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Sample records for neonatal hypoglycemia prevalence

  1. Update on Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rozance, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. Recent Findings New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. Summary The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of over treating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of under treating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge. PMID:24275620

  2. Neonatal Hypoglycemia: A Continuing Debate in Definition and Management.

    PubMed

    Stomnaroska-Damcevski, Orhideja; Petkovska, Elizabeta; Jancevska, Snezana; Danilovski, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia (NH) is one of the most common abnormalities encountered in the newborn. Maintaining glucose homeostasis is one of the important physiological events during fetal-to-neonatal transition. Transient low blood glucose concentrations are frequently encountered in the majority of healthy newborns and are the reflections of normal metabolic adaptation processes. Nevertheless, there is a great concern that prolonged or recurrent low blood glucose levels may result in long-term neurological and developmental consequences. Strikingly, it was demonstrated that the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia, did not find association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. On the contrary, NH due to hyperinsulinism is strongly associated with brain injury. Fundamental issue of great professional controversy is concerning the best manner to manage asymptomatic newborns NH. Both, overtreating NH and undertreating NH are poles with significant potential disadvantages. Therefore, NH is one of the most important issues in the day-to-day practice. This article appraises the critical questions of definition (widely accepted blood glucose concentration: < 2.6 mmol/l or 47 mg/dl), follow-up ad management of NH. PMID:27442401

  3. Improving the Diagnosis of Neonatal Hypoglycemia in a Well-Baby Nursery

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Eric; Alexander, Jennifer; Akinmboni, Temi; Woo, Hyung; Driscoll, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Point of care glucose (POCG) measurements, used for detecting neonatal hypoglycemia, can have variable accuracy. The appropriate diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia in babies with low POCG measurements involves confirmatory serum glucose (CSG) testing. At our institution, no babies with low POCG measurements had CSG testing in their evaluation of neonatal hypoglycemia over a three year period. Our aim was to increase the percentage of CSG testing in babies with a low POCG. A secondary aim was to decrease the percentage of low-risk, asymptomatic babies who received POCG testing. Interventions included the design and implementation of an evidence-based protocol for the diagnosis and management of neonatal hypoglycemia (cycle 1), along with supportive education for multi-disciplinary providers on best practices related to neonatal hypoglycemia (cycle 2). Data were analyzed using statistical process control. During Cycle 1, the percentage of CSG testing in babies with POCG ≤40 mg/dL significantly increased from 0 to 33%, and increased further to 63% during Cycle 2. The initial gain was sustained over 2 years. The percentage of POCG testing among low-risk asymptomatic babies was 40% at baseline and did not change during the project period. 18 babies with low POCG results were spared from a diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia based on CSG testing. Implementation of a neonatal hypoglycemia protocol, along with supportive education, significantly improved rates of CSG testing, but not POCG overutilization, in our newborn population. Factors related to POCG overutilization should be further explored. PMID:27752317

  4. Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Morales, Javier; Schneider, Doron

    2014-10-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common, potentially avoidable consequence of diabetes treatment and is a major barrier to initiating or intensifying antihyperglycemic therapy in efforts to achieve better glycemic control. Therapy regimen and a history of hypoglycemia are the most important predictors of future events. Other risk factors include renal insufficiency, older age, and history of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure. Reported rates of hypoglycemia vary considerably among studies because of differences in study design, definitions used, and population included, among other factors. Although occurring more frequently in type 1 diabetes, hypoglycemia also is clinically important in type 2 diabetes. Symptoms experienced by patients vary among individuals, and many events remain undiagnosed. The incidence of severe events is unevenly distributed, with only a small proportion (∼ 5%) of individuals accounting for >50% of events. Consequently, clinicians must be conscientious in obtaining thorough patient histories, because an accurate picture of the frequency and severity of hypoglycemic events is essential for optimal diabetes management. Severe hypoglycemia in particular is associated with an increased risk of mortality, impairments in cognitive function, and adverse effects on patients' quality of life. Economically, hypoglycemia burdens the healthcare system and adversely affects workplace productivity, particularly after a nocturnal event. Ongoing healthcare reform efforts will result in even more emphasis on reducing this side effect of diabetes treatment. Therefore, improving patients' self-management skills and selecting or modifying therapy to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia will increase in importance for clinicians and patients alike. PMID:25282009

  5. Neonatal hypoglycemia caused by hypopituitarism in infants with congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Daaboul, J J; Kartchner, W; Jones, K L

    1993-12-01

    Two infants with congenital syphilis and persistent hypoglycemia were found to have hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism should be recognized as a potential complication of congenital syphilis; affected infants with persistent hypoglycemia should receive a prompt evaluation of pituitary function.

  6. Hypoglycemias.

    PubMed Central

    Service, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    Low plasma glucose concentrations that may or may not be sufficiently low to result in symptoms can be observed as a concomitant of several diverse diseases. Treatment of the primary underlying disorder usually alleviates the hypoglycemia. For patients whose primary symptom is that of hypoglycemia, it is essential to confirm that the plasma glucose concentration is low during the occurrence of symptoms. Symptoms that occur after meals usually are mild and rarely signify serious disease. With rare exceptions, hypoglycemia resulting in major symptoms occurs in the food-deprived state. Lower concentrations of plasma insulin and C-peptide and a concomitant low plasma glucose are major clues to a correct diagnosis. Images PMID:1877184

  7. Re-evaluating "transitional neonatal hypoglycemia": mechanism and implications for management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Committee of the Pediatric Endocrine Society was recently formed to develop guidelines for evaluation and management of hypoglycemia in neonates, infants, and children. To aid in formulating recommendations for neonates, in this review, we analyzed available data on the brief period of hypoglycemi...

  8. Hypoglycemia: a factor associated with low survival rate of neonatal piglets infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, R; Morin, M; Fontaine, M

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to study changes in the balance of fluids, electrolytes and blood metabolites in neonatal piglets with severe transmissible gastroenteritis. Six two day old conventional piglets were infected with transmissible gastroenteritis virus while six others were used as normal controls. Blood samples were collected in heparin when the infected piglets were moribund. The following variables were measured: packed red cell volume, total plasma protein and bicarbonate, blood pH, blood urea nitrogen and plasma glucose, creatinine, chloride, inorganic phosphorus, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium. Vomiting and diarrhea appeared 12 to 24 hours postinoculation in the infected piglets and they were moribund one or two days later. Before becoming moribund, most of the piglets fell rapidly into a lethargic and comatose state. The most evident changes in their blood variables were an increase in packed cell volume, total protein, blood urea nitrogen, phosphorus and magnesium levels and a decrease in pH and bicarbonate concentration as well as a severe hypoglycemia. The results suggest that severe hypoglycemia coupled with metabolic acidosis and dehydration might be an important factor contributing to the high mortality rates caused by transmissible gastroenteritis in neonatal piglets. The hypoglycemia results from a combination of the inadequate glucose metabolism inherent to neonatal piglets and the acute maldigestion and malabsorption resulting from the diffuse and severe villous atrophy induced by the virus. PMID:6478297

  9. The use of dextrostix and dextrostix reflectance meters in the diagnosis of neonatal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Harvey, D R; Cooper, L V; Fancourt, R F; Levene, M; Schoberg, T

    1976-01-01

    less than 10 mg/dl. When estimated by eye there was one case in which the blood glucose was only 7 mg/dl but the observer had estimated the result of 30 mg/dl. In order to avoid any possibility that a blood glucose was less than 20 mg/dl, it is necessary to take action on any estimate below 40 mg/dl on a Dextrostix. Despite this, Dextrostix remains a very useful method of screening for neonatal hypoglycemia, whether assessed by eye or with the new Dextrostix-Eyetone meter. the meter does give better results than estimating Dextrostix by eye, but the difference was never statistically significant.

  10. Antepartum findings and obstetric aspects in pregnancies followed by neonatal persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Anna-Maria; Puolakka, Jukka; Kirkinen, Pertti

    2002-04-01

    In this study we report antepartum and obstetric findings in cases of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI). The study is retrospective and covers the years 1983 to 1994, when there were 9 infants treated for PHHI in the region of the University Hospital of Kuopio. One of the mothers had gestational diabetes mellitus and one had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). There were signs of fetal distress in cardiotocography (CTG) in 3 of 9 cases prenatally and in 3 of 9 cases intrapartum (33%). There were 5 premature deliveries (56%) and 5 cesarean sections (56%) in this series. Five neonates (56%) were macrosomic and one delivery was complicated by shoulder dystocia. Three neonates (33%) had a 1-minute Apgar score of <6, but there were no cases at 5 minutes. In cases of fetal macrosomia without a maternal diabetic problem amniocentesis may be carried out after 34 weeks of gestation to assay amniotic fluid insulin, C-peptide and erythropoietin to reveal rare cases of PHHI where there may be problems of fetal hypoxemia similar to those in diabetic pregnancies.

  11. Hypoglycemia associated hospitalizations in a population with a high prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, J R

    1991-11-01

    In order to evaluate the rates, causes, and clinical features of hospitalizations associated with hypoglycemia in a population with a high prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), a retrospective analysis of medical records was conducted in a multi-hospital primary care system on the Navajo Indian Reservation. During an estimated 26,125 person-years of observation among diabetic patients, there were 126 hypoglycemia-associated admissions related to diabetes among 109 diabetic patients, yielding a hospitalization rate of 4.7 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 4.1-5.7). Using estimates of drug utilization based on a defined daily dose, hospitalization rates were 5.8 per 1000 PY (95% CI 4.4-7.6) for chlorpropamide, 16.0 per 1000 PY (95% CI 9.5-26.9) for glyburide, and 9.1 per 1000 PY (95% CI 6.9-11.9) for insulin. After stratification by age, the relative risk for hypoglycemia-associated hospitalization among patients prescribed glyburide compared to those prescribed chlorpropamide was 2.8 (95% CI 1.6-4.9). Hypoglycemia-associated hospitalizations were relatively common among patients with NIDDM, particularly among those treated with glyburide. PMID:1756685

  12. Prevalence of neonatal hypothyroidism in Kangra Valley, Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Kapil, U; Jain, V; Kabra, M; Pandey, R M; Sareen, N; Khenduja, P

    2014-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) is an endemic health problem in Kangra District, Himachal Pradesh (HP). ID in pregnant mothers leads to neonatal hypothyroidism (NH), mental retardation, deaf mutism, squint, dwarfism, spastic dysplasia, neurological defects and congenital anomalies. NH can be assessed by estimating the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in cord blood samples. The present study was conducted with an objective to assess the prevalence of NH in district Kangra, HP. In district Kangra, all the hospitals providing obstetric services were enlisted. Three hospitals conducting more than 100 deliveries per year were selected randomly. A total of 613 umbilical cord blood samples of neonates were collected on filter papers and analyzed for TSH. TSH was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Neonates with TSH levels ⩾20 mIU/l were recalled for reassessment of TSH for confirmation of NH. Prevalence of NH was found to be 4.4%. This finding suggests the need for the implementation of a neonatal screening program for early detection of children with ID. PMID:24755928

  13. Prevalence of neonatal hypothyroidism in Kangra Valley, Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Kapil, U; Jain, V; Kabra, M; Pandey, R M; Sareen, N; Khenduja, P

    2014-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) is an endemic health problem in Kangra District, Himachal Pradesh (HP). ID in pregnant mothers leads to neonatal hypothyroidism (NH), mental retardation, deaf mutism, squint, dwarfism, spastic dysplasia, neurological defects and congenital anomalies. NH can be assessed by estimating the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in cord blood samples. The present study was conducted with an objective to assess the prevalence of NH in district Kangra, HP. In district Kangra, all the hospitals providing obstetric services were enlisted. Three hospitals conducting more than 100 deliveries per year were selected randomly. A total of 613 umbilical cord blood samples of neonates were collected on filter papers and analyzed for TSH. TSH was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Neonates with TSH levels ⩾20 mIU/l were recalled for reassessment of TSH for confirmation of NH. Prevalence of NH was found to be 4.4%. This finding suggests the need for the implementation of a neonatal screening program for early detection of children with ID.

  14. Recommendations from the Pediatric Endocrine Society for evaluation and management of persistent hypoglycemia in neonates, infants, and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the first 24-48 hours of life, as normal neonates transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life, their plasma glucose (PG) concentrations are typically lower than later in life. Published guidelines for screening at-risk newborns and managing low PG concentrations in neonates focus on the...

  15. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  16. Prevalence of gonococcal conjunctivitis in adults and neonates

    PubMed Central

    McAnena, L; Knowles, S J; Curry, A; Cassidy, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the prevalence of gonococcal conjunctivitis (GC) presenting to a tertiary referral maternity hospital (NMH) and a tertiary referral ophthalmic hospital (RVEEH) from 2011 to 2013 and describe the demographics, clinical presentation, and antibiotic susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae ocular infections. Methods Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were collected from patients with laboratory confirmed GC. Results There were 27 556 live births at NMH during the study period, and no case of neonatal GC was identified. Fourteen cases of GC were identified at RVEEH in this period, representing a prevalence of 0.19 cases per 1000 eye emergency attendees. Antibiotic susceptibility data were available on nine cases, of which, all were ceftriaxone- and ciprofloxacin sensitive. 64.3% of patients were male, with a mean age of 18 years. The mean duration of symptoms was 3 days. All patients presented with unilateral conjunctival injection and purulent discharge. Eight cases had visual impairment at presentation and their mean visual acuity was 6/15. Corneal involvement was present in 25% of patients. Uveitis was not detected. On receipt of positive culture and/or PCR results, treatment was altered in two thirds of patients. All patients were referred for full STI screening and all patients showed a full clinical recovery 1 week posttreatment. Conclusion We observed that GC presented in young adults with a male predominance and was rare in neonates. In cases of unilateral purulent conjunctivitis, there should be a high clinical suspicion of GC, early swab for PCR and culture, and knowledge of current CDC-recommended antibiotic guidelines. PMID:25907207

  17. Hypoglycemia, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Wadwa, R Paul

    2012-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

  18. Hypoglycemia, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wadwa, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in people with diabetes, and the risk of CVD for adults with diabetes is at least two to four times the risk in adults without diabetes. Complications of diabetes, including not only CVD but also microvascular diseases such as retinopathy and nephropathy, are a major health and financial burden. Diabetes is a disease of glucose intolerance, and so much of the research on complications has focused on the role of hyperglycemia. Clinical trials have clearly demonstrated the role of hyperglycemia in microvascular complications of diabetes, but there appears to be less evidence for as strong of a relationship between hyperglycemia and CVD in people with diabetes. Hypoglycemia has become a more pressing health concern as intensive glycemic control has become the standard of care in diabetes. Clinical trials of intensive glucose lowering in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations has resulted in significantly increased hypoglycemia, with no decrease in CVD during the trial period, although several studies have shown a reduction in CVD with extended follow-up. There is evidence that hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes, and this is one potential explanation for the lack of CVD prevention in trials of intensive glycemic control. Hypoglycemia causes a cascade of physiologic effects and may induce oxidative stress and cardiac arrhythmias, contribute to sudden cardiac death, and cause ischemic cerebral damage, presenting several potential mechanisms through which acute and chronic episodes of hypoglycemia may increase CVD risk. In this review, we examine the risk factors and prevalence of hypoglycemia in diabetes, review the evidence for an association of both acute and chronic hypoglycemia with CVD in adults with diabetes, and discuss potential mechanisms through which hypoglycemia may adversely affect cardiovascular risk. PMID:22650225

  19. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: incidence, prevalence, and temporal trends.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Suneet P; Blackwell, Sean B; Ananth, Cande V

    2014-06-01

    Epidemiological knowledge of the incidence, prevalence, and temporal changes of neonatal brachial plexuses palsy (NBPP) should assist the clinician, avert unnecessary interventions, and help formulate evidence-based health policies. A summary of 63 publications in the English language with over 17 million births and 24,000 NBPPs is notable for six things. First, the rate of NBPP in the US and other countries is comparable: 1.5 vs. 1.3 per 1000 total births, respectively. Second, the rate of NBPP may be decreasing: 0.9, 1.0 and 0.5 per 1,000 births for publications before 1990, 1990-2000, and after 2000, respectively. Third, the likelihood of not having concomitant shoulder dystocia with NBPP was 76% overall, though it varied by whether the publication was from the US (78%) vs. other countries (47%). Fourth, the likelihood of NBPP being permanent (lasting at least 12 months) was 10-18% in the US-based reports and 19-23% in other countries. Fifth, in studies from the US, the rate of permanent NBPP is 1.1-2.2 per 10,000 births and 2.9-3.7 per 10,000 births in other nations. Sixth, we estimate that approximately 5000 NBPPs occur every year in the US, of which over 580-1050 are permanent, and that since birth, 63,000 adults have been afflicted with persistent paresis of their brachial plexus. The exceedingly infrequent nature of permanent NBPP necessitates a multi-center study to improve our understanding of the antecedent factors and to abate the long-term sequela.

  20. Neonatal respiratory distress in a reference neonatal unit in Cameroon: an analysis of prevalence, predictors, etiologies and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tochie, Joel Noutakdie; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre; Langmia, Regina Ndasi; Barla, Esther; Koki-Ndombo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a main cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Early detection of its risk factors and early treatment of its etiologies are major challenges. However, few studies in developing countries have provided data needed to tackle it. We aimed to determine the prevalence, predictors, etiologies and outcome of NRD in a tertiary health care centre of Cameroon. Methods We analyzed the hospital files of all newborns admitted to the Neonatal unit of Douala General Hospital from 1st January 2011 to 28th February 2013. NRD was diagnosed based on the presence of one or more of the following signs: an abnormal respiratory rate, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring, chest wall recessions and thoraco-abdominal asynchrony with or without cyanosis, in their files. Socio-demographic and clinical variables of newborns and their mothers were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence of NRD was 47.5% out of the 703 newborns studied. Acute fetal distress, elective caesarean delivery, APGAR score < 7 at the 1st minute, prematurity, male gender and macrosomia were independent predictors of NRD. The main etiologies were neonatal infections (31%) and transient tachypnea of the newborn (25%). Its neonatal mortality rate was 24.5%, mainly associated with neonatal sepsis and hyaline membrane disease. Conclusion NRD is a frequent emergency and causes high morbidity and mortality. Most of its risk factors and etiologies are preventable. Adequate follow-up of pregnancy and labor for timely intervention may improve the neonatal outcomes. PMID:27642489

  1. Prevalence and management of natal/neonatal teeth in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, R. Burcu Nur; Cakan, Derya Germec; Mesgarzadeh, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of natal/neonatal teeth in infants with cleft lip and palate (CLP) according to gender, involving jaw and side and to show the management of some cases. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on medical history and photographic records of 69 infants with CLP, who were treated at the CLP clinic of Yeditepe University between years 2014–2015. The presence of neonatal teeth was determined, and if present the gender, type of cleft, and position were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: Neonatal teeth were observed in 7% of the study group. No significant differences were found between cleft types and gender (P > 0.05). The prevalence of neonatal teeth in bilateral, unilateral and isolated cleft type was 16.5%, 6.5%, and none, respectively. All neonatal teeth were located in the maxilla and on the cleft-side (100%). Conclusion: The presence of natal/neonatal teeth in infants with CLP was not rare. In all of these cases the teeth were located adjacent to the cleft region. In isolated palatal cleft, where the alveolar region including the teeth buds are away from the cleft, no neonatal teeth were observed. It may be concluded that neonatal teeth in infants with CLP are frequently present and located inside the borders of the presurgical orthopedic treatment (POT) plate. Therefore, if possible, immediate extraction of the neonatal teeth is advised or if not possible because of systemic health reasons, modifications of the plate are required. PMID:27011740

  2. Update on strategies limiting iatrogenic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Dallegri, Franco

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing all over the world. Targeting good glycemic control is fundamental to avoid the complications of diabetes linked to hyperglycemia. This narrative review is based on material searched for and obtained via PubMed up to April 2015. The search terms we used were: 'hypoglycemia, diabetes, complications' in combination with 'iatrogenic, treatment, symptoms.' Serious complications might occur from an inappropriate treatment of hyperglycemia. The most frequent complication is iatrogenic hypoglycemia that is often associated with autonomic and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Furthermore, hypoglycemia causes acute cardiovascular effects, which may explain some of the typical symptoms: ischemia, QT prolongation, and arrhythmia. With regards to the latter, the night represents a dangerous period because of the major increase in arrhythmias and the prolonged period of hypoglycemia; indeed, sleep has been shown to blunt the sympatho-adrenal response to hypoglycemia. Two main strategies have been implemented to reduce these effects: monitoring blood glucose values and individualized HbA1c goals. Several drugs for the treatment of T2DM are currently available and different combinations have been recommended to achieve individualized glycemic targets, considering age, comorbidities, disease duration, and life expectancy. In conclusion, according to international guidelines, hypoglycemia-avoiding therapy must reach an individualized glycemic goal, which is the lowest HbA1c not causing severe hypoglycemia and preserving awareness of hypoglycemia. PMID:26099256

  3. Update on strategies limiting iatrogenic hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Dallegri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing all over the world. Targeting good glycemic control is fundamental to avoid the complications of diabetes linked to hyperglycemia. This narrative review is based on material searched for and obtained via PubMed up to April 2015. The search terms we used were: ‘hypoglycemia, diabetes, complications’ in combination with ‘iatrogenic, treatment, symptoms.’ Serious complications might occur from an inappropriate treatment of hyperglycemia. The most frequent complication is iatrogenic hypoglycemia that is often associated with autonomic and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Furthermore, hypoglycemia causes acute cardiovascular effects, which may explain some of the typical symptoms: ischemia, QT prolongation, and arrhythmia. With regards to the latter, the night represents a dangerous period because of the major increase in arrhythmias and the prolonged period of hypoglycemia; indeed, sleep has been shown to blunt the sympatho-adrenal response to hypoglycemia. Two main strategies have been implemented to reduce these effects: monitoring blood glucose values and individualized HbA1c goals. Several drugs for the treatment of T2DM are currently available and different combinations have been recommended to achieve individualized glycemic targets, considering age, comorbidities, disease duration, and life expectancy. In conclusion, according to international guidelines, hypoglycemia-avoiding therapy must reach an individualized glycemic goal, which is the lowest HbA1c not causing severe hypoglycemia and preserving awareness of hypoglycemia. PMID:26099256

  4. Prevalence of sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait in national neonatal screening studies

    PubMed Central

    Lervolino, Luciana Garcia; Baldin, Paulo Eduardo Almeida; Picado, Silvia Miguéis; Calil, Karina Barreto; Viel, Ana Amélia; Campos, Luiz Alexandre Freixo

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the best known hereditary blood disorder; there are serious complications associated with the condition. Diagnosis and early intervention reduce morbidity and mortality. These benefits have resulted in the widespread use of newborn screening education programs. In Brazil, the National Neonatal Screening Program established by decree 822/01 included sickle cell disease in the list of diseases tested in the so called "heel prick test". Since then, national studies of the results of this program have been periodically published. To review the literature in order to assess the prevalence of sickle cell trait and sickle cell anemia from data of national neonatal screening studies on hemoglobin S (Hb S). A bibliographic review was carried out using the key words: sickle cell anemia & hemoglobinopathies & neonatal screening & Brazil in the Bireme and SciELO databases. Original Brazilian studies presenting data on prevalence of the sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and sickle cell anemia (Hb SS) based on neonatal screening for Hb S were analysed. Twelve original national studies were identified with prevalences varying from 1.1% to 9.8% for the sickle cell trait and from 0.8 to 60 per 100,000 live births for sickle cell disease in different Brazilian regions. Conclusion: Neonatal screening for Hb S is a very useful method to assess the prevalence of sickle cell trait (Hb AS) and sickle cell anemia (Hb SS) in Brazil. There is a heterogeneous distribution of this disease with the highest prevalence in the northeastern region and the lowest prevalence in the south. PMID:23284244

  5. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  6. Hypoglycemia education needs.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Leslie; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen

    2011-09-01

    Because more than half of those participating in a community-based diabetes session expressed experience with hypoglycemia, we sought additional information by conducting focus groups before developing programs or materials for educational support. The objectives of these focus groups were to determine how and to what extent hypoglycemia affected people, and what, if any, methods were used to prevent or treat the condition, to better target education in the future. Four focus groups were held using a tiered discussion script with a moderator and comoderator. Discussions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed by content by independent researchers. Five themes emerged from the discussions: friends, family, and neighbors need hypoglycemia education as well as individuals themselves; leaving home is a concern if you experience hypoglycemia; overeating occurs when treating hypoglycemia; routine is important; and hypoglycemia is a limitation. We found that hypoglycemia had a significant impact on the participants' quality of life.

  7. Trends in Prevalence and Characteristics of Post-Neonatal Cerebral Palsy Cases: A European Registry-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germany, Laurence; Ehlinger, Virginie; Klapouszczak, Dana; Delobel, Malika; Hollody, Katalin; Sellier, Elodie; De La Cruz, Javier; Alberge, Corine; Genolini, Christophe; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The present paper aims to analyze trends over time in prevalence of cerebral palsy of post-neonatal origin, to investigate whether changes are similar according to severity and to describe the disability profile by etiology. Post-neonatal cases, birth years 1976 to 1998, were identified from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe…

  8. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia.

  9. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in Sotos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Terumichi; Ihara, Kenji; Ochiai, Masayuki; Kinjo, Tadamune; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Kojima-Ishii, Kanako; Noda, Marie; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Misaki, Maiko; Minagawa, Kyoko; Tominaga, Koji; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Sotos syndrome (OMIM #117550) is a congenital syndrome characterized by overgrowth with advanced bone age, macrocephaly, and learning difficulties. Endocrine complications of this syndrome have not yet been fully described in previous reports. We here investigated the clinical manifestations of Sotos syndrome in Japanese patients who presented with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. We recruited patients diagnosed as having Sotos syndrome who presented with the complication of hyperinsulinemia during the neonatal period using a survey of the abstracts of Pediatric Meetings in domestic areas of Japan from 2007 to 2011. As a result, five patients (four females and one male) were recruited to evaluate the clinical presentation of Sotos syndrome by reference to the clinical record of each patient. A 5q35 deletion including the NSD1 gene was detected in all patients. Major anomalies in the central nervous, cardiovascular, and genito-urinary systems were frequently found. Hypoglycemia occurred between 0.5 and 3 hr after birth and high levels of insulin were initially found within 3 days of birth. The patients were treated with intravenous glucose infusion at a maximum rate of 4.6-11.0 mg/kg/min for 12-49 days. Three of the five patients required nasal tube feeding. One patient received medical treatment with diazoxide. This study shows that patients with Sotos syndrome may present with transient hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in the neonatal period. PMID:23239432

  10. Symptoms of hypoglycemia, thresholds for their occurrence, and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    PubMed

    Cryer, P E

    1999-09-01

    Ultimately traceable to neural glucose deprivation, symptoms of hypoglycemia include neurogenic (autonomic) and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Neurogenic symptoms (tremulousness, palpitations, anxiety, sweating, hunger, paresthesias) are the results of the perception of physiologic changes caused by the autonomic nervous system's response to hypoglycemia. Neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sensation of warmth, weakness or fatigue, severe cognitive failure, seizure, coma) are the results of brain glucose deprivation itself. Glycemic thresholds for symptoms of hypoglycemia shift to lower plasma glucose concentrations following recent episodes of hypoglycemia, leading to the syndrome of hypoglycemia unawareness--loss of the warning symptoms of developing hypoglycemia. Thus, patients with recurrent hypoglycemia (e.g., those with tightly controlled diabetes or with an insulinoma) often tolerate abnormally low plasma glucose concentrations without symptoms. PMID:10500927

  11. [Influence of neonatal and maternal factors on the prevalence of vernix caseosa].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, B; Labandeira, J; León-Muiños, E; Romarís, R; Ramírez-Santos, A; González-Vilas, D; Fernández-Prieto, R; Toribio, J

    2011-11-01

    At birth, vernix caseosa can cover the whole body surface or accumulate only on the back and in the skin folds. Interest in its composition and function and its possible applications in adults has increased in recent years. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of vernix caseosa in newborn infants in the health care area of Ferrol, Spain, and to assess its relationship with neonatal and maternal factors. We performed a prospective study of 1000 newborns seen within the first 3 days of life in our hospital. Vernix caseosa was observed in 42.9% of cases. The clinical profile associated with the presence of vernix caseosa was the following: healthy newborn girl with a high birth weight, born at term by normal vaginal delivery to a multiparous mother who had received medication and dietary supplements during pregnancy. The absence of vernix caseosa was associated with the presence of physiological scaling of the newborn and erythema toxicum neonatorum.

  12. Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia – The Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nessa, Azizun; Rahman, Sofia A.; Hussain, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, pancreatic β-cells secrete insulin to maintain fasting blood glucose levels in the range 3.5–5.5 mmol/L. In hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HH), this precise regulation of insulin secretion is perturbed so that insulin continues to be secreted in the presence of hypoglycemia. HH may be due to genetic causes (congenital) or secondary to certain risk factors. The molecular mechanisms leading to HH involve defects in the key genes regulating insulin secretion from the β-cells. At this moment, in time genetic abnormalities in nine genes (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GCK, SCHAD, GLUD1, SLC16A1, HNF1A, HNF4A, and UCP2) have been described that lead to the congenital forms of HH. Perinatal stress, intrauterine growth retardation, maternal diabetes mellitus, and a large number of developmental syndromes are also associated with HH in the neonatal period. In older children and adult’s insulinoma, non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome and post bariatric surgery are recognized causes of HH. This review article will focus mainly on describing the molecular mechanisms that lead to unregulated insulin secretion. PMID:27065949

  13. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus between the Neonates and Their Mothers.

    PubMed

    Skoczyński, Mariusz; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection on pregnancy is a major problem of medicine. The transmission of the virus from mother to fetus is a process yet unresolved. The immune response and changed hormonal status of pregnant women might facilitate infection. A research on the prevalence of HPV infection was conducted at the Clinic of Obstetrics, Medical University of Lublin (Poland). The studied group included 152 randomly selected women. The material was tested for the presence of HPV DNA by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The aim of the research was to assess the relation between HPV infections detected in the buccal smears of the neonates and the incidence of such infections in the cervical/buccal smears of their mothers. In the group of 152 infants HPV was found in 16 (10.53%). Among the cervical/buccal smears, HPV was isolated, respectively, in 24 (15.79%) and in 19 (12.5%) pregnant women. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of HPV swabs from the newborns and the cervical/buccal smears of their mothers were found (p < 0.001). The identification of mothers in whose buccal smears HPV was detected can help develop a group of children who run a relatively significant risk of being infected.

  14. Noninvasive biosensor for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Sarukesi, Karunakaran

    2003-01-01

    Hypoglycemia-abnormal decrease in blood sugar- is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This is especially a concern in early childhood years when the nervous system is still developing. Hypoglycemic unawareness (in which the body"s normal ability to signal low blood sugar doesn"t work and an oncoming low blood sugar episode proceeds undetected) is a particularly frightening problem for many people with diabetes. Researchers have now uncovered evidence that repeated bouts of insulin-induced hypoglycemia can harm the brain over time, causing confusion, abnormal behavior, loss of consciousness, and seizures. Extreme cases have resulted in coma and death. In this paper, a non-invasive biosensor in a wrist watch along with a wireless data downloading system is proposed.

  15. Hypoglycemia from a cardiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Vani P; Sanon, Saurabh; Kanakia, Rushit; Yu, Hu; Araj, Faris; Oliveros, Rene; Chilton, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Hypoglycemia in people with diabetes mellitus (DM) has been potentially linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologically, hypoglycemia triggers activation of the sympathoadrenal system, leading to an increase in counter-regulatory hormones and, consequently, increased myocardial workload and oxygen demand. Additionally, hypoglycemia triggers proinflammatory and hematologic changes that provide the substrate for possible myocardial ischemia in the already-diseased diabetic cardiovascular system. Hypoglycemia creates electrophysiologic alterations causing P-R-interval shortening, ST-segment depression, T-wave flattening, reduction of T-wave area, and QTc-interval prolongation. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at an increased risk of silent ischemia as well as QTc prolongation and consequent arrhythmias. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial showed an increase in all-cause mortality with intensive glycemic control, whereas the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) study and Veteran's Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) showed no benefit with aggressive glycemic control. Women, elderly patients, and those with renal insufficiency are more vulnerable to hypoglycemic events. In fact, hypoglycemia is the most common metabolic complication experienced by older patients with DM in the United States. The concurrent use of medications like β-blockers warrants caution in DM because they can mask warning signs of hypoglycemia. Here we aim to elucidate the pathophysiology, review the electrocardiographic changes, analyze the current clinical literature, and consider the safety considerations of hypoglycemia as it relates to the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, in the current era of DM and its vascular ramifications, hypoglycemia from a cardiologist's perspective deserves due attention.

  16. Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes - More Common Than You Think

    PubMed Central

    Gehlaut, Richa Redhu; Dogbey, Godwin Y.; Schwartz, Frank L.; Marling, Cynthia R.; Shubrook, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia is often the limiting factor for intensive glucose control in diabetes management, however its actual prevalence in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is not well documented. Methodology: A total of 108 patients with T2DM wore a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) for 5 days. Rates and patterns of hypoglycemia and glycemic variability (GV) were calculated. Patient and medication factors were correlated with rates, timing, and severity of hypoglycemia. Results: Of the patients, 49.1% had at least 1 hypoglycemic episode (mean 1.74 episodes/patient/ 5 days of CGMS) and 75% of those patients experienced at least 1 asymptomatic hypoglycemic episode. There was no significant difference in the frequency of daytime versus nocturnal hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia was more frequent in individuals on insulin (alone or in combination) (P = .02) and those on oral hypoglycemic agents (P < .001) compared to noninsulin secretagogues. CGMS analysis resulted in treatment modifications in 64% of the patients. T2DM patients on insulin exhibited higher glycemic variability (GV) scores (2.3 ± 0.6) as compared to those on oral medications (1.8 ± 0.7, P = .017). Conclusions: CGMS can provide rich data that show glucose excursions in diabetes patients throughout the day. Consequently, unwarranted onset of hypo- and hyperglycemic events can be detected, intervened, and prevented by using CGMS. Hypoglycemia was frequently unrecognized by the patients in this study (75%), which increases their potential risk of significant adverse events. Incorporation of CGMS into the routine management of T2DM would increase the detection and self-awareness of hypoglycemia resulting in safer and potentially better overall control. PMID:25917335

  17. Prevalence of rotavirus (GARV) and coronavirus (BCoV) associated with neonatal diarrhea in calves in western Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Selles Sidi Mohammed; Mokhtaria, Kouidri; Tahar, Belhamiti Belkacem; Amar, Ait Amrane; Redha, Benia Ahmed; Yuva, Bellik; Mohamed, Hammoudi Si; Abdellatif, Niar; Laid, Boukrâa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the prevalence of bovine group A rotavirus (GARV) and bovine coronavirus (BCoV) in diarrheic feces from calves and the sensitive's parameters such as age group and sex. Methods Feces samples from 82 diarrheic dairy calves from farms around Tiaret (Western Algeria) were collected. These samples were tested by ELISA assay. Results The results showed that the prevalence of rotavirus and coronavirus infection are 14.63% (12.2% alone and 2.43% associated with bovine coronavirus) and 20.73% (18.3% alone and 2.43% associated with GARV), respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the both BCoV and GARV are involved in the neonatal calves' diarrhea, where the frequency of BCoV is clearly higher than that of GARV. PMID:25183104

  18. Nationwide surveillance study of Clostridium difficile in Australian neonatal pigs shows high prevalence and heterogeneity of PCR ribotypes.

    PubMed

    Knight, Daniel R; Squire, Michele M; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important enteric pathogen of humans and the cause of diarrhea and enteritis in neonatal pigs. Outside Australia, prevalence in piglets can be up to 73%, with a single PCR ribotype (RT), 078, predominating. We investigated the prevalence and genotype of C. difficile in Australian pig herds. Rectal swabs (n = 229) were collected from piglets aged <7 days from 21 farms across Australia. Selective culture for C. difficile was performed and isolates characterized by PCR for toxin genes and PCR ribotyping. C. difficile was isolated from 52% of samples by direct culture on chromogenic agar and 67% by enrichment culture (P = 0.001). No association between C. difficile recovery or genotype and diarrheic status of either farm or piglets was found. The majority (87%; 130/154) of isolates were toxigenic. Typing revealed 23 different RTs, several of which are known to cause disease in humans, including RT014, which was isolated most commonly (23%; 36/154). RT078 was not detected. This study shows that colonization of Australian neonatal piglets with C. difficile is widespread in the herds sampled.

  19. Paternal Uniparental Disomy 11p15.5 in the Pancreatic Nodule of an Infant With Costello Syndrome: Shared Mechanism for Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Neonates With Costello and Beckwith–Wiedemann Syndrome and Somatic Loss of Heterozygosity in Costello Syndrome Driving Clonal Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Robbins, Katherine M.; Sheffield, Brandon S.; Lee, Anna F.; Patel, Millan S.; Yip, Stephen; Doyle, Daniel; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) entails a cancer predisposition and is caused by activating HRAS mutations, typically arising de novo in the paternal germline. Hypoglycemia is common in CS neonates. A previously reported individual with the rare HRAS p.Gln22Lys had hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Autopsy showed a discrete pancreatic nodule. The morphologic and immunohistochemistry findings, including loss of p57Kip2 protein, were identical to a focal lesion of congenital hyperinsulinism, however, no KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutation was identified and germline derived DNA showed no alternation of the maternal or paternal 11p15 alleles. Here we report paternal uniparental disomy (pUPD) within the lesion, similar to the pUPD11p15.5 in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The similar extent of the pUPD suggests a similar mechanism driving hyperinsulinemia in both conditions. After coincidental somatic LOH and pUPD, the growth promoting effects of the paternally derived HRAS mutation, in combination with the increased function of the adjacent paternally expressed IGF2, may together result in clonal expansion. Although this somatic LOH within pancreatic tissue resulted in hyperinsulinism, similar LOH in mesenchymal cells may drive embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Interestingly, biallelic IGF2 expression has been linked to rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis and pUPD11 occurred in all 8 ERMS samples from CS individuals. Somatic KRAS and HRAS mutations occur with comparable frequency in isolated malignancies. Yet, the malignancy risk in CS is notably higher than in Noonan syndrome with a KRAS mutation. It is conceivable that HRAS co-localization with IGF2 and the combined effect of pUPD 11p15.5 on both genes contributes to the oncogenic potential. PMID:26572961

  20. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  1. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  2. Neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency: prevalence and SLC25A13 mutations among thai infants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The most common causes of cholestatic jaundice are biliary atresia and idiopathic neonatal hepatitis (INH). Specific disorders underlying INH, such as various infectious and metabolic causes, including neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD) especially, in East Asian populations are increasingly being identified. Since most NICCD infants recovered from liver disease by 1 year of age, they often are misdiagnosed with INH, leading to difficulty in determining the true prevalence of NICCD. Mutation(s) of human SLC25A13 gene encoding a mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 2 (AGC2), can lead to AGC2 deficiency, resulting in NICCD and an adult-onset fatal disease namely citrullinemia type II (CTLN2). To study the prevalence of NICCD and SLC25A13 mutations in Thai infants, and to compare manifestations of NICCD and non-NICCD, infants with idiopathic cholestatic jaundice or INH were enrolled. Clinical and biochemical data were reviewed. Urine organic acid and plasma amino acids profiles were analyzed. PCR-sequencing of all 18 exons of SLC25A13 and gap PCR for the mutations IVS16ins3kb and Ex16+74_IVS17-32del516 were performed. mRNA were analyzed in selected cases with possible splicing error. Results Five out of 39 (12.8%) unrelated infants enrolled in the study were found to have NICCD, of which three had homozygous 851del4 (GTATdel) and two compound heterozygous 851del4/IVS16ins3kb and 851del4/1638ins23, respectively. Two missense mutations (p.M1? and p.R605Q) of unknown functional significance were identified. At the initial presentation, NICCD patients had higher levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and lower level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) than those in non-NICCD patients (p< 0.05). NICCD patients showed higher citrulline level and threonine/serine ratio than non-NICCD infants (p< 0.05). Fatty liver was found in 2 NICCD patients. Jaundice resolved in all NICCD and in 87.5% of non

  3. Noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome in a Saudi male.

    PubMed

    Karawagh, Abdullah M; Abdullah, Layla S; Gasim, Abdelhamid M; Abdelaziz, Muntasir M

    2008-11-01

    Nesidioblastosis is focal or diffuse islet hyperplasia leading to hyperinsulinism with subsequent hypoglycemia in the absence of insulinoma, usually described in neonates and infancy. We described the first adult case of nesidioblastosis in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf region. The diagnosis and treatment of the condition can be very difficult and challenging. Despite the fact that our patient responded initially to surgical treatment, his hypoglycemic symptoms occasionally recurred and needed adjunctive medical treatment. Although initially thought to affect only infants and children, cases of nesidioblastosis can affect adults and pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the clinicians.

  4. Diazoxide-responsive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia caused by HNF4A gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, S E; Kapoor, R R; Mali, G; Cody, D; Murphy, N; Schwahn, B; Siahanidou, T; Banerjee, I; Akcay, T; Rubio-Cabezas, O; Shield, J P H; Hussain, K; Ellard, S

    2010-01-01

    Objective The phenotype associated with heterozygous HNF4A gene mutations has recently been extended to include diazoxide responsive neonatal hypoglycemia in addition to maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). To date, mutation screening has been limited to patients with a family history consistent with MODY. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of HNF4A mutations in a large cohort of patients with diazoxide responsive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HH). Subjects and methods We sequenced the ABCC8, KCNJ11, GCK, GLUD1, and/or HNF4A genes in 220 patients with HH responsive to diazoxide. The order of genetic testing was dependent upon the clinical phenotype. Results A genetic diagnosis was possible for 59/220 (27%) patients. KATP channel mutations were most common (15%) followed by GLUD1 mutations causing hyperinsulinism with hyperammonemia (5.9%), and HNF4A mutations (5%). Seven of the 11 probands with a heterozygous HNF4A mutation did not have a parent affected with diabetes, and four de novo mutations were confirmed. These patients were diagnosed with HI within the first week of life (median age 1 day), and they had increased birth weight (median +2.4 SDS). The duration of diazoxide treatment ranged from 3 months to ongoing at 8 years. Conclusions In this large series, HNF4A mutations are the third most common cause of diazoxide responsive HH. We recommend that HNF4A sequencing is considered in all patients with diazoxide responsive HH diagnosed in the first week of life irrespective of a family history of diabetes, once KATP channel mutations have been excluded. PMID:20164212

  5. Continuous glucose monitoring in newborn infants: how do errors in calibration measurements affect detected hypoglycemia?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Felicity; Signal, Mathew; Harris, Deborah L; Weston, Philip J; Harding, Jane E; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia is common and can cause serious brain injury. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) could improve hypoglycemia detection, while reducing blood glucose (BG) measurements. Calibration algorithms use BG measurements to convert sensor signals into CGM data. Thus, inaccuracies in calibration BG measurements directly affect CGM values and any metrics calculated from them. The aim was to quantify the effect of timing delays and calibration BG measurement errors on hypoglycemia metrics in newborn infants. Data from 155 babies were used. Two timing and 3 BG meter error models (Abbott Optium Xceed, Roche Accu-Chek Inform II, Nova Statstrip) were created using empirical data. Monte-Carlo methods were employed, and each simulation was run 1000 times. Each set of patient data in each simulation had randomly selected timing and/or measurement error added to BG measurements before CGM data were calibrated. The number of hypoglycemic events, duration of hypoglycemia, and hypoglycemic index were then calculated using the CGM data and compared to baseline values. Timing error alone had little effect on hypoglycemia metrics, but measurement error caused substantial variation. Abbott results underreported the number of hypoglycemic events by up to 8 and Roche overreported by up to 4 where the original number reported was 2. Nova results were closest to baseline. Similar trends were observed in the other hypoglycemia metrics. Errors in blood glucose concentration measurements used for calibration of CGM devices can have a clinically important impact on detection of hypoglycemia. If CGM devices are going to be used for assessing hypoglycemia it is important to understand of the impact of these errors on CGM data.

  6. [Mechanism of hypoglycemia in insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Pigareva, M I; Starosel'tseva, L K; Kazeev, K N; Kertsman, V I

    1977-01-01

    A study was made of the capacity of insulinoma to catalyze the splitting of hippuryl-L-arginine (HA) and the contents of proinsulin-like component in the tissues of the tumours and in the blood serum of the patients. As revealed, in the absence of HA splitting by the tumour cytoplasmic fraction in the neutral pH zone there was noted a higher proinsulin-like component both in the tumour tissue and in the blood serum. An increase amount of proinsulin-like component in the blood serum stipulates possibly a more prolonged period of starvation before the occurrence of hypoglycemia, and a less pronounced picture of hypoglycemia in such patients in comparison with the patients whose tumours were capable of splitting HA similarly to the normal islands of Langerhans.

  7. Selected topics of hypoglycemia care

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review 4 topics in hypoglycemia (HoG) care: diagnosis, circumstances predisposing to HoG, risk of adverse effects, and prevention. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched using the words hypoglycemia and diabetes mellitus. Other relevant sources were hand searched. Evidence was mostly level III and IV from consensus, from observation, and from the author’s clinical experience. MAIN MESSAGES Hypoglycemia can be diagnosed using clinical criteria or using a glucometer; it cannot be diagnosed after death. Capillary blood glucose testing for HoG is required only for patients taking insulin and insulin secretagogues. With intensified treatment of diabetes, a greater incidence of HoG is inevitable. Chronic morbidity and mortality resulting from HoG are believed to be rare. There are no reliable data on HoG-related mortality for idiopathic or accidental sudden death. Interventions by friends, family, colleagues, and teachers can prevent HoG. CONCLUSION Clinical diagnosis of HoG deserves greater emphasis; when patients are unaware of having HoG, physicians must rely on blood glucose testing. Patients not taking insulin or insulin secretagogues need neither fear nor test for HoG. The risk of HoG should not preclude efforts to achieve best possible control of blood sugar. Patients with unstable cardiac arrhythmias, drivers of motor vehicles, and those in high-risk industrial occupations require special vigilance for HoG. PMID:16639972

  8. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  9. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes treatment plan. Causes of Low Blood Sugar Levels Low blood sugar levels are fairly common in ... headache. previous continue Checking for Low Blood Sugar Levels When blood sugar levels fall too low, the ...

  10. Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  11. Nocturnal Hypoglycemia: Answering the Challenge With Long-acting Insulin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Nocturnal hypoglycemia may be the most common type of hypoglycemia in individuals with diabetes using insulin and is particularly worrisome because it often goes undetected and may lead to unconsciousness and even death in severe cases. Objectives The prevalence, causes, and consequences of nocturnal hypoglycemia as well as detection and prevention strategies are reviewed, including the use of long-acting insulin analogs, which offer more physiologic and predictable time-action profiles than traditional human basal insulin. Data Sources A total of 307 publications (151 PubMed; 104 Adis; 52 BIOSIS) were reviewed. Review Methods Relevant trials were found by searching for “(detemir OR glargine) AND nocturnal AND (hypoglycemia OR hypoglycaemia) AND diabetes.” To capture trials that may not have specified “nocturnal” in the title or abstract text but still reported nocturnal hypoglycemia data, a supplemental search of PubMed using “(detemir OR glargine) AND (nocturnal OR hypoglycemia OR hypoglycaemia) AND diabetes” was undertaken. Results A review of these trials found that patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus have a lower risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia when receiving long-acting insulin analogs (insulin detemir or insulin glargine), provided that glycemic control is comparable to that provided by traditional human basal insulin. Long-acting insulin analogs may be the best option to provide basal insulin coverage in patients who do not choose or require continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Conclusions Randomized clinical trials suggest that the long-acting insulin analogs are associated with a lower risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia than neutral protamine Hagedorn without sacrificing glycemic control. PMID:17955093

  12. Effects of morning hypoglycemia on neuroendocrine and metabolic responses to subsequent afternoon hypoglycemia in normal man.

    PubMed

    Davis, S N; Tate, D

    2001-05-01

    There is general agreement that prior hypoglycemia blunts subsequent hypoglycemic counterregulatory responses. However, there is considerable debate concerning the timing and number of prior hypoglycemic episodes required to cause this blunting effect. The aim of this study was to determine whether one episode of hypoglycemia could modify neuroendocrine, metabolic, and symptom responses to hypoglycemia induced 2 h later. A total of 24 (12 male and 12 female) young, healthy, overnight-fasted subjects participated in a series of glucose clamp studies. A total of 16 individuals underwent 2 randomized studies of either identical 2-h morning and afternoon hyperinsulinemic (490 +/- 60 pmol/L) hypoglycemia (2.9 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) separated by 2 h or, at least 2 months later, 2-h morning and afternoon hyperinsulinemic (492 +/- 45 pmol/L) euglycemia (5.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L). A total of 8 other subjects participated in a single experiment that consisted of 2-h morning hyperinsulinemic (516 +/- 60 pmol/L) euglycemia (5.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) and 2-h afternoon hyperinsulinemic (528 +/- 66 pmol/L) hypoglycemia (2.9 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) also separated by 2 h. Morning hypoglycemia significantly (P < 0.01) reduced (33-55%) the responses of epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, GH, cortisol, and pancreatic polypeptide during afternoon hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic symptoms (primarily neuroglycopenic) were also significantly (P < 0.01) reduced during afternoon hypoglycemia. Plasma glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, glycerol, lactate, beta-hydroxybutyrate (P < 0.01), GH, and cortisol (P < 0.05) levels were significantly increased at the start of afternoon hypoglycemia following morning hypoglycemia. Morning hypoglycemia created an insulin-resistant state during afternoon hypoglycemia. Despite blunted neuroendocrine responses, glucose infusion rates required to maintain hypoglycemia and increases in glucose oxidation were significantly attenuated during afternoon compared with morning

  13. Hypoglycemia during moderate intensity exercise reduces counterregulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cade, W Todd; Khoury, Nadia; Nelson, Suzanne; Shackleford, Angela; Semenkovich, Katherine; Krauss, Melissa J; Arbeláez, Ana María

    2016-09-01

    Hypoglycemia, which occurs commonly during and following exercise in people with diabetes, is thought to be due to attenuated counterregulation in the setting of therapeutic insulin excess. To better understand the pathophysiology of counterregulation, we aimed to determine if dextrose administration to maintain euglycemia during moderate intensity exercise alters the attenuation of counterregulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia in healthy adults : Counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia were assessed in 18 healthy adults after bed rest and following exercise with (n = 9) and without (n = 9) dextrose infusion. Responses were measured during a stepped euglycemic-hypoglycemic clamp 24 h after either bed rest or two 90-min bouts of exercise at 70% peak oxygen uptake : Hypoglycemia occurred during the second bout of exercise without dextrose infusion. Plasma glucagon and epinephrine responses to stepped hypoglycemia after antecedent exercise without dextrose infusion were significantly lower at the 45 mg/dL glycemic level compared to after bed rest. However, no attenuation of the counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia was evident after antecedent exercise when dextrose was infused. This study suggests that the attenuation of the counterregulatory responses during hypoglycemia after exercise is likely due to the hypoglycemia that occurs during moderate prolonged exercise and not solely due to exercise or its intensity. PMID:27597762

  14. Severe Hypoglycemia Accompanied with Thyroid Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Yuki; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Minoru; Domeki, Nozomi; Matsumura, Mihoko; Banba, Nobuyuki; Nakamoto, Takaaki

    2012-01-01

    We report a 32-year-old Japanese women with severe hypoglycemia accompanied with thyroid crisis. She complained of dyspnea, general fatigue, and leg edema. She was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism with congestive heart failure and liver dysfunction. Soon after admission, sudden cardiopulmonary arrest occurred. She was then transferred to the intensive care unit. Her serum glucose level was 7 mg/dl. Intravenous glucose, hydrocortisone, diuretics, and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) saved her. We considered that hypoglycemia occurred due to heart failure and liver dysfunction due to thyroid crisis. PMID:23198181

  15. Hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in rodent models of severe malaria infection.

    PubMed Central

    Elased, K; Playfair, J H

    1994-01-01

    Severe hypoglycemia developed during nonlethal Plasmodium chabaudi and lethal P. yoelii blood stage malaria infection in mice, always in association with hyperinsulinemia. Supernatants of lethal P. yoelii incubated overnight induced hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in normal mice. In murine malaria, hypoglycemia may be largely secondary to increased insulin secretion. PMID:7927799

  16. Development of a New Fear of Hypoglycemia Scale: FH-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anarte Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Caballero, Francisco Felix; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rondan, Rosa Maria; Carreira, Monica; Dominguez-Lopez, Marta; Machado, Alberto; Gonzalo-Marin, Montserrat; Tapia, Maria Jose; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalez-Romero, Stella; Soriguer, Federico C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with insulin treatment in diabetes. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite aversive and potentially life threatening. The physical sequelae provide ample reason for patients to fear hypoglycemia and avoid episodes. For these reasons, our purpose in this study was to develop a new…

  17. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  18. Determination of Insulin for the Diagnosis of Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    De León, Diva D.; Stanley, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is the most common cause of persistent hypoglycemia in children and adults. The diagnosis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia relies on the evaluation of the biochemical profile at the time of hypoglycemia, however, contrary to common perception, plasma insulin is not always elevated. Thus, the diagnosis must often be based on the examination of other physiologic manifestations of excessive insulin secretion, such as suppression of glycogenolysis, lipolysis and ketogenesis, which can be inferred by the finding of a glycemic response to glucagon, and the suppression of plasma free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations during hypoglycemia. PMID:24275188

  19. Importance of Insulin Immunoassays in the Diagnosis of Factitious Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Nalbantoğlu Elmas, Özlem; Demir, Korcan; Soylu, Nusret; Çelik, Nilüfer; Özkan, Behzat

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases emphasizing the importance of insulin assays for evaluation of hypoglycemia in diabetic patients. Case 1 was a 96/12-year-old female patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus and case 2 was a 1010/12-year-old male patient with DIDMOAD. Both patients were on a basal-bolus insulin regimen. Both were admitted because of persistent hypoglycemia. Analyses of serum samples obtained at the time of hypoglycemia initially showed low insulin and C-peptide levels. Recurrent episodes of unexplained hypoglycemia necessitated measurement of insulin levels by using different insulin assays, which revealed hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with low C-peptide levels, findings which confirmed a diagnosis of factitious hypoglycemia. Surreptitious administration of insulin should not be excluded in diabetic patients with hypoglycemia without taking into account the rate of cross-reactivity of insulin analogues with the insulin assay used. PMID:25541899

  20. Prevalence of permanent childhood hearing impairment in the United Kingdom and implications for universal neonatal hearing screening: questionnaire based ascertainment study

    PubMed Central

    Fortnum, Heather M; Summerfield, A Quentin; Marshall, David H; Davis, Adrian C; Bamford, John M

    2001-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of confirmed permanent childhood hearing impairment and its profile across age and degree of impairment in the United Kingdom. Design Retrospective total ascertainment through sources in the health and education sectors by postal questionnaire. Setting Hospital based otology and audiology departments, community health clinics, education services for hearing impaired children. Participants Children born from 1980 to 1995, resident in United Kingdom in 1998, with severe permanent childhood hearing impairment (hearing level in the better ear >40 dB averaged over 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz). Main outcome measures Numbers of cases with date of birth and severity of impairment converted to prevalences for each annual birth cohort (cases/1000 live births) and adjusted for underascertainment. Results 26 000 notifications ascertained 17 160 individual children. Prevalence rose from 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.85 to 0.98) for 3 year olds to 1.65 (1.62 to 1.68) for children aged 9-16 years. Adjustment for underascertainment increased estimates to 1.07 (1.03 to 1.12) and 2.05 (2.02 to 2.08). Comparison with previous studies showed that prevalence increases with age, rather than declining with year of birth. Conclusions Prevalence of confirmed permanent childhood hearing impairment increases until the age of 9 years to a level higher than previously estimated. Relative to current yields of universal neonatal hearing screening in the United Kingdom, which are close to 1/1000 live births, 50-90% more children are diagnosed with permanent childhood hearing impairment by the age of 9 years. Paediatric audiology services must have the capacity to achieve early identification and confirmation of these additional cases. What is already known on this topicThe prevalence of confirmed permanent childhood hearing impairment (>40 dB HL) in the United Kingdom has been estimated to rise with age to 1.33/1000 live births among children aged 5 years and

  1. Prevalence of anti-rubella, anti-measles and anti-mumps IgG antibodies in neonates and pregnant women in Catalonia (Spain) in 2013: susceptibility to measles increased from 2003 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Plans, P; de Ory, F; Campins, M; Álvarez, E; Payà, T; Guisasola, E; Compte, C; Vellbé, K; Sánchez, C; Lozano, M J; Aran, I; Bonmatí, A; Carreras, R; Jané, M; Cabero, L

    2015-06-01

    Non-immune neonates and non-immune pregnant women are at risk of developing rubella, measles and mumps infections, including congenital rubella syndrome. We describe the seroepidemiology of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) in neonates and pregnant women in Catalonia (Spain). Anti-rubella, anti-measles and anti-mumps serum IgG titres were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests in 353 cord blood samples from neonates of a representative sample of pregnant women obtained in 2013. The prevalence of protective antibody titres in neonates was 96 % for rubella IgG (≥8 IU/ml), 90 % for measles IgG (>300 IU/ml) and 84 % for mumps IgG (>460 EU/ml). Slightly lower prevalences of protective IgG titres, as estimated from the cord blood titres, were found in pregnant women: 95 % for rubella IgG, 89 % for measles IgG and 81 % for mumps IgG. The anti-measles and anti-mumps IgG titres and the prevalences of protective IgG titres against measles and mumps increased significantly (p < 0.001) with maternal age. The prevalence of protective anti-measles IgG titres decreased by 7 % [odds ratio (OR) = 0.15, p < 0.001), the prevalence of protective anti-rubella IgG titres increased by 3 % (OR = 1.80, p < 0.05) and the MMR vaccination coverage (during childhood) in pregnant women increased by 54 % (OR = 2.09, p < 0.001) from 2003 to 2013. We recommend to develop an MMR prevention programme in women of childbearing age based on mass MMR vaccination or MMR screening and vaccination of susceptible women to increase immunity levels against MMR.

  2. Risk of hospitalization for hypoglycemia among older Korean people with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Min; Seong, Jong-Mi; Kim, Jaetaek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to carry out a large population-based study to understand the factors associated with hypoglycemia-related hospitalizations among older Korean adults with diabetes mellitus. This study analyzed data from a subset of the 2013 Health Insurance and Review and Assessment service-Adult Patient Sample. A total of 307,170 subjects, comprising 41.7% men and 58.3% women, had diabetes mellitus. Hypertension (80.8%) was the most common comorbidity, and dyslipidemia (59.0%) and ischemic heart disease (21.3%) were also prevalent. Approximately half of the patients with diabetes had >2 comorbidities, and two-thirds of the patients had >3 comorbidities. The proportion of patients taking insulin or sulfonylureas was 54.9%, and 23.2% of the patients were taking other medications. About 21.9% of the patients were treated nonpharmacologically. A total of 2867 hypoglycemia-related admission occurred, the incident rate was 9.33 per 1000 person. The risk was higher among female patients and older patients with several comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic liver disease, chronic kidney disease, dementia, and malignancies. Treatment modalities, including insulin and sulfonylureas, were associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. After adjustments for age, sex, the different comorbidities, and the treatment modalities, we determined that chronic kidney disease and dementia were associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia-related hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] = 2.52 and OR = 1.93, respectively). Furthermore, patients with chronic kidney disease or dementia who were treated with sulfonylureas and insulin had very high risks of hypoglycemia, and the incident rate was 66.6 and 63.75 per 1000 person, respectively. In conclusion, the presence of comorbidities, especially chronic kidney disease and dementia, increased the risk of hypoglycemia-associated hospitalization within this population of older

  3. Brain Lactate Concentration Falls in Response to Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and Impaired Awareness of Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Wiegers, Evita C; Rooijackers, Hanne M; Tack, Cees J; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2016-06-01

    Brain lactate may be involved in the development of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH), a condition that affects approximately 25% of patients with type 1 diabetes and increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoglycemia on brain lactate concentration in patients with IAH as compared with those with normal awareness of hypoglycemia (NAH) and healthy control subjects (n = 7 per group). After an overnight fast, all subjects underwent a two-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic (5.0 mmol/L)-hypoglycemic (2.8 mmol/L) glucose clamp. Brain lactate concentrations were measured continuously with (1)H-MRS using a specific lactate detection method. Hypoglycemia generated symptoms in patients with NAH and healthy control subjects but not in patients with IAH. Brain lactate fell significantly by ∼20% in response to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes with IAH but remained stable in both healthy control subjects and in patients with NAH. The fall in brain lactate is compatible with increased brain lactate oxidation providing an alternative fuel source during hypoglycemia, which may contribute to the impaired detection of hypoglycemia. PMID:26993070

  4. Optimal management of type 2 diabetes in patients with increased risk of hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Morgan; Powell, Jason; Campbell, Kendall M; Taylor, James R

    2014-01-01

    With the number of individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes on the rise, it has become more important to ensure these patients are effectively treated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 8.3% of all Americans were diagnosed with diabetes in 2011 and this number will likely continue to rise. With lifestyle interventions, such as proper diet and exercise, continuing to be an essential component of diabetes treatment, more patients are requiring medication therapy to help them reach their therapeutic goals. It is important for the clinician, when determining the treatment strategy for these individuals, to find a balance between reaching treatment goals and limiting the adverse effects of the treatments themselves. Of all the adverse events associated with treatment of diabetes, the risk of hypoglycemia is one that most therapies have in common. This risk is often a limiting factor when attempting to aggressively treat diabetic patients. This manuscript will review how hypoglycemia is defined and categorized, as well as discuss the prevalence of hypoglycemia among the many different treatment options. PMID:24623984

  5. The Role of Hypoglycemia in Cardiovascular Outcomes in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Paty, Breay W

    2015-12-01

    Intensive glucose management, targeting lower glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels, has been shown to reduce the microvascular complications of diabetes, but the effect on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes is less clear. Observational follow-up of intensive glucose management studies suggest possible long-term CV benefits, but no clear reduction in CV events has been seen over 3 to 5 years. Intensive glucose management also increases the risk for hypoglycemia, particularly in patients with longstanding diabetes, cognitive impairment and hypoglycemia unawareness. Severe hypoglycemia has been linked to adverse consequences, including cardiac dysrhythmias, CV events and death, but the precise role of hypoglycemia in CV outcomes is uncertain. The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial was terminated early because of a higher rate of CV events in the intensive arm. Post hoc analyses of ACCORD and other trials suggest that cardiac autonomic neuropathy may be a predisposing factor to CV events. The Analyses of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE) trial and the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) showed that subjects with severe hypoglycemia had more frequent adverse outcomes. However, rather than causing adverse events, it appears that severe hypoglycemia may be a marker of vulnerability for such events. This review focuses on the current understanding of the association between hypoglycemia and CV risk.

  6. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BE. Perinatal viral infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ... K. Postnatal bacterial infections. In Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal ...

  7. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  8. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters. PMID:8653553

  9. How to prevent and treat pharmacological hypoglycemias.

    PubMed

    Reyes García, R; Mezquita Raya, P

    2014-05-01

    A 58 year-old woman with type 2 diabetes diagnosed 3 years before came to our clinic. Her treatment was metformin 850 mg every 12 hours and glimepiride 4 mg every 24 hours. After the initiation of glimepiride 9 months before her weight has increased 5 kg, and she suffers frequent hypoglycemias which have affected her while driving. Her BMI is 35.5 kg/m². She has a normal eye fund exam. She has hypertension treated with telmisartán and hidroclorotiazide with adequate control, and also hypercholesterolemia treated with atorvastatine 40 mg every 24 hours. Her blood test shows an HbA1c of 7.0%, normal values of microalbuminuria, total cholesterol 149 mg/dl, HDL cholesterol 52 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol 98 mg/dl and triglycerides 123 mg/dl. Her blood pressure is 129/81 mmHg, there was no orthostatic hypotension, and her peripheral neurological examination shows normal results. In summary, our case is a young woman with type 2 diabetes and obesity, without chronic complications and which has frequent hypoglycaemia. How must this woman be evaluated and treated?

  10. Severe hypoglycemia-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmias are mediated by sympathoadrenal activation.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-10-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemia-induced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmias and overall mortality. β-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response.

  11. Gastric Bypass Reduces Symptoms and Hormonal Responses in Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Niclas; Börjesson, Joey Lau; Sundbom, Magnus; Wiklund, Urban; Karlsson, F Anders; Eriksson, Jan W

    2016-09-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) surgery, one of the most common bariatric procedures, induces weight loss and metabolic effects. The mechanisms are not fully understood, but reduced food intake and effects on gastrointestinal hormones are thought to contribute. We recently observed that GBP patients have lowered glucose levels and frequent asymptomatic hypoglycemic episodes. Here, we subjected patients before and after undergoing GBP surgery to hypoglycemia and examined symptoms and hormonal and autonomic nerve responses. Twelve obese patients without diabetes (8 women, mean age 43.1 years [SD 10.8] and BMI 40.6 kg/m(2) [SD 3.1]) were examined before and 23 weeks (range 19-25) after GBP surgery with hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp (stepwise to plasma glucose 2.7 mmol/L). The mean change in Edinburgh Hypoglycemia Score during clamp was attenuated from 10.7 (6.4) before surgery to 5.2 (4.9) after surgery. There were also marked postsurgery reductions in levels of glucagon, cortisol, and catecholamine and the sympathetic nerve responses to hypoglycemia. In addition, growth hormone displayed a delayed response but to a higher peak level. Levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 and gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose during hypoglycemia but rose less postsurgery compared with presurgery. Thus, GBP surgery causes a resetting of glucose homeostasis, which reduces symptoms and neurohormonal responses to hypoglycemia. Further studies should address the underlying mechanisms as well as their impact on the overall metabolic effects of GBP surgery.

  12. A novel extreme learning machine for hypoglycemia detection.

    PubMed

    San, Phyo Phyo; Ling, Sai Ho; Soe, Ni Ni; Nguyen, Hung T

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common side-effect of insulin therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and is the major limiting factor to maintain tight glycemic control. The deficiency in glucose counter-regulation may even lead to severe hypoglycaemia. It is always threatening to the well-being of patients with T1DM since more severe hypoglycemia leads to seizures or loss of consciousness and the possible development of permanent brain dysfunction under certain circumstances. Thus, an accurate early detection on hypoglycemia is an important research topic. With the use of new emerging technology, an extreme learning machine (ELM) based hypoglycemia detection system is developed to recognize the presence of hypoglycemic episodes. From a clinical study of 16 children with T1DM, natural occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes are associated with increased heart rates (p <; 0.06) and increased corrected QT intervals (p <; 0.001). The overall data were organized into a training set with 8 patients (320 data points) and a testing set with 8 patients (269 data points). By using the ELM trained feed-forward neural network (ELM-FFNN), the testing sensitivity (true positive) and specificity (true negative) for detection of hypoglycemia is 78 and 60% respectability. PMID:25569957

  13. Severe hypoglycemia in users of sulfonylurea antidiabetic agents and antihyperlipidemics.

    PubMed

    Leonard, C E; Bilker, W B; Brensinger, C M; Han, X; Flory, J H; Flockhart, D A; Gagne, J J; Cardillo, S; Hennessy, S

    2016-05-01

    Drug-drug interactions causing severe hypoglycemia due to antidiabetic drugs is a major clinical and public health problem. We assessed whether sulfonylurea use with a statin or fibrate was associated with severe hypoglycemia. We conducted cohort studies of users of glyburide, glipizide, and glimepiride plus a statin or fibrate within a Medicaid population. The outcome was a validated, diagnosis-based algorithm for severe hypoglycemia. Among 592,872 persons newly exposed to a sulfonylurea+antihyperlipidemic, the incidence of severe hypoglycemia was 5.8/100 person-years. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for sulfonylurea+statins were consistent with no association. Most overall HRs for sulfonylurea+fibrate were elevated, with sulfonylurea-specific adjusted HRs as large as 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24-1.81) for glyburide+gemfibrozil, 1.37 (95% CI: 1.11-1.69) for glipizide+gemfibrozil, and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.29-2.06) for glimepiride+fenofibrate. Concomitant therapy with a sulfonylurea and fibrate is associated with an often delayed increased rate of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:26566262

  14. Update on the management of neonatal sepsis in horses.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jon

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in neonatal intensive care sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock remain the biggest killers of neonatal foals. Management of this severe syndrome remains difficult, requiring intensive intervention. Key aspects of management include infection control, hemodynamic support, immunomodulatory interventions, and metabolic/endocrine support. Infection control largely consists of early antimicrobial therapy, plasma transfusions, and local therapy for the infected focus. In cases with severe sepsis or septic shock, hemodynamic support with fluids, vasoactive agents, and respiratory support insuring oxygen delivery to vital organs is important. Nutritional support is important, but close monitoring is needed to avoid hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

  15. Elective Cesarean section at 37 weeks is associated with the higher risk of neonatal complications.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yamanouchi, Sohsaku; Sekiya, Shin-ichiro; Hirabayashi, Masato; Mine, Kenji; Ohashi, Atsushi; Tsuji, Shoji; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Kanzaki, Hideharu; Hirano, Daishi; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    Elective Cesarean section performed before 39 weeks of gestation may be associated with increased risk of neonatal complications. We retrospectively investigated differences in the neonatal complication rate between 684 newborns delivered by elective Cesarean section at 37 weeks of gestation (n = 390) and those delivered by the same procedure at 38 weeks (n = 294) between 2006 and 2012 at our hospital in order to ascertain whether adverse outcomes differ between the groups. Newborns delivered at 37 weeks had a significantly higher incidence of neonatal intensive care unit admission (p = 0.03), adverse respiratory complications (p < 0.01), low birth weight (p < 0.001), and hypoglycemia (p < 0.005) than those delivered at 38 weeks. Compared with normal weight neonates, low birth weight neonates were more likely to have hypoglycemia (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an adverse respiratory outcome was independently associated with gestational age (p < 0.01; odds ratio [OR], 3.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-7.81), while hypoglycemia was independently associated with birth weight (p < 0.01; OR, 16.34; 95% CI, 7.72-34.56). Respiratory disorders were significantly associated with gestational age even in normal birth weight newborns without any other complications such as hyperbirilubinemia, hypoglycemia or bacterial infections. In conclusion, the incidence of neonatal complications was higher in newborns delivered at 37 weeks of gestation than in those delivered at 38 weeks via elective Cesarean section. Thus, the procedure should be scheduled at 38 weeks to improve neonatal outcomes.

  16. Intranasal glucagon: a promising approach for treatment of severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of diabetic complications is mainly obtained through optimal control of blood glucose levels. With hypoglycemic drugs like beta-cell stimulating drugs and especially insulin, the limit to treatment is represented by hypoglycemia, a life-threatening occurrence that is dangerous itself and can induce fear of other episodes. Glucagon, injected subcutaneously (SC) or intramuscularly (IM), is the treatment of choice for severe hypoglycemia outside of the hospital setting. However, due to practical aspects such as preparation of solutions for administration and injection by untrained persons, there are obstacles to its routine use. This review focuses on the current status of alternative routes of administration of peptide hormones, and in particular the intranasal (IN) route of glucagon, as a promising approach for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:25385946

  17. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  18. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, Antonio; Cimaz, Rolando; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2002-12-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB), defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0-27 d after birth), is a rare disorder closely linked to transplacental transport of maternal antibodies anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB. These antibodies may induce a myocarditis, or interact directly with calcium channel proteins with disturbance of transmembrane signaling at the level of the conduction tissue, or interfere with apoptosis. Depending on the severity of the process, the fetus may die in utero or a few days after birth or survive to the perinatal period and have a near-normal life; in most survivors a pace-maker must be implanted. Skin lesions, haematological disorders, and hepatic cholestasis are other transient clinical features of the syndrome. Sinus bradycardia and QT interval prolongation may be observed as well in babies born from anti-Ro/SSA positive mothers. The risk of recurrence of complete block ranges from 10-17%. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Their long-term outcome generally is more reassuring than previously assumed and arthralgias and dry eyes are the most common symptoms. A standard therapy for blocks detected in utero still does not exist. The prevalence of complete CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women and with known connective-tissue disease was 2%. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 2 wk starting from the 16 wk gestation, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women.

  19. Hypoglycemia as a complication of removal of a pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, C. T.; Imrie, D.

    1977-01-01

    In a patient with a solitary pheochromocytoma severe hypoglycemia developed following excision of the tumour. The possible causative mechanism was thought to be a reactive relative increase in insulin production secondary to increased endogenous production of glucose, induced by the large amounts of epinephrine produced by the tumour. Alternatively, epinephrine withdrawal following removal of the tumour under phentolamine infusion may have induced increased insulin production and hence potentiated the development of hypoglycemia. Careful monitoring of the blood glucose concentration during and after the operation is recommended to obviate this potentially fatal complication. PMID:844018

  20. Predictors of hypoglycemia in insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Basrah

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Dhuha Tarik; Habib, Omran S; Mansour, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    AIM To measure the incidence and determinants (predictors) of hypoglycemia among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who were on insulin treatment for at least one year. METHODS The present study is an out-patients based inquiry about the risk and predictors of hypoglycemia among patients with T2DM seeking care at the Al-Faiha Specialized Diabetes, Endocrine, and Metabolism Center, in Basrah over a period of 7 mo (from 15th of April, 2013 to 15th of October, 2013). The data used in the study were based on all detailed interview and selected laboratory investigations. A total of 336 patients could be included in the study. RESULTS The incidence of overall hypoglycemia among the studied patients was 75.3% within the last 3 mo preceding the interview. The incidence of hypoglycemia subtypes were 10.2% for severe hypoglycemia requiring medical assistance in the hospital, 44.36% for severe hypoglycemia treated at home by family; this includes both confirmed severe hypoglycemia with an incidence rate of 14.6% and unconfirmed severe hypoglycemia for which incidence rate was 29.76%. Regarding mild self-treated hypoglycemia, the incidence of confirmed mild hypoglycemia was 21.42%, for unconfirmed mild hypoglycemia the incidence rate was 50.0% and for total mild hypoglycemia, the incidence rate was 71.42%. The most important predictors of hypoglycemia were a peripheral residence, increasing knowledge of hypoglycemia symptoms, in availability and increasing frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, higher diastolic blood pressure, and lower Hemoglobin A1c. CONCLUSION Hypoglycemia is very common among insulin-treated patients with T2DM in Basrah. It was possible to identify some important predictors of hypoglycemia. PMID:27795821

  1. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Programming after Recurrent Hypoglycemia during Development.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghavendra

    2015-08-28

    Permanent brain injury is a complication of recurrent hypoglycemia during development. Recurrent hypoglycemia also has adverse consequences on the neuroendocrine system. Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, characterized by ineffective glucose counterregulation during hypoglycemia, is well described in children and adults on insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus. Whether recurrent hypoglycemia also has a programming effect on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal cortex (HPA) axis has not been well studied. Hypoglycemia is a potent stress that leads to increased glucocorticoid secretion in all age groups, including the perinatal period. Other conditions associated with exposure to excess glucocorticoid in the perinatal period have a programming effect on the HPA axis activity. Limited animal data suggest the possibility of similar programming effect after recurrent hypoglycemia in the postnatal period. The age at exposure to hypoglycemia likely determines the HPA axis response in adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia in the early postnatal period likely leads to a hyperresponsive HPA axis, whereas recurrent hypoglycemia in the late postnatal period lead to a hyporesponsive HPA axis in adulthood. The age-specific programming effects may determine the neuroendocrine response during hypoglycemia and other stressful events in individuals with history of recurrent hypoglycemia during development.

  2. Hypoglycemia associated with oleander toxicity in a dog.

    PubMed

    Page, C; Murtaugh, R J

    2015-03-01

    Oleander poisoning typically results in cardiac arrhythmias, hyperkalemia, and gastrointestinal irritation, and can be fatal. Oleander extracts have also been studied experimentally as hypoglycemic agents. Here, we describe a dog with confirmed oleander toxicosis presenting with classical symptoms and also hypoglycemia. After excluding other likely causes of hypoglycemia, the finding was attributed to oleander toxicosis, which has not been previously reported in dogs. A 7-year-old female spayed Maltese was presented to the emergency service after ingesting oleander leaves. Toxicosis was confirmed by measurement of digoxin using a competitive binding immunoassay, patient level 0.7 ng/mL (0.9 nmol/L) 24-h post-ingestion. Clinical symptoms included vomiting, cardiac arrhythmia, mild hyperkalemia, and hypoglycemia. Treatment was successful with aggressive supportive care, and the dog was discharged from the hospital after 48 h and made a full recovery. This case reviews the presentation and treatment of oleander toxicity but also highlights possible effects of oleander on blood sugar in dogs. Hypoglycemia in this dog, attributed to oleander poisoning, is interesting as it supports experimental research into hypoglycemic properties of oleander extracts. PMID:25252802

  3. Hypoglycemia associated with oleander toxicity in a dog.

    PubMed

    Page, C; Murtaugh, R J

    2015-03-01

    Oleander poisoning typically results in cardiac arrhythmias, hyperkalemia, and gastrointestinal irritation, and can be fatal. Oleander extracts have also been studied experimentally as hypoglycemic agents. Here, we describe a dog with confirmed oleander toxicosis presenting with classical symptoms and also hypoglycemia. After excluding other likely causes of hypoglycemia, the finding was attributed to oleander toxicosis, which has not been previously reported in dogs. A 7-year-old female spayed Maltese was presented to the emergency service after ingesting oleander leaves. Toxicosis was confirmed by measurement of digoxin using a competitive binding immunoassay, patient level 0.7 ng/mL (0.9 nmol/L) 24-h post-ingestion. Clinical symptoms included vomiting, cardiac arrhythmia, mild hyperkalemia, and hypoglycemia. Treatment was successful with aggressive supportive care, and the dog was discharged from the hospital after 48 h and made a full recovery. This case reviews the presentation and treatment of oleander toxicity but also highlights possible effects of oleander on blood sugar in dogs. Hypoglycemia in this dog, attributed to oleander poisoning, is interesting as it supports experimental research into hypoglycemic properties of oleander extracts.

  4. A case of hypoglycemia due to illegitimate sexual enhancement medication.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Naoki; Yabe, Daisuke; Kurose, Takeshi; Seino, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Sexual enhancement medication presents a large market for counterfeit versions. We report here a case of hypoglycemia caused by an illicit sexual enhancement medication containing an extremely large amount of the sulfonylurea drug glibenclamide together with a moderate amount sildenafil citrate. PMID:25748828

  5. Orexin signaling is necessary for hypoglycemia-induced prevention of conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Otlivanchik, Oleg; Sanders, Nicole M; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose; Levin, Barry E

    2016-01-01

    While the neural control of glucoregulatory responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia is beginning to be elucidated, brain sites responsible for behavioral responses to hypoglycemia are relatively poorly understood. To help elucidate central control mechanisms associated with hypoglycemia unawareness, we first evaluated the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia on a simple behavioral measure, the robust feeding response to hypoglycemia, in rats. First, food intake was significantly, and similarly, increased above baseline saline-induced intake (1.1 ± 0.2 g; n = 8) in rats experiencing a first (4.4 ± 0.3; n = 8) or third daily episode of recurrent insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH, 3.7 ± 0.3 g; n = 9; P < 0.05). Because food intake was not impaired as a result of prior IIH, we next developed an alternative animal model of hypoglycemia-induced behavioral arousal using a conditioned place preference (CPP) model. We found that hypoglycemia severely blunted previously acquired CPP in rats and that recurrent hypoglycemia prevented this blunting. Pretreatment with a brain penetrant, selective orexin receptor-1 antagonist, SB-334867A, blocked hypoglycemia-induced blunting of CPP. Recurrently hypoglycemic rats also showed decreased preproorexin expression in the perifornical hypothalamus (50%) but not in the adjacent lateral hypothalamus. Pretreatment with sertraline, previously shown to prevent hypoglycemia-associated glucoregulatory failure, did not prevent blunting of hypoglycemia-induced CPP prevention by recurrent hypoglycemia. This work describes the first behavioral model of hypoglycemia unawareness and suggests a role for orexin neurons in mediating behavioral responses to hypoglycemia.

  6. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  7. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  8. Extended-release glipizide overdose presenting with delayed hypoglycemia and treated with subcutaneous octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Pelavin, Paul; Abramson, Erika; Pon, Steven; Vogiatzi, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The onset of symptomatic hypoglycemia in children with ingestions of second-generation sulfonylureas has never been documented to be later than 21 hours post-ingestion. We report a case with the longest known interval, 45 hours, between ingestion of a sulfonylurea and the onset of hypoglycemia requiring medical intervention. The hypoglycemia was severe and required multiple dextrose boluses in addition to continuous dextrose infusion for 36 hours. This patient was also treated with multiple doses of subcutaneous octreotide because of persistent hypoglycemia despite the above management. This case represents the first report of subcutaneous octreotide used as a treatment for pediatric hypoglycemia secondary to sulfonylurea exposure. PMID:19449674

  9. Evidence-informed clinical practice recommendations for treatment of type 1 diabetes complicated by problematic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Pratik; Rickels, Michael R; Senior, Peter A; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Maffi, Paola; Kay, Thomas W; Keymeulen, Bart; Inagaki, Nobuya; Saudek, Frantisek; Lehmann, Roger; Hering, Bernhard J

    2015-06-01

    Problematic hypoglycemia, defined as two or more episodes per year of severe hypoglycemia or as one episode associated with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, extreme glycemic lability, or major fear and maladaptive behavior, is a challenge, especially for patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Individualized therapy for such patients should include a composite target: optimal glucose control without problematic hypoglycemia. Therefore, we propose a tiered, four-stage algorithm based on evidence of efficacy given the limitations of educational, technological, and transplant interventions. All patients with problematic hypoglycemia should undergo structured or hypoglycemia-specific education programs (stage 1). Glycemic and hypoglycemia treatment targets should be individualized and reassessed every 3-6 months. If targets are not met, one diabetes technology-continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or continuous glucose monitoring-should be added (stage 2). For patients with continued problematic hypoglycemia despite education (stage 1) and one diabetes technology (stage 2), sensor-augmented insulin pumps preferably with an automated low-glucose suspend feature and/or very frequent contact with a specialized hypoglycemia service can reduce hypoglycemia (stage 3). For patients whose problematic hypoglycemia persists, islet or pancreas transplant should be considered (stage 4). This algorithm provides an evidence-informed approach to resolving problematic hypoglycemia; it should be used as a guide, with individual patient circumstances directing suitability and acceptability to ensure the prudent use of technology and scarce transplant resources. Standardized reporting of hypoglycemia outcomes and inclusion of patients with problematic hypoglycemia in studies of new interventions may help to guide future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25998294

  10. Evidence-Informed Clinical Practice Recommendations for Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes Complicated by Problematic Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Pratik; Rickels, Michael R.; Senior, Peter A.; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Maffi, Paola; Kay, Thomas W.; Keymeulen, Bart; Inagaki, Nobuya; Saudek, Frantisek; Lehmann, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Problematic hypoglycemia, defined as two or more episodes per year of severe hypoglycemia or as one episode associated with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, extreme glycemic lability, or major fear and maladaptive behavior, is a challenge, especially for patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Individualized therapy for such patients should include a composite target: optimal glucose control without problematic hypoglycemia. Therefore, we propose a tiered, four-stage algorithm based on evidence of efficacy given the limitations of educational, technological, and transplant interventions. All patients with problematic hypoglycemia should undergo structured or hypoglycemia-specific education programs (stage 1). Glycemic and hypoglycemia treatment targets should be individualized and reassessed every 3–6 months. If targets are not met, one diabetes technology—continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or continuous glucose monitoring—should be added (stage 2). For patients with continued problematic hypoglycemia despite education (stage 1) and one diabetes technology (stage 2), sensor-augmented insulin pumps preferably with an automated low-glucose suspend feature and/or very frequent contact with a specialized hypoglycemia service can reduce hypoglycemia (stage 3). For patients whose problematic hypoglycemia persists, islet or pancreas transplant should be considered (stage 4). This algorithm provides an evidence-informed approach to resolving problematic hypoglycemia; it should be used as a guide, with individual patient circumstances directing suitability and acceptability to ensure the prudent use of technology and scarce transplant resources. Standardized reporting of hypoglycemia outcomes and inclusion of patients with problematic hypoglycemia in studies of new interventions may help to guide future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25998294

  11. Insulin Autoimmune Syndrome: a rare cause of postprandial hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Pooja; Trivedi, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 65-year-old obese Caucasian woman presented with symptomatic postprandial hypoglycemic episodes, resolution of symptoms with carbohydrate intake and significantly elevated anti-insulin antibody levels. She did not have any evidence for the use of oral antidiabetic medications, insulin, herbal substances, performing strenuous exercise or history of bariatric surgery. Fingerstick blood glucose readings revealed blood sugar of 35 mg/dL and 48 mg/dL, when she had these symptoms. Her medical history was significant for morbid obesity, hypothyroidism and gastro esophageal reflux disease. Her home medications included levothyroxine, propranolol and omeprazole. A blood sample obtained during the symptoms revealed the following: fingerstick blood sugar 38 mg/dL, venous blood glucose 60 mg/dL (normal (n): 70–99 mg/dL), serum insulin 202 IU/mL (n: <21), proinsulin 31.3 pmol/L (n: <28.9), C-peptide 8 ng/mL (n: 0.9–7), beta-hydroxybutyrate 0.12 mmol/L (n: 0.02–0.27) anti-insulin antibody >45.4 U/mL (n: <0.4). The result obtained while screening for serum sulfonylurea and meglitinides was negative. The repeated episodes of postprandial hypoglycemia associated with significantly elevated anti-insulin antibodies led to a diagnosis of insulin antibody syndrome (IAS). Significant improvement of hypoglycemic symptoms and lower anti-insulin antibody levels (33 U/mL) was noted on nutritional management during the following 6 months. Based on a report of pantoprazole-related IAS cases, her omeprazole was switched to a H2 receptor blocker. She reported only two episodes of hypoglycemia, and anti-insulin antibody levels were significantly lower at 10 U/mL after the following 12-month follow-up. Learning points: Initial assessment of the Whipple criteria is critical to establish the clinical diagnosis of hypoglycemia accurately. Blood sugar monitoring with fingerstick blood glucose method can provide important information during hypoglycemia workup

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of early fecal carriage of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus spp and their antimicrobial resistant patterns among healthy neonates born in a hospital setting in central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    El-Kersh, Talat A.; Marie, Mohammed A.; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A.; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H.; Al-Bloushy, Ahmad A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence, antibiotic resistant profiles, and risk factors of early fecal carriage of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) and staphylococci among 150 healthy Saudi neonates born in a hospital setting in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in Al-Bukayriyah General Hospital, Qassim, Saudi Arabia, between June 2012 and January 2013. The E. faecalis and Staphylococcus spp. isolates were identified manually, and Vitek2 system was used for identity confirmation at the species level and minimum inhibitory concentration-susceptibility testing. Results: Enterococcus faecalis (n=73) and Staphylococcus spp. (n=18) were recovered. Unlike staphylococci, E. faecalis colonization did not significantly vary from day one up to 7 days of life, regardless of the type of feeding, but it was relatively higher among vaginally versus cesarean delivery. Both Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) and Staphylococcus aureus carriage increase as the body weight increases, and this difference was significant (p=0.025) for S. epidermidis. High-level resistance in Gentamycin among E. faecalis isolates was 25% and 11% to Streptomycin. Thirty percent of S. epidermidis were resistant to oxacillin and exhibited multidrug-resistant (MDR) patterns of 5 resistant markers, which were also observed among 2/5 (40%) of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Conclusion: Enterococcus faecalis did not significantly vary in relation to type of delivery, age up to 7 days, and type of feeding. The neonatal fecal carriage of MDR isolates should be considered as a crucial reservoir to the further spread of antimicrobial resistance genes among hospitals, cross infections, and the community. PMID:26905350

  13. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  14. Avoiding or coping with severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major barrier to achieving the glycemic goal in patients with type 2 diabetes. In particular, severe hypoglycemia, which is defined as an event that requires the assistance of another person to actively administer carbohydrates, glucagon, or take other corrective actions, is a serious clinical concern in patients with diabetes. If severe hypoglycemia is not managed promptly, it can be life threatening. Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is the main pathogenic mechanism behind severe hypoglycemia. Defective glucose counter-regulation (altered insulin secretion, glucagon secretion, and an attenuated increase in epinephrine during hypoglycemia) and a lack of awareness regarding hypoglycemia (attenuated sympathoadrenal activity) are common components of HAAF in patients with diabetes. There is considerable evidence that hypoglycemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In addition, hypoglycemia has a significant influence on the quality of life of patients with diabetes. To prevent hypoglycemic events, the setting of glycemic goals should be individualized, particularly in elderly individuals or patients with complicated or advanced type 2 diabetes. Patients at high-risk for the future development of severe hypoglycemia should be selected carefully, and intensive education with reinforcement should be implemented. PMID:25589828

  15. Exercise and deficient carbohydrate storage and intake as causes of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Field, J B

    1989-03-01

    Exercise is associated with a marked increase in glucose uptake by muscle, which is initially supported by breakdown of hepatic glycogen and subsequently by increased gluconeogenesis. If hepatic glucose production is inadequate, hypoglycemia results. During exercise there is decreased plasma insulin and increased catecholamines, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone, which contribute to but are not essential for the increased hepatic output of glucose. Although insulin concentrations fall, insulin sensitivity is increased. However, the augmented glucose uptake by muscle is due to other factors. The symptoms of exhaustion during exercise are not due to hypoglycemia, and prevention of hypoglycemia may not prolong the time of exercise to exhaustion. During severe caloric restriction, hepatic glucose production decreases and free fatty acids and ketone bodies become important sources of calories. Although under these circumstances hepatic gluconeogenesis is usually sufficient to prevent hypoglycemia, with very severe caloric restriction hypoglycemia can result. With starvation, insulin concentrations fall while growth hormone and glucagon increase. Frequently the usual symptoms of hypoglycemia are absent in individuals with hypoglycemia from severe caloric restriction. Hypoglycemia from severe caloric restriction has not been totally restricted to underdeveloped areas of the world. In such patients no endocrine abnormalities have been found, and hypoglycemia has persisted despite administration of large amounts of carbohydrate. Pregnancy and lactation could predispose to hypoglycemia in the face of inadequate caloric intake. PMID:2645124

  16. Recognition and management of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E; Steffen, Kristine; Engel, Scott; Wiisanen, Ron; Garcia, Luis; Malik, Shahbaz Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is an increasingly recognized complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) due to the changes in gut hormonal milieu. Physicians should be aware of this complication to ensure timely and effective treatment of post-RYGB patients, who present to them with hypoglycemic symptoms. Possible causes of hypoglycemia in these patients include late dumping syndrome, nesidioblastosis and rarely insulinoma. Systematic evaluation including history, biochemical analysis, and diagnostic testing might help in distinguishing among these diagnoses. Continuous glucose monitoring is also a valuable tool, revealing the episodes in the natural environment and can also be used to monitor treatment success. Treatment should begin with strict low carbohydrate diet, followed by medication therapy. Therapy with diazoxide, acarbose, calcium channel blockers and octreotide have been proven to be beneficial, but the response apparently is highly variable. When other treatment options fail, surgical options can be considered. PMID:26522879

  17. [Will the new SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin help us reduce the risk of hypoglycemia?].

    PubMed

    Pelikánová, Terezie

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes is typically accompanied by hypoglycemia, if insulin or derivatives of sulfonylurea are used within the treatment. Apart from the fact that hypoglycemias are the major obstacle to achieving the desirable compensation of diabetes, hypoglycemia also has a number of serious clinical consequences. A long term serious hypoglycemia may lead to a sudden death, heart attack or irreversible brain damage. Clinically significant are also the light or asymptomatic hypoglycemias which in a considerably negative way affect the patient's quality of life. The use of modern technologies in continuous monitoring of glycemias has shown that the occurrence of asymptomatic hypoglycemias is much higher than we anticipated and that they largely involve nocturnal hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is associated with an increased level of depression, anxiety, dissatisfaction with the treatment and with a greater number of physician office visits. Nocturnal hypoglycemia has a negative impact on the quality of sleep, it may impair cognitive functions and performance efficiency next day. The prevention of hypoglycemia is therefore one of the basic goals of diabetes treatment and the low risk of hypoglycemia is among the main requirements that we place on the newly developed antidiabetic drugs. The negligible risk of hypoglycemia, which is comparable to placebo both in monotherapy and in most combinations with the antidiabetic drugs available today, is evidenced by the data from the studies undertaken with empagliflozin. It shows that the low risk of hypoglycemia is one of the benefits of gliflozins, the new group of medications with a unique mechanism of effect which has quite recently appeared on our market. PMID:25692841

  18. Reducing the Risk of Hypoglycemia Associated With Intravenous Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Victoria; Misiasz, Meaghan R.; Jones, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Computerized insulin infusion protocols have facilitated more effective blood glucose (BG) control in intensive care units (ICUs). This is particularly important in light of the risks associated with hypoglycemia. End stage renal disease (ESRD) increases the risk of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. We evaluated BG control in 210 patients in 2 medical ICUs and in 2 surgical ICUs who were treated with a computerized insulin infusion program (CIIP). Our CIIP was programmed for a BG target of 140-180 mg/dL for medical ICU patients or 120-160 mg/dL for surgical ICU patients. In addition, we focused on BG control in the 11% of our patients with ESRD. Mean BG was 147 ± 20 mg/dL for surgical ICU patients and 171 ± 26 mg/dL for medical ICU patients. Of both surgical and medical ICU patients, 17% had 1 or more BG 60-79 mg/dL, while 3% of surgical ICU and 8% of medical ICU patients had 1 or more BG < 60 mg/dL. Mean BG in ESRD patients was 147 ± 16 mg/dL similar to 152 ± 23 mg/dL in patients without ESRD. Of ESRD patients, 41% had 1 or more BG < 79 mg/dL as compared with 17.8% of non-ESRD patients (P < .01). A higher BG target for medical ICU patients as compared with surgical ICU patients yielded comparably low rates of moderate or severe hypoglycemia. However, hypoglycemia among ESRD patients was more common compared to non-ESRD patients, suggesting a need for a higher BG target specific to ESRD patients. PMID:25172875

  19. Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy: experience with 28 cases.

    PubMed

    al-Rabeeah, A; al-Ashwal, A; al-Herbish, A; al-Jurayyan, N; Sakati, N; Abobakr, A

    1995-08-01

    Twenty-eight infants with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) were seen during a 10-year period. There were 13 males and 15 females. Their age at time of presentation ranged from a few hours to 6 months. Consanguinity was reported in 20 cases (71.4%). One family had two affected siblings and two affected cousins, another had three affected siblings and one affected cousin, and three others had lost siblings because of hypoglycemia and seizures. The primary clinical presentation was jitters and seizures in association with hypoglycemia. The diagnosis was suspected when the therapeutic glucose requirement was found to be more than 12 mg/kg/min and also when there was a good response to glucagon after exclusion of metabolic and storage diseases. A high insulin-to-glucose ratio was noted for all patients. Twenty-two had near-total (90%) pancreatectomy; the result was excellent in all but four, who required supplemental medical therapy. Five patients were treated medically, and one patient's family refused treatment. Twelve patients sustained moderate to severe brain injury before referral. There were no deaths, and only one patient had evidence of malabsorption after the pancreatectomy. PHHI correlates well with consanguinity and family history. Clinical awareness is essential to permit early diagnosis and prompt medical and supportive therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis.

  1. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  2. Prolactin and growth hormone responses to hypoglycemia in patients with systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Raffayova, Helena; Imrich, Richard; Radikova, Zofia; Penesova, Adela; Macho, Ladislav; Lukac, Jozef; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Vigas, Milan

    2006-06-01

    This study compared prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with those in matched healthy controls. No differences were found in glucose and GH responses to hypoglycemia in both groups of patients compared to controls. SSc patients had lower PRL response (P < 0.05) to hypoglycemia compared to controls. PRL response tended to be lower also in PsA patients, however the difference did not reach level of statistical significance (P = 0.11). The present study showed decreased PRL response to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with SSc. PMID:16855141

  3. Neonatal Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Whitington, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as “self” and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies. PMID:25755519

  4. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  5. Acute Hypoglycemia Impairs Executive Cognitive Function in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Graveling, Alex J.; Deary, Ian J.; Frier, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Acute hypoglycemia impairs cognitive function in several domains. Executive cognitive function governs organization of thoughts, prioritization of tasks, and time management. This study examined the effect of acute hypoglycemia on executive function in adults with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirty-two adults with and without type 1 diabetes with no vascular complications or impaired awareness of hypoglycemia were studied. Two hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps were performed at least 2 weeks apart in a single-blind, counterbalanced order, maintaining blood glucose at 4.5 mmol/L (euglycemia) or 2.5 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). Executive functions were assessed with a validated test suite (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function). A general linear model (repeated-measures ANOVA) was used. Glycemic condition (euglycemia or hypoglycemia) was the within-participant factor. Between-participant factors were order of session (euglycemia-hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia-euglycemia), test battery used, and diabetes status (with or without diabetes). RESULTS Compared with euglycemia, executive functions (with one exception) were significantly impaired during hypoglycemia; lower test scores were recorded with more time required for completion. Large Cohen d values (>0.8) suggest that hypoglycemia induces decrements in aspects of executive function with large effect sizes. In some tests, the performance of participants with diabetes was more impaired than those without diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Executive cognitive function, which is necessary to carry out many everyday activities, is impaired during hypoglycemia in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. This important aspect of cognition has not received previous systematic study with respect to hypoglycemia. The effect size is large in terms of both accuracy and speed. PMID:23780950

  6. "Big IGF-II"-induced hypoglycemia secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morbois-Trabut, L; Maillot, F; De Widerspach-Thor, A; Lamisse, F; Couet, C

    2004-06-01

    Non-islet cell tumor-related hypoglycemia is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 63 Year-old man admitted for hemiparesia and a capillary blood glucose of 20 mg/dL. The presence of an immature form of IGF-II that can mimic the effect of insulin, namely "big IGF-II", explained this patient's hypoglycaemia. A moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the cardia with metastatic extension to the stomach and the liver was demonstrated. Octreotide failed to control the hypoglycaemia, therefore prednisolone (2 mg/kg per day) and enteral feeding prevented new episodes of severe hypoglycaemia. PMID:15223980

  7. Neonatal circumcision.

    PubMed

    Lerman, S E; Liao, J C

    2001-12-01

    The merits of neonatal circumcision continue to be debated hotly. Some argue that circumcision is a "uniquely American medical enigma." Most of the world's male population remains uncircumcised; however, most boys born in the United States continue to undergo neonatal circumcision. Review of existing literature supports that most children who are uncircumcised do well from a medical standpoint and, thus, the question of whether US health care practitioners are subjecting neonates to an unnecessary surgical procedure remains. The medical benefits of circumcision are multiple, but most are small. The clearest medical benefit of circumcision is the relative reduction in the risk for a UTI, especially in early infancy. Although this risk [figure: see text] is real, the absolute numbers are small (risk ranges from 1 in 100 to 1 in 1000), and one investigator has estimated that it may take approximately 80 neonatal circumcisions to prevent one UTI. In the case of a patient with known urologic abnormalities that predispose to UTI, neonatal circumcision has a clearer role in terms of medical benefit to the patient. Most of the other medical benefits of circumcision probably can be realized without circumcision as long as access to clean water and proper penile hygiene are achieved. Proper penile hygiene should all but eliminate the risk for foreskin-related medical problems that will require circumcision. Moreover, proper hygiene and access to clean water has been shown to reduce the rate of development of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in the uncircumcised population. Proper techniques on the care of the foreskin are illustrated in the American Academy of Pediatrics pamphlet titled "How to care for the uncircumcised penis." Regarding the relationship between STDs and circumcision, patient education and the practice of low-risk sexual behavior make a far greater impact than does routine circumcision in hopes of reducing the spread of HIV and other STDs. Nevertheless

  8. BOLD Response to Semantic and Syntactic Processing during Hypoglycemia Is Load-Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robin J.; Page, Kathleen A.; Arora, Jagriti; Sherwin, Robert; Constable, R. Todd

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how syntactic and semantic load factors impact sentence comprehension and BOLD signal under moderate hypoglycemia. A dual session, whole brain fMRI study was conducted on 16 healthy participants using the glucose clamp technique. In one session, they experienced insulin-induced hypoglycemia (plasma glucose at [image…

  9. Body position and the neuroendocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Jezova, D; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Macho, L; Koska, J

    2003-10-01

    Changes in body fluid distribution are known to influence neuroendocrine function. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that changes in plasma volume affect the counterregulatory neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia. The tests were performed in 12 subjects in two situations: 'head-up' (+60 degrees head-up tilt standing for 30 min and hypoglycemia in sitting position afterwards) and 'leg-up' (leg-up position for 30 min and hypoglycemia in leg-up position afterwards) in a random order. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia was adjusted to 2.7 mmol/l for 15 min by glucose infusion. Plasma volume was greater by 2.2% (p < 0.001) in leg-up and lower by 9.6% (p < 0.001) in head-up position compared to the basal value in sitting position. Head-up position was associated with increases in ACTH, aldosterone, norepinephrine levels and plasma renin activity (p < 0.01). Leg-up position resulted in decreases in plasma growth hormone and epinephrine concentrations (p < 0.05). Except epinephrine, the neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia, if any, was mild. Hypoglycemia failed to activate ACTH release after head-up position. Body fluid redistribution did not modify hormonal changes during insulin hypoglycemia. In conclusion, we suggest that body position and accompanying plasma volume changes do not appear to affect neuroendocrine and counterregulatory responses to moderate, short duration hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. PMID:15764080

  10. Seasonal variations of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and non-diabetes mellitus: clinical analysis of 578 hypoglycemia cases.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Remi; Kimura, Akio; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Blood glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is reportedly influenced by the seasons, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreasing in the summer or warm season and increasing in the winter or cold season. In addition, several studies have shown that sepsis is also associated with the seasons. Although both blood glucose control and sepsis can strongly affect the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, few studies have examined the seasonal variation of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between severe hypoglycemia and the seasons in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM). We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with severe hypoglycemia at a national center in Japan between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2012. A total of 57,132 consecutive cases that had visited the emergency room by ambulance were screened, and 578 eligible cases of severe hypoglycemia were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was to assess the seasonality of severe hypoglycemia. In the T1DM group (n  =  88), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the summer than in the winter (35.2% in summer vs 18.2% in winter, P  =  0.01), and the HbA1c levels were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer (9.1% [7.6%-10.1%] in winter vs 7.7% [7.1%-8.3%] in summer, P  =  0.13). In the non-DM group (n  =  173), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the winter than in the summer (30.6% in winter vs 19.6% in summer, P  =  0.01), and sepsis as a complication occurred significantly more often in winter than in summer (24.5% in winter vs 5.9% in summer, P  =  0.02). In the T2DM group (n  =  317), the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia and the HbA1c levels did not differ significantly among the seasons. The occurrence of severe hypoglycemia might be seasonal and might fluctuate with temperature changes

  11. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Hypoglycemia Symptoms Improved with Diet Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Sukriti

    2016-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that a relationship may exist between high glycemic index diets and the development of anxiety and depression symptoms; however, as no interventional studies assessing this relationship in a psychiatric population have been completed, the possibility of a causal link is unclear. AB is a 15-year-old female who presented with concerns of generalized anxiety disorder and hypoglycemia symptoms. Her diet consisted primarily of refined carbohydrates. The addition of protein, fat, and fiber to her diet resulted in a substantial decrease in anxiety symptoms as well as a decrease in the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia symptoms. A brief return to her previous diet caused a return of her anxiety symptoms, followed by improvement when she restarted the prescribed diet. This case strengthens the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index may play a role in the pathogenesis or progression of mental illnesses such as generalized anxiety disorder and subsequently that dietary modification as a therapeutic intervention in the treatment of mental illness warrants further study. PMID:27493821

  12. [Natal and neonatal teeth].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Manuela; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Natal teeth have been defined as teeth which are present at birth, while neonatal teeth erupt during the first 30 days. Their occurrence is rare, the prevalence ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3000 with a higher frequency in the lip and palate clefts and syndroms. In about 85% natal or neonatal teeth are lower central incisors (60% in pairs), rare are upper teeth, molars and multiple teeth. In almost 90% they are part of the deciduous dentition. A lot of possible causes of early eruption are discussed, but only the relation to hereditary factors seems to be evident. An autosomal dominant trait is often described. The appearance of these teeth is dependent on the degree of maturity, but most of the time it is loose, small, discoloured and hypoplastic. Histologically, enamel hypoplasia with normal prism structure is apparent. No significant disturbances of the dentin structures are observed, only cervically dentin becomes atubular with spaces and enclosed cells. A large vascular pulp and failure of root formation are further investigations. Our microhardness measurements showed values from 24.3-32.4 KHN for enamel and 48.3-62.2 KHN for dentin, while normal deciduous teeth have an enamel hardness of 322.0 +/- 17.5 KHN. The thickness of enamel was never more than 280 microm compared to up to 1200 microm in normal teeth. This shows the retarded development of natal and neonatal teeth, because mineralization has not finished at the time of birth. In accordance with developmental age tooth structure and appearence are normal. In consideration of complications as Riga-Fede-disease, feeding problems, possibility of infection and hypermobility most of the time extraction is the treatment of choice, but in the interest of protecting the child this decision should be made carefully. PMID:17051960

  13. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  14. Diazoxide improves hormonal counterregulatory responses to acute hypoglycemia in long-standing type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    George, Priya S; Tavendale, Roger; Palmer, Colin N A; McCrimmon, Rory J

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at increased risk of severe hypoglycemia secondary to impairments in normal glucose counterregulatory responses (CRRs). Strategies to prevent hypoglycemia are often ineffective, highlighting the need for novel therapies. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels within the hypothalamus are thought to be integral to hypoglycemia detection and initiation of CRRs; however, to date this has not been confirmed in human subjects. In this study, we examined whether the KATP channel-activator diazoxide was able to amplify the CRR to hypoglycemia in T1D subjects with long-duration diabetes. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial using a stepped hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia clamp was performed in 12 T1D subjects with prior ingestion of diazoxide (7 mg/kg) or placebo. Diazoxide resulted in a 37% increase in plasma levels of epinephrine and a 44% increase in plasma norepinephrine during hypoglycemia compared with placebo. In addition, a subgroup analysis revealed that the response to oral diazoxide was blunted in participants with E23K polymorphism in the KATP channel. This study has therefore shown for the first time the potential utility of KATP channel activators to improve CRRs to hypoglycemia in individuals with T1D and, moreover, that it may be possible to stratify therapeutic approaches by genotype. PMID:25591873

  15. Glycemic goals in diabetes: trade-off between glycemic control and iatrogenic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Philip E

    2014-07-01

    The selection of a glycemic goal in a person with diabetes is a compromise between the documented upside of glycemic control-the partial prevention or delay of microvascular complications-and the documented downside of glycemic control-the recurrent morbidity and potential mortality of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The latter is not an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with drugs that do not cause hypoglycemia or with substantial weight loss. However, hypoglycemia becomes an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with a sulfonylurea, a glinide, or insulin, particularly in the setting of absolute endogenous insulin deficiency with loss of the normal decrease in circulating insulin and increase in glucagon secretion and attenuation of the sympathoadrenal response as plasma glucose concentrations fall. Then the selection of a glycemic goal should be linked to the risk of hypoglycemia. A reasonable individualized glycemic goal is the lowest A1C that does not cause severe hypoglycemia and preserves awareness of hypoglycemia, preferably with little or no symptomatic or even asymptomatic hypoglycemia, at a given stage in the evolution of the individual's diabetes.

  16. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the release of adrenocorticotropin predominantly via central and propranolol insensitive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Kovács, K; Oprsalová, Z; Vigas, M; Makara, G B

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic patterns of pituitary-adrenocortical and sympatho-adrenal hormone responses to insulin hypoglycemia as well as the relative importance of central vs. peripheral control of hypoglycemia-induced ACTH secretion were evaluated. In conscious rats bearing indwelling cannulae, the changes in hormone concentrations after insulin injection were dependent on the changes in blood glucose levels with respect to both time course and magnitude. ACTH, corticosterone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine levels were found to be maximal at 60 min after 2.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected ip, whereas earlier (20 min) but smaller increases were obtained in response to 0.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected iv. In rats 6-7 days after lesions of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH), the rise of ACTH during insulin hypoglycemia was markedly inhibited and corticosterone levels were significantly reduced. Simultaneously, the hypoglycemia-induced increase in plasma epinephrine was unchanged and that in plasma norepinephrine was significantly enhanced in rats with the MBH destroyed. The beta-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol did not inhibit ACTH and corticosterone responses to hypoglycemia in either sham-operated or MBH-lesioned animals. We conclude that the main factors triggering ACTH release during insulin-induced hypoglycemia are of central rather than peripheral origin. The high concentrations of circulating catecholamines occurring during insulin hypoglycemia are not responsible for pituitary-adrenocortical activation by direct, beta-adrenoreceptor mediated action at the pituitary level. PMID:3023036

  17. Protective effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Deng, Jiangshan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Yuwu

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin. Clinical studies have demonstrated that hypoglycemic edema is involved in the initiation of hypoglycemic brain damage. However, the mechanisms of this edema are poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent regulator of blood vessel function, has been observed an important candidate hormone induced by hypoglycemia to protect neurons by restoring plasma glucose. Whether VEGF has a protective effect against hypoglycemia-induced damage in brain endothelial cells is still unknown. To investigate the effects of hypoglycemia on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells and assess the protective effect of exogenous VEGF on endothelial cells during hypoglycemia, confluent monolayers of the brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3 were treated with normal (5.5 mM glucose), hypoglycemic (0, 0.5, 1 mM glucose) medium or hypoglycemic medium in the presence of VEGF. The results clearly showed that hypoglycemia significantly downregulated the expression of claudin-5 in bEnd.3 cells, without affecting ZO-1 and occludin expression and distribution. Besides, transendothelial permeability significantly increased under hypoglycemic conditions compared to that under control conditions. Moreover, the hypoglycemic medium in presence of VEGF decreased endothelial permeability via the inhibition of claudin-5 degradation and improved hypoglycemia-induced cell toxicity. Furthermore, Glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 expression were significantly upregulated. Taken together, hypoglycemia can significantly increase paraendocellular permeability by downregulating claudin-5 expression. We further showed that VEGF protected brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia by enhancing glucose passage, reducing endothelial cell death, and ameliorating paraendocellular permeability.

  18. Neuronal damage and cognitive impairment associated with hypoglycemia: An integrated view.

    PubMed

    Languren, Gabriela; Montiel, Teresa; Julio-Amilpas, Alberto; Massieu, Lourdes

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present review is to offer a current perspective about the consequences of hypoglycemia and its impact on the diabetic disorder due to the increasing incidence of diabetes around the world. The main consequence of insulin treatment in type 1 diabetic patients is the occurrence of repetitive periods of hypoglycemia and even episodes of severe hypoglycemia leading to coma. In the latter, selective neuronal death is observed in brain vulnerable regions both in humans and animal models, such as the cortex and the hippocampus. Cognitive damage subsequent to hypoglycemic coma has been associated with neuronal death in the hippocampus. The mechanisms implicated in selective damage are not completely understood but many factors have been identified including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, zinc release, PARP-1 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Importantly, the diabetic condition aggravates neuronal damage and cognitive failure induced by hypoglycemia. In the absence of coma prolonged and severe hypoglycemia leads to increased oxidative stress and discrete neuronal death mainly in the cerebral cortex. The mechanisms responsible for cell damage in this condition are still unknown. Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia is far more common in diabetic patients than severe hypoglycemia and currently important efforts are being done in order to elucidate the relationship between cognitive deficits and recurrent hypoglycemia in diabetics. Human studies suggest impaired performance mainly in memory and attention tasks in healthy and diabetic individuals under the hypoglycemic condition. Only scarce neuronal death has been observed under moderate repetitive hypoglycemia but studies suggest that impaired hippocampal synaptic function might be one of the causes of cognitive failure. Recent studies have also implicated altered mitochondrial function and mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  19. Association of Hypoglycemia With Incident Chronic Kidney Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Wu, Yueh-Lin; Lo, Yuan-Hao; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Lin, Chih-Ching; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to investigate the long-term risk of incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with hypoglycemia. This nationwide, population-based, propensity score (PS)-matched cohort study involved 2 cohorts: a hypoglycemic cohort and a matched cohort without hypoglycemia. Data from 1.3 million patients with newly diagnosed T2DM between 2000 and 2010 were extracted from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Hypoglycemic events were collected using inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department diagnoses. Patients aged <20 years and those with previous histories of CKD were excluded. The association between hypoglycemia and subsequent CKD risk in patients with T2DM was examined using Cox regression analysis after PS matching. During the mean follow-up period of 4.2 years, a total of 15,036 (1.7 %) patients experienced at least 1 episode of hypoglycemia and 15,036 matched controls without hypoglycemia were identified among 906,368 eligible patients. The incidence rates of subsequent CKD were 26.1 and 14.8 events per 1000 person-years in the hypoglycemic and matched cohorts, respectively. The hazard ratio (HR) of hypoglycemia for incident CKD was 1.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.63–1.92; P < 0.001). Compared with those without hypoglycemia, HRs for 1 to 3 and ≥4 episodes of hypoglycemia for CKD were 1.65 (95% CI, 1.50–1.81) and 1.75 (95% CI, 1.34–2.29), respectively (P for trend <0.001). Our study supports the association of hypoglycemia with CKD development among patients with T2DM, possibly in a dose-dependent relationship. PMID:25906112

  20. Leptin acts in the brain to influence hypoglycemic counterregulation: disparate effects of acute and recurrent hypoglycemia on glucagon release.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Ding, Yuyan; Sherwin, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Leptin has been shown to diminish hyperglycemia via reduced glucagon secretion, although it can also enhance sympathoadrenal responses. However, whether leptin can also inhibit glucagon secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycemia or increase epinephrine during acute or recurrent hypoglycemia has not been examined. To test whether leptin acts in the brain to influence counterregulation, hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic (∼45 mg/dl) clamps were performed on rats exposed to or not exposed to recurrent hypoglycemia (3 days, ∼40 mg/dl). Intracerebroventricular artificial cerebral spinal fluid or leptin was infused during the clamp. During acute hypoglycemia, leptin decreased glucagon responses by 51% but increased epinephrine and norepinephrine by 24 and 48%, respectively. After recurrent hypoglycemia, basal plasma leptin levels were undetectable. Subsequent brain leptin infusion during hypoglycemia paradoxically increased glucagon by 45% as well as epinephrine by 19%. In conclusion, leptin acts within the brain to diminish glucagon secretion during acute hypoglycemia but increases epinephrine, potentially limiting its detrimental effects during hypoglycemia. Exposure to recurrent hypoglycemia markedly suppresses plasma leptin, whereas exogenous brain leptin delivery enhances both glucagon and epinephrine release to subsequent hypoglycemia. These data suggest that recurrent hypoglycemia may diminish counterregulatory responses in part by reducing brain leptin action.

  1. Hypoglycemia-induced spontaneous unilateral jerking movement in bilateral internal capsule posterior limb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuhito; Ueda, Masayuki; Nagayama, Hiroshi; Katayama, Yasuo

    2014-03-15

    We report an 89-year-old woman who developed consciousness disturbance associated with marked hypoglycemia, and showed involuntary movements manifested as spontaneous quick-jerking flexion followed by slow relaxation, in the right leg. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed bilateral hyperintensities in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule (P-IC). She was treated with intravenous glucose supplementation, and her symptoms dramatically improved. The P-IC lesions are common abnormalities on MRI in hypoglycemia, and may cause paralysis. However involuntary movements associated with the lesions are rarely observed. The spontaneous jerking movements observed in this patient might result from transient impairment of the pyramidal tract associated with hypoglycemia. PMID:24411408

  2. Survey of Hypoglycemia in Elderly People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Doi, Kunihiro; Sugawara, Masahiro; Naka, Yoshikazu; Mochizuki, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of elderly type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Japan is increasing continuously. Hypoglycemia is a significant issue in their treatment. However, the actual situation and related details of their hypoglycemia remain unclear. In order to elucidate them, the Japan Physicians Association conducted a large-scale questionnaire survey for physicians and their outpatients all over Japan. Methods Targeted elderly T2DM outpatients were 65 years old or older in 2011. Specialized questionnaire survey forms were distributed to both of physicians and patients. The forms for physicians included questions whether patient had hypoglycemia in the last 1 month or 1 year; those for patients included whether they experienced it in the same durations and any of the 28 symptoms that are suggestive of hypoglycemia or pertaining to geriatric syndrome in the last 1 month, as well as questions about knowledge regarding hypoglycemia. We analyzed associations between hypoglycemia and the symptoms, and between hypoglycemia and medications. Results Of 15,892 T2DM patients (age, 74.2 ± 6.3 years; diabetes duration, 12.8 ± 8.9 years; HbA1c, 7.0±1.0%), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP-4i) was the most prescribed medication among all oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). The frequencies of hypoglycemia in the last 1 month recognized by physicians and experienced by patients were 7.8% and 10.4% (P < 0.0001), and in the last 1 year were 15.5% and 21.1% respectively (P < 0.0001). The most common symptom was “weakness, fatigue/feeling languid” and the majority of all patients reported neuroglycopenic or autonomic symptoms. Regarding monotherapy, hypoglycemia was observed in 32.7% of the patients with insulin, 4% in sulfonylurea (SU), 3.8% in glinide, and 3.5% in pioglitazone. The questions asking knowledge about hypoglycemia revealed that SU or insulin users had significantly more knowledge of hypoglycemia than others (P < 0.001); however, 63% of patients using

  3. Impact of hypoglycemia on daily life of type 2 diabetes patients in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Mandrik, Olena; Severens, Johan L; Doroshenko, Olena; Pan'kiv, Vladymir; Kravchun, Nonna; Vlasenko, Maryna; Hulchiy, Mykola; Baljuk, Maryna; Komisarenko, Yuliia; Martsynik, Eugene; Sokolova, Liubov; Zalis'ka, Olga; Mankovsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of hypoglycemia on the lives of Ukrainian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The secondary objective was to explore patient-physician relationships and the attitudes of patients towards various informational resources on diabetes management. Three focus groups with 26 patients were conducted. Qualitative information was evaluated using content analysis. The results show that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ukraine are adapting to potential attacks of hypoglycemia; however, they still experience periodic manifestations of hypoglycemia that significantly affect their psychological well-being. This result is similar to observations made in other countries. Ukrainian patients >40 years old mainly receive information on disease management from endocrinologists, and rarely use internet resources on diabetes management. Information provision was especially important at the early stage of the disease, when patients lack information on hypoglycemia manifestations and could therefore fail to identify and manage it properly. PMID:23874102

  4. Demystifying hypoglycemia. When is it real and how can you tell?

    PubMed

    McFarland, K F; Baker, C; Ferguson, S D

    1987-11-01

    Contrary to popular belief, hypoglycemia is an infrequently encountered condition and its presence is questionable until confirmed by appropriate tests. In ambulatory patients, blood glucose levels obtained during intake of a normal diet are more reliable than those obtained during a glucose tolerance test. If the blood glucose is actually abnormally low and the other two criteria of hypoglycemia are also satisfied, a search for the cause is in order. In hospitalized patients, excessive doses of insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents, the effect of drugs, or chronic renal failure are the most common causes of hypoglycemia. If these factors are absent, another chronic illness known to cause hypoglycemia may be the source. If the cause is still obscure, a thorough evaluation of the endocrine status is warranted. PMID:3313350

  5. Partial blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in recurrently hypoglycemic rats.

    PubMed

    LaGamma, Edmund F; Kirtok, Necla; Chan, Owen; Nankova, Bistra B

    2014-10-01

    Recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia can impair the normal counterregulatory hormonal responses that guard against hypoglycemia, leading to hypoglycemia unawareness. This pathological condition known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is the main adverse consequence that prevents individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus from attaining the long-term health benefits of tight glycemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the progressive loss of the epinephrine response to subsequent bouts of hypoglycemia, a hallmark sign of HAAF, are largely unknown. Normally, hypoglycemia triggers both the release and biosynthesis of epinephrine through activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) on the adrenal glands. We hypothesize that excessive cholinergic stimulation may contribute to impaired counterregulation. Here, we tested whether administration of the nAChR partial agonist cytisine to reduce postganglionic synaptic activity can preserve the counterregulatory hormone responses in an animal model of HAAF. Compared with nicotine, cytisine has limited efficacy to activate nAChRs and stimulate epinephrine release and synthesis. We evaluated adrenal catecholamine production and secretion in nondiabetic rats subjected to two daily episodes of hypoglycemia for 3 days, followed by a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp on day 4. Recurrent hypoglycemia decreased epinephrine responses, and this was associated with suppressed TH mRNA induction (a measure of adrenal catecholamine synthetic capacity). Treatment with cytisine improved glucagon responses as well as epinephrine release and production in recurrently hypoglycemic animals. These data suggest that pharmacological manipulation of ganglionic nAChRs may be promising as a translational adjunctive therapy to avoid HAAF in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Does orthostatic stress influence the neuroendocrine response to subsequent hypoglycemia in humans?

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Koska, J; Kvetnansky, R; Jezova, D; Huckova, M; Vigas, M; Macho, L

    2004-06-01

    Neuroendocrine response to stress stimuli is influenced by previous stimuli of different nature. The aim of the study was to test whether antecedent orthostatic stress may affect the neuroendocrine response to subsequent hypoglycemia. A group of 12 (6 men, 6 women) nonobese, healthy volunteers aged 19 to 27 y (mean 24 +/- 0.8) participated in the study in two sessions: controlled insulin-induced hypoglycemia to 2.7 mmol/L for 15 min either with or without antecedent orthostatic stress (30 min of 60 degrees head-up tilt before insulin administration). Orthostatic stress caused a significant decrease in plasma volume (-9.6%; P < 0.001) and a significant increase in plasma renin activity, aldosterone, norepinephrine (P < 0.01), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations (P < 0.05) in all subjects. Growth hormone response to hypoglycemia was diminished in women (P < 0.01). The epinephrine response to hypoglycemia was diminished in women in comparison to men (P < 0.001), but was unaffected by antecedent orthostatic stress. Hypoglycemia failed to induce the ACTH release after its elevation during orthostatic stress. ACTH response to moderate hypoglycemia without previous orthostatic stress was evident only in men in comparison to women (P < 0.05). We conclude that the epinephrine, growth hormone, and ACTH responses to hypoglycemia were diminished in women. Except ACTH, the neuroendocrine response to mild hypoglycemia was not affected by previous orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. In the case of ACTH, the first stress stimulus is consequential for the subsequent response of this hormone, probably due to short-loop negative feedback effects. PMID:15240417

  7. Vitamin D Deficiency Increases the Risk of Adverse Neonatal Outcomes in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Reichelt, Angela Jacob; Schmitt, Leonardo Rauber; Boff, Roberta; Oppermann, Maria Lucia Rocha; Camargo, Joiza Lins; Silveiro, Sandra Pinho

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and vitamin D deficiency have been associated with increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes but the consequences of both conditions simultaneously present in pregnancy have not yet been evaluated. Our objective was to study the influence of vitamin D deficiency in neonatal outcomes of pregnancies with GDM. Methods 184 pregnant women with GDM referred to specialized prenatal monitoring were included in this cohort and had blood sampled for 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurement. Vitamin D was measured by chemiluminescence and deficiency was defined as < 20 ng/mL. Participants were followed until puerperium and adverse neonatal outcomes were evaluated. Results Newborns of women with vitamin D deficiency had higher incidences of hospitalization in intensive care units (ICU) (32 vs 19%, P = 0.048), of hypoglycemia (any, 17.3 vs 7.1%, P = 0.039requiring ICU, 15.3 vs 3.6%, P = 0.008), and were more frequently small for gestational age (SGA) (17.3 vs 5.9%, P = 0.017). After adjustment, relative risk (RR) for hypoglycemia requiring ICU was 3.63 (95%CI 1.09–12.11) and for SGA was 4.32 (95%CI 1.75–10.66). The incidence of prematurity, jaundice and shoulder dystocia was no statistically different between groups. Conclusions In this cohort of pregnant women with GDM, vitamin D deficiency was associated with a major increase in the incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes such as SGA newborns and neonatal hypoglycemia. PMID:27764194

  8. Factors Associated with Nocturnal Hypoglycemia in At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Darrell M.; Calhoun, Peter M.; Maahs, David M.; Chase, H. Peter; Messer, Laurel; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Aye, Tandy; Clinton, Paula K.; Hramiak, Irene; Kollman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypoglycemia remains an impediment to good glycemic control, with nocturnal hypoglycemia being particularly dangerous. Information on major contributors to nocturnal hypoglycemia remains critical for understanding and mitigating risk. Materials and Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data for 855 nights were studied, generated by 45 subjects 15–45 years of age with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≤8.0% who participated in a larger randomized study. Factors assessed for potential association with nocturnal hypoglycemia (CGM measurement of <60 mg/dL for ≥30 min) included bedtime blood glucose (BG), exercise intensity, bedtime snack, insulin on board, day of the week, previous daytime hypoglycemia, age, gender, HbA1c level, diabetes duration, daily basal insulin, and daily insulin dose. Results: Hypoglycemia occurred during 221 of 885 (25%) nights and was more frequent with younger age (P<0.001), lower HbA1c levels (P=0.006), medium/high-intensity exercise during the preceding day (P=0.003), and the occurrence of antecedent daytime hypoglycemia (P=0.001). There was a trend for lower bedtime BG levels to be associated with more frequent nocturnal hypoglycemia (P=0.10). Bedtime snack, before bedtime insulin bolus, weekend versus weekday, gender, and daily basal and bolus insulin were not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. Conclusions: Awareness that HbA1c level, exercise, bedtime BG level, and daytime hypoglycemia are all modifiable factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia may help patients and providers decrease the risk of hypoglycemia at night. Risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia increased in a linear fashion across the range of variables, with no clear-cut thresholds to guide clinicians or patients for any particular night. PMID:25761202

  9. Hypoglycemia prediction using machine learning models for patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sudharsan, Bharath; Peeples, Malinda; Shomali, Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the occurrence of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes is a challenging task since these patients typically check only 1 to 2 self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) readings per day. We trained a probabilistic model using machine learning algorithms and SMBG values from real patients. Hypoglycemia was defined as a SMBG value < 70 mg/dL. We validated our model using multiple data sets. In addition, we trained a second model, which used patient SMBG values and information about patient medication administration. The optimal number of SMBG values needed by the model was approximately 10 per week. The sensitivity of the model for predicting a hypoglycemia event in the next 24 hours was 92% and the specificity was 70%. In the model that incorporated medication information, the prediction window was for the hour of hypoglycemia, and the specificity improved to 90%. Our machine learning models can predict hypoglycemia events with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. These models-which have been validated retrospectively and if implemented in real time-could be useful tools for reducing hypoglycemia in vulnerable patients.

  10. The Impact of Hypoglycemia on the Cardiovascular System: Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Wei; Park, Kyoung-Ha; Zhou, Yu-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Intensive glycemic control may increase cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality due to hypoglycemia. The pathophysiology of glucose counter-regulation in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes for over 15 years is characterized by impairment of the defense mechanisms against hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia causes pronounced physiological and pathophysiological effects on the CV system as consequences of autonomic system activation and counter regulatory hormones release. These effects provoke a series of hemodynamic changes that include an increase in heart rate and peripheral systolic blood pressure, a decrease in central blood pressure, reduced peripheral arterial resistance, and increased myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Cardiac electrophysiological changes including flattening or inversion of T waves, QT prolongation, and ST segment depression were observed in both insulin-induced and spontaneous hypoglycemia. Sympathoadrenal activation is the main cause of these changes through mechanisms that involve, but are not limited to, catecholamine-mediated hypokalemia. Hypoglycemia is also involved in platelet activation. There is growing concern about the long-term effects of hypoglycemia, especially as related to inflammation and atherogenesis.

  11. Increased Brain Lactate Concentrations Without Increased Lactate Oxidation During Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    De Feyter, Henk M.; Mason, Graeme F.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Petersen, Kitt Falk

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that brain metabolism of acetate is increased more than twofold during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic (T1D) subjects with hypoglycemia unawareness. These data support the hypothesis that upregulation of blood-brain barrier monocarboxylic acid (MCA) transport may contribute to the maintenance of brain energetics during hypoglycemia in subjects with hypoglycemia unawareness. Plasma lactate concentrations are ∼10-fold higher than acetate concentrations, making lactate the most likely alternative MCA as brain fuel. We therefore examined transport of [3-13C]lactate across the blood-brain barrier and its metabolism in the brains of T1D patients and nondiabetic control subjects during a hypoglycemic clamp using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Brain lactate concentrations were more than fivefold higher (P < 0.05) during hypoglycemia in the T1D subjects compared with the control subjects. Surprisingly, we observed no increase in the oxidation of blood-borne lactate in the T1D subjects, as reflected by similar 13C fractional enrichments in brain glutamate and glutamine. Taken together, these data suggest that in addition to increased MCA transport at the blood-brain barrier, there may be additional metabolic adaptations that contribute to hypoglycemia unawareness in patients with T1D. PMID:23715622

  12. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  13. Non-invasive biosensor and wilreless interrogating system for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Saukesi, K.

    2002-11-01

    Hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease in blood sugar - is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This paper presents the development of a non-invasive sensor with miniaturized telemetry device in a wrist-watch for monitoring glucose concentration in blood. The sensor concept is based on optical chiralit of glucose level in the interstitial fluid. The wrist watch consists of a laser power source of the wavelength compatible with the glucose. A nanofilm with specific chirality is placed at the bottom of the watch. The light then passes through the film and illuminates a small area on the skin.It has been documented that there is certain concentration of sugar level is taken by the intertitial fluid from the blood stream and deposit a portion of it at the dead skin. The wrist-watch when in contact with the outer skin of the human will thus monitor the glucose concentration. A wireless monitoring system in the watch then downloads the data from the watch to a Palm or laptop computer.

  14. Mechanisms of hypoglycemia unawareness and implications in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia unawareness (HU) is defined at the onset of neuroglycopenia before the appearance of autonomic warning symptoms. It is a major limitation to achieving tight diabetes and reduced quality of life. HU occurs in approximately 40% of people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and with less frequency in T2DM. Though the aetiology of HU is multifactorial, possible mechanisms include chronic exposure to low blood glucose, antecedent hypoglycaemia, recurrent severe hypoglycaemia and the failure of counter-regulatory hormones. Clinically it manifests as the inability to recognise impeding hypoglycaemia by symptoms, but the mechanisms and mediators remain largely unknown. Prevention and management of HU is complex, and can only be achieved by a multifactorial intervention of clinical care and structured patient education by the diabetes team. Less know regarding the impact of medications on the development or recognition of this condition in patients with diabetes. Several medications are thought to worsen or promote HU, whereas others may have an attenuating effect on the problem. This article reviews recent advances in how the brain senses and responds to hypoglycaemia, novel mechanisms by which people with insulin-treated diabetes develop HU and impaired counter-regulatory responses. The consequences that HU has on the person with diabetes and their family are also described. Finally, it examines the evidence for prevention and treatment of HU, and summarizes the effects of medications that may influence it. PMID:26185599

  15. Risk of hypoglycemia following intensification of metformin treatment with insulin versus sulfonylurea

    PubMed Central

    Roumie, Christianne L.; Min, Jea Young; Greevy, Robert A.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Hung, Adriana M.; Liu, Xulei; Elasy, Tom; Griffin, Marie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia remains a common life-threatening event associated with diabetes treatment. We compared the risk of first or recurrent hypoglycemia event among metformin initiators who intensified treatment with insulin versus sulfonylurea. Methods: We assembled a retrospective cohort using databases of the Veterans Health Administration, Medicare and the National Death Index. Metformin initiators who intensified treatment with insulin or sulfonylurea were followed to either their first or recurrent hypoglycemia event using Cox proportional hazard models. Hypoglycemia was defined as hospital admission or an emergency department visit for hypoglycemia, or an outpatient blood glucose value of less than 3.3 mmol/L. We conducted additional analyses for risk of first hypoglycemia event, with death as the competing risk. Results: Among 178 341 metformin initiators, 2948 added insulin and 39 990 added sulfonylurea. Propensity score matching yielded 2436 patients taking metformin plus insulin and 12 180 taking metformin plus sulfonylurea. Patients took metformin for a median of 14 (interquartile range [IQR] 5–30) months, and the median glycated hemoglobin level was 8.1% (IQR 7.2%–9.9%) at intensification. In the group who added insulin, 121 first hypoglycemia events occurred, and 466 first events occurred in the group who added sulfonylurea (30.9 v. 24.6 events per 1000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06–1.59). For recurrent hypoglycemia, there were 159 events in the insulin group and 585 events in the sulfonylurea group (39.1 v. 30.0 per 1000 person-years; adjusted HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.12–1.72). In separate competing risk analyses, the adjusted HR for hypoglycemia was 1.28 (95% CI 1.04–1.56). Interpretation: Among patients using metformin who could use either insulin or sulfonylurea, the addition of insulin was associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia than the addition of sulfonylurea. This finding should

  16. Risk factors for 30-day readmission following hypoglycemia-related emergency room and inpatient admissions

    PubMed Central

    Emons, M F; Bae, J P; Hoogwerf, B J; Kindermann, S L; Taylor, R J; Nathanson, B H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of diabetes treatment. This retrospective observational study characterized hypoglycemia-related hospital emergency room (ER) and inpatient (in-pt) admissions and identified risk factors for 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Research design and methods 4476 hypoglycemia-related ER and in-pt encounters with discharge dates from 1/1/2009 to 3/31/2014 were identified in a large, multicenter electronic health record database. Outcomes were 30-day all-cause ER/hospital readmission and hypoglycemia-related readmission. Multivariable logistic regression methods identified risk factors for both outcomes. Results 1095 (24.5%) encounters had ER/hospital all-cause readmission within 30 days and 158 (14.4%) of these were hypoglycemia-related. Predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission included recent exposure to a hospital/nursing home (NH)/skilled nursing facility (SNF; OR 1.985, p<0.001); age 25–34 and 35–44 (OR 2.334 and 1.996, respectively, compared with age 65–74, both p<0.001); and African-American (AA) race versus all other race categories (OR 1.427, p=0.011). Other factors positively associated with readmission include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, cardiac dysrhythmias, congestive heart disease, hypertension, and mood disorders. Predictors of readmissions attributable to hypoglycemia included recent exposure to a hospital/NH/SNF (OR 2.299, p<0.001), AA race (OR 1.722, p=0.002), age 35–44 (OR 3.484, compared with age 65–74, p<0.001), hypertension (OR 1.891, p=0.019), and delirium/dementia and other cognitive disorders (OR 1.794, p=0.038). Obesity was protective against 30-day hypoglycemia-related readmission (OR 0.505, p=0.017). Conclusions Factors associated with 30-day all-cause and hypoglycemia-related readmission among patients with diabetic hypoglycemia include recent exposure to hospital/SNF/NH, adults <45 years, AAs, and several cardiovascular and

  17. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  18. Bacteriological study of neonatal sepsis and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, R K; Rai, S K; Khanal, L K; Manda, P K

    2013-03-01

    Bloodstream infections in neonates are life-threatening emergencies. Identification of the common bacteria causing such infections and their susceptibility patterns will provide necessary information for timely intervention. This study was done to determine the prevalence of neonatal septicaemia, identify the bacterial isolates and study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH), Kathmandu, Nepal. This descriptive-analytical study was conducted in NMCTH from July 2011 to January 2012. Blood culture of all neonates who were suspected for neonatal sepsis was performed. Bacterial isolation, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done by standard microbiological method. Out of 120 neonates suspected of having neonatal sepsis, 30.8% (37/120) were blood culture positive (i.e. prevalence = 30.8%). The most common causative agents of neonatal sepsis was Staphylococcus aureus (56.8%; 21/37) followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (21.7%; 8/37), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.4%; 5/37) and others. Neonatal sepsis was more frequent in male neonates (32.5%) while (26.5%) in female neonates in the ratio of 1.2:1 (p > 0.05). Neonatal sepsis was significantly higher (58.3%) in low birth weight (LBW) (< 2.5kg) neonates compared with good birth weight (GBW) (23.9%) (< 0.05). Prevalence was higher in preterm neonates (57.8%; 11/19) as compared with term-babies (25.7%) (P = 0.05). Generally, all of the isolates were sensitive to most of the antibiotics used as the first line drugs like amikacin, gentamicin, cefotaxime and ampicillin except Acinetobacter baumannii. This organisms was only sensitive towards cotrimoxazole, azithromicin, cefotaxime and ceftazidime.

  19. Somatotropic, lactotropic and adrenocortical responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Bakosová, Jana; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Jezová, Daniela; Vigas, Milan

    2002-06-01

    Neuroendocrine mechanisms have been suggested to play an important role in the onset and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary functions in RA patients by measurement of hormone responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Insulin-hypoglycemia (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, i.v. as a bolus) was induced in 17 male patients and in 11 age-, gender-, and weight-matched healthy subjects. Concentrations of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and cortisol were analyzed in plasma. PRL release after thyreoliberin stimulation (TRH, 200 g, i.v.) was determined in 21 patients with active forms of RA and in 12 control subjects to evaluate pituitary lactotropic response. In RA patients, basal concentrations of glucose, GH, PRL, and cortisol were in the normal range and they were comparable to those in the control group. Stress of hypoglycemia induced significant elevation of GH, PRL, and cortisol concentrations in all groups. Cortisol responses to hypoglycemia were comparable in patients and in control subjects. GH release during hypoglycemia was increased (p < 0.05) and PRL response was attenuated (p < 0.05) in RA patients versus control subjects. After TRH administration, PRL response was the same in patients as in healthy subjects. In conclusion, the present study revealed an altered hypothalamic-pituitary function in patients with RA, namely, an enhanced somatotropic and reduced lactotropic activation in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Basal hormone levels and cortisol release during hypoglycemia were similar to those in healthy subjects. PMID:12114282

  20. Neonatal Klebsiella Septicaemia in Ibadan: Implications for Neonatal Care in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omokhodion, S. I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The antecedent events, clinical features, prevalence, and complications of neonatal Klebsiella septicaemia in 73 infants admitted to a special care baby unit in Nigeria are retrospectively reviewed and compared with those of 72 infants who had no risk factors for sepsis admitted to the same unit during the same period. A nosocomial acquisition of…

  1. Pyruvate kinase deficiency as a cause of extreme hyperbilirubinemia in neonates from a polygamist community.

    PubMed

    Christensen, R D; Eggert, L D; Baer, V L; Smith, K N

    2010-03-01

    Neonatal hemolytic jaundice is a risk factor for kernicterus. Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare cause of neonatal hemolytic jaundice, with a prevalence estimated at 1 case per 20,000 births in the United States, but with a higher prevalence among the Amish communities in Pennsylvania and Ohio. We discovered four neonates with PK deficiency born in a small community of polygamists. All four had early, severe, hemolytic jaundice. PK deficiency should be considered in neonates with early hemolytic, Coombs-negative, non-spherocytic jaundice, particularly in communities with considerable consanguinity. Such cases should be recognized early and managed aggressively to prevent kernicterus. PMID:20182430

  2. The best defense against hypoglycemia is to recognize it: is caffeine useful?

    PubMed

    Watson, J; Kerr, D

    1999-01-01

    Caffeine, 1,3,7trimethylxanthine, is used by 80% of the adult population of the world in its various forms. Even the simple pleasure of consuming this socially acceptable drug has implications for the person with diabetes mellitus. Caffeine may increase an individual's sensitivity to hypoglycemia through the combined effects of reducing substrate delivery to the brain via constriction of the cerebral arteries, whilst simultaneously increasing brain glucose metabolism and augmenting catecholamine production. This article summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that caffeine influences the perception of and physiological response to hypoglycemia. Under laboratory conditions, acute ingestion of caffeine markedly enhances the symptomatic and sympathoadrenal responses to hypoglycemia in both healthy volunteers and patients with type 1 diabetes. Recently a study of free-living people with type 1 diabetes showed that caffeine consumption increased the awareness of hypoglycemia. Caffeine has been associated with a number of negative effects and addiction. Most serious of these associations are ischemic heart disease and hypertension, the relationships have not been clearly established and the evidence to date is controversial. Thus we conclude that in modest doses, caffeine may be a useful adjuvant therapy for patients with hypoglycemia unawareness. For once here is a therapy which is inexpensive, safe, and remarkably popular with its consumers. PMID:11475292

  3. Hyperuricemia in glycogen storage disease type I. Contributions by hypoglycemia and hyperglucagonemia to increased urate production.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J L; Vinik, A; Faller, J; Fox, I H

    1985-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether hypoglycemia or the glucagon response to hypoglycemia increases uric acid production in glycogen storage disease type I (glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency). Three adults with this disease had hyperuricemia (serum urate, 11.3-12.4 mg/dl) and reduced renal clearance of urate (renal urate clearance, 1.1-3.1 ml/min). These abnormalities were improved in one patient by intravenous glucose infusion for 1 mo, suggesting a role for hypoglycemia and its attendant effects on urate metabolism and excretion. A pharmacologic dose of glucagon caused a rise in serum urate from 11.4 to 13.0 mg/dl, a ninefold increase in urinary excretion of oxypurines, a 65% increase in urinary radioactivity derived from radioactively labeled adenine nucleotides, and a 90% increase in urinary uric acid excretion. These changes indicate that intravenous glucagon increases ATP breakdown to its degradation products and thereby stimulates uric acid production. To observe whether physiologic changes in serum glucagon modulate ATP degradation, uric acid production was compared during saline and somatostatin infusions. Serum urate, urinary oxypurine, radioactivity, and uric acid excretion increased during saline infusion as patients became hypoglycemic. Infusion of somatostatin suppressed these increases despite hypoglycemia and decreased the elevated plasma glucagon levels from a mean of 81.3 to 52.2 pg/ml. These data suggest that hypoglycemia can stimulate uric acid synthesis in glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. Glucagon contributes to this response by activating ATP degradation to uric acid. PMID:2856925

  4. beta. -Receptor-mediated increase in cerebral blood flow during hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, B.R.; Bryan, R.M. )

    1987-10-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that {beta}-adrenergic receptor stimulation is involved with the increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during hypoglycemia. Rats were surgically prepared with the use of halothane-nitrous oxide anesthesia. A plaster restraining cast was placed around the hindquarters, and anesthesia was discontinued. Hypoglycemia was produced by an intravenous injection of insulin; normoglycemic control rates were given saline. Propranolol was administered to some control and some hypoglycemic rats to block the {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Regional CBF was measured using 4-(N-methyl-{sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine. Regional CBF increased during hypoglycemia in rats that were not treated with propranolol. The increase varied from {approximately}60 to 200% depending on the brain region. During hypoglycemia, propranolol abolished the increase in rCBF in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, and pyramidal tract. In other regions the increase in rCBF was only 33-65% of the increase in hypoglycemic rats that were not treated with propranolol. They conclude that {beta}-receptor stimulation plays a major role in the increase in rCBF during hypoglycemia.

  5. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining “normal” GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26918849

  6. Understanding the Construct of Fear of Hypoglycemia in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Vajda, Karen; Nyer, Maren; Clarke, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fear of hypoglycemia (FoH) can be a significant barrier to glycemic control in pediatric type 1 diabetes (T1D). This study aimed to explore underlying constructs of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) for parents (PHFS) and children (CHFS). Methods Data were aggregated from five studies of 259 youth with T1D and 250 parents. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to determine the underlying factors of the CHFS and PHFS. Results Similar four-factor solutions were found for the CHFS and PHFS. Both subscales consisted of two factors: Behavior Subscale (1) behaviors used to keep blood glucose (BG) high to prevent hypoglycemia (Maintain High BG) and (2) other actions to avoid hypoglycemia (Avoidance); Worry Subscale (1) concerns about helplessness (Helplessness) and (2) negative social consequences associated with hypoglycemia (Social Consequences). Conclusions These constructs provide a more comprehensive understanding of pediatric FoH and have implications for interventions aimed at reducing FoH in this population. PMID:25214644

  7. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  8. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining "normal" GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy.

  9. The impact of parents' sleep quality and hypoglycemia worry on diabetes self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality, possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships among parents' sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ≤ age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; one third of parents reported their overall sleep quality was "fairly bad" or "very bad." Hypoglycemia worry and parents' sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents' sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children's hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

  10. Neonatal Thrombocytopenia as a Consequence of Maternal Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kalagiri, Ram R; Choudhury, Saiara; Carder, Timothy; Govande, Vinayak; Beeram, Madhava R; Uddin, M Nasir

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (preE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension affecting a significant proportion of pregnant women worldwide and can cause detrimental effects in the mother and newborn. Some of the effects in the newborn include neonatal thrombocytopenia. Pertaining specifically to neonatal thrombocytopenia, several questions remain unanswered. Discussion According to the current literature, neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal preE is highly prevalent in the general population and the incidence is reported to be around 30% worldwide. This review gives an insight into the syndrome and summarizes the possible pathological mechanisms, the diagnostic approach, complications, and therapeutic interventions of neonatal thrombocytopenia. It also identifies the involvement of other cell lines, apart from platelets in the newborns. Furthermore, we suggest a future prospective study to investigate the pathogenesis of preE and plan a study involving animal models to come up with a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent preE and its various consequences in neonates. PMID:26929869

  11. Neonatal Thrombocytopenia as a Consequence of Maternal Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kalagiri, Ram R.; Choudhury, Saiara; Carder, Timothy; Govande, Vinayak; Beeram, Madhava R.; Uddin, M Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (preE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension affecting a significant proportion of pregnant women worldwide and can cause detrimental effects in the mother and newborn. Some of the effects in the newborn include neonatal thrombocytopenia. Pertaining specifically to neonatal thrombocytopenia, several questions remain unanswered. Discussion According to the current literature, neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal preE is highly prevalent in the general population and the incidence is reported to be around 30% worldwide. This review gives an insight into the syndrome and summarizes the possible pathological mechanisms, the diagnostic approach, complications, and therapeutic interventions of neonatal thrombocytopenia. It also identifies the involvement of other cell lines, apart from platelets in the newborns. Furthermore, we suggest a future prospective study to investigate the pathogenesis of preE and plan a study involving animal models to come up with a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent preE and its various consequences in neonates. PMID:26929869

  12. Manganese Neurotoxicity: A Focus on the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Keith M.; Thompson, Khristy; Aschner, Judy; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal found in all tissues, and it is required for normal amino acid, lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism. While Mn deficiency is extremely rare in humans, toxicity due to overexposure of Mn is more prevalent. The brain appears to be especially vulnerable. Mn neurotoxicity is most commonly associated with occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (> 1-5 mg Mn/m3) of Mn, consumption of contaminated well water, or parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with liver disease or immature hepatic functioning such as the neonate. This review will focus primarily on the neurotoxicity of Mn in the neonate. We will discuss putative transporters of the metal in the neonatal brain and then focus on the implications of high Mn exposure to the neonate focusing on typical exposure modes (e.g., dietary and parenteral). Although Mn exposure via parenteral nutrition is uncommon in adults, in premature infants, it is more prevalent, so this mode of exposure becomes salient in this population. We will briefly review some of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity and conclude with a discussion of ripe areas for research in this underreported area of neurotoxicity. PMID:17084903

  13. Effect of bilateral carotid body resection on cardiac baroreflex control of blood pressure during hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Taylor, Jennifer L; Mozer, Michael T; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A; Curry, Timothy B; Joyner, Michael J; Wehrwein, Erica A

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia results in a reduction in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity and a shift in the baroreflex working range to higher heart rates. This effect is mediated, in part, by the carotid chemoreceptors. Therefore, we hypothesized hypoglycemia-mediated changes in baroreflex control of heart rate would be blunted in carotid body-resected patients when compared with healthy controls. Five patients with bilateral carotid body resection for glomus tumors and 10 healthy controls completed a 180-minute hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic (≈3.3 mmol/L) clamp. Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were assessed. Baseline baroreflex sensitivity was not different between groups (P>0.05). Hypoglycemia resulted in a reduction in baroreflex sensitivity in both the groups (main effect of time, P<0.01) and responses were lower in resected patients when compared with controls (main effect of group, P<0.05). Hypoglycemia resulted in large reductions in systolic (-17±7 mm Hg) and mean (-14±5 mm Hg) blood pressure in resected patients that were not observed in controls (interaction of group and time, P<0.05). Despite lower blood pressures, increases in heart rate with hypoglycemia were blunted in resected patients (interaction of group and time, P<0.01). Major novel findings from this study demonstrate that intact carotid chemoreceptors are essential for increasing heart rate and maintaining arterial blood pressure during hypoglycemia in humans. These data support a contribution of the carotid chemoreceptors to blood pressure control and highlight the potential widespread effects of carotid body resection in humans.

  14. Case report on an infant presenting with hypoglycemia, and milky serum

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogesh Kumar; Prasad, Anushre; Kini, Pushpa; Naik, Prashant; Choprra, Deepti; Prabhu, Krishnananda

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old male baby who presented in a moribund condition with seizures was found to have hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia and milky serum. Serum triglycerides were markedly elevated (3 168 mg/dL) with cholesterol being 257 mg/dL and high density lipoprotein levels were low (19 mg/dL). The possibility of glycogen storage disease type I was considered in the diagnosis. Infants with glycogen storage disease type I may present like sepsis. The association of hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia and abnormal lipid profile stated above should alert the physician to consider glycogen storage disease type I in the diagnosis. PMID:23569924

  15. Influence of GLP-1 on Myocardial Glucose Metabolism in Healthy Men during Normo- or Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Gejl, Michael; Lerche, Susanne; Mengel, Annette; Møller, Niels; Bibby, Bo Martin; Smidt, Kamille; Brock, Birgitte; Søndergaard, Hanne; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Gjedde, Albert; Holst, Jens Juul; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard; Rungby, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may provide beneficial cardiovascular effects, possibly due to enhanced myocardial energetic efficiency by increasing myocardial glucose uptake (MGU). We assessed the effects of GLP-1 on MGU in healthy subjects during normo- and hypoglycemia. Materials and Methods We included eighteen healthy men in two randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over studies. MGU was assessed with GLP-1 or saline infusion during pituitary-pancreatic normo- (plasma glucose (PG): 4.5 mM, n = 10) and hypoglycemic clamps (PG: 3.0 mM, n = 8) by positron emission tomography with 18fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) as tracer. Results In the normoglycemia study mean (± SD) age was 25±3 years, and BMI was 22.6±0.6 kg/m2 and in the hypoglycemia study the mean age was 23±2 years with a mean body mass index of 23±2 kg/m2. GLP-1 did not change MGU during normoglycemia (mean (+/− SD) 0.15+/−0.04 and 0.16+/−0.03 µmol/g/min, P = 0.46) or during hypoglycemia (0.16+/−0.03 and 0.13+/−0.04 µmol/g/min, P = 0.14). However, the effect of GLP-1 on MGU was negatively correlated to baseline MGU both during normo- and hypoglycemia, (P = 0.006, r2 = 0.64 and P = 0.018, r2 = 0.64, respectively) and changes in MGU correlated positively with the level of insulin resistance (HOMA 2IR) during hypoglycemia, P = 0.04, r2 = 0.54. GLP-1 mediated an increase in circulating glucagon levels at PG levels below 3.5 mM and increased glucose infusion rates during the hypoglycemia study. No differences in other circulating hormones or metabolites were found. Conclusions While GLP-1 does not affect overall MGU, GLP-1 induces changes in MGU dependent on baseline MGU such that GLP-1 increases MGU in subjects with low baseline MGU and decreases MGU in subjects with high baseline MGU. GLP-1 preserves MGU during hypoglycemia in insulin resistant subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov registration numbers: NCT00418288

  16. Prevalence of Hypoglycemic Symptoms after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clare J.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Schweitzer, Michael; Magnuson, Thomas; Steele, Kimberley; Koerner, Olivia; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms among bariatric surgery patients. Design and Methods A questionnaire including the Edinburgh hypoglycemia scale was mailed to patients who underwent either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) at a single center. Based on the questionnaire, we categorized the patients as having high or low suspicion for post-surgical, postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms. Results Of the 1119 patients with valid addresses, 40.2% (N=450) responded. Among the respondents, 34.2% had a high suspicion for symptoms of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia. In multivariate analyses, in addition to female sex (p=0.001), RYGB (p=0.004), longer time since surgery (p=0.013), lack of diabetes (p=0.040), the high suspicion group was more likely to report preoperative symptoms of hypoglycemia (p<0.001), compared to the low suspicion group. Similar results were observed when the high suspicion group was restricted to those requiring assistance from others, syncope, seizure with severe symptoms or medically confirmed hypoglycemia (N=52). Conclusion One third of RYGB or VSG reported postprandial symptoms concerning for post-surgical hypoglycemia, which was related to the presence of pre-operative hypoglycemic symptoms. Pre-operative screening for hypoglycemic symptoms may identify a group of patients at increased risk of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia. PMID:25866150

  17. Effects of Acute Hypoglycemia on Working Memory and Language Processing in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kate V.; Pickering, Martin J.; Zammitt, Nicola N.; Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Traxler, Matthew J.; Frier, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of hypoglycemia on language processing in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty adults were studied (20 with type 1 diabetes and 20 healthy volunteers) using a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp to lower blood glucose to 2.5 mmol/L (45 mg/dL) (hypoglycemia) for 60 min, or to maintain blood glucose at 4.5 mmol/L (81 mg/dL) (euglycemia), on separate occasions. Language tests were applied to assess the effects of hypoglycemia on the relationship between working memory and language (reading span), grammatical decoding (self-paced reading), and grammatical encoding (subject-verb agreement). RESULTS Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span (P < 0.001; η2 = 0.37; Cohen d = 0.65) and a fall in correct responses (P = 0.005; η2 = 0.19; Cohen d = 0.41). On the self-paced reading test, the reading time for the first sentence fragment increased during hypoglycemia (P = 0.039; η2 = 0.11; Cohen d = 0.25). For the reading of the next fragment, hypoglycemia affected the healthy volunteer group more than the adults with type 1 diabetes (P = 0.03; η2 = 0.12; Cohen d = 0.25). However, hypoglycemia did not significantly affect the number of errors in sentence comprehension or the time taken to answer questions. Hypoglycemia caused a deterioration of subject-verb agreement (correct responses: P = 0.011; η2 = 0.159; Cohen d = 0.31). CONCLUSIONS Hypoglycemia caused a significant deterioration in reading span and in the accuracy of subject-verb agreement, both of which are practical aspects of language involved in its everyday use. Language processing is therefore impaired during moderate hypoglycemia. PMID:25758768

  18. Neonatal leukaemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Handler, M Z; Schwartz, R A

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal leukaemia cutis is a significant neoplasm that may represent a cutaneous manifestation of systemic leukaemia, usually of myeloblastic type. Rarely, it may be or appear to be limited to skin, in which case it is called neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis. By definition, it presents within the first 4 weeks of life and often has a 'blueberry muffin baby' appearance of magenta coloured nodules affecting almost any area of the skin, usually sparing mucous membranes, palms and soles. This clinical pattern is more commonly associated with neonatal infections such rubella and toxoplasmosis, and may be evident with other neonatal neoplasms such as neuroblastoma. Due to the morbidity associated with chemotherapy and reported cases of spontaneous remission without systemic progression in those with neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis without 11q23 translocation, the authors not treating the child with chemotherapy, but to simply monitor for fading of the violaceous nodules, and watch for possible signs of systemic leukaemia.

  19. Minimizing morbidity of hypoglycemia in diabetes: A review of mini-dose glucagon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 1 diabetes is a common chronic disease of childhood and one of the most difficult conditions to manage. Advances in insulin formulations and insulin delivery devices have markedly improved the ability to achieve normal glucose homeostasis. However, hypoglycemia remains the primary limiting fact...

  20. Acute Hypoglycemia Induces Painful Neuropathy and the Treatment of Coenzyme Q10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Ping; Mei, Shanshan; Yang, Jinfeng; Rodriguez, Yiliam; Candiotti, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain is reduced with tight glycemic control. However, strict control increases the risk of hypoglycemic episodes, which are themselves linked to painful neuropathy. This study explored the effects of hypoglycemia-related painful neuropathy. Pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was performed to explore the preventive effect of CoQ10 on hypoglycemia-related acute neuropathic pain. Two strains of mice were used and 1 unit/kg of insulin was given to induce hypoglycemia. Mechanical sensitivity of hindpaw withdrawal thresholds was measured using von Frey filaments. Blood glucose levels were clamped at normal levels by joint insulin and glucose injection to test whether insulin itself induced hypersensitivity. Results suggest that the increased mechanical sensitivity after insulin injection is related to decreased blood glucose levels. When blood glucose levels remained at a normal level by the linked administration of insulin and glucose, mice demonstrated no significant change in mechanical sensitivity. Pretreatment with CoQ10 prevented neuropathic pain and the expression of the stress factor c-Fos. These results support the concept that pain in the diabetic scenario can be the result of hypoglycemia and not insulin itself. Additionally, pretreatment with CoQ10 may be a potent preventive method for the development of neuropathic pain. PMID:26824041

  1. Leptin-inhibited PBN neurons enhance counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycemia in negative energy balance

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Goforth, Paulette B.; Sutton, Amy K.; Malec, Paige A.; Wong, Jenny-Marie T.; Germani, Mark; Jones, Justin C.; Rajala, Michael; Satin, Leslie; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Olson, David P.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Heisler, Lora K.; Myers, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia initiates the counter regulatory response (CRR), in which the sympathetic nervous system, glucagon, and glucocorticoids restore glucose to appropriate concentrations. During starvation, low leptin restrains energy utilization, enhancing long-term survival. To ensure short-term survival during hypoglycemia in fasted animals, the CRR must overcome this energy-sparing program and nutrient depletion. Here, we identify in mice a previously unrecognized role for leptin and a population of leptin-regulated neurons that modulate the CRR to meet these challenges. Hypoglycemia activates leptin receptor (LepRb) and cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), which project to the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Leptin inhibits these cells and Cckcre-mediated ablation of LepRb enhances the CRR. Inhibition of PBN LepRb cells blunts the CRR, while their activation mimics the CRR in a CCK-dependent manner. PBN LepRbCCK neurons represent a crucial component of the CRR system, and may represent a therapeutic target in hypoglycemia. PMID:25383904

  2. Intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas for complex pancreatogenous hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong; Sun, Yongliang; Si, Shuang; Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Liguo; Zhou, Wenying; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative localization and confirmation of complete resection of the hypersecreting tissue are the 2 main challenges in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Here, we report our experience with intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Clinical courses of 2 patients with biochemical evidence of a pancreatogenous hypoglycemia were studied. The preoperative diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) and nesidioblastosis, respectively. Rapid intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas was used to localize and confirm complete excision of the hypersecreting tissue. Hypoglycemia was successfully treated in both the patients. In the MEN-1 patient, 2 small tumors in the head of pancreas were not resected, as they were deemed noninsulin secreting by intraoperative portal vein insulin assay, thus avoiding a total pancreatectomy. In the patient with nesidioblastosis, using intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas, an appropriate amount of pancreatic tissue was resected thereby avoiding recurrence and diabetes. This technique may be of particular value in patients with complex conditions such as MEN-1 and nesidioblastosis, to localize and achieve complete resection of hypersecreting pancreatic tissue. PMID:27367988

  3. Embryotoxic effects of brief maternal insulin-hypoglycemia during organogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, T A; Schemmer, J K; Freinkel, N

    1986-01-01

    To test whether maternal hypoglycemia can impair organogenesis, we induced brief glucopenia with insulin in conscious pregnant rats during either the headfold stage or the early neural tube closure stage of embryogenesis. At each time, 10 pairs of animals received identical insulin infusions for 1 h. Half the animals were maintained at euglycemia during the infusions, while the others were allowed to become hypoglycemic. Euglycemia was maintained or restored in all animals immediately after the insulin was stopped. Spontaneous activity was diminished during the hypoglycemia but consciousness was preserved. Embryos were removed from mothers and examined 2 d later. This examination revealed that embryos from the hypoglycemic mothers were growth-retarded and displayed a small but significant incidence of gross developmental anomalies compared with embryos from the insulin-infused euglycemic mothers. Thus, brief, mild maternal hypoglycemia during early organogenesis can disrupt normal embryo development in the rat. The effect is due to the hypoglycemia per se rather than to the insulin employed for its induction. PMID:3528219

  4. Adrenomedullary response to hypoglycemia in first-degree relatives of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, J; Imrich, R; Penesova, A; Radikova, Z; Scipova, A; Vlcek, M; Vigas, M

    2008-12-01

    Our recent studies showed blunted adrenomedullary responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis, suggesting dysregulation of the adrenomedullary hormonal system (AMHS). Since no relationship has been found between degree of AMHS dysfunction and clinical or inflammatory parameters in those patients, we hypothesize the presence of an inherited perturbation of the AMHS. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated adrenomedullary responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (0.1 IU/kg) in premenopausal female subjects: 17 glucocorticoid-naïve RA patients, 15 healthy first-degree family members (FDR), and 18 age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Our results demonstrate that when compared to controls, RA patients had lower baseline epinephrine levels (P= 0.01) and lower area under response curve (AUC) levels of norepinephrine (P < 0.001) and epinephrine (P < 0.003). In contrast, FDR had lower (P= 0.001) AUC levels of norepinephrine compared to controls and higher (P= 0.033) AUC levels of epinephrine compared to RA patients. There were no significant differences in epinephrine response between FDR and controls. Although we found lower norepinephrine responses to hypoglycemia in FDR of RA patients, adrenomedullary responses to hypoglycemia does not appear to be altered to the degree found in RA patients. PMID:19120156

  5. Analysis of alternatives for insulinizing patients to achieve glycemic control and avoid accompanying risks of hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIALIN; XIONG, QIANYIN; MIAO, JUN; ZHANG, YAO; XIA, LIBING; LU, MEIQIN; ZHANG, BINHUA; CHEN, YUEPING; ZHANG, ANSU; YU, CUI; WANG, LI-ZHUO

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the efficacy of glycemic control and the risks of hypoglycemia with different methods of insulin therapy, and to provide reference data for the clinical treatment of diabetes. In this retrospective study, hospitalized patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between March and December 2014, in the Department of Endocrinology in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, were divided into three groups, including an intensive insulin analogue therapy group, a premixed insulin analogue treatment group and a premixed human insulin therapy group. The efficacy of glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemia were determined in each of the insulin treatment groups. Compared with the other treatment groups, the intensive insulin analogue therapy group was associated with superior blood glucose control, shorter time to reach standard insulin regimen, shorter hospitalization time, fewer fluctuations in blood glucose levels and lower insulin dosage on discharge from hospital. However, this treatment was also associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, when combined with the effective prevention of hypoglycemia and appropriate nursing care (especially in hospital care), intensive insulin analogue therapy may provide the greatest benefit to patients. PMID:26137223

  6. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  7. Altered Nrf2 Signaling Mediates Hypoglycemia-Induced Blood–Brain Barrier Endothelial Dysfunction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Ravi K.; Green, Kayla N.; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia impairs blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial function; a major hallmark in the pathogenesis of various CNS disorders. Previously, we have demonstrated that prolonged hypoglycemic exposure down-regulated BBB endothelial NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression; a redox-sensitive transcriptional factor that regulates endothelial function. Here, we sought to determine the functional role of Nrf2 in preserving BBB integrity and molecular mechanisms underlying hypoglycemia-induced Nrf2 down-regulation in vitro using human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3). Cell monolayers were exposed to normal or hypoglycemic (5.5 or 2.2mM D-glucose) media for 3-24h. Pharmacological or gene manipulation (by silencing RNA) approaches were used to investigate specific molecular pathways implicated in hypoglycemia-induced Nrf2 degradation. BBB integrity was assessed by paracellular permeability to labeled dextrans of increasing molecular sizes (4-70kDa). Silencing Nrf2 expression in hCMEC/D3 cells abrogated the expression of claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, while ZO-1 was up-regulated. These effects were paralleled by a decrease in electrical resistance of hCMEC/D3 monolayers and potential increase in permeability to all labeled dextrans. Hypoglycemic exposure (3-24h) led to progressive and sustained down-regulation of Nrf2 (without affecting mRNA) and its target, NQO-1, with a concomitant increase in the cytosolic pool of E3 ubiquitin ligase, Siah2 (but not Keap1). Pretreatment with protease inhibitor MG132, or selective knock-down of Siah2 (but not Keap1) significantly attenuated hypoglycemia-induced Nrf2 destabilization. While hypoglycemic exposure triggered a significant increase in BBB permeability to dextrans, silencing Siah2 gene abrogated the effects of hypoglycemia and restored BBB integrity. In summary, our data indicate a potential role for Nrf2 signaling in regulating tight junction integrity and maintaining BBB function. Nrf2 suppression by

  8. Clinical Profile and Biochemical Abnormalities of Neonatal Seizure at NICU of a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Hossain, M A; Yeasmin, L; Dutta, A; Ahmad, F; Khan, R H

    2016-07-01

    Seizures are most common neurological emergency in the neonatal period and present as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to clinicians worldwide. This prospective observational study was conducted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital from January 2015 to March 2015. Total 318 patients were enrolled in the study who presented with convulsion. Most of the patients were term (72.95%) and birth weight was normal (77.3%). Around 75% patients were delivered at home. Most common causes of convulsion were Perinatal Asphyxia (78%) followed by Septicemia, Hypoglycemia and Meningitis in order of frequency. Commonest type of seizure was subtle seizure (45.5%). Most of the patients recovered completely (73%) and 8.4% patients died due to complications. PMID:27612889

  9. GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Marta; Rodrigues, Pedro; Pereira, Sofia S; Nora, Mário; Gonçalves, Gil; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Wewer; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-prandial hypoglycemia is frequently found after bariatric surgery. Although rare, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), which occasionally are mixed hormone secreting, can lead to atypical clinical manifestations, including reactive hypoglycemia. Two years after gastric bypass surgery for the treatment of severe obesity, a 54-year-old female with previous type 2 diabetes, developed post-prandial sweating, fainting and hypoglycemic episodes, which eventually led to the finding by ultrasound of a 1.8-cm solid mass in the pancreatic head. The 72-h fast test and the plasma chromogranin A levels were normal but octreotide scintigraphy showed a single focus of abnormal radiotracer uptake at the site of the nodule. There were no other clinical signs of hormone secreting pNET and gastrointestinal hormone measurements were not performed. The patient underwent surgical enucleation with complete remission of the hypoglycemic episodes. Histopathology revealed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with low-grade malignancy with positive chromogranin A and glucagon immunostaining. An extract of the resected tumor contained a high concentration of glucagon (26.707 pmol/g tissue), in addition to traces of GLP1 (471 pmol/g), insulin (139 pmol/g) and somatostatin (23 pmol/g). This is the first report of a GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pNET presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass surgery. Although pNET are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the clinical approach to the post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia patient. Learning points pNETs can be multihormonal-secreting, leading to atypical clinical manifestations.Reactive hypoglycemic episodes are frequent after gastric bypass.pNETs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery. PMID:26266036

  10. Population-Based Study of Severe Hypoglycemia Requiring Emergency Medical Service Assistance Reveals Unique Findings

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Carter, Rickey E; Pattan, Vishwanath; Myers, Lucas A; Kumar, Hamit; Smith, Steven A; Russi, Christopher S; Levine, James A; Basu, Ananda; Kudva, Yogish C

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective is to report a contemporary population-based estimate of hypoglycemia requiring emergency medical services (EMS), its burden on medical resources, and its associated mortality in patients with or without diabetes mellitus (DM, non-DM), which will enable development of prospective strategies that will capture hypoglycemia promptly and provide an integrated approach for prevention of such episodes. Methods We retrieved all ambulance calls activated for hypoglycemia in Olmsted County, Minnesota, between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2009. Results A total of 1473 calls were made by 914 people (DM 8%, non-DM 16%, unknown DM status 3%). Mean age was 60 ± 16 years with 49% being female. A higher percentage of calls were made by DM patients (87%) with proportionally fewer calls coming from non-DM patients (11%) (chi-square test, p < .001), and the remaining 2% calls by people with unknown DM status. Emergency room transportation and hospitalization were significantly higher in non-DM patients compared to DM patients (p < .001) and type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to type 1 diabetes mellitus (p < .001). Sulphonylureas alone or in combination with insulin varied during the study period (p = .01). The change in incidence of EMS for hypoglycemia was tracked during this period. However, causality has not been established. Death occurred in 240 people, 1.2 (interquartile range 0.2–2.7) years after their first event. After adjusting for age, mortality was higher in non-DM patients compared with DM patients (p < .001) but was not different between the two types of DM. Conclusions The population burden of EMS requiring hypoglycemia is high in both DM and non-DM patients, and imposes significant burden on medical resources. It is associated with long-term mortality. PMID:22401324

  11. Insulin Delivery Into the Peripheral Circulation: A Key Contributor to Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Justin M; Kraft, Guillaume; Scott, Melanie F; Neal, Doss W; Farmer, Ben; Smith, Marta S; Hastings, Jon R; Allen, Eric J; Donahue, E Patrick; Rivera, Noelia; Winnick, Jason J; Edgerton, Dale S; Nishimura, Erica; Fledelius, Christian; Brand, Christian L; Cherrington, Alan D

    2015-10-01

    Hypoglycemia limits optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), making novel strategies to mitigate it desirable. We hypothesized that portal (Po) vein insulin delivery would lessen hypoglycemia. In the conscious dog, insulin was infused into the hepatic Po vein or a peripheral (Pe) vein at a rate four times of basal. In protocol 1, a full counterregulatory response was allowed, whereas in protocol 2, glucagon was fixed at basal, mimicking the diminished α-cell response to hypoglycemia seen in T1DM. In protocol 1, glucose fell faster with Pe insulin than with Po insulin, reaching 56 ± 3 vs. 70 ± 6 mg/dL (P = 0.04) at 60 min. The change in area under the curve (ΔAUC) for glucagon was similar between Pe and Po, but the peak occurred earlier in Pe. The ΔAUC for epinephrine was greater with Pe than with Po (67 ± 17 vs. 36 ± 14 ng/mL/180 min). In protocol 2, glucose also fell more rapidly than in protocol 1 and fell faster in Pe than in Po, reaching 41 ± 3 vs. 67 ± 2 mg/dL (P < 0.01) by 60 min. Without a rise in glucagon, the epinephrine responses were much larger (ΔAUC of 204 ± 22 for Pe vs. 96 ± 29 ng/mL/180 min for Po). In summary, Pe insulin delivery exacerbates hypoglycemia, particularly in the presence of a diminished glucagon response. Po vein insulin delivery, or strategies that mimic it (i.e., liver-preferential insulin analogs), should therefore lessen hypoglycemia. PMID:26085570

  12. Suspension of basal insulin to avoid hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pump

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Rodríguez-Cordero, Julia; Jiménez-Ortega, Angelines; Nóvoa, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Treatment with continuous s.c. insulin infusion (CSII) provides better glycemic control and lower risk of hypoglycemia than conventional therapy with multiple daily insulin injections. These benefits have been related to a more reliable absorption and an improved pharmacokinetic profile of insulin delivered through CSII therapy. However, even for patients treated with CSII, exaggerated postmeal hyperglycemic excursions and late postabsorptive hypoglycemia can still constitute a therapeutic challenge. Two female patients with type 1 diabetes who began treatment with CSII required to increase their previous breakfast insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio in order to achieve postprandial glycemic goals. However, they simultaneously presented recurrent episodes of late hypoglycemia several hours after breakfast bolus. Advancing the timing of the bolus was ineffective and bothersome for patients. In both cases, the best therapeutic option was to set a basal insulin rate of zero units per hour during 6 h after breakfast. Even so, they need to routinely take a midmorning snack with 10–20 g of carbohydrates to avoid late postabsorptive hypoglycemia. They have been using this insulin schedule for about 3 years without complications. The action of prandial insulin delivered through insulin pumps can be inappropriately delayed for the requirements of some patients. Although suspension of basal rate can be an acceptable therapeutic alternative for them, these cases demonstrate that new strategies to improve the bioavailability of prandial insulin infused through CSII are still needed. Learning points CSII remains the most physiologically suitable system of insulin delivery available today.Additionally, the duration of action of prandial insulin delivered through insulin pumps can be excessively prolonged in some patients with type 1 diabetes.These patients can present recurrent late episodes of hypoglycemia several hours after the administration of insulin boluses

  13. Suspected postprandial hypoglycemia is associated with beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity and emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Grimaldi, A; Landault, C; Cesselin, F; Puech, A J

    1994-11-01

    Suspected postprandial (reactive or idiopathic) hypoglycemia is characterized by predominantly adrenergic symptoms appearing after meals rich in carbohydrates and by their rare association with low blood glucose level (< 2.77 mmol/L). We studied heart rate, blood pressure, plasma insulin, C-peptide, and catecholamine responses during a 5-h oral glucose tolerance test in eight patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia and eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated beta-adrenergic sensitivity by using the isoproterenol sensitivity test. Psychological profile was assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R) self-report symptom inventory. Patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia had higher beta-adrenergic sensitivity (defined as the dose of isoproterenol required to increase the resting heart rate by 25 beats/min) than controls (mean +/- SEM, 0.8 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.86 +/- 0.25 microgram isoproterenol; P = 0.002). After administration of glucose (75 g) blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, plasma epinephrine, and plasma norepinephrine responses were identical in the two groups, but plasma insulin was higher in the patients (group effect, P = 0.02; group by time interaction, P = 0.0001). Both heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly higher (but remained in the normal range) after glucose administration in patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia than in controls (group by time interactions, P = 0.004 and 0.0007, respectively). After glucose intake, seven patients had symptoms (palpitations, headache, tremor, generalized sweating, hunger, dizziness, sweating of the palms, flush, nausea, and fatigue), whereas in the control group, one subject reported flush and another palpitations, tremor, and hunger. Analysis of the SCL-90R questionnaire revealed that patients had emotional distress and significantly higher anxiety, somatization, depression, and obsessive-compulsive scores than controls. We may

  14. Suspected postprandial hypoglycemia is associated with beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity and emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Grimaldi, A; Landault, C; Cesselin, F; Puech, A J

    1994-11-01

    Suspected postprandial (reactive or idiopathic) hypoglycemia is characterized by predominantly adrenergic symptoms appearing after meals rich in carbohydrates and by their rare association with low blood glucose level (< 2.77 mmol/L). We studied heart rate, blood pressure, plasma insulin, C-peptide, and catecholamine responses during a 5-h oral glucose tolerance test in eight patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia and eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated beta-adrenergic sensitivity by using the isoproterenol sensitivity test. Psychological profile was assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R) self-report symptom inventory. Patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia had higher beta-adrenergic sensitivity (defined as the dose of isoproterenol required to increase the resting heart rate by 25 beats/min) than controls (mean +/- SEM, 0.8 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.86 +/- 0.25 microgram isoproterenol; P = 0.002). After administration of glucose (75 g) blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, plasma epinephrine, and plasma norepinephrine responses were identical in the two groups, but plasma insulin was higher in the patients (group effect, P = 0.02; group by time interaction, P = 0.0001). Both heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly higher (but remained in the normal range) after glucose administration in patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia than in controls (group by time interactions, P = 0.004 and 0.0007, respectively). After glucose intake, seven patients had symptoms (palpitations, headache, tremor, generalized sweating, hunger, dizziness, sweating of the palms, flush, nausea, and fatigue), whereas in the control group, one subject reported flush and another palpitations, tremor, and hunger. Analysis of the SCL-90R questionnaire revealed that patients had emotional distress and significantly higher anxiety, somatization, depression, and obsessive-compulsive scores than controls. We may

  15. [Quality of life and hypoglycemia burden in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on basal-bolus insulin therapy].

    PubMed

    Ionova, T I; Odin, V I; Nikitina, T P; Kurbatova, K A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the observational program "Parameters of life quality, symptoms of hypoglycemia and treatment satisfaction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on basal-bolus insulin therapy" (2012-2014). The analysis included 1000 patients. It showed that their quality of life was below that of the general population due to compromised physical, role physical, and role emotional functioning (p < 0.001). Hypoglycemia is a serious challenge to the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on basal-bolus insulin therapy. They are characterized by impaired physical, psychological, and social functioning compared with the patients without hypoglycemic episodes (p < 0.01). Patients experiencing mild hypoglycemic episodes were not significantly different from those without them. In patients experiencing severe hypoglycemic episodes the quality of life was much worse (ES = 0.22-0.51). The profile of hypoglycemic episodes differed in different forms of hypoglycemia. The spectrum of symptoms and problems related to hypoglycemia was broader in patients with severe and/or nocturnal hypoglycemia. Patients free from hypoglycemia were less afraid of it than those used to have hypoglycemic episodes (p < 0.001). The stronger the fear, the more pronounced disturbances in social functioning, vitality, psychic and general health (p = 0.0001). It is concluded that evaluation of quality of life and hypoglycemia-related symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on basal-bolus insulin therapy allows for comprehensive estimation of the effectiveness of therapy on an individual basis. PMID:25782322

  16. Surgically cured hypoglycemia secondary to pleural solitary fibrous tumour: case report and update review on the Doege-Potter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalebi, Ahmed Y; Hale, Martin J; Wong, Michelle L; Hoffman, Tessa; Murray, Jill

    2009-01-01

    The association of paraneoplastic hypoglycemia [Doege-Potter syndrome] and finger clubbing [Pierre-Marie-Bamberg syndrome] with pleural solitary fibrous tumour is rare. We present a previously unpublished but typical example of this rare occurrence together with a detailed updated literature review of previously published cases of pleural SFT discussing the histopathology of SFT; pathophysiology of the hypoglycemia and finger clubbing; treatment and outcome of pleural SFT. The patient, a 57-year-old African male was admitted at our hospital with recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia. He was found to have digital clubbing and decreased breath sounds in the right lower chest but no other significant clinical findings. His insulin level measured during an episode of hypoglycemia was undetectable. Chest radiograph and CT-scan revealed a lobulated mass in the right chest which was diagnosed to be SFT on histology. Surgical excision of the mass resulted in cure of the hypoglycemic episodes and rapid regression of the clubbing. Less than 65 cases of pleural SFT manifesting with hypoglycemia with or without finger-clubbing have been published in the English literature. The mean diameter of these tumours manifesting with hypoglycemia is 20 cm, 54% being benign while 42% were malignant. They predominantly present in the 6th-8th decade, average age of 64 years and a slight male preponderance at 58%. Complete surgical resection remains the most important predictor of clinical outcome in terms of recurrence and metastases, while providing instant cure for the hypoglycemia and rapid resolution of the finger clubbing.

  17. Nateglinide is Effective for Diabetes Mellitus with Reactive Hypoglycemia in a Child with a Compound Heterozygous ABCC8 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Yorifuji, Tohru; Kanno, Junko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2012-07-01

    ABCC8 encodes the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) subunits of the beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel playing a critical role in the regulation of insulin secretion, and inactivating mutations in ABCC8 cause congenital hyperinsulinism. Recently, ABCC8 inactivating mutations were reported to be involved in the development of diabetes mellitus later in life. We report a girl who was born macrosomic with transient hypoglycemia and thereafter developed diabetes mellitus accompanied by severe reactive hypoglycemia at the age of 11 yr. An OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) revealed hyperglycemia due to poor early insulin response and subsequent hypoglycemia due to delayed prolonged insulin secretion. Hypoglycemia was improved by the combination of nateglinide, which stimulates early insulin secretion, and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, voglibose. Sequencing of the ABCC8 identified a compound heterozygous mutation (R1420H/F591fs604X), suggesting that this mutation may alter regulation of insulin secretion with advancing age, leading to diabetes mellitus with reactive hypoglycemia from hyperinsulinism. Therefore, long-term follow-up and periodic OGTTs are important for early detection of insulin dysregulation in congenital hyperinsulinism patients carrying the ABCC8 mutation, even though hypoglycemia resolves spontaneously during infancy. Furthermore, nateglinide may be useful therapeutically in the treatment of not only diabetes mellitus but also reactive hypoglycemia. PMID:23926410

  18. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  19. Neonatal hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Margaret A

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal hearing screening can be performed using reliable and reproducible methods. Intervention before the age of 6 months with hearing aids and appropriate educational support services will give the infant the best possible opportunity to develop language. Potential barriers to efficient implementation of a neonatal hearing screening program include access to appropriate and timely diagnostic and support services and insurance to cover the services. Without universal neonatal hearing screening, many children with hearing loss will be missed, which will have a direct negative impact on their speech, language, educational, and social development. PMID:12809324

  20. The future of neonatal BCG.

    PubMed

    Odent, Michel R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesise that neonatal BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) might be used to adapt to a new phase in the history of human births. Among most mammals, the placenta is not effective at transferring antibodies to the fetus: antibodies are transferred immediately after birth via the colostrum. Among humans (and other mammals with hemochorial placentas) the transplacental transfer of antibodies (namely IgG) is effective. In humans, foetal concentrations of IgG sub-classes approximate to maternal concentrations at 38weeks and continue to increase thereafter. These facts explain inter-species differences regarding the basic needs of neonates. Among most mammals, the early colostrum is, strictly speaking, vital. Among humans, the main questions are about the bacteriological environment in the birthing place and how familiar it is to the mother. Today, most human beings are born in unfamiliar bacteriological environments characterized by a low microbial diversity. The effects of clinical environments may be amplified by the use of antibiotics and birth by caesarean, i.e. by-passing the bacteriologically rich perineal zone. There is already an accumulation of data confirming that the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response is affected by the mode of delivery. There is also an accumulation of epidemiological studies detecting risk factors in the perinatal period for health conditions such as type 1 diabetes (and other autoimmune diseases), atopy, autism and obesity. In such a context there are reasons to plan randomized controlled trials with long term follow-up of the effects of BCG given immediately after birth, as a modulator of Th-1/Th-2 responses. A follow-up period in the region of 6-10years would be long enough to evaluate the prevalence of several nosologically well defined diseases. These studies would be ethically acceptable, since BCG is the only infancy vaccine that has been evaluated through randomised controlled trials with long term follow

  1. Assessment of Febrile Neonates According to Low Risk Criteria for Serious Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zarkesh, Marjaneh; Hashemian, Houman; Momtazbakhsh, Mohammad; Rostami, Tahereh

    2011-01-01

    Objective It is propounded that febrile neonates with low risk criteria (LRC) can be carefully observed without parenteral antimicrobial therapy; but yet, reliability of LRC to exclude serious bacterial infection (SBI) is uncertain. Methods The records of all febrile term neonates, seen in the emergency room and admitted in neonatal ward of 17 Shahrivar children's hospital of Rasht, Iran from January 2004 to January 2009 were reviewed. All of them underwent full sepsis workup. The prevalence of SBI in total population and LRC positive and negative neonates were calculated Findings A total of 202 records of previously healthy febrile neonates were evaluated. SBI was shown in 38 (18.8%). The most common type of SBI was urinary tract infection (UTI). Sixty-two (31%) neonates had LRC, and only one (1.6%) had SBI (UTI with E. coli). SBI was significantly more common in neonates without LRC (26.6% versus 1.6%, P<0.001). The negative predictive value (NPV) of LRC to exclude SBI was 98.4% (95%confidence interval: 96.7% to 100%). Conclusion These findings suggest that LRC may be relied upon to exclude SBI in febrile neonates. We propose that all febrile neonates be admitted, ill or LRC negative neonates should undergo a full sepsis work up and be administered systemic antibiotics immediately. LRC positive neonates should be under close observation. PMID:23056828

  2. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3-/-) mice. Most Slc52a3-/- mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3-/- mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3-/- fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  3. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3−/−) mice. Most Slc52a3−/− mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3−/− mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3−/− fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  4. [Neonatal herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    van Ham-Borawitz, Veronique E J; Stam, Edo D; Welborn, Kathleen M; Sas, Theo C J

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal encephalitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a familiar disease with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Isolated skin-eye-mouth infection is less familiar among professionals. In this article we present two neonates with an isolated skin lesion caused by an HSV infection. Of the neonates infected with HSV, 40-45% show isolated skin-eye-mouth disease. With correct treatment, the risk of spread to the central nervous system will decrease from 50-60% to 5-10%. Typical HSV skin lesions may present at a late stage of the disease or may be masked by a secondary bacterial infection. When a neonate presents with atypical skin lesions starting 7-12 days after the birth, immediate testing for HSV and immediate treatment are required, to decrease the risk of further progression of the disease.

  5. Drug Screening in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2016-01-01

    Gestational substance exposure continues to be a significant problem. Neonates may be exposed to various substances including illicit drugs, prescription drugs, and other legal substances that are best not used during pregnancy because of their potential deleterious effects as possible teratogens or their potential to create dependence and thus withdrawal in the neonate. Screening the newborn for gestational substance exposure is important for both acute care and early intervention to promote the best possible long-term outcomes. This column provides insight into what is known about the extent of substance use by pregnant women, an overview of neonatal biologic matrices for drug testing, and a discussion of the legal implications of neonatal substance screening. PMID:27636697

  6. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  7. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  8. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Scheans, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of readiness for neonatal resuscitation in low-risk maternity settings is challenging. The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) algorithm is a community standard in the United States; yet training is biannual, and exposure to enough critical events to be proficient at timely implementation of the algorithm and the advanced procedures is rare. Evidence supports hands-free leadership to help prevent task saturation and communication to promote patient safety. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation involves the addition of remote, expert NRP leadership (a NICU-based neonatal nurse practitioner) via camera link to augment effectiveness of the low-risk birth center team. Unanticipated outcomes to report include faster times to transfer initiation and neuroprotective cooling. The positive impact of remote NRP leadership could lead to use of telemedicine to support teams at birthing centers throughout the United States as well as around the world.

  9. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Pet, Gillian C

    2015-09-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This article explores some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury is discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  10. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons.

  11. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  12. Intentional hypoglycemia to control bingeing in a patient with type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart; Hall, Lacresha

    2015-02-01

    Most cases of eating disorders associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus are categorized as diabulimia, a disorder of withholding insulin treatment to lose weight through sustained hyperglycemia. In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with both type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa who has an atypical way of controlling her bingeing by keeping her blood sugars low. This pattern of intentionally sustained hypoglycemia has not been previously described in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Knowing various presentations of eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes can provide healthcare workers with enhanced ability in recognizing and educating at-risk patients, in the hope of preventing serious hypoglycemia or complications. Furthermore, a patient's awareness of complications associated with suboptimal control of diabetes, whether by overdosing or underdosing their insulin regimen, might lead to avoidance of disordered eating behaviours.

  13. A Parabrachial-Hypothalamic Cholecystokinin Neurocircuit Controls Counterregulatory Responses to Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Alastair S.; Shah, Bhavik P.; Madara, Joseph C.; Burke, Luke K.; Patterson, Christa M.; Flak, Jonathan; Neve, Rachael L.; Evans, Mark L.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Myers, Martin G.; Heisler, Lora K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hypoglycemia engenders an autonomically mediated counterregulatory (CR)-response that stimulates endogenous glucose production to maintain concentrations within an appropriate physiological range. Although the involvement of the brain in preserving normoglycemia has been established, the neurocircuitry underlying centrally mediated CR-responses remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that lateral parabrachial nucleus cholecystokinin (CCKLPBN) neurons are a population of glucose-sensing cells (glucose inhibited) with counterregulatory capacity. Furthermore, we reveal that steroidogenic-factor 1 (SF1)-expressing neurons of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (SF1VMH) are the specific target of CCKLPBN glucoregulatory neurons. This discrete CCKLPBN→SF1VMH neurocircuit is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of CR-responses. Together, these data identify CCKLPBN neurons, and specifically CCK neuropeptide, as glucoregulatory and provide significant insight into the homeostatic mechanisms controlling CR-responses to hypoglycemia. PMID:25470549

  14. Profound hypoglycemia-ınduced by vaccinium corymbosum juice and laurocerasus fruit

    PubMed Central

    Aktan, Ahmet Hamdi; Ozcelik, Abdullah; Cure, Erkan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Yuce, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    An emergency intervention was performed in a 75-year-old male patient with hypoglycemic attack and blackout. Although he was diagnosed with prediabetes before 2 years, he did not take any anti-diabetic drug or follow dietary advice. He drank Vaccinium corymbosum L (VC) juice daily with a belief that it increases sexual potency. Before the development of hypoglycemia, the patient had consumed about 500 ml VC juice in addition to eating 200-300 gram of Laurocerasus officinalis (LO) fruit. The measured plasma glucose (PG) level during loss of consciousness was 30 mg/dl. The profound hypoglycemia may be an unexpected side effect of an interaction between the chemical compositions of the two plants, occurred as a result of LO fruit intake that may have a strong PG-lowering effect or related to excessive intake of VC juice. Both plants may be considered in the alternative treatment of diabetes. PMID:25097289

  15. Secular Trends in the Clinical Characteristics of Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Severe Hypoglycemia Between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Tsugami, Emiko; Ando, Shigenori; Imai, Ayano; Matsumoto, Suzuko; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the trends in the clinical characteristics and prescriptions of type 2 diabetic patients with severe hypoglycemia because the prescription rate of antidiabetic agents has significantly changed recently. Methods A total of 193 patients with type 2 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia induced by antidiabetic agents between 2008 and 2013 were divided into three groups based on the period of visit: 2008 - 2009, 2010 - 2011 and 2012 - 2013. Results While the proportion of patients with severe hypoglycemia using insulin (from 55% to 74%), biguanides (from 6% to 20%), glinides, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors significantly increased, those using sulfonylureas (from 45% to 20%) significantly decreased. Errors of drug use significantly increased as a trigger of hypoglycemia in recent years. The number of antidiabetic agents (from 1.9 ± 0.6 to 2.3 ± 0.7), non-diabetic agents (from 2.3 ± 2.4 to 4.3 ± 3.3), and total drugs prescribed were significantly higher in recent years among patients receiving insulin therapy. Conclusions Polypharmacy especially in patients receiving insulin therapy and errors of drug use have increased in type 2 diabetic patients with severe hypoglycemia in recent years. Intensive education in the usage rule of drugs is considered to be important in order to prevent severe hypoglycemia. PMID:27635175

  16. The relationship of glucokinase activator-induced hypoglycemia with arteriopathy, neuronal necrosis, and peripheral neuropathy in nonclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, John C; Litchfield, John; Neef, Natasha; Schmidt, Stephen P; Shirai, Norimitsu; Walters, Karen M; Enerson, Bradley E; Chatman, Linda A; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A

    2014-06-01

    Glucokinase activators (GKAs) are being developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The toxicity of 4 GKAs (PF-04279405, PF-04651887, piragliatin, and PF-04937319) was assessed in mice, rats, dogs, and/or monkeys. GKAs were administered for 2 to 8 weeks. Standard endpoints, glucose, and insulin were assessed. All compounds produced varying degrees of hypoglycemia in all species. Brain neuronal necrosis and/or peripheral neuropathy were observed with most compounds. These findings are consistent with literature reports linking hypoglycemia with nervous system effects. Arteriopathy, mainly of cardiac vessels, was observed at a low frequency in monkey and/or dog. Arteriopathy occurred only at doses that produced severe and prolonged periods of repeated hypoglycemia. Since this lesion occurred in multiple studies with structurally distinct GKAs, these results suggested arteriopathy was related to GKA pharmacology. The morphological characteristics of the arteriopathy were consistent with that produced by experimental catecholamine administration. We hypothesize that the prolonged periods of hypoglycemia resulted in increased local and/or systemic concentrations of catecholamines via a counterregulatory and/or stress-related mechanism. Alternatively, prolonged hypoglycemia may have resulted in endothelial dysfunction leading to arteriopathy. This risk can be managed in human patients in clinical studies by careful glucose monitoring and intervention to avoid prolonged episodes of hypoglycemia.

  17. Secular Trends in the Clinical Characteristics of Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Severe Hypoglycemia Between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Tsugami, Emiko; Ando, Shigenori; Imai, Ayano; Matsumoto, Suzuko; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the trends in the clinical characteristics and prescriptions of type 2 diabetic patients with severe hypoglycemia because the prescription rate of antidiabetic agents has significantly changed recently. Methods A total of 193 patients with type 2 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia induced by antidiabetic agents between 2008 and 2013 were divided into three groups based on the period of visit: 2008 - 2009, 2010 - 2011 and 2012 - 2013. Results While the proportion of patients with severe hypoglycemia using insulin (from 55% to 74%), biguanides (from 6% to 20%), glinides, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors significantly increased, those using sulfonylureas (from 45% to 20%) significantly decreased. Errors of drug use significantly increased as a trigger of hypoglycemia in recent years. The number of antidiabetic agents (from 1.9 ± 0.6 to 2.3 ± 0.7), non-diabetic agents (from 2.3 ± 2.4 to 4.3 ± 3.3), and total drugs prescribed were significantly higher in recent years among patients receiving insulin therapy. Conclusions Polypharmacy especially in patients receiving insulin therapy and errors of drug use have increased in type 2 diabetic patients with severe hypoglycemia in recent years. Intensive education in the usage rule of drugs is considered to be important in order to prevent severe hypoglycemia.

  18. Hypoglycemia Prevention and User Acceptance of an Insulin Pump System with Predictive Low Glucose Management

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Birthe S.; Conget, Ignacio; Welsh, John B.; Vorrink, Linda; Shin, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The MiniMed 640G sensor-augmented insulin pump system (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) can automatically suspend insulin delivery in advance of predicted hypoglycemia and restart it upon recovery. The aims of this analysis were to determine the rate at which predicted hypoglycemia was avoided with this strategy, as well as to assess user acceptance of the system and its insulin management features. Subjects and Methods: Forty subjects with type 1 diabetes used the system for 4 weeks. We retrospectively evaluated performance of the system, using downloaded pump and sensor data, and evaluated user acceptance via questionnaires. Results: There were 2,322 suspend before low events (2.1 per subject-day). The mean (± SD) duration of pump suspension events was 56.4 ± 9.6 min, and the mean subsequent sensor glucose (SG) nadir was 71.8 ± 5.2 mg/dL. SG values following 1,930 (83.1%) of the predictive suspensions did not reach the preset low limit. Nadir SG values of ≤50 and ≤60 mg/dL were seen in 207 (8.9%) and 356 (15.3%) of the predictive suspensions, respectively. Blood glucose (BG) and SG values before and during the study were comparable (P > 0.05). The mean absolute relative difference between paired SG and BG values was 10.9 ± 13.8%. Subjects felt confident using the system, agreed that it helped protect them from hypoglycemia, and wished to continue using it. Conclusions: Automatic insulin pump suspension as implemented in the MiniMed 640G system can help patients avoid hypoglycemia, without significantly increasing hyperglycemia. PMID:26907513

  19. Serum estradiol but not gonadotropin levels decrease acutely after insulin-induced hypoglycemia in cycling women.

    PubMed

    Bing-You, R G; Spratt, D I

    1992-10-01

    Although corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) acutely suppresses gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in animal models, its effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in humans is not well defined. To further evaluate the acute effects of adrenal axis activation on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in humans, we employed a model of insulin-induced hypoglycemia to stimulate endogenous CRH secretion in eight cycling women. Serum samples were obtained immediately before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 120 min following iv insulin (0.15 U/kg) or saline injection. To ensure that the degree of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in our subjects was similar to that observed in severely ill patients with hypogonadotropism, serum cortisol (F) levels were also measured in a group of acutely ill patients selected to have hypogonadotropism. All women experienced symptomatic hypoglycemia after insulin injection. Differences between serum F levels in hypoglycemic vs. control sessions were evident at 30 min (P < 0.01) and maximum at 120 min (P < 0.0001) after insulin injection. Serum estradiol levels were significantly lower following hypoglycemia than during control sessions (P < 0.001). In contrast, serum LH and FSH levels were not significantly different between control and hypoglycemic sessions. Peak serum F levels in these hypoglycemic women were similar to F levels in critically ill patients with hypogonadotropism. These results demonstrate that stress and/or hypoglycemia can acutely decrease circulating estradiol levels. In addition, these data suggest that endogenous CRH does not play a major role in acute suppression of GnRH (over 2 h) in humans. Further studies are required to identify longer term effects of CRH on GnRH secretion which may be present in hypothalamic amenorrhea or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of critical illness.

  20. Severe Hypoglycemia Caused by Recurrent Sarcomatoid Carcinoma in the Pelvic Cavity: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chao; Fan, Chuan Wen; Yu, Yong Yang; Wang, Cun; Yang, Lie; Li, Yuan; Mo, Xian Ming; Zhou, Zong Guang

    2015-10-01

    Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by persistent, severe hypoglycemia in different tumor types of mesochymal or epithelial origin; however, NICTH is infrequently induced by sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC). Despite some sarcomatoid and epithelioid characteristics in few cases of malignancies from epithelium, NICTH induced by recurrent SC in pelvic cavity in this report is extremely rare.We report a case in which NICTH caused by recurrence and pulmonary metastases from SC in the pelvic cavity, and the computed tomography scan revealed multiple pelvic masses and multiple large masses in the pulmonary fields. During the treatment of intestinal obstruction, the patient presented paroxysmal loss of consciousness and sweating. Her glucose even reached 1.22 mmol/L while the serum glycosylated hemoglobin was normal and previous history of diabetes or use of oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin denied.The laboratory examination showed that the low level of insulin, C-peptide, and growth hormone levels in the course of hypoglycemic episodes suggesting to the diagnosis of hypoglycemia induced by nonislet cell tumor, and the decreased levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGFBP3 and the high expression of big IGF-II in the serum further confirmed the diagnosis of NICTH. Because of the widely pelvic recurrence and pulmonary metastases were unresected, the patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 weeks treatment with dexamethasone and glucose and unfortunately died 1 week later.NICTH caused by SC in the pelvic cavity is extremely rare case in clinical. The aim of this report was to present the importance to examine big IGF-II expression in patient's serum in order to reach the diagnosis of NICTH in cases of intractable cancer-associated hypoglycemia. PMID:26496258

  1. Solitary fibrous tumor in the pelvic cavity with hypoglycemia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Takeshi; Adachi, Iwao; Yamada, Tetsuji; Murakami, Nozomu; Morita, Katsuya; Yoshino, Yuji; Katayanagi, Kazuyoshi; Kurumaya, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    A case of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) in the pelvic cavity with hypoglycemia is reported. The patient was a 60-year-old man who was referred to our hospital for a closer examination of hypoglycemia. Computed tomography demonstrated a mass, measuring 14 x 9 cm in size, in the pelvic cavity. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the mass to have a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a high intensity on T2-weighted images. Laparotomy revealed no peritoneal dissemination nor lymph node metastasis. An en bloc excision of the tumor was performed with a good recovery, and the hypoglycemia disappeared. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle-shaped and oval cells in sarcoma, based on a moderate mitotic rate and cellularity. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for CD34 and negative for keratin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, S100 protein, c-kit protein, and epithelial membrane antigen. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed to be malignant SFT in the pelvic cavity.

  2. Exhaustion of Food Budgets at Month's End and Hospital Admissions for Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Bolger, Ann F.; Guzman, David; López, Andrea; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    One in seven US households cannot reliably afford food. Food budgets are more frequently exhausted at the end of a month than at other points in time. We postulated that this monthly pattern influenced health outcomes, such as risk for hypoglycemia among people with diabetes. Using administrative data on inpatient admissions in California for 2000–08, we found that admissions for hypoglycemia were more common in the low-income than the high-income population (270 versus 210 admissions per 1,000,000). Risk for hypoglycemia admission increased 27 percent in the last week of the month compared to the first week in the low-income population, but we observed no similar temporal variation in the high-income population. These findings suggest that exhaustion of food budgets might be an important driver of health inequities. Policy solutions to improve stable access to nutrition in low-income populations and raise awareness of the health risks of food insecurity might be warranted. PMID:24395943

  3. Exhaustion of food budgets at month's end and hospital admissions for hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Hilary K; Bolger, Ann F; Guzman, David; López, Andrea; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    One in seven US households cannot reliably afford food. Food budgets are more frequently exhausted at the end of a month than at other points in time. We postulated that this monthly pattern influenced health outcomes, such as risk for hypoglycemia among people with diabetes. Using administrative data on inpatient admissions in California for 2000-08, we found that admissions for hypoglycemia were more common in the low-income than the high-income population (270 versus 200 admissions per 100,000). Risk for hypoglycemia admission increased 27 percent in the last week of the month compared to the first week in the low-income population, but we observed no similar temporal variation in the high-income population. These findings suggest that exhaustion of food budgets might be an important driver of health inequities. Policy solutions to improve stable access to nutrition in low-income populations and raise awareness of the health risks of food insecurity might be warranted.

  4. Effect of simulated microgravity on endocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in physically fit men.

    PubMed

    Ksinantova, L; Koska, J; Kvetnansky, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M

    2002-03-01

    Adaptation to microgravity is associated with alteration in some endocrine functions. In the present longitudinal study, the counterregulatory hormonal response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT, 0.1 IU/kg short acting insulin i. v.) was evaluated under simulated microgravity conditions in 15 physically fit subjects. ITT was performed at the beginning of the investigation, and again after completion of 6 weeks of endurance training and after a subsequent period of 4 days of head-down bed rest at a backward tilt of 6 degrees from the horizontal. Endurance training showed a significant increase in maximal aerobic capacity in previously well-trained subjects (increase by 12 %), as well as on attenuation of counterregulatory response of epinephrine to hypoglycemia. After 4 days of bed rest, basal concentrations of plasma norepinephrine was diminished (p < 0.002) and plasma renin activity was enhanced (p < 0.02). After bed rest, decreased responses of the two catecholamines (norepinephrine, p < 0.001; epinephrine, p < 0.001), growth hormone (p < 0.001), and cortisol (p < 0.05) were observed. Response of plasma renin activity after bed rest was increased (p < 0.01). This longitudinal study indicated that 4 days of bed rest in endurance-trained subjects induced increased response of PRA to hypoglycemia and attenuation of other counterregulatory neuroendocrine responses. PMID:11972306

  5. Mild hypoglycemia associated with deterioration of mental efficiency in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C M; Atchison, J; Puczynski, S; Puczynski, M; Arslanian, S; Becker, D

    1990-07-01

    To assess the effects of mild hypoglycemia on cognitive functioning in diabetic children, we used an insulin glucose clamp technique to induce and maintain a hypoglycemic state. Eleven patients, 11 to 18 years of age, completed a series of cognitive tests during a baseline euglycemic state (100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L] and repeated those measures at the beginning and end of a hypoglycemic plateau (55 to 65 mg/dl (3.1 to 3.6 mmol/L], and again at restoration of euglycemia. At plasma glucose levels of 60 to 65 mg/dl (3.3 to 3.6 mmol/L), a significant decline in mental efficiency was found. This was most apparent on measures of mental "flexibility" (Trial Making Test) and on measures that required planning and decision making, attention to detail, and rapid responding. Moreover, complete recovery of cognitive function was not contemporaneous with restoration of euglycemia, particularly on those tests requiring rapid responding and decision making (choice reaction time). Not all subjects showed evidence of cognitive impairment during hypoglycemia. The very high degree of intersubject variability suggests that, in addition to plasma glucose values, unknown physiologic variables are responsible for triggering cognitive impairments in school-aged youngsters with diabetes during an episode of mild hypoglycemia. PMID:2196358

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnant Women and Their Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Maryam; Chaman, Reza; Amiri, Mohammad; Ajami, Mohammad Esmaeil; Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Rohani, Hossein; Taghavi-Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Sadeghi, Erfan; Raei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is a worldwide problem. Studies have reported prevalence ranged 18-84% in pregnant women. Receiving adequate calcium and vitamin D during pregnancy period is necessary for calcium homeostasis, fetal growth and bone mineralization. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and their neonates in Shahroud city in the northeast Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 284 pregnant women and their neonates referred to Fatemiyeh Hospital of Shahroud were included. Blood samples of mothers and umbilical cords were collected during the delivery and were sent to laboratory in order to measure calcium and 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Findings: Amounts of Vitamin D insufficiency (20-30 ng/mL) and deficiency (<20 ng/mL) in (mothers, neonates) were found to be (60.2%, 48.9%) and (1.1%, 2.5%) respectively. Calcium deficiency (<8.5 mg/dL) was present in 33.5% of mothers and 25% of neonates. There was a weak correlation between maternal serum and cord blood 25-hydroxy vitamin D (r=0.12, p=0.053). Conclusion: More than half of the mothers and their neonates had some degrees of vitamin D deficiency. It is recommended to evaluate the nutritional status of vitamin D in pregnant women along with public health interventions to be carried out. PMID:27157170

  7. Illuminance of neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Moseley, M J; Fielder, A R

    1990-07-01

    We have measured the illuminance (brightness) of seven neonatal units during both the day and the night. When the units were lit solely by fluorescent tubes the mean illuminance was 348 lux (range 192-690). During the day the mean illuminance was 470 lux (range 236-905). The high dependency regions in four of the seven units were significantly brighter than the corresponding low dependency nurseries at all times. In two of these units there is a policy of reducing the amount of artificial light in the low dependency areas at night, and in these the normal mean illuminance was 50 lux. We have measured the general levels of illumination to which a neonate might be exposed; the ocular exposure to light of a neonate depends, however, on both physical and biological factors and more research is required before an accurate estimate can be made.

  8. Minimization of Hypoglycemia as an Adverse Event During Insulin Infusion: Further Refinement of the Yale Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Besterman, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The management of hyperglycemia in the intensive care unit has been a controversial topic for more than a decade, with target ranges varying from 80–110 mg/dL to <200 mg/dL. Multiple insulin infusion protocols exist, including several computerized protocols, which have attempted to achieve these targets. Importantly, compliance with these protocols has not been a focus of clinical studies. Methods: GlucoCare™, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared insulin-dosing calculator, was originally designed based on the Yale Insulin Infusion Protocol to target 100–140 mg/dL and has undergone several modifications to reduce hypoglycemia. The original Yale protocol was modified from 100–140 mg/dL to a range of 120–140 mg/dL (GlucoCare 120–140) and then to 140 mg/dL (GlucoCare 140, not a range but a single blood glucose [BG] level target) in an iterative and evidence-based manner to eliminate hypoglycemia <70 mg/dL. The final modification [GlucoCare 140(B)] includes the addition of bolus insulin “midprotocol” during an insulin infusion to reduce peak insulin rates for insulin-resistant patients. This study examined the results of these protocol modifications and evaluated the role of compliance with the protocol in the incidence of hypoglycemia <70 mg/dL. Results: Protocol modifications resulted in mean BG levels of 133.4, 136.4, 143.8, and 146.4 mg/dL and hypoglycemic BG readings <70 mg/dL of 0.998%, 0.367%, 0.256%, and 0.04% for the 100–140, 120–140, 140, and 140(B) protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Adherence to the glucose check interval significantly reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001). Protocol modifications led to a reduction in peak insulin infusion rates (P < 0.001) and the need for dextrose-containing boluses (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that refinements in protocol design can improve glucose control in critically ill patients and that the use of

  9. Restoration of Self-Awareness of Hypoglycemia in Adults With Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leelarathna, Lalantha; Little, Stuart A.; Walkinshaw, Emma; Tan, Horng Kai; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Lane, Annette P.; Chadwick, Thomas; Marshall, Sally M.; Speight, Jane; Flanagan, Daniel; Heller, Simon R.; Shaw, James A.M.; Evans, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) and defective counterregulation significantly increase severe hypoglycemia risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We evaluated restoration of IAH/defective counterregulation by a treatment strategy targeted at hypoglycemia avoidance in adults with T1D with IAH (Gold score ≥4) participating in the U.K.-based multicenter HypoCOMPaSS randomized controlled trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighteen subjects with T1D and IAH (mean ± SD age 50 ± 9 years, T1D duration 35 ± 10 years, HbA1c 8.1 ± 1.0% [65 ± 10.9 mmol/mol]) underwent stepped hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic clamp studies before and after a 6-month intervention. The intervention comprised the HypoCOMPaSS education tool in all and randomized allocation, in a 2 × 2 factorial study design, to multiple daily insulin analog injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy and conventional glucose monitoring or real-time continuous glucose monitoring. Symptoms, cognitive function, and counterregulatory hormones were measured at each glucose plateau (5.0, 3.8, 3.4, 2.8, and 2.4 mmol/L), with each step lasting 40 min with subjects kept blinded to their actual glucose value throughout clamp studies. RESULTS After intervention, glucose concentrations at which subjects first felt hypoglycemic increased (mean ± SE from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 3.1 ± 0.2 mmol/L, P = 0.02), and symptom and plasma metanephrine responses to hypoglycemia were higher (median area under curve for symptoms, 580 [interquartile range {IQR} 420–780] vs. 710 [460–1,260], P = 0.02; metanephrine, 2,412 [−3,026 to 7,279] vs. 5,180 [−771 to 11,513], P = 0.01). Glycemic threshold for deterioration of cognitive function measured by four-choice reaction time was unchanged, while the color-word Stroop test showed a degree of adaptation. CONCLUSIONS Even in long-standing T1D, IAH and defective counterregulation may be improved by a clinical strategy aimed at hypoglycemia avoidance. PMID:24130355

  10. Repeated Episodes of Hypoglycemia as a Potential Aggravating Factor for Preclinical Atherosclerosis in Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Giménez, Marga; Gilabert, Rosa; Monteagudo, Joan; Alonso, Anna; Casamitjana, Roser; Paré, Carles; Conget, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate through early preclinical atherosclerosis assessment whether repeated episodes of hypoglycemia represent an aggravating factor for macrovascular disease in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After sample-size calculation, a case-control study of 25 patients with type 1 diabetes and repeated severe/nonsevere hypoglycemia (H-group) compared with 20 age- and sex-matched type 1 diabetes control subjects (C-group) was designed. Assessment of preclinical atherosclerosis consisted of flow-mediated brachial dilatation (FMD) and carotid and femoral intima-media thickness (IMT) studies. To consider hypoglycemia awareness, two different questionnaires and symptomatic response to an acute induction to hypoglycemia were used. Evaluation of the glycemic profile was obtained from continuous glucose monitoring. Endothelial function/inflammation markers were measured in euglycemia/hypoglycemia. A multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to test whether repeated hypoglycemia was independently associated with atherosclerosis. RESULTS H-group subjects displayed hypoglycemia unawareness and presented a higher percentage of continuous glucose values and area under the curve <70 mg/dl compared with the C-group (14.2 ± 8.9 vs. 6.3 ± 7.1%, P < 0.02 and 2.4 ± 1.8 vs. 0.6 ± 1.0 mg/dl/day, P < 0.01). The percentage of maximal FMD was lower in the H-group than in the C-group (6.52 ± 2.92 vs. 8.62 ± 3.13%, P < 0.05). A significantly higher IMT was observed at both carotid and femoral sites in the H-group (carotid 0.53 ± 0.09 vs. 0.47 ± 0.08 mm, P < 0.05 and femoral 0.51 ± 0.17 vs. 0.39 ± 0.09 mm, P < 0.05). Baseline inflammation and endothelial function markers were higher in the H-group (leukocytes 7.0 ± 1.8 vs. 5.6 ± 1.4 × 103/ml, von Willebrand factor 119 ± 29 vs. 93 ± 26%, fibrinogen 2.82 ± 0.64 vs. 2.29 ± 0.44g/l, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 408 ± 224 vs. 296 ± 95 ng/ml; P < 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS In

  11. Obligate role for ketone body oxidation in neonatal metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Cotter, David G; d'Avignon, D André; Wentz, Anna E; Weber, Mary L; Crawford, Peter A

    2011-03-01

    To compensate for the energetic deficit elicited by reduced carbohydrate intake, mammals convert energy stored in ketone bodies to high energy phosphates. Ketone bodies provide fuel particularly to brain, heart, and skeletal muscle in states that include starvation, adherence to low carbohydrate diets, and the neonatal period. Here, we use novel Oxct1(-/-) mice, which lack the ketolytic enzyme succinyl-CoA:3-oxo-acid CoA-transferase (SCOT), to demonstrate that ketone body oxidation is required for postnatal survival in mice. Although Oxct1(-/-) mice exhibit normal prenatal development, all develop ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and reduced plasma lactate concentrations within the first 48 h of birth. In vivo oxidation of (13)C-labeled β-hydroxybutyrate in neonatal Oxct1(-/-) mice, measured using NMR, reveals intact oxidation to acetoacetate but no contribution of ketone bodies to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Accumulation of acetoacetate yields a markedly reduced β-hydroxybutyrate:acetoacetate ratio of 1:3, compared with 3:1 in Oxct1(+) littermates. Frequent exogenous glucose administration to actively suckling Oxct1(-/-) mice delayed, but could not prevent, lethality. Brains of newborn SCOT-deficient mice demonstrate evidence of adaptive energy acquisition, with increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase α, increased autophagy, and 2.4-fold increased in vivo oxidative metabolism of [(13)C]glucose. Furthermore, [(13)C]lactate oxidation is increased 1.7-fold in skeletal muscle of Oxct1(-/-) mice but not in brain. These results indicate the critical metabolic roles of ketone bodies in neonatal metabolism and suggest that distinct tissues exhibit specific metabolic responses to loss of ketone body oxidation. PMID:21209089

  12. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  13. Mode of Delivery in Premature Neonates: Does It Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Racusin, Diana A.; Antony, Kathleen M.; Haase, Jennifer; Bondy, Melissa; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite the current prevalence of preterm births, no clear guidelines exist on the optimal mode of delivery. Our objective was to investigate the effects of mode of delivery on neonatal outcomes among premature infants in a large cohort. Study Design We applied a retrospective cohort study design to a database of 6,408 births. Neonates were stratified by birth weight and a composite score was calculated to assess neonatal outcomes. The results were then further stratified by fetal exposure to antenatal steroids, birth weight, and mode of delivery. Results No improvement in neonatal outcome with cesarean delivery (CD) was noted when subjects were stratified by mode of delivery, both in the presence or absence of antenatal corticosteroid administration. In the 1,500 to 1,999 g subgroup, there appears to be an increased risk of respiratory distress syndromes in neonates born by CD. Conclusion In our all-comers cohort, replicative of everyday obstetric practice, CD did not improve neonatal outcomes in preterm infants. PMID:27468363

  14. Neonatal Near Miss: the need for a standard definition and appropriate criteria and the rationale for a prospective surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana P; Cecatti, José G; Serruya, Suzanne J; Almeida, Paulo V; Duran, Pablo; Mucio, Bremen de; Pileggi-Castro, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    In Latin American, there is currently a regional action with the main purposes of putting the concept of severe neonatal morbidity in practice and formulating proposals for interventions. A general overview of neonatal health conditions, including morbidity and mortality, is provided to update regional knowledge on the topic. An example of the development and implementation of the concept of maternal near miss is also provided, followed by results from a systematic review covering all previously published studies on Neonatal Near Miss. Finally, some proposals for building a common concept on the topic and for launching a prospective surveillance study are presented. A Neonatal Near Miss is a neonate who had a severe morbidity (organ dysfunction or failure) but who survived this condition within the first 27 days of life. The pragmatic criteria recommended to be used are as follows: birth weight below 1700 g, Apgar score below 7 at 5 minutes of life and gestational age below 33 weeks. As a proxy for organ dysfunction, the following management criteria are also confirmed: parenteral therapeutic antibiotics; nasal continuous positive airway pressure; any intubation during the first 27 days of life; phototherapy within the first 24 h of life; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the use of vasoactive drugs, anticonvulsants, surfactants, blood products and steroids for refractory hypoglycemia and any surgical procedure. Although this study starts from a regional perspective, this topic is clearly globally relevant. All nations, especially low and middle-income countries, could benefit from the proposed standardization.

  15. Reliability of Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Necessity of Repeating MRI in Noncooled and Cooled Infants With Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Miller, Steven P; Zwicker, Jill G; Xu, Qi; Wong, Darren S T; Roland, Elke H; Hill, Alan; Chau, Vann

    2016-04-01

    In cooled newborns with encephalopathy, although late magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (10-14 days of age) is reliable in predicting long-term outcome, it is unknown whether early scan (3-6 days of life) is. We compared the predominant pattern and extent of lesion between early and late MRI in 89 term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-three neonates (48%) were cooled. The predominant pattern of lesions and the extent of lesion in the watershed region agreed near perfectly in noncooled (kappa = 0.94; k = 0.88) and cooled (k = 0.89; k = 0.87) infants respectively. There was perfect agreement in the extent of lesion in the basal nuclei in noncooled infants (k = 0.83) and excellent agreement in cooled infants (k = 0.67). Changes in extent of lesions on late MRI occurred in 19 of 89 infants, with higher risk in infants with hypoglycemia and moderate-severe lesions in basal nuclei. In most term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy, early MRI (relative to late scan) robustly predicts the predominant pattern and extent of injury.

  16. Neonatal Near Miss: the need for a standard definition and appropriate criteria and the rationale for a prospective surveillance system

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana P; Cecatti, José G; Serruya, Suzanne J; Almeida, Paulo V; Duran, Pablo; de Mucio, Bremen; Pileggi-Castro,, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    In Latin American, there is currently a regional action with the main purposes of putting the concept of severe neonatal morbidity in practice and formulating proposals for interventions. A general overview of neonatal health conditions, including morbidity and mortality, is provided to update regional knowledge on the topic. An example of the development and implementation of the concept of maternal near miss is also provided, followed by results from a systematic review covering all previously published studies on Neonatal Near Miss. Finally, some proposals for building a common concept on the topic and for launching a prospective surveillance study are presented. A Neonatal Near Miss is a neonate who had a severe morbidity (organ dysfunction or failure) but who survived this condition within the first 27 days of life. The pragmatic criteria recommended to be used are as follows: birth weight below 1700 g, Apgar score below 7 at 5 minutes of life and gestational age below 33 weeks. As a proxy for organ dysfunction, the following management criteria are also confirmed: parenteral therapeutic antibiotics; nasal continuous positive airway pressure; any intubation during the first 27 days of life; phototherapy within the first 24 h of life; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the use of vasoactive drugs, anticonvulsants, surfactants, blood products and steroids for refractory hypoglycemia and any surgical procedure. Although this study starts from a regional perspective, this topic is clearly globally relevant. All nations, especially low and middle-income countries, could benefit from the proposed standardization. PMID:26735223

  17. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  18. Intimate partner violence, substance use, and adverse neonatal outcomes among urban women

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Lucea, Marguerite B.; Bullock, Linda; Sharps, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of intimate partner violence, substance use, and their co-occurrence during pregnancy and examines their associations with adverse neonatal outcomes. Study design Between February 2009 and February 2010, pregnant women receiving obstetrical care at three urban clinics were screened for intimate partner violence and substance use between 24-28 weeks gestation. A chart review was conducted upon delivery to assess for adverse neonatal outcomes of low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, and small for gestational age (SGA). Results Maternal and neonatal data were collected on 166 mothers and their neonates. Overall, 19% of the sample reported intimate partner violence during their pregnancies. Of the study's neonates 41% had at least one adverse neonatal outcome. Nearly half of the mothers reported using at least one substance during pregnancy. Women experiencing intimate partner violence had a higher prevalence of marijuana use than their non-abused counterparts (p < 0.01). Experiencing intimate partner violence was associated with a fourfold increase in having a SGA neonate (aOR = 4.00; 95% CI 1.58 – 9.97). Women who reported marijuana use had five times the odds of having a neonate classified as SGA (aOR = 5.16, 95% CI 2.24 – 11.89) or LBW (aOR 5.00; 95% CI 1.98 – 12.65). Conclusions The prevalence of intimate partner violence during pregnancy and substance use is high in urban mothers, the risks of which extend to their neonates. Pediatric providers are urged to routinely screen for both issues and recognize the impact of co-occurrence of these risk factors on poor neonatal and childhood outcomes. PMID:23485028

  19. Philip E. Cryer, MD: Seminal Contributions to the Understanding of Hypoglycemia and Glucose Counterregulation and the Discovery of HAAF (Cryer Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Optimized glycemic control prevents and slows the progression of long-term complications in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In healthy individuals, a decrease in plasma glucose below the physiological range triggers defensive counterregulatory responses that restore euglycemia. Many individuals with diabetes harbor defects in their defenses against hypoglycemia, making iatrogenic hypoglycemia the Achilles heel of glycemic control. This Profile in Progress focuses on the seminal contributions of Philip E. Cryer, MD, to our understanding of hypoglycemia and glucose counterregulation, particularly his discovery of the syndrome of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF). PMID:26604275

  20. The development of a neonatal communication intervention tool.

    PubMed

    Strasheim, Esedra; Kritzinger, Alta; Louw, Brenda

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal communication intervention is important in South Africa, which has an increased prevalence of infants born with risks for disabilities and where the majority of infants live in poverty. Local literature showed a dearth of information on the current service delivery and roles of speech-language therapists (SLTs) and audiologists in neonatal nurseries in the South African context. SLTs have the opportunity to provide the earliest intervention, provided that intervention is well-timed in the neonatal nursery context. The aim of the research was to compile a locally relevant neonatal communication intervention instrument/tool for use by SLTs in neonatal nurseries of public hospitals. The study entailed descriptive, exploratory research. During phase 1, a survey was received from 39 SLTs and 2 audiologists in six provinces. The data revealed that participants performed different roles in neonatal nurseries, which depended on the environment, tools, materials and instrumentation available to them. Many participants were inexperienced, but resourceful in their attempts to adapt tools/materials. Participants expressed needs for culturally appropriate and user-friendly instruments for parent guidance and staff/team training on the topic of developmental care. During phase 2, a tool for parent guidance titled Neonatal communication intervention programme for parents was compiled in English and isiZulu. The programme was piloted by three participants. Suggestions for enhancements of the programme were made, such as providing a glossary of terms, adapting the programme's language and terminology, and providing more illustrations. SLTs and audiologists must contribute to neonatal care of high-risk infants to facilitate development and to support families.

  1. Persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Mathew, P M; Young, J M; Abu-Osba, Y K; Mulhern, B D; Hammoudi, S; Hamdan, J A; Sa'di, A R

    1988-03-01

    Over a 3-year period, the diagnosis of persistent neonatal hyperinsulinism (PNH) was made in seven infants, from an unselected cohort of 18,726 births, all of Saudi Arabian origin. Thus the incidence of PNH was one in 2,675 births. The high incidence, associated consanguinity, and occurrence in siblings suggest that PNH may be inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder.

  2. Neonatal antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares Rolim, A M; Castro, M; Santiago, M B

    2006-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a clinical entity characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, adverse obstetric outcome and the presence of antibodies against phospholipids in serum or plasma. The objective of the present study is to describe a rare case of APS that occurred in a neonate born from a patient previously diagnosed as primary APS. A male, preterm born twin infant, whose mother had been diagnosed as primary APS, developed thrombocytopenia, livedo reticularis, pericardial effusion and thrombosis of the left subclavian and external jugular veins concomitantly with severe respiratory tract infection soon after his delivery, that culminated with his death two months after the birth, in spite of the large spectrum antibiotic therapy and all supportive measures. Laboratory findings included high titers of IgM anticardiolipin antibodies and moderate titers of IgG isotype and negative antinuclear antibody, configuring a case of neonatal APS. Neonatal APS is a rare clinical condition, with only a few cases described in the literature. Its occurrence may depend on the passage of antibodies through the placenta or, as it seems to have occurred in the present case, by the production of de novo antibodies by the fetus. The present case illustrates the necessity of a higher surveillance of the neonates born from mothers with primary APS or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) for the eventual development of such complication. PMID:16761506

  3. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  4. [Genetic syndromes recognizable in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a neonatal neurological lesion associated or not with dysmorphism or with a particular phenotype can be caused by a) prenatal infections (Group TORCH) toxic or teratotoxic agents (alcohol, cocain, antiepileptics, inhalants such as toluene, etc.), vascular defects or genetic anomalies; b) perinatal isquemic hypoxic lesions, infectious or metabolic disorders, etc. In this paper we analyze all entities of genetic origin neonatally recognizable by their phenotype which must be included in the differential diagnosis of all children neurologically compromised. In order to simplify the diagnosis, these entities will be divided according to the prevalence of the phenotype present at birth, dividing them into two large groups: 1) Genic alterations which include: Syndromes with characteristic facies and member malformations, Supra growth syndrome, Syndrome with neonatal growth deficit, Neuro-ectodermic syndromes, Syndromes with characteristic facies and ocular compromise, Syndromes with characteristic facies including those that bear MIM number, and 2) Chromosomal alterations (autosomal in number, mosaic, deletion, and sex chromosomes). The detection of these anomalies through phenotype studies involving congenital encephalopathies of genetic origin is of major importance because it will permit the orientation of specific diagnostic studies, the prevention of difficult and expensive maneuvers, and furthermore, it will offer adequate family counseling and control eventual complications.

  5. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  6. Ebstein's anomaly in neonates.

    PubMed

    Moura, C; Guimarães, H; Areias, J C; Moreira, J

    2001-09-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart disease abnormality in which the tricuspid valve leaflets do not attach normally to the tricuspid valve annulus. The effective tricuspid valve orifice is displaced apically into the right ventricle (RV), near the junction of the inlet and the trabecular parts of the RV. The authors present a retrospective study of the patients with Ebstein's anomaly admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, in the period between January 1993 and March 2000. There were ten patients, representing 0.24% of total neonates and 1.99% of total congenital heart disease admitted to the institution in the same period. Fifty per cent were male and only one case had prenatal diagnosis. Holosystolic murmur (100%) from tricuspid regurgitation and cyanosis (80%) were the most frequent clinical findings. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 90% of the neonates, with a "balloon-shaped" enlarged heart. The main electrocardiographic findings were right atrial enlargement (70%) and arrhythmias (40%). Apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve, to a maximum of 20 mm, and leaflets tethering to underlying RV myocardium were found in all patients. Tricuspid valve regurgitation was found in 90% (severe form in four cases). An atrial intracardiac shunt, mostly right-to-left, was also found in 50%. Digoxin was used (40%) to restore sinus rhythm. Fifty per cent of the neonates received intravenous prostaglandins. Two patients required a surgical procedure. Two patients died in the neonatal period. During the follow-up period (range 0.3-74.6 months), only one episode of supraventricular tachycardia was recorded. At present seven patients are clinically stable, three of them on medication.

  7. Management of Refractory Noninsulinoma Pancreatogenous Hypoglycemia Syndrome with Gastric Bypass Reversal: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Bhavana B.; Click, Benjamin; Eid, George; Codario, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a commonly performed, effective bariatric procedure; however, rarely, complications such as postprandial hypoglycemia due to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS) may ensue. Management of refractory NIPHS is challenging. We report a case that was successfully treated with RYGB reversal. Case Report. A 58-year-old male with history of RYGB nine months earlier for morbid obesity presented for evaluation of postprandial, hypoglycemic seizures. Testing for insulin level, insulin antibodies, oral hypoglycemic agents, pituitary axis hormone levels, and cortisol stimulation was unrevealing. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen was unremarkable. A 72-hour fast was completed without hypoglycemia. Mixed meal testing demonstrated endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (EHH) and selective arterial calcium stimulation testing (SACST) was positive. Strict dietary modifications, maximal medical therapy, gastrostomy tube feeding, and stomal reduction failed to alleviate symptoms. Ultimately, he underwent laparoscopic reversal of RYGB. Now, 9 months after reversal, he has markedly reduced hypoglycemia burden. Discussion. Hyperfunctioning islets secondary to exaggerated incretin response and altered intestinal nutrient delivery are hypothesized to be causative in NIPHS. For refractory cases, there is increasing skepticism about the safety and efficacy of pancreatic resection. RYGB reversal may be successful. PMID:26523235

  8. Single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for the treatment of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Shan; Li, Long; Cheng, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery as a surgical approach in treatment of pancreatic disease has recently been reported in adults. However, its application in persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) in children is limited. In this article, we report single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for the treatment of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. Between July 2011 and February 2015, the single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy was performed in three children with PHHI. All patients underwent (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT before the surgeries. The scans showed diffuse physiologic (18)F-FDOPA activity in entire pancreas. All patients were followed up. The levels of blood sugar and insulin were recorded postoperatively. The time required for surgery was 120-230 min, and blood loss was minimal. The hospital stay was 6 days. The duration of postoperative abdominal drainage was 4-5 days. The levels of fasting blood glucose after surgery were higher than those before surgery (4.38-8.9 vs. 0.54-1.8 mmol/L). The levels of fasting insulin after surgery were lower than those before surgery (2.4-5.5 vs. 14-33.3 uU/ml). The duration of follow-up was 4-46 months. During follow-up, the levels of blood glucose and insulin were normal in three patients. There was no recurrence of hypoglycemia after operation in all patients. Single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for children with PHHI is feasible and safe in well-selected cases in the experienced centers.

  9. Risk of Post-Gastric Bypass Surgery Hypoglycemia in Nondiabetic Individuals: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clare J.; Craig Wood, G.; Lazo, Mariana; Brown, Todd T.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Still, Christopher; Benotti, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective The epidemiology of post-gastric bypass surgery hypoglycemia (PGBH) is incompletely understood. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of PGBH among nondiabetic patients and associated factors. Methods A cohort study of nondiabetic patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) was conducted. PGBH was defined by any postoperative record of glucose < 60 mg/dL, diagnosis of hypoglycemia, or any medication use for treatment of PGBH. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to describe PGBH occurrence, log-rank tests, and Cox regression to examine associated factors. Results Of the 1,206 eligible patients, 86% were female with mean age of 43.7 years, mean preoperative BMI of 48.7 kg/m2, and a mean follow-up of 4.8 years. The cumulative incidence of hypoglycemia at 1 and 5 years post-RYGB was 2.7% and 13.3%, respectively. Incidence of PGBH was identified in 158 patients and was associated with lower preoperative BMI (P = 0.048), lower preoperative HbA1c (P = 0.012), and higher 6-month percent of excess body weight loss (%EWL) (P = 0.001). A lower preoperative HbA1c (HR = 1.73, P = 0.0034) and higher 6-month %EWL (HR = 1.96, P = 0.0074) remained independently correlated with increased risk for PGBH in multi-regression analysis. Conclusions The 5-year incidence of PGBH among nondiabetic individuals was 13.3% and was associated with a lower preoperative HbA1c and greater weight loss at 6 months following surgery. PMID:27225597

  10. Single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for the treatment of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Shan; Li, Long; Cheng, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Single incision laparoscopic surgery as a surgical approach in treatment of pancreatic disease has recently been reported in adults. However, its application in persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) in children is limited. In this article, we report single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for the treatment of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. Between July 2011 and February 2015, the single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy was performed in three children with PHHI. All patients underwent (18)F-FDOPA PET/CT before the surgeries. The scans showed diffuse physiologic (18)F-FDOPA activity in entire pancreas. All patients were followed up. The levels of blood sugar and insulin were recorded postoperatively. The time required for surgery was 120-230 min, and blood loss was minimal. The hospital stay was 6 days. The duration of postoperative abdominal drainage was 4-5 days. The levels of fasting blood glucose after surgery were higher than those before surgery (4.38-8.9 vs. 0.54-1.8 mmol/L). The levels of fasting insulin after surgery were lower than those before surgery (2.4-5.5 vs. 14-33.3 uU/ml). The duration of follow-up was 4-46 months. During follow-up, the levels of blood glucose and insulin were normal in three patients. There was no recurrence of hypoglycemia after operation in all patients. Single incision laparoscopic 90 % pancreatectomy for children with PHHI is feasible and safe in well-selected cases in the experienced centers. PMID:27473008

  11. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  12. Metastatic Secondary Fibrosarcoma of Bone Responsive to Repeated Courses of Ifosfamide and Associated With Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, N. Wilson; Bramwell, Vivien H. C.

    2003-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old man with secondary fibrosarcoma of bone, arising from a non-ossifying fibroma. He subsequently developed metastatic disease that responded to four successive chemotherapy courses, the last three using the same dose/schedule of single agent ifosfamide. Eventual rapid progression of a huge intra-abdominal mass was associated with the syndrome of extrapancreatic tumour hypoglycemia (EPTH). The clinicopathological behaviour of fibrosarcoma of bone, and the mechanism of EPTH are discussed. PMID:18521374

  13. Statistical survey of skin changes in Japanese neonates.

    PubMed

    Hidano, A; Purwoko, R; Jitsukawa, K

    1986-02-01

    We observed 5387 infants over 10 years in weekly visits to a neonatal ward and obtained the following frequency data on these skin changes: erythema toxicum neonatorum, 40.8%; perianal dermatitis, 18.9%; scrotal pigmentation, 15.2%; miliaria, 8.5%; and adnexal polyp of neonatal skin, 4.1%. The frequencies of the types of birthmarks were: mongolian spots, 81.5%; salmon patches, 22.3%; nevocellular nevi, 2.7%; port-wine stains, 2.1%; strawberry marks, 1.7%; café au lait spots, 1.7% (including a case of von Recklinghausen's disease); epidermal and sebaceous nevi, 0.3%; accessory auricles, 0.3%; and smooth muscle hamartomas, 0.2%. A positive relationship was observed between infant maturity and the prevalence of erythema toxicum neonatorum. Apart from candidiasis, neonatal skin infections were extremely rare. PMID:3952030

  14. [Neonatal lupus syndrome: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Levesque, K; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Le Guern, V; Le Bidois, J; Bessières, B; Brouzes, C; Le Mercier, D; Villain, E; Maltret, A; Costedoat-Chalumeau, N

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is associated with transplacental passage of maternal anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies. Children display cutaneous, hematological, liver or cardiac features. Cardiac manifestations include congenital heart block (CHB); endocardial fibroelastosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of CHB in newborns of anti-Ro/SSA positive women with known connective tissue disease is between 1 and 2% and the risk of recurrence is around 19%. Skin and systemic lesions are transient, whereas CHB is definitive and associated with significant morbidity and a mortality of 18%. A pacemaker must be implanted in 2/3 of cases. Myocarditis may be associated or appear secondly. Mothers of children with CHB are usually asymptomatic or display Sjogren's syndrome or undifferentiated connective tissue disease. In anti-Ro/SSA positive pregnant women, fetal echocardiography should be performed at least every 2 weeks from the 16th to 24th week gestation. An electrocardiogram should be performed for all newborn babies. The benefit of fluorinated corticosteroid therapy for CHB detected in utero remains unclear. Maternal use of hydroxychloroquine may be associated with a decreased recurrent CHB risk in a subsequent offspring. A prospective study is actually ongoing to confirm these findings.

  15. Prevalence of Low Birth Weight and Obesity in Central Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiei, M.; Ayatollahi, S. M. T.

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of low birth weight (LBW) and to document distribution of body mass index (BMI) at birth in Arak (central Iran) neonates of the 10,241 live neonates (5241 boys, 5000 girls, sex ratio 105) born in 2004 in Arak. A birth weight of less than 2500 g was classified as LBW. BMI based on the original supine length and weight…

  16. Do Clinical Standards for Diabetes Care Address Excess Risk for Hypoglycemia in Vulnerable Patients? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Seth A; Aragon, Katherine; Hines, Jonas; Seligman, Hilary; Lee, Sei; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether diabetes clinical standards consider increased hypoglycemia risk in vulnerable patients. Data Sources MEDLINE, the National Guidelines Clearinghouse, the National Quality Measures Clearinghouse, and supplemental sources. Study Design Systematic review of clinical standards (guidelines, quality metrics, or pay-for-performance programs) for glycemic control in adult diabetes patients. The primary outcome was discussion of increased risk for hypoglycemia in vulnerable populations. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Manuscripts identified were abstracted by two independent reviewers using prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria and a standardized abstraction form. Principal Findings We screened 1,166 titles, and reviewed 220 manuscripts in full text. Forty-four guidelines, 17 quality metrics, and 8 pay-for-performance programs were included. Five (11 percent) guidelines and no quality metrics or pay-for-performance programs met the primary outcome. Conclusions Clinical standards do not substantively incorporate evidence about increased risk for hypoglycemia in vulnerable populations. PMID:23445498

  17. Relative hypoglycemia of rectal insulin suppositories containing deoxycholic acid, sodium taurocholate, polycarbophil, and their combinations in diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hosny, E A

    1999-06-01

    In this study, insulin suppositories containing 50 U insulin incorporated with 50 mg of deoxycholic acid, sodium taurocholate, or both were placed in the rectum of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rabbits. A large decrease in plasma glucose concentrations was observed, and the relative hypoglycemias were calculated to be 38.0%, 34.9%, and 44.4%, respectively, compared with insulin subcutaneous (s.c.) injection (40 U). Insulin suppositories containing 50 mg polycarbophil alone or mixed with 50 mg deoxycholic acid produced relative hypoglycemia of 43.1% and 42.2%, respectively. The most pronounced effect was observed with the addition of polycarbophil to the suppository formulation containing a combination of deoxycholic acid and sodium taurocholate, which produced a 56% relative hypoglycemia compared with subcutaneous injection. These suppository formulations could be very promising alternatives to the current insulin injections, being roughly half as efficacious as subcutaneous injection.

  18. Predictors of Hypoglycemia in the ASPIRE In-Home Study and Effects of Automatic Suspension of Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Garg, Satish K.; Bergenstal, Richard M.; Klonoff, David C.; Bode, Bruce W.; Bailey, Timothy S.; Thrasher, James; Schwartz, Frank; Welsh, John B.; Kaufman, Francine R.; Brazg, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia varies between patients with type 1 diabetes and is the main obstacle to therapy intensification. We investigated known and potential risk factors for hypoglycemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Method: In the ASPIRE In-Home study (NCT01497938), a randomized trial of the threshold suspend (TS) feature of sensor-augmented insulin pump (SAP) therapy, subjects’ propensity to nocturnal hypoglycemia (NH) was established in a 2-week run-in phase and assessed in a 3-month study phase via continuous glucose monitoring. Categorical variables were tested for association with NH rates in both phases. Results: Elevated rates of NH were significantly associated with baseline A1C ≤7%, with bolus insulin deliveries unassisted by the bolus estimation calculator, and with assignment to the control group during the study phase. Conclusions: Routine use of the TS feature and the bolus estimation calculator are strategies that may reduce the risk of NH. PMID:25986629

  19. [Neonatal hearing screening].

    PubMed

    Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; van Straaten, H L; Ens-Dokkum, M H; Kauffman-de Boer, M A

    2000-03-25

    Approximately 1 to 2 per thousand live-born infants suffer from a serious perceptive hearing loss. Normal hearing from birth is essential for optimal human development (language and speech, social and emotional development, communicative skills and learning). The earlier the hearing loss is diagnosed the better the prognosis for the infant with a hearing impairment. Suitable methods are now available for neonatal hearing screening: automated measurement of auditory brain stem response and measurement of oto-acoustic emissions. Screening must be viewed as only the first step in a program of diagnosis, treatment and habilitation of these children. The ultimate goal of the implementation of neonatal hearing screening is: identification of bilateral hearing losses before the age of 3 months and start of therapy and counselling before the age of 6 months.

  20. Neonatal mortality in Meerut district.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Mishra, V N; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Chopra, H; Singh, R B

    1993-09-01

    A study of neonatal mortality in Meerut district revealed an infant mortality rate of 50.1 per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality accounted for 37.8% of infant mortality with a neonatal mortality rate of 19.0 per 1000 live births. 90.5% of these neonates were delivered at home largely by untrained personnel (57.2%). Only 28.6% of these neonates were treated by qualified doctors and only 30.9% of their mothers were fully immunized against tetanus. At least 2/3rd of neonatal mortality was due to exogenous factors with tetanus neonatorum and septicaemia being the principal causes of mortality each accounting for a mortality rate of 4.7 per 1000 live births. PMID:8112786

  1. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  2. Humane Neonatal Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Levin, A

    1999-04-01

    The author has worked for many years in experimental departments in the former Soviet health system. Now, with integration into the western health system, many questions are being asked about high-technology neonatal medicine and whether it is sufficiently humane. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) movement is well known all over the world, but unfortunately it is only used for healthy children in maternity hospitals. A paradoxical situation has been created: the routines of maternity wards comply with the BFHI, whereas a neonatal intensive care unit in the same hospital may not meet the requirements of the BFHI. BFHI mainly cover breastfeeding in maternity hospitals. Humane Neonatal Care Initiatives include minimum aggressive therapy, minimum contact between sick newborns and medical staff, and maximum contact with mothers; the number of tests and examinations should be reduced to a minimum. Eleven steps towards the improvement of psychosocial and medical care in units for sick newborns are presented. This article is intended to provoke serious discussion. PMID:10342526

  3. Pasteurella gallinarum neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, K; Sein, P P; Shahnawaz, M; Hoosen, A A

    2002-01-01

    A 4-day-old baby weighing 1.7 kg was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, Pretoria, with a history of apneic attacks. On examination there was an umbilical sepsis and the neonate was septicemic. The baby had been delivered at home and the umbilical cord had been cut by the grandmother using unclean scissors and chimney soot applied to the umbilical stump. On admission, a septic screen was done and antibiotic treatment was started with penicillin and amikacin. The investigations showed that the baby was slightly anemic, with hemoglobin levels of 10.0 g/dL (14.9-23.7 g/dL), and a pure growth of a Gram-negative bacillus was obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid, blood culture and suprapubic aspirate urine specimens. The Gram-negative bacillus was catalase and oxidase positive and it was identified as Pasteurella gallinarum. Antimicrobial profiling showed the organism to be susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, gentamicin and amikacin. Despite having received antimicrobial agents to which the etiological agent was susceptible, the neonate died within 5 days of admission. The cause of death was postulated to be due to overwhelming sepsis which resulted in septic shock. PMID:11906503

  4. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  5. Comparison of Glibenclamide and Insulin on Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Behrashi, Mitra; Samimi, Mansooreh; Ghasemi, Tayyebeh; Saberi, Farzaneh; Atoof, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Untreated or poorly controlled gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for mother and newborn. Glibenclamide is rarely used in treating mothers with this disease. This study aimed at comparing the effect of glibenclamide and insulin on neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 249 pregnant women aged 18–45 years within the 11th–33rd weeks of gestation with gestational diabetes, single fetus pregnancy, and in need of hyperglycemia treatment were entered and grouped randomly as either glibenclamide or insulin. In the insulin group (n = 129), insulin was administered with an initial dose of 0.2 IU/kg subcutaneously twice per day, whereas in the glibenclamide group (n = 120), 1.25 mg oral glibenclamide was administered once daily and increased if needed. Results: The results showed no significant difference in means age, gestational age, and body mass index between women in the two groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in the frequency of neonatal hypoglycemia, anomaly, hyperbilirubinemia, admission in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and neonatal respiratory distress between two groups. Macrosomia was lower in the glibenclamide group than the insulin group (3.3% vs. 13.2%, respectively, P = 0.005). Regression logistics model results showed that the type of treatment (odds ratio [OR]: 4.62; confidence interval [CI]: 1.45–14.02; P = 0.01) and gestational age at delivery (OR: 1.41; CI: 1.04–1.74; P = 0.01) were as predictor factors of macrosomia. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that glibenclamide is able to reduce the risk of fetal macrosomia without increasing neonatal anomalies, jaundice, hypocalcemia, infant respiratory distress, and NICU admission. PMID:27413519

  6. Functional Connectivity of Insula, Basal Ganglia, and Prefrontal Executive Control Networks during Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, Donald C.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Flores, Veronica L.; Siracusa, Tamar; Hager, Brandon; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jacobson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Human brain networks mediating interoceptive, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of glycemic control are not well studied. Using group independent component analysis with dual-regression approach of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we examined the functional connectivity changes of large-scale resting state networks during sequential euglycemic–hypoglycemic clamp studies in patients with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic controls and how these changes during hypoglycemia were related to symptoms of hypoglycemia awareness and to concurrent glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. During hypoglycemia, diabetic patients showed increased functional connectivity of the right anterior insula and the prefrontal cortex within the executive control network, which was associated with higher HbA1c. Controls showed decreased functional connectivity of the right anterior insula with the cerebellum/basal ganglia network and of temporal regions within the temporal pole network and increased functional connectivity in the default mode and sensorimotor networks. Functional connectivity reductions in the right basal ganglia were correlated with increases of self-reported hypoglycemic symptoms in controls but not in patients. Resting state networks that showed different group functional connectivity during hypoglycemia may be most sensitive to glycemic environment, and their connectivity patterns may have adapted to repeated glycemic excursions present in type 1 diabetes. Our results suggest that basal ganglia and insula mediation of interoceptive awareness during hypoglycemia is altered in type 1 diabetes. These changes could be neuroplastic adaptations to frequent hypoglycemic experiences. Functional connectivity changes in the insula and prefrontal cognitive networks could also reflect an adaptation to changes in brain metabolic pathways associated with chronic hyperglycemia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The major factor limiting improved glucose control in type 1 diabetes is

  7. Alterations in clinical, hematological and metabolic variables in bovine neonatal endotoxemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gerros, T C; Semrad, S D; Proctor, R A

    1995-01-01

    Endotoxemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonate. Although many models are used to study the problem, none completely simulates the natural disease. To more clearly define a bovine neonatal endotoxemia model we studied the effects of dose of endotoxin on clinical, hematological and biochemical variables. Thirty-four neonatal calves were administered Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS) at 0 (0.9% saline solution), 0.2, 2.0 or 20 micrograms/kg, by either IV bolus or infusion over 50 minutes. Variables monitored included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), leukocyte (WBC) count, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations and clinical status. All LPS-treated calves displayed similar clinical signs within one hour. Dose-dependent differences in response to LPS among groups became evident over time. Substantial dose-dependent changes in attitude, appetite, mucous membrane character, capillary refill time, MAP, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations, and WBC count were noted in LPS-treated calves. Higher doses of LPS induced a more prolonged clinical response and significantly (p < 0.05) greater hypotension, lacticemia and hypoglycemia. While dose altered the response to endotoxin, the method of administration had no overall effect on the variables measured. PMID:7704840

  8. Reduced Neonatal Mortality in Meishan Piglets: A Role for Hepatic Fatty Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Bacardit, Jaume; Li, Dongfang; Wessely, Frank; Mongan, Nigel P.; Symonds, Michael E.; Clarke, Lynne; Mostyn, Alison

    2012-01-01

    The Meishan pig breed exhibits increased prolificacy and reduced neonatal mortality compared to commercial breeds, such as the Large White, prompting breeders to introduce the Meishan genotype into commercial herds. Commercial piglets are highly susceptible to hypoglycemia, hypothermia, and death, potentially due to limited lipid stores and/or delayed hepatic metabolic ability. We therefore hypothesized that variation in hepatic development and lipid metabolism could contribute to the differences in neonatal mortality between breeds. Liver samples were obtained from piglets of each breed on days 0, 7, and 21 of postnatal age and subjected to molecular and biochemical analysis. At birth, both breeds exhibited similar hepatic glycogen contents, despite Meishan piglets having significantly lower body weight. The livers from newborn Meishan piglets exhibited increased C18∶1n9C and C20∶1n9 but lower C18∶0, C20∶4n6, and C22∶6n3 fatty acid content. Furthermore, by using an unsupervised machine learning approach, we detected an interaction between C18∶1n9C and glycogen content in newborn Meishan piglets. Bioinformatic analysis could identify unique age-based clusters from the lipid profiles in Meishan piglets that were not apparent in the commercial offspring. Examination of the fatty acid signature during the neonatal period provides novel insights into the body composition of Meishan piglets that may facilitate liver responses that prevent hypoglycaemia and reduce offspring mortality. PMID:23155453

  9. Carcinoid syndrome, acromegaly, and hypoglycemia due to an insulin-secreting neuroendocrine tumor of the liver.

    PubMed

    Furrer, J; Hättenschwiler, A; Komminoth, P; Pfammatter, T; Wiesli, P

    2001-05-01

    We report a patient with a hepatic neuroendocrine tumor showing an extraordinary change of the tumor's humoral manifestations from a clinically documented extrapituitary acromegaly and a typical carcinoid syndrome toward a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome. At the primary manifestation of the tumor, an increased serum level of insulin-like growth factor I due to overproduction of GHRH and an increased urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were found. The clinical manifestation of the GHRH excess was an arthralgia, which resolved completely after operative tumor debulking and normalization of insulin-like growth factor I and GHRH serum levels. The secretion of serotonin from the tumor resulted in a typical carcinoid syndrome including right-sided valvular heart disease. On the later course of the disease, the humoral manifestations of the tumor were supplemented by the secretion of insulin, leading to recurrent severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The hepatic origin of hyperinsulinism was demonstrated by selective arterial calcium stimulation. Moreover, tumor cells revealed insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivity in the immunohistochemical analysis. The patient died 8 yr after the initial diagnosis of the tumor, and a carefully performed autopsy procedure confirmed the absence of any extrahepatic tumor manifestation. PMID:11344231

  10. [Solitary fibrous tumor presenting as perivesical mass associated with hypoglycemia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsurukawa, Hiroyuki; Komura, Hideki; Hirata, Teruo

    2005-11-01

    Some non-islet tumors can induce hypoglycemia. We report a case of a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) as perivesical mass associated with hypoglycemia. A 61-year-old man was admitted to our department with recurrent hypoglycemic attack and lower abdominal discomfort, but no symptom of urination. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a giant heterogeneous mass in the pelvic and rightward shift of bladder, but the tumor's border was clear. Endocrinological analyses showed high serum levels of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and suppressed secretion of insulin. We removed perivesical tumor that weighed 720 g on 30th January in 2003. After the removal, serum IGF-II levels returned to normal and hypoglycemic attacks ceased. Pathological examination revealed well-circumscribed nodular mass composed of uniform spindle cells arranged in bundles and fascicles with varying amounts of collagen and reticulin fibers. Almost all of the tumor cells were immunohystochemically positive for vimentin and CD34, negative for cytokeratin.

  11. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P M; Cote, G J; Hallman, D M; Mathew, P M

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [theta = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release.

  12. Homozygosity mapping, to chromosome 11p, of the gene for familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Cote, G.J.; Hallman, D.M.; Mathew, P.M.

    1995-02-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of unregulated insulin secretion, defined by elevations in serum insulin despite severe hypoglycemia. We used the homozygosity gene-mapping strategy to localize this disorder to the region of chromosome 11p between markers D11S1334 and D11S899 (maximum LOD score 5.02 [{theta} = 0] at marker D11S926) in five consanguineous families of Saudi Arabian origin. These results extend those of a recent report that also placed PHHI on chromosome 11p, between markers D11S926 and D11S928. Comparison of the boundaries of these two overlapping regions allows the PHHI locus to be assigned to the 4-cM region between the markers D11S926 and D11S899. Identification of this gene may allow a better understanding of other disorders of glucose homeostasis, by providing insight into the regulation of insulin release. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Carcinoid syndrome, acromegaly, and hypoglycemia due to an insulin-secreting neuroendocrine tumor of the liver.

    PubMed

    Furrer, J; Hättenschwiler, A; Komminoth, P; Pfammatter, T; Wiesli, P

    2001-05-01

    We report a patient with a hepatic neuroendocrine tumor showing an extraordinary change of the tumor's humoral manifestations from a clinically documented extrapituitary acromegaly and a typical carcinoid syndrome toward a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome. At the primary manifestation of the tumor, an increased serum level of insulin-like growth factor I due to overproduction of GHRH and an increased urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were found. The clinical manifestation of the GHRH excess was an arthralgia, which resolved completely after operative tumor debulking and normalization of insulin-like growth factor I and GHRH serum levels. The secretion of serotonin from the tumor resulted in a typical carcinoid syndrome including right-sided valvular heart disease. On the later course of the disease, the humoral manifestations of the tumor were supplemented by the secretion of insulin, leading to recurrent severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The hepatic origin of hyperinsulinism was demonstrated by selective arterial calcium stimulation. Moreover, tumor cells revealed insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivity in the immunohistochemical analysis. The patient died 8 yr after the initial diagnosis of the tumor, and a carefully performed autopsy procedure confirmed the absence of any extrahepatic tumor manifestation.

  14. A comparison of different statistical methods analyzing hypoglycemia data using bootstrap simulations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Honghua; Ni, Xiao; Huster, William; Heilmann, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia has long been recognized as a major barrier to achieving normoglycemia with intensive diabetic therapies. It is a common safety concern for the diabetes patients. Therefore, it is important to apply appropriate statistical methods when analyzing hypoglycemia data. Here, we carried out bootstrap simulations to investigate the performance of the four commonly used statistical models (Poisson, negative binomial, analysis of covariance [ANCOVA], and rank ANCOVA) based on the data from a diabetes clinical trial. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model and zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) model were also evaluated. Simulation results showed that Poisson model inflated type I error, while negative binomial model was overly conservative. However, after adjusting for dispersion, both Poisson and negative binomial models yielded slightly inflated type I errors, which were close to the nominal level and reasonable power. Reasonable control of type I error was associated with ANCOVA model. Rank ANCOVA model was associated with the greatest power and with reasonable control of type I error. Inflated type I error was observed with ZIP and ZINB models.

  15. Abnormal Nocturnal Behavior due to Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kwang Ik; Kim, Hyung Ki; Baek, Jeehun; Kim, Doh-Eui; Park, Hyung Kook

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal nocturnal behavior can have many causes, including primary sleep disorder, nocturnal seizures, and underlying medical or neurological disorders. A 79-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes was admitted for evaluation of abnormal nocturnal behavior. Every night at around 04:30 she was observed displaying abnormal behavior including leg shaking, fumbling with bedclothes, crawling around the room with her eyes closed, and non-responsiveness to verbal communication. Polysomnography with 20-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was performed. EEG showed that the posterior dominant rhythm was slower than that observed in the initial EEG, with diffuse theta and delta activities intermixed, and no epileptiform activity. The serum glucose level was 35 mg/dL at that time, and both the EEG findings and clinical symptoms were resolved after an intravenous injection of 50 mL of 50% glucose. These results indicate that nocturnal hypoglycemia should be considered as one of the possible etiologies in patients presenting with abnormal nocturnal behavior. Citation: Yang KI, Kim HK, Baek J, Kim DE, Park HK. Abnormal nocturnal behavior due to hypoglycemia in a patient with type 2 diabetes. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):627–629. PMID:26943712

  16. Elimination of maternal and neonatal tetanus: a 21st-century challenge.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Darko, Sharon; Diouf, Khady; Nour, Nawal M

    2012-01-01

    Tetanus is an acute disease manifested by motor system and autonomic nervous system instability. Maternal and neonatal tetanus occur where deliveries are performed under unsanitary circumstances and unhygienic umbilical cord practices are prevalent. Neonatal tetanus is almost always fatal in the absence of medical care. These deaths can be prevented with changes in traditional obstetrical practices and maternal immunization. This situation led to the development of the Maternal and Neonatal Elimination Initiative by the World Health Organization. Using a three-pronged approach, tetanus can be eliminated via promotion of hygienic practices during delivery, maternal and childhood immunization, and close surveillance. PMID:23483091

  17. The role of central nervous system on hypoglycemia and the feasibility of the brain theory in traditional Chinese medicine on treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-li; Niu, Jing-jing; Zhang, Wei-fei; Huang, Wen-jin; Zhou, Ming-yue; Sha, Wen-jun; Li, Jun-yan; Li, Fu-feng; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Shen, Yuan-dong; Zhou, Li-gang

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) plays a key regulatory role in glucose homeostasis. In particular, the brain is important in initiating and coordinating protective counterregulatory responses when blood glucose levels fall. This may due to the metabolic dependency of the CNS on glucose, and protection of food supply to the brain. In healthy subjects, blood glucose is normally maintained within a relatively narrow range. Hypoglycemia in diabetic patients can increase the risk of complications, such as heart disease and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The clinical research finds that the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a positive effect on the treatment of hypoglycemia. Here the authors reviewed the current understanding of sensing and counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia, and discuss combining traditional Chinese and Western medicine and the theory of iatrogenic hypoglycemia in diabetes treatment. Furthermore, the authors clarify the feasibility of treating hypoglycemia on the basis of TCM theory and CNS and have an insight on its clinical practice.

  18. Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... less) when you’re having symptoms is an important part of diagnosis. Your doctor will check your blood glucose level and may order other tests. A personal blood glucose meter is not accurate enough for ...

  19. Neonatal haemostasis and the management of neonatal thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Will, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Two detailed reviews of the management of neonatal thrombosis were published in 2012; one was an up-dated version of guidance first issued in 2004 and the other was a comprehensive review. Both of these publications gave very similar advice regarding the practical aspects of the indications, dosage and management of antithrombotic therapy. The authors stated that the evidence supporting most of their recommendations for anti-thrombotic therapy in neonates remained weak and so the therapy for a neonate with a thrombosis has to be based on an individualized assessment of estimated risk versus potential benefit. The aim of this present review is to give the treating physician an outline of the unique physiology of neonatal coagulation and how this affects the monitoring, dosing and even the choice of therapeutic strategy for the management of thrombosis in the neonate.

  20. Neonatal neurosonography: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Neurosonography is a simple, established non-invasive technique for the intracranial assessment of preterm neonate. Apart from established indication in the evaluation of periventricular haemorrhage, it provides clue to wide range of pathology. This presentation provides a quick roadmap to the technique, imaging anatomy and spectrum of pathological imaging appearances encountered in neonates. PMID:25489132

  1. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, Jill P; Clancy, Robert M

    2003-09-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes, although quite rare, provide an excellent opportunity to examine disease from bench to bedside. During the past year numerous publications have reported basic and clinical research. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in more than 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with conduction abnormalities in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with congenital heart block was at or below one in 50. Although the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease, and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors from the scavenging macrophages, and transdifferentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroblast scarring phenotype. Cross-reactivity of anti-52-kD SSA/Ro antibodies with a serotoninergic cardiac receptor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)4, has been suggested but remains unconfirmed. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to grow, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late-onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements that identify first-degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. Reassuringly, most children with neonatal lupus syndromes do not

  2. The association of leukocyte adhesion defect type I and persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in a Saudi Arabian family.

    PubMed

    Suliaman, Fawzi; Jabbar, Mohammed Abdul

    2002-09-01

    The authors describe 2 female sibling infants diagnosed with leukocyte adhesion defects CD11 and CD18. Both had successful bone marrow transplants from identical siblings. One of the patients was found to have persistent hypoglycemia of infancy. The association of these two rare conditions has not been reported previously.

  3. Food Insecurity is Associated with Hypoglycemia and Poor Diabetes Self-Management in a Low-Income Sample with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Davis, Terry C.; Schillinger, Dean; Wolf, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    More than 14% of the American population is food insecure, or at risk of going hungry because of an inability to afford food. Food-insecure (FI) adults often reduce food intake or substitute inexpensive, energy-dense carbohydrates for healthier foods. We hypothesized these behaviors would predispose FI adults with diabetes to impaired diabetes self-management and hypoglycemia. We therefore assessed whether food insecurity was associated with multiple indicators of diabetes self-management (self-efficacy, medication- and glucose-monitoring adherence, hypoglycemia, or glycemic control) among 40 low-income adults with diabetes. Mean self-efficacy score was lower among FI than food-secure (FS) participants (34.4 vs. 41.2, p=.02). Food-insecure participants reported poorer adherence to blood glucose monitoring (RR=3.5, p=.008) and more hypoglycemia-related emergency department visits (RR=2.2, p=.007). Mean hemoglobin A1c was 9.2% among FI and 7.7% among FS participants (p=.08). Food insecurity is a barrier to diabetes self-management and a risk factor for clinically significant hypoglycemia. PMID:21099074

  4. Anesthetic agents modulate ECoG potentiation after spreading depression, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia does not modify this effect.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thays Kallyne Marinho; E Silva-Gondim, Mariana Barros; Rodrigues, Marcelo Cairrão Araújo; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2015-04-10

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is characterized by reversible reduction of spontaneous and evoked electrical activity of the cerebral cortex. Experimental evidence suggests that CSD may modulate neural excitability and synaptic activity, with possible implications for long-term potentiation. Systemic factors like anesthetics and insulin-induced hypoglycemia can influence CSD propagation. In this study, we examined whether the post-CSD ECoG potentiation can be modulated by anesthetics and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. We found that awake adult rats displayed increased ECoG potentiation after CSD, as compared with rats under urethane+chloralose anesthesia or tribromoethanol anesthesia. In anesthetized rats, insulin-induced hypoglycemia did not modulate ECoG potentiation. Comparison of two cortical recording regions in awake rats revealed a similarly significant (p<0.05) potentiation effect in both regions, whereas in the anesthetized groups the potentiation was significant only in the recording region nearer to the stimulating point. Our data suggest that urethane+chloralose and tribromoethanol anesthesia modulate the post-CSD potentiation of spontaneous electrical activity in the adult rat cortex, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia does not modify this effect. Data may help to gain a better understanding of excitability-dependent mechanisms underlying CSD-related neurological diseases. PMID:25681772

  5. Acarbose reduces the risk of pre-lunch hypoglycemia in elderly people with diabetes eating rice porridge for breakfast.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ching Jung

    2010-09-01

    To decrease the risk of postprandial hyperglycemia and late hypoglycemia in elderly people with diabetes who eat rice porridge for breakfast, we administered 50mg acarbose to 30 elderly people with type 2 diabetes. The results demonstrated that acarbose could prevent the fluctuations in post-breakfast blood glucose levels.

  6. Severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis among youth with type 1 diabetes in the T1D Exchange clinic registry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe hypoglycemia (SH) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are common serious acute complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SH and DKA and identify factors related to their occurrence in the T1D Exchange pediatric and young adult cohort. The anal...

  7. Neonatal congenital microvillus atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pecache, N; Patole, S; Hagan, R; Hill, D; Charles, A; Papadimitriou, J

    2004-01-01

    Congenital microvillous atrophy (CMVA) is the leading cause of neonatal secretory diarrhoea with onset either in the first 72 hours of life (early onset) or at 6–8 weeks after birth (late onset). To date over 30 cases have been reported worldwide. The prognosis for this life threatening condition continues to be poor. Therapeutic agents like somatostatin and epidermal growth factor are either ineffective or of marginal benefit. Overall five year survival after small bowel transplantation is currently ∼50%. The following brief review is aimed towards helping neonatologists/perinatologists in the early diagnosis, and management of CMVA and in counselling the parents appropriately. PMID:14970294

  8. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure.

  9. Transient neonatal tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Rice, D N; Houston, I B; Lyon, I C; Macarthur, B A; Mullins, P R; Veale, A M; Guthrie, R

    1989-01-01

    Children who had presented with transient neonatal tyrosinaemia (TNT) were compared with a group of unaffected controls at 7-9 years of age. A comprehensive psychometric assessment revealed significant differences between the groups in adaptive behaviour, psycholinguistic abilities, and speed of learning. In nearly all components of the tests used, higher levels of TNT were associated with lower levels of performance. This study demonstrates that TNT, a condition commonly regarded as benign in the short term, has long-term effects which may be detrimental to the child in school.

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Predicts Post-Load Hypoglycemia following Bariatric Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Itariu, Bianca K.; Zeyda, Maximilian; Prager, Gerhard; Stulnig, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Postprandial hypoglycemia is a complication following gastric bypass surgery, which frequently remains undetected. Severe hypoglycemic episodes, however, put patients at risk, e.g., for syncope. A major cause of hypoglycemia following gastric bypass is hyperinsulinemic nesidioblastosis. Since pancreatic islets in nesidioblastosis overexpress insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor α and administration of recombinant IGF-1 provokes hypoglycemia, our main objective was to investigate the occurrence of post-load hypoglycemia one year after bariatric surgery and its relation to pre- and post-operative IGF-1 serum concentrations. We evaluated metabolic parameters including 2 h 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and measured IGF-1 serum concentration in thirty-six non-diabetic patients (29 f/7 m), aged 41.3±2.0 y with a median (IQR) BMI of 30.9 kg/m2 (27.5–34.3 kg/m2), who underwent elective bariatric surgery (predominantly gastric bypass, 83%) at our hospital. Post-load hypoglycemia as defined by a 2 h glucose concentration <60 mg/dl was detected in 50% of patients. Serum insulin and C-peptide concentration during the OGTT and HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment–insulin resistance) were similar in hypoglycemic and euglycemic patients. Strikingly, pre- and post-operative serum IGF-1 concentrations were significantly higher in hypoglycemic patients (p = 0.012 and p = 0.007 respectively). IGF-1 serum concentration before surgery negatively correlated with 2 h glucose concentration during the OGTT (rho = −0.58, p = 0.0003). Finally, IGF-1 serum concentrations before and after surgery significantly predicted post-load hypoglycemia with odds ratios of 1.28 (95%CI:1.03–1.55, p = 0.029) and 1.18 (95%CI:1.03–1.33, p = 0.015), respectively, for each 10 ng/ml increment. IGF-1 serum concentration could be a valuable biomarker to identify patients at risk for hypoglycemia following bariatric surgery independently of a diagnostic OGTT

  11. Portal Vein Glucose Sensors Do Not Play a Major Role in Modulating Physiological Responses to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paolo; Porcellati, Francesca; Lucidi, Paola; Busciantella Ricci, Natalia; Candeloro, Paola; Cioli, Patrizia; Santeusanio, Fausto; Bolli, Geremia B.; Fanelli, Carmine G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Experimental data from animal studies indicate that portal vein glucose sensors play a key role in the responses to slow-fall hypoglycemia. However, their role in modulating these responses in humans is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to examine in humans the potential role of portal vein glucose sensors in physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia mimicking the slow fall of insulin-treated diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Ten nondiabetic subjects were studied on two different occasions during intravenous insulin (2 mU · kg−1 · min−1) plus variable glucose for 160 minutes. In both studies, after 60 min of normal plasma glucose concentrations, hypoglycemia (47 mg/dl) was induced slowly (60 min) and maintained for 60 min. Hypoglycemia was preceded by the ingestion of either oral placebo or glucose (28 g) given at 30 min. RESULTS—Plasma glucose and insulin were not different with either placebo or glucose (P > 0.2). Similarly, counterregulatory hormones, substrates, and symptoms were not different with either placebo or glucose. The Stroop color and colored words subtest of the Stroop test deteriorated less (P < 0.05) with glucose than placebo. CONCLUSIONS—In contrast to animals, in humans, prevention of portal hypoglycemia with oral glucose from the beginning of insulin-induced slow-fall hypoglycemia has no effect on sympathoadrenal and symptomatic responses to hypoglycemia. PMID:18852332

  12. A 36-year-old man with vomiting, pain abdomen, significant weight loss, hyponatremia, and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Sivasami, Kartik; Tewari, Vanmalini; Nandi, Bhaskar; Nair, G Lakhsmi; Patil, Sunita D

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection can be a challenge. The key to a timely diagnosis is to have a high index of suspicion. We present a rare case of a 36-year-old human immunodeficiency virus negative male patient, who was on multidrug therapy for lepromatous leprosy and was treated for type 2 lepra reactions with steroids in the past. The patient presented with vomiting and pain abdomen, persistent hyponatremia, and terminal hypoglycemia. He had features of malnutrition and had a rapid downhill course following admission. A diagnosis of S. stercoralis hyperinfection with sepsis and multiorgan failure, adrenal hemorrhage, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion was established on a postmortem examination. PMID:26549076

  13. Economic resources consumption structure in severe hypoglycemia episodes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Michał; Rdzanek, Elżbieta; Niewada, Maciej; Czech, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with severe hypoglycemia events (SHEs) that vary in severity and resource consumption. Here we perform a systematic review in Medline of studies evaluating SHE-related health resource use. Eligible studies investigated patients with DM and included ≥10 SHEs. We also assessed studies identified in another systematic review, and through references from the included studies. We identified 14 relevant studies and used data from 11 (encompassing 6075 patients). Study results were interpreted to fit our definitions, which sometimes required assumptions. SHE type structure was synthesized using Bayesian modeling. Estimating Type 1 & 2 DM separately revealed only small differences; therefore, we used joint results. Of the analyzed SHEs, 9.97% were hospital-treated, 22.3% medical professional-treated, and 67.73% family-treated. These meta-analysis results help in understanding the structure of resource consumption following SHE and can be used in economic studies. PMID:26289736

  14. Neonatal hygroscopic condenser humidifier.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, A; Mebius, C; Palmer, K

    1987-01-01

    A hygroscopic condenser humidifier was developed for neonates on mechanical ventilation and was evaluated by laboratory tests and clinically. Humidification provided by the unit was measured in the 10- to 50-ml tidal-volume range at ambient temperatures of 24 degrees C and 38 degrees C. The effect of a leaking patient connection on device performance was investigated. Leakage rates were measured routinely in a neonatal ICU and surgery to determine the clinical significance. In the entire tidal volume and temperature range, the unit provided an inspiratory water content in excess of 30 g/m3 when the leak fraction (volume leaked/volume delivered at Y-piece) was less than 15%. This was found in three out of four cases. In about one out of ten cases, the leak exceeded 30%, which invariably led to corrective action, such as repositioning or changing the endotracheal tube. However, even at a 30% leak, a water content of about 26 g/m3 was still available for humidifying the inspired gas, which corresponds to normal physiologic conditions found in the trachea for nasal breathing of room air.

  15. Effect of algorithm aggressiveness on the performance of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System.

    PubMed

    Finan, Daniel A; McCann, Thomas W; Rhein, Kathleen; Dassau, Eyal; Breton, Marc D; Patek, Stephen D; Anhalt, Henry; Kovatchev, Boris P; Doyle, Francis J; Anderson, Stacey M; Zisser, Howard; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2014-07-01

    The Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System aims to mitigate glucose excursions by preemptively modulating insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitor (CGM) measurements. The "aggressiveness factor" is a key parameter in the HHM System algorithm, affecting how readily the system adjusts insulin infusion in response to changing CGM levels. Twenty adults with type 1 diabetes were studied in closed-loop in a clinical research center for approximately 26 hours. This analysis focused on the effect of the aggressiveness factor on the insulin dosing characteristics of the algorithm and, to a lesser extent, on the glucose control results observed. As the aggressiveness factor increased from conservative to medium to aggressive: the maximum observed insulin dose delivered by the algorithm—which is designed to give doses that are corrective in nature every 5 minutes—increased (1.00 vs 1.15 vs 2.20 U, respectively); tendency to adhere to the subject's nominal basal dose decreased (61.9% vs 56.6% vs 53.4%); and readiness to decrease insulin below basal also increased (18.4% vs 19.4% vs 25.2%). Glucose analyses by both CGM and Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) indicated that the aggressive setting of the algorithm resulted in the least time spent at levels >180 mg/dL, and the most time spent between 70-180 mg/dL. There was no severe hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or severe hypoglycemia for any of the aggressiveness values investigated. These analyses underscore the importance of investigating the sensitivity of the HHM System to its key parameters, such as the aggressiveness factor, to guide future development decisions. PMID:24876443

  16. Sodium salicylate augments the plasma adrenocorticotropin and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia in man.

    PubMed

    Halter, J B; Metz, S A

    1982-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that prostaglandins attenuate neuroendocrine responses to changes in circulating glucose levels in man, we studied the effects of sodium salicylate (SS), a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, on the plasma ACTH and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia. Six normal men were given insulin (0.05 U/kg, iv) on 2 different days during the infusion of either SS (40 mg/min) or saline. Compared to the saline control, SS had no significant effect on either the rate of fall of plasma glucose after insulin or the glucose nadir (mean +/- SEM, 33 +/- 3 vs. 36 +/- 3 mg/dl; P = NS). Peak ACTH levels after insulin were higher during SS compared to those during saline in all six subjects (316 +/- 95 vs. 102 +/- 26 pg/ml; P less than 0.05), and SS had a clear effect to increase both the overall ACTH response (F = 21.3; P less than 0.01, by analysis of variance) and the plasma cortisol response (F = 6.72; P less than 0.05, by analysis of variance). The most striking example of this effect of SS occurred in one subject whose peak plasma ACTH was only 44 pg/ml during saline but reached 750 pg/ml during SS despite an identical fall of plasma glucose to 42 mg/dl. Augmentation of the ACTH and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia may be the result of an alteration by SS of recognition of glucose levels by glucose-sensitive cells of the brain, and effect which could be due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6274894

  17. Hypoglycemia and Medical Expenses in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analysis Based on the Korea National Diabetes Program Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Suk; Ahn, Kyu Jeung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Yong Soo; Nam, Moon Suk; Lee, Kwan Woo; Woo, Jeong-Taek; Kim, Young Seol

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Hypoglycemia is one of the most important adverse events in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, hypoglycemia-related events are usually overlooked and have been documented less in clinical practice. Materials and Methods We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, and medical expenses of hypoglycemia related events in T2DM patients based on the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), which is the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4,350). For accurate outcomes, the KNDP data were merged with claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) of Korea. Results During a median follow-up period of 3.23 years (95% CI: 3.14, 3.19), 88 subjects (2.02%) were newly diagnosed with hypoglycemia, and the incidence of hypoglycemia was 6.44 cases per 1,000 person-years (PY). Individuals with hypoglycemia were significantly older (59.7±10.7 vs. 53.3±10.4 years, p < 0.001), had more hospital visits (121.94±126.88 days/PY, p < 0.001), had a longer hospital stays (16.13±29.21 days/PY, p < 0.001), and incurred greater medical costs ($2,447.56±4,056.38 vs. $1,336.37±3,403.39 /PY, p < 0.001) than subjects without hypoglycemia. Conclusion Hypoglycemia-related events were infrequently identified among the medical records of T2DM subjects. However, they were associated significantly with poor clinical outcomes, and thus, hypoglycemia could have a substantial burden on the Korean national healthcare system. PMID:26890789

  18. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day. PMID:26931268

  19. Neonatal Conjunctivitis Leading to Neonatal Sepsis--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dey, A C; Hossain, M I; Dey, S K; Mannan, M A; Shahidullah, M

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis is the most common occular disease in neonates. Most infections are acquired during vaginal delivery. In spite most of these cases are benign; some of them may progress to systemic complications like loss of vision if left untreated. The authors present a case of a newborn who developed late onset neonatal sepsis from E. coli positive conjunctivitis. The baby was treated with Injection Meropenem and Injection Amikacin for 10 days. The course was uneventful, after that baby responded well and discharged home on 24th day.

  20. Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas as Neonatal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Katz, Brenda; Schelonka, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mycoplasmas represent a complex and unique group of microorganisms that have been associated with a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and infants. The lack of conclusive knowledge regarding the pathogenic potential of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. in many conditions is due to a general unfamiliarity of physicians and microbiology laboratories with their fastidious growth requirements, leading to difficulty in their detection; their high prevalence in healthy persons; the poor design of research studies attempting to base association with disease on the mere presence of the organisms in the lower urogenital tract; the failure to consider multifactorial aspects of diseases; and considering these genital mycoplasmas only as a last resort. The situation is now changing because of a greater appreciation of the genital mycoplasmas as perinatal pathogens and improvements in laboratory detection, particularly with regard to the development of powerful molecular nucleic acid amplification tests. This review summarizes the epidemiology of genital mycoplasmas as causes of neonatal infections and premature birth; evidence linking ureaplasmas with bronchopulmonary dysplasia; recent changes in the taxonomy of the genus Ureaplasma; the neonatal host response to mycoplasma and ureaplasma infections; advances in laboratory detection, including molecular methods; and therapeutic considerations for treatment of systemic diseases. PMID:16223956

  1. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  2. Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Malabu, Usman H; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kennedy, Richard Lee

    2014-01-01

    A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose <4.0 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) requiring external assistance, occurs in one-third of elderly diabetics on glucose-lowering therapies. It represents a major barrier to the treatment of diabetes, particularly in the elderly population. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at a high risk for adverse outcomes, including falls leading to bone fracture, seizures, cognitive dysfunction, and prolonged hospital stays. An increase in mortality has been observed in patients who experience any one of these events. Paradoxically, rational insulin therapy, dosed according to a patient's clinical status and the results of home blood glucose monitoring, so as to achieve and maintain recommended glycemic goals, can be an effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review, the risk factors of falls associated with hypoglycemia in elderly diabetics were highlighted and management plans were suggested. A target hemoglobin A1c level between 7% and 8% seems to be more appropriate for this

  3. Hypoglycemia Associated with a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Producing High-molecular-weight Insulin Growth Factor II: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Emi; Ohki, Shinji; Fukuda, Izumi; Tanaka, Mizuko; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with multiple metastatic and unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was referred for investigation of refractory hypoglycemia that developed four months before this hospitalization. On admission, her fasting plasma glucose was 38 mg/dL despite 10% glucose infusion. Investigations revealed that her serum C-peptide, insulin and growth hormone levels were suppressed, and big insulin-like growth factor II was observed. She was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia, which resolved after glucocorticoid treatment. Clinicians should thus be vigilant to identify hypoglycemia in patients with large metastatic GISTs because glucocorticoid therapy is useful even if the GIST is inoperable. PMID:27181538

  4. Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Malabu, Usman H; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kennedy, Richard Lee

    2014-01-01

    A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose <4.0 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) requiring external assistance, occurs in one-third of elderly diabetics on glucose-lowering therapies. It represents a major barrier to the treatment of diabetes, particularly in the elderly population. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at a high risk for adverse outcomes, including falls leading to bone fracture, seizures, cognitive dysfunction, and prolonged hospital stays. An increase in mortality has been observed in patients who experience any one of these events. Paradoxically, rational insulin therapy, dosed according to a patient’s clinical status and the results of home blood glucose monitoring, so as to achieve and maintain recommended glycemic goals, can be an effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review, the risk factors of falls associated with hypoglycemia in elderly diabetics were highlighted and management plans were suggested. A target hemoglobin A1c level between 7% and 8% seems to be more appropriate for this

  5. Acute liver failure in a term neonate after repeated paracetamol administration

    PubMed Central

    Bucaretchi, Fábio; Fernandes, Carla Borrasca; Branco, Maíra Migliari; Capitani, Eduardo Mello De; Hyslop, Stephen; Caldas, Jamil Pedro S.; Moreno, Carolina Araújo; Porta, Gilda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Severe hepatotoxicity caused by paracetamol is rare in neonates. We report a case of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure in a term neonate. Case description: A 26-day-old boy was admitted with intestinal bleeding, shock signs, slight liver enlargement, coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis (pH=7.21; bicarbonate: 7.1mEq/L), hypoglycemia (18mg/dL), increased serum aminotransferase activity (AST=4,039IU/L; ALT=1,087IU/L) and hyperbilirubinemia (total: 9.57mg/dL; direct: 6.18mg/dL) after receiving oral paracetamol (10mg/kg/dose every 4 hours) for three consecutive days (total dose around 180mg/kg; serum concentration 36-48 hours after the last dose of 77µg/ mL). Apart from supportive measures, the patient was successfully treated with intravenous N-acetylcysteine infusion during 11 consecutive days, and was discharged on day 34. The follow-up revealed full recovery of clinical and of laboratory findings of hepatic function. Comments: The paracetamol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in neonates and infants differ substantially from those in older children and adults. Despite the reduced rates of metabolism by the P-450 CYP2E1 enzyme system and the increased ability to synthesize glutathione - which provides greater resistance after overdoses -, it is possible to produce hepatotoxic metabolites (N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone) that cause hepatocellular damage, if glutathione sources are depleted. Paracetamol clearance is reduced and the half-life of elimination is prolonged. Therefore, a particular dosing regimen should be followed due to the toxicity risk of cumulative doses. This report highlights the risk for severe hepatotoxicity in neonates after paracetamol multiple doses for more than two to three days. PMID:24676202

  6. Urban and rural comparison of vitamin D status in Pakistani pregnant women and neonates.

    PubMed

    Anwar, S; Iqbal, M P; Azam, I; Habib, A; Bhutta, S; Soofi, S B; Bhutta, Z A

    2016-01-01

    We undertook a cross-sectional study in rural Jehlum and urban Karachi to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Pakistani pregnant women and neonates and to assess any association of serum 25(OH) vitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration with vitamin D binding protein (Gc) genotypes. Altogether, 390 women and 266 neonates were recruited from urban and rural sites, respectively. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by an immunoassay, while Gc genotypes were identified using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-RFLP. One-way analysis of variance or ANOVA and linear regression were used for statistical analysis. In urban Karachi, 99.5% of women and 97.3% of neonates were vitamin D deficient (< 50 nmol/L), while 89% of women and 82% of neonates were deficient in rural Jehlum. Gc genotypes were not associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations in both women and their neonates. We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in Pakistani women and their neonates, and Gc genotypes are not associated with serum 25(OH)D concentrations.

  7. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  8. Neonatal iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rao, R; Georgieff, M K

    2001-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to iron deficiency. Their total body iron content at birth is low and gets further depleted by clinical practices such as uncompensated phlebotomy losses and exogenous erythropoietin administration during the neonatal period. Early iron deficiency appears to adversely affect cognitive development in human infants. To maintain iron sufficiency and meet the iron demands of catch-up postnatal growth, iron supplementation is prudent in preterm infants. A dose of 2-4 mg/kg/day is recommended for preterm infants who are fed exclusively human milk. A dose of 6 mg/kg/day or more is needed with the use of exogenous erythropoietin or to correct preexisting iron deficiency. However, due to the poor antioxidant capabilities of preterm infants and the potential role of iron in several oxidant-related perinatal disorders, indiscriminate iron supplementation should be avoided.

  9. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  10. Validity of C-reactive protein (CRP) for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hisamuddin, Effat; Hisam, Aliya; Wahid, Sughra; Raza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the validity of C-reactive protein levels for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Methods: A cross sectional (Validation) study was conducted at Neonatology unit in KRL general hospital (emergency/OPD) of 7 months duration from February 2012 to August 2012. By using purposive sampling technique, 147, sample size was calculated by using WHO sample size calculator taking sensitivity 75%, specificity 95%, expected prevalence 50%, desired precision 10% and confidence level 95%. Results: Mean age of the neonates was 5.72 days + 3.86. Male patients were 81(55.1%) while 66(44.9%) were female. Neonatal sepsis was observed in 43(29.25%) and were confirmed through blood culture while 104(70.75%) were not confirmed on blood culture as neonatal sepsis. The sensitivity and specificity of CRP in diagnosis of acute neonatal sepsis was 76.92% and 53.49% respectively while it had a positive predictive value of 80% and negative predictive value of 48.94%. Over all the diagnostic accuracy of CRP in diagnosis of neonatal sepsis was 70.07%. Conclusion: CRP estimation does have a role in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis but the test is not specific enough to be relied upon as the only indicator. PMID:26150837

  11. Mastitis in a neonatal filly

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Rebecca; Lewis, Danyse; Lohmann, Katharina L.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare occurrence in the horse. This report documents a case of mastitis caused by an organism within the Streptococcus dysgalactiae group in a 1-week-old Paint filly. PMID:25565717

  12. Neonatal euthanasia: The Groningen Protocol.

    PubMed

    Vizcarrondo, Felipe E

    2014-11-01

    For the past thirty years, voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide of adult patients have been common practice in the Netherlands. Neonatal euthanasia was recently legalized in the Netherlands and the Groningen Protocol (GP) was developed to regulate the practice. Supporters claim compliance with the GP criteria makes neonatal euthanasia ethically permissible. An examination of the criteria used by the Protocol to justify the euthanasia of seriously ill neonates reveals the criteria are not based on firm moral principles. The taking of the life of a seriously ill person is not the solution to the pain and suffering of the dying process. It is the role of the medical professional to care for the ailing patient with love and compassion, always preserving the person's dignity. Neonatal euthanasia is not ethically permissible. PMID:25473136

  13. Barrier mechanisms in neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Ingrid; Chip, Sophorn; Vexler, Zinaida S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data continue to reveal that the incidence of perinatal stroke is high, similar to that in the elderly. Perinatal stroke leads to significant morbidity and severe long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, including cerebral palsy. Experimental models of cerebral ischemia in neonatal rodents have shown that the pathophysiology of perinatal brain damage is multifactorial. Cerebral vasculature undergoes substantial structural and functional changes during early postnatal brain development. Thus, the state of the vasculature could affect susceptibility of the neonatal brain to cerebral ischemia. In this review, we discuss some of the most recent findings regarding the neurovascular responses of the immature brain to focal arterial stroke in relation to neuroinflammation. We also discuss a possible role of the neonatal blood-CSF barrier in modulating inflammation and the long-term effects of early neurovascular integrity after neonatal stroke on angiogenesis and neurogenesis. PMID:25426016

  14. Neonatal `Brain Damage'—An Analysis of 250 Claims

    PubMed Central

    Cornblath, Marvin; Clark, Russell L.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in perinatal care have resulted in decreased neonatal mortality. Increasingly, damage in survivors has been attributed to alleged negligence. We analyzed the 250 claims (1957 to 1982) from one major insurance company for factors to characterize high-risk pregnancies and then to distinguish preventable from nonpreventable causes within the group. Using predetermined criteria, 77 (31%) were classified preventable, 105 (42%) nonpreventable and 68 (27%) indeterminate. Preventable actions could be attributed to family members as well as health care providers. Twenty risk factors were significantly increased in the study group compared with those in a general population and included maternal, gestational, delivery and postdelivery risks. Furthermore, 13 of 25 factors differed significantly between preventable and nonpreventable cases. Those with significantly higher prevalence in preventable cases included prolonged gestation, the use of mid or high forceps, cesarean sections, meconium staining, low one- and five-minute Apgar scores, birth weight exceeding 4.5 kg (10 lb), poor tone, seizures and transfers to neonatal intensive care units. Increased in prevalence in the nonpreventable cases were congenital infections and malformations and the late onset of neurologic abnormalities. These findings suggest preventive measures to reduce unwarranted litigation and certain cases of neonatal brain damage. PMID:6730485

  15. A case of neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Malecki, J M

    1991-03-01

    The morbidity and mortality from neonatal tetanus are preventable. It is largely a disease of developing countries. This single case of neonatal tetanus in southern Florida must serve as an indicator for the need for health care professionals to evaluate the degree of utilization of maternal health services and the impact of immunization programs for those women at risk, in this case, women who have migrated from developing countries. PMID:2000534

  16. The use of non-insulin anti-diabetic agents to improve glycemia without hypoglycemia in the hospital setting: focus on incretins.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stanley; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia in hospital have increased adverse outcomes compared with patients with normoglycemia, and the pathophysiological causes seem relatively well understood. Thus, a rationale for excellent glycemic control exists. Benefits of control with intensive insulin regimes are highly likely based on multiple published studies. However, hypoglycemia frequency increases and adverse outcomes of hypoglycemia accrue. This has resulted in a 'push' for therapeutic nihilism, accepting higher glycemic levels to avoid hypoglycemia. One would ideally prefer to optimize glycemia, treating hyperglycemia while minimizing or avoiding hypoglycemia. Thus, one would welcome therapies and processes of care to optimize this benefit/ risk ratio. We review the logic and early studies that suggest that incretin therapy use in-hospital can achieve this ideal. We strongly urge randomized prospective controlled studies to test our proposal and we offer a process of care to facilitate this research and their use in our hospitalized patients. PMID:24515252

  17. Determining Prevalence of Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Developing Countries

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-11

    Demonstrate BIND II Score of >=5, is Valid for Detecting Moderate to Severe ABE in Neonates <14 Days Old.; Demonstrate Community-BIND Instrument, a Modified BIND II, is a Valid and Reliable Tool for Detecting ABE.; Demonstrate That Community-BIND Can be Used for Acquiring Population-based Prevalence of ABE in the Community.

  18. Risk estimates for neonatal myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Glånz, A; Fråser, F C

    1984-01-01

    Children who inherit the autosomal dominant gene for myotonic dystrophy from their mother rather than their father may develop the severe neonatal type rather than the late onset type. The families of 22 neonatal type probands and 59 late onset type probands were studied to determine the risk of occurrence and recurrence of the neonatal type. The frequency of the neonatal type in sibs of neonatal type probands was 29%, or 37% if cases of neonatal deaths are counted as affected. This is significantly higher than the 6% of the neonatal type found in the offspring of affected women not ascertained through a child with the neonatal type. These data suggest that certain women carrying the gene for myotonic dystrophy are predisposed to have children affected with the neonatal type rather than the late onset type. The female near relatives of these women do not seem to share this predisposition. The data should be useful for genetic counseling. PMID:6748014

  19. Hypoglycemia Reduction and Changes in Hemoglobin A1c in the ASPIRE In-Home Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Garg, Satish K.; Bode, Bruce W.; Bailey, Timothy S.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Schultz, Kenneth A.; Welsh, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: ASPIRE In-Home randomized 247 subjects with type 1 diabetes to sensor-augmented pump therapy with or without the Threshold Suspend (TS) feature, which interrupts insulin delivery at a preset sensor glucose value. We studied the effects of TS on nocturnal hypoglycemia (NH) in relation to baseline hemoglobin A1c (A1C) and change in A1C during the study. Materials and Methods: NH event rates and mean area under curve (AUC) of NH events were evaluated at different levels of baseline A1C (<7%, 7–8%, and >8%) and at different levels of changes in A1C (less than −0.3% [decreased], −0.3% to 0.3% [stable], and >0.3% [increased]), in the TS Group compared with the Control Group (sensor-augmented pump only). Results: In the TS Group, 27.9% of the NH events were accompanied by a confirmatory blood glucose value, compared with 39.3% in the Control Group. Among subjects with baseline A1C levels of <7% or 7–8%, those in the TS Group had significantly lower NH event rates than those in the Control Group (P=0.001 and P=0.004, respectively). Among subjects with decreased or stable A1C levels, those in the TS Group had significantly lower NH event rates, and the events had lower AUCs (P≤0.001 for each). Among subjects with increased A1C levels, those in the TS Group had NH events with significantly lower AUCs (P<0.001). Conclusions: Use of the TS feature was associated with decreases in the rate and severity (as measured by AUC) of NH events in many subjects, including those with low baseline A1C levels and those whose A1C values decreased during the study period. Use of the TS feature can help protect against hypoglycemia in those wishing to intensify diabetes management to achieve target glucose levels. PMID:26237308

  20. ASPIRE In-Home: rationale, design, and methods of a study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of automatic insulin suspension for nocturnal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Bergenstal, Richard M; Garg, Satish K; Bode, Bruce W; Meredith, Melissa; Slover, Robert H; Ahmann, Andrew; Welsh, John B; Lee, Scott W

    2013-07-01

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a barrier to therapy intensification efforts in diabetes. The Paradigm® Veo™ system may mitigate nocturnal hypoglycemia by automatically suspending insulin when a prespecified sensor glucose threshold is reached. ASPIRE (Automation to Simulate Pancreatic Insulin REsponse) In-Home (NCT01497938) was a multicenter, randomized, parallel, adaptive study of subjects with type 1 diabetes. The control arm used sensor-augmented pump therapy. The treatment arm used sensor-augmented pump therapy with threshold suspend, which automatically suspends the insulin pump in response to a sensor glucose value at or below a prespecified threshold. To be randomized, subjects had to have demonstrated ≥2 episodes of nocturnal hypoglycemia, defined as >20 consecutive minutes of sensor glucose values ≤65 mg/dl starting between 10:00 PM and 8:00 AM in the 2-week run-in phase. The 3-month study phase evaluated safety by comparing changes in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) values and evaluated efficacy by comparing the mean area under the glucose concentration time curves for nocturnal hypoglycemia events in the two groups. Other outcomes included the rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia events and the distribution of sensor glucose values. Data from the ASPIRE In-Home study should provide evidence on the safety of the threshold suspend feature with respect to A1C and its efficacy with respect to severity and duration of nocturnal hypoglycemia when used at home over a 3-month period.

  1. Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia Suppresses Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex and Impairs Sensorimotor Gating in the Posthypoglycemic Period in Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Mitchell, Eugena P; Tran, Phu V; Gewirtz, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is common in infants and children. In developing rat models, recurrent moderate hypoglycemia leads to neuronal injury in the medial prefrontal cortex. To understand the effects beyond neuronal injury, 3-week-old male rats were subjected to 5 episodes of moderate hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, approx. 30 mg/dl for 90 min) once daily from postnatal day 24 to 28. Neuronal injury was determined using Fluoro-Jade B histochemistry on postnatal day 29. The effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) expression, which is critical for prefrontal cortex development, were determined on postnatal day 29 and at adulthood. The effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated function were determined by assessing the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex on postnatal day 29 and 2 weeks later, and by testing for fear-potentiated startle at adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia led to neuronal injury confined primarily to the medial prefrontal cortex. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex was suppressed on postnatal day 29 and was accompanied by lower prepulse inhibition, suggesting impaired sensorimotor gating. Following the cessation of recurrent hypoglycemia, the prepulse inhibition had recovered at 2 weeks. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex had normalized and fear-potentiated startle was intact at adulthood. Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia during development has significant adverse effects on the prefrontal cortex in the posthypoglycemic period. PMID:26820887

  2. Activation of Medulla-Projecting Perifornical Neurons Modulates the Adrenal Sympathetic Response to Hypoglycemia: Involvement of Orexin Type 2 (OX2-R) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Korim, Willian S; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J; Verberne, Anthony J M

    2016-02-01

    Iatrogenic hypoglycemia in response to insulin treatment is commonly experienced by patients with type 1 diabetes and can be life threatening. The body releases epinephrine in an attempt to counterregulate hypoglycemia, but the neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. Orexin neurons in the perifornical hypothalamus (PeH) project to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and are likely to be involved in epinephrine secretion during hypoglycemia. In anesthetized rats, we report that hypoglycemia increases the sympathetic preganglionic discharge to the adrenal gland by activating PeH orexin neurons that project to the RVLM (PeH-RVLM). Electrophysiological characterization shows that the majority of identified PeH-RVLM neurons, including a subpopulation of orexin neurons, are activated in response to hypoglycemia or glucoprivation. Furthermore, the excitatory input from the PeH is mediated by orexin type 2 receptors in the RVLM. These results suggest that activation of orexin PeH-RVLM neurons and orexin type 2 receptors in the RVLM facilitates epinephrine release by increasing sympathetic drive to adrenal chromaffin cells during hypoglycemia.

  3. Clinical heterogeneity of neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency: case reports from 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Yusaku; Kobayashi, Keiko; Abukawa, Daiki; Nagata, Ikuo; Maisawa, Shunichi; Sumazaki, Ryo; Iizuka, Toshiyuki; Hosoda, Yoshito; Okamoto, Manabu; Murakami, Jun; Kaji, Shunsaku; Tabata, Ayako; Lu, Yao Bang; Sakamoto, Osamu; Matsui, Akira; Kanzaki, Susumu; Takada, Goro; Saheki, Takeyori; Iinuma, Kazuie; Ohura, Toshihiro

    2004-11-01

    A deficiency of citrin, which is encoded by the SLC25A13 gene, causes both adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis (NICCD). We analyzed 16 patients with NICCD to clarify the clinical features of the disease. Severe intrahepatic cholestasis with fatty liver was the most common symptom, but the accompanying clinical features were variable, namely; suspected cases of neonatal hepatitis or biliary atresia, positive results from newborn screening, tyrosinemia, failure to thrive, hemolytic anemia, bleeding tendencies and ketotic hypoglycemia. Laboratory data showed elevated serum bile acid levels, hypoproteinemia, low levels of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors, and hypergalactosemia. Hypercitrullinemia was detected in 11 out of 15 patients examined. Most of the patients were given a lactose-free and/or medium chain triglycerides-enriched formula and lipid-soluble vitamins. The prognosis of the 16 patients is going fairy well at present, but we should observe these patients carefully to see if they manifest any symptom of CTLN2 in the future.

  4. Complex III deficiency due to an in-frame MT-CYB deletion presenting as ketotic hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mari; Goldstein, Jennifer; Young, Sarah P; Bossen, Edward H; Shoffner, John; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-09-01

    Complex III deficiency due to a MT-CYB mutation has been reported in patients with myopathy. Here, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia and carnitine deficiency. Electron transport chain analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing on muscle tissue lead to the eventual diagnosis of complex III deficiency. This case demonstrates the critical role of muscle biopsies in a myopathy work-up, and the clinical efficacy of supplement therapy. PMID:26937408

  5. Coordinated changes in hepatic amino acid metabolism and endocrine signals support hepatic glucose production during fetal hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Houin, Satya S.; Rozance, Paul J.; Brown, Laura D.; Hay, William W.; Wilkening, Randall B.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced fetal glucose supply, induced experimentally or as a result of placental insufficiency, produces an early activation of fetal glucose production. The mechanisms and substrates used to fuel this increased glucose production rate remain unknown. We hypothesized that in response to hypoglycemia, induced experimentally with maternal insulin infusion, the fetal liver would increase uptake of lactate and amino acids (AA), which would combine with hormonal signals to support hepatic glucose production. To test this hypothesis, metabolic studies were done in six late gestation fetal sheep to measure hepatic glucose and substrate flux before (basal) and after [days (d)1 and 4] the start of hypoglycemia. Maternal and fetal glucose concentrations decreased by 50% on d1 and d4 (P < 0.05). The liver transitioned from net glucose uptake (basal, 5.1 ± 1.5 μmol/min) to output by d4 (2.8 ± 1.4 μmol/min; P < 0.05 vs. basal). The [U-13C]glucose tracer molar percent excess ratio across the liver decreased over the same period (basal: 0.98 ± 0.01, vs. d4: 0.89 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Total hepatic AA uptake, but not lactate or pyruvate uptake, increased by threefold on d1 (P < 0.05) and remained elevated throughout the study. This AA uptake was driven largely by decreased glutamate output and increased glycine uptake. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin were 50% lower, while cortisol and glucagon concentrations increased 56 and 86% during hypoglycemia (P < 0.05 for basal vs. d4). Thus increased hepatic AA uptake, rather than pyruvate or lactate uptake, and decreased fetal plasma insulin and increased cortisol and glucagon concentrations occur simultaneously with increased fetal hepatic glucose output in response to fetal hypoglycemia. PMID:25516551

  6. Hindbrain lactostasis regulates hypothalamic AMPK activity and metabolic neurotransmitter mRNA and protein responses to hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Amit D; Ibrahim, Baher A; Tamrakar, Pratistha; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Briski, Karen P

    2014-04-01

    Nerve cell metabolic activity is monitored in multiple brain regions, including the hypothalamus and hindbrain dorsal vagal complex (DVC), but it is unclear if individual metabolosensory loci operate autonomously or interact to coordinate central nervous system (CNS) reactivity to energy imbalance. This research addressed the hypothesis that hypoglycemia-associated DVC lactoprivation stimulates hypothalamic AMPK activity and metabolic neurotransmitter expression. As DVC catecholaminergic neurons express biomarkers for metabolic monitoring, we investigated whether these cells are a source of lactate deficit signaling to the hypothalamus. Caudal fourth ventricle (CV4) infusion of the glucose metabolite l-lactate during insulin-induced hypoglycemia reversed changes in DVC A2 noradrenergic, arcuate neuropeptide Y (NPY) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and lateral hypothalamic orexin-A (ORX) neuronal AMPK activity, coincident with exacerbation of hypoglycemia. Hindbrain lactate repletion also blunted hypoglycemic upregulation of arcuate NPY mRNA and protein. This treatment did not alter hypoglycemic paraventricular oxytocin (OT) and lateral hypothalamic ORX mRNA profiles, but exacerbated or reversed adjustments in OT and ORX neuropeptide synthesis, respectively. CV4 delivery of the monocarboxylate transporter inhibitor, 4-CIN, increased A2 phosphoAMPK (pAMPK), elevated circulating glucose, and stimulated feeding, responses that were attenuated by 6-hydroxydopamine pretreatment. 4-CIN-infused rats exhibited increased (NPY, ORX neurons) or decreased (POMC neurons) pAMPK concurrent with hyperglycemia. These data show that hindbrain lactoprivic signaling regulates hypothalamic AMPK and key effector neurotransmitter responses to hypoglycemia. Evidence that A2 AMPK activity is lactate-dependent, and that DVC catecholamine cells are critical for lactoprivic control of glucose, feeding, and hypothalamic AMPK, implies A2 derivation of this metabolic regulatory stimulus.

  7. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  8. Rings, slings, and other tracheal disorders in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Javia, Luv; Harris, Matthew A; Fuller, Stephanie

    2016-08-01

    Tracheal and bronchial pathologies in the neonate can be rapidly fatal if prenatal or quick postnatal diagnosis and intervention is not performed. Close multidisciplinary collaboration between multiple medical and surgical specialties is vital to the effective diagnosis and treatment of these pathologies. The fetal and neonatal airway may be affected or compromised by more prevalent pathologies such as tracheomalacia and tracheo-esophageal fistula with esophageal atresia. However, it is imperative that we also consider other potential sources that may perhaps be less familiar such as congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, tracheal stenosis, complete tracheal rings, tracheal sleeve, and foregut duplication cysts. Modern imaging studies and surgical techniques are allowing us to better serve these children. PMID:27090408

  9. Risk factors for infantile hypothermia in early neonatal life.

    PubMed

    Zabelle, J; Dagan, R; Neumann, L; Sofer, S

    1990-06-01

    Hypothermia in infancy is not uncommon among the low socioeconomic population in various parts of the world. It is prevalent in Israel and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. We tried to identify neonates at risk among the population of the Negev district of Israel. Ninety-one infant hospitalized with infantile hypothermia (IH) during the years 1974 to 1981 were identified. The neonates belonged to two distinct ethnic groups, Bedouins and Jews, and were compared with 120 healthy controls of similar background. Our data show that premature infants and babies with low birth weight born during the cold season to young (inexperienced) mothers of lower socioeconomic strata and who sustained perinatal morbidity are at risk for IH. It is suggested that parents of infants at risk should be approached while the baby is till in the nursery, be advised about the possibility of hypothermia, and institute the appropriate preventive measures.

  10. Inactivation of the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, and familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.M.; Wohllk, N.; Huang, E.

    1996-09-01

    Familial persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy is a disorder of glucose homeostasis and is characterized by unregulated insulin secretion and profound hypoglycemia. Loss-of-function mutations in the second nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea receptor, a subunit of the pancreatic-islet {beta}-cell ATP-dependent potassium channel, has been demonstrated to be causative for persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. We now describe three additional mutations in the first nucleotide-binding fold of the sulfonylurea-receptor gene. One point mutation disrupts the highly conserved Walker A motif of the first nucleotide-binding-fold region. The other two mutations occur in noncoding sequences required for RNA processing and are predicted to disrupt the normal splicing pathway of the sulfonylurea-receptor mRNA precursor. These data suggest that both nucleotide-binding-fold regions of the sulfortylurea receptor are required for normal regulation of {beta}-cell ATP-dependent potassium channel activity and insulin secretion. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  12. Overview of neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benay

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal lupus (NL) is defined by the presentation of the fetus and the newborn who possess autoantibodies received from the mother. It is the dysfunction of the maternal immune system that leads to the production of autoantibodies to anti-Sjögren syndrome-A, anti-Sjögren syndrome-B, and anti-ribonuclear protein antigens. These antibodies are shared through the placenta and produce bodily changes in the fetal skin and heart, as well as potential changes in other body systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most dangerous manifestation of NL that can occur in utero or after birth. This article will provide an overview the presentation of NL and current therapies. Prenatal steroids have been the mainstay of therapy to try to reverse first- and second-degree congenital heart block and to prevent progression to a more advanced stage. New therapies are combining steroids with intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. This article will provide guidelines for practitioners so they can consider NL as a differential diagnosis when presented with cutaneous lesions, congenital heart block, or abnormal findings in the hematologic, hepatobiliary, neurologic, and musculoskeletal systems.

  13. Neonatal infrared axillary thermometry.

    PubMed

    Seguin, J; Terry, K

    1999-01-01

    The authors compared axillary skin temperatures (AT) measured with an infrared (IR) thermometer (Lightouch Neonate, Exergen Corp) with rectal temperatures (RT) in 16 newly born term infants under radiant warmers (RW) and in cribs. Twelve stable, growing premature infants in incubators were also studied. This new device may be useful because of safety and rapid results (1 second), but clinical accuracy is unknown. For term infants, mean (SD) RT-AT difference was 0.1 (0.48) degree C under RW and 0.25 (0.17) degree C 2 hours later in cribs. For premature infants in incubators the mean RT-AT difference was 0.09 (0.16) degree C. Axillary temperatures measured by IR thermometer approximate RT for newly born term infants in cribs and stable premature infants in incubators. For newly born term infants under RW, RT-AT differences vary more widely, limiting clinical usefulness in this setting. The device, the unique age of this population, and the RW environment may play a role. PMID:9924640

  14. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  15. A glucagon analog chemically stabilized for immediate treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chabenne, Joseph; Chabenne, Maria Dimarchi; Zhao, Yan; Levy, Jay; Smiley, David; Gelfanov, Vasily; Dimarchi, Richard

    2014-06-01

    For more than half a century glucagon has been used as a critical care medicine in the treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia. It is commercially supplied as a lyophilized powder intended to be solubilized in dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid immediately prior to administration. We have envisioned a "ready-to-use" glucagon as a drug of more immediate and likely use. Through a series of iterative changes in the native sequence we have identified glucagon analogs of appreciably enhanced aqueous solubility at physiological pH, and of chemical stability suitable for routine medicinal use. The superior biophysical properties were achieved in part through adjustment of the isoelectric point by use of a C-terminal Asp-Glu dipeptide. The native glutamines at positions 3, 20 and 24 as well as the methionine at 27 were substituted with amino acids of enhanced chemical stability, as directed by a full alanine scan of the native hormone. Of utmost additional importance was the dramatically enhanced stability of the peptide when Ser16 was substituted with alpha,aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), a substitution that stabilizes peptide secondary structure. The collective set of changes yield glucagon analogs of comparable in vitro and in vivo biological character to native hormone but with biophysical properties much more suitable for clinical use. PMID:24749059

  16. Abnormal Nocturnal Behavior due to Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kwang Ik; Kim, Hyung Ki; Baek, Jeehun; Kim, Doh-Eui; Park, Hyung Kook

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal nocturnal behavior can have many causes, including primary sleep disorder, nocturnal seizures, and underlying medical or neurological disorders. A 79-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes was admitted for evaluation of abnormal nocturnal behavior. Every night at around 04:30 she was observed displaying abnormal behavior including leg shaking, fumbling with bedclothes, crawling around the room with her eyes closed, and non-responsiveness to verbal communication. Polysomnography with 20-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was performed. EEG showed that the posterior dominant rhythm was slower than that observed in the initial EEG, with diffuse theta and delta activities intermixed, and no epileptiform activity. The serum glucose level was 35 mg/dL at that time, and both the EEG findings and clinical symptoms were resolved after an intravenous injection of 50 mL of 50% glucose. These results indicate that nocturnal hypoglycemia should be considered as one of the possible etiologies in patients presenting with abnormal nocturnal behavior. PMID:26943712

  17. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Presenting as Hypoglycemia due to Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwal Rim; Shim, Young Seok; Lee, Hae Sang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) mutation is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet, and anterior pituitary tumors. The incidence of insulinoma in MEN is relatively uncommon, and there have been a few cases of MEN manifested with insulinoma as the first symptom in children. We experienced a 9-year-old girl having a familial MEN1 mutation. She complained of dizziness, occasional palpitation, weakness, hunger, sweating, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure that lasted for 5 minutes early in the morning. At first, she was only diagnosed with insulinoma by abdominal magnetic resonance images of a 1.3 x 1.5 cm mass in the pancreas and high insulin levels in blood of the hepatic vein, but after her father was diagnosed with MEN1. We found she had familial MEN1 mutation, and she recovered hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after enucleation of the mass. Therefore, the early genetic identification of MEN1 mutation is considerable for children with at least one manifestation. PMID:27247513

  18. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 Presenting as Hypoglycemia due to Insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eun Byul; Jeong, Hwal Rim; Shim, Young Seok; Lee, Hae Sang; Hwang, Jin Soon

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) mutation is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet, and anterior pituitary tumors. The incidence of insulinoma in MEN is relatively uncommon, and there have been a few cases of MEN manifested with insulinoma as the first symptom in children. We experienced a 9-year-old girl having a familial MEN1 mutation. She complained of dizziness, occasional palpitation, weakness, hunger, sweating, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure that lasted for 5 minutes early in the morning. At first, she was only diagnosed with insulinoma by abdominal magnetic resonance images of a 1.3 x 1.5 cm mass in the pancreas and high insulin levels in blood of the hepatic vein, but after her father was diagnosed with MEN1. We found she had familial MEN1 mutation, and she recovered hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after enucleation of the mass. Therefore, the early genetic identification of MEN1 mutation is considerable for children with at least one manifestation. PMID:27247513

  19. Solitary fibrous tumor of the liver with CD 34 positivity and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, A; Frameglia, M; Iuzzolino, P; Martignoni, G; De Manzoni, G; Laterza, E; Veraldi, G F; Girlanda, R

    1998-01-01

    We report a new case of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the liver, an extremely rare neoplasm. Including the present case no more than ten cases are reported in the English-language literature. To date there is no definite proof of the origin of this tumor. Both mesothelial and fibroblas-tic genesis has been postulated. The monoclonal antibody CD 34 has recently been used for the characterization of SFT. SFT would appear to be histogenetically related to a CD 34 - positive fibroblastic stem cell. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our department with epigastric and right hypochondriac pain, weight loss, and hypoglycemia. Ultrasonography and computed tomography demonstrated a large heterogeneous mass in the right hepatic lobe. A right hepatectomy was performed. The tumor weighed 2850 g and microscopic section revealed a peculiar random pattern, the so-called patternless pattern of spindle tumor cells separated by abundant thick collagen bands. The tumor presented a number of highly cellular areas composed of plump spindle cell with hyperchromatic nuclei and rare mitotic figures. Ninety percent of the neoplastic cells displayed strong immunoreactivity for CD 34/My 10. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient is alive and well without recurrence 6 years after surgery.

  20. Eucaloric Ketogenic Diet Reduces Hypoglycemia and Inflammation in Mice with Endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Nandivada, Prathima; Fell, Gillian L; Pan, Amy H; Nose, Vania; Ling, Pei-Ra; Bistrian, Bruce R; Puder, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Dietary strategies to alter the immune response to acute inflammation have the potential to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. A eucaloric ketogenic diet (EKD), composed predominantly of fat with very small amounts of carbohydrate, can provide adequate caloric support while minimizing spikes in blood glucose and reducing oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an EKD on glycemic control and the inflammatory response after acute endotoxemia in mice. Mice received either an EKD or a carbohydrate-based control diet (CD) for 4 weeks. Animals subsequently underwent either a 2-h fast (postprandial) or an overnight fast (postabsorptive), and half of the animals in each diet group were randomized to receive either intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (1 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline. Glycemic response, insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokine levels, and the expression of key inflammatory and metabolic genes were measured. After endotoxin challenge, hypoglycemia was more frequent in mice fed a CD than an EKD in the postprandial period. This was due in part to the preservation of hepatic glycogen stores despite endotoxin exposure and prolonged fasting in mice fed an EKD. Furthermore, mice fed the CD had higher levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the postabsorptive period, with a fivefold higher expression of hepatic NFκB compared to mice fed the EKD in both fasting periods. These results suggest that the unique metabolic state induced by an EKD can alter the response to acute inflammation in mice. PMID:27117864

  1. Glucose utilization in a patient with hepatoma and hypoglycemia. Assessment by a positron emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, R C; Carson, R E; Orloff, D G; Cochran, C S; Perdue, J F; Rechler, M M; Lanau, F; Roberts, C T; Shapiro, J; Roth, J

    1992-01-01

    Tumor glucose use in patients with non-islet-cell tumors has been difficult to measure, particularly in hepatoma, because of hepatic involvement by neoplasm. We studied a patient with nonhepatic recurrence of hepatoma after successful liver transplantation. Tumor tissue contained messenger RNA for insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), and circulating high molecular weight components and E-peptide of IGF-II were increased. Glucose use measured by isotope dilution with [3-3H]glucose was 7.94 mg/kg fat-free mass per min, and splanchnic glucose production was 0.93 mg/kg fat-free mass per min. Glucose uptake and glucose model parameters were independently measured in tissues by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Glucose uptake by heart muscle, liver, skeletal muscle, and neoplasm accounted for 0.8, 14, 44, and 15% of total glucose use, respectively. Model parameters in liver and neoplasm were not significantly different, and glucose transport and phosphorylation were twofold and fourfold greater than in muscle. This suggests that circulating IGF-II-like proteins are partial insulin agonists, and that hypoglycemia in hepatoma with IGF-II production is predominantly due to glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and suppression of glucose production. PMID:1318326

  2. Neonatal hemochromatosis in monochorionic twins.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, L; Baştuğ, O; Daar, G; Doğanay, S; Deniz, K; Kurtoğlu, S

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a form of neonatal liver failure caused by maternal-fetal alloimmune injury to hepatocytes. The etiology of neonatal hemochromatosis is not exactly understood. However, according to one theory neonatal hemochromatosis is believed to be an alloimmune disorder causing liver injury in the fetus. In order to diagnose neonatal hemochromatosis there are some criteria that should be taken into account, such as positive family history, high serum ferritin levels, high serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and siderosis demonstrated by histology or with magnetic resonance.We present a case of a monochorionic newborn twin who applied to our hospital with sepsis clinical symptoms like clinics, was diagnosed with NH and immediately treated with antioxidant therapy while the other twin with same clinical symptoms did not respond to therapy and passed away. NH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with sepsis-like clinical symptoms that do not respond to antibiotics; early antioxidant therapy in these cases is lifesaving. PMID:26836824

  3. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    PubMed

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  4. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20th week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30th week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  5. Fetal and neonatal thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Chandar Mohan

    2013-10-01

    Fetal thyrotoxicosis is a rare disease occurring in 1 out of 70 pregnancies with Grave's disease or in 1 out of 4000-50,000 deliveries. The mortality is 12-20%, usually from heart failure, but other complications are tracheal compression, infections and thrombocytopenia. It results from transfer of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins from mother to fetus through the placenta. This transplacental transfer begins around 20(th) week of pregnancy and reaches its maximum by 30(th) week. These autoantibodies bind to the fetal thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptors and increase the secretion of the thyroid hormones. The mother has an active autoimmune thyroid disease or has been treated for it in the past. She may be absolutely euthyroid due to past treatment by drugs, surgery or radioiodine ablation, but still have active TSH receptor stimulating autoantibodies, which can cause fetal thyrotoxicosis. The other features of this disease are fetal tachycardia, fetal goiter and history of spontaneous abortions and findings of goiter, ascites, craniosyntosis, fetal growth retardation, maceration and hydrops at fetal autopsy. If untreated, this disease can result in intrauterine death. The treatment for this disease consists of giving carbimazole to the mother, which is transferred through the placenta to the fetus. The dose of carbimazole is titrated with the fetal heart rate. If the mother becomes hypothyroid due to carbimazole, thyroxine is added taking advantage of the fact that very little of thyroxine is transferred across the placenta. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis patients are very sick and require emergency treatment. The goal of the treatment is to normalize thyroid functions as quickly as possible, to avoid iatrogenic hypothyroidism while providing management and supportive therapy for the infant's specific signs and symptoms. PMID:24251220

  6. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %. PMID:27229489

  7. Nonpolio enterovirus infections in neonates.

    PubMed

    Haston, Julia C; Dixon, Terry C

    2015-05-01

    There are currently 12 species and over 100 serotypes that have been identified in the enterovirus genus, including the coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and polioviruses. Since their discovery 65 years ago, much has been discovered and continues to be researched regarding the pathogenicity and scope of disease of nonpolio enteroviruses. Like many infections, enteroviruses have been found to affect neonates much differently, and often more severely, than older children and adults. Neonatal infections often cause mild illnesses with nonspecific symptoms, but they may also have severe presentations involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hematologic, or central nervous systems. This article provides an overview of what is known about nonpolio enteroviruses in neonates including epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

  8. Neonatal Hemophilia: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Proença, Elisa; Godinho, Cristina; Oliveira, Dulce; Guedes, Ana; Morais, Sara; Carvalho, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding. PMID:26734126

  9. 21 CFR 880.5400 - Neonatal incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal incubator. 880.5400 Section 880.5400 Food... § 880.5400 Neonatal incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal incubator is a device consisting of a... humidity, a control valve through which oxygen may be added, and access ports for nursing care....

  10. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Agrawal, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus. PMID:24741257

  11. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  12. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection.

  13. Comparative Study of Hearing Impairment among Healthy and Intensive Care unit Neonates in Mashhad, North East Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Ahmadshah; Ghasemi, Mohammad Mehdi; Akhondian, Javad; Mohammadzadeh, Ashraf; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Amiri, Rana; Raoof Saeb, Ali Asqar; Tale, Mohammad Reza; Madani Sani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2001 statistics, hearing disorders are the most common congenital disease, and the incidence rate among high-risk newborns is as much as ten times as high as that in healthy neonates. However, 78% of screening test failures are well-baby nursery babies. The Joint Committee on Infants’ Hearing (JCIH) has emphasized the importance of early diagnosis and treatment in neonates with hearing impairments in order to preserve their maximum linguistic skills. The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of hearing loss among babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the rooming-in unit (RIU). Materials and Methods: Neonates born in three hospitals in Mashhad between 2008 to 2010 were studied prospectively and screened for auditory disorders using the oto acoustic emission (OAE) test at the time of discharge and 3 weeks later. To confirm hearing loss, the auditory steady state response (ASSR) test was used among those participants who failed both OAE tests. Results: Two-thousand and sixty-three neonates from the NICU were screened and compared with a control group consisting of 8,724 neonates from the RIU or the well-baby nursery. At the end of the study, hearing impairment as confirmed by failure in the ASSR test was diagnosed in 31 neonates (26 in the control group [0.30%] and five in the NICU group [1.94%]). Conclusion: In our study, the prevalence of hearing disorders among NICU neonates was 6.5-times greater than that among babies from the RIU or well-baby unit. This observation demonstrates the importance of universal screening programs particularly for high-risk population neonates. PMID:26788475

  14. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  15. Estrogen regulates energy metabolic pathway and upstream adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and phosphatase enzyme expression in dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neurons during glucostasis and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Ibrahim, Baher A; Gujar, Amit D; Briski, Karen P

    2015-02-01

    The ability of estrogen to shield the brain from the bioenergetic insult hypoglycemia is unclear. Estradiol (E) prevents hypoglycemic activation of the energy deficit sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hindbrain metabolosensory A2 noradrenergic neurons. This study investigates the hypothesis that estrogen regulates A2 AMPK through control of fuel metabolism and/or upstream protein kinase/phosphatase enzyme expression. A2 cells were harvested by laser microdissection after insulin or vehicle (V) injection of E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats. Cell lysates were evaluated by immunoblot for glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, and acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA pathway enzymes. A2 phosphofructokinase (PFKL), isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase subunit profiles were elevated in E/V vs. O/V; hypoglycemia augmented PFKL and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression in E only. Hypoglycemia increased A2 Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-β in O and reduced protein phosphatase in both groups. A2 phospho-AMPK levels were equivalent in O/V vs. E/V but elevated during hypoglycemia in O only. These results implicate E in compensatory upregulation of substrate catabolism and corresponding maintenance of energy stability of A2 metabolosensory neurons during hypoglycemia, outcomes that support the potential viability of molecular substrates for hormone action as targets for therapies alleviating hypoglycemic brain injury.

  16. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  17. Neonatal posterior fossa subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Coker, S; Beltran, R; Fine, M

    1987-07-01

    Hemorrhage into the posterior fossa is a rare neurosurgical emergency in neonates. CT scanning is diagnostic. Blood layering under the apex of the tentorium cerebelli, however, may resemble a dilated vascular structure, and the rigidity of the pressured tentorium may prevent upward transmission of increased intracranial pressure, resulting in a soft fontanelle.

  18. Standardisation of neonatal clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Z A; Giuliani, F; Haroon, A; Knight, H E; Albernaz, E; Batra, M; Bhat, B; Bertino, E; McCormick, K; Ochieng, R; Rajan, V; Ruyan, P; Cheikh Ismail, L; Paul, V

    2013-09-01

    The International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21(st) Century (INTERGROWTH-21(st) ) is a large-scale, population-based, multicentre project involving health institutions from eight geographically diverse countries, which aims to assess fetal, newborn and preterm growth under optimal conditions. Given the multicentre nature of the project and the expected number of preterm births, it is vital that all centres follow the same standardised clinical care protocols to assess and manage preterm infants, so as to ensure maximum validity of the resulting standards as indicators of growth and nutrition with minimal confounding. Moreover, it is well known that evidence-based clinical practice guidelines can reduce the delivery of inappropriate care and support the introduction of new knowledge into clinical practice. The INTERGROWTH-21(st) Neonatal Group produced an operations manual, which reflects the consensus reached by members of the group regarding standardised definitions of neonatal morbidities and the minimum standards of care to be provided by all centres taking part in the project. The operational definitions and summary management protocols were developed by consensus through a Delphi process based on systematic reviews of relevant guidelines and management protocols by authoritative bodies. This paper describes the process of developing the Basic Neonatal Care Manual, as well as the morbidity definitions and standardised neonatal care protocols applied across all the INTERGROWTH-21(st) participating centres. Finally, thoughts about implementation strategies are presented.

  19. Arginine production in the neonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous arginine synthesis in adults is a complex multiorgan process, in which citrulline is synthesized in the gut, enters the general circulation, and is converted into arginine in the kidney, by what is known as the intestinal-renal axis. In neonates, the enzymes required to convert citrulline...

  20. Photodegradation of riboflavin in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, T.R.

    1987-04-01

    The biologically most important flavins are riboflavin and its related nucleotides, all highly sensitive to light. It is because of its photoreactivity and its presence in almost all body fluids and tissues that riboflavin assumes importance in phototherapy of neonatal jaundice. The absorption maxima of both bilirubin and riboflavin in the body are nearly identical: 445-450 (447) nm. In consequence, blue visible light will cause photoisomerization of bilirubin accompanied by photodegradation of riboflavin. This results in diminished erythrocyte glutathione reductase, which indicates generalized tissue riboflavin deficiency and red cell lysis. Single- and double-strand breaks in intracellular DNA have occurred with phototherapy. This light exposure of neonates may result also in alterations of bilirubin-albumin binding in the presence of both riboflavin and theophylline (the latter frequently given to prevent neonatal apnea). Many newborns, especially if premature, have low stores of riboflavin at birth. The absorptive capacity of premature infants for enteral riboflavin is likewise reduced. Consequently, inherently low stores and low intake of riboflavin plus phototherapy for neonatal jaundice will cause a deficiency of riboflavin at a critical period for the newborn. Supplementation to those infants most likely to develop riboflavin deficiency is useful, but dosage, time, and mode of administration to infants undergoing phototherapy must be carefully adjusted to avoid unwanted side effects.

  1. Robust classification of neonatal apnoea-related desaturations.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Violeta; Burgess, Fred; Clifford, Gari D

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory signals monitored in the neonatal intensive care units are usually ignored due to the high prevalence of noise and false alarms (FA). Apneic events are generally therefore indicated by a pulse oximeter alarm reacting to the subsequent desaturation. However, the high FA rate in the photoplethysmogram may desensitize staff, reducing the reaction speed. The main reason for the high FA rates of critical care monitors is the unimodal analysis behaviour. In this work, we propose a multimodal analysis framework to reduce the FA rate in neonatal apnoea monitoring. Information about oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate and signal quality was extracted from electrocardiogram, impedance pneumogram and photoplethysmographic signals for a total of 20 features in the 5 min interval before a desaturation event. 1616 desaturation events from 27 neonatal admissions were annotated by two independent reviewers as true (physiologically relevant) or false (noise-related). Patients were divided into two independent groups for training and validation, and a support vector machine was trained to classify the events as true or false. The best classification performance was achieved on a combination of 13 features with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 100% in the training set, and a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 91% and an accuracy of 90% in the validation set.

  2. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tahirkheli, Noor N; Cherry, Amanda S; Tackett, Alayna P; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Gillaspy, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD) goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions. PMID:25473317

  3. Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered “risky,” including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient–provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  4. Intimate partner violence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered "risky," including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient-provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  5. Neonatal Informatics: Information Technology to Support Handoffs in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jonathan P; Van Eaton, Erik G; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Communication failures during physician handoffs represent a significant source of preventable adverse events. Computerized sign-out tools linked to hospital electronic medical record systems and customized for neonatal care can facilitate standardization of the handoff process and access to clinical information, thereby improving communication and reducing adverse events. It is important to note, however, that adoption of technological tools alone is not sufficient to remedy flawed communication processes. OBJECTIVES: After completing this article, readers should be able to: Identify key elements of a computerized sign-out tool.Describe how an electronic tool might be customized for neonatal care.Appreciate that technological tools are only one component of the handoff process they are designed to facilitate.

  6. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  7. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  8. Epidemiology of early neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, N K; Bharambe, M S; Garg, B S; Mathur, J S; Goswami, K

    1994-01-01

    During 1981-1991 at a rural teaching hospital (Kasturba Hospital) of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences in Sevagram, Wardha, India, 454 of 13,939 newborns died during the early neonatal period for an early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR) of 33.7/1000 live births. The ENMR for boys was not significantly different from that for girls (36.1 vs. 28.6). Community medicine specialists analyzed data on these early neonatal deaths to examine distribution of early neonatal mortality, especially its relationship with prematurity, low birth weight, birth order, and by sex. They calculated average percent deaths (APD) per hour to examine the dynamics in early neonatal mortality. The mean age at death was lower among newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (23.47 vs. 26.85 hours; p 0.001). ENMR was higher for newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (41.74% vs. 27.35%; P 0.001). The mean age at death increased as gestation increased (10.34 for 28 weeks; 24.27 for 28-33 weeks, 31.53 for 33-37 weeks, and 34.43 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). ENMR decreased as gestation increased (850 for 28 weeks; 375 for 28-33 weeks, 147.02 for 33-37 weeks, and 8.77 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). The mean age at death increased as birth weight increased for newborns weighing less than 1500 gms through 2000-2500 gms (23.36-37.13 hours; p 0.001). It was lowest among those weighing more 3000 gms (11.55 gms). ENMR fell as birth weight increased (614.33 for 1500 gms, 116.19 for 1500-2000 gms, 19.38 for 2000-2500 gms, 10.99 for 2500-3000 gms, and 5.41 for 3000 gms; p 0.001). The APD/hour for the first hour of life was 3.74% for a relative risk of 12.9. It decreased steadily as the hours of life increased (3.08% for 1-6 hours, 1.19% for 6-24 hours, 0.67% for 24-72 hours, and 0.29% for 72-168 hours). Knowledge of time of likely death can help providers know where they need to focus their attention to prevent early neonatal deaths.

  9. [Heart surgery in neonates (experience with surgery in 420 neonates)].

    PubMed

    Hucín, B; Tláskal, T; Horváth, P; Kostelka, M; Kucera, V; Tax, P; Reich, O; Chaloupecký, V; Skovránek, J; Kopecká, L

    1994-03-01

    In the child cardiocentre in Prague 5-Motol in 1977-1993 a total of 420 neonates with critical inborn heart disease were operated. Obstructive defects of the left heart were found in 178 children, obstructive defects of the right heart in 87, defects with a left-right shunt with pulmonary hypertension in 75, conotruncal malformations in 73 and various operations were made in 7 children. Complete repair of the defect was achieved in 281 neonates, incl. 104 where extracorporeal circulation was used. Palliative operations were made in 139 children. Early mortality during the entire period was 26%, whereby a decrease from 40% to 16% was recorded during the last three years. At present it is possible to repair permanently critical inborn heart disease in the majority of neonates. This is made possible in particular by early non-invasive diagnosis, treatment with prostaglandins E in duct-dependent critical heart disease, optimal time for and selection of most suitable surgery, microsurgical technique, miniaturization of extracorporeal circulation and the method of deep hypothermia. PMID:8184369

  10. Retroperitoneal malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the small pelvis causing recurrent hypoglycemia by secretion of insulin-like growth factor 2.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sigrid; Greco, Francesco; Hamza, Amir; Hoda, Rashid M; Holzhausen, Hans Jürgen; Fornara, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    A 28-yr-old man presented with recurrent reduced consciousness, generalized seizures of unknown etiology, recurrent hypoglycemia, psychomotor retardation, and grade 2 ectasia of the left kidney. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans demonstrated a well-circumscribed suprapubic pelvic mass, measuring 18 x 15 x 11 cm, with involvement of para-aortic lymph nodes and dilatation of the left ureter suggestive of an extragonadal testicular tumor. We excised the tumor by laparotomy, and it was confirmed to be a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). After surgery and R0 tumor resection, the patient had no further evidence of hypoglycemia or of recurrence.

  11. Localized reversible high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted MRI in hypoglycemia: A study of 70 cases

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Masahito; Yoshino, Masami; Aoki, Takeshi; Abumiya, Takeo; Imamura, Hiroyuki; Aida, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that localized reversible high signal intensities in the splenium of the corpus callosum or the basal ganglia appear on diffusion-weighted MRI in the presence of hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to clarify the incidence and significance of such high signal intensity lesions. Results: We analyzed 70 cases of hypoglycemia with consciousness disturbance referred to our outpatient office. Localized reversible high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted MRI were noted in 6 cases (8.6%). They were at the splenium of the corpus callosum in four cases (5.7%), and right frontal cortex and bilateral frontal white matter in one each. Convulsions were noted in five cases, and right hemiparesis was noted in three. None of the three cases of hemiparesis showed localized reversible high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted MRI. These lesions are reversible if the patients undergo treatment without delay. Conclusion: The significance of these lesions is still unclear. However, when a high signal intensity lesion that is not reasonable for the symptom is detected on diffusion-weighted MRI, an immediate check of the blood sugar level is mandatory. PMID:27695547

  12. [Quality of life and problems posed by hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus during oral hypoglycemic therapy].

    PubMed

    Ionova, T I; Odin, V I; Nikitina, T P; Kurbatova, K A; Shablovskaia, N E

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life characteristics, hypoglycemic episodes and patients' attitude toward them were estimated in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the modern recommendations for the patient-oriented treatment with metformin in combination with sulfonylurea derivatives (M+S) therapy, traditional approach, n = 83) and metformin in combination with vildagliptin (M+V therapy, innovative approach, n = 111). M+V therapy ensured a higher quality of life than M+S therapy based on all SF-36 scales. Quality of life parameters corresponded to population norms in most patients given M+V therapy and only in 52% of those treated with M+S. The frequency of hypoglycemic episodes, related concerns, and other problems associated with this condition were less apparent in case of M+V therapy. Transition from M+S to M+V therapy resulted in the improvement of quality of life and reduction in the frequency of hypoglycemia. Quality of life did not change after transition to M+S therapy while the frequency of hypoglycemia and the number of related problems increased. HbA1c levels were similar in both groups (0.8% difference). According to patients' reports M+V therapy is more efficient than M+S; these data allow to comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of therapy and monitor the health state of diabetic patients in the course of treatment. PMID:24437153

  13. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura causing recurrent hypoglycemia by secretion of insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Y; Takada, A; Tateno, M; Sato, H; Koizumi, M; Tanaka, A; Sato, T

    1998-01-01

    A case of malignant solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is reported, occurring in a 61-year-old man with frequent hypoglycemia. Endocrinological analyses showed high serum levels of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and suppressed secretion of insulin. After the removal of a pleural tumor, which weighed 3150 g, serum IGF-II levels returned to normal and hypoglycemic attacks ceased. The tumor was composed of uniform spindle cells arranged in bundles, and fascicles with varying amounts of collagen and reticulin fibers. Mitotic figures at the rate of 6/10 high-power fields, and frequent foci of necrosis and hemorrhage were seen. Almost all of the tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin and CD34. Electron microscopy revealed the immature mesenchymal or myofibroblastic nature of the tumor cells. These findings are consistent with malignant SFT of the pleura. Moreover, the tumor produced IGF-II mRNA as demonstrated by northern blot analysis. Thus, hypoglycemia of this patient was induced by SFT through the production and secretion of IGF-II.

  14. Localized reversible high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted MRI in hypoglycemia: A study of 70 cases

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Masahito; Yoshino, Masami; Aoki, Takeshi; Abumiya, Takeo; Imamura, Hiroyuki; Aida, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is well-known that localized reversible high signal intensities in the splenium of the corpus callosum or the basal ganglia appear on diffusion-weighted MRI in the presence of hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to clarify the incidence and significance of such high signal intensity lesions. Results: We analyzed 70 cases of hypoglycemia with consciousness disturbance referred to our outpatient office. Localized reversible high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted MRI were noted in 6 cases (8.6%). They were at the splenium of the corpus callosum in four cases (5.7%), and right frontal cortex and bilateral frontal white matter in one each. Convulsions were noted in five cases, and right hemiparesis was noted in three. None of the three cases of hemiparesis showed localized reversible high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted MRI. These lesions are reversible if the patients undergo treatment without delay. Conclusion: The significance of these lesions is still unclear. However, when a high signal intensity lesion that is not reasonable for the symptom is detected on diffusion-weighted MRI, an immediate check of the blood sugar level is mandatory.

  15. First report of a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST466 strain causing neonatal sepsis harbouring the blaCTX-M-15 gene in Rabat, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ballén, Victoria; Sáez, Emma; Benmessaoud, Rachid; Houssain, Tligui; Alami, Hassan; Barkat, Amina; Kabiri, Meryem; Moraleda, Cinta; Bezad, Rachid; Vila, Jordi; Bosch, Jordi; Bassat, Quique; Soto, Sara M

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the Gram-negative bacilli most commonly found in urine of pregnant women and causing neonatal sepsis. The aim of this study was to analyse in terms of epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of 23 K. pneumoniae isolates collected from vaginal swabs or urine of pregnant women, from pharyngeal and ear swabs of apparently healthy newborns and from peripheral cultures and hemocultures of newborns with suspected invasive neonatal infection in Rabat, Morocco. The prevalence of K. pneumoniae was 0.6 and 0.9% among pregnant women and neonates, respectively. These strains showed lower antimicrobial resistance levels regarding the developed countries. Thus, only one strain from a neonate presented an ESBL. This is the first report of a K. pneumoniae strain causing neonatal sepsis harbouring the blaCTX-M-15 gene in an IncFII plasmid and belonging to ST466 in this area.

  16. DEA based neonatal lung simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, Samuel; Haemmerle, Enrico; Chang, Robin; O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain

    2011-04-01

    To reduce the likelihood of ventilator induced lung injury a neonatal lung simulator is developed based on Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs). DEAs are particularly suited for this application due to their natural like response as well as their self-sensing ability. By actively controlling the DEA, the pressure and volume inside the lung simulator can be controlled giving rise to active compliance control. Additionally the capacitance of the DEA can be used as a measurement of volume eliminating the integration errors that plague flow sensors. Based on simulations conducted with the FEA package ABAQUS and experimental data, the characteristics of the lung simulator were explored. A relationship between volume and capacitance was derived based on the self sensing of a bubble actuator. This was then used to calculate the compliance of the experimental bubble actuator. The current results are promising and show that mimicking a neonatal lung with DEAs may be possible.

  17. EEG in the neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, M D; de Villepin-Touzery, A

    2015-03-01

    The execution and interpretation of neonatal EEG adheres to strict and specific criteria related to this very early age. In preterm newborns, the dedicated healthcare staff needs to respect EEG indications and chronology of EEG recordings in order to diagnose and manage various pathologies, and use EEG in addition to cerebral imaging. EEG analysis focuses on a global vision of the recording according to the neonate's state of alertness and various age-related patterns. Monitoring of continuous conventional EEG and simplified EEG signal processing can help screen for seizures and monitor the effect of antiepileptic treatment, as well as appreciating changes in EEG background activity, for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. EEG reports should be highly explanatory to meet the expectations of the physician's clinical request.

  18. Neonatal jaundice: the surgical viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Kling, S

    1980-12-20

    There is good evidence that neonatal hepatitis, biliary hypoplasia, biliary atresia and choledochal cyst are different stages of one disease process for which the term infantile obstructive cholangiopathy has been suggested. Thanks to the work of Kasai and the operation of hepatic portoenterostomy the surgical outlook has greatly improved, although in North America it still leaves much to be desired. One cannot procrastinate too long in the hope that the patient's condition will improve spontaneously, because the surgical results are much better when the operation is performed before the patient is 10 weeks old. This article outlines the steps that should be followed in investigating neonatal jaundice, the nonsurgical measures that can be taken in an attempt to reverse or alleviate the underlying condition, and the specific role of the pediatric surgeon in the management of choledochal cyst and biliary atresia.

  19. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  20. Pleural effusion in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sandeep Krishnanand; Butler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A premature neonate who developed respiratory distress in the first few days of life was found to have a pleural effusion, which reaccumulated following drainage. The effusion was demonstrated to be a chylothorax. He required multiple chest drains and was started on a medium chain triglyceride formula feed. This brought about a full resolution of the effusions and he made a complete recovery. PMID:22688472

  1. [A neonate with ambiguous genitalia].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Burgo J; van Rijn, Rick R; van Trotsenburg, A S P Paul

    2015-01-01

    In a neonate with ambiguous genitalia, physical examination revealed a phallus. Ultrasonography showed a vagina and uterus, but no gonads. Because of severe undervirilisation in the presence of a uterus, probably due to 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis, parents were advised female sex assignment. When after a few weeks the phallus had increased in size, abdominal laparoscopy showed an underdeveloped uterus. Gonadal biopsy confirmed gonadal dysgenesis. Sex assignment was reconsidered and changed into the male gender. PMID:26200425

  2. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  3. Strategies to reduce neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M

    1990-01-01

    In India, 60% of deaths in infants under 1 year of age occur in the 1st 4 weeks after birth. The neonatal mortality rate is currently 76/1000 live births in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. The Government if India has launched a plan of action of address the cycle of poorly spaced pregnancies, inadequate maternal health care and nutrition, and high incidence of low birthweight babies that contributes to this high neonatal mortality phenomenon. Crucial to such a plan is the expansion, strengthening, and improved organization of maternal-child health services. At the level of maternal health services, efforts will be made to identify pregnant women early, arrange a minimum of 4 prenatal visits, provide dietary supplementation and immunization against tetanus toxoid, create more sterile conditions for home deliveries, identify and refer high-risk pregnancies and deliveries, and provide postnatal follow-up care. Child health service staff are motivating mothers to breastfeed and screening newborns for jaundice and bacterial infection. A risk approach, in which there is a minimum necessary level of care for all pregnant women but more intensive management and follow-up of those at high risk, is most cost-efficient given the lack of human and financial resources. Attention must also be given to the determinants of low birthweight (maternal undernutrition, closely spaced pregnancies, severe anemia, adolescent childbearing, prenatal infections, strenuous work responsibilities, and maternal hypertension), which is a co-factor in neonatal mortality. PMID:12316586

  4. Early-onset neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Kari A; Anderson-Berry, Ann L; Delair, Shirley F; Davies, H Dele

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS.

  5. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications.

  6. Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: a focus on.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, M; Lagrasta, N; Garcìa Garcìa, C; Campos Serna, J; Zicari, E; Marzocca, G

    2002-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a multifactorial worldwide problem, representing the most frequent gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. Extremely common in preterm infants, it is also registered in fullterm low birth weight neonates. Despite extensive research, its etiopathogenesis is not completely understood and this neonatal disease remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. This review proposes an interdisciplinary focus on recent developments in NEC etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management. PMID:12608653

  7. Neonatal jaundice, aflatoxins and naphthols: report of a study in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sodeinde, O; Chan, M C; Maxwell, S M; Familusi, J B; Hendrickse, R G

    1995-06-01

    This study set out to investigate the prevalence of naphthols and aflatoxins in the sera of babies with neonatal jaundice and their mothers in order to determine whether they contribute to the occurrence of unexplained neonatal jaundice in Ibadan. Blood was obtained from 327 jaundiced neonates and 80 of their mothers, and 60 non-jaundiced controls and seven of their mothers admitted to hospital between April 1989 and April 1991. Blood group, bilirubin concentration, erythrocyte G6PD status, aflatoxin and naphthol concentrations in blood were measured. Altogether, 30.9% of the jaundiced neonates were G6PD-deficient, compared with 13.3% of controls (chi 2 = 6.88; p = 0.009). Aflatoxins were detected in 27.4% of jaundiced neonates, 17% of their mothers, 16.6% of controls and 14.4% of control mothers. Naphthols were detected in 7.2% of jaundiced babies, 6.3% of their mothers, 6.25% of control babies and 14.4% of their mothers. Analysis of the data revealed that either G6PD deficiency or the presence of any serum aflatoxin is a risk factor for neonatal jaundice; odds ratio were 2.97 (95%) confidence intervals (CI): 1.31-6.74) and 2.68 (CI: 1.18-6.10), respectively. This study demonstrates that G6PD deficiency and/or the presence of serum aflatoxins are risk factors for neonatal jaundice in Nigeria. Aflatoxins are an additional risk factor not previously reported.

  8. Aberrant Synaptic Integration in Adult Lamina I Projection Neurons Following Neonatal Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kritzer, Elizabeth; Craig, Paige E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that neonatal tissue damage evokes alterations in spinal pain reflexes which persist into adulthood. However, less is known about potential concomitant effects on the transmission of nociceptive information to the brain, as the degree to which early injury modulates synaptic integration and membrane excitability in mature spinal projection neurons remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that neonatal surgical injury leads to a significant shift in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition onto identified lamina I projection neurons of the adult mouse spinal cord. The strength of direct primary afferent input to mature spino-parabrachial neurons was enhanced following neonatal tissue damage, whereas the efficacy of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition onto the same population was compromised. This was accompanied by reorganization in the pattern of sensory input to adult projection neurons, which included a greater prevalence of monosynaptic input from low-threshold A-fibers when preceded by early tissue damage. In addition, neonatal incision resulted in greater primary afferent-evoked action potential discharge in mature projection neurons. Overall, these results demonstrate that tissue damage during early life causes a long-term increase in the gain of spinal nociceptive circuits, and suggest that the prolonged consequences of neonatal trauma may not be restricted to the spinal cord but rather include excessive ascending signaling to supraspinal pain centers. PMID:25673839

  9. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL.

  10. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis.

  11. Prevalence of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in Nigeria: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O.; Slusher, Tina M.; Boppana, Suresh B.

    2014-01-01

    Dried saliva specimens from 263 neonates in Lagos, Nigeria were tested for CMV using real-time PCR and 10 infants (3.8%; 95%CI, 2.1-6.8) were positive. Congenital CMV infection was not associated with any of the demographic or maternal factors including HIV. These data demonstrate high prevalence of congenital CMV infection and the feasibility of CMV screening by testing real-time PCR. PMID:25742080

  12. Improved Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetic Patients Using the Ubiquitous Healthcare Service, a New Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C <7% without hypoglycemia at 6 months. U-healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient’s mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. RESULTS After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in the u-healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C <7% without hypoglycemia was 30.6% in the u-healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The CDSS-based u-healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients. PMID:21270188

  13. Lack of Association Between Residual Insulin Production and Glucagon Response to Hypoglycemia in Youth With Short Duration of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sherr, Jennifer; Xing, Dongyuan; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Buckingham, Bruce; White, Neil H.; Fox, Larry; Tsalikian, Eva; Weinzimer, Stuart; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Tamborlane, William V.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the loss of glucagon response to hypoglycemia and its relationship with residual β-cell function early in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-one youth with T1D duration <1 year (ages 8–18 years, T1D duration 6–52 weeks) underwent mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs) to assess residual β-cell function and hypoglycemic clamps to assess glucagon responses to hypoglycemia. Glucagon responses to hypoglycemia in T1D subjects were compared with those in 12 nondiabetic young adults (ages 19–25 years). RESULTS Peak MMTT-stimulated C-peptide levels (range 0.12–1.43) were ≥0.2 nmol/L in all but one T1D subject. As expected, the median of glucagon responses to hypoglycemia in the T1D subjects (18 pg/mL [interquartile range 7–32]) was significantly reduced compared with the responses in nondiabetic control subjects (38 pg/mL [19–66], P = 0.02). However, there was no correlation between the incremental increase in plasma glucagon during the hypoglycemic clamp and the incremental increase and peak plasma C-peptide level during the MMTT. Similarly, the seven T1D subjects who failed to achieve an increase in glucagon ≥12 pg/mL (i.e., 3 SD above baseline values) had C-peptide response ≥0.2 nmol/L (0.54–1.12), and the one T1D subject with peak stimulated <0.2 nmol/L had a 14 pg/mL increase in plasma glucagon in response to hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS Impaired plasma glucagon responses to hypoglycemia are evident in youth with T1D during the first year of the disease. Moreover, defective and absent glucagon responses to hypoglycemia were observed in patients who retained clinically important residual endogenous β-cell function. PMID:23288858

  14. Neonatal presentation of familial glucocorticoid deficiency with a MRAP mutation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhou, Rui; Fang, Yanlan; Jiang, Liqiong; Liang, Li; Wang, Chunlin

    2016-12-01

    Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which the adrenal cortex fails to respond appropriately to stimulation by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) to produce cortisol. The disease is characterized in laboratory testing by glucocorticoid deficiency and markedly elevated ACTH levels. FGD may present in infancy or early childhood with symptoms related to low cortisol and high ACTH, such as hyperpigmentation, severe hypoglycemia, failure to thrive and recurrent infections. Mutations in the MC2R accessory protein (MRAP) cause FGD types 2, which accounts for approximately 15-20% of FGD cases. Here, we report a female neonate of Chinese Han origin, who presented with noted hyperpigmentation at birth. Laboratory investigations revealed hypocortisolaemia (cortisol < 1.0 μg/dl) and elevated plasma ACTH (1051 pg/ml). She responded to hydrocortisone treatment. Genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis showing homozygous deletion (c. 106 + 1delG) in intron 3 of MRAP gene, a mutation already reported as responsible for FDG type 2. This mutation can cause complete lack of ACTH response thus explaining the early presentation in this case. Her parents and maternal grandmother were heterozygous for the same mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first Chinese Han patient reported with FGD type 2 due to a known MRAP mutation. PMID:27660747

  15. Effects of Moderate-to-Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Overnight and Next-Day Hypoglycemia in Active Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kristen M.; Singhvi, Ajay; Tsalikian, Eva; Tansey, Michael J.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Esliger, Dale W.; Janz, Kathleen F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Physical activity (PA) provides many benefits to adolescents with type 1 diabetes; however, these individuals tend to have lower fitness and PA levels than their disease-free counterparts. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute temporal associations between moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and hypoglycemia (continuous glucose monitor [CGM] reading ≤70 mg/dL). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Nineteen participants (53% females) 14–20 years old with type 1 diabetes were recruited. Participant fitness was evaluated via indirect calorimetry using a maximal exercise test; body composition was measured using air displacement plethysmography. An accelerometer was worn continuously (3–5 days) and acceleration data used to estimate MVPA (minutes per day). Blood glucose values were simultaneously tracked using CGM. Controlling for sex, percent body fat (%BF), fitness, and concurrent MVPA, the likelihood of nighttime and next-day hypoglycemia due to MVPA was examined using logistic regression. RESULTS Participants were of average fitness (females: 43.9 mL/kg/min; males: 49.8 mL/kg/min) and adiposity (females: 26.2%; males: 19.2%); 63.2% met the U.S. federal guideline of accumulating 60 min/day of MVPA. Hypoglycemia was 31% more likely in those who accumulated 30 min/day more MVPA in the previous afternoon than those with less (95% CI 1.05–1.63; P = 0.017). CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that participating in afternoon MVPA increases the risk of overnight and next-day hypoglycemia, independent of sex, %BF, fitness, and concurrent MVPA. While promoting PA as a healthy behavior, it is important to educate adolescents with type 1 diabetes on prevention of hypoglycemia following PA. PMID:24574352

  16. Individual Differences and Auditory Conditioning in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, W. K.; And Others

    The purposes of this study are (1) to analyze learning ability in newborns using heart rate responses to auditory temporal conditioning and (2) to correlate these with measures on the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale. Twenty normal neonates were tested using the Brazelton Scale on the third day of life. They were also given a…

  17. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  18. Enterobacter cloacae causing pneumatocele in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Glustein, J Z; Kaplan, M

    1994-09-01

    Pneumatocele formation, a cyst-like rarefaction that develops within the lung parenchyma, is an unusual complication of pneumonia in the neonate. It has been reported to occur with Staphlococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. We describe a case of a premature neonate with pneumonia and subsequent pneumatocele formation caused by Enterobacter cloacae.

  19. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  20. Brazelton Neonatal Assessment for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoudt, Calvin L.

    This speech addresses the "What,""Why," and "How" of Brazelton Neonatal Assessment Training for school psychologists. "What" concerns the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale, its administration, and what it assesses. Based on the best performance, the infant's score on this scale is scored in the context of six states of consciousness…

  1. Maternal and Neonatal Care. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course in maternal and neonatal care that will prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The course's five instructional units cover procedures for caring for the following: prenatal patients, patients in labor and delivery, postpartum patients, healthy neonates, and…

  2. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  3. Screening for Mutations in ABCC8 and KCNJ11 Genes in Saudi Persistent Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia of Infancy (PHHI) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adi, Ahmad; Bin Abbas, Bassam; Al Hamed, Mohamed; Al Tassan, Nada; Bakheet, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The autosomal recessive form of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is associated with mutations in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 genes. In the present study, we describe the clinical features and results of genetic analysis of 13 Saudi Arabian patients with PHHI. Clinically, most patients presented with infantile seizures and/or developmental delay, with a subset of patients who were also found to have abnormal brain imaging and electrophysiological studies. Interestingly no coding pathogenic mutations were identified in these two genes by direct sequencing. However, two splice variants were identified in ABCC8 gene in two patients, and a large deletion of exons 1-22 of the ABCC8 gene was identified in three patients. Our data shows that large deletions in ABCC8 gene are the common genetic mechanism in the Saudi population. PMID:25871929

  4. Effect of acute cold exposure and insulin hypoglycemia on plasma thyrotropin levels by IRMA in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Martino, E; Bukovská, M; Langer, P

    1988-12-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH) levels in plasma were estimated with the aid of immunoradiometric assay in two groups of healthy male subjects aged 21-22 years in two experiments: 1. acute (30 min) exposure to 4 degrees C in a cold room; 2. insulin (0.01 U per kg i.v.) hypoglycemia at room temperature and at 55 degrees C. Immediately after cold exposure a decrease of TSH level was found (P less than 0.01), while no changes were observed during 30 min exposure. After insulin injection a significant decrease (P less than 0.05 to less than 0.001) of TSH level was found at 45 to 120 min irrespectively of the ambient temperature. In addition, increased levels of noradrenaline and decreased levels of growth hormone after cold exposure are presented. PMID:3243203

  5. Osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A J; Stent, A W; Milne, M; Walmsley, E A

    2016-10-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disorder characterised by a defect in osteoclastic bone resorption. This report describes osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey that suffered a displaced tibial fracture. Radiographic examination identified generalised reduction in medullary cavity size, thickened mid-diaphyseal cortices and conical metaphyseal bone extending toward the mid-diaphysis of long bones. Postmortem examination identified additional fractures and brittle bones. Histologically, osteoclasts were absent in multiple bone sections. Diaphyseal cortices consisted of concentric bone lamellae with marrow tissue infiltration. Large wedges of secondary spongiosa extended from the metaphyseal growth plate. Clinical and histopathological features were similar to an osteoclast-deficient, autosomal recessive form of osteopetrosis in humans. PMID:27671079

  6. Internet resources for neonatal nurses.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, S

    1999-03-01

    The availability of health information over the Internet has exploded in recent years. Nurses can use the Internet to access information to support professional and clinical interests and join in dialogues with colleagues around the world. The Internet can also be used to identify resources for clients and their families. As with any other information resource, Internet sites must be evaluated for accuracy, currency, and objectivity. The article describes examples of Internet resources and discussion forums for neonatal nurses, use of search engines to find and retrieve information about specific topics, and evaluation of World Wide Web sites.

  7. Bronchopleural fistula in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Shen-Schwarz, S; Dosi, P C; Schwarz, K O; Brown, E G; Strauss, L

    1986-01-01

    Bronchopleural fistula (BPF) produced by endotracheal suction catheter is a known cause of persistent pneumothorax in preterm infants in intensive care nurseries. This report describes the pulmonary pathology of a neonate who had sustained this injury. The observation suggests that the abnormal airflow results in severe damage of the involved lobe and an unusually mild bronchopulmonary dysplasia in the rest of the lung. This is in agreement with the fact that BPF acts as the path of least resistance for the oxygen-rich air from the ventilator.

  8. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-09-01

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period. PMID:27601113

  9. Neonatal networks: clinical research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Profit, Jochen; Soll, Roger F

    2015-12-01

    Worldwide, neonatal networks have been formed to address both the research and quality improvement agenda of neonatal-perinatal medicine. Neonatal research networks have led the way in conducting many of the most important clinical trials of the last 25 years, including studies of cooling for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, delivery room management with less invasive support, and oxygen saturation targeting. As we move into the future, increasing numbers of these networks are tackling quality improvement initiatives as a priority of their collaboration. Neonatal quality improvement networks have been in the forefront of the quality movement in medicine and, in the 21st century, have contributed to many of the reported improvements in care. In the coming years, building and maintaining this community of care is critical to the success of neonatal-perinatal medicine.

  10. Effects of Maternal Cervical Incompetence on Morbidity and Mortality of Preterm Neonates with Birth weight Less than 2000g

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wang; Wei, Zhang; Ling, Fan; Song, Yu; Jian-Rong, Ma; Ping, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the impact of maternal cervical incompetence (with or without McDonald cerclage) on mortality and morbidity of preterm infant with birth weight <2000g. Methods: 581 neonates were eligible for this study, 79 with cervical incompetence and 502 without it (control). Incidences of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), severe asphyxia, small for gestational age (SGA), early-onset sepsis (EOS), and mortality were compared between the two groups. Findings: Mean gestational age was earlier in cervical incompetence group than in control (30.2±2.1 vs 30.7±1.9, P<0.05). Except lower frequency of SGA, there were no significant differences in the incidences of RDS, BPD, ROP, PVL, IVH, NEC, EOS, severe asphyxia and mortality between the two groups. Infants with no cerclage had a higher prevalence of RDS (21/66 vs 9/13, P<0.05) compared to cerclage group due to lower mean gestational age (30.68±2.1 vs 28.6±1.4, P<0.01) and birth weight (1519.5±274.6 vs 1205.8±204.4, P<0.001), and clinical neonatal outcomes of the elective cerclage were similar to emergency cerclage in cervical incompetence groups. Conclusion: Maternal cervical incompetence was not associated with postnatal adverse neonatal outcomes. Lower mean gestational age was a major risk associated with higher prevalence of RDS in preterm neonates with no McDonald cerclage, and emergency cerclage did not predict poor clinical neonatal outcomes. PMID:26019783

  11. Impact of Kidney Disease on Survival in Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Aaron; Bradford, Miranda C.; Symons, Jordan; Brogan, Thomas V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and survival to discharge of neonates with kidney disease who received extracorporeal life support. Design We analyzed the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization international registry of neonates (< 30 d old) who received extracorporeal life support from 1989 to 2012. We used International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, codes to identify neonates with kidney disease at time of cannulation for extracorporeal life support. Setting Participating Extracorporeal Life Support Organization centers. Patients All neonates who received extracorporeal life support at an Extracorporeal Life Support Organization center from 1989 to 2012. Interventions We performed bivariate logistic regression to estimate associations between survival and covariates. We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to compare survival to discharge between neonates with and without kidney disease. Odds ratios were estimated separately for three groups based on extracorporeal life support indication: pulmonary indication without congenital diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary indication with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and cardiac indication. Adjusted models included covariates identified as significant in bivariate models for each group. Measurements and Main Results The primary outcome measure was survival to discharge from hospitalization. Of the 28,755 neonates who received extracorporeal life support, 405 had kidney disease (extracorporeal life support indication: 210 pulmonary indication without congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 65 pulmonary indication with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and 130 cardiac indication). Survival was lower in neonates with kidney disease than those without (49% vs 82% pulmonary indication without congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 25% vs 51% pulmonary indication with congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 21% vs 41% cardiac indication). Kidney disease was

  12. Concurrent Therapy with a Low-carbohydrate Diet and Miglitol Remarkably Improved the Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin Levels in a Patient with Reactive Hypoglycemia due to Late Dumping Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Sachie; Iwahashi, Yasuyuki; Seo, Akane; Sumiyoshi, Michitaka; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive hypoglycemia induced by late dumping syndrome is often observed after gastrectomy. However, no effective therapy has yet been fully established. We herein describe a case in which concurrent therapy with a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, miglitol, very effectively ameliorated the postprandial fluctuations in the blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in a patient with reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome following total gastrectomy. The administration of miglitol under a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food may therefore be an ideal treatment for reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome. PMID:27150868

  13. Nutritional factors influencing intestinal health of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Sheila K; Odle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Dietary nutrients are essential for gastrointestinal (GI) growth and function, and nutritional support of GI growth and development is a significant component of infant care. For healthy full-term neonates, nutritional provisions of the mother's milk and/or formula will support normal maturation of structure and function of the GI tract in most infants. The composition of breast milk affects GI barrier function and development of a competent mucosal immune system. The functional nutrients and other bioactive components of milk support a microenvironment for gut protection and maturation. However, premature infants struggle with feeding tolerance impairing normal GI function, leading to intestinal dysfunction and even death. The high prevalence worldwide of enteric diseases and dysfunction in neonates has led to much interest in understanding the role of nutrients and food components in the establishment and maintenance of a functioning GI tract. Neonates who do not receive enteral feeding as either mother's milk or formula are supported by total parental nutrition (TPN). The lack of enteral nutrition can compound intestinal dysfunction, leading to high morbidity and mortality in intestinally compromised infants. Reciprocally, enteral stimulation of an immature GI tract can also compound intestinal dysfunction. Therefore, further understanding of nutrient interactions with the mucosa is necessary to define nutritional requirements of the developing GI tract to minimize intestinal complications and infant morbidity. Piglet models of intestinal development and function are similar to humans, and this review summarizes recent findings regarding nutrient requirements for growth and maintenance of intestinal health. In particular, this article reviews the role of specific amino acids (arginine, glutamine, glutamate, and threonine), fatty acids (long chain polyunsaturated, medium chain, and short chain), various prebiotic carbohydrates (short-chain fructo

  14. Redirecting treatment during neonatal transport.

    PubMed

    Dulkerian, Susan J; Douglas, Webra Price; Taylor, Renee McCraine

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal transport teams comprise multidisciplinary health care providers who are skilled in patient care, communication and customer service, and equipment mechanics. They are extensively trained in resuscitation and stabilization, preparing for accelerating care, and their focus is preservation of life. In any situation focused on caring for critically ill patients, ethical issues and questions may arise. For instance, is it compassionate and/or cost-effective to separate mothers and infants when continuing/accelerating care is futile, and when and how should care be redirected from acute and lifesaving care to comfort care and bereavement support for the family? The knowledge and skills required to address such situations and communicate and participate in a redirection of care may not be adequately emphasized in the preparation of the professionals responsible for stabilizing and transporting critically ill newborns. This article raises issues relating to transport and redirecting care such as eligibility for transport, parental request and consent, separation of mothers and infants, palliative and bereavement care, ethical considerations, competitive transport environment, and customer service. A shared mental model is essential. The focus of this article is not to provide answers to all of these issues, but to highlight the complexity of the topic of redirecting treatment during neonatal transport. Redirecting treatment needs to be discussed, and health care professionals should be prepared during their transport team training. Each family and situation must be approached individually, with the acceptance that there will always be more questions than answers. PMID:21540683

  15. To explore the neonatal nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards caring for dying neonates in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Huei; Huang, Li-Chi; Liu, Hsin-Li; Lee, Ho-Yu; Wu, Shu-Ya; Chang, Yue-Cune; Peng, Niang-Huei

    2013-12-01

    (1) To explore attitudes and beliefs of neonatal nurses toward nursing care for dying neonates; (2) to estimate the influence of neonatal nurses' personal and professional characteristics on their attitudes towards end-of life care for dying infants. A cross-sectional design was used. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 80 neonatal nurses. Research setting was four level III NICUs at four medical centers around the central region of Taiwan. Research participants were neonatal nurses who had worked for at least 1 year in one of level III NICUs and had been directly involved with the care of dying infants. Research participants were 80 neonatal nurses (response rate 100 %). Research findings identified eight barriers hindering neonatal palliative care practice. These barriers were insufficient communication due to the lack of an in-service educational program; the lack of available counseling help for neonatal clinicians; inability to express personal opinions, values and beliefs towards neonatal palliative care; insufficient staffing; the lack of unit policies/guidelines for supporting palliative care; the technological imperative; parental demands and personal beliefs about death and previous experience caring for dying infants. Further studies are needed to explore each barrier and to provide in-service neonatal palliative care educational programs that are needed to decrease these barriers.

  16. Neonatal pain in very preterm infants: long-term effects on brain, neurodevelopment and pain reactivity.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Ruth Eckstein

    2013-01-01

    Effects of early life psychosocial adversity have received a great deal of attention, such as maternal separation in experimental animal models and abuse/neglect in young humans. More recently, long-term effects of the physical stress of repetitive procedural pain have begun to be addressed in infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care. Preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and stress, which cannot be distinguished in neonates. The focus of this review is clinical studies of long-term effects of repeated procedural pain-related stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in relation to brain development, neurodevelopment, programming of stress systems, and later pain sensitivity in infants born very preterm (24-32 weeks' gestational age). Neonatal pain exposure has been quantified as the number of invasive and/or skin-breaking procedures during hospitalization in the NICU. Emerging studies provide convincing clinical evidence for an adverse impact of neonatal pain/stress in infants at a time of physiological immaturity, rapidly developing brain microstructure and networks, as well as programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Currently it appears that early pain/stress may influence the developing brain and thereby neurodevelopment and stress-sensitive behaviors, particularly in the most immature neonates. However, there is no evidence for greater prevalence of pain syndromes compared to children and adults born healthy at full term. In addressing associations between pain/stress and outcomes, careful consideration of confounding clinical factors related to prematurity is essential. The need for pain management for humanitarian care is widely advocated. Non-pharmacological interventions to help parents reduce their infant's stress may be brain-protective. PMID:24228168

  17. Use of extensively hydrolysed formula for refeeding neonates postnecrotising enterocolitis: a nationwide survey-based, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Matar, Maroun; Adleff, Ariane; Chbihi, Marwa; Kermorvant-Duchemin, Elsa; Campeotto, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of and reasons for using extensively hydrolysed formulas (EHFs) of cow's milk proteins in the French neonatal units as well as the modality of their prescription for refeeding infants recovering from necrotising enterocolitis (NEC). Methods A multicentre nationwide cross-sectional study using a questionnaire to address the prevalence of use and the reasons for prescribing EHF in hospitalised neonates and to examine the protocols and the actual reasons for their use for refeeding infants in recovery from NEC. The questionnaire was sent to only 1 senior neonatologist in each neonatal unit included in the study. Results More than half of the French neonatal units participated in the survey. 91% of the surveyed units used EHF. Of 1969 infants hospitalised on the day the survey was run, 12% were fed on an EHF. 11% of the EHF prescriptions were due to previous NEC. The main reasons for using an EHF to feed infants post-NEC were the absence of human milk (75%) and surgical management of NEC (17%). When given, EHF was mainly prescribed for a period varying between 15 days and 3 months. None of the involved units continued using the EHF after 6 months of age. More than half of the surveyed units acknowledged hospitalising infants for the initiation of weaning EHF but only 21% of them tested these infants for cow's milk allergy. Conclusions The prevalence of EHF use in the French neonatal units is high. Refeeding infants post-NEC is one of the main reasons for such a high prevalence. The main incentive for using an EHF is the absence of human breast milk, either maternal or donor. PMID:27388344

  18. The Korean Neonatal Network: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the Republic of Korea, despite the very-low-birth rate, the birth rate and number of preterm infants are markedly increasing. Neonatal deaths and major complications mostly occur in premature infants, especially very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWIs). VLBWIs weigh less than 1,500 g at birth and require intensive treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The operation of the Korean Neonatal Network (KNN) officially started on April 15, 2013, by the Korean Society of Neonatology with support from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The KNN is a national multicenter neonatal network based on a prospective web-based registry for VLBWIs. About 2,000 VLBWIs from 60 participating hospital NICUs are registered annually in the KNN. The KNN has built unique systems such as a web-based real-time data display on the web site and a site-visit monitoring system for data quality surveillance. The KNN should be maintained and developed further in order to generate appropriate, population-based, data-driven, health-care policies; facilitate active multicenter neonatal research, including quality improvement of neonatal care; and ultimately lead to improvement in the prognosis of high-risk newborns and subsequent reduction in health-care costs through the development of evidence-based neonatal medicine in Korea. PMID:26566355

  19. Interpretation of clotting tests in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanchita; Curley, Anna; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences between the coagulation system in neonates compared with children and adults. Abnormalities of standard coagulation tests are common within the neonatal population. The laboratory tests of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) were developed to investigate coagulation factor deficiencies in patients with a known bleeding history, and their significance and applied clinical value in predicting bleeding (or thrombotic) risk in critically ill patients is weak. Routine screening of coagulation on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit leads to increased use of plasma for transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is a human donor plasma frozen within a short specified time period after collection (often 8 h) and then stored at -30°C. FFP has little effect on correcting abnormal coagulation tests when mild and moderate abnormalities of PT are documented in neonates. There is little evidence of effectiveness of FFP in neonates. A large trial by the Northern Neonatal Nursing Initiative assessed the use of prophylactic FFP in preterm infants and reported no improvement in clinical outcomes in terms of mortality or severe disability. An appropriate FFP transfusion strategy in neonates should be one that emphasises the therapeutic use in the face of bleeding rather than prophylactic use in association with abnormalities of standard coagulation tests that have very limited predictive value for bleeding.

  20. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis with atypical and early neonatal debut].

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Esther; Bernabeu-Wittel, José; Calderón-López, Gemma; Pavón-Delgado, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a systemic disease associated with the proliferation of this type of cells in tissues. Its prevalence is estimated at 1-9/100 000. Bone is the most frequently affected organ, followed by the skin, lymph nodes, haematopoietic system, pituitary gland, lungs and liver. In the majority of cases, onset occurs during childhood, with peak between one and three years of age, and poor prognosis before two years of age. The haematological forms (pancytopenia) are usually aggressive in infants. We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with neonatal onset and complex diagnosis: maintained and significant leukocytosis was the predominant data for the first two months of life, so some type of leukemia was considered. However, the most common blood disorder in Langerhans cell histiocytosis is pancytopenia rather than leukocytosis, so that the diagnosis was delayed.

  1. MRSA infection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, Mario; Bonura, Celestino; Cipolla, Domenico; Mammina, Caterina

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is well known as one of the most frequent etiological agents of healthcare-associated infections. The epidemiology of MRSA is evolving with emergence of community-associated MRSA, the clonal spread of some successful clones, their spillover into healthcare settings and acquisition of antibacterial drug resistances. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients are at an especially high risk of acquiring colonization and infection by MRSA. Epidemiology of MRSA in NICU can be very complex because outbreaks can overlap endemic circulation and make it difficult to trace transmission routes. Moreover, increasing prevalence of community-associated MRSA can jeopardize epidemiological investigation, screening and effectiveness of control policies. Surveillance, prevention and control strategies and clinical management have been widely studied and are still the subject of scientific debate. More data are needed to determine the most cost-effective approach to MRSA control in NICU in light of the local epidemiology.

  2. Neonatal melioidosis: a case report from India.

    PubMed

    Noyal, M J C; Harish, B N; Bhat, V; Parija, S C

    2009-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei , is an infectious disease of major public health importance in Southeast Asia and Australia. We report, for the first time from the Indian subcontinent, a case of melioidosis in a neonate, its clinical presentation, microbiological diagnosis, possible mode of transmission and outcome. A pre-term female baby developed respiratory distress soon after birth. The child was febrile, had tachypnea, grunting, normal heart rate with a low pulse volume and poor peripheral perfusion. Chest X-ray revealed right-sided bronchopneumonia. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the blood culture of the neonate collected aseptically. The neonate was successfully treated with meropenem. PMID:19584512

  3. Diagnosis and management of neonatal thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Holzhauer, Susanne; Zieger, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the most common haematological abnormality in newborns admitted to neonatal care units and serves as an important indicator of underlying pathological processes of mother or child. In most cases thrombocytopenia is mild to moderate and resolves within the first weeks of life without any intervention. However, in some neonates thrombocytopenia is severe or may reflect an inborn platelet disorder. As clinical course and outcome of thrombocytopenia depend on the aetiology of thrombocytopenia, an appropriate work-up is essential to guide therapy in neonates with thrombocytopenia and to avoid severe bleeding.

  4. Neonatal peripheral hypotonia: clinical and electromyographic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Parano, E; Lovelace, R E

    1993-06-01

    Hypotonia is a common occurrence in pediatrics, especially in the neonatal period. The hypotonic neonate represents a diagnostic challenge for the general pediatrician because hypotonia may be caused by a lesion at any level in the neuraxis: (1) central nervous system (CNS), (2) peripheral nerves (PN), (3) neuromuscular junction, or (4) muscles. Distinguishing among these pathologies is a particularly arduous task. This review will discuss the clinical approach to neonatal hypotonia with emphasis on disorders of the peripheral nervous system and muscle, and the importance of the electrophysiological study as a diagnostic test.

  5. Retinoblastoma in the perinatal and neonatal child.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Dan S

    2012-08-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare primary intraocular malignancy. Presentation in the neonatal period is not common. With improved genetic testing, screening of the unborn child and neonate is taking on a greater role in the management of these patients. Treatment of retinoblastoma in the neonate is complex and requires a multidisciplinary and highly individualized approach. If possible, focal modalities should be used and external beam radiation avoided. Systemic intravenous chemotherapy may be necessary with regimens including carboplatin, vincristine and etoposide. Such cases are best managed by specialist centers with access to experts in oncology, ophthalmology, radiation therapy, genetics, pathology and anesthesia.

  6. Neonatal sludge: a finding of congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Coban, Dilek; Akın, Mustafa Ali; Akın, Leyla; Yıkılmaz, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most urgent diseases of the neonate. When diagnosed and treated at an early stage, its most important complication, mental retardation, is preventable. The signs of congenital hypothyroidism are nonspecific in neonates. Only 5% of the cases have characteristic clinical findings. One of the most important and earliest signs is prolonged jaundice during the neonatal period. We report herein a case of congenital hypothyroidism, who presented with icterus accompanied with sludge formation into the gallbladder, which disappeared after treatment with L-thyroxine.

  7. Neonatal ovarian cysts: therapeutic dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Widdowson, D J; Pilling, D W; Cook, R C

    1988-01-01

    Seven cases of neonatal ovarian cysts that presented over the past seven years were studied. Complications included torsion and rupture and usually occurred in cysts more than 5 cm in diameter. Surgical removal, either oophorectomy or cystectomy, was the treatment of choice. Because even cystectomy results in loss of normal ovarian tissue, and because spontaneous regression of cysts less than 5 cm in diameter can occur, a more conservative approach is now proposed. Regular ultrasonography alone is recommended if the cysts are less than 5 cm in diameter, and aspiration of the cysts followed by regular ultrasonographs if the cysts are more than 5 cm in diameter. Operation should be reserved for recurrent cysts or for those with complications. Cysts diagnosed antenatally may be aspirated in utero if there are signs of thoracic compression. Images Fig 1a Fig 1b Fig 2 PMID:3046508

  8. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale for predicting skin breakdown in neonates.

    PubMed

    Huffines, B; Logsdon, M C

    1997-01-01

    An instrument was developed to assess neonates at risk for skin breakdown, based on the Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk in adults. Using such an instrument to predict, and thus prevent, skin breakdown could decrease costs associated with prolonged hospital stays in neonates. The Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale (NSRAS) was piloted with 32 neonates. Reliability was high for the subscales of general physical condition, activity, and nutrition, but low in the other three subscales. For predictive validity, sensitivity was 83% and specificity was 81%. The NSRAS appears to be useful in predicting days most likely for skin breakdown to occur.

  9. Neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone level is influenced by neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy factors.

    PubMed

    Trumpff, Caroline; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Vanderpas, Jean; Tafforeau, Jean; Van Oyen, Herman; De Schepper, Jean

    2015-11-01

    The percentage of newborns with a neonatal whole blood thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) greater than 5 mIU/L has been used as an indicator of iodine deficiency at the population level. However, TSH levels in newborns may be influenced by many factors other than iodine status. The objective of this study was to identify neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants of neonatal TSH levels in a retrospective cohort study. The study sample included 313 Belgian mothers and their 4- to 5-year-old children. The children had a neonatal TSH concentration between 0 and 15 mIU/L at neonatal screening, and blood samples were collected 3 to 5 days after birth. Children with suspected congenital hypothyroidism (neonatal TSH level >15 mIU/L), prematurely born (i.e., <37 weeks), or with a low birth weight (i.e., <2500 g) were excluded. Information about maternal and birth-related determinants was collected from the neonatal screening center via a self-administered questionnaire filled in by the mother together with the child's health booklet. Higher TSH levels were found in spring and winter compared to summer and autumn (P = .011). Higher TSH levels were associated with lifetime smoking behavior (up to child birth) in the mother (P = .005), lower weight gain during pregnancy (P = .014), and longer pregnancies (P = .003). This study showed that several neonatal, maternal, and pregnancy-related determinants are influencing neonatal TSH level. PMID:26428622

  10. Challenging issues in neonatal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, David A

    2010-07-01

    In an era of quality improvement and 'getting to zero (infections and/or related mortality),' neonatal candidiasis is ripe for evidence-based initiatives. Knowledge of each institution's invasive Candida infection (ICI) incidence and infection-related mortality is critical to evaluate disease burden and effective interventions. Evidenced-based interventions include: antifungal prophylaxis, starting with appropriate dosing, and prompt removal of central venous catheters (CVC). There is A-I evidence supporting antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole, and it should be considered in every neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The literature supports targeting infants <1000 g and/or 1000 g and >or=28 weeks not receiving antifungal prophylaxis. Evaluation of ICI incidence and

  11. Role of gender in morbidity and mortality of extremely premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Binet, Marie-Eve; Bujold, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Francine; Tremblay, Yves; Piedboeuf, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the effect of gender on survival and short-term outcomes of extremely premature infants (≤27 weeks) born in Canada. The records of infants admitted between 2000 and 2005 to a neonatal intensive care unit participating in the Canadian Neonatal Network were reviewed for infant gender, birth weight, gestational age, outborn status, Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology II, and antenatal corticosteroid exposure. The following outcomes were recorded: survival at final discharge, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), intraventricular hemorrhage grade ≥3, retinopathy grade ≥3, days on ventilation, and length of hospital stay. Among 2744 extremely premature infants, 1480 (54%) were male and 1264 (46%) were female. Mean birth weight of female neonates was significantly lower at each week of gestational age. Although no significant difference in survival at discharge was found between genders overall, the prevalence of BPD, combined adverse outcomes, and mortality for infants born between 24 and 26 weeks were significantly higher in males. This study suggests that, in the postsurfactant era, males remain at higher risk of respiratory complications and may have higher mortality when born between 24 and 26 weeks of gestation.

  12. Whole blood viscosity of preterm infants - differences to term neonates.

    PubMed

    Kuss, N; Bauknecht, E; Felbinger, C; Gehm, J; Gehm, L; Pöschl, J; Ruef, P

    2015-01-01

    Determination of shear stresses at given shear rates with the LS 300 allows approximation of flow curves by mathematical models and to calculate viscosities of non-Newtonian fluids across the entire physiological shear range. Particular in preterm neonates, which in comparison to term neonates and adults have a substantially lower mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), rheological blood properties play a decisive role to maintain the perfusion. Whole blood viscosity was measured in umbilical cord blood taken from 34 preterm neonates using the LS 300 viscometer. In addition aggregation index, plasma viscosity, hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined. The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of whole blood was achieved by the method of Ostwald. Shear stresses of whole blood of preterm neonates were significantly lower compared to term neonates at similar shear rates (velocity range 6.16 s-1-50 s-1). With hematocrit calculated to 0.40 the related exponent (n) of the viscosity of preterm neonates (by Ostwald) showed a significant lower exponent (n) (0.71 ± 0.07) than term neonates (0.76 ± 0.06). The highest quality of approximation of the flow curve of plasma was achieved with the model of Ostwald in preterm neonates as well as in term neonates. The viscosity of plasma determined by Newton was lower for preterm neonates (0.89 ± 0.19) than for term neonates (1.04 ± 0.16). Concurrent to term neonates the whole blood of preterm neonates showed a very low aggregation index (term neonates 2.97 ± 2.10; preterm neonates 2.37 ± 1.32) and preterm neonates showed higher RBC deformability than term neonates. Because of the physiologically lower MAP and the particular viscous properties of neonatal blood special attention should be given when treating neonates with conventional blood products derived from adult donors. PMID:26444619

  13. Sound production in neonate sperm whales (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, P. T.; Carder, D. A.; Au, W. W. L.; Nachtigall, P. E.; Møhl, B.; Ridgway, S. H.

    2003-06-01

    Acoustic data from two sperm whale neonates (Physeter macrocephalus) in rehabilitation are presented and implications for sound production and function are discussed. The clicks of neonate sperm whale are very different from usual clicks of adult specimens in that neonate clicks are of low directionality [SL anomaly (0°-90°) <8 dB], long duration (2-12 ms), and low frequency (centroid frequency between 300 and 1700 Hz) with estimated SLs between 140 and 162 dB//1 μPa (rms). Such neonate clicks are unsuited for biosonar, but can potentially convey homing information between calves and submerged conspecifics in open ocean waters at ranges of some 2 km. Moreover, it is demonstrated that sperm whale clicks are produced at the anterior placed monkey lips, thereby substantiating a key point in the modified Norris and Harvey theory and supporting the unifying theory of sound production in odontocetes.

  14. Anaesthetic consideration for neonatal surgical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Pani, Nibedita; Panda, Chinmaya K

    2012-09-01

    A newborn requires constant vigilance, rapid recognition of the events and swift intervention during anaesthesia. The anaesthetic considerations in neonatal surgical emergencies are based on the physiological immaturity of various body systems, poor tolerance of the anaesthetic drugs, associated congenital disorders and considerations regarding the use of high concentration of oxygen. The main goal is for titration of anaesthetics to desired effects, while carefully monitoring of the cardiorespiratory status. The use of regional anaesthesia has shown to be safe and effective. Advancements in neonatology have resulted in the improvement of the survival of the premature and critically ill newborn babies. Most of the disorders previously considered as neonatal surgical emergencies in the past no longer require immediate surgery due to new technology and new methods of treating sick neonates. This article describes the common neonatal surgical emergencies and focuses on factors that affect the anaesthetic management of patients with these disorders.

  15. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable disease.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, H Hunter; Waldo, Ann B; Brown, Zane A; Corey, Lawrence; Drucker, Joan L; Ebel, Charles W; Leone, Peter A; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Whitley, Richard J

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal herpes is a devastating disease, the most serious complication of genital herpes, one of the most common serious congenital or perinatal infections, and the most frequent complication of sexually transmitted infections among children. Nevertheless, neonatal herpes is not reportable to health authorities in most states. The potential for prevention has been enhanced by recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances, and the disease meets widely accepted criteria for reporting, including incidence rates that exceed those of comparable conditions, epidemiologic instability, disease severity, direct and indirect socioeconomic costs, concern by persons at risk, the potential for prevention by public health interventions, and the prospect that the resulting data would influence public health policy. The absence of national surveillance contributes to beliefs by healthcare providers and the public health community that genital and neonatal herpes are uncommon conditions that affect small segments of society, beliefs that directly interfere with prevention. Neonatal herpes should be a reportable condition. PMID:16118598

  16. Perspectives on neonatal nursing: 1985-2005.

    PubMed

    Samson, Linda F

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal nursing practice has been influenced by a number of external forces over the past 20 years. This article explores some of the influences that have altered practice in the 20-year history of the Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Attention is directed to several significant influences such as the development of the Internet and the World Wide Web and the role that information plays in care delivery. Changing practice roles with the continuing evolution of the neonatal nurse practitioner role and the emerging plans for the doctorate of nursing practice are described. The history of professional associations for neonatal nurses and the impact of evidence-based practice are considered. Finally, the legal environment surrounding practice is explored.

  17. Preventing Unnecessary Costs of Drug-Induced Hypoglycemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in the United States and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Boulin, Mathieu; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Tannenbaum, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Background The costs of drug-induced hypoglycemia are a critical but often neglected component of value-based arguments to reduce tight glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods An economic (decision-tree) analysis compared rates, costs, quality-adjusted life-years, and incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year gained associated with mild, moderate and severe hypoglycemic events for 6 glucose-lowering medication classes in type 2 diabetic adults aged 65–79 versus those 80 years and older. The national U.S. (Center for Medicare Services) and Canadian public health payer perspectives were adopted. Findings Incidence rates of drug-induced hypoglycemia were the highest for basal insulin and sulfonylureas: 8.64 and 4.32 events per person-year in 65–79 year olds, and 12.06 and 6.03 events per person-year for 80 years and older. In both the U.S. and Canada, metformin dominated sulfonylureas, basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide1 receptor agonists. Relative to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones had the lowest incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the U.S. and dominated sulfonylureas in Canada for adults 80 years and older. Relative to sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase4 inhibitors were cost-effective for adults 80 years and older in both countries, and for 65–79 year olds in Canada. Annual costs of hypoglycemia for older adults attaining very tight glycemic control with the use of insulin or sulfonylureas were estimated at U.S.$509,214,473 in the U.S. and CAN$65,497,849 in Canada. Conclusions Optimizing drug therapy for older type 2 diabetic adults through the avoidance of drug-induced hypoglycemia will dramatically improve patient health while also generating millions of dollars by saving unnecessary medical costs. PMID:27648831

  18. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with early ichthyosis, associated dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets, hypoglycemia, and later distinctive clinical SDS phenotype.

    PubMed

    Scalais, Emmanuel; Connerotte, Anne-Catherine; Despontin, Karine; Biver, Armand; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Alders, Marielle; Kolivras, Athanassios; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; De Meirleir, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a recessive ribosomopathy, characterized by bone marrow failure and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (ePI) often associated with neurodevelopmental and skeletal abnormalities. The aim of this report is to describe a SDS patient with early ichthyosis associated with dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets (iLDs), hypoglycemia and later a distinctive clinical SDS phenotype. At 3 months of age, she had ichthyosis, growth retardation, and failure to thrive. She had not cytopenia. Ultrasonography (US) showed pancreatic diffuse high echogenicity. Subsequently fasting hypoketotic hypoglycemia occurred without permanent hepatomegaly or hyperlipidemia. Continuous gavage feeding was followed by clinical improvement including ichthyosis and hypoglycemia. After 14 months of age, she developed persistent neutropenia and ePI consistent with SDS. The ichthyotic skin biopsy, performed at 5 months of age, disclosed iLDs in all epidermal layers, in melanocytes, eccrine sweat glands, Schwann cells and dermal fibroblasts. These iLDs were reminiscent of those described in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome (DCS) or Wolman's disease. Both LIPA and CGI-58 analysis did not revealed pathogenic mutation. By sequencing SBDS, a compound heterozygous for a previously reported gene mutation (c.258 + 2T>C) and a novel mutation (c.284T>G) were found. Defective SBDS may hypothetically interfere as in DCS, with neutral lipid metabolism and play a role in the SDS phenotype such as ichthyosis with dermal and epidermal iLDs and hypoglycemia. This interference with neutral lipid metabolism must most likely occur in the cytoplasm compartment as in DCS and not in the lysosomal compartment as in Wolman's disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27127007

  19. Three consecutive outbreaks of Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Fleisch, Felix; Zimmermann-Baer, Urs; Zbinden, Reinhard; Bischoff, Gian; Arlettaz, Romaine; Waldvogel, Katharina; Nadal, David; Ruef, Christian

    2002-03-15

    We investigated an outbreak of Serratia marcescens in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the University Hospital of Zurich. S. marcescens infection was detected in 4 children transferred from the NICU to the University Children's Hospital (Zurich). All isolates showed identical banding patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In a prevalence survey, 11 of 20 neonates were found to be colonized. S. marcescens was isolated from bottles of liquid theophylline. Despite replacement of these bottles, S. marcescens colonization was detected in additional patients. Prospective collection of stool and gastric aspirate specimