months after the birth, in spite of the large spectrum antibiotic therapy and all supportive measures. Laboratory findings included high titers of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies and moderate titers of IgG isotype and negative antinuclear antibody, configuring a case of neonatal APS. Neonatal APS is a rare clinical condition, with only a few cases described in the literature. Its occurrence may depend on the passage of antibodies through the placenta or, as it seems to have occurred in the present case, by the production of de novo antibodies by the fetus. The present case illustrates the necessity of a higher surveillance of the neonates born from mothers with primary APS or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for the eventual development of such complication. PMID:16761506

  4. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  5. How to manage neonatal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di Comite, A; Esposito, S; Villani, A; Stronati, M

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the recommendations for managing neonatal tuberculosis (TB) drawn up by a group of Italian scientific societies. The Consensus Conference method was used, and relevant publications in English were identified through a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Group experts concluded that if suspicion is aroused, it is necessary to undertake promptly all of the investigations useful for identifying the disease not only in the newborn, but also in the mother and family contacts because a diagnosis of TB in the family nucleus can guide its diagnosis and treatment in the newborn. If the suspicion is confirmed, empirical treatment should be started. Breast-fed newborns being treated with isoniazid should be given pyridoxine supplementation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Mothers with active-phase TB can breast-feed once they have become smear negative after having received appropriate treatment.

  6. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  7. Ebstein's anomaly in neonates.

    PubMed

    Moura, C; Guimarães, H; Areias, J C; Moreira, J

    2001-09-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease abnormality in which the tricuspid valve leaflets do not attach normally to the tricuspid valve annulus. The effective tricuspid valve orifice is displaced apically into the right ventricle (RV), near the junction of the inlet and the trabecular parts of the RV. The authors present a retrospective study of the patients with Ebstein's anomaly admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, in the period between January 1993 and March 2000. There were ten patients, representing 0.24% of total neonates and 1.99% of total congenital heart disease admitted to the institution in the same period. Fifty per cent were male and only one case had prenatal diagnosis. Holosystolic murmur (100%) from tricuspid regurgitation and cyanosis (80%) were the most frequent clinical findings. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 90% of the neonates, with a "balloon-shaped" enlarged heart. The main electrocardiographic findings were right atrial enlargement (70%) and arrhythmias (40%). Apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve, to a maximum of 20 mm, and leaflets tethering to underlying RV myocardium were found in all patients. Tricuspid valve regurgitation was found in 90% (severe form in four cases). An atrial intracardiac shunt, mostly right-to-left, was also found in 50%. Digoxin was used (40%) to restore sinus rhythm. Fifty per cent of the neonates received intravenous prostaglandins. Two patients required a surgical procedure. Two patients died in the neonatal period. During the follow-up period (range 0.3-74.6 months), only one episode of supraventricular tachycardia was recorded. At present seven patients are clinically stable, three of them on medication.

  8. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  9. What neonatal intensive care nurses need to know about neonatal palliative care.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize topics for a professional development program in neonatal palliative care. A total of 276 nurses and midwives who work in an Australian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 26 international healthcare professionals working in NICU and palliative care served as participants. A Delphi technique was used, consisting of a series of rounds of data collection via interview and questionnaire, to identify and consolidate opinions of nurses and other healthcare professionals who work in neonatal intensive care units. The main outcome measures were: (1) Topics to be included in a professional development program for nurses working in neonatal intensive care units and (2) the preferred format of the program. Twenty-three high-priority topics were identified, which included preparing families when death is imminent, how to provide emotional support to grieving parents, advocating for a dying baby, and assessing and managing pain in a dying baby. Care of a dying infant requires the same skill set as caring for older terminally ill children internationally. A combination of face-to-face lectures and interactive workshops using case studies and audiovisual examples is the preferred format.

  10. The development of a neonatal communication intervention tool.

    PubMed

    Strasheim, Esedra; Kritzinger, Alta; Louw, Brenda

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal communication intervention is important in South Africa, which has an increased prevalence of infants born with risks for disabilities and where the majority of infants live in poverty. Local literature showed a dearth of information on the current service delivery and roles of speech-language therapists (SLTs) and audiologists in neonatal nurseries in the South African context. SLTs have the opportunity to provide the earliest intervention, provided that intervention is well-timed in the neonatal nursery context. The aim of the research was to compile a locally relevant neonatal communication intervention instrument/tool for use by SLTs in neonatal nurseries of public hospitals. The study entailed descriptive, exploratory research. During phase 1, a survey was received from 39 SLTs and 2 audiologists in six provinces. The data revealed that participants performed different roles in neonatal nurseries, which depended on the environment, tools, materials and instrumentation available to them. Many participants were inexperienced, but resourceful in their attempts to adapt tools/materials. Participants expressed needs for culturally appropriate and user-friendly instruments for parent guidance and staff/team training on the topic of developmental care. During phase 2, a tool for parent guidance titled Neonatal communication intervention programme for parents was compiled in English and isiZulu. The programme was piloted by three participants. Suggestions for enhancements of the programme were made, such as providing a glossary of terms, adapting the programme's language and terminology, and providing more illustrations. SLTs and audiologists must contribute to neonatal care of high-risk infants to facilitate development and to support families.

  11. On the behavior of Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations for transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Vojvodic, A; Calle-Vallejo, F; Guo, W; Wang, S; Toftelund, A; Studt, F; Martínez, J I; Shen, J; Man, I C; Rossmeisl, J; Bligaard, T; Noørskov, J K; Abild-Pedersen, F

    2011-06-28

    Versatile Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site, and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP relation is strongly coupled to the adsorbate geometry in the transition state. If it is final state-like the dissociative chemisorption energy can be considered as a descriptor for the dissociation. If it is initial state-like, on the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption energy is not suitable as descriptor for the dissociation. Dissociation of molecules with strong intramolecular bonds belong to the former and molecules with weak intramolecular bonds to the latter group. We show, for the prototype system La-perovskites, that there is a "cyclic" behavior in the transition state characteristics upon change of the active transition metal of the oxide. PMID:21721645

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VFTS. B-type stars classification and RV (Evans+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Kennedy, M. B.; Dufton, P. L.; Howarth, I. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Markova, N.; Clark, J. S.; de Mink, S. E.; de Koter, A.; Dunstall, P. R.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; McEvoy, C. M.; Sana, H.; Simon-Diaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-03-01

    All of the VFTS data discussed here were obtained using the Medusa-Giraffe mode of the Fibre Large Array Multi-Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The Medusa fibres (which subtend 1.2" on the sky) were used to relay light from up to 130 targets simultaneously to the Giraffe spectrograph (see Pasquini et al., 2002Msngr.110....1P). Full details of the observational strategy and reduction of the data are given in Paper I (Evans et al., 2011A&A...530A.108E). In brief, the ESO Common Pipeline Library FLAMES recipes were used to undertake bias subtraction, fibre location, summed extractions of each object, division by a normalised flat-field, and wavelength calibration. Subsequent processing included correction of the spectra to the heliocentric frame, sky subtraction, and rejection of significant cosmic rays. (5 data files).

  13. Separation of Evans and Hiro currents in VDE of tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Svidzinski, V. A.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2014-10-01

    Progress on the Disruption Simulation Code (DSC-3D) development and benchmarking will be presented. The DSC-3D is one-fluid nonlinear time-dependent MHD code, which utilizes fully 3D toroidal geometry for the first wall, pure vacuum and plasma itself, with adaptation to the moving plasma boundary and accurate resolution of the plasma surface current. Suppression of fast magnetosonic scale by the plasma inertia neglecting will be demonstrated. Due to code adaptive nature, self-consistent plasma surface current modeling during non-linear dynamics of the Vertical Displacement Event (VDE) is accurately provided. Separation of the plasma surface current on Evans and Hiro currents during simulation of fully developed VDE, then the plasma touches in-vessel tiles, will be discussed. Work is supported by the US DOE SBIR Grant # DE-SC0004487.

  14. On the behavior of Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi Relations for Transition Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2011-08-22

    Versatile Broensted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found from density functional theory for a wide range of transition metal oxides including rutiles and perovskites. For oxides, the relation depends on the type of oxide, the active site and the dissociating molecule. The slope of the BEP relation is strongly coupled to the adsorbate geometry in the transition state. If it is final state-like the dissociative chemisorption energy can be considered as a descriptor for the dissociation. If it is initial state-like, on the other hand, the dissociative chemisorption energy is not suitable as descriptor for the dissociation. Dissociation of molecules with strong intramolecular bonds belong to the former and molecules with weak intramolecular bonds to the latter group. We show, for the prototype system La-perovskites, that there is a 'cyclic' behavior in the transition state characteristics upon change of the active transition metal of the oxide.

  15. The influence of radioactive decay on actinide magnetic susceptibility measurements obtained using the Evans method.

    PubMed

    Autillo, Matthieu; Kaden, Peter; Geist, Andreas; Guerin, Laetitia; Moisy, Philippe; Berthon, Claude

    2014-05-14

    In order to explain the higher magnetic susceptibility of some aquo actinide ions than predicted by Hund's rules, the molar magnetic susceptibilities of two americium isotopes ((241)Am and (243)Am) were measured using the Evans method. The results obtained show a growing change in the magnetic susceptibility with α and also a β(-) activity increase in solution. β(-) particle effects appear to be stronger than radicals formed by α particles on the experimental values. The temperature dependence of Am(iii) magnetic susceptibility has been observed but from experiments carried out here, it appears to be difficult to prove whether this effect arises from radicals or β(-). Finally, magnetic susceptibilities of americium recorded in different media (HClO4, HCl, and HNO3) have been compared to alpha and beta emissions' impact.

  16. Measurement of vascular permeability in spinal cord using Evans Blue spectrophotometry and correction for turbidity.

    PubMed

    Warnick, R E; Fike, J R; Chan, P H; Anderson, D K; Ross, G Y; Gutin, P H

    1995-05-01

    Vascular permeability can be visualized by Evans Blue (EB) extravasation and quantified by spectrophotometry after formamide extraction of the tissue. However, formamide extracts show significant turbidity, which may contribute to the total optical density at the wavelength of measurement (e.g., 620 lambda). We developed a simple method for estimating the component of the total optical density of a dyed specimen contributed by turbidity. Our method, which uses a determination of turbidity made at another point of the light spectrum (740 lambda), was more precise than two other EB quantification techniques. We therefore recommend it for individual correction of formamide extracts of spinal cord specimens. The application of this technique to the brain remains to be determined.

  17. Plasma exudation. Correlation between Evans blue dye and radiolabeled albumin in guinea pig airways in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.F.; Boschetto, P.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1989-07-01

    We quantified the tissue exudation and luminal transudation of two plasma markers, Evans blue (EB) dye and ({sup 125}I)-human serum albumin (HSA), into the airways of the anesthetized guinea pig in response to platelet activating factor (PAF). There was a highly significant correlation between the tissue content of EB and ({sup 125}I)-HSA in all airways studied. Significant correlation for transudation of the two markers was limited to high rates of plasma leakage. ({sup 125}I)-HSA was the more sensitive marker for the association between exudation and transudation and the effect of PAF on transudation. EB was the better marker for assessing the relationship between the dose of PAF and plasma exudation.

  18. Development of obesity in the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Mariana; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna; Shbiro, Liat; Marco, Asaf; Hyun, Jayson; Moran, Timothy H.; Bi, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the early factors affecting obesity development in males and females may help to prevent obesity and may lead to the discovery of more effective treatments for those already obese. The Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat model of obesity is characterized by hyperphagia-induced obesity, due to a spontaneous lack of CCK1 receptors. In the present study, we focused on the behavioral and physiological aspects of obesity development from weaning to adulthood. We examined body weight, feeding efficiency, fat pad [brown, retroperitoneal, inguinal and epydidimal (in males)] weight, inguinal adipocyte size and number, leptin and oxytocin levels, body mass index, waist circumference, and females' estrous cycle structure. In the males, central hypothalamic gene expression was also examined. OLETF rats presented overall higher fat and leptin levels, larger adipocytes, and increased waist circumference and BMI from weaning until adulthood, compared with controls. Analysis of developmental patterns of gene expression for hypothalamic neuropeptides revealed peptide-specific patterns that may underlie or be a consequence of the obesity development. Analysis of the developmental trajectories toward obesity within the OLETF strain revealed that OLETF females developed obesity in a more gradual manner than the males, presenting delayed obesity-related “turning points,” with reduced adipocyte size but larger postweaning fat pads and increased adipocyte hyperplasia compared with the males. Intake decrease in estrus vs. proestrus was significantly less in OLETF vs. Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka females. The findings highlight the importance of using different sex-appropriate approaches to increase the efficacy of therapeutic interventions in the treatment and prevention of chronic early-onset obesity. PMID:19793959

  19. ATRAZINE INCREASES DIMETHYLBENZ[A]ANTHRACENE-INDUCED MAMMARY TUMOR INCIDENCE IN LONG EVANS OFFSPRING EXPOSED IN UTERO

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATRAZINE INCREASES DIMETHYLBENZ[A]ANTHRACENE-INDUCED MAMMARY TUMOR INCIDENCE IN LONG EVANS OFFSPRING EXPOSED IN UTERO.

    SE Fenton and CC Davis

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, Durham, NC, USA

    Recently, we found that ATR exposure during ma...

  20. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TOLUENE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT: BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhaled toluene was developed for Long-Evans rats as a component of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for volatile organic compounds. The PBPK model was needed to link airborne toluene exposure to its concentration in b...

  1. Mammary gland development and response to prenatal atrazine exposure in the Sprague Dawley and Long-Evans rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammary gland (MG) tumor development in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats is increased by longterm dietary exposure to the chlorotriazine herbicide atrazine (ATR). ATR is proposed to cause these changes in the adult SD rat by altering hormonally-regulated estrous cyclicity. In Long-Evans...

  2. EXPOSURE PARAMETERS FOR DELAYED PUBERTY AND MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG-EVANS RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Parameters For Delayed Puberty And Mammary Gland Development In Long-Evans Rats Exposed In Utero To Atrazine

    Jennifer L. Rayner1 and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 UNC-Chapel Hill, DESE, Chapel Hill, NC, and 2 RTD, USEPA, NHEERL/ORD, RTP,NC

    Prenatal exposure ...

  3. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS.
    Rolondo R. Enoch2, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1, Christine C. Davis 1, and Suzanne E. Fenton 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, ...

  4. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND IT'S BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS.
    Rolondo R. Enoch2, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1, Christine C. Davis 1, and Suzanne E. Fenton 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, ...

  5. An aerial radiological survey of the Evans Area, US Army Communications-Electronics Command, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, R.J.

    1989-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Evans Area, US Army Communications-Electronics Command, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, during the period November 14--18, 1988. The purposes of the survey were to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the Evans site and surrounding area and to determine if there had been any radiological impact on the area due to past laboratory operations. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark'' exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assay of soil samples obtained at sites outside the survey perimeter. Similar ground-based measurements were also made at several locations on the Evans site and at the bank of the Shark River bordering the Evans Area. No evidence for contamination was identified by either radionuclide assay of soil samples or the aerial survey. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND ITS METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE: EFFECTS FROM GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO A MIXTURE OF ATRAZINE AND IT'S BIOLOGICAL METABOLITES IN MALE LONG EVANS RATS. Suzanne E. Fenton 1, Sara N. Greiner 1, Geri L. Youngblood 1 and Christine C. Davis 1
    1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  7. EXPOSURE PARAMETERS NECESSARY FOR DELAYED PUBERTY AND MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN LONG-EVANS RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure Parameters Necessary For Delayed Puberty And Mammary Gland Development In Long-Evans Rats Exposed In Utero To Atrazine

    Jennifer L. Rayner1, 2, Carmen Wood2, and Suzanne E. Fenton2

    1 Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, School of Public Heal...

  8. [Neonatal hearing screening].

    PubMed

    Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; van Straaten, H L; Ens-Dokkum, M H; Kauffman-de Boer, M A

    2000-03-25

    Approximately 1 to 2 per thousand live-born infants suffer from a serious perceptive hearing loss. Normal hearing from birth is essential for optimal human development (language and speech, social and emotional development, communicative skills and learning). The earlier the hearing loss is diagnosed the better the prognosis for the infant with a hearing impairment. Suitable methods are now available for neonatal hearing screening: automated measurement of auditory brain stem response and measurement of oto-acoustic emissions. Screening must be viewed as only the first step in a program of diagnosis, treatment and habilitation of these children. The ultimate goal of the implementation of neonatal hearing screening is: identification of bilateral hearing losses before the age of 3 months and start of therapy and counselling before the age of 6 months.

  9. [Genetic syndromes recognizable in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a neonatal neurological lesion associated or not with dysmorphism or with a particular phenotype can be caused by a) prenatal infections (Group TORCH) toxic or teratotoxic agents (alcohol, cocain, antiepileptics, inhalants such as toluene, etc.), vascular defects or genetic anomalies; b) perinatal isquemic hypoxic lesions, infectious or metabolic disorders, etc. In this paper we analyze all entities of genetic origin neonatally recognizable by their phenotype which must be included in the differential diagnosis of all children neurologically compromised. In order to simplify the diagnosis, these entities will be divided according to the prevalence of the phenotype present at birth, dividing them into two large groups: 1) Genic alterations which include: Syndromes with characteristic facies and member malformations, Supra growth syndrome, Syndrome with neonatal growth deficit, Neuro-ectodermic syndromes, Syndromes with characteristic facies and ocular compromise, Syndromes with characteristic facies including those that bear MIM number, and 2) Chromosomal alterations (autosomal in number, mosaic, deletion, and sex chromosomes). The detection of these anomalies through phenotype studies involving congenital encephalopathies of genetic origin is of major importance because it will permit the orientation of specific diagnostic studies, the prevention of difficult and expensive maneuvers, and furthermore, it will offer adequate family counseling and control eventual complications.

  10. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  11. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  12. Bed bug outbreak in a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, T; Kumar, A; Saili, A

    2015-10-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in bed bug infestations over the last 10-15 years. A major stigma is placed upon the institutions found to be infested. We report our experience with an outbreak of the tropical bed bug, Cimex hemipterus, in a neonatal unit. The outbreak not only affected the admitted newborns and mothers by causing a wide variety of rashes and inducing sleeplessness, but also impinged upon the health professionals and their families by producing similar symptomology. It is important for healthcare providers to be aware of, and for each healthcare facility to have, bed bug prevention and control policies. PMID:25591490

  13. Humane Neonatal Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Levin, A

    1999-04-01

    The author has worked for many years in experimental departments in the former Soviet health system. Now, with integration into the western health system, many questions are being asked about high-technology neonatal medicine and whether it is sufficiently humane. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) movement is well known all over the world, but unfortunately it is only used for healthy children in maternity hospitals. A paradoxical situation has been created: the routines of maternity wards comply with the BFHI, whereas a neonatal intensive care unit in the same hospital may not meet the requirements of the BFHI. BFHI mainly cover breastfeeding in maternity hospitals. Humane Neonatal Care Initiatives include minimum aggressive therapy, minimum contact between sick newborns and medical staff, and maximum contact with mothers; the number of tests and examinations should be reduced to a minimum. Eleven steps towards the improvement of psychosocial and medical care in units for sick newborns are presented. This article is intended to provoke serious discussion. PMID:10342526

  14. Pasteurella gallinarum neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, K; Sein, P P; Shahnawaz, M; Hoosen, A A

    2002-01-01

    A 4-day-old baby weighing 1.7 kg was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, Pretoria, with a history of apneic attacks. On examination there was an umbilical sepsis and the neonate was septicemic. The baby had been delivered at home and the umbilical cord had been cut by the grandmother using unclean scissors and chimney soot applied to the umbilical stump. On admission, a septic screen was done and antibiotic treatment was started with penicillin and amikacin. The investigations showed that the baby was slightly anemic, with hemoglobin levels of 10.0 g/dL (14.9-23.7 g/dL), and a pure growth of a Gram-negative bacillus was obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid, blood culture and suprapubic aspirate urine specimens. The Gram-negative bacillus was catalase and oxidase positive and it was identified as Pasteurella gallinarum. Antimicrobial profiling showed the organism to be susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin and amikacin. Despite having received antimicrobial agents to which the etiological agent was susceptible, the neonate died within 5 days of admission. The cause of death was postulated to be due to overwhelming sepsis which resulted in septic shock. PMID:11906503

  15. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  16. THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF BROMOCHLOROACETONITRILE IN PREGNANT LONG-EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. Adverse effects of BCAN in an in vivo teratology screen (i.e. neonatal survival assay) gave reason for further investigation into the developmental toxicity o...

  17. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design

    PubMed Central

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. Objective To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. Methods The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Results Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a “bell cord” to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using

  18. Sexually dimorphic effects of neonatal immune system activation with lipopolysaccharide on the behavioural response to a homotypic adult immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Tenk, Christine M; Kavaliers, Martin; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown that acute immune activation during the early postnatal period with the Gram-negative endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alters a variety of physiological and behavioural processes in the adult animal. For example, neonatal LPS exposure affects disease susceptibility later in life, though these effects appear to be modulated by time of exposure, sex, and immune stimulus. The current study examined sex differences in the effect of neonatal LPS treatment on the locomotor activity response to adult LPS administration. Male and female Long-Evans rats were treated systemically with either LPS (50 microg/kg) or saline (0.9%) on postnatal days 3 and 5. Later in adulthood (postnatal day 92), all animals were subjected to an adult LPS challenge and were injected (i.p.) with 200 microg/kg LPS. Two hours after injection, animals were placed in a non-novel open-field and locomotor activity was assessed for 30 min. Body weights were determined both at the time of injection and 24h later to examine LPS-induced weight loss. Adult males treated neonatally with LPS exhibited significantly less horizontal and vertical activity in response to the LPS challenge relative to males treated neonatally with saline. This effect was not observed in females. Thus, the current study provides important evidence of sexual dimorphism in the long-term effects of neonatal LPS exposure on the responses to an adult homotypic immune challenge in rats. These findings have potential clinical significance given that neonatal exposure to pathogens is a fairly common occurrence and Gram-negative bacteria are a common cause of neonatal bacterial infections.

  19. Neonatal Marfan Syndrome: Report of a Case with an Inherited Splicing Mutation outside the Neonatal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Le Gloan, Laurianne; Hauet, Quentin; David, Albert; Hanna, Nadine; Arfeuille, Chloé; Arnaud, Pauline; Boileau, Catherine; Romefort, Bénédicte; Benbrik, Nadir; Gournay, Véronique; Joram, Nicolas; Baron, Olivier; Isidor, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    We report a child and her mother affected by Marfan syndrome. The child presented with a phenotype of neonatal Marfan syndrome, revealed by acute and refractory heart failure, finally leading to death within the first 4 months of life. Her mother had a common clinical presentation. Genetic analysis revealed an inherited FBN1 mutation. This intronic mutation (c.6163+3_6163+6del), undescribed to date, leads to exon 49 skipping, corresponding to in-frame deletion of 42 amino acids (p.Ile2014_Asp2055del). FBN1 next-generation sequencing did not show any argument for mosaicism. Association in the same family of severe neonatal and classical Marfan syndrome illustrates the intrafamilial phenotype variability. PMID:27022329

  20. Empedobacter brevis Meningitis in a Neonate: A Very Rare Case of Neonatal Meningitis and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankur; Soni, Priyanka; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, Basudev

    2016-01-01

    Empedobacter brevis is gram-negative bacilli that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family. It was previously known with name of Flavobacterium breve. The reservoir of these bacteria is soil, plants, water, food, hospital water sources, including incubators, sinks, faucets, tap water, hemodialysis systems, saline solutions, and other pharmaceutical solutions. We report a case of term female newborn, admitted with complaint of respiratory distress developing soon after birth and developed clinical features of sepsis at age of 92 hours of postnatal life. The sepsis screen was positive and blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid showed growth of Empedobacter brevis that was resistant to multiple antibiotics. The neonate was treated with appropriate antibiotics and was discharged successfully. The novelty of the case report is that this is the first case report of neonatal sepsis caused by Empedobacter brevis. PMID:27648334

  1. Empedobacter brevis Meningitis in a Neonate: A Very Rare Case of Neonatal Meningitis and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankur; Soni, Priyanka; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, Basudev

    2016-01-01

    Empedobacter brevis is gram-negative bacilli that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family. It was previously known with name of Flavobacterium breve. The reservoir of these bacteria is soil, plants, water, food, hospital water sources, including incubators, sinks, faucets, tap water, hemodialysis systems, saline solutions, and other pharmaceutical solutions. We report a case of term female newborn, admitted with complaint of respiratory distress developing soon after birth and developed clinical features of sepsis at age of 92 hours of postnatal life. The sepsis screen was positive and blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid showed growth of Empedobacter brevis that was resistant to multiple antibiotics. The neonate was treated with appropriate antibiotics and was discharged successfully. The novelty of the case report is that this is the first case report of neonatal sepsis caused by Empedobacter brevis.

  2. Empedobacter brevis Meningitis in a Neonate: A Very Rare Case of Neonatal Meningitis and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Patel, Ankur; Soni, Priyanka; Sharma, Pradeep; Gupta, Basudev

    2016-01-01

    Empedobacter brevis is gram-negative bacilli that belongs to Flavobacteriaceae family. It was previously known with name of Flavobacterium breve. The reservoir of these bacteria is soil, plants, water, food, hospital water sources, including incubators, sinks, faucets, tap water, hemodialysis systems, saline solutions, and other pharmaceutical solutions. We report a case of term female newborn, admitted with complaint of respiratory distress developing soon after birth and developed clinical features of sepsis at age of 92 hours of postnatal life. The sepsis screen was positive and blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid showed growth of Empedobacter brevis that was resistant to multiple antibiotics. The neonate was treated with appropriate antibiotics and was discharged successfully. The novelty of the case report is that this is the first case report of neonatal sepsis caused by Empedobacter brevis. PMID:27648334

  3. Neonatal haemostasis and the management of neonatal thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Will, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Two detailed reviews of the management of neonatal thrombosis were published in 2012; one was an up-dated version of guidance first issued in 2004 and the other was a comprehensive review. Both of these publications gave very similar advice regarding the practical aspects of the indications, dosage and management of antithrombotic therapy. The authors stated that the evidence supporting most of their recommendations for anti-thrombotic therapy in neonates remained weak and so the therapy for a neonate with a thrombosis has to be based on an individualized assessment of estimated risk versus potential benefit. The aim of this present review is to give the treating physician an outline of the unique physiology of neonatal coagulation and how this affects the monitoring, dosing and even the choice of therapeutic strategy for the management of thrombosis in the neonate.

  4. Socioeconomic differentials and neonatal mortality: racial comparison of California singletons.

    PubMed

    Gould, J B; Davey, B; LeRoy, S

    1989-02-01

    The median family income of the zip code of maternal residence was used to estimate the presence and determine the extent of socioeconomic differentials in the neonatal mortality rates of a cohort of 401,399 white and of 66,577 black Californian singletons born from 1982 to 1983. The neonatal mortality rate in the white infants increased from 3.99 in mothers residing in zip codes with a median family income greater than $25,000 to 12.1 for mothers residing in zip codes with a median family income less than $11,000. With decreasing socioeconomic status there was also a significant increase in the percentage of white infants weighing less than 2,500 g (percentage of low birth weight increased from 3.75 to 8.33) and weighing less than 1,500 g (percentage of very low birth weight increased from 0.56 to 1.46). When the source of the socioeconomic difference in white neonatal mortality was partitioned, 77.4% was due to deterioration in the birth weight distribution and 22.6% to deterioration in the birth weight-specific mortality rates. For the black cohort, the neonatal mortality rate increased from 5.9 in the most, to 9.0 in the least affluent strata. Although decreasing residential median family income was associated with an increase in the percent low birth weight (8.19 v 12.86), the percentage of very low birth weight was not significantly different (1.59 v 2.10). When the source of the differential in black neonatal mortality was partitioned, only 29% was due to deterioration of the birth weight distribution, whereas 71% was secondary to less favorable birth weight-specific mortality rates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Topics for Family Medicine Research in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William E.; Calonge, Ned

    1988-01-01

    Primarily because of improvements in care of the low-birthweight neonate, Canada's neonatal mortality rates have declined significantly over the last 20 years. To make further improvement, research is now focused on the prevention of prematurity. However, benefits from the implementation of such research and the maintenance of the current neonatal mortality rate depend on the availability of obstetric care providers in rural areas. The recent trend among family physicians to drop the practice of obstetrics significantly jeopardizes access to obstetric care for inhabitants of rural areas, and a significant body of literature suggests that such declines in access will be accompanied by an increase in the neonatal death rate. A logical research agenda for rural family physicians would include the forecasting of the effect of the decrease in obstetric care manpower, follwed by the study of factors behind this trend, and the evaluation programs designed to prevent family physicians abandoning obstetric practice. PMID:21253225

  6. Need for neonatal screening program in India: A national priority.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Pradhan, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    In India, out of 342 districts surveyed, 286 have been identified as endemic to iodine deficiency (ID). Research studies conducted in school age children (SAC), Adolescent girls, Pregnant Mothers (PMs) and Neonates have documented poor iodine nutritional status. As observed by total goiter rate of more than 5% and median urinary iodine concentration level of <100 μg/l in SAC and <150 μg/l in PMs as prescribed cutoff of World Health Organization. And higher thyroid stimulating hormone levels among neonates. ID leads to compromised mental development and hence which remain hidden and not visible to family, program managers and administrator. The present review describes the current status of ID in different parts of the country. With a view to strongly recommend the implementation of Neonatal screening program for ID so that the optimal mental development of children can be achieved. PMID:25729682

  7. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units.

  8. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  9. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, Jill P; Clancy, Robert M

    2003-09-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes, although quite rare, provide an excellent opportunity to examine disease from bench to bedside. During the past year numerous publications have reported basic and clinical research. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in more than 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with conduction abnormalities in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with congenital heart block was at or below one in 50. Although the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease, and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors from the scavenging macrophages, and transdifferentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroblast scarring phenotype. Cross-reactivity of anti-52-kD SSA/Ro antibodies with a serotoninergic cardiac receptor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)4, has been suggested but remains unconfirmed. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to grow, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late-onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements that identify first-degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. Reassuringly, most children with neonatal lupus syndromes do not

  10. [Natal and neonatal teeth].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Manuela; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Natal teeth have been defined as teeth which are present at birth, while neonatal teeth erupt during the first 30 days. Their occurrence is rare, the prevalence ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3000 with a higher frequency in the lip and palate clefts and syndroms. In about 85% natal or neonatal teeth are lower central incisors (60% in pairs), rare are upper teeth, molars and multiple teeth. In almost 90% they are part of the deciduous dentition. A lot of possible causes of early eruption are discussed, but only the relation to hereditary factors seems to be evident. An autosomal dominant trait is often described. The appearance of these teeth is dependent on the degree of maturity, but most of the time it is loose, small, discoloured and hypoplastic. Histologically, enamel hypoplasia with normal prism structure is apparent. No significant disturbances of the dentin structures are observed, only cervically dentin becomes atubular with spaces and enclosed cells. A large vascular pulp and failure of root formation are further investigations. Our microhardness measurements showed values from 24.3-32.4 KHN for enamel and 48.3-62.2 KHN for dentin, while normal deciduous teeth have an enamel hardness of 322.0 +/- 17.5 KHN. The thickness of enamel was never more than 280 microm compared to up to 1200 microm in normal teeth. This shows the retarded development of natal and neonatal teeth, because mineralization has not finished at the time of birth. In accordance with developmental age tooth structure and appearence are normal. In consideration of complications as Riga-Fede-disease, feeding problems, possibility of infection and hypermobility most of the time extraction is the treatment of choice, but in the interest of protecting the child this decision should be made carefully. PMID:17051960

  11. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  12. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

  13. Transient neonatal tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Rice, D N; Houston, I B; Lyon, I C; Macarthur, B A; Mullins, P R; Veale, A M; Guthrie, R

    1989-01-01

    Children who had presented with transient neonatal tyrosinaemia (TNT) were compared with a group of unaffected controls at 7-9 years of age. A comprehensive psychometric assessment revealed significant differences between the groups in adaptive behaviour, psycholinguistic abilities, and speed of learning. In nearly all components of the tests used, higher levels of TNT were associated with lower levels of performance. This study demonstrates that TNT, a condition commonly regarded as benign in the short term, has long-term effects which may be detrimental to the child in school.

  14. Predictors of neonatal encephalopathy in full-term infants.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, S. J.; Alessandri, L. M.; Badawi, N.; Burton, P. R.; Pemberton, P. J.; Stanley, F.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Preliminary investigation of the contribution of adverse antepartum and intrapartum factors to neonatal encephalopathy in singleton neonates born full term. DESIGN--Matched case-control study based on incidence density sampling of controls. SETTING--Two major teaching hospitals (one paediatric and one obstetric) and three peripheral maternity hospitals in Perth, Western Australia (population 1.2 million). SUBJECTS--89 cases, all the full term singleton neonates born during an eight month period in 1992 who fulfilled one or more of six criteria during the first week of life (seizures, abnormal conscious state, persistent hypertonia or hypotonia, and feeding or respiratory difficulties of central origin). One full term control infant without neonatal encephalopathy was matched to each case by sex, hospital of delivery, time of day and day of the week of birth, and maternal health insurance status. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratio estimates of relative risk of neonatal encephalopathy associated with antepartum and intrapartum factors. RESULTS--Estimated incidence of moderate or severe encephalopathy in first week of life was 3.75 per 1000 full term live births. Thirteen cases and no controls had evidence suggestive of important intrapartum hypoxia, and in only five of these cases was the neurological condition at birth attributed to events during the intrapartum period. Univariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified significant differences between cases and controls for maternal vaginal bleeding in pregnancy, maternal thyroxine treatment, congenital abnormalities, induction of labour, interval from membrane rupture to delivery, maternal pyrexia in labour, augmentation of labour, abnormal intrapartum cardiotocograms, and meconium in labour. Family history of convulsions also approached significance. CONCLUSIONS--Our preliminary results suggest that intrapartum hypoxia, according to currently used criteria, was not the cause of neonatal

  15. Legal issues in neonatal nursing: considerations for staff nurses and advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Enzman Hagedorn, M I; Gardner, S L

    1999-01-01

    A neonatal nurse is a professional with special training, skill, and knowledge in the care of newborns and their families. The neonatal nurse is accountable to the patient, profession, and employer. Failure of the neonatal nurse to meet these obligations can result in liability in the profession, liability in the employment, a civil suit, or a criminal conviction. Regardless of the health care setting, professional nurses, whether at the bedside or in advanced practice, are morally, ethically, and legally accountable for their nursing judgments and actions. Although most nurses assume they will never be named in a lawsuit, and it is true that few are, their professional actions can be the focus of a suit. An overview of the legal implications found within neonatal nursing practice is presented. Two recent legal cases are presented and discussed to illustrate neonatal nursing and advanced practice liability.

  16. Bleeding issues in neonates and infants - update 2015.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike; Limperger, Verena; Bauer, Alexander; Kowalski, Dorothee; Kenet, Gili

    2015-02-01

    The presentation of a neonate with clinical bleeding symptoms commonly causes considerable anxiety to parents and treating physicians. Since inherited coagulation disorders are rare many children with persistently abnormal coagulation screens will have an underlying bleeding disorder. Apart from emergency cases a family history including a bleeding questionnaire is mandatory asking for the onset and/or severity symptoms of hemorrhage prior to laboratory assessment. The absolute values of reference ranges for coagulation assays in neonates and children vary with analyzer and reagent systems, but confirm the concept of developmental hemostasis, showing that physiologic concentrations of coagulation proteins gradually increase and are lower in premature infants as compared to full-term babies or healthy children. The evaluation should include global screening tests and a full blood cell count to rule out thrombocytopenia. As in adults a prolonged PT in neonates reflects decreased plasma concentrations of vitamin-K-dependent factors, whereas the prolonged PTT stems from decreased plasma levels of contact factors. When initial laboratory test results reveal abnormalities, as compared to age-related values, a stepwise diagnostic approach should be followed. In the bleeding neonate or infant that has no laboratory abnormality, FXIII and alpha2-antiplasmin activity should be assessed, and when primary hemostatic defects are suspected, platelet function should be further evaluated. Treatment options of a bleeding neonate vary according to the underlying medical condition.

  17. Challenging Expertise: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on democracy, public participation and scientific authority: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on scientific authority and public participation.

    PubMed

    Sorgner, Helene

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares Feyerabend's arguments in Science in a Free Society to the controversial theory of expertise proposed by Harry Collins and Robert Evans as a Third Wave of Science Studies. Is the legitimacy of democratic decisions threatened by the unquestioned authority of scientific advice? Or does, on the contrary, science need protection from too much democratic participation in technical decisions? Where Feyerabend's political relativism envisions democratic society as inherently pluralist and demands equal contribution of all traditions and worldviews to public decision-making, Collins and Evans hold a conception of elective modernism, defending the reality and value of technical expertise and arguing that science deserves a privileged status in modern democracies, because scientific values are also democratic values. I will argue that Feyerabend's political relativism provides a valuable framework for the evaluation of Collins' and Evans' theory of expertise. By constructing a dialog between Feyerabend and this more recent approach in Science and Technology Studies, the aim of this article is not only to show where the two positions differ and in what way they might be reconciled, but also how Feyerabend's philosophy provides substantial input to contemporary debate.

  18. Challenging Expertise: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on democracy, public participation and scientific authority: Paul Feyerabend vs. Harry Collins & Robert Evans on scientific authority and public participation.

    PubMed

    Sorgner, Helene

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares Feyerabend's arguments in Science in a Free Society to the controversial theory of expertise proposed by Harry Collins and Robert Evans as a Third Wave of Science Studies. Is the legitimacy of democratic decisions threatened by the unquestioned authority of scientific advice? Or does, on the contrary, science need protection from too much democratic participation in technical decisions? Where Feyerabend's political relativism envisions democratic society as inherently pluralist and demands equal contribution of all traditions and worldviews to public decision-making, Collins and Evans hold a conception of elective modernism, defending the reality and value of technical expertise and arguing that science deserves a privileged status in modern democracies, because scientific values are also democratic values. I will argue that Feyerabend's political relativism provides a valuable framework for the evaluation of Collins' and Evans' theory of expertise. By constructing a dialog between Feyerabend and this more recent approach in Science and Technology Studies, the aim of this article is not only to show where the two positions differ and in what way they might be reconciled, but also how Feyerabend's philosophy provides substantial input to contemporary debate. PMID:27269270

  19. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  20. Neonatal hygroscopic condenser humidifier.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, A; Mebius, C; Palmer, K

    1987-01-01

    A hygroscopic condenser humidifier was developed for neonates on mechanical ventilation and was evaluated by laboratory tests and clinically. Humidification provided by the unit was measured in the 10- to 50-ml tidal-volume range at ambient temperatures of 24 degrees C and 38 degrees C. The effect of a leaking patient connection on device performance was investigated. Leakage rates were measured routinely in a neonatal ICU and surgery to determine the clinical significance. In the entire tidal volume and temperature range, the unit provided an inspiratory water content in excess of 30 g/m3 when the leak fraction (volume leaked/volume delivered at Y-piece) was less than 15%. This was found in three out of four cases. In about one out of ten cases, the leak exceeded 30%, which invariably led to corrective action, such as repositioning or changing the endotracheal tube. However, even at a 30% leak, a water content of about 26 g/m3 was still available for humidifying the inspired gas, which corresponds to normal physiologic conditions found in the trachea for nasal breathing of room air.

  1. The effects of chronic photoperiod shifting on the physiology of female Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Deibel, Scott H; Hong, Nancy S; Himmler, Stephanie M; McDonald, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    As the prevalence of shift work is increasing, it is important to elucidate the impact that shift work has on health. Because of the alternating work schedules present in rotating shift work and working at night, shift workers are in a chronic state of circadian disruption. Animal models of circadian disruption are useful because they offer more experimental control than the largely correlational human shift work studies. The effects of chronic circadian disruption on food preference, glucose tolerance, corticosterone secretion, and performance in a stress-inducing task were investigated in female Long-Evans rats. A 64-day photoperiod shifting paradigm was used to induce circadian disruption. Surprisingly, neither the photoperiod shifted animals, nor the control animals demonstrated a preference for either an unhealthy or healthy diet. Nor was there a difference between the groups in weight gained during photoperiod shifting. However, the photoperiod shifted rats gained significantly more weight than control animals, without eating more food during discriminative fear conditioning to context (DFCTC). Surprisingly, chronic photoperiod shifting appeared to facilitate retention in the DFCTC task. The photoperiod shifted animals also had increased serum glucose values during fasting and after a glucose challenge test. The photoperiod shifted animals only had elevated corticosterone during the final two phases of photoperiod shifting. This study demonstrates that chronic photoperiod shifting elicits weight gain when exposed to a stressful event and impairs glucose tolerance in the same individual. PMID:24631903

  2. The effects of chronic photoperiod shifting on the physiology of female Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Deibel, Scott H; Hong, Nancy S; Himmler, Stephanie M; McDonald, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    As the prevalence of shift work is increasing, it is important to elucidate the impact that shift work has on health. Because of the alternating work schedules present in rotating shift work and working at night, shift workers are in a chronic state of circadian disruption. Animal models of circadian disruption are useful because they offer more experimental control than the largely correlational human shift work studies. The effects of chronic circadian disruption on food preference, glucose tolerance, corticosterone secretion, and performance in a stress-inducing task were investigated in female Long-Evans rats. A 64-day photoperiod shifting paradigm was used to induce circadian disruption. Surprisingly, neither the photoperiod shifted animals, nor the control animals demonstrated a preference for either an unhealthy or healthy diet. Nor was there a difference between the groups in weight gained during photoperiod shifting. However, the photoperiod shifted rats gained significantly more weight than control animals, without eating more food during discriminative fear conditioning to context (DFCTC). Surprisingly, chronic photoperiod shifting appeared to facilitate retention in the DFCTC task. The photoperiod shifted animals also had increased serum glucose values during fasting and after a glucose challenge test. The photoperiod shifted animals only had elevated corticosterone during the final two phases of photoperiod shifting. This study demonstrates that chronic photoperiod shifting elicits weight gain when exposed to a stressful event and impairs glucose tolerance in the same individual.

  3. Developmental Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyls Reduces Amphetamine Behavioral Sensitization in Long-Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Emily; Monaikul, Supida; Kostyniak, Paul J.; Chi, Lai Har; Schantz, Susan L.; Sable, Helen J. K.

    2013-01-01

    PCBs have long been known to affect dopamine (DA) function in the brain. The current study used an amphetamine behavioral sensitization paradigm in rats developmentally exposed to PCBs. Long-Evans rats were given perinatal exposure to 0, 3, or 6 mg/kg/day PCBs and behavioral sensitization to d-amphetamine (AMPH) was assessed in one adult male and female/litter. Non-exposed (control) males showed increasing locomotor activity to repeated injections of 0.5 mg/kg AMPH, typical of behavioral sensitization. PCB-exposed males showed greater activation to the initial acute AMPH injection, but sensitization occurred later and was blunted relative to controls. Sensitization in control females took longer to develop than in the males, but no exposure-related differences were observed. Analysis of whole brain and serum AMPH content following a final IP injection of 0.5 mg/kg revealed no differences among the exposure groups. Overall, these results indicated developmental PCB-exposure can alter the motor-stimulating effects of repeated AMPH injections. Males developmentally exposed to PCBs appeared to be pre-sensitized to AMPH, but quickly showed behavioral tolerance to the same drug dose. Results also revealed the behavioral effect was not due to exposure-induced alterations in AMPH metabolism following PCB exposure. PMID:23623962

  4. Therapeutic effects of sericin on diabetic keratopathy in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2013-12-15

    An Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat provides a useful model for studies to develop corneal wound healing drugs for use in diabetic keratopathy resulting from type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated the effects of sericin on corneal wound healing in OLETF rats. Corneal wounds were prepared by removal of the corneal epithelium and documented using a TRC-50X. Sericin was instilled into the eyes of rats five times a day following corneal abrasion. The plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol and insulin in 38 wk old OLETF rats were significantly higher than in normal control rats (LETO rats), and the rate of corneal wound healing in OLETF rats was slower than in normal rat, probably due to the suppression of cell migration and proliferation caused by high plasma glucose levels. The corneal wounds of OLETF rats instilled with saline showed almost complete healing 72 h after corneal epithelial abrasion. On the other hand, the instillation of sericin has a potent effect in promoting wound healing and wound size reduction in OLETF rats and the wounds showed almost complete healing at 48 h after abrasion. The sericin may be an effective and safe drug to promote corneal wound healing in diabetic keratopathy. PMID:24379918

  5. Working-memory training: effects on delay discounting in male Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Renda, C Renee; Stein, Jeffrey S; Madden, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Delay discounting describes the devaluation of a reward as the delay to the receipt of the reward increases. Because steep delay discounting is robustly correlated with a number of behavioral problems (e.g., substance dependence, gambling) and some evidence suggests steep discounting precedes and predicts drug-taking in humans and rats, this study sought to experimentally reduce rats' delay discounting. Human stimulant-dependent participants given working-memory training reportedly decreased their rates of discounting relative to a sham-training group (Bickel, Yi, Landes, Hill, & Baxter, 2011). To evaluate the cross-species generality of this effect, 38 male Long-Evans rats, matched on pretraining delay-discounting rates, were randomly assigned to receive 140 sessions of working-memory training or sham training (which required no memory of the sample stimulus). Large between-group differences in working memory were observed after training; however, posttraining delay-discounting rates were undifferentiated across groups. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed.

  6. Analysis of Zebrafish Larvae Skeletal Muscle Integrity with Evans Blue Dye

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Ann E.; Dowling, James

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an emerging system for the study of neuromuscular disorders. In the study of neuromuscular diseases, the integrity of the muscle membrane is a critical disease determinant. To date, numerous neuromuscular conditions display degenerating muscle fibers with abnormal membrane integrity; this is most commonly observed in muscular dystrophies. Evans Blue Dye (EBD) is a vital, cell permeable dye that is rapidly taken into degenerating, damaged, or apoptotic cells; in contrast, it is not taken up by cells with an intact membrane. EBD injection is commonly employed to ascertain muscle integrity in mouse models of neuromuscular diseases. However, such EBD experiments require muscle dissection and/or sectioning prior to analysis. In contrast, EBD uptake in zebrafish is visualized in live, intact preparations. Here, we demonstrate a simple and straightforward methodology for performing EBD injections and analysis in live zebrafish. In addition, we demonstrate a co-injection strategy to increase efficacy of EBD analysis. Overall, this video article provides an outline to perform EBD injection and characterization in zebrafish models of neuromuscular disease. PMID:26649573

  7. Structural and functional alterations of spinal cord axons in adult Long Evans Shaker (LES) dysmyelinated rats.

    PubMed

    Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Sinha, Kusum; Velumian, Alexander A; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2005-06-01

    Abnormal formation or loss of myelin is a distinguishing feature of many neurological disorders and contributes to the pathobiology of neurotrauma. In this study we characterize the functional and molecular changes in CNS white matter in Long Evans Shaker (LES) rats. These rats have a spontaneous mutation of the gene encoding myelin basic protein which results in severe dysmyelination of the central nervous system (CNS), providing a unique model for demyelinating/dysmyelinating disorders. To date, the functional and molecular changes in CNS white matter in this model are not well understood. We have used in vivo somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), in vitro compound action potential (CAP) recording in isolated dorsal columns, confocal immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and real-time PCR to examine the electrophysiological, molecular and cellular changes in spinal cord white matter in LES rats. We observed that dysmyelination is associated with dispersed labeling of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 K+ channel subunits, as well as Caspr, a protein normally confined to paranodes, along the LES rat spinal cord axons. Abnormal electrophysiological properties including attenuation of CAP amplitude and conduction velocity, high frequency conduction failure and enhanced sensitivity to K+ channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and dendrotoxin-I were observed in spinal cord axons from LES rats. Our results in LES rats clarify some of the key molecular, cellular and functional consequences of dysmyelination and myelin-axon interactions. Further understanding of these issues in this model could provide critical insights for neurological disorders characterized by demyelination. PMID:15869936

  8. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8+ T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127−CD28−CD57+ phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21− CD11c+ phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias. PMID:25414442

  9. Tempol protects sleep-deprivation induced behavioral deficits in aggressive male Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Asghar, Saman; Salim, Samina

    2016-01-26

    Earlier, we reported that elevated anxiety-like behavior and high aggression in aged retired breeder Long-Evans (L-E) rats was associated with increased plasma corticosterone and elevated oxidative stress levels. In the present study, we examined how this aged aggressive and anxious rat strain responds to acute sleep deprivation (24h) and whether their behaviors can be modulated via antioxidant tempol treatment. Four groups of L-E rats were utilized: naïve control (NC), tempol treated control (T+NC), sleep deprived (SD), tempol treated and sleep deprived (T+SD). Thus, two groups were treated with tempol (1mM in drinking water for 2 weeks) while the other two were not. Two groups were subjected to acute sleep deprivation (24h) using the columns-in-water model while the other two were not. Sleep deprivation induced anxiety-like behavior, led to significant depression-like behavior and short-term memory impairment in SD rats. And, decision-making behavior also was compromised in SD rats. These behavioral and cognitive impairments were prevented with tempol treatment in T+SD rats. Tempol treatment also reduced SD-induced increase in corticosterone and oxidative stress levels in T+SD rats. These results suggest potential involvement of oxidative stress mechanisms in regulation of sleep deprivation induced behavioral and cognitive deficits in male aged-aggressive rats. PMID:26724222

  10. Obesity in the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Rat: Mechanisms and Discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Moran, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the neural systems underlying the controls of energy balance has been greatly advanced by identifying the deficits and underlying mechanisms in rodent obesity models. The current review focuses on the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat obesity model. Since its recognition in the 1990s, significant progress has been made in identifying the causes and consequences of obesity in this model. Fundamental is a deficit in the cholecystokinin (CCK)-1 receptor gene resulting in the absence of CCK-1 receptors in both the gastrointestinal track and the brain. OLETF rats have a deficit in their ability to limit the size of meals and in contrast to CCK-1 receptor knockout mice, do not compensate for this increase in the size of their spontaneous meals, resulting in hyperphagia. Prior to becoming obese and in response to pair feeding, OLETF rats have increased expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the compact region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), and this overexpression contributes to their overall hyperphagia. Study of the OLETF rats has revealed important differences in the organization of the DMH in rats and mice and elucidated previously unappreciated roles for DMH NPY in energy balance and glucose homeostasis. PMID:27512691

  11. Tempol protects sleep-deprivation induced behavioral deficits in aggressive male Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Asghar, Saman; Salim, Samina

    2016-01-26

    Earlier, we reported that elevated anxiety-like behavior and high aggression in aged retired breeder Long-Evans (L-E) rats was associated with increased plasma corticosterone and elevated oxidative stress levels. In the present study, we examined how this aged aggressive and anxious rat strain responds to acute sleep deprivation (24h) and whether their behaviors can be modulated via antioxidant tempol treatment. Four groups of L-E rats were utilized: naïve control (NC), tempol treated control (T+NC), sleep deprived (SD), tempol treated and sleep deprived (T+SD). Thus, two groups were treated with tempol (1mM in drinking water for 2 weeks) while the other two were not. Two groups were subjected to acute sleep deprivation (24h) using the columns-in-water model while the other two were not. Sleep deprivation induced anxiety-like behavior, led to significant depression-like behavior and short-term memory impairment in SD rats. And, decision-making behavior also was compromised in SD rats. These behavioral and cognitive impairments were prevented with tempol treatment in T+SD rats. Tempol treatment also reduced SD-induced increase in corticosterone and oxidative stress levels in T+SD rats. These results suggest potential involvement of oxidative stress mechanisms in regulation of sleep deprivation induced behavioral and cognitive deficits in male aged-aggressive rats.

  12. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day. PMID:26931268

  13. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  14. Outcomes of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in neonates treated with hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Seetha

    2014-03-01

    This article examines the evidence regarding mortality and neurodevelopmental outcomes following hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Data from randomized controlled trials regarding neurodevelopmental outcome at the end point of the major trials, and from 2 of the trials on childhood outcome following hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are presented. The predictors of outcome that can be evaluated in the neonatal period are also reviewed, as this information may assist in the counseling of families. Most trials of hypothermia have been performed in high-resource countries; published studies from the low- and middle-income countries are also reviewed.

  15. Occurrence of both hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans' syndrome) in systemic lupus erythematosus. Relationship to antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Delezé, M; Oria, C V; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1988-04-01

    Ten of 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who had hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans' syndrome) during their course had evidence of antiphospholipid antibodies either because they had a false positive VDRL test (8 patients), a prolonged partial thromboplastin time (5 patients), a lupus anticoagulant (3/4 patients), and/or anticardiolipin antibodies as determined by an ELISA method (7 patients). Antibodies to cardiolipin were found in very high levels (up to 38 standard deviations above the mean of normal controls) and were of both IgG and IgM isotypes. The 2 patients with SLE and Evans' syndrome who did not have evidence of antiphospholipid antibodies were studied at the onset of SLE which occurred with Evans' syndrome. Although cardiolipin is not a constituent of the cell wall of either platelets or erythrocytes, other phospholipids that cross react antigenically with cardiolipin are and can be exposed through cell damage. This could be a mechanism whereby hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia could occur in the same patient with SLE. Whether absorption of the antiphospholipid antibody during the acute episode of hemocytopenia could occur, and thus prevent its detection at such time, remains undetermined.

  16. Spontaneous hepatic copper accumulation in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats with hereditary hepatitis. A model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Togashi, Y; Sato, S; Emoto, T; Kang, J H; Takeichi, N; Kobayashi, H; Kojima, Y; Une, Y; Uchino, J

    1991-05-01

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an inbred strain of a mutant rat isolated from Long-Evans rats, develop hereditary hepatitis. To elucidate the role of copper metabolism in the development of the hepatitis in LEC rats, we examined the copper concentration in the tissues and serum levels of copper and ceruloplasmin. Copper concentration in the liver of LEC rats was over 40 times that of normal Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats, while the serum ceruloplasmin and copper concentrations in LEC rats decreased significantly. The hepatocytes of LEC rats show steatosis in cytoplasm and pleomorphism of mitochondria, resembling the histologic features of the liver in Wilson's disease. These findings suggest that the hereditary hepatitis in LEC rats is closely associated with copper toxicity, and may be dealing with a rat form of Wilson's disease. Thus the LEC rats will provide a unique and useful animal model for clarifying the mechanism and for developing treatment strategies for Wilson's disease and other abnormal copper metabolism in humans.

  17. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  18. Neonatal iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rao, R; Georgieff, M K

    2001-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to iron deficiency. Their total body iron content at birth is low and gets further depleted by clinical practices such as uncompensated phlebotomy losses and exogenous erythropoietin administration during the neonatal period. Early iron deficiency appears to adversely affect cognitive development in human infants. To maintain iron sufficiency and meet the iron demands of catch-up postnatal growth, iron supplementation is prudent in preterm infants. A dose of 2-4 mg/kg/day is recommended for preterm infants who are fed exclusively human milk. A dose of 6 mg/kg/day or more is needed with the use of exogenous erythropoietin or to correct preexisting iron deficiency. However, due to the poor antioxidant capabilities of preterm infants and the potential role of iron in several oxidant-related perinatal disorders, indiscriminate iron supplementation should be avoided.

  19. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  20. Mastitis in a neonatal filly

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca; Lewis, Danyse; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare occurrence in the horse. This report documents a case of mastitis caused by an organism within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae group in a 1-week-old Paint filly. PMID:25565717

  1. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  2. Barrier mechanisms in neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Ingrid; Chip, Sophorn; Vexler, Zinaida S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data continue to reveal that the incidence of perinatal stroke is high, similar to that in the elderly. Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and severe long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, including cerebral palsy. Experimental models of cerebral ischemia in neonatal rodents have shown that the pathophysiology of perinatal brain damage is multifactorial. Cerebral vasculature undergoes substantial structural and functional changes during early postnatal brain development. Thus, the state of the vasculature could affect susceptibility of the neonatal brain to cerebral ischemia. In this review, we discuss some of the most recent findings regarding the neurovascular responses of the immature brain to focal arterial stroke in relation to neuroinflammation. We also discuss a possible role of the neonatal blood-CSF barrier in modulating inflammation and the long-term effects of early neurovascular integrity after neonatal stroke on angiogenesis and neurogenesis. PMID:25426016

  3. "Nice guys finish last": influence of mate choice on reproductive success in Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Winland, C; Bolton, J L; Ford, B; Jampana, S; Tinker, J; Frohardt, R J; Guarraci, F A; Zewail-Foote, M

    2012-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine if male physiology and male reproductive behavior predict reproductive success in Long-Evans rats. Mating behavior was observed in sexually naïve, naturally cycling female rats during behavioral estrous that were given the opportunity to mate with two males simultaneously. DNA analysis of offspring born following these mating encounters was used to identify the paternity of each pup. In order to assess the effect of mate choice during these mating encounters on reproductive success, one male rat in each pair was categorized as the preferred mate if the female spent more time (>50%) with him during the mating test of the present study. Furthermore, each male in the pairs was categorized as "attractive" or "non-attractive" by computing the number of females that preferred each male across many mating tests. Similar to results reported in Lovell et al. (2007), during 76% of these mating tests the same male rat in each pair was preferred by different female rats. Overall attractiveness of individual male rats predicted reproductive success in the present study. Interestingly, "attractive" males sired significantly FEWER pups than "non-attractive" males. Neither behavioral (e.g., latency to first sexual stimulation, number of sexual stimulations) nor physiological measures (e.g., body weight, urinary testosterone levels) of male rats predicted their reproductive success. In conclusion, the present results indicate that certain features of some males are more attractive to females, but attractive males are at a reproductive disadvantage (as measured by the number of pups sired). Although basal urinary testosterone levels did not differ between males that sired the majority of pups in a litter and males that sired few or none of the pups in a litter, aggression and/or other physiological measures of fertility (e.g., penile reflexes) may differ between males that are attractive to females and those that have a reproductive

  4. "Nice guys finish last": influence of mate choice on reproductive success in Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Winland, C; Bolton, J L; Ford, B; Jampana, S; Tinker, J; Frohardt, R J; Guarraci, F A; Zewail-Foote, M

    2012-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine if male physiology and male reproductive behavior predict reproductive success in Long-Evans rats. Mating behavior was observed in sexually naïve, naturally cycling female rats during behavioral estrous that were given the opportunity to mate with two males simultaneously. DNA analysis of offspring born following these mating encounters was used to identify the paternity of each pup. In order to assess the effect of mate choice during these mating encounters on reproductive success, one male rat in each pair was categorized as the preferred mate if the female spent more time (>50%) with him during the mating test of the present study. Furthermore, each male in the pairs was categorized as "attractive" or "non-attractive" by computing the number of females that preferred each male across many mating tests. Similar to results reported in Lovell et al. (2007), during 76% of these mating tests the same male rat in each pair was preferred by different female rats. Overall attractiveness of individual male rats predicted reproductive success in the present study. Interestingly, "attractive" males sired significantly FEWER pups than "non-attractive" males. Neither behavioral (e.g., latency to first sexual stimulation, number of sexual stimulations) nor physiological measures (e.g., body weight, urinary testosterone levels) of male rats predicted their reproductive success. In conclusion, the present results indicate that certain features of some males are more attractive to females, but attractive males are at a reproductive disadvantage (as measured by the number of pups sired). Although basal urinary testosterone levels did not differ between males that sired the majority of pups in a litter and males that sired few or none of the pups in a litter, aggression and/or other physiological measures of fertility (e.g., penile reflexes) may differ between males that are attractive to females and those that have a reproductive

  5. TURAN and EVAN Mediate Pollen Tube Reception in Arabidopsis Synergids through Protein Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Heike; Shimosato-Asano, Hiroko; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tube (PT) reception in flowering plants describes the crosstalk between the male and female gametophytes upon PT arrival at the synergid cells of the ovule. It leads to PT growth arrest, rupture, and sperm cell release, and is thus essential to ensure double fertilization. Here, we describe TURAN (TUN) and EVAN (EVN), two novel members of the PT reception pathway that is mediated by the FERONIA (FER) receptor-like kinase (RLK). Like fer, mutations in these two genes lead to PT overgrowth inside the female gametophyte (FG) without PT rupture. Mapping by next-generation sequencing, cytological analysis of reporter genes, and biochemical assays of glycoproteins in RNAi knockdown mutants revealed both genes to be involved in protein N-glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). TUN encodes a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferase superfamily protein and EVN a dolichol kinase. In addition to their common role during PT reception in the synergids, both genes have distinct functions in the pollen: whereas EVN is essential for pollen development, TUN is required for PT growth and integrity by affecting the stability of the pollen-specific FER homologs ANXUR1 (ANX1) and ANX2. ANX1- and ANX2-YFP reporters are not expressed in tun pollen grains, but ANX1-YFP is degraded via the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, likely underlying the anx1/2-like premature PT rupture phenotype of tun mutants. Thus, as in animal sperm–egg interactions, protein glycosylation is essential for the interaction between the female and male gametophytes during PT reception to ensure fertilization and successful reproduction. PMID:25919390

  6. [Overgrowth and DNA synthesis of neuroepithelium in embryonic stages of induced Long-Evans rat myeloschisis].

    PubMed

    Chono, Y

    1993-01-01

    Overgrowth of the myeloschisis, namely the excessive amount of the neural plate tissue, has been reported in the human myeloschisis. However, it is still debatable how the overgrowth develops and whether the overgrowth is the cause, or the secondary effect of spinal dysraphism. The author induced myeloschisis in the fetuses of Long-Evans rats by the administration of ethylenethiourea (ETU) to pregnant rats on day 10 of gestation. The fetuses were removed 1 hour after the treatment with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to the dams on day 14 and 21. The fetuses were fixed in alcohol and embedded in paraffin. H-E staining and the immunohistologic examination were performed on the staining patterns to anti-neurofilament (NFP), anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and anti-BrdU antibody by ABC method. On day 14, the lateral portion of everted neural plate showed a loose arrangement of cells and there was rosette formation in the mesoderm. On day 21, cell necrosis was observed at the dorsolateral portion of myeloschisis, although the ventral portion showed almost normal cytoarchitecture and was positive to NFP and GFAP. The cause of myeloschisis in this model is supposed to be the local and direct cytotoxic effect of ETU to neuro-ectodermal junction. On day 14, control animals contained few BrdU-incorporated cells at the basal plate of neural tube. In contrast, everted neural plate showed an active uptake of BrdU diffusely in the subependymal matrix layer cells. Overgrowth was not yet identified. On day 21, overgrowth of myeloschisis was found in spite of a few positive cells to BrdU which was identical to the control animals. These findings seem to suggest that cells in the myeloschisis retain their ability of DNA synthesis for longer periods of development and overgrowth found on day 21 is possibly a secondary effect of spinal dysraphism in this model.

  7. Methylphenidate alters flash-evoked potentials, body temperature, and behavior in Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Hetzler, Bruce E; Meckel, Katherine R; Stickle, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    This experiment examined the effects of methylphenidate hydrochloride on flash-evoked potentials (FEPs) recorded from the visual cortex (VC) and superior colliculus (SC) of chronically implanted male Long-Evans rats, as well as on body temperature and open field behavior. FEPs were recorded at 10, 20 and 40 min following intraperitoneal injections of saline, and of doses of 0.7, 2.9, and 11.6 mg/kg methylphenidate on separate days. The 0.7 mg/kg dose did not produce significant effects. In the VC, following administration of the 11.6 mg/kg dose of methylphenidate the amplitude of components P83, N146, and P232 decreased, the amplitude of component N64 briefly increased and components P23, N30, N40, and P48 were unchanged in amplitude. In the SC, component P29 was unaffected, while components P38 and N51 were reduced in amplitude by the 11.6 mg/kg dose of methylphenidate. Peak latencies of components N40, P48, P83, and N146 in the VC and component P38 in the SC were increased by the 11.6 mg/kg dose of methylphenidate. When body temperature was recorded 45 min after drug administration, a mild dose-dependent hypothermia was found with the 2.9 and 11.6 mg/kg methylphenidate doses, suggesting that this may have contributed to the increased latencies. In subsequent open field observations, both line crossings and rearings were significantly increased by the 11.6 mg/kg dose. Increased movement into the center of the testing area was also observed, which could be a sign of increased exploration and reduced anxiety following methylphenidate.

  8. Metallothionein and antioxidant enzymes in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats treated with zinc.

    PubMed

    Medici, Valentina; Santon, Alessandro; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; D'Incà, Renata; Giannetto, Sabrina; Albergoni, Vincenzo; Irato, Paola

    2002-09-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat is a mutant animal model for Wilson's disease. It is known that an abnormal accumulation of Cu and Fe in the liver and low concentrations of both ceruloplasmin and Cu in the serum occur in these rats. The accumulation of Cu is explained by the defective expression of the Cu-transporting P-type ATPase gene, homologous to the gene for Wilson's disease (ATP7B). The aim of this work was to clarify the action mechanism of Zn, and to verify the role that this metal plays in LEC rats in short-term treatment experiments (1 and 2 weeks) on concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, metallothionein (MT), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (oh(8)dG) and on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. It is well known that Zn induces MT and has the ability to prevent redox-active metals, Cu and Fe, binding to and causing oxidative damage at active sites of Zn metalloenzymes and nonspecific binding sites on proteins. Zn administration reduces Cu and Fe transport from mucosal to serosal intestinal sides through competitive mechanisms. Our findings show that treatment with zinc acetate increases tissue Zn and MT contents and decreases Cu and Fe concentrations in the liver and kidneys, even if hepatic Zn and MT concentrations decrease with treatment period. Induction of MT synthesis by Zn contributes to the reduction in free radicals produced by Cu and Fe. We also observed that the superoxide dismutase (SOD)activity in liver decreases with treatment duration in association with the Cu and Fe liver decrease. However, the SOD activity in kidney increases in untreated rats at 2 weeks relative to those untreated for 1 week.

  9. Evans Blue as a Simple Method to Discriminate Mosquitoes’ Feeding Choice on Small Laboratory Animals

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Ceres; Fujita, André; Gueroni, Daniele I.; Ramos, Anderson D.; Capurro, Margareth L.; Sá-Nunes, Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature, humidity, vision, and particularly odor, are external cues that play essential roles to mosquito blood feeding and oviposition. Entomological and behavioral studies employ well-established methods to evaluate mosquito attraction or repellency and to identify the source of the blood meal. Despite the efficacy of such methods, the costs involved in the production or acquisition of all parts, components and the chemical reagents involved are unaffordable for most researchers from poor countries. Thus, a simple and relatively low-cost method capable of evaluating mosquito preferences and the blood volume ingested is desirable. Principal Findings By using Evans blue (EB) vital dye and few standard laboratory supplies, we developed and validated a system capable of evaluating mosquito’s choice between two different host sources of blood. EB-injected and PBS-injected mice submitted to a number of situations were placed side by side on the top of a rounded recipient covered with tulle fabric and containing Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Homogenates from engorged mosquitoes clearly revealed the blood source (EB- or PBS-injected host), either visually or spectrometrically. This method was able to estimate the number of engorded mosquitoes, the volume of blood ingested, the efficacy of a commercial repellent and the attractant effects of black color and human sweat. Significance Despite the obvious limitations due to its simplicity and to the dependence of a live source of blood, the present method can be used to assess a number of host variables (diet, aging, immunity, etc) and optimized for several aspects of mosquito blood feeding and vector-host interactions. Thus, it is proposed as an alternative to field studies, and it could be used for initial screenings of chemical compound candidates for repellents or attractants, since it replicates natural conditions of exposure to mosquitoes in a laboratory environment. PMID:25333369

  10. Neonatal Bisphenol A exposure alters sexually dimorphic gene expression in the postnatal rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinyan; Mickens, Jillian A; McCaffrey, Katherine A; Leyrer, Stephanie M; Patisaul, Heather B

    2012-01-01

    Developmental exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), a component of polycarbonate and epoxy resins, has been purported to adversely impact reproductive function in female rodents. Because neonatal life is a critical window for the sexual dimorphic organization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, interference with this process could underlie compromised adult reproductive physiology. The goal of the present study was to determine if neonatal BPA exposure interferes with sex specific gene expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), ER beta (ERβ) and kisspeptin (Kiss1) in the anterior and mediobasal hypothalamus. Long Evans (LE) neonatal rats were exposed to vehicle, 10μg estradiol benzoate (EB), 50mg/kg BPA or 50μg/kg BPA by subcutaneous injection daily from postnatal day 0 (PND 0) to PND 2. Gene expression was assessed by in situ hybridization on PNDs 4 and 10. Within the anterior hypothalamus ERα expression was augmented by BPA in PND 4 females, then fell to male-typical levels by PND 10. ERβ expression was not altered by BPA on PND 4, but significantly decreased or eliminated in both sexes by PND 10. Kiss1 expression was diminished by BPA in the anterior hypothalamus, especially in females. There were no significant impacts of BPA in the mediobasal hypothalamus. Collectively, BPA effects did not mirror those of EB. The results show that neonatal hypothalamic ER and Kiss1 expression is sensitive to BPA exposure. This disruption may alter sexually dimorphic hypothalamic organization and underlie adult reproductive deficiencies. Additionally, the discordant effects of EB and BPA indicate that BPA likely disrupts hypothalamic organization by a mechanism other than simply acting as an estrogen mimic.

  11. A case of neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Malecki, J M

    1991-03-01

    The morbidity and mortality from neonatal tetanus are preventable. It is largely a disease of developing countries. This single case of neonatal tetanus in southern Florida must serve as an indicator for the need for health care professionals to evaluate the degree of utilization of maternal health services and the impact of immunization programs for those women at risk, in this case, women who have migrated from developing countries. PMID:2000534

  12. Management of neonatal jaundice varies by practitioner type

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Patrocinio C.; Lee, Kyong-Soon; Barozzino, Matthew; Sgro, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To survey current practices among different types of medical practitioners in Ontario to assess if national guidelines for screening and management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were being followed. Design An anonymized, cross-sectional survey distributed by mail and e-mail. Setting Ontario. Participants From each group (general practitioners, family medicine practitioners, and pediatricians), 500 participants were randomly selected, and all 390 registered midwives were selected. Main outcome measures Compliance with national guidelines for screening, postdischarge follow-up, and management of newborns with hyperbilirubinemia. Results Of the 1890 potential respondents, 321 (17%) completed the survey. Only 41% of family physicians reported using national guidelines, compared with 75% and 69% of pediatricians and midwives, respectively (P < .001). Bilirubin was routinely measured for all newborns before discharge by 42% of family physicians, 63% of pediatricians, and 22% of midwives (P < .001). Newborn follow-up was completed within 72 hours after discharge by 60% of family physicians, 89% of pediatricians, and 100% of midwives. Management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia differed significantly (P < .001), with 91% of family physicians, 99% of pediatricians, and 79% of midwives correctly managing a case scenario according to the guidelines. Conclusion The management of jaundice varied considerably among the different practitioner types, with pediatricians both most aware of the guidelines and most likely to follow them. Increased knowledge translation efforts are required to promote adherence to the jaundice management guidelines across all practitioner types, but particularly among family physicians. PMID:23946045

  13. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  14. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults.

    PubMed

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates' qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  15. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children

    PubMed Central

    JEICAN, IONUŢ ISAIA; ICHIM, GABRIELA; GHEBAN, DAN

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison’s disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  16. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis. PMID:27547054

  17. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems.

  18. Neonatal infrared axillary thermometry.

    PubMed

    Seguin, J; Terry, K

    1999-01-01

    The authors compared axillary skin temperatures (AT) measured with an infrared (IR) thermometer (Lightouch Neonate, Exergen Corp) with rectal temperatures (RT) in 16 newly born term infants under radiant warmers (RW) and in cribs. Twelve stable, growing premature infants in incubators were also studied. This new device may be useful because of safety and rapid results (1 second), but clinical accuracy is unknown. For term infants, mean (SD) RT-AT difference was 0.1 (0.48) degree C under RW and 0.25 (0.17) degree C 2 hours later in cribs. For premature infants in incubators the mean RT-AT difference was 0.09 (0.16) degree C. Axillary temperatures measured by IR thermometer approximate RT for newly born term infants in cribs and stable premature infants in incubators. For newly born term infants under RW, RT-AT differences vary more widely, limiting clinical usefulness in this setting. The device, the unique age of this population, and the RW environment may play a role. PMID:9924640

  19. A new neurological focus in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Peloquin, Susan; Ferriero, Donna M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the care of high-risk newborn babies have contributed to reduced mortality rates for premature and term births, but the surviving neonates often have increased neurological morbidity. Therapies aimed at reducing the neurological sequelae of birth asphyxia at term have brought hypothermia treatment into the realm of standard care. However, this therapy does not provide complete protection from neurological complications and a need to develop adjunctive therapies for improved neurological outcomes remains. In addition, the care of neurologically impaired neonates, regardless of their gestational age, clearly requires a focused approach to avoid further injury to the brain and to optimize the neurodevelopmental status of the newborn baby at discharge from hospital. This focused approach includes, but is not limited to, monitoring of the patient's brain with amplitude-integrated and continuous video EEG, prevention of infection, developmentally appropriate care, and family support. Provision of dedicated neurocritical care to newborn babies requires a collaborative effort between neonatologists and neurologists, training in neonatal neurology for nurses and future generations of care providers, and the recognition that common neonatal medical problems and intensive care have an effect on the developing brain. PMID:21808297

  20. Elevated free thyroxine levels detected by a neonatal screening system.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Toshihiro; Jo, Wakako; Fujikura, Kaori; Fukushi, Masaru; Fujieda, Kenji

    2009-09-01

    In Sapporo city of Japan, neonatal screening for congenital hypothyroidism has used the measurement of free thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the filter-paper blood spot. This system has enabled us to identify hyperthyroxinemic diseases. Filter papers were collected from neonatal infants born at 4-6 d of age and neonates who showed elevated free T4 (>4.0 ng/dL, 4 SD above the mean) were studied. Between January 2000 and December 2006, 83,232 newborns were screened. Eleven infants demonstrated persistent hyperthyroxinemia. One patient with slightly elevated free T4 and normal TSH was diagnosed as having familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH). The other two patients with elevated free T4 without suppressed TSH were considered as having resistance of thyroid hormone (RTH), and analysis of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta gene confirmed the diagnosis. The remaining eight patients were diagnosed as having neonatal Graves' disease (NGD). Seven of eight pregnant women were treated with antithyroid drug and thus only one unrecognized NGD during pregnancy was detected by screening. Our screening system enables for early awareness of RTH and FDH. Regarding Graves' disease, the benefit of elevated free T4 screening is small, because most pregnant women with Graves' disease were managed.

  1. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case–control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0–252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years

  2. Oxygen consumption and distribution in the Long-Evans rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jennifer C.M.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxygen distribution and consumption in the pigmented Long-Evans rat retina in vivo during dark and light adaptation, and to compare these results to previous work on cat and albino rat. Double-barreled microelectrodes recorded both intraretinal PO2 depth profiles and the electroretinogram (ERG), which was used to identify the boundaries of the retina. Light adaptation decreased photoreceptor oxygen consumption per unit volume (Qav) from 3.0±0.4 ml•100 g−1•min−1 (mean ± SEM) in darkness to 1.8±0.2 ml•100 g−1•min−1 and increased minimum outer retinal PO2 at the inner segments (Pmin) from 17.4±3.0 to 29.9±5.3 mmHg. The effects of light on outer retinal PO2 and Qav were similar to those previously observed in cat, monkey, and albino rats; however, dark-adapted Pmin was higher in rat than cat. The parameters derived from fitting the oxygen diffusion model to the rat data were compared to those from cat. Oxygen consumption of the inner segments (Q2) and choroidal PO2 (PC) in rat and cat were similar. Pmin was higher in rat than in cat for two reasons: first, rat photoreceptors have a shorter oxygen consuming region; and second, the retinal circulation supplied a greater fraction of consumed oxygen to rat photoreceptors. The average PO2 across the inner retina (PIR) was not different in dark adaptation (25.4±4.8 mm Hg) and light adaptation (28.8±5.4 mmHg) when measured from PO2 profiles. However, with the microelectrode stationary at 9–18% retinal depth, a small consistent decrease in PO2 occurred during illumination. Flickering light at 6 Hz decreased inner retinal PO2 significantly more than an equivalent steady illumination, suggesting that changes in blood flow did not completely compensate for increased metabolism. This study comprehensively characterized rat retinal oxygenation in both light and dark, and determined the similarities and differences between rat and cat retinas. PMID:22828049

  3. Dietary copper triggers onset of fulminant hepatitis in the Long-Evans cinnamon rat model

    PubMed Central

    Siaj, Ramsi; Sauer, Vanessa; Stöppeler, Sandra; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Köhler, Gabriele; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut HJ

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of dietary copper given at different time points on the onset of fulminant hepatitis. METHODS: The Long-Evans cinnamon (LEC) rat model of Wilson’s disease (WD) was used to study the impact of high dietary copper (hCu) on the induction of fulminant hepatitis at early or late time points of life. High Cu diet was started in rat pups or in adults (month 5) for three months. Animals that received reduced dietary copper (rCu) throughout their lifetime served as a control. Hepatitis-associated serum markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin) were analyzed in animal groups receiving hCu or rCu. Liver copper content and liver histology were revealed at sacrifice. A set of 5 marker genes previously found to be affected in injured liver and which are related to angiogenesis (Vegfa), fat metabolism (Srebf1), extracellular matrix (Timp1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), and the cell cycle (Cdkn1a) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Regardless of the time point when hCu was started, LEC rats (35/36) developed fulminant hepatitis and died. Animals receiving rCu (36/36) remained healthy, did not develop hepatitis, and survived long term without symptoms of overt disease, although liver copper accumulated in adult animals (477 ± 75 μg/g). With regard to start of hCu, onset of fulminant hepatitis was significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in adults (35 ± 9 d) that showed pre-accumulation of liver copper as compared to the pup group (77 ± 15 d). Hepatitis-associated serum markers, liver copper and liver histology, as well as gene expression, were affected in LEC rats receiving hCu. However, except for early and rapid onset of hepatitis, biochemical and molecular markers were similar at the early and late time points of disease. CONCLUSION: Rapid onset of fulminant hepatitis in asymptomatic LEC rats with elevated liver copper suggests that there is a critical threshold of liver copper which is important

  4. Evans Syndrome in Children: Long-Term Outcome in a Prospective French National Observational Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Aladjidi, Nathalie; Fernandes, Helder; Leblanc, Thierry; Vareliette, Amélie; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Bertrand, Yves; Chambost, Hervé; Pasquet, Marlène; Mazingue, Françoise; Guitton, Corinne; Pellier, Isabelle; Roqueplan-Bellmann, Françoise; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Thomas, Caroline; Marie-Cardine, Aude; Lejars, Odile; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bayart, Sophie; Lutz, Patrick; Piguet, Christophe; Jeziorski, Eric; Rohrlich, Pierre; Lemoine, Philippe; Bodet, Damien; Paillard, Catherine; Couillault, Gérard; Millot, Frédéric; Fischer, Alain; Pérel, Yves; Leverger, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Evans syndrome (ES) is a rare autoimmune disorder whose long-term outcome is not well known. In France, a collaborative pediatric network set up via the National Rare Disease Plan now provides comprehensive clinical data in children with this disease. Patients aged less than 18 years at the initial presentation of autoimmune cytopenia have been prospectively included into a national observational cohort since 2004. The definition of ES was restricted to the simultaneous or sequential association of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Cases were deemed secondary if associated with a primitive immunodeficiency or systemic lupus erythematosus. In December 2014, we analyzed the data pertaining to 156 children from 26 centers with ES whose diagnosis was made between 1981 and 2014. Median age (range) at the onset of cytopenia was 5.4 years (0.2–17.2). In 85 sequential cases, the time lapse between the first episodes of AIHA and ITP was 2.4 years (0.1–16.3). The follow-up period as from ES diagnosis was 6.5 years (0.1–28.8). ES was secondary, revealing another underlying disease, in 10% of cases; various associated immune manifestations (mainly lymphoproliferation, other autoimmune diseases, and hypogammaglobulinemia) were observed in 60% of cases; and ES remained primary in 30% of cases. Five-year ITP and AIHA relapse-free survival were 25 and 61%, respectively. Overall, 69% of children required one or more second-line immune treatments, and 15 patients (10%) died at the age of 14.3 years (1.7–28.1). To our knowledge, this is the first consistent long-term clinical description of this rare syndrome. It underscores the high rate of associated immune manifestations and the burden of long-term complications and treatment toxicity. Future challenges include (1) the identification of the underlying genetic defects inducing immune dysregulation and (2) the need to better characterize patient subgroups and second

  5. [Situational profile and intervention strategy in the Mesoamerican region in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health area].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Prado, Bernardo; Kestler, Edgar; Díaz, Juan; Walker, Dilys; Langer, Ana; Lewis, Sarah; De la Vara-Salazar, Elvia; Melo-Zurita, María del Carmen; Iriarte, Emma; Danel, Isabella; Donnay, France; Alemán, Denis; Serrano, Roselyn; Morales, Evelyn; Largaespada, Natalia; González, José Douglas Jarquín; Hernández, Ma Del Carmen; Mejía, Claudia E Quiroz; González, Geneva; Carrera, Yadira; Valverde, Clelia; Luna, Rufino; Valencia-Mendoza, Atanacio; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G; Hernández-Prado, Bernardo; Kestler, Edgar; Díaz, Juan; Walker, Dilys; Langer, Ana; Lewis, Sarah; De la Vara-Salazar, Elvia; Melo-Zurita, María Del Carmen

    2011-01-01

    To present the main results of the regional situation diagnosis and intervention plan developed in 2010 as part of the planning activities of the Mesoamerican Health System by the Working Group on Maternal, Reproductive and Neonatal Health. A group of experts and representatives from countries in the region (Central America and nine southern Mexican states) conducted an exhaustive review of available data to construct a situational analysis and a review of effective practices for improving maternal, reproductive and neonatal health. Finally, the group proposed a regional action plan, defining regional goals and specific interventions. The situational diagnosis suggests that, although there has been progress in the last 10 years, maternal and neonatal mortality rates are still unnaceptably high in the region, with a substantial variability across countries. The group proposed as a regional goal the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality in accordance with the Millenium Development Goals. The regional plan recommends specific maternal and neonatal health interventions emphasizing obstetric and neonatal emergency care, skilled birth attendance and family planning. The plan also includes a five year implementation strategy, along with training and evaluation strategies. The regional plan for maternal, neonatal and reproductive health has the potential to be successful, provided it is effectively implemented.

  6. Changes in plasma glucose in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats after oral administration of maple syrup.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Tanabe, Wataru; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether maple syrup is a suitable sweetener in the management of type 2 diabetes using the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat. The enhancement in plasma glucose (PG) and glucose absorption in the small intestine were lower after the oral administration of maple syrup than after sucrose administration in OLETF rats, and no significant differences were observed in insulin levels. These data suggested that maple syrup might inhibit the absorption of glucose from the small intestine and preventing the enhancement of PG in OLETF rats. Therefore, maple syrup might help in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Issues in Neonatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldstein, Arnold, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of articles evolved from papers presented and issues discussed at a workshop entitled "The Health Care/Education Relationship: Services for Infants with Special Needs and Their Families," held in March, 1981, for members of the Handicapped Children's Early Education Program (HCEEP) network. During that workshop, staff from many…

  8. Adverse Prenatal, Perinatal and Neonatal Experiences in Children with Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnco, Carly; Lewin, Adam B; Salloum, Alison; Murphy, Tanya K; Crawford, Erika A; Dane, Brittney F; McBride, Nicole M; Storch, Eric A

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the incidence of adverse prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal experiences amongst children with anxiety disorders, and the relationship to clinical symptomology and functional impairment in treatment-seeking children (N = 107) with a primary anxiety disorder. Anxious children had higher rates of reported maternal prescription medication use during pregnancy, maternal smoking and illness during pregnancy and neonatal complications (including neonatal intensive care and feeding issues) compared with population base rates and non-affected children. Almost one-third had early problems with sleep. Developmental problems were common with more than half having at least one area of delay. More than three quarters of anxious children had a first-degree family member with a psychiatric history. There were several associations between neonatal complications and subsequent clinical symptomology, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depressive comorbidity, anxiety severity and functional impairment. Findings suggest higher rates of perinatal complications in anxious children. PMID:26206734

  9. Adverse Prenatal, Perinatal and Neonatal Experiences in Children with Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnco, Carly; Lewin, Adam B; Salloum, Alison; Murphy, Tanya K; Crawford, Erika A; Dane, Brittney F; McBride, Nicole M; Storch, Eric A

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the incidence of adverse prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal experiences amongst children with anxiety disorders, and the relationship to clinical symptomology and functional impairment in treatment-seeking children (N = 107) with a primary anxiety disorder. Anxious children had higher rates of reported maternal prescription medication use during pregnancy, maternal smoking and illness during pregnancy and neonatal complications (including neonatal intensive care and feeding issues) compared with population base rates and non-affected children. Almost one-third had early problems with sleep. Developmental problems were common with more than half having at least one area of delay. More than three quarters of anxious children had a first-degree family member with a psychiatric history. There were several associations between neonatal complications and subsequent clinical symptomology, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depressive comorbidity, anxiety severity and functional impairment. Findings suggest higher rates of perinatal complications in anxious children.

  10. Acute effects of neonatal dexamethasone treatment on proliferation and astrocyte immunoreactivity in hippocampus and corpus callosum: towards a rescue strategy.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Sanne E F; Belanoff, Joseph K; Kanatsou, Sofia; Lucassen, Paul J; Champagne, Danielle L; de Kloet, E Ronald

    2012-10-30

    Dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, has been used to treat respiratory distress syndrome in prematurely born infants. Despite the important short-term benefit on lung function, there is growing concern about the long-term outcome of this treatment, since follow-up studies of prematurely born infants have shown lasting adverse neurodevelopmental effects. Since the mechanism underlying these neurodevelopmental impairments is largely unknown, the aim of the present study was (i) to investigate the acute effects of neonatal DEX treatment on the developing brain; and (ii) to block specifically the effects of DEX on the brain by central administration of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone. Long Evans rat pups were injected subcutaneously with tapering doses of DEX or saline (SAL) on postnatal days (pnd) 1, 2 and 3. Separate groups received intracerebroventricular injections with mifepristone prior to DEX treatment. On pnd 4 and 10, pups were sacrificed and brains collected for analysis of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and astrogliosis (GFAP). We report that neonatal DEX treatment reduced hippocampal cell proliferation on pnd 4, an effect that was normalized by pnd 10. Although on pnd 4, GFAP expression was not affected, DEX treatment caused a significant reduction in the number and density of astrocytes in hippocampus and corpus callosum on pnd 10, which was normalized by mifepristone pre-treatment. These acute alterations in the neonate brain might underlie later functional impairments reported in DEX-treated animals and humans and further illustrate the impact of early GR activation on brain development.

  11. S-Allyl cysteine improves nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats via regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigekazu; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Kodai, Shintaro; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Tsukioka, Takuma; Okada, Shigeru; Azuma, Hideki; Kubo, Shoji

    2013-09-01

    It is important to prevent and improve diabetes mellitus and its complications in a safe and low-cost manner. S-Allyl cysteine, an aged garlic extract with antioxidant activity, was investigated to determine whether S-allyl cysteine can improve type 2 diabetes in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and age-matched Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats were used and were divided into two groups at 29 weeks of age. S-Allyl cysteine (0.45% diet) was administered to rats for 13 weeks. Rats were killed at 43 weeks of age, and detailed analyses were performed. S-Allyl cysteine improved hemoglobinA1c, blood glucose, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Furthermore, S-allyl cysteine normalized plasma insulin levels. S-Allyl cysteine activated the mRNA and protein expression of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ, as well as inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat liver. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and forkhead box O1 proteins were normalized by S-allyl cysteine in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rat liver. In conclusions, these findings support the hypothesis that S-allyl cysteine has diabetic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapeutic potential as a potent regulating agent against lipogenesis and glucose metabolism. PMID:24062606

  12. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  13. Environmental enrichment attenuates the blood brain barrier dysfunction induced by the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ramiro; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Confortim, Heloísa Deola; Barbosa, Sílvia; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-10-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is considered an efficient neuroprotector against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal HI and environmental stimulation in the hippocampus of rats at 3 different time points (PND 8, 22 and 60), evaluating some aspects of BBB structure and function. Seven-day-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group maintained in a standard environment (CTSE), a control group maintained in an enrichment environment (CTEE), an HI group maintained in a standard environment (HISE) and an HI group maintained in an enrichment environment (HIEE). At the 7th postnatal day (PND), rats were submitted to the Levine-Rice model of neonatal HI. This method consists of permanent occlusion of the right common carotid artery with subsequent exposure to hypoxia. Rats from CTEE and HIEE were stimulated with environmental enrichment. The EE protocol started 24h after HI, in which pup rats with their dams were stimulated in a maintained EE (PND 8-22). Subsequently, animals were submitted to daily EE (1h/day, PND 23-60). The expression of some proteins involved in BBB structure (β-catenin, occludin, connexin-43, aquaporin-4, glut-1 and GFAP) were quantified by western blotting in the hippocampi of rats in three periods, at PND 8, 22 and 60. The BBB permeability and integrity was assessed by Evans blue staining and the immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were also performed. The results showed an HI-induced decreased occludin expression at PND 22 and low levels of occludin, β-catenin and GFAP at PND 60 in the hippocampus of the hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, in young and adult rats, EE reversed these effects. Evans blue extravasation into the brain parenchyma confirmed the BBB dysfunction brought on by HI. No differences were observed at PND 8, probably due to the immaturity of the

  14. Environmental enrichment attenuates the blood brain barrier dysfunction induced by the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ramiro; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Confortim, Heloísa Deola; Barbosa, Sílvia; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-10-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is considered an efficient neuroprotector against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal HI and environmental stimulation in the hippocampus of rats at 3 different time points (PND 8, 22 and 60), evaluating some aspects of BBB structure and function. Seven-day-old Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group maintained in a standard environment (CTSE), a control group maintained in an enrichment environment (CTEE), an HI group maintained in a standard environment (HISE) and an HI group maintained in an enrichment environment (HIEE). At the 7th postnatal day (PND), rats were submitted to the Levine-Rice model of neonatal HI. This method consists of permanent occlusion of the right common carotid artery with subsequent exposure to hypoxia. Rats from CTEE and HIEE were stimulated with environmental enrichment. The EE protocol started 24h after HI, in which pup rats with their dams were stimulated in a maintained EE (PND 8-22). Subsequently, animals were submitted to daily EE (1h/day, PND 23-60). The expression of some proteins involved in BBB structure (β-catenin, occludin, connexin-43, aquaporin-4, glut-1 and GFAP) were quantified by western blotting in the hippocampi of rats in three periods, at PND 8, 22 and 60. The BBB permeability and integrity was assessed by Evans blue staining and the immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were also performed. The results showed an HI-induced decreased occludin expression at PND 22 and low levels of occludin, β-catenin and GFAP at PND 60 in the hippocampus of the hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, in young and adult rats, EE reversed these effects. Evans blue extravasation into the brain parenchyma confirmed the BBB dysfunction brought on by HI. No differences were observed at PND 8, probably due to the immaturity of the

  15. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20th week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30th week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  16. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-10-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20(th) week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30(th) week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  17. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  18. Nonpolio enterovirus infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Haston, Julia C; Dixon, Terry C

    2015-05-01

    There are currently 12 species and over 100 serotypes that have been identified in the enterovirus genus, including the coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and polioviruses. Since their discovery 65 years ago, much has been discovered and continues to be researched regarding the pathogenicity and scope of disease of nonpolio enteroviruses. Like many infections, enteroviruses have been found to affect neonates much differently, and often more severely, than older children and adults. Neonatal infections often cause mild illnesses with nonspecific symptoms, but they may also have severe presentations involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hematologic, or central nervous systems. This article provides an overview of what is known about nonpolio enteroviruses in neonates including epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

  19. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of a... humidity, a control valve through which oxygen may be added, and access ports for nursing care....

  20. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Agrawal, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus. PMID:24741257

  1. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  2. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Intake in the Bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Dai Jin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is related with a number of cystopathic complications. However, there have been no studies about the influence of alcohol consumption in the bladder of type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the effect of moderate alcohol intake in the bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rat. The non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, n=14) and the OLETF control group (n=14) were fed an isocaloric diet; the LETO (n=14) and the OLETF ethanol group (n=14) were fed 36% ethanol 7 g/kg/day. After ten weeks, muscarinic receptors, RhoGEFs, myogenic change, and the level of oxidative stress were evaluated. Moderate alcohol intake significantly decreased excessive muscarinic receptor and Rho kinase expressions in the OLETF rats compared with the LETO rats. In addition, iNOS and collagen expression were not changed in the OLETF rats in spite of alcohol consumption. Superoxide dismutase levels, which is involved in antioxidant defense, in the LETO rats were significantly decreased after alcohol consumption, however those in the OLETF rats were similar. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces the oxidative stress, and may prevent molecular and pathologic changes of the bladder of rats with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26339173

  3. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Intake in the Bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Dai Jin; Lee, Ji Youl

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is related with a number of cystopathic complications. However, there have been no studies about the influence of alcohol consumption in the bladder of type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the effect of moderate alcohol intake in the bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rat. The non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, n=14) and the OLETF control group (n=14) were fed an isocaloric diet; the LETO (n=14) and the OLETF ethanol group (n=14) were fed 36% ethanol 7 g/kg/day. After ten weeks, muscarinic receptors, RhoGEFs, myogenic change, and the level of oxidative stress were evaluated. Moderate alcohol intake significantly decreased excessive muscarinic receptor and Rho kinase expressions in the OLETF rats compared with the LETO rats. In addition, iNOS and collagen expression were not changed in the OLETF rats in spite of alcohol consumption. Superoxide dismutase levels, which is involved in antioxidant defense, in the LETO rats were significantly decreased after alcohol consumption, however those in the OLETF rats were similar. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces the oxidative stress, and may prevent molecular and pathologic changes of the bladder of rats with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  5. Mechanism of enhanced lipid peroxidation in the liver of Long-Evans cinnamon (LEC) rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Hirose, K; Hayasaki, Y; Masuda, M; Kazusaka, A; Fujita, S

    1999-11-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat is a mutant strain of rats that accumulate copper (Cu) in the liver in much the same way as individuals who suffer from Wilson's disease (WD) and has been suggested as a model for this disease. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) is considered to be involved in the toxic action of Cu in the livers of LEC rats. We investigated the mechanism of LPO in the livers of LEC rats showing apparent signs of hepatitis. Several-fold higher LPO levels were observed in post-mitochondrial supernatant (S-9) fraction of livers from hepatitic LEC rats than in those from Wistar rats. To mimic living cells, we introduced NADPH-generating system (NADPH-gs) into the S-9 incubation system. Thus was ensured a constant supply of NADPH to vital enzymes that may be directly or indirectly involved in the generation and/or elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROSs), such as glutathione reductase (GSSG-R), which require NADPH for their reactions. The levels of LPO in liver S-9 from hepatitic LEC rats were further increased by incubating liver S-9 at 37 degrees C in the presence of NADPH-gs. This increase was inhibited by EDTA, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and catalase (CAT), suggesting that some metal, most likely the accumulated Cu, and ROSs derived from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are involved in the increased levels of LPO in the livers of hepatitic LEC rats. The requirement of NADPH-gs for enhanced LPO in the livers of hepatitic LEC rats indicates the consumption of NADPH during reactions leading to LPO. It is known that H2O2, and consequently hydroxyl radical are generated during Cu-catalyzed glutathione (GSH) oxidation. The cyclic regeneration of GSH from GSSG by NADPH-dependent GSSG-R in the presence of NADPH-gs may cause sustained generation of hydroxyl radical in the presence of excess free Cu. The generation of H2O2 in S-9 fraction of livers from hepatitic LEC rats was observed to be significantly higher than that in S-9 fraction of livers from non

  6. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  7. End-of-life care in the neonatal intensive care unit: applying comfort theory.

    PubMed

    Marchuk, Allison

    2016-07-01

    The provision of quality end-of-life care is essential when a neonate is dying. End-of-life care delivered in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) must consider the needs of both the newborn and their family. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how comfort theory and its associated taxonomic structure can be used as a conceptual framework for nurses and midwives providing end-of-life care to neonates and their families. Comfort theory and its taxonomic structure are presented and issues related to end-of-life care in the NICU are highlighted. A case study is used to illustrate the application of comfort theory and issues related to implementation are discussed. The delivery of end-of-life care in the NICU can be improved through the application of comfort.

  8. Neonatal diabetes mellitus and cerebellar hypoplasia/agenesis: report of a new recessive syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoveyda, N.; Shield, J.; Garrett, C.; Chong, W; Beardsall, K.; Bentsi-Enchill, E.; Mallya, H.; Thompson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Classical neonatal diabetes mellitus is defined as hyperglycaemia occurring within the first six weeks of life in term infants. Cerebellar agenesis is rare. We report three cases of neonatal diabetes mellitus, cerebellar hypoplasia/agenesis, and dysmorphism occurring within a highly consanguineous family. This constellation of abnormalities has not previously been described. Two of these cases are sisters and the third case is a female first cousin. The pattern of inheritance suggests this is a previously undescribed autosomal recessive disorder. Prenatal diagnosis of the condition in this family was possible by demonstration of the absence of the cerebellum and severe IUGR.


Keywords: cerebellar agenesis/hypoplasia; neonatal diabetes mellitus; dysmorphic features; autosomal recessive PMID:10507728

  9. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  10. Neonatal posterior fossa subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Coker, S; Beltran, R; Fine, M

    1987-07-01

    Hemorrhage into the posterior fossa is a rare neurosurgical emergency in neonates. CT scanning is diagnostic. Blood layering under the apex of the tentorium cerebelli, however, may resemble a dilated vascular structure, and the rigidity of the pressured tentorium may prevent upward transmission of increased intracranial pressure, resulting in a soft fontanelle.

  11. Standardisation of neonatal clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Giuliani, F; Haroon, A; Knight, H E; Albernaz, E; Batra, M; Bhat, B; Bertino, E; McCormick, K; Ochieng, R; Rajan, V; Ruyan, P; Cheikh Ismail, L; Paul, V

    2013-09-01

    The International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21(st) Century (INTERGROWTH-21(st) ) is a large-scale, population-based, multicentre project involving health institutions from eight geographically diverse countries, which aims to assess fetal, newborn and preterm growth under optimal conditions. Given the multicentre nature of the project and the expected number of preterm births, it is vital that all centres follow the same standardised clinical care protocols to assess and manage preterm infants, so as to ensure maximum validity of the resulting standards as indicators of growth and nutrition with minimal confounding. Moreover, it is well known that evidence-based clinical practice guidelines can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. The INTERGROWTH-21(st) Neonatal Group produced an operations manual, which reflects the consensus reached by members of the group regarding standardised definitions of neonatal morbidities and the minimum standards of care to be provided by all centres taking part in the project. The operational definitions and summary management protocols were developed by consensus through a Delphi process based on systematic reviews of relevant guidelines and management protocols by authoritative bodies. This paper describes the process of developing the Basic Neonatal Care Manual, as well as the morbidity definitions and standardised neonatal care protocols applied across all the INTERGROWTH-21(st) participating centres. Finally, thoughts about implementation strategies are presented.

  12. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  13. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  14. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates’ qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  15. Genetic disorders of neonatal respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cole, F S; Hamvas, A; Nogee, L M

    2001-08-01

    Genetic risk for respiratory distress in infancy has been recognized with increasing frequency in neonatal intensive care units. Reports of family clusters of affected infants and of ethnic- and gender-based respiratory phenotypes point to the contribution of inheritance. Similarly, different outcomes among gestationally matched infants with comparable exposures to oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or nutritional deficiency also suggest a genetic risk for respiratory distress. Examples of inherited deficiency of surfactant protein B in both humans and genetically engineered murine lineages illustrate the importance of identifying markers of genetic risk. In contrast to developmental, inflammatory, or nutritional causes of respiratory distress that may resolve as infants mature, genetic causes result in both acute and chronic (and potentially irreversible) respiratory failure. The availability of clinically useful genetic markers of risk for respiratory distress in infancy will permit development of rational strategies for treatment of genetic lung disorders of infancy and more accurate counseling of families whose infants are at genetic risk for development of respiratory distress at birth or during early childhood. We review examples of genetic variations known to be associated with or cause respiratory distress in infancy. PMID:11477198

  16. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  17. Materials on Nursing in the Clearinghouse: Bibliography #16, and Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Bibliography #17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield.

    The first of the two bibliographies in this document contains 38 entries on neonatal nursing, including books and journal articles (originally published from 1973 to 1986) dealing with such topics as high-risk pregnancy and delivery, home care of developmentally disabled newborns, and family dynamics. The second bibliography, titled "Neonatal…

  18. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  19. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  20. Neonatal Informatics: Information Technology to Support Handoffs in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jonathan P; Van Eaton, Erik G; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Communication failures during physician handoffs represent a significant source of preventable adverse events. Computerized sign-out tools linked to hospital electronic medical record systems and customized for neonatal care can facilitate standardization of the handoff process and access to clinical information, thereby improving communication and reducing adverse events. It is important to note, however, that adoption of technological tools alone is not sufficient to remedy flawed communication processes. OBJECTIVES: After completing this article, readers should be able to: Identify key elements of a computerized sign-out tool.Describe how an electronic tool might be customized for neonatal care.Appreciate that technological tools are only one component of the handoff process they are designed to facilitate.

  1. Epidemiology of early neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, N K; Bharambe, M S; Garg, B S; Mathur, J S; Goswami, K

    1994-01-01

    During 1981-1991 at a rural teaching hospital (Kasturba Hospital) of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences in Sevagram, Wardha, India, 454 of 13,939 newborns died during the early neonatal period for an early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR) of 33.7/1000 live births. The ENMR for boys was not significantly different from that for girls (36.1 vs. 28.6). Community medicine specialists analyzed data on these early neonatal deaths to examine distribution of early neonatal mortality, especially its relationship with prematurity, low birth weight, birth order, and by sex. They calculated average percent deaths (APD) per hour to examine the dynamics in early neonatal mortality. The mean age at death was lower among newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (23.47 vs. 26.85 hours; p 0.001). ENMR was higher for newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (41.74% vs. 27.35%; P 0.001). The mean age at death increased as gestation increased (10.34 for 28 weeks; 24.27 for 28-33 weeks, 31.53 for 33-37 weeks, and 34.43 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). ENMR decreased as gestation increased (850 for 28 weeks; 375 for 28-33 weeks, 147.02 for 33-37 weeks, and 8.77 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). The mean age at death increased as birth weight increased for newborns weighing less than 1500 gms through 2000-2500 gms (23.36-37.13 hours; p 0.001). It was lowest among those weighing more 3000 gms (11.55 gms). ENMR fell as birth weight increased (614.33 for 1500 gms, 116.19 for 1500-2000 gms, 19.38 for 2000-2500 gms, 10.99 for 2500-3000 gms, and 5.41 for 3000 gms; p 0.001). The APD/hour for the first hour of life was 3.74% for a relative risk of 12.9. It decreased steadily as the hours of life increased (3.08% for 1-6 hours, 1.19% for 6-24 hours, 0.67% for 24-72 hours, and 0.29% for 72-168 hours). Knowledge of time of likely death can help providers know where they need to focus their attention to prevent early neonatal deaths.

  2. Additional information for “TREMOR: A Wireless, MEMS Accelerograph for Dense Arrays” (Evans et al., 2003)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Hamstra, Robert H.; Spudich, Paul; Kundig, Christoph; Camina, Patrick; Rogers, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The length of Evans et al. (2003) necessitated transfer of several less germane sections to this alternate forum to meet that venue’s needs. These sections include a description of the development of Figure 1, the plot of spatial variability so critical to the argument for dense arrays of strong-motion instruments; the description of the rapid, integer, computational method for PGV used in the TREMOR instrument (the Oakland instrument, the commercial prototype, and the commercial instrument); siting methods and strategies used for Class B TREMOR instruments and those that can be used for Class C instruments to preserve the cost advantages of such systems; and some general discussion of MEMS accelerometers, including a comparative Table with representative examples of Class A, B and C MEMS devices. (“MEMS” means “Micro-ElectroMechanical” Systems—“micromachined” sensors, generally of silicon. Classes A, B, and C are defined in Table 1.)

  3. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome concomitant with immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans syndrome).

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Huseyin; Bugdaci, Mehmet Sait; Temel, Tuncer; Dagli, Mehmet; Karabagli, Pinar

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) associated with Evans syndrome; combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 53-year-old patient who presented with weakness, myalgia, arthralgia, shortness of breath and purpura. Initial laboratory investigations revealed liver dysfunction, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Anti-nuclear (ANA) and antimitochondrial M2 (AMA M2) antibodies were positive. Diagnose of PBC-AIH overlap was made by clinical, serological and histological investigations. AIHA and ITP was identified with clinical-laboratory findings and bone marrow puncture. She was treated with IVIG followed by prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid. Hemoglobin-thrombocytes increased rapidly and transaminases improved at day 8. We have reported the first case in the literature with AIH-PBC overlap syndrome concurrent by ITP and AIHA which suggest the presence of shared genetic susceptibility factors in multiple autoimmune conditions including AIH, PBC, ITP and AIHA.

  4. Electrocardiogram and cardiac function in a longitudinal study of copper deficiency in the Long-Evans rat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiming Liao, Hamlin, R.; Medeiros, D.M. )

    1991-03-11

    Weanling Long-Evans rats were fed either copper-adequate or -restricted diets for varying periods of time up to 6 wk. Beginning at 2 wk after weaning, and weekly thereafter, 5 rats from each diet were evaluated for cardiac function and ECG activity and sacrificed. ECG traces revealed indications of cardiac failure at week 3 in rats fed the copper-restricted diet at which time concentric cardiac hypertrophy was evident. Prolonged P-R and Q-T intervals and greater QRS height and higher voltages were observed in copper-restricted rats. However, + and {minus} dP/dt max did not differ by diet copper treatment for any of the time intervals studied, nor was any notable difference in total left developed ventricular pressure apparent. These results suggest that the onset of cardiac dysfunction in copper deficiency is rapid, with both dysfunction and hypertrophy apparent within 3 weeks after copper restriction.

  5. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: from Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-28

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water. PMID:24182086

  6. [Heart surgery in neonates (experience with surgery in 420 neonates)].

    PubMed

    Hucín, B; Tláskal, T; Horváth, P; Kostelka, M; Kucera, V; Tax, P; Reich, O; Chaloupecký, V; Skovránek, J; Kopecká, L

    1994-03-01

    In the child cardiocentre in Prague 5-Motol in 1977-1993 a total of 420 neonates with critical inborn heart disease were operated. Obstructive defects of the left heart were found in 178 children, obstructive defects of the right heart in 87, defects with a left-right shunt with pulmonary hypertension in 75, conotruncal malformations in 73 and various operations were made in 7 children. Complete repair of the defect was achieved in 281 neonates, incl. 104 where extracorporeal circulation was used. Palliative operations were made in 139 children. Early mortality during the entire period was 26%, whereby a decrease from 40% to 16% was recorded during the last three years. At present it is possible to repair permanently critical inborn heart disease in the majority of neonates. This is made possible in particular by early non-invasive diagnosis, treatment with prostaglandins E in duct-dependent critical heart disease, optimal time for and selection of most suitable surgery, microsurgical technique, miniaturization of extracorporeal circulation and the method of deep hypothermia. PMID:8184369

  7. Danger signs of neonatal illnesses: perceptions of caregivers and health workers in northern India.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Shally; Verma, Tuhina; Agarwal, Monica

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess household practices that can affect neonatal health, from the perspective of caregivers and health workers; to identify signs in neonates leading either to recognition of illness or health-care seeking; and to ascertain the proportion of caregivers who recognize the individual items of the integrated management of neonatal and childhood illnesses (IMNCI) programme. METHODS: The study was carried out in a rural community in Sarojininagar Block, Uttar Pradesh, India, using qualitative and quantitative research designs. Study participants were mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers, fathers or "nannies" (other female relatives) caring for infants younger than 6 months of age and recognized health-care providers serving the area. Focus group discussions (n = 7), key informant interviews (n = 35) and structured interviews (n = 210) were conducted with these participants. FINDINGS: Many household practices were observed which could adversely affect maternal and neonatal health. Among 200 caregivers, 70.5% reported home deliveries conducted by local untrained nurses or relatives, and most mothers initiated breastfeeding only on day 3. More than half of the caregivers recognized fever, irritability, weakness, abdominal distension/vomiting, slow breathing and diarrhoea as danger signs in neonates. Seventy-nine (39.5%) of the caregivers had seen a sick neonate in the family in the past 2 years, with 30.38% in whom illness manifested as continuous crying. Health care was sought for 46 (23%) neonates. Traditional medicines were used for treatment of bulging fontanelle, chest in-drawing and rapid breathing. CONCLUSION: Because there is no universal recognition of danger signs in neonates, and potentially harmful antenatal and birthing practices are followed, there is a need to give priority to implementing IMNCI, and possible incorporation of continuous crying as an additional danger sign. PMID:17128362

  8. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge.

  9. Evolution of Exchangeable Copper and Relative Exchangeable Copper through the Course of Wilson's Disease in the Long Evans Cinnamon Rat

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Françoise; Podevin, Guillaume; Poupon, Joël; Roux, Jérôme; Legras, Pierre; Trocello, Jean-Marc; Woimant, France; Laprévote, Olivier; NGuyen, Tuan Huy; Balkhi, Souleiman El

    2013-01-01

    Background Wilson's disease (WD) is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism leading to liver failure and/or neurological impairment. Its diagnosis often remains difficult even with genetic testing. Relative exchangeable copper (REC) has recently been described as a reliable serum diagnostic marker for WD. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this study was to validate the use of REC in the Long Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, an animal model for WD, and to study its relevance under different conditions in comparison with conventional markers. Two groups of LEC rats and one group of Long-Evans (LE) rats were clinically and biologically monitored from 6 to 28 weeks of age. One group of LEC rats was given copper-free food. The other groups had normal food. Blood samples were collected each month and different serum markers for WD (namely ceruloplasmin oxidase activity, exchangeable copper (CuEXC), total serum copper and REC) and acute liver failure (serum transaminases and bilirubinemia) were tested. Every LEC rat under normal food developed acute liver failure (ALF), with 40% global mortality. Serum transaminases and bilirubinemia along with total serum copper and exchangeable copper levels increased with the onset of acute liver failure. A correlation was observed between CuEXC values and the severity of ALF. Cut-off values were different between young and adult rats and evolved because of age and/or liver failure. Only REC, with values >19%, was able to discriminate LEC groups from the LE control group at every time point in the study. REC sensitivity and specificity reached 100% in adults rats. Conclusions/Significance REC appears to be independent of demographic or clinical data in LEC rats. It is a very simple and reliable blood test for the diagnosis of copper toxicosis owing to a lack of ATP7B function. CuEXC can be used as an accurate biomarker of copper overload. PMID:24358170

  10. Redox regulation of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 activity in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats during spontaneous hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Karmahapatra, Soumendra Krishna; Saha, Tapas; Adhikari, Sanjay; Woodrick, Jordan; Roy, Rabindra

    2014-03-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat is an animal model for Wilson's disease. This animal is genetically predisposed to copper accumulation in the liver, increased oxidative stress, accumulation of DNA damage, and the spontaneous development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, this animal model is useful for studying the relationship of endogenous DNA damage to spontaneous carcinogenesis. In this study, we have investigated the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1)-mediated excision repair of endogenous DNA damage, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP)-sites, which is highly mutagenic and implicated in human cancer. We found that the activity was reduced in the liver extracts from the acute hepatitis period of LEC rats as compared with extracts from the age-matched Long-Evans Agouti rats. The acute hepatitis period had also a heightened oxidative stress condition as assessed by an increase in oxidized glutathione level and loss of enzyme activity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key redox-sensitive protein in cells. Interestingly, the activity reduction was not due to changes in protein expression but apparently by reversible protein oxidation as the addition of reducing agents to extracts of the liver from acute hepatitis period reactivated APE1 activity and thus, confirmed the oxidation-mediated loss of APE1 activity under increased oxidative stress. These findings show for the first time in an animal model that the repair mechanism of AP-sites is impaired by increased oxidative stress in acute hepatitis via redox regulation which contributed to the increased accumulation of mutagenic AP-sites in liver DNA.

  11. Strain Differences in Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-Induced Mammary Tumor Incidence in Long Evans and Sprague Dawley Rat Offspring Following Prenatal Atrazine Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that prenatal exposure to the chlorotriazine herbicide atrazine (ATR) during mammary bud outgrowth (late gestation) delays postnatal mammary epithelial progression in Long Evans (LE) rats. Our laboratory has recently found that prenatal exposure to ATR also effe...

  12. Sources for Women's History in the Microtext Department of the Sterling C. Evans Library at Texas A&M University. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Yvonne D., Comp.; And Others

    This two-volume annotated bibliography is designed to provide access to materials in the microtext collection of Texas A&M University's Sterling C. Evans Library that relate to women's history. Volume I presents 96 citations to microform editions of works published by, for, and about women before 1900, and Volume II includes 444 citations to…

  13. Age-related dose response of selected reproductive parameters to acute cadmium chloride exposure in the male Long-Evans rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groups of Long Evans rats 30, 50, or 70 days old were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with a single dose of between 0 and 52 micromoles Cd/Kg as cadmium (CD) chloride. Sixty days post dosing and two hours prior to sacrifice the rats were injected s.c. with 100 IU of hCG to stimula...

  14. THE EFFECT OF TARGETED KNOCKOUT MUTATION ON THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILE OF THE KIDNEY IN TSC2 MUTANT LONG-EVANS (EKER) RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of a targeted knockout mutation on the transcriptional profile of the kidney in
    Tsc2 mutant Long-Evans (Eker) rats.

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common tumor of the adult kidney, accounting
    for up to 80% of malignant renal neoplasms. Hereditary...

  15. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture onpubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide extensively used in the US and other countries. Studies examining the effects of adult or developmental ATR exposure on the mammary gland (MG) have used either the Sprague Dawley (SD) or Long-Evans (LE) rat, but no strain comparisons h...

  16. DEA based neonatal lung simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, Samuel; Haemmerle, Enrico; Chang, Robin; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain

    2011-04-01

    To reduce the likelihood of ventilator induced lung injury a neonatal lung simulator is developed based on Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs). DEAs are particularly suited for this application due to their natural like response as well as their self-sensing ability. By actively controlling the DEA, the pressure and volume inside the lung simulator can be controlled giving rise to active compliance control. Additionally the capacitance of the DEA can be used as a measurement of volume eliminating the integration errors that plague flow sensors. Based on simulations conducted with the FEA package ABAQUS and experimental data, the characteristics of the lung simulator were explored. A relationship between volume and capacitance was derived based on the self sensing of a bubble actuator. This was then used to calculate the compliance of the experimental bubble actuator. The current results are promising and show that mimicking a neonatal lung with DEAs may be possible.

  17. EEG in the neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, M D; de Villepin-Touzery, A

    2015-03-01

    The execution and interpretation of neonatal EEG adheres to strict and specific criteria related to this very early age. In preterm newborns, the dedicated healthcare staff needs to respect EEG indications and chronology of EEG recordings in order to diagnose and manage various pathologies, and use EEG in addition to cerebral imaging. EEG analysis focuses on a global vision of the recording according to the neonate's state of alertness and various age-related patterns. Monitoring of continuous conventional EEG and simplified EEG signal processing can help screen for seizures and monitor the effect of antiepileptic treatment, as well as appreciating changes in EEG background activity, for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. EEG reports should be highly explanatory to meet the expectations of the physician's clinical request.

  18. Neonatal jaundice: the surgical viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Kling, S

    1980-12-20

    There is good evidence that neonatal hepatitis, biliary hypoplasia, biliary atresia and choledochal cyst are different stages of one disease process for which the term infantile obstructive cholangiopathy has been suggested. Thanks to the work of Kasai and the operation of hepatic portoenterostomy the surgical outlook has greatly improved, although in North America it still leaves much to be desired. One cannot procrastinate too long in the hope that the patient's condition will improve spontaneously, because the surgical results are much better when the operation is performed before the patient is 10 weeks old. This article outlines the steps that should be followed in investigating neonatal jaundice, the nonsurgical measures that can be taken in an attempt to reverse or alleviate the underlying condition, and the specific role of the pediatric surgeon in the management of choledochal cyst and biliary atresia.

  19. Neonatal `Brain Damage'—An Analysis of 250 Claims

    PubMed Central

    Cornblath, Marvin; Clark, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in perinatal care have resulted in decreased neonatal mortality. Increasingly, damage in survivors has been attributed to alleged negligence. We analyzed the 250 claims (1957 to 1982) from one major insurance company for factors to characterize high-risk pregnancies and then to distinguish preventable from nonpreventable causes within the group. Using predetermined criteria, 77 (31%) were classified preventable, 105 (42%) nonpreventable and 68 (27%) indeterminate. Preventable actions could be attributed to family members as well as health care providers. Twenty risk factors were significantly increased in the study group compared with those in a general population and included maternal, gestational, delivery and postdelivery risks. Furthermore, 13 of 25 factors differed significantly between preventable and nonpreventable cases. Those with significantly higher prevalence in preventable cases included prolonged gestation, the use of mid or high forceps, cesarean sections, meconium staining, low one- and five-minute Apgar scores, birth weight exceeding 4.5 kg (10 lb), poor tone, seizures and transfers to neonatal intensive care units. Increased in prevalence in the nonpreventable cases were congenital infections and malformations and the late onset of neurologic abnormalities. These findings suggest preventive measures to reduce unwarranted litigation and certain cases of neonatal brain damage. PMID:6730485

  20. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  1. Pleural effusion in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sandeep Krishnanand; Butler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A premature neonate who developed respiratory distress in the first few days of life was found to have a pleural effusion, which reaccumulated following drainage. The effusion was demonstrated to be a chylothorax. He required multiple chest drains and was started on a medium chain triglyceride formula feed. This brought about a full resolution of the effusions and he made a complete recovery. PMID:22688472

  2. [A neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burgo J; van Rijn, Rick R; van Trotsenburg, A S P Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a neonate with ambiguous genitalia, physical examination revealed a phallus. Ultrasonography showed a vagina and uterus, but no gonads. Because of severe undervirilisation in the presence of a uterus, probably due to 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, parents were advised female sex assignment. When after a few weeks the phallus had increased in size, abdominal laparoscopy showed an underdeveloped uterus. Gonadal biopsy confirmed gonadal dysgenesis. Sex assignment was reconsidered and changed into the male gender. PMID:26200425

  3. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  4. Blood Stream Infection by Escherchia hermannii in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    Sood, Smita; Hemrajani, Satyen K

    2016-08-01

    Escherichia hermannii is a Gram negative bacillus, facultative anaerobe and member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It was earlier classified as Enteric Group 11 by the Enteric Section of Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and was reported in the clinical laboratory as a yellow pigmented E. coli strain. On the basis of its unique genomic features, this organism was labelled as a distinct species in 1982. A successfully treated case of a blood stream infection by E. hermannii in a neonate is being described. PMID:27656438

  5. Blood Stream Infection by Escherchia hermannii in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Hemrajani, Satyen K

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia hermannii is a Gram negative bacillus, facultative anaerobe and member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It was earlier classified as Enteric Group 11 by the Enteric Section of Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and was reported in the clinical laboratory as a yellow pigmented E. coli strain. On the basis of its unique genomic features, this organism was labelled as a distinct species in 1982. A successfully treated case of a blood stream infection by E. hermannii in a neonate is being described. PMID:27656438

  6. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  7. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  8. Early-onset neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Kari A; Anderson-Berry, Ann L; Delair, Shirley F; Davies, H Dele

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS.

  9. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications.

  10. Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: a focus on.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Lagrasta, N; Garcìa Garcìa, C; Campos Serna, J; Zicari, E; Marzocca, G

    2002-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a multifactorial worldwide problem, representing the most frequent gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. Extremely common in preterm infants, it is also registered in fullterm low birth weight neonates. Despite extensive research, its etiopathogenesis is not completely understood and this neonatal disease remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This review proposes an interdisciplinary focus on recent developments in NEC etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management. PMID:12608653

  11. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL.

  12. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  13. The new standard: single family room design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2012-10-01

    Nurse leaders influence decisions related to single patient rooms or multioccupancy room designs. The purpose of this facility design article is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competency in health facility design enabling them to lead design efforts and the transition to new facilities and models of care. This article describes the new standard of all-private rooms for adult and neonatal ICU care and defines the benefits of the single family room design on patients, families, and providers.

  14. Clinical trials of medicines in neonates: the influence of ethical and practical issues on design and conduct

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    In the past, there has been a perception that ethical and practical problems limit the opportunities for research in neonates. This perception is no longer appropriate. It is now clear that research about the medicines used in neonates is an ethical requirement. It is possible to conduct high quality research in neonates if the research team adapt to the characteristics of this population. Good practice involves respecting the specific needs of newborn babies and their families by adopting relevant approaches to study design, recruitment, pharmacokinetic studies and safety assessment. Neonatal units have a unique culture that requires careful development in a research setting. Clinical investigators need to recognize the clinical and ethical imperative to conduct rigorous research. Industry needs to engage with neonatal networks early in the process of drug development, preferably before contacting regulatory agencies. Follow-up over 3–5 years is essential for the evaluation of medicines in neonates and explicit funding for this is required for the assessment of the benefit and risk of treatments given to sick newborn babies. The views of parents must be central to the development of studies and the research agenda. Ethical and practical problems are no longer barriers to research in neonates. The current challenges are to disseminate good practice and maximize capacity in order to meet the need for research among newborn babies. PMID:25041601

  15. The myth of the miracle baby: how neonatal nurses interpret media accounts of babies of extreme prematurity.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-09-01

    Improved life sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has resulted in an increased probability of survival in extremely premature babies. Miracle baby stories in the popular press are a regular occurrence and these reports are often the first source from which the general public learn about extremely premature babies. The research from which this paper is drawn sought to explore the care-giving and ethical dilemmas of neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies 24 weeks gestation and less. This current paper aims to outline the views of neonatal nurses on miracle baby stories in the media. Data were collected via a questionnaire to 760 Australian neonatal nurses with 414 returned, representing a response rate of 54.4%. Narrative was collected from semi-structured interviews with 24 experienced neonatal nurses in NSW, Australia. A qualitative approach utilising thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data. The theme the myth of the miracle baby is seen as generating myths and unrealistic expectations on the part of vulnerable families and the public. Neonatal nurses, as the primary caregivers for tiny babies and their families, viewed popular media publications with suspicion, believing published reports to be incomplete, inaccurate and biased towards the positive.

  16. Prediction of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia using PCR.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L R; Jones, C; Munro, T E

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is a potentially fatal condition and in the majority of cases is associated with maternal antibodies to the HPA-1a (PLA1) haplotype. Early diagnosis in utero can enhance survival rates. The application of DNA genomic analysis and PCR technology for the determination of the HPA-1a/HPA-1b (PLA1/PLA2) locus is described and applied in a family study where the fetus was diagnosed to have NAIT. This rapid technique differentiated between the 3 haplotypes HPA-1a/HPA-1a, HPA-1b/HPA-1b and HPA-1a/HPA-1b using the polymorphism at base 196 of the GPIIIa gene. This is the first Australian report on the establishment of this technology for platelet genotype typing and the application in the diagnosis of NAIT. This technique can be performed on DNA extracted from any nucleated cells and avoids the difficulty of requiring fetal platelets for serological typing when NAIT is suspected. The PCR technique of genomic DNA analysis has an important application in the prediction and management of this potentially severe condition.

  17. Neonatal treatment with lipopolysaccharide differentially affects adult anxiety responses in the light-dark test and taste neophobia test in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Tenk, Christine M; Kavaliers, Martin; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter

    2013-05-01

    Neonatal administration of the bacterial cell wall component, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to alter a variety of behavioural and physiological processes in the adult rat, including altering adult anxiety-like behaviour. Research conducted to date, however, has produced conflicting findings with some results demonstrating increases in adult anxiety-like behaviour while others report decreases or no changes in anxiety-like behaviour. Thus, the current study conducted additional evaluation of the effects of neonatal LPS exposure on adult anxiety-like behaviours by comparing the behavioural outcomes in the more traditional light-dark test, together with the less common hyponeophagia to sucrose solution paradigm. Male and female Long-Evans rats were treated systemically with either LPS (50μg/kg) or saline (0.9%) on postnatal days 3 and 5. Animals were then tested in the light-dark apparatus on postnatal day 90 for 30min. Next, following 5 days of habituation to distilled water delivery in Lickometer drinking boxes, animal were tested for neophagia to a 10% sucrose solution (0.3M) for 30min daily on postnatal days 96 and 97. In the light-dark test, neonatal LPS treatment decreased adult anxiety-like behaviour in females, but not males. In contrast, neonatal exposure to LPS did not influence adult anxiety-like behaviour as measured by hyponeophagia, but altered the licking patterns of drinking displayed towards a novel, palatable sucrose solution in adult males and females, in a manner that may reflect a decrease in situational anxiety. The current study supports the idea that neonatal LPS treatment results in highly specific alterations of adult anxiety-like behaviour, the nature of which seems to depend not only on the measure of anxiety behaviour used, but also possibly, on the degree of anxiety experienced during the behavioural test.

  18. Aspects of the Development of Housing for the Spaceflight of Pregnant and Lactating Rats with Neonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinds, William E.; Mayer, David J.; Evans, Juli; Spratt, Shahn; Lane, Philip K.; Rodriguez, Shari L.; Navidi, Meena; Armstrong, Rachel; Lemos, Bonnie; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Recent and upcoming spaceflights are investigating the effect of weightlessness on developing neural and organ systems. Pregnant rats and dams with neonates have to be accommodated in cages that support the special requirements of these animals. Extensive ground testing of cage concepts, the effect of launch and landing stresses on the maintenance of pregnancy and maternal behavior at different neonatal ages, and techniques for monitoring adaptability to change are discussed. A spaceflight opportunity for the NlH.R3 payload of rat families at three different postnatal ages demonstrated that the survival of very young animals was not good but that older newborns could be returned to Earth in reasonably good health. The development of cages for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) to support the flight of neonates on Neurolab was continued and incorporated modifications that were demonstrated by the NIH.R3 flight. Other modifications to the RAHF are discussed. Data from biocompatibility and experiment verification testing are presented.

  19. Palliative care delivery in the NICU: what barriers do neonatal nurses face?

    PubMed

    Kain, Victoria J

    2006-01-01

    Despite the existence of a universal protocol in palliative care for dying babies and their families, provision of this type of care remains ad hoc in contemporary neonatal settings. Influential bodies such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization support palliative care to this patient population, so why are such measures not universally adopted? Are there barriers that prevent neonatal nurses from delivering this type of care? A search of the literature reveals that such barriers may be significant and that they have the potential to prevent dying babies from receiving the care they deserve. The goal of this literature review is to identify these barriers to providing palliative care in neonatal nursing. Results of the research have been used to determine item content for a survey to conceptualize and address these barriers.

  20. Individual Differences and Auditory Conditioning in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, W. K.; And Others

    The purposes of this study are (1) to analyze learning ability in newborns using heart rate responses to auditory temporal conditioning and (2) to correlate these with measures on the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale. Twenty normal neonates were tested using the Brazelton Scale on the third day of life. They were also given a…

  1. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  2. Enterobacter cloacae causing pneumatocele in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Glustein, J Z; Kaplan, M

    1994-09-01

    Pneumatocele formation, a cyst-like rarefaction that develops within the lung parenchyma, is an unusual complication of pneumonia in the neonate. It has been reported to occur with Staphlococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We describe a case of a premature neonate with pneumonia and subsequent pneumatocele formation caused by Enterobacter cloacae.

  3. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  4. Brazelton Neonatal Assessment for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, Calvin L.

    This speech addresses the "What,""Why," and "How" of Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Training for school psychologists. "What" concerns the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale, its administration, and what it assesses. Based on the best performance, the infant's score on this scale is scored in the context of six states of consciousness…

  5. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  6. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  7. Osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A J; Stent, A W; Milne, M; Walmsley, E A

    2016-10-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disorder characterised by a defect in osteoclastic bone resorption. This report describes osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey that suffered a displaced tibial fracture. Radiographic examination identified generalised reduction in medullary cavity size, thickened mid-diaphyseal cortices and conical metaphyseal bone extending toward the mid-diaphysis of long bones. Postmortem examination identified additional fractures and brittle bones. Histologically, osteoclasts were absent in multiple bone sections. Diaphyseal cortices consisted of concentric bone lamellae with marrow tissue infiltration. Large wedges of secondary spongiosa extended from the metaphyseal growth plate. Clinical and histopathological features were similar to an osteoclast-deficient, autosomal recessive form of osteopetrosis in humans. PMID:27671079

  8. Bronchopleural fistula in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Shen-Schwarz, S; Dosi, P C; Schwarz, K O; Brown, E G; Strauss, L

    1986-01-01

    Bronchopleural fistula (BPF) produced by endotracheal suction catheter is a known cause of persistent pneumothorax in preterm infants in intensive care nurseries. This report describes the pulmonary pathology of a neonate who had sustained this injury. The observation suggests that the abnormal airflow results in severe damage of the involved lobe and an unusually mild bronchopulmonary dysplasia in the rest of the lung. This is in agreement with the fact that BPF acts as the path of least resistance for the oxygen-rich air from the ventilator.

  9. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  10. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  11. Neurological Complications after Neonatal Bacteremia: The Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs) in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. Results Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5%) had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7%) and E. coli (16.7%). The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28), hydrocephalus (20), encephalomalacia (11), cerebral infarction (7), subdural empyema (6), ventriculitis (8), and abscess (4). Eight (22.8%) neonates died and six (16.7%) were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20–36.08; p = 0.002) and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53–23.15; p = 0.010) were independently associated with BNCs. Conclusions Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock. PMID:25364821

  12. Did professional attendance at home births improve early neonatal survival in Indonesia?

    PubMed

    Hatt, Laurel; Stanton, Cynthia; Ronsmans, Carine; Makowiecka, Krystyna; Adisasmita, Asri

    2009-07-01

    BACKGROUND Early neonatal mortality has been persistently high in developing countries. Indonesia, with its national policy of home-based, midwife-assisted birth, is an apt context for assessing the effect of home-based professional birth attendance on early neonatal survival. METHODS We pooled four Indonesian Demographic and Health Surveys and used multivariate logistic regression to analyse trends in first-day and early neonatal mortality. We measured the effect of the context of delivery, including place and type of provider, and tested for changes in trend when the 'Midwife in the Village' programme was initiated. RESULTS Reported first-day mortality did not decrease significantly between 1986 and 2002, whereas early neonatal mortality decreased by an average of 3.2% annually. The rate of the decline did not change over the time period, either in 1989 when the Midwife in the Village programme was initiated, or in any year following when uptake of professional care increased. In simple and multivariate analyses, there were no significant differences in first-day or early neonatal death rates comparing home-based births with or without a professional midwife. Early neonatal mortality was higher in public facilities, likely due to selection. Biological determinants (twin births, male sex, short birth interval, previous early neonatal loss) were important for both outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Decreasing newborn death rates in Indonesia are encouraging, but it is not clear that these decreases are associated with greater uptake of professional delivery care at home or in health facilities. This may suggest a need for improved training in immediate newborn care, strengthened emergency referral, and continued support for family planning policies.

  13. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    PubMed

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  14. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-09-01

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period. PMID:27601113

  15. Neonatal networks: clinical research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Profit, Jochen; Soll, Roger F

    2015-12-01

    Worldwide, neonatal networks have been formed to address both the research and quality improvement agenda of neonatal-perinatal medicine. Neonatal research networks have led the way in conducting many of the most important clinical trials of the last 25 years, including studies of cooling for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, delivery room management with less invasive support, and oxygen saturation targeting. As we move into the future, increasing numbers of these networks are tackling quality improvement initiatives as a priority of their collaboration. Neonatal quality improvement networks have been in the forefront of the quality movement in medicine and, in the 21st century, have contributed to many of the reported improvements in care. In the coming years, building and maintaining this community of care is critical to the success of neonatal-perinatal medicine.

  16. The ethics of neonatal research: An ethicist's and a parents' perspective.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Annie; Farlow, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The ethics of neonatal research are complex because vulnerable new parents are asked to provide consent on behalf of their fragile baby. Whereas clinical neonatal care has evolved to value personalized and shared decision-making, the goal of research ethics is still to standardize the informed consent process and make it as complete and thorough as possible. Ethicists, lawyers and physicians have shaped the field of research ethics and consent for research. The goal of detailed informed consent is to protect participants from harm, but procedures were developed without input from the principal stakeholders: ex-neonatal intensive care unit parents/patients. Empirical investigations examining patient and parental perspectives on research and research ethics are lacking. Rigorous investigations are needed to determine how parents of sick neonates want their families to be protected, knowing that a lack of research is also harmful. Large randomized controlled multicenter trials will always be needed to improve neonatal outcomes. These trials are costly and time-consuming. Currently, the way in which research is funded and regulated and the way in which academic merit is recognized lead to inefficiency and a waste of precious resources. Following a review of the history of research ethics, this article examines and discusses the ethics of research in neonatology. In addition, challenges and opportunities are identified and ideas for future investigations are proposed.

  17. The Family Care Center: Transitional Care for the Sick Infant and His Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldson, Edward

    1981-01-01

    A hospital-based transitional care medical program for infants discharged from a neonatal intensive care unit is described. Family involvement is emphasized, as is interdisciplinary teamwork. Concerns that the program would encourage unnecessary hospitalization and increase vulnerability to infection have been proven unjustified. (Author/DB)

  18. Hepatic iron deprivation prevents spontaneous development of fulminant hepatitis and liver cancer in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Kobune, M; Kohgo, Y; Sugawara, N; Hisai, H; Nakamura, T; Sakamaki, S; Sawada, N; Niitsu, Y

    1996-08-15

    Several clinical studies have suggested that excess hepatic iron accumulation is a progressive factor in some liver diseases including chronic viral hepatitis and hemochromatosis. However, it is not known whether iron-induced hepatotoxicity may be directly involved in hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, which accumulates excess copper in the liver as in patients with Wilson's disease, is of a mutant strain displaying spontaneous hemolysis, hepatitis, and liver cancer. We found previously that LEC rats harbored an additional abnormality: accumulation of as much iron as copper in the liver. In the present study, we compared the occurrence of hepatitis and liver cancer in LEC rats fed an iron-deficient diet (ID) with those in rats fed a regular diet (RD). The RD group showed rapid increments of hepatic iron concentrations as the result of hemolysis, characteristics of fulminant hepatitis showing apoptosis, and a 53% mortality rate. However, no rats in the ID group died of fulminant hepatitis. Hepatic iron, especially "free" iron concentration and the extent of hepatic fibrosis in the ID group were far less than those of the RD group. At week 65, all rats in the RD group developed liver cancer, whereas none did in the ID group. These results suggest that the accumulation of iron, possibly by virtue of synergistic radical formation with copper, plays an essential role in the development of fulminant hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis, and subsequent hepatocarcinogenesis in LEC rats.

  19. Mechanism of hepatorenal syndrome in rats of Long-Evans Cinnamon strain, an animal model of fulminant Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, K; Nomiyama, H; Kameda, N; Tsuji, A; Sakurai, H

    1999-02-15

    Rats of Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) strain were used as a hepatorenal syndrome model of fulminant Wilson's disease. Copper levels in the kidneys increased markedly from 16 to 126 microg Cu/g from 12 to 16 weeks, and remained at the same level at 16 and 19 weeks when the rats suffered from severe renal dysfunction and also at 20 weeks in some other normal rats. The above findings imply that the renal dysfunction may have been induced independently of the copper level in the kidneys. The present study suggested the following mechanism: immediately after copper-induced hepatic dysfunction, plasma copper-metallothionein (CuMT), which was released from the liver, became elevated. The elevation was closely related to the increases in alkaline phosphatase, glucose and amino acids, all in the urine. The above findings suggest that plasma CuMT, which was released from the liver into the blood upon copper-induced hepatic dysfunction, was subsequently filtered at the glomeruli due to its smaller molecular weight, and then caused dysfunction of the brush border membrane of the renal proximal tubules probably after splitting into radical copper and amino acids in acidic vesicles close to the membrane. The critical concentration of plasma CuMT required to induce renal dysfunction was estimated as 1 microg Cu/l.

  20. To explore the neonatal nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards caring for dying neonates in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Huei; Huang, Li-Chi; Liu, Hsin-Li; Lee, Ho-Yu; Wu, Shu-Ya; Chang, Yue-Cune; Peng, Niang-Huei

    2013-12-01

    (1) To explore attitudes and beliefs of neonatal nurses toward nursing care for dying neonates; (2) to estimate the influence of neonatal nurses' personal and professional characteristics on their attitudes towards end-of life care for dying infants. A cross-sectional design was used. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 80 neonatal nurses. Research setting was four level III NICUs at four medical centers around the central region of Taiwan. Research participants were neonatal nurses who had worked for at least 1 year in one of level III NICUs and had been directly involved with the care of dying infants. Research participants were 80 neonatal nurses (response rate 100 %). Research findings identified eight barriers hindering neonatal palliative care practice. These barriers were insufficient communication due to the lack of an in-service educational program; the lack of available counseling help for neonatal clinicians; inability to express personal opinions, values and beliefs towards neonatal palliative care; insufficient staffing; the lack of unit policies/guidelines for supporting palliative care; the technological imperative; parental demands and personal beliefs about death and previous experience caring for dying infants. Further studies are needed to explore each barrier and to provide in-service neonatal palliative care educational programs that are needed to decrease these barriers.

  1. Osteopontin-Rac1 on Blood-Brain Barrier Stability Following Rodent Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brandon; Malaguit, Jay; Casel, Darlene; Doycheva, Desislava; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H; Lekic, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a neuroprotective molecule that is upregulated following rodent neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (nHI) brain injury. Because Rac1 is a regulator of blood-brain barrier (BBB) stability, we hypothesized a role for this in OPN signaling. nHI was induced by unilateral ligation of the right carotid artery followed by hypoxia (8 % oxygen for 2 h) in P10 Sprague-Dawley rat pups. Intranasal (iN) OPN was administered at 1 h post-nHI. Groups consisted of: (1) Sham, (2) Vehicle, (3) OPN, and (4) OPN + Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Evans blue dye extravasation (BBB permeability) was quantified 24 h post-nHI, and brain edema at 48 h. Increased BBB permeability and brain edema following nHI was ameliorated in the OPN treatment group. However, those rat pups receiving OPN co-treatment with the Rac1 inhibitor experienced no improvement compared with vehicle. OPN protects the BBB following nHI, and this was reversed by Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). PMID:26463959

  2. The Evans Aldol-Prins cyclization: a general and stereoselective method for the synthesis of 2,3,4,5,6-pentasubstituted tetrahydropyrans.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Méndez, Sergio J; García, Celina; Martín, Víctor S

    2016-02-25

    A general and stereoselective method to synthesize 2,3,4,5,6-pentasubstituted tetrahydropyrans in three steps starting from three different aldehydes is described. Key substrates β,γ-unsaturated N-acyloxazolidin-2-ones were subjected to an "Evans Aldol-Prins" protocol to generate five σ-bonds and five stereocenters in only a one-pot process with yields up to 60% and excellent stereoselectivities.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-91) - Hood River Fish Habitat (Evans Creek Culvert Replacement)

    SciTech Connect

    Yarde, Richard

    2002-10-01

    BPA and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO) propose to remove a culvert acting as a fish passage barrier, and replace it with a bridge. The culvert is located on a private residential / farm access road on Evans Creek, a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. The culvert will be replaced with a clear-span bridge in order to eliminate the passage barrier and open several miles of stream as fish habitat.

  4. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  5. Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A.; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A six-hour hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15 min or 2 hr after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and Caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the

  6. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  7. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  8. Neonatal melioidosis: a case report from India.

    PubMed

    Noyal, M J C; Harish, B N; Bhat, V; Parija, S C

    2009-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei , is an infectious disease of major public health importance in Southeast Asia and Australia. We report, for the first time from the Indian subcontinent, a case of melioidosis in a neonate, its clinical presentation, microbiological diagnosis, possible mode of transmission and outcome. A pre-term female baby developed respiratory distress soon after birth. The child was febrile, had tachypnea, grunting, normal heart rate with a low pulse volume and poor peripheral perfusion. Chest X-ray revealed right-sided bronchopneumonia. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the blood culture of the neonate collected aseptically. The neonate was successfully treated with meropenem. PMID:19584512

  9. Diagnosis and management of neonatal thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Holzhauer, Susanne; Zieger, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the most common haematological abnormality in newborns admitted to neonatal care units and serves as an important indicator of underlying pathological processes of mother or child. In most cases thrombocytopenia is mild to moderate and resolves within the first weeks of life without any intervention. However, in some neonates thrombocytopenia is severe or may reflect an inborn platelet disorder. As clinical course and outcome of thrombocytopenia depend on the aetiology of thrombocytopenia, an appropriate work-up is essential to guide therapy in neonates with thrombocytopenia and to avoid severe bleeding.

  10. Neonatal peripheral hypotonia: clinical and electromyographic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Parano, E; Lovelace, R E

    1993-06-01

    Hypotonia is a common occurrence in pediatrics, especially in the neonatal period. The hypotonic neonate represents a diagnostic challenge for the general pediatrician because hypotonia may be caused by a lesion at any level in the neuraxis: (1) central nervous system (CNS), (2) peripheral nerves (PN), (3) neuromuscular junction, or (4) muscles. Distinguishing among these pathologies is a particularly arduous task. This review will discuss the clinical approach to neonatal hypotonia with emphasis on disorders of the peripheral nervous system and muscle, and the importance of the electrophysiological study as a diagnostic test.

  11. Retinoblastoma in the perinatal and neonatal child.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Dan S

    2012-08-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare primary intraocular malignancy. Presentation in the neonatal period is not common. With improved genetic testing, screening of the unborn child and neonate is taking on a greater role in the management of these patients. Treatment of retinoblastoma in the neonate is complex and requires a multidisciplinary and highly individualized approach. If possible, focal modalities should be used and external beam radiation avoided. Systemic intravenous chemotherapy may be necessary with regimens including carboplatin, vincristine and etoposide. Such cases are best managed by specialist centers with access to experts in oncology, ophthalmology, radiation therapy, genetics, pathology and anesthesia.

  12. Neonatal sludge: a finding of congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Coban, Dilek; Akın, Mustafa Ali; Akın, Leyla; Yıkılmaz, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most urgent diseases of the neonate. When diagnosed and treated at an early stage, its most important complication, mental retardation, is preventable. The signs of congenital hypothyroidism are nonspecific in neonates. Only 5% of the cases have characteristic clinical findings. One of the most important and earliest signs is prolonged jaundice during the neonatal period. We report herein a case of congenital hypothyroidism, who presented with icterus accompanied with sludge formation into the gallbladder, which disappeared after treatment with L-thyroxine.

  13. [Neonatal deafness screening with the evoked otoacoustic emissions technique. Study of 320 newborns at the neonatal resuscitation service of the Amiens neonatal care unit].

    PubMed

    Ayache, S; Kolski, C; Stramandinoli, E; Leke, A; Krim, G; Strunski, V

    2001-04-01

    Between January 1997 and June 1999, we screened for hearing loss using evoked otoacoustic emissions in 320 newborns in the neonate intensive care unit at the Amiens University Hospital. The purpose of this study was to search for correlations between deafness and one of the hearing loss risk factors identified by the Joint Committee on Infant Screening. Three risk factors were found to be significant: craniofacial abnormalities, low birth weight (less than 1500 g) and a familial history of hearing loss. Unfortunately a large proportion of the infants were lost to follow-up. Evoked otoacoustic emission provide an excellent screening technique for hearing loss in newborns. Such screening implies however the creation of networks to assure patient follow-up.

  14. Predicting Infant Maltreatment in Low-Income Families: The Interactive Effects of Maternal Attributions and Child Status at Birth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugental, Daphne Blunt; Happaney, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Maternal attributions and child neonatal status at birth were assessed as predictors of infant maltreatment (harsh parenting and safety neglect). The population included low-income, low-education families who were primarily Hispanic. Child maltreatment during the 1st year of life (N = 73) was predicted by neonatal status (low Apgar scores, preterm…

  15. Family Meals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  16. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  17. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  18. High t-PA release by neonate brain microvascular endothelial cells under glutamate exposure affects neuronal fate.

    PubMed

    Henry, Vincent Jean; Lecointre, Maryline; Laudenbach, Vincent; Ali, Carine; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Berezowski, Vincent; Carmeliet, Peter; Vivien, Denis; Marret, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Bruno José; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is a consolidated hypothesis in neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor mediated effects. In brain microvascular endothelial cell (nBMEC) cultures from neonates, t-PA content and release upon glutamate are higher than in adult (aBMECs) cultures. Owing to the variety of t-PA substrates and receptor targets, the study was aimed at determining the putative roles of endothelial t-PA in the neonatal brain parenchyma under glutamate challenge. Basal t-PA release was 4.4 fold higher in nBMECs vs aBMECs and glutamate was 20 fold more potent to allow Evans blue vascular permeability in neonate microvessels indicating that, under noxious glutamate (50 μM) exposure, high amounts of endothelial t-PA stores may be mobilized and may access the nervous parenchyma. Culture media from nBMECS or aBMECs challenged by excitotoxic glutamate were applied to neuron cultures at DIV 11. While media from adult cells did not evoke more LDH release in neuronal cultures that under glutamate alone, media from nBMECs enhanced 2.2 fold LDH release. This effect was not observed with media from t-PA(-/-) nBMECs and was inhibited by hr-PAI-1. In Cortical slices from 10 day-old mice, hrt-PA associated with glutamate evoked neuronal necrosis in deeper (more mature) layers, an effect reversed by NMDA receptor GluN1 amino-terminal domain antibody capable of inhibiting t-PA potentiation of the receptor. In superficial layers (less mature), hrt-PA alone inhibited apoptosis, an effect reversed by the EGF receptor antagonist AG1478. Applied to immature neurons in culture (DIV5), media from nBMEC rescued 85.1% of neurons from cell death induced by serum deprivation. In cortical slices, the anti-apoptotic effect of t-PA fitted with age dependent localization of less mature neurons. These data suggest that in the immature brain, propensity of vessels to release high amounts of t-PA may not only

  19. Neonatal ovarian cysts: therapeutic dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Widdowson, D J; Pilling, D W; Cook, R C

    1988-01-01

    Seven cases of neonatal ovarian cysts that presented over the past seven years were studied. Complications included torsion and rupture and usually occurred in cysts more than 5 cm in diameter. Surgical removal, either oophorectomy or cystectomy, was the treatment of choice. Because even cystectomy results in loss of normal ovarian tissue, and because spontaneous regression of cysts less than 5 cm in diameter can occur, a more conservative approach is now proposed. Regular ultrasonography alone is recommended if the cysts are less than 5 cm in diameter, and aspiration of the cysts followed by regular ultrasonographs if the cysts are more than 5 cm in diameter. Operation should be reserved for recurrent cysts or for those with complications. Cysts diagnosed antenatally may be aspirated in utero if there are signs of thoracic compression. Images Fig 1a Fig 1b Fig 2 PMID:3046508

  20. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale for predicting skin breakdown in neonates.

    PubMed

    Huffines, B; Logsdon, M C

    1997-01-01

    An instrument was developed to assess neonates at risk for skin breakdown, based on the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk in adults. Using such an instrument to predict, and thus prevent, skin breakdown could decrease costs associated with prolonged hospital stays in neonates. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale (NSRAS) was piloted with 32 neonates. Reliability was high for the subscales of general physical condition, activity, and nutrition, but low in the other three subscales. For predictive validity, sensitivity was 83% and specificity was 81%. The NSRAS appears to be useful in predicting days most likely for skin breakdown to occur.

  1. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone level is influenced by neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy factors.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Vanderpas, Jean; Tafforeau, Jean; Van Oyen, Herman; De Schepper, Jean

    2015-11-01

    The percentage of newborns with a neonatal whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) greater than 5 mIU/L has been used as an indicator of iodine deficiency at the population level. However, TSH levels in newborns may be influenced by many factors other than iodine status. The objective of this study was to identify neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants of neonatal TSH levels in a retrospective cohort study. The study sample included 313 Belgian mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children. The children had a neonatal TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mIU/L at neonatal screening, and blood samples were collected 3 to 5 days after birth. Children with suspected congenital hypothyroidism (neonatal TSH level >15 mIU/L), prematurely born (i.e., <37 weeks), or with a low birth weight (i.e., <2500 g) were excluded. Information about maternal and birth-related determinants was collected from the neonatal screening center via a self-administered questionnaire filled in by the mother together with the child's health booklet. Higher TSH levels were found in spring and winter compared to summer and autumn (P = .011). Higher TSH levels were associated with lifetime smoking behavior (up to child birth) in the mother (P = .005), lower weight gain during pregnancy (P = .014), and longer pregnancies (P = .003). This study showed that several neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants are influencing neonatal TSH level. PMID:26428622

  2. Challenging issues in neonatal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, David A

    2010-07-01

    In an era of quality improvement and 'getting to zero (infections and/or related mortality),' neonatal candidiasis is ripe for evidence-based initiatives. Knowledge of each institution's invasive Candida infection (ICI) incidence and infection-related mortality is critical to evaluate disease burden and effective interventions. Evidenced-based interventions include: antifungal prophylaxis, starting with appropriate dosing, and prompt removal of central venous catheters (CVC). There is A-I evidence supporting antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole, and it should be considered in every neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The literature supports targeting infants <1000 g and/or 1000 g and >or=28 weeks not receiving antifungal prophylaxis. Evaluation of ICI incidence and

  3. Profuse congenital familial milia with absent dermatoglyphics (Basan's Syndrome): description of a new family.

    PubMed

    Luna, Paula Carolina; Larralde, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Milia are common, small, keratin-containing cysts frequently seen in all age groups. They may arise spontaneously or develop after a variety of stimuli. They can be found alone or as part of syndromes. We present a female neonate born not only with profuse facial milia, but also with acral bullae and absent dermatoglyphics. Similar features were seen in several members of her family. These findings correspond to the syndrome known as Basan's syndrome, a rare autosomal-dominant inherited dermatosis characterized by profuse congenital milia, transient neonatal acral bullae, and absence of dermatoglyphics.

  4. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies.

  5. Neonatal care practices in a tribal community of Odisha, India: a cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Chauhan, Abhimanyu S; Panda, Madhusmita; Swain, Subhashish; Hussain, Mohammad A

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal care practices have been shown to vary across tribal communities. This cross-sectional study was conducted in tribal block in Nabarangpur district of Odisha, India, to measure perinatal and antenatal practices by qualitative inquiries of 55 mothers who had babies aged <60 days and from 11 traditional birth attendants. Reasons for home deliveries were cited as easy availability of traditional birth attendants and family preferences. Application of indigenously made substances on umbilical stump and skin of the baby, bathing baby immediately after birth, late initiation of breast-feeding and 'Budu practices' were common. Cultural issues, decision of family members and traditional beliefs still play a crucial role in shaping neonatal care practice in tribal communities. Awareness on child care, ethnographic understanding of health-seeking behavior of tribal community and mobilization of community by health workers can be useful in improving health status of mothers and newborn babies in tribal population.

  6. Stress facilitates late reversal learning using a touchscreen-based visual discrimination procedure in male Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Courtney A; Howland, John G

    2015-02-01

    The stress response is essential to the survival of all species as it maintains internal equilibrium and allows organisms to respond to threats in the environment. Most stress research has focused on the detrimental impacts of stress on cognition and behavior. Reversal learning, which requires a change in response strategy based on one dimension of the stimuli, is one type of behavioral flexibility that is facilitated following some brief stress procedures. The current study investigated a potential mechanism underlying this facilitation by blocking glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) during stress. Thirty-seven male Long Evans rats learned to discriminate between two images on a touchscreen, one of which was rewarded. Once a criterion was reached, rats received stress (30 min of restraint stress or no stress) and drug (GR antagonist RU38486 or vehicle) administration prior to each of the first 3 days of reversal learning. We expected that stress would facilitate reversal learning and RU38486 (10 mg/kg) would prevent this facilitation in both early (<50% correct in one session) and late (>50% correct in one session) stages of reversal learning. Results showed that stressed rats performed better than unstressed rats (fewer days for late reversal, fewer correction trials, and fewer errors) in the late but not early stage of reversal learning. RU38486 did not block the facilitation of RL by stress, although it dramatically increased response, but not reward, latencies. These results confirm the facilitation of late reversal by stress in a touchscreen-based operant task in rats and further our understanding of how stress affects higher level cognitive functioning and behavior. PMID:25251839

  7. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Katherine M.; Weir, Ruth K.; Silverman, Jill L.; Berman, Robert F.; Bauman, Melissa D.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE), between the ages of postnatal day (PND) 26–56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i) commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii) the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii) simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions. PMID:27351457

  8. Preventive effect of zinc compounds, polaprezinc and zinc acetate against the onset of hepatitis in Long-Evans Cinnamon rat.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, N; Katakura, M; Sugawara, C

    1999-02-01

    It is known that Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats are characterized by the fulminant hepatitis occurring as a result of an abnormal hepatic deposition of Cu due to the lack of the Cu-transporter p-type ATPase. To prevent the hepatitis, two Zn compounds, Zn acetate and polaprezinc were given orally to LEC rats aged 30 days. At 100 days after birth, the control group composed of LEC rats fed a basal diet (Cu, 17 ppm; Zn, 50 ppm; Fe, 150 ppm) exhibited slight jaundice and showed high activities of serum enzymes related to hepatic function. The groups fed the diet fortified (1000 ppm as Zn) with Zn acetate or polaprezinc did not have jaundice. The hepatic Cu concentrations were 174 +/- 34 micrograms/g and 156 +/- 23 micrograms/g in the polaplezinc group and Zn acetate group, respectively. The control group showed 267 +/- 17 micrograms Cu/g and 298 +/- 62 micrograms Fe/g in the liver. The Fe concentration was about 1.7 times the concentration in the two Zn groups. Hepatic free Cu and Fe concentrations were 2.6 +/- 0.3 and 21.4 +/- 5.8 micrograms/g, 1.7 +/- 0.7 and 6.8 +/- 1.1 micrograms/g, and 1.3 +/- 0.1 and 6.2 +/- 0.8 micrograms/g in the control, polaprezinc and zinc acetate groups, respectively. Intestinal metallothionein (MT) concentrations were not increased significantly by the Zn diets. The two Zn compounds inhibit Cu absorption from the intestinal tract, resulting in a decrease of hepatic Cu deposition. The new Zn compound as well as Zn acetate is categorized as a therapeutic drug for Cu poisoning, including Wilson's disease.

  9. In vivo cerebral incorporation of radiolabeled fatty acids after acute unilateral orbital enucleation in adult hooded Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, S.; Freed, L.M.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1994-03-01

    We examined effects of acute unilateral enucleation on incorporation from blood of intravenously injected unsaturated [1-{sup 14}C]arachidonic acid ([{sup 14}C]AA) and [1-{sup 14}C]docosahexaenoic acid ([{sup 14}C]DHA), and of saturated [9,10-{sup 3}H]palmitic acid ([{sup 3}H]PA), into visual and nonvisual brain areas of awake adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR{sub glc}) values also were assessed with 2-deoxy-D-[1-{sup 14}C]glucose ([{sup 14}C]DG). One day after unilateral enucleation, an awake rat was placed in a brightly lit visual stimulation box with black and white striped walls, and a radiolabeled fatty acid was infused for 5 min or [{sup 14}C]DG was injected as a bolus. [{sup 14}C]DG also was injected in a group of rats kept in the dark for 4 h. Fifteen minutes after starting an infusion of a radiolabeled fatty acid, or 45 min after injecting [{sup 14}C]DG, the rat was killed and the brain was prepared for quantitative autoradiography. Incorporation coefficients k* of fatty acids, or rCMR{sub glc} values, were calculated in homologous brain regions contralateral and ipsilateral to enucleation. As compared with ipsilateral regions, rCMR{sub glc} was reduced significantly (by as much as -39%) in contralateral visual areas, including the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate body, and layers I, IV, and V of the primary (striate) and secondary (association, extrastriate) visual cortices. These results indicate that enucleation acutely reduces neuronal activity in contralateral visual areas of the awake rat and that the reductions are coupled to reduced incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into sn-2 regions of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Reduced fatty acid incorporation likely reflects reduced activity of phospholipases A{sub 2} and/or phospholipase C. 65 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Influence of gender on thermoregulation and cholinesterase inhibition in the long-evans rat exposed to diazinon.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Mack, Cina M

    2003-02-14

    Diazinon is an organophosphate (OP)-based, anticholinesterase insecticide that irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and produces cholinergic stimulation in central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. Our laboratory has found that OPs administered orally in rats induce a transient period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever that persists for several days after exposure. There is little information on the thermoregulatory effects of diazinon. Core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radiotelemetry in male and female rats of the Long-Evans strain dosed orally with diazinon (0 [corn-oil vehicle], 100, 200, or 300 mg/kg in males and 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg in females). There was a dose-dependent decrease in Tc during the first night after treatment, with females exhibiting slightly greater sensitivity than males. MA was unaffected in females exposed to diazinon at doses of 50 to 200 mg/kg; MA of males was reduced during the first night after dosing with 300 mg/kg. There was a delayed elevation in Tc of males dosed with 200 and 300 mg/kg and females dosed with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg diazinon. The elevated Tc was only manifested during d 2 and 3 after diazinon. Administration of 200 mg/kg sodium salicylate to females 48 h after being treated with 200 mg/kg diazinon led to a rapid abatement of the fever. Diazinon doses of 50 to 300 mg/kg led to 40% to 50% inhibition in plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity 4 h after dosing, and females displayed a significantly slower recovery of ChE activity compared to males. When compared on a molar basis, the hypothermic response to diazinon was relatively small compared to other OPs such as chlorpyrifos. The delayed fever and efficacy of sodium salicylate to block diazinon-induced fever are similar to the effects of OPs chlorpyrifos and diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate (DFP). PMID:12521673

  11. Stress facilitates late reversal learning using a touchscreen-based visual discrimination procedure in male Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Courtney A; Howland, John G

    2015-02-01

    The stress response is essential to the survival of all species as it maintains internal equilibrium and allows organisms to respond to threats in the environment. Most stress research has focused on the detrimental impacts of stress on cognition and behavior. Reversal learning, which requires a change in response strategy based on one dimension of the stimuli, is one type of behavioral flexibility that is facilitated following some brief stress procedures. The current study investigated a potential mechanism underlying this facilitation by blocking glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) during stress. Thirty-seven male Long Evans rats learned to discriminate between two images on a touchscreen, one of which was rewarded. Once a criterion was reached, rats received stress (30 min of restraint stress or no stress) and drug (GR antagonist RU38486 or vehicle) administration prior to each of the first 3 days of reversal learning. We expected that stress would facilitate reversal learning and RU38486 (10 mg/kg) would prevent this facilitation in both early (<50% correct in one session) and late (>50% correct in one session) stages of reversal learning. Results showed that stressed rats performed better than unstressed rats (fewer days for late reversal, fewer correction trials, and fewer errors) in the late but not early stage of reversal learning. RU38486 did not block the facilitation of RL by stress, although it dramatically increased response, but not reward, latencies. These results confirm the facilitation of late reversal by stress in a touchscreen-based operant task in rats and further our understanding of how stress affects higher level cognitive functioning and behavior.

  12. Cessation of daily exercise dramatically alters precursors of hepatic steatosis in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats.

    PubMed

    Rector, R Scott; Thyfault, John P; Laye, Matthew J; Morris, R Tyler; Borengasser, Sarah J; Uptergrove, Grace M; Chakravarthy, Manu V; Booth, Frank W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate potential mechanisms initiating the onset of hepatic steatosis following the cessation of daily physical activity. Four-week-old, hyperphagic/obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were given access to voluntary running wheels for 16 weeks to prevent the development of hepatic steatosis. The animals were then suddenly transitioned to a sedentary condition as wheels were locked (wheel lock; WL) for 5 h (WL5), 53 h (WL53) or 173 h (WL173). Importantly after the cessation of daily exercise (5-173 h), no changes occurred in body weight, fat pad mass (omental and retroperitoneal), food intake, serum insulin, hepatic triglycerides or in the exercise-suppressed hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma protein content. However, complete hepatic fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial enzyme activities were highest at WL5 and WL53 and dropped significantly to SED levels by WL173. In addition, cessation of daily exercise quickly increased the hepatic protein contents of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), reduced ACC phosphorylation status, and dramatically increased hepatic malonyl-CoA concentration. This study is the first to show that the sudden cessation of daily exercise in a hyperphagic/obese model activates a subgroup of precursors and processes known to initiate hepatic steatosis, including decreased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increased hepatic expression of de novo lipogenesis proteins, and increased hepatic malonyl CoA levels; each probably increasing the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  13. Chronic ethanol exposure increases voluntary home cage intake in adult male, but not female, Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Melissa; McGinnis, Molly M; McCool, Brian A

    2015-12-01

    The current experiment examined the effects of 10 days of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on anxiety-like behavior and home cage ethanol intake using a 20% intermittent access (M, W, F) paradigm in male and female Long-Evans rats. Withdrawal from alcohol dependence contributes to relapse in humans and increases in anxiety-like behavior and voluntary ethanol consumption in preclinical models. Our laboratory has shown that 10 days of CIE exposure produces both behavioral and neurophysiological alterations associated with withdrawal in male rats; however, we have yet to examine the effects of this exposure regime on ethanol intake in females. During baseline, females consumed more ethanol than males but, unlike males, did not show escalations in intake. Rats were then exposed to CIE and were again given intermittent access to 20% ethanol. CIE males increased their intake compared to baseline, whereas air-exposed males did not. Ethanol intake in females was unaffected by CIE exposure. Notably, both sexes expressed significantly elevated withdrawal-associated anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Finally, rats were injected with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, SR141716A (0, 1, 3, 10mg/kg, i.p.) which reduced ethanol intake in both sexes. However, females appear to be more sensitive to lower doses of this CB1 receptor antagonist. Our results show that females consume more ethanol than males; however, they did not escalate their intake using the intermittent access paradigm. Unlike males, CIE exposure had no effect on drinking in females. It is possible that females may be less sensitive than males to ethanol-induced increases in drinking after a short CIE exposure. Lastly, our results demonstrate that males and females may have different pharmacological sensitivities to CB1 receptor blockade on ethanol intake, at least under the current conditions.

  14. Atrazine-induced reproductive tract alterations after transplacental and/or lactational exposure in male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, Jennifer L.; Enoch, Rolondo R.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Fenton, Suzanne E. . E-mail: fenton.suzanne@epa.gov

    2007-02-01

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR would also result in altered puberty and reproductive tissue effects in the male rat. Timed-pregnant Long-Evans (LE) rats were dosed by gavage on gestational days (GD) 15-19 with 100 mg ATR/kg body weight (BW) or 1% methylcellulose (controls, C). On postnatal day (PND)1, half litters were cross-fostered, creating 4 treatment groups; C-C, ATR-C, C-ATR, and ATR-ATR (transplacental-milk as source, respectively). On PND4, male offspring in the ATR-ATR group weighed significantly less than the C-C males. ATR-ATR male pups had significantly delayed preputial separation (PPS). BWs at PPS for C-ATR and ATR-ATR males were reduced by 6% and 9%, respectively, from that of C-C. On PND120, lateral prostate weights of males in the ATR-ATR group were significantly increased over C-C. Histological examination of lateral and ventral prostates identified an increased distribution of inflammation in the lateral prostates of C-ATR males. By PND220, lateral prostate weights were significantly increased for ATR-C and ATR-ATR, but there were no significant changes in inflammation in either the lateral or ventral prostate. These results suggest that in LE rats, gestational ATR exposure delays PPS when male offspring suckle an ATR dam, but leads to increased lateral prostate weight via transplacental exposure alone. Inflammation present at PND120 does not increase in severity with time.

  15. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ku, Katherine M; Weir, Ruth K; Silverman, Jill L; Berman, Robert F; Bauman, Melissa D

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE), between the ages of postnatal day (PND) 26-56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i) commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii) the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii) simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions. PMID:27351457

  16. Behavioral Phenotyping of Juvenile Long-Evans and Sprague-Dawley Rats: Implications for Preclinical Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ku, Katherine M; Weir, Ruth K; Silverman, Jill L; Berman, Robert F; Bauman, Melissa D

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rat is emerging as an attractive preclinical animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), allowing investigators to explore genetic, environmental and pharmacological manipulations in a species exhibiting complex, reciprocal social behavior. The present study was carried out to compare two commonly used strains of laboratory rats, Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Long-Evans (LE), between the ages of postnatal day (PND) 26-56 using high-throughput behavioral phenotyping tools commonly used in mouse models of ASD that we have adapted for use in rats. We detected few differences between young SD and LE strains on standard assays of exploration, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, repetitive behaviors, and learning. Both SD and LE strains also demonstrated sociability in the 3-chamber social approach test as indexed by spending more time in the social chamber with a constrained age/strain/sex matched novel partner than in an identical chamber without a partner. Pronounced differences between the two strains were, however, detected when the rats were allowed to freely interact with a novel partner in the social dyad paradigm. The SD rats in this particular testing paradigm engaged in play more frequently and for longer durations than the LE rats at both juvenile and young adult developmental time points. Results from this study that are particularly relevant for developing preclinical ASD models in rats are threefold: (i) commonly utilized strains exhibit unique patterns of social interactions, including strain-specific play behaviors, (ii) the testing environment may profoundly influence the expression of strain-specific social behavior and (iii) simple, automated measures of sociability may not capture the complexities of rat social interactions.

  17. Whole blood viscosity of preterm infants - differences to term neonates.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-01-01

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates with the LS 300 allows approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids across the entire physiological shear range. Particular in preterm neonates, which in comparison to term neonates and adults have a substantially lower mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), rheological blood properties play a decisive role to maintain the perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 34 preterm neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. In addition aggregation index, plasma viscosity, hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined. The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of whole blood was achieved by the method of Ostwald. Shear stresses of whole blood of preterm neonates were significantly lower compared to term neonates at similar shear rates (velocity range 6.16 s-1-50 s-1). With hematocrit calculated to 0.40 the related exponent (n) of the viscosity of preterm neonates (by Ostwald) showed a significant lower exponent (n) (0.71 ± 0.07) than term neonates (0.76 ± 0.06). The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of plasma was achieved with the model of Ostwald in preterm neonates as well as in term neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Newton was lower for preterm neonates (0.89 ± 0.19) than for term neonates (1.04 ± 0.16). Concurrent to term neonates the whole blood of preterm neonates showed a very low aggregation index (term neonates 2.97 ± 2.10; preterm neonates 2.37 ± 1.32) and preterm neonates showed higher RBC deformability than term neonates. Because of the physiologically lower MAP and the particular viscous properties of neonatal blood special attention should be given when treating neonates with conventional blood products derived from adult donors. PMID:26444619

  18. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  19. Anaesthetic consideration for neonatal surgical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Pani, Nibedita; Panda, Chinmaya K

    2012-09-01

    A newborn requires constant vigilance, rapid recognition of the events and swift intervention during anaesthesia. The anaesthetic considerations in neonatal surgical emergencies are based on the physiological immaturity of various body systems, poor tolerance of the anaesthetic drugs, associated congenital disorders and considerations regarding the use of high concentration of oxygen. The main goal is for titration of anaesthetics to desired effects, while carefully monitoring of the cardiorespiratory status. The use of regional anaesthesia has shown to be safe and effective. Advancements in neonatology have resulted in the improvement of the survival of the premature and critically ill newborn babies. Most of the disorders previously considered as neonatal surgical emergencies in the past no longer require immediate surgery due to new technology and new methods of treating sick neonates. This article describes the common neonatal surgical emergencies and focuses on factors that affect the anaesthetic management of patients with these disorders.

  20. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable disease.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, H Hunter; Waldo, Ann B; Brown, Zane A; Corey, Lawrence; Drucker, Joan L; Ebel, Charles W; Leone, Peter A; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Whitley, Richard J

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal herpes is a devastating disease, the most serious complication of genital herpes, one of the most common serious congenital or perinatal infections, and the most frequent complication of sexually transmitted infections among children. Nevertheless, neonatal herpes is not reportable to health authorities in most states. The potential for prevention has been enhanced by recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances, and the disease meets widely accepted criteria for reporting, including incidence rates that exceed those of comparable conditions, epidemiologic instability, disease severity, direct and indirect socioeconomic costs, concern by persons at risk, the potential for prevention by public health interventions, and the prospect that the resulting data would influence public health policy. The absence of national surveillance contributes to beliefs by healthcare providers and the public health community that genital and neonatal herpes are uncommon conditions that affect small segments of society, beliefs that directly interfere with prevention. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable condition. PMID:16118598

  1. Perspectives on neonatal nursing: 1985-2005.

    PubMed

    Samson, Linda F

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal nursing practice has been influenced by a number of external forces over the past 20 years. This article explores some of the influences that have altered practice in the 20-year history of the Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Attention is directed to several significant influences such as the development of the Internet and the World Wide Web and the role that information plays in care delivery. Changing practice roles with the continuing evolution of the neonatal nurse practitioner role and the emerging plans for the doctorate of nursing practice are described. The history of professional associations for neonatal nurses and the impact of evidence-based practice are considered. Finally, the legal environment surrounding practice is explored.

  2. Five families share their views of ethical decisionmaking in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Pinch, W J

    1990-12-01

    Five families' descriptions of their experiences with neonates in the intensive care nursery provides a glimpse into their perceptions of ethical problems and moral actions. Based on clinical experiences with families of high-risk neonates in the community health setting, a need for parents to share their reflections with a broader audience was identified. Definitions of conflict, identification of moral problems, and determination of right action showed similarities and differences among the families. Future study is suggested to validate these impressions for generalization to additional families.

  3. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  4. Cranial MRI in neonatal hypernatraemic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, A; Yiğit, S; Firat, M; Oran, O

    2000-05-01

    Severe neonatal hypernatraemia is a life-threatening electrolyte disorder because of its neurological complications. These are brain oedema, intracranial haemorrhages, haemorrhagic infarcts and thromboses. There are few reports concerning the radiological findings in the central nervous system in severe neonatal hypernatraemia. Cranial MRI findings in hypernatraemia have been reported in an older child, but have not been described in newborn infants. We report the cranial MRI findings in a newborn infant with acute renal failure and severe hypernatraemia.

  5. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kenji; Fujita, Riku; Maezawa, Masaki; Fukumoto, Natsuko; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Inokuma, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-08-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  6. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  7. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant, born at 39 weeks' gestation, and diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition and being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Jack's prognosis is poor and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. PMID:27615591

  8. Naloxone during neonatal resuscitation: acknowledging the unknown.

    PubMed

    Guinsburg, Ruth; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2006-03-01

    There are no studies to support or to refute the current recommendations regarding naloxone concentration, routes for administration, and doses in neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room. Given the lack of supporting evidence, naloxone should not be given routinely in the delivery room to depressed neonates whether or not they are exposed to opioids before delivery because no important improvement has been documented and the drug may have potential short- and long-term harmful effects.

  9. Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abdulraheem, Muhydeen Abiodun; Tongo, Olukemi Oluwatoyin; Orimadegun, Adebola Emmanuel; Akinbami, Olukayode Felix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal transport involves moving sick neonates in optimal conditions to ensure good outcomes. It is well organized in most developed countries but receives little attention in developing countries where the highest burden of neonatal mortality exists and a large number of newborns require referrals daily for better medical care. This study sought to evaluate the modes of transport, pre- and intra-transport care of neonates referred to the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods The methods of transporting 401 neonates presenting to the children’s emergency room of the hospital were evaluated as well as the care the babies received during transport. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi square test while continuous variables were compared by the student t-test. Results About a third presented in the first 12hours and 85% in the first week of life, all from within 80km radius. There were 67.1% term, 31.4% preterm and 1.5% post-term neonates, all without prior communication. The modes of transport included private vehicles (43.9%), commercial vehicles (40.6%), motorcycles (9.0%), ambulance (4.0%) and on foot (2.5%). Only 3 (0.7%) were transported in incubators and none in KMC position. Only 42.0% had referral letters and 7.0% were accompanied by medical personnel. Materials available during transport included Ambubags (3.7%), oxygen (3.5%) and some drugs (3.5%). Events during transport were apnoea, 4.7%, vomiting 1.0%, reduced activity 16.2% and seizures 13.7%. 19 (4.7%) neonates were dead on arrival. Pre-transport care included resuscitation (18.2%), intravenous fluid/feeding (24.4%) and supplemental oxygen (14.0%). Conclusion Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria are abysmal with associated high mortality. PMID:27800071

  10. Trends in stillbirths, early and late neonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh: the role of public health interventions.

    PubMed

    Ronsmans, Carine; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Alam, Nurul; Koblinsky, Marge; El Arifeen, Shams

    2008-05-01

    Trends were examined in a cohort study of stillbirths and early and late neonatal deaths in Matlab, a rural area of Bangladesh between 1975 and 2002, using routinely collected demographic surveillance data. Main outcome measures were stillbirths per 1000 births, early neonatal deaths per 1000 livebirths, and late neonatal deaths per 1000 children surviving after 1 week. We performed a logistic regression examining trends over time and between two areas in the three outcome measures, controlling for the effects of parental education, religion, time, geography, parity, maternal age and birth spacing. There was a marked decline in stillbirths, early and late neonatal mortality over time in both areas, though the pace of decline was somewhat faster in the ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh) service area. Stillbirths declined by 24% overall in the ICDDR,B service area (crude OR comparing 1996-2002 with 1975-81: 0.76 [95% CI 0.68, 0.84]), compared with 15% in the Government service area (crude OR comparing 1996-2002 with 1975-81: 0.85 [0.76, 0.94]). The overall reduction in early and late neonatal mortality comparing the same periods was 39% and 73%, respectively, in the ICDDR,B area, compared with 30% and 63%, respectively, in the Government service area. Adjusting for socio-economic or demographic factors did not substantially alter the time or area differentials. The dramatic decline in neonatal mortality was, in large part, due to a fall in deaths from neonatal tetanus. The pace of decline was faster in the area receiving intense maternal and child health and family planning interventions, but stillbirths, early and late neonatal deaths also declined in the area not receiving such intense attention, suggesting that factors outside the formal health sector play an important role. PMID:18426522

  11. Trends in stillbirths, early and late neonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh: the role of public health interventions.

    PubMed

    Ronsmans, Carine; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Alam, Nurul; Koblinsky, Marge; El Arifeen, Shams

    2008-05-01

    Trends were examined in a cohort study of stillbirths and early and late neonatal deaths in Matlab, a rural area of Bangladesh between 1975 and 2002, using routinely collected demographic surveillance data. Main outcome measures were stillbirths per 1000 births, early neonatal deaths per 1000 livebirths, and late neonatal deaths per 1000 children surviving after 1 week. We performed a logistic regression examining trends over time and between two areas in the three outcome measures, controlling for the effects of parental education, religion, time, geography, parity, maternal age and birth spacing. There was a marked decline in stillbirths, early and late neonatal mortality over time in both areas, though the pace of decline was somewhat faster in the ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh) service area. Stillbirths declined by 24% overall in the ICDDR,B service area (crude OR comparing 1996-2002 with 1975-81: 0.76 [95% CI 0.68, 0.84]), compared with 15% in the Government service area (crude OR comparing 1996-2002 with 1975-81: 0.85 [0.76, 0.94]). The overall reduction in early and late neonatal mortality comparing the same periods was 39% and 73%, respectively, in the ICDDR,B area, compared with 30% and 63%, respectively, in the Government service area. Adjusting for socio-economic or demographic factors did not substantially alter the time or area differentials. The dramatic decline in neonatal mortality was, in large part, due to a fall in deaths from neonatal tetanus. The pace of decline was faster in the area receiving intense maternal and child health and family planning interventions, but stillbirths, early and late neonatal deaths also declined in the area not receiving such intense attention, suggesting that factors outside the formal health sector play an important role.

  12. Selenium status in neonates with connatal infection.

    PubMed

    Wiehe, Lennart; Cremer, Malte; Wisniewska, Monika; Becker, Niels-Peter; Rijntjes, Eddy; Martitz, Janine; Hybsier, Sandra; Renko, Kostja; Bührer, Christoph; Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases impair Se metabolism, and low Se status is associated with mortality risk in adults with critical disease. The Se status of neonates is poorly characterised, and a potential impact of connatal infection is unknown. We hypothesised that an infection negatively affects the Se status of neonates. We conducted an observational case-control study at three intensive care units at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Plasma samples were collected from forty-four neonates. On the basis of clinical signs for bacterial infection and concentrations of IL-6 or C-reactive protein, neonates were classified into control (n 23) and infected (n 21) groups. Plasma Se and selenoprotein P (SePP) concentrations were determined by X-ray fluorescence and ELISA, respectively, at day of birth (day 1) and 48 h later (day 3). Se and SePP showed a positive correlation in both groups of neonates. Se concentrations indicative of Se deficit in adults (500 ng/l). During antibiotic therapy, SePP increased significantly from day 1 (1·03 (sd 0·10) mg/l) to day 3 (1·34 (sd 0·10) mg/l), indicative of improved hepatic Se metabolism. We conclude that both Se and SePP are suitable biomarkers for assessing Se status in neonates and for identifying subjects at risk of deficiency. PMID:27267586

  13. A history of neonatal medicine in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaeizadeh, Golnaz; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mamak

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal medicine was officially initiated in the United States of America in 1973, and in the same year, the American Board of Pediatrics held the first subspecialty examination in the field of neonatal-perinatal medicine. The first Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Tehran began its work with great efforts of Prof. Hadi Samaee at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital, approved by the Ministry of Health as the first standard center for training neonatologists. Hence, the first neonatology fellowship program began in 1986 and two years later (1988) its graduate started work at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital. Afterwards, more NICUs were built all over the country and equipped gradually. The Iranian Association of Neonatology and Perinatology were founded in 1998 and 2003, respectively. These two scientific associations jointly made recommendations to health officials to develop consistent educational programs for neonatal and maternal health promotion in Iran. Regionalization of maternal-neonatal health services was also another recommendation which has now been presented to the Ministry of Health as a national program to promote neonatal and maternal health status. Thanks to the measures taken so far over the last few years, the index of neonatal mortality has declined from 26 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 11 per 1,000 live births in 2012.

  14. Antiepileptic drug treatment strategies in neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hernan, A E; Holmes, G L

    2016-01-01

    The highest risk of seizures across the lifespan is in the neonatal period. The enhanced excitability of the immature brain compared to the mature brain is related to the sequential development and expression of essential neurotransmitter signaling pathways. During the neonatal period there is an overabundance of excitatory receptors, and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is potentially depolarizing, as opposed to hyperpolarizing in the older brain. While this enhanced excitability is required for regulation of activity-dependent synapse formation and refining of synaptic connections that are necessary for normal brain development, enhanced excitability predisposes the immature brain to seizures. In addition to being common, neonatal seizures are very difficult to treat; antiepileptic drugs used in older children and adults are less efficacious, and possibly detrimental to brain development. In an effort to target the unique features of neurotransmission in the neonate, bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) and induces a significant shift of EGABA toward more hyperpolarized values in vitro, has been used to treat neonatal seizures. As the understanding of the pathophysiology of genetic forms of neonatal epilepsy has evolved there have been a few successful attempts to pharmacologically target the mutated protein. This approach, while promising, is challenging due to the findings that the genetic syndromes presenting in infancy demonstrate genetic heterogeneity in regard to both the mutated gene and its function. PMID:27323943

  15. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  16. Family Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Charles W., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the impact of learning disabilities within families, specifically families with low literacy skills. It explores the effectiveness of family literacy programs, examines the connection between the field of family literacy and learning disabilities (LD), and offers suggestions on how to work with students with…

  17. [Neonatal palliative care and culture].

    PubMed

    Bétrémieux, P; Mannoni, C

    2013-09-01

    The period of palliative care is a difficult time for parents and caregivers because they are all weakened by the proximity of death. First of all, because of religious and cultural differences, parents and families cannot easily express their beliefs or the rituals they are required to develop; second, this impossibility results in conflicts between the caregiver team and the family with consequences for both. Caregivers are concerned to allow the expression of religious beliefs and cultural demands because it is assumed that they may promote the work of mourning by relating the dead child to its family and roots. However, caregivers' fear not knowing the cultural context to which the family belongs and having inappropriate words or gestures, as sometimes families dare not, cannot, or do not wish to describe their cultural background. We attempt to differentiate what relates to culture and to religion and attempt to identify areas of potential disagreement between doctors, staff, and family. Everyone has to work with the parents to open a space of freedom that is not limited by cultural and religious assumptions. The appropriation of medical anthropology concepts allows caregivers to understand simply the obligations imposed on parents by their culture and/or their religion and open access to their wishes. Sometimes help from interpreters, mediators, ethnopsychologists, and religious representatives is needed to understand this reality.

  18. Apoptosis and regulation of Bax and Bcl-X proteins during human neonatal vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Hwang, K K; Seo, J W; Kim, S Y; Oh, B H; Lee, M M; Park, Y B

    2000-04-01

    To verify that apoptosis is one of the possible mechanisms of neonatal vascular remodeling during the transition from fetal to neonatal circulation, we assayed for apoptosis and evaluated the expression of apoptosis-regulatory proteins in umbilical vessel versus ascending aorta, ductus arteriosus (DA) versus adjacent pulmonary artery and aorta, or aorta versus its branching arteries. Twenty-two umbilical cords (UCs), 6 DAs with adjacent aortas and pulmonary arteries, and 4 aortic arches with their branching great arteries were obtained from neonates. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis in umbilical vessels was identified in all UCs. The expressions of Bax and Bcl-X were stronger in umbilical artery than in the neonatal aorta, but Bcl-2 was weak in both arteries in immunohistochemistry. In the immunoblot analysis of UCs, the expression of the proapoptotic short isoform of Bcl-X was stronger than in other tissue, and caspase-3 was selectively activated, whereas it was not in the other components of the cardiovascular system. In contrast, the expression patterns of the FasAg and Fas ligand were similar in umbilical artery and aorta. Regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins was also observed in other vascular sites at which SMCs undergo apoptosis on hemodynamic changes during birth, such as the DA and the branching points of the great arteries from the aortic arch. Apoptosis is involved in the regression of human umbilical vessels and the DA and in the remodeling of the branching great arteries during the neonatal period, when Bcl-2 family proteins are likely to play a key role.

  19. Asteroid families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James G.

    1991-01-01

    More than 100 asteroid families are presented in Williams. Several examples of cratering events are known including family numbers 150, 162, 169, and 189. These are recognizable as many small fragments adjacent to and to one side (in three dimensions) of a much larger cratered body. Family numbers 138 and 140 are adjacent in proper element space. In population they are an intermediate step between the long recognizable families and the more frequent less populated families. Family number 164 is the fifth most populous family in the belt. All members are faint and nothing is known of the physical properties.

  20. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India

    PubMed Central

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. Design We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Results Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Conclusions Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. PMID:25972443

  1. Case study of a high-risk neonate failing to thrive post-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and post-necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, G C; Lobo, M L

    1994-06-01

    Infants discharged from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) often face a long journey of chronic illness, family stresses, and financial burdens. Health care professionals involved in acute care need to be aware of the far-reaching repercussions of neonatal illness. This report presents a case study of a low-income, single mother from a rural community and her son, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduate post-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and post-necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) discharged with a gastronomy tube (g-tube) and failure to thrive (FTT), from his birth to 10 months of age. Family-focused interventions aimed at improving growth and developmental delays and providing family support will be discussed.

  2. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  3. Muslim Families and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshpour, Manijeh

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The differences in value systems are the Muslim families' preferences for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Suggests that directions for change for Muslims need to…

  4. Cancer, Families, and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen; Gillig, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of the family counselor in working with cancer patients and their families. Suggests ways in which the family counselor can work proactively with families in the area of cancer prevention and helping them cope more effectively with its impact on their lives. Uses a clinical case example to illustrate intervention with cancer…

  5. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency presenting with neonatal perianal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Lauren S; Burnett, John R; Mehta, Divyesh K; Martin, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a member of the triglyceride lipase gene family, is synthesised by parenchymal cells of the heart, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues before being transported to luminal surfaces of vascular endothelial cells to exert its main physiological function to hydrolyse plasma lipoproteins. LPL deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, resulting in severe hypertriglyceridaemia from birth. The effect of marked hypertriglyceridaemia on the immune function in children has not been described. We present a case of a neonate with LPL deficiency and grossly elevated plasma triglyceride levels, presenting with recurrent and recalcitrant perianal abscesses suggestive of underlying immunodeficiency. With reduced levels of plasma triglycerides, the recurrent perianal infections resolved. This case report reviews evidence for potential deleterious effects of hypertriglyceridaemia on immune function, however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Whether hypertriglyceridaemia contributes to immune dysfunction in this context is unknown. If there is a pathophysiological link, this may have implications for hypertriglyceridaemia management. PMID:26825936

  6. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    PubMed Central

    Mullowney, Tara; Manson, David; Kim, Raymond; Stephens, Derek; Shah, Vibhuti

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare inherited disease affecting motile cilia lining the respiratory tract. Despite neonatal respiratory distress as an early feature, diagnosis is typically delayed until late childhood. Our objective was to identify characteristics that differentiate PCD from common causes of term neonatal respiratory distress. METHODS: This was a case-control study. Patients with PCD born after 1994 attending a regional PCD clinic who had a history of neonatal respiratory distress (n = 46) were included. Controls (n = 46), term neonates with respiratory distress requiring a chest radiograph, were randomly selected from hospital birth records and matched on gender, birth month/year, and mode of delivery. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between neonatal characteristics and PCD diagnosis. The diagnostic performance of the best predictive variables was estimated by calculating sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PCD cases required more oxygen therapy (39 cases, 29 controls, P = .01), longer duration of oxygen therapy (PCD mean = 15.2 days, control mean = 0.80 days, P < .01), had later onset of neonatal respiratory distress (PCD median = 12 hours, control median = 1 hour, P < .001), and higher frequency of lobar collapse and situs inversus (PCD = 70% and 48% respectively, control = 0% for both, P < .001). Situs inversus, lobar collapse, or oxygen need for >2 days had 87% (95% confidence interval: 74–94) sensitivity and 96% (95% confidence interval: 85–99) specificity for PCD. CONCLUSIONS: When encountering term neonates with unexplained respiratory distress, clinicians should consider PCD in those with lobar collapse, situs inversus, and/or prolonged oxygen therapy (>2 days). PMID:25422025

  7. Assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, E.; Gournay, V.; Calamel, J.; Mouzard, A.; Roze, J.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether it is possible to assess baroreflex sensitivity in neonates by studying only spontaneous variations in systolic blood pressure and heart rate.
METHODS—ECG and non-invasive blood pressure signals were continuously studied in 14 preterm neonates (term 29-32 weeks) and five term neonates (term 40-41 weeks). Non-invasive blood pressure measures were obtained using a Finapres placed around the child's wrist. Both signals (ECG and blood pressure), sampled at 400 Hz, were digitised by an A/D converter and stored in a binary mode on magnetic disk. An inhouse software QRS detection algorithm was used to define R peaks of the QRS complexes with an accuracy greater than 2 ms. Four 4 minute periods were recorded in each infant. The slope of the linear regression of RR intervals versus systolic blood pressure was calculated in each period and the mean value of the four slopes was then considered as the index of baroreflex sensitivity (in ms/mm Hg) in each neonate.
RESULTS—Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity was lower in preterm neonates than in term neonates (mean(SD): 4.07 (2.19) ms/mm Hg vs 10.23 (2.92) ms/mm Hg).
CONCLUSION—Baroreflex sensitivity can be assessed in term and preterm neonates by studying spontaneous variations in systolic blood pressure alone. This method could be useful for studying the ontogeny of baroreflex sensitivity and might therefore provide information about the maturation of the autonomic nervous system.

 Keywords: blood pressure; heart rate; baroreflex sensitivity; autonomic nervous system. PMID:9135289

  8. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome: A Case-Control, Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0-252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years. Therefore

  9. Clinical Features of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Complicated With Evans Syndrome: A Case-Control, Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Wu, Xiuhua; Wang, Laifang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical features of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) complicated with Evans syndrome (ES). We conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features of age- and gender-matched lupus patients with and without ES in 1:3 ratios. In 5724 hospitalized SLE patients, we identified 27 (0.47%, 22 women and 5 men, average age 34.2 years) SLE patients complicated with ES. Fifteen patients (55.6%) presented with hematologic abnormalities initially, including 6 (22.2%) cases of isolated ITP, 4 (14.8%) cases of isolated AIHA, and 5 (18.5%) cases of classical ES. The median intervals between hematological presentations the diagnosis of SLE was 36 months (range 0-252). ES developed after the SLE diagnosis in 4 patients (14.8%), and concomitantly with SLE diagnosis in 8 patients (29.6%). Systemic involvements are frequently observed in SLE patients with ES, including fever (55.6%), serositis (51.9%), hair loss (40.7%), lupus nephritis (37%), Raynaud phenomenon (33.3%), neuropsychiatric (33.3%) and pulmonary involvement (25.9%), and photosensitivity (25.9%). The incidence of photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, elevated serum IgG level, and lupus nephritis in patients with ES or without ES was 25.9% vs 6.2% (P = 0.007), 88.9% vs 67.1% (P = 0.029), 48.1% vs 24.4% (P = 0.021), and 37% vs 64.2% (P = 0.013), respectively. Twenty-five (92.6%) patients achieved improvement following treatment of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants as well as splenectomy, whereas 6 patients experienced the relapse and 1 patient died from renal failure during the follow-up. ES is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Photosensitivity, hypocomplementemia, and elevated serum IgG level were frequently observed in ES patients, but lupus nephritis was less observed. More than half of patients presented with hematological manifestation at onset, and progress to typical lupus over months to years. Therefore

  10. [Neonatal lupus syndrome: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Levesque, K; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Le Bidois, J; Bessières, B; Brouzes, C; Le Mercier, D; Villain, E; Maltret, A; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is associated with transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Children display cutaneous, hematological, liver or cardiac features. Cardiac manifestations include congenital heart block (CHB); endocardial fibroelastosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women with known connective tissue disease is between 1 and 2% and the risk of recurrence is around 19%. Skin and systemic lesions are transient, whereas CHB is definitive and associated with significant morbidity and a mortality of 18%. A pacemaker must be implanted in 2/3 of cases. Myocarditis may be associated or appear secondly. Mothers of children with CHB are usually asymptomatic or display Sjogren's syndrome or undifferentiated connective tissue disease. In anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women, fetal echocardiography should be performed at least every 2 weeks from the 16th to 24th week gestation. An electrocardiogram should be performed for all newborn babies. The benefit of fluorinated corticosteroid therapy for CHB detected in utero remains unclear. Maternal use of hydroxychloroquine may be associated with a decreased recurrent CHB risk in a subsequent offspring. A prospective study is actually ongoing to confirm these findings.

  11. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  12. Strain-dependent effects of acute caffeine on anxiety-related behavior in PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert N; Hancock, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the possibility that acute caffeine's behavioral action might depend on rats' strain, effects of 50mg/kg of the drug were observed on activity, anxiety-related behavior and habituation learning in male and female rats from three different strains, namely PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar. All subjects were tested in an open field, an elevated plus maze and a light-dark box. For the three strains combined, increased occupancy of the center of the open field and entries of the open plus-maze arms with caffeine suggested caffeine-induced anxiolysis, whereas increased grooming in the open field, decreased rearing in the plus maze and increased risk assessment in the light-dark box were consistent with anxiogenesis. Caffeine also reduced open-field rearing only for PVG/c rats, and entries into and occupation of the light side of the light-dark box only for Long-Evans rats, and increased total defecation in the three types of apparatus for all three strains combined. Overall, caffeine appeared to be mainly anxiogenic. The drug also increased open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats and walking for all rats, but decreased open-field ambulation and entries into the plus maze closed arms for Wistar rats alone. In general, Wistar rats appeared to be the least and Long-Evans the most anxious of the three strains investigated. Caffeine also decreased within-session habituation of open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats alone, thereby suggesting strain-dependent interference with non-associative learning and short-term memory. Several overall sex differences were also observed that supported female rats being more active and less anxious than males.

  13. Strain-dependent effects of acute caffeine on anxiety-related behavior in PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert N; Hancock, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the possibility that acute caffeine's behavioral action might depend on rats' strain, effects of 50mg/kg of the drug were observed on activity, anxiety-related behavior and habituation learning in male and female rats from three different strains, namely PVG/c, Long-Evans and Wistar. All subjects were tested in an open field, an elevated plus maze and a light-dark box. For the three strains combined, increased occupancy of the center of the open field and entries of the open plus-maze arms with caffeine suggested caffeine-induced anxiolysis, whereas increased grooming in the open field, decreased rearing in the plus maze and increased risk assessment in the light-dark box were consistent with anxiogenesis. Caffeine also reduced open-field rearing only for PVG/c rats, and entries into and occupation of the light side of the light-dark box only for Long-Evans rats, and increased total defecation in the three types of apparatus for all three strains combined. Overall, caffeine appeared to be mainly anxiogenic. The drug also increased open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats and walking for all rats, but decreased open-field ambulation and entries into the plus maze closed arms for Wistar rats alone. In general, Wistar rats appeared to be the least and Long-Evans the most anxious of the three strains investigated. Caffeine also decreased within-session habituation of open-field ambulation for PVG/c rats alone, thereby suggesting strain-dependent interference with non-associative learning and short-term memory. Several overall sex differences were also observed that supported female rats being more active and less anxious than males. PMID:26577750

  14. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  15. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146

  16. Patterns and causes of neonatal and postneonatal mortality in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S

    1989-01-01

    Community-level research data from a Maternal-Child Health and Family Planning (MCH/FP) program and comparison areas in rural Bangladesh indicate that 60 percent of infant deaths occurred in the neonatal period in both areas. Since the inception of the MCH/FP program, mortality rates declined relative to those in the comparison area. This decline, however, was confined to the neonatal period death rates only, with mortality rates in the postneonatal period remaining similar in the two areas. Prematurity accounted for approximately 40 percent of deaths in the neonatal period. Cause-of-death data indicated that the differences in the neonatal mortality rates between the two areas was mainly due to a marked decline in tetanus neonatorum deaths in the MCH/FP program area, because of the tetanus toxoid immunization of pregnant women there. The interventions in the MCH/FP area, however, did not significantly influence mortality due to any other cause. This study provides an explanation for the limited impact on infant mortality of health interventions that focus on diarrheal diseases and immunizations of children. PMID:2734810

  17. Neonatal nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and feelings toward the care and management of fetal-infants.

    PubMed

    Richey, D A

    1988-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care nurses must handle on a regular basis the complex dilemmas that accompany the rapid advances in knowledge and technology that have enabled the survival of fetal-infants. Little literature addresses the attitudes and feelings of neonatal nurses regarding the moral, ethical, legal, economic, and social issues surrounding fetal-infants. The purpose of this investigation, therefore, was to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and feelings held by neonatal nurses towards these issues as they relate to the care and management of fetal-infants. The research design of this study was a nonexperimental approach. The sample was drawn from a roster of subscribers to a neonatal nursing journal. The tool that was used in this study is an attitudinal assessment questionnaire developed by the investigator. Data obtained were described and synthesized by use of measures of central tendency, variability, frequency, and the chi square statistic. Comments to the questionnaire almost overwhelmingly referred to the participants' difficulty in responding as the issues were felt to be dependent on the particular fetal-infant, family, and circumstances involved. Respondents strongly supported the need for situational ethics in cases involving fetal-infants.

  18. Prevention and Management of Neonatal Hypothermia in Rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Marsh, David R.; Kafwanda, Sarah Ngolofwana; Musso, Austen; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypothermia is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for newborn survival. The World Health Organization recommends maintaining a warm chain and skin-to-skin care for thermoprotection of newborn children. Since little is known about practices related to newborn hypothermia in rural Africa, this study's goal was to characterize relevant practices, attitudes, and beliefs in rural Zambia. Methods and Findings We conducted 14 focus group discussions with mothers and grandmothers and 31 in-depth interviews with community leaders and health officers in Lufwanyama District, a rural area in the Copperbelt Province, Zambia, enrolling a total of 171 participants. We analyzed data using domain analysis. In rural Lufwanyama, community members were aware of the danger of neonatal hypothermia. Caregivers' and health workers' knowledge of thermoprotective practices included birthplace warming, drying and wrapping of the newborn, delayed bathing, and immediate and exclusive breastfeeding. However, this warm chain was not consistently maintained in the first hours postpartum, when newborns are at greatest risk. Skin-to-skin care was not practiced in the study area. Having to assume household and agricultural labor responsibilities in the immediate postnatal period was a challenge for mothers to provide continuous thermal care to their newborns. Conclusions Understanding and addressing community-based practices on hypothermia prevention and management might help improve newborn survival in resource-limited settings. Possible interventions include the implementation of skin-to-skin care in rural areas and the use of appropriate, low-cost newborn warmers to prevent hypothermia and support families in their provision of newborn thermal protection. Training family members to support mothers in the provision of thermoprotection for their newborns could facilitate these practices. PMID:24714630

  19. Interplay of Tunneling, Two-State Reactivity, and Bell-Evans-Polanyi Effects in C-H Activation by Nonheme Fe(IV)O Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason

    2016-02-24

    The study of C-H bond activation reactions by nonheme Fe(IV)O species with nine hydrocarbons shows that the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) involves strong tunneling and is a signature of the reactive spin states. Theory reproduces the observed spike-like appearance of plots of KIE(exp) against the C-H bond dissociation energy, and its origins are discussed. The experimentally observed Bell-Evans-Polanyi correlations, in the presence of strong tunneling, are reproduced, and the pattern is rationalized. PMID:26824716

  20. Interplay of Tunneling, Two-State Reactivity, and Bell-Evans-Polanyi Effects in C-H Activation by Nonheme Fe(IV)O Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason

    2016-02-24

    The study of C-H bond activation reactions by nonheme Fe(IV)O species with nine hydrocarbons shows that the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) involves strong tunneling and is a signature of the reactive spin states. Theory reproduces the observed spike-like appearance of plots of KIE(exp) against the C-H bond dissociation energy, and its origins are discussed. The experimentally observed Bell-Evans-Polanyi correlations, in the presence of strong tunneling, are reproduced, and the pattern is rationalized.

  1. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  2. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  3. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS. PMID:25425653

  4. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  5. Neonatal Tracheostomy – Issues and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    A, Saadia; GR, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To record and analyse the technical aspects of neonatal tracheostomy and to suggest some solutions. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective observational cohort of 37 cases of neonatal tracheostomies performed over 30 years (1985-2014). Results: Thirty-three of the 37 tracheostomies were done as an elective procedure and four done emergently. Eighteen neonatal tracheostomies were done with a low transverse cervical incision and 19 were done with low vertical cervical incision. Three patients had bleeding while exposing the trachea. Trachea could not easily be identified in 2 cases. Commercial tracheostomy tubes were used in only 20 cases. In 17 patients, the conventional endotracheal tubes 2.5 or 3fr size were used. There were 3 instances of wound infection out of which one has peri-tracheostomy necrotizing cellulitis and the neonate succumbed to sepsis. Two cases had surgical emphysema. No case had pneumothorax. Conclusion: We described tracheostomy in neonates in a resource constrained centre. Various makeshift arrangements can be used in absence of standard supplies. PMID:26034707

  6. Inadvertent Methylergonovine Administration to a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Bryan M.; O’Connell, Charles; Boutin, Mallory A.; Fatayerji, Nabil I.; Sauer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, Newborn Final Diagnosis: Accidental methylergonovine poisoning Symptoms: Respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Methylergonovine is an ergot alkaloid used to treat post-partum hemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Mistaking methylergonovine for vitamin K with accidental administration to the neonate is a rare iatrogenic illness occurring almost exclusively in the delivery room setting. Complications of ergot alkaloids in neonates include respiratory depression, seizures, and death. Case Report: A term infant was inadvertently given 0.1 mg of methylergonovine intramuscularly in the right thigh. The error was only noted when the vial of medication was scanned, after administration, identifying it as methylergonovine rather than vitamin K. The local poison center was notified, and the infant was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for observation. Two hours after transfer, the infant was noted to have oxygen desaturations and required oxygen via nasal cannula. Supplemental oxygen was continued for 4 hours until the neonate was able to maintain normal oxygen saturations in room air. Feeding was started by 10 hours of life, and the infant was discharged home in good condition after a 72-hour stay without further complications. Conclusions: Because of the potential for serious adverse events, vigilance is required to prevent accidental administration of methylergonovine to the neonate as a result of possible confusion with vitamin K in the early post-partum period. PMID:27765939

  7. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS.

  8. Neonatal hypothermia in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, LC

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia among newborns is considered an important contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality in low resource settings. However, in these settings only limited progress has been made towards understanding the risk of mortality subsequent to hypothermia, describing how this relationship is dependent on both the degree or severity of exposure and the gestational age and weight status of the baby, and implementing interventions to mitigate both exposure and the associated risk of poor outcomes. Given the centrality of averting neonatal mortality to achieving global milestones towards reductions in child mortality by 2015, recent years have seen substantial resources and efforts to improve understanding of global epidemiology of neonatal health. In this seminar, a summary of the burden, consequences, and risk factors of neonatal hypothermia in low-resources settings is presented, with a particular focus on community-based data. Context-appropriate interventions for reducing hypothermia exposure and the role of these interventions in reducing global neonatal mortality burden are explored. PMID:21094417

  9. Familial gigantism.

    PubMed

    Herder, Wouter W de

    2012-01-01

    Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas. PMID:22584702

  10. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  11. Attenuated innate immune defenses in very premature neonates during the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Kan, Bernard; Sharma, Ashish A.; van Zanten, Alice; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Brant, Rollin; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-microbial responses have been shown to be profoundly attenuated in very preterm neonates when examined on cord blood. However, we lack data on these responses at the time these neonates are most vulnerable to infections. Methods Multiple cytokine responses to two prototypic Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists: LPS (TLR4) and R848 (TLR7/8) were prospectively measured in preterm neonates born ≤30 weeks of gestation (n=50) during the first 28 days of age using whole blood and single-cell multi-parameter flow cytometry assays. Results were compared to term neonates (n=30) and adult controls (n=25). Results In preterm neonates, LPS and R848 responses remained attenuated in both cord blood and in the first 28 days of age. These responses showed significant maturation over time after adjusting for gestational age and were confirmed in blood monocytes and dendritic cells on a per-cell basis. We detected no major contribution of chorioamnionitis, maternal antenatal corticosteroids or magnesium sulfate treatment, labor, or mode of delivery to the maturation of cytokine responses. Conclusion Innate immune anti-microbial defenses are profoundly attenuated developmentally in very preterm neonates during the neonatal period, suggesting that exogenous factors drive the sustained systemic inflammation that has been linked to increased morbidities in these infants. PMID:26186294

  12. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  13. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the 1990s" (James Knoll);…

  14. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  15. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  16. Hyperammonemia in neonates receiving intravenous nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Hack, S L; Smith, T M; Platzker, A C; Merritt, R J

    1982-01-01

    Inadequate arginine intake has been suggested as an etiology for hyperammonemia in neonates on parenteral nutrition. We randomized 26 nonasphyxiated neonates to receive amino acid solutions containing either 3.6 or 10.4% of total nitrogen as arginine when intravenous nutrition (IVN) therapy was initiated. Neonates in both amino acid solution study groups were observed to have significantly elevated blood ammonia (BA) concentrations during IVN (p less than 0.01) as compared to pre-IVN levels. Blood ammonia concentrations tended to be higher in infants receiving the 3.6% arginine amino acid solution. Septic infants were at particular risk for hyperammonemia as compared to nonseptic patients (p less than 0.025). Other clinical parameters including birth weight, gestational age, oxygen requirements, enteral nutritional intake, congenital anomalies, and heart disease did not appear to be related to BA concentration.

  17. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  18. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers.

  19. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers. PMID:27582162

  20. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  1. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  2. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  3. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother. PMID:27008754

  4. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother.

  5. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  6. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies.

  7. From Imitation to Conversation: The First Dialogues with Human Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese

    2006-01-01

    The functional maturity of the newborn infant's brain, the resemblances between neonatal imitation and imitation in adults and the possibly lateralized neonatal imitation suggest that the mirror neuron system may contribute to neonatal imitation. Newborn infants not only imitate but also initiate previously imitated gestures, and are able to…

  8. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications.

  9. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  13. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  14. The Tuning of Human Neonates' Preference for Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Hauser, Marc D.; Werker, Janet F.; Martin, Alia

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates prefer listening to speech compared to many nonspeech sounds, suggesting that humans are born with a bias for speech. However, neonates' preference may derive from properties of speech that are not unique but instead are shared with the vocalizations of other species. To test this, thirty neonates and sixteen 3-month-olds were…

  15. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  19. Ruptured Liver Abscess in Neonates: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Choudhury, SR; Jhanwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hepatic abscess is a rare disease seen mainly in preterm following umbilical catheterisation. Liver abscess in term neonates without any predisposing factor is still rarer and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of liver abscess in term neonates presenting with abdominal mass due to rupture. PMID:27433449

  20. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... the warmed air, a container for water to add humidity, and provision for a portable oxygen bottle....

  1. Development of an inhalation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for 2,2, 4-trimethylpentane (TMP) in male Long-Evans rats using gas uptake experiments.

    PubMed

    El-Masri, Hisham A; Dowd, Sean; Pegram, Rex A; Harrison, Randy; Yavanhxay, Sisouphanh J; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Evans, Marina

    2009-12-01

    2,2,4-Trimethylpentane (TMP) is a volatile colorless liquid used primarily to increase the octane rating of combustible fuels. TMP is released in the environment through the manufacture, use, and disposal of products associated with the gasoline and petroleum industry. Short-term inhalation exposure to TMP (< 4 h; > 1000 ppm) caused sensory and motor irritations in rats and mice. Like many volatile hydrocarbons, acute exposure to TMP may also be expected to alter neurological functions. To estimate in vivo metabolic kinetics of TMP and to predict its target tissue dosimetry during inhalation exposures, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the chemical in Long-Evans male rats using closed-chamber gas-uptake experiments. Gas-uptake experiments were conducted in which rats (80-90 days old) were exposed to targeted initial TMP concentrations of 50, 100, 500, and 1000 ppm. The model consisted of compartments for the closed uptake chamber, lung, fat, kidney, liver, brain, and rapidly and slowly perfused tissues. Physiological parameters were obtained from literature. Partition coefficients for the model were experimentally determined for air/blood, fat, liver, kidney, muscle, and brain using vial equilibration methods. Common to other hydrocarbons, metabolism of TMP via oxidative reactions is assumed to mainly occur in the liver. The PBPK model simulations of the closed chamber data were used to estimate in vivo metabolic parameters for TMP in male Long-Evans rats.

  2. Rare sugar D-psicose improves insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Kitagaki, Shigeru; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Funamoto, Yasunobu; Matsunaga, Toru; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Dong, Youyi; Hirata, Yuko; Murao, Koji; Toyoda, Yukiyasu; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2011-02-01

    A rare sugar, D-psicose has progressively been evaluated as a unique metabolic regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and thus represents a promising compound for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was undertaken to examine the underlying effector organs of D-psicose in lowering blood glucose and abdominal fat by exploiting a T2DM rat model, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Rats were fed 5% D-psicose or 5% D-glucose supplemented in drinking water, and only water in the control for 13 weeks and the protective effects were compared. A non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO), fed with water served as a counter control of OLETF. After 13 weeks feeding, D-psicose treatment significantly reduced the increase in body weight and abdominal fat mass. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) showed the reduced blood glucose and insulin levels suggesting the improvement of insulin resistance in OLETF rats. Oil-red-O staining elucidated that D-psicose significantly reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. Immunohistochemical analysis showed D-psicose induced glucokinase translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm of the liver which enhances glucokinase activity and subsequent synthesis of glycogen in the liver. D-psicose also protected the pathological change of the β-cells of pancreatic islets. These data demonstrate that D-psicose controls blood glucose levels by reducing lipotoxicity in liver and by preserving pancreatic β-cell function.

  3. [Parental roles and needs in neonatal intensive care: a review of Portuguese guidelines].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Mariana; Alves, Elisabete; Barros, Henrique; Silva, Susana

    2016-08-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the parental roles and needs included in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit guidelines. Thematic content analysis was conducted of 33 guidelines (28 consensuses and 5 documents directed to parents) freely available on the Portuguese Pediatrics Society website in August 2014. These documents deal mainly with information needs, child care activities performed by the parents and the respective responsibilities in decision making with respect to the health of children. Furthermore, parental and family characteristics were mentioned as risk factors for prematurity and perinatal diseases. The psychosocial consequences of parenthood experienced in Neonatal Intensive Care Units, as well as the adequacy of their environmental characteristics to parental needs, were less frequently touched upon. Issues related to the safety and comfort, confidence of parents in healthcare and social support were rarely touched upon. The results reflect sociocultural norms associated with intensive parenting, which is exclusively child centered, highly emotional and performed under the guidance of health professionals. The important aspect is to issue and disseminate guidelines that foster the integration of family-centered care in the dynamics of Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:27557031

  4. [Neonatal diarrhea due to congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption: report of seven cases].

    PubMed

    Chedane-Girault, C; Dabadie, A; Maurage, C; Piloquet, H; Chailloux, E; Colin, E; Pelatan, C; Giniès, J-L

    2012-12-01

    Congenital glucose-galactose malabsorption (CGGM) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which presents as a protracted diarrhea in early neonatal life. We describe the clinical history, diagnostic evaluation, and management of 7 children with CGGM in western France. There were 4 girls and 3 boys from 5 families, born between 1984 and 2010. The principal complaint was a neonatal onset of watery and acidic severe diarrhea complicated by hypertonic dehydration. The diarrhea stopped with fasting. In 2 cases, the family history supported the diagnosis. In the other cases, elimination of glucose and galactose (lactose) from the diet resulted in the complete resolution of diarrhea symptoms. In 2 cases, the H2 breath tests were positive. In 2 cases, the HGPO or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) demonstrated an abnormal curve with glucose and a normal curve with fructose. DNA sequencing was not used. When glucose and galactose were eliminated from the diet, the infants had normal growth and development. In conclusion, CGGM is a rare etiology of neonatal diarrhea; however, the diagnosis is easy to make and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:23107089

  5. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  6. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  7. D-lactic acidosis in neonatal ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ingrid; Gentile, Arcangelo

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic acidosis in calves with neonatal diarrhea was believed to be mainly caused by the loss of bicarbonate via the intestines or the formation of L-lactate during anaerobic glycolysis after tissue hypoperfusion in dehydrated calves. Because D-lactate was not considered to be of interest in human or veterinary medicine, routine diagnostic methods targeted the detection of L-lactate only. The development of stereospecific assays for the measurement of D-lactate facilitated research. This article summarizes the available information on D-lactic metabolic acidosis in neonatal ruminants.

  8. Next generation neonatal health informatics with Artemis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Carolyn; Catley, Christina; James, Andrew; Padbury, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a platform to enable processing of currently uncharted high frequency, high fidelity, synchronous data from medical devices. Such a platform would support the next generation of informatics solutions for neonatal intensive care. We present Artemis, a platform for real-time enactment of clinical knowledge as it relates to multidimensional data analysis and clinical research. Through specific deployment examples at two different neonatal intensive care units, we demonstrate that Artemis supports: 1) instantiation of clinical rules; 2) multidimensional analysis; 3) distribution of services for critical care via cloud computing; and 4) accomplishing 1 through 3 using current technology without a negative impact on patient care. PMID:21893725

  9. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated.

  10. Diagnosing and Managing Neonatal Respiratory Depression

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Max

    1985-01-01

    There are four types of neonatal respiratory depression. Most infants who require resuscitation have clearly depressed respiration at birth. The onset is prenatal in these cases. However, other infants appear normal at birth, cough and breathe a few times, but become acutely depressed in the first minute or so. A third group deteriorates gradually over the first few minutes, making little or no effort to breathe. A fourth group appears normal or fairly normal at birth, and while breathing strenuously develops signs of asphyxia. The pre- and postnatal signs, causes and differential diagnosis of the four types of neonatal depression are described, and guidelines for resuscitation are provided. PMID:21274148

  11. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  12. Management of neonatal sepsis in term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Du Pont-Thibodeau, Geneviève; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a common and deadly disease. It is broadly defined as a systemic inflammatory response, occurring in the first four weeks of life, as a result of a suspected or proven infection. Yet, more reliable and consistently applied diagnostic criteria would help improve our knowledge of the disease epidemiology. Several therapeutic attempts to control systemic inflammation in sepsis were unsuccessful. Immediate empirical administration of broad-spectrum anti-microbials, aggressive fluid resuscitation, and vaso-active or inotropic support (or both) are the mainstays of the therapeutic management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:25165566

  13. Neonatal nurse practitioners: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Honeyfield, Mary Ellen

    2009-06-01

    The advanced practice nursing role in neonatal intensive care enjoys an almost 40-year history. The 1970s and the 1980s were fraught with growing pains, including what to call these providers, and role clarity that was defined in most settings by community need. With the birth of NANN, 25 years ago, the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role began to receive support and advocacy that led to the development of educational standards and definition of the role. This article reviews the role's history and identifies current and future issues that will require attention by the national NNP leadership. PMID:19542775

  14. Neonatal death dwarfism. (A further report).

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, K; Masel, J; Morris, L; Kunze, D

    1978-11-01

    Seven cases of rare "Neonatal Death Dwarfism" observed recently in three major Children's Hospitals in Australia are reported. These include Diastrophic Dwarfism, Achondrogenesis II, Lethal Form of Hypophosphatasia, Homozygous Achondroplasia, Minor Form of Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy, Achondrogenesis II (?) and Unclassified Lethal Bone Dysplasia. In all the patients the clinical diagnosis was uncertain or incorrect, whereas a conclusive radiographic diagnosis could be made after X-ray examination in all but one of the cases. Skeletal survey should be performed in each case of neonatal death dwarfism. PMID:152275

  15. Neonatal Marfan Syndrome: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ghandi, Yazdan; S.Zanjani, Keyhan; Mazhari-Mousavi, Seyed-Eshagh; Parvaneh, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Background Neonatal Marfan syndrome is a rare and severe phenotype of this disease. A poor prognosis is anticipated due to the high probability of congestive heart failure, and mitral and tricuspid regurgitations with suboptimal response to medical therapy and difficulties in surgical management at an early age. Case Presentation We present two consecutive patients with this disease who are the first reported cases from Iran to the best of our knowledge. Unfortunately both of them died shortly after diagnosis. Conclusion Neonatal Marfan syndrome is reported from Iran and has a poor prognosis like the patients reported from elsewhere. PMID:23549323

  16. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates.

  17. The Predictive Value of Early Behavioural Assessments in Pet Dogs – A Longitudinal Study from Neonates to Adults

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2–10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40–50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited. PMID:25003341

  18. The predictive value of early behavioural assessments in pet dogs--a longitudinal study from neonates to adults.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Stefanie; Müller, Corsin; Virányi, Zsófia; Huber, Ludwig; Range, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Studies on behavioural development in domestic dogs are of relevance for matching puppies with the right families, identifying predispositions for behavioural problems at an early stage, and predicting suitability for service dog work, police or military service. The literature is, however, inconsistent regarding the predictive value of tests performed during the socialisation period. Additionally, some practitioners use tests with neonates to complement later assessments for selecting puppies as working dogs, but these have not been validated. We here present longitudinal data on a cohort of Border collies, followed up from neonate age until adulthood. A neonate test was conducted with 99 Border collie puppies aged 2-10 days to assess activity, vocalisations when isolated and sucking force. At the age of 40-50 days, 134 puppies (including 93 tested as neonates) were tested in a puppy test at their breeders' homes. All dogs were adopted as pet dogs and 50 of them participated in a behavioural test at the age of 1.5 to 2 years with their owners. Linear mixed models found little correspondence between individuals' behaviour in the neonate, puppy and adult test. Exploratory activity was the only behaviour that was significantly correlated between the puppy and the adult test. We conclude that the predictive validity of early tests for predicting specific behavioural traits in adult pet dogs is limited.

  19. Sex differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responding to endotoxin challenge in the neonate: reversal by gonadectomy.

    PubMed

    Shanks, N; McCormick, C M; Meaney, M J

    1994-06-17

    Exposure to endotoxin is known to activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses in both adult and neonatal animals. We have previously reported that female rat pups exhibit greater HPA responses to endotoxin challenge than males. It is unclear, however, whether observed gender differences at this early age are mediated by gonadal factors. In the present investigation we assessed the effects of neonatal gonadectomy on HPA responses to endotoxin challenge in the developing rat. On the first day of life Long-Evans rat pups were gonadectomized or subjected to sham surgery. On the third day of life the pups were injected i.p. with 0.05 mg/kg Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin. Four hours following injection, trunk blood and tissues were collected for determination of plasma hormones and median eminence corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) content. Intact female rat pups were found to exhibit greater plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to endotoxin challenge compared with male animals. Plasma corticosterone levels, both total and free steroid, were markedly altered by removal of gonads such that responding to endotoxin was elevated in males, while it was reduced in females. In contrast, ACTH responding in male pups was not altered following gonadectomy, whereas female ACTH responses were significantly reduced compared with endotoxin-treated intact controls. CRH levels in the median eminence were reduced following endotoxin challenge to an equivalent extent in both male and female pups and this effect was partially attenuated by the removal of gonadal hormones. These data suggest that sex differences in HPA responses to immune challenge may be mediated at different levels of the HPA axis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Neonatal screening for inborn errors of metabolism: cost, yield and outcome.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, R J; Green, A; McCabe, C J; Booth, A; Cooper, N J; Leonard, J V; Nicholl, J; Nicholson, P; Tunaley, J R; Virdi, N K

    1997-01-01

    phenylketonuria and congenital hypothyroidism have largely achieved the expected objectives and are cost-effective. Current concerns are the difficulty of maintaining adequate coverage, perceived organisational weaknesses, and a lack of overview. For many of the organic acid disorders it was necessary to rely on data obtained from clinically-diagnosed cases. Many of these diseases can be treated very effectively and a sensitive screening test was available for most of the diseases. Except for cystic fibrosis, there have been no randomised controlled trials of the overall effectiveness of neonatal screening. Despite the anxiety generated by the screening process, there is strong parental support for screening. The effects of diagnosis through screening on subsequent reproductive behaviour is less clear. Conflicts exist between current concepts and the traditional principles of screening. The availability of effective treatment is not an absolute prerequisite: early diagnosis is of value to the family concerned and, to the extent that is leads to increased use of prenatal diagnosis, may help to reduce the overall burden of disease. Neonatal screening is also of value in diseases which present early but with non-specific symptoms. Indeed, almost all of the diseases considered could merit neonatal screening. The majority of economic evaluations failed to incorporate the health benefits from screening, and therefore failed to address the value of the information which the screening programmes provided to parents. The marginal cost of changing from present technology to tandem MS would be approximately 0.60 pounds per baby at a workload of 100,000 samples a year, and 0.87 pounds at 50,000 samples per year. The ability to screen for a wider range of diseases would lead to the identification of some 20 additional cases per 100,000 infants screened, giving a laboratory cost per additional diagnosis of 3000 pounds at an annual workload of 100,000 babies per year.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  1. Diversity of Disorders Causing Neonatal Cholestasis – The Experience of a Tertiary Pediatric Center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoerning, André; Raub, Simon; Dechêne, Alexander; Brosch, Michelle N.; Kathemann, Simone; Hoyer, Peter F.; Gerner, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rapidly establishing the cause of neonatal cholestasis is an urgent matter. The aim of this study was to report on the prevalence and mortality of the diverse disorders causing neonatal cholestasis in an academic center in Germany. Methods: Clinical chemistry and cause of disease were retrospectively analyzed in 82 infants (male n = 42, 51%) that had presented with neonatal cholestasis to a tertiary medical center from January 2009 to April 2013. Results: Altogether, 19 disorders causing neonatal cholestasis were identified. Biliary atresia was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by idiopathic cases (13%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC, 10%), cholestasis in preterm infants (10%), α1AT deficiency, Alagille syndrome, portocaval shunts, mitochondriopathy, biliary sludge (all 2%), and others. Infants with biliary atresia were diagnosed with a mean age of 62 days, they underwent Kasai portoenterostomy ~66 days after birth. The majority of these children (~70%) received surgery within 10 weeks of age and 27% before 60 days. The 2-year survival with their native liver after Kasai procedure was 12%. The time span between Kasai surgery and liver transplantation was 176 ± 73 days. Six children (7%), of whom three patients had a syndromic and one a non-syndromic biliary atresia, died prior to liver transplantation. The pre- and post-transplant mortality rate for children with biliary atresia was ~12 and ~17%, respectively. Conclusion: Neonatal cholestasis is a severe threat associated with a high risk of complications in infancy and it therefore requires urgent investigation in order to initiate life saving therapy. Although in the last 20 years new causes such as the PFICs have been identified and newer diagnostic tools have been introduced into the clinical routine biliary atresia still represents the major cause. PMID:25003101

  2. Human neonatal hepatocyte transplantation induces long-term rescue of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; López, Silvia; Pareja, Eugenia; Donato, María Teresa; Myara, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Castell, José Vicente; Gómez-Lechón, María José

    2015-06-01

    Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease is a rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by high levels of unconjugated bilirubin due to the complete absence of hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronate-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) has been proposed as an alternative treatment for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, but it is still limited by the quality and the low engraftment and repopulation ability of the cells used. Because of their attachment capability and expression of adhesion molecules as well as the higher proportion of hepatic progenitor cells, neonatal hepatocytes may have an advantage over adult cells. Adult or neonatal hepatocytes were transplanted into Gunn rats, a model for Crigler-Najjar disease. Engraftment and repopulation were studied and compared by immunofluorescence (IF). Additionally, the serum bilirubin levels, the presence of bilirubin conjugates in rat serum, and the expression of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1 family polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) in rat liver samples were also analyzed. Here we show that neonatal HT results in long-term correction in Gunn rats. In comparison with adult cells, neonatal cells showed better engraftment and repopulation capability 3 days and 6 months after transplantation, respectively. Bilirubinemia decreased in the transplanted animals during the whole experimental follow-up (6 months). Bilirubin conjugates were also present in the serum of the transplanted animals. Western blots and IF confirmed the presence and expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. This work is the first to demonstrate the advantage of using neonatal hepatocytes for the treatment of Crigler-Najjar in vivo. PMID:25821167

  3. Safety and Impact of Chlorhexidine Antisepsis Interventions for Improving Neonatal Health in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Luke C.; Darmstadt, Gary L.; Tielsch, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Affordable, efficacious, and safe interventions to prevent infections and improve neonatal survival in low-resource settings are needed. Chlorhexidine is a broad-spectrum antiseptic that has been used extensively for many decades in hospital and other clinical settings. It has also been given as maternal vaginal lavage, full-body newborn skin cleansing, and/or umbilical cord cleansing to prevent infection in neonates. Recent evidence suggests that these chlorhexidine interventions may have significant public health impact on the burden of neonatal infection and mortality in developing countries. This review examines the available data from randomized and nonrandomized studies of chlorhexidine cleansing, with a primary focus on potential uses in low-resource settings. Safety issues related to chlorhexidine use in newborns are reviewed, and future research priorities for chlorhexidine interventions for neonatal health in developing countries are discussed. We conclude that maternal vaginal cleansing combined with newborn skin cleansing could reduce neonatal infections and mortality in hospitals of sub-Saharan Africa, but the individual impact of these interventions must be determined, particularly in community settings. There is evidence for a protective benefit of newborn skin and umbilical cord cleansing with chlorhexidine in the community in south Asia. Effectiveness trials in that region are required to address the feasibility of community-based delivery methods such as incorporating these interventions into clean birth kits or training programs for minimally skilled delivery assistants or family members. Efficacy trials for all chlorhexidine interventions are needed in low-resource settings in Africa, and the benefit of maternal vaginal cleansing beyond that provided by newborn skin cleansing needs to be determined. PMID:16874163

  4. The Child and Family Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Deron; Fryda, Sarah; Rubin, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Patient and family experiences are important indicators of quality of care and little is known about how family accommodation affects hospital experience. We added questions about accommodation to standardized inpatient pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit family experience surveys at 10 U.S. hospitals to determine the accommodation types used by families, compare characteristics across accommodation types and explore accommodation-type influences on overall hospital experience outcomes. Parents of inpatient children (n = 5,105; 93.4%) most often stayed in the child’s room (76.8%). Parents of neonatal intensive care unit infants (n = 362; 6.6%) most often stayed overnight in their own home or with relatives/friends (47.2%). Accommodation varied based on hospital, parent, and child factors. Accommodation type was a significant predictor for most hospital experience outcomes, with families who stayed at a Ronald McDonald House reporting more positive overall hospital experiences (odds ratios: ranging from 1.83 to 4.86 for contrasted accommodation types and three experience outcomes). PMID:25854957

  5. Strategic and operational aspects of a transfusion-free neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin; Dave, Hitendu; Kelly, Janet; Hübler, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery in a neonate remains a challenge for multidisciplinary cardiac teams. At our institution, a 3.5 kg neonate, born to a family of Jehovah's Witnesses and postnatally diagnosed with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and a small muscular ventricular septal defect, underwent a successful arterial switch operation without blood or platelet transfusion. Key points that contributed to success were optimal preoperative haematopoetic conditioning using erythropoietin and iron, a miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass circuit including a low prime volume oxygenator and crystalloid cardioplegia, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. We report an overview of the literature regarding blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery.

  6. Strategic and operational aspects of a transfusion-free neonatal arterial switch operation

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin; Dave, Hitendu; Kelly, Janet; Hübler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery in a neonate remains a challenge for multidisciplinary cardiac teams. At our institution, a 3.5 kg neonate, born to a family of Jehovah's Witnesses and postnatally diagnosed with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and a small muscular ventricular septal defect, underwent a successful arterial switch operation without blood or platelet transfusion. Key points that contributed to success were optimal preoperative haematopoetic conditioning using erythropoietin and iron, a miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass circuit including a low prime volume oxygenator and crystalloid cardioplegia, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. We report an overview of the literature regarding blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23460601

  7. Strategic and operational aspects of a transfusion-free neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin; Dave, Hitendu; Kelly, Janet; Hübler, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery in a neonate remains a challenge for multidisciplinary cardiac teams. At our institution, a 3.5 kg neonate, born to a family of Jehovah's Witnesses and postnatally diagnosed with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and a small muscular ventricular septal defect, underwent a successful arterial switch operation without blood or platelet transfusion. Key points that contributed to success were optimal preoperative haematopoetic conditioning using erythropoietin and iron, a miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass circuit including a low prime volume oxygenator and crystalloid cardioplegia, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. We report an overview of the literature regarding blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23460601

  8. Splenic rupture and intracranial haemorrhage in a haemophilic neonate: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Ibrahim; Asarian, Armand; Xiao, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Splenic rupture and intracranial haemorrhage are life-threatening conditions infrequently encountered in neonates without history of birth trauma. External manifestations of birth trauma; namely, capput succadeneum and cephalhematoma, when present raise suspicions for more serious intracranial or visceral damage. Rupture of normal spleen without an obvious source of trauma in haemophilic neonate is a rare event. The concurrence of both conditions and the unusual presentation make this case a rare one that is seldom encountered in the literature. Additionally, when splenic rupture occurs, the consensus is to employ all non-operative techniques aimed at salvaging the spleen, thus avoiding the immune-compromised state associated with splenectomy. However, in this case, we present a 3-day-old male with family history of haemophilia A, who was diagnosed with splenic rupture and bilateral subdural haematomas and underwent splenectomy, albeit with post-operative complications, in light of haemodynamic instability and high ongoing transfusion requirements. PMID:22878771

  9. Volumetric diffusive respirator use in neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P J; Chilton, H W; Garvey, P A; Gupta, J M

    1991-02-01

    Six very low birthweight neonates with terminal respiratory failure due to severe hyaline membrane disease who failed to respond to conventional ventilation were offered a trial of high frequency jet ventilation using the volumetric diffusive respirator (VDR). All neonates showed improvement in pulmonary function. Two neonates were weaned successfully from high frequency ventilation. The results of this initial trial suggest that the volumetric diffusive respirator is a safe and effective method of ventilation in neonates with respiratory failure and that the survival rate in such neonates might be enhanced if treatment is introduced earlier in the disease.

  10. Early Onset Neonatal Septicaemia Caused by Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Mallika; Das, Niloy Kumar; Guchhait, Partha; Misra, Saheli

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans is an opportunistic pathogen causing infection in the immunocompromised patients. It is a plant pathogen and a rare human pathogen causing neonatal sepsis, joint infection, urinary tract infection and bloodstream infections. Neonatal Gram negative septicaemia may have an unusual presentation of subtle generalised neonatal seizures without any other cardinal features of sepsis. An appropriate diagnosis is therefore the key to proper management. P. agglomerans being an unusual cause of neonatal sepsis should be diagnosed early with proper antibiogram for clinical cure. Here, we report a case of neonatal sepsis caused by P. agglomerans in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India. PMID:27437219

  11. Intracranial complications of Serratia marcescens infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Madide, Ayanda; Smith, Johan

    2016-03-15

    Even though Serratia marcescens is not one of the most common causes of infection in neonates, it is associated with grave morbidity and mortality. We describe the evolution of brain parenchymal affectation observed in association with S. marcescens infection in neonates. This retrospective case series details brain ultrasound findings of five neonates with hospital-acquired S. marcescens infection. Neonatal S. marcescens infection with or without associated meningitis can be complicated by brain parenchymal affectation, leading to cerebral abscess formation. It is recommended that all neonates with this infection should undergo neuro-imaging more than once before discharge from hospital; this can be achieved using bedside ultrasonography.

  12. Neonatal enteral feeding tubes as loci for colonisation by members of the Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    , irrespective of feeding regime, act as loci for the bacterial attachment and multiplication of numerous opportunistic pathogens within the Enterobacteriaceae family. Subsequently, these organisms will enter the stomach as a bolus with each feed. Therefore, enteral feeding tubes are an important risk factor to consider with respect to neonatal infections. PMID:19723318

  13. Neonatal Atlas Construction Using Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Atlas construction generally includes first an image registration step to normalize all images into a common space and then an atlas building step to fuse the information from all the aligned images. Although numerous atlas construction studies have been performed to improve the accuracy of the image registration step, unweighted or simply weighted average is often used in the atlas building step. In this article, we propose a novel patch-based sparse representation method for atlas construction after all images have been registered into the common space. By taking advantage of local sparse representation, more anatomical details can be recovered in the built atlas. To make the anatomical structures spatially smooth in the atlas, the anatomical feature constraints on group structure of representations and also the overlapping of neighboring patches are imposed to ensure the anatomical consistency between neighboring patches. The proposed method has been applied to 73 neonatal MR images with poor spatial resolution and low tissue contrast, for constructing a neonatal brain atlas with sharp anatomical details. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly enhance the quality of the constructed atlas by discovering more anatomical details especially in the highly convoluted cortical regions. The resulting atlas demonstrates superior performance of our atlas when applied to spatially normalizing three different neonatal datasets, compared with other start-of-the-art neonatal brain atlases. PMID:24638883

  14. Infants at Risk: Perinatal and Neonatal Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of infant behavior and development. Delineates a behavioral hypothesis relating prenatal and neonatal risk factors in infancy to crib death. The mutual dependence of experience and neurostructural development suggests that infancy is a period of critical learning experiences. (Author/RH)

  15. Hansenula anomala infection in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Wong, A R; Ibrahim, H; Van Rostenberghe, H; Ishak, Z; Radzi, M J

    2000-12-01

    We present an unusual neonatal fungal infection, Hansenula anomala in a very low birthweight infant who underwent abdominal surgery for an omphalocele. Despite treatment with adequate doses of amphotericin B, the yeast continued to grow from the blood culture, and was only eradicated with the use of oral ketoconazole. PMID:11115044

  16. Gender-Related Differences in Neonatal Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese; Kompagne, Hajnalka; Orvos, Hajnalka; Pal, Attila

    2007-01-01

    Socio-emotional behaviour is in part sex-related in humans, although the contribution of the biological and socio-cultural factors is not yet known. This study explores sex-related differences during the earliest communicative exchange, the neonatal imitation in 43 newborn infants (3-96 hours old) using an index finger extension imitative gesture.…

  17. [Advances in the management of neonatal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos; Becker, Michele M; Ranzan, Josiane; Winckler, Maria Isabel B; Ohlweiler, Lygia

    2013-09-01

    Introduccion. Durante el nacimiento, ocurren cambios fisiologicos en practicamente todos los organos del niño, incluyendo el sistema nervioso central. En esta fase de transicion, es posible un cierto grado de hipoxemia, en general bien tolerado por el neonato. Sin embargo, si la hipoxia neonatal es muy intensa y continuada, puede instalarse una encefalopatia neonatal, lo que caracteriza una situacion critica para el recien nacido. Su abordaje adecuado es imprescindible para garantizar un buen pronostico a largo plazo. Desarrollo. Se actualizan las informaciones acerca de la hipoxia neonatal y se revisan publicaciones recientes acerca de los avances en su abordaje a traves de la medicina basada en evidencias. Conclusiones. La encefalopatia neonatal se puede clasificar desde el punto de vista clinico en tres niveles de intensidad. Usualmente, los casos leves tienen un buen pronostico, los casos de intensidad moderada tienen un 30% de posibilidad de secuelas y los de intensidad grave tienen mas del 70% de mortalidad, pero practicamente todos los supervivientes tendran secuelas. Los avances ocurrieron en dos areas: en el diagnostico, con nuevas tecnicas de EEG y RM, y en el tratamiento, con la aparicion de la hipotermia terapeutica. Existe la posibilidad de un uso futuro para la terapia con celulas madre. El pronostico depende de la clasificacion clinica, de los datos de neuroimagen y del EEG.

  18. Torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Justice, Denise; Vanaman, Monique M; Nelson, Virginia S; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the incidence of torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, whether the severity of brachial plexus palsy affects outcomes and the rate of recovery. We performed a retrospective review of 128 consecutive neonatal brachial plexus palsy patients evaluated at the University of Michigan from 2005-2009. Patients were followed for at least 3 months, with regular physical examinations and imaging. Forty-three percent presented concurrently with torticollis. Significant differences were evident in mean age at first brachial plexus examination, suggesting that patients with concurrent torticollis present earlier for clinical examination. Recovery from torticollis was evident in 62% of patients by 23 ± 12 weeks with conservative management. No statistically significant differences were evident between torticollis and nontorticollis groups after reviewing their severity of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (Narakas score), recovery from neonatal brachial plexus palsy (biceps function at 6 months), need for nerve repair or reconstructive procedures, or infant, maternal, or other factors associated with labor. Results suggest that although torticollis occurs with increased frequency in children with brachial plexus palsy, its presence is not related to severity and does not affect the probability of recovery from brachial plexus palsy. Conservative management for torticollis yields reasonable recovery.

  19. Parental and Perinatal Correlates of Neonatal Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standley, Kay

    This paper discusses the analyses of antecedent correlates of the behavior of 60 infants as measured by the Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Scale on the third day after birth. The data include two sets of antecedent variables: maternal adaptation to pregnancy as reported in prenatal interviews and measured describing the conditions of labor and…

  20. [Forensic approach of infanticide and neonatal death].

    PubMed

    Beauthier, J P

    2007-01-01

    The foetal of neonatal death brings up many questions as well on the physiopathological level as on the medico-legal one. We consider here the various natural and violent origins which allow understanding this difficult forensic activity. The approach of forensic anthropology and recent medical techniques (X-rays and echography) are also studied in order to be helpful to the medical examiner.

  1. Neonate Orientation Behaviour towards Human Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alegria, J.; Noirot, E.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the effect of a recorded male human voice on neonate head, eye, mouth and crying behaviors. Vocal Stimulation enhanced head movement, eye opening, mouthing and crying and influenced hand sucking. Differences between breast fed and bottle fed babies were found for mouth orientation, hand sucking and crying. (RH)

  2. Auditory Evoked Responses in Neonates by MEG

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pavon, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Lutter, W. J.; Maier, M.; Wakai, R. T.

    2008-08-11

    Magnetoencephalography is a biomagnetic technique with outstanding potential for neurodevelopmental studies. In this work, we have used MEG to determinate if newborns can discriminate between different stimuli during the first few months of life. Five neonates were stimulated during several minutes with auditory stimulation. The results suggest that the newborns are able to discriminate between different stimuli despite their early age.

  3. Neurodevelopmental outcome of transient neonatal intracerebral echodensities.

    PubMed

    Appleton, R E; Lee, R E; Hey, E N

    1990-01-01

    The later neurodevelopmental progress of 15 babies who had neonatal periventricular echodensities or flares in the absence of any intraventricular bleeding or subsequent cystic degeneration was studied. At follow up four infants had neurological abnormalities, including spastic diplegia (n = 2). These findings suggest that transient flares may represent mild periventricular leucomalacia with consequent mild neurological dysfunction. PMID:2407199

  4. Minimally invasive surgery in neonates and infants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tiffany; Pimpalwar, Ashwin

    2010-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has significantly improved the field of surgery, with benefits including shorter operating time, improved recovery time, minimizing stress and pain due to smaller incisions, and even improving mortality. MIS procedures, including their indications, impact, limitations, and possible future evolution in neonates and infants, are discussed in this article. PMID:21180496

  5. Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress

    MedlinePlus

    ... individual comparison. Addiction 106(7):1355–1362, 2011. Full Text Jones, H.E., et al. Neonatal abstinence syndrome ... Journal of Medicine 363(24):2320–2331, 2010. Full Text MOTHER Collaborators Following is a list of collaborators ...

  6. Neonatal listeriosis: Uncommon or misdiagnosed?

    PubMed

    Kylat, R I; Bartholomew, A; Cramer, N; Bader, M Y

    2016-09-16

    The incidence of perinatal and neonatal Listeriosis is underestimated due undiagnosed stillbirths, misdiagnosis of NL and underreporting of single case reports. Recent outbreaks reinforce the need for better surveillance and targeted health education in certain population groups especially during pregnancy. PMID:27589546

  7. Manganese Neurotoxicity: A Focus on the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Keith M.; Thompson, Khristy; Aschner, Judy; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal found in all tissues, and it is required for normal amino acid, lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism. While Mn deficiency is extremely rare in humans, toxicity due to overexposure of Mn is more prevalent. The brain appears to be especially vulnerable. Mn neurotoxicity is most commonly associated with occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (> 1-5 mg Mn/m3) of Mn, consumption of contaminated well water, or parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with liver disease or immature hepatic functioning such as the neonate. This review will focus primarily on the neurotoxicity of Mn in the neonate. We will discuss putative transporters of the metal in the neonatal brain and then focus on the implications of high Mn exposure to the neonate focusing on typical exposure modes (e.g., dietary and parenteral). Although Mn exposure via parenteral nutrition is uncommon in adults, in premature infants, it is more prevalent, so this mode of exposure becomes salient in this population. We will briefly review some of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity and conclude with a discussion of ripe areas for research in this underreported area of neurotoxicity. PMID:17084903

  8. Humidity control tool for neonatal incubator.

    PubMed

    Abdiche, M; Farges, G; Delanaud, S; Bach, V; Villon, P; Libert, J P

    1998-03-01

    In the first days of life, the daily evaporative loss from premature neonates can reach up to 20% of body mass. Such loss can be reduced by increasing the air humidity inside the incubator. Neither passive humidification nor open loop systems allow high humidity rates to be maintained or easily controlled: at 34 degrees C, the maximum levels vary with the system from 40% to 77% of relative humidity. The skin evaporative exchanges between the neonate and the environment are directly proportional to the water vapour partial pressure difference between the neonate's skin and the air. An active closed loop system has been designed, which permits reliable and accurate control of humidity according to the water vapour partial pressure set, between 1 and 6 kPa, in an air temperature range of 28-39 degrees C. It is characterised by variations of about 0.05 kPa around the set value and a maximum humidification speed of 0.25 kPa min-1. The algorithm is based on optimal control and the dynamic programming principles. Test results place this active system above usual systems for its power, precision and adaptability. It is an exploitable tool in fundamental and clinical research, to precisely study the humidity effects on neonatal comfort and thermo-regulation evolution.

  9. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    PubMed Central

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  10. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. PMID:26177232

  11. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-ze; Frank, Matthew W.; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition. PMID:26416771

  12. Maternal bile acid transporter deficiency promotes neonatal demise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Fei; Wang, Yao; Pitre, Aaron; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Frank, Matthew W; Calabrese, Christopher; Krausz, Kristopher W; Neale, Geoffrey; Frase, Sharon; Vogel, Peter; Rock, Charles O; Gonzalez, Frank J; Schuetz, John D

    2015-09-29

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is associated with adverse neonatal survival and is estimated to impact between 0.4 and 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Here we show that maternal cholestasis (due to Abcb11 deficiency) produces neonatal death among all offspring within 24 h of birth due to atelectasis-producing pulmonary hypoxia, which recapitulates the neonatal respiratory distress of human ICP. Neonates of Abcb11-deficient mothers have elevated pulmonary bile acids and altered pulmonary surfactant structure. Maternal absence of Nr1i2 superimposed on Abcb11 deficiency strongly reduces maternal serum bile acid concentrations and increases neonatal survival. We identify pulmonary bile acids as a key factor in the disruption of the structure of pulmonary surfactant in neonates of ICP. These findings have important implications for neonatal respiratory failure, especially when maternal bile acids are elevated during pregnancy, and highlight potential pathways and targets amenable to therapeutic intervention to ameliorate this condition.

  13. Planning the acoustic environment of a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Philbin, M Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    This article addresses general principles of designing a quiet neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and describes basic aspects of room acoustics as these apply to the NICU. Recommended acoustical criteria for walls, background noise, vibration, and reverberation are included as appendices. Crowding in open, multiple-bed NICUs is the major factor in designs that inevitably produce noisy nurseries with limited space for parents. Quiet infant spaces with appropriate sound sources rely on isolation of the infant from facility and operational noise sources (eg, adult work spaces, supply delivery, and travel paths) and extended contact with family members.However, crowding has been an important influence on the clinical practice and social context of neonatology. It allows clinicians to rely on wide visual and auditory access to many patients for monitoring their well-being. It also allows immediate social contact with other adults, both staff and families. Giving up this wide access and relying on other forms of communication in order to provide for increased quiet and privacy for staff, infants, and parents is a challenge for some design teams. Studies of the effects of various nursery designs on infants, parents, clinicians, and the delivery of services are proposed as a means of advancing the field of design.

  14. The Intestinal Eukaryotic Virome in Healthy and Diarrhoeic Neonatal Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Juliette; Berg, Mikael; Jacobson, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal porcine diarrhoea of uncertain aetiology has been reported from a number of European countries. The aim of the present study was to use viral metagenomics to examine a potential viral involvement in this diarrhoea and to describe the intestinal virome with focus on eukaryotic viruses. Samples from the distal jejunum of 50 diarrhoeic and 19 healthy piglets from 10 affected herds were analysed. The viral fraction of the samples was isolated and nucleic acids (RNA and DNA fractions) were subjected to sequence independent amplification. Samples from diarrhoeic piglets from the same herds were pooled whereas samples from healthy piglets were analysed individually. In total, 29 clinical samples, plus two negative controls and one positive control consisting of a mock metagenome were sequenced using the Ion Torrent platform. The resulting sequence data was subjected to taxonomic classification using Kraken, Diamond and HMMER. In the healthy specimens, eight different mammalian virus families were detected (Adenoviridae, Anelloviridae, Astroviridae, Caliciviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Reoviridae) compared to four in the pooled diarrhoeic samples (Anelloviridae, Circoviridae, Picornaviridae, and Reoviridae). It was not possible to associate a particular virus family with the investigated diarrhoea. In conclusion, this study does not support the hypothesis that the investigated diarrhoea was caused by known mammalian viruses. The results do, however, indicate that known mammalian viruses were present in the intestine as early as 24–48 hours after birth, indicating immediate infection post-partum or possibly transplacental infection. PMID:26982708

  15. Reduced nephron endowment in the neonates of Indigenous Australian peoples.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Y; Smith, R; Wright, I M R; Lumbers, E R

    2014-02-01

    Rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among Indigenous groups in Australia exceed non-Indigenous rates eight-fold. Using kidney volume as a surrogate for nephron number, we carried out a study to determine if Indigenous neonates have a smaller kidney volume (and thus a reduced nephron number) from birth compared with non-Indigenous neonates. We recruited term and preterm neonates (<32 weeks) at a tertiary care neonatal unit over a 12 months period. Preterm neonates were assessed (renal sonography and renal function measurement) at 32 weeks corrected age (CA) and again at 38 weeks CA when blood pressure was also measured. All term neonates were assessed in the first post-natal week, including renal sonography, renal function and blood pressure measurement. The primary outcome measured was total kidney volume (TKV) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was a secondary outcome. Data was available for 44 preterm (11 Indigenous) and 39 term (13 Indigenous) neonates. TKV of Indigenous neonates was significantly lower at 32 weeks [12.0 (2.0) v. 15.4 (5.1) ml; P=0.03] and 38 weeks CA [18.6 (4.0) v. 22.6 (5.9) ml; P=0.04] respectively. Term Indigenous neonates also had smaller kidney volumes compared with non-Indigenous neonates. Despite a smaller kidney volume (and reduced nephron number), Indigenous neonates did not have a significantly lower eGFR. Indigenous neonates achieve similar eGFRs to Non-Indigenous neonates, presumably through a higher single nephron filtration rate. This places Indigenous neonates at a greater risk of long-term kidney damage later in life.

  16. Neonatal nursing: an unmet challenge in India.

    PubMed

    Kalyan, Geetanjli; Vatsa, Manju

    2014-11-01

    Nurses comprise a key component to maternal and newborn health care delivery, including the care of 'at-risk' or sick newborns. However, the efficiency and effectiveness of services rely heavily on adequate numbers of highly skilled neonatal nurses. Currently, in India, a significant shortage of trained nurses in the field of newborn care is contributing to poor neonatal outcomes. Specifically, nurses caring for newborns lack the competency and experience needed to ensure optimal care. This deficiency has been linked to a lack of expert faculty, standardized training and minimal or no exposures to newborn clinical care areas during pre service education. Moreover, in addition to a lack of operational research in the area, nurses who provide care for newborns are often faced with numerous system related issues that impede their ability to provide optimal care. Most notably, frequent changes of work place, poor wages, and lack of continuing education, skill maintenance, recognition, and collaborative team culture further compromise the nursing care. All these lead to poor motivation and competency. To meet this challenge, it is essential that emphasis be placed on the identification and support of nursing faculty with expertise in newborn and neonatal care who are able to ensure that nurses receive standardized education for pre-service, in-service and ongoing care. In addition, importance should be placed on encouraging newborn nursing research as well as on governmental increases in salary compensation. Lastly, given the shortage of physicians to take care of sick neonates in remote areas, the creation of a cadre of Neonatal nurse practitioner/ advanced practice nurses would be an invaluable solution in developing countries. Furthermore, centralized oversight of newborn education and training would be best served, if responsibility was placed with Reproductive maternal newborn child health (RMNCH) workers and district level officers. PMID:25278279

  17. Strategies to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Paul, V K

    1988-06-01

    The perinatal mortality rate in India averages 66.3/1000 live births. 60% of all infant deaths occur during the 1st month, making the neonatal mortality rate 76/1000 in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. These rates have remained static since 1974. Over 90% of all deliveries occur at home and are conducted by untrained birth attendants. The major causes of perinatal deaths are immaturity/low birth weight, birth asphyxia/trauma, neonatal infections, and congenital malformations. Neonatal tetanus alone is responsible for 230,000-280,000 deaths a year. Hypoxia, low birth weight, and tetanus are preventable, if primary perinatal care is provided and high-risk pregnancies are recognized and referred to facilities where fetal monitoring and neonatal care are available. It is proposed to train all of the country's 5 million traditional birth attendants by 1990 to deliver primary perinatal care. By 1990 also there will be 1 village health guide for every 1000 people. All traditional birth attendants must know how to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and the infrastructure for an adequate referral system must be established. In order to reduce the incidence of low birth weight, the Integrated Child Development Service Scheme proposes that all pregnant women receive a dietary supplement of 500 calories and 25 gm protein, and that pregnant women be given a 2-hour midday rest period. The control of malaria and intestinal infections with chloroquine and antibiotics would do much to reduce low birth weight. Simple technologies for measuring birth weight indicators, such as chest circumference or mid-arm circumference, require only a tape measure. Finally, technics of mass communication must be utilized to spread knowledge of perinatal and neonatal care. PMID:3069742

  18. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  19. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  20. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of Disability: A…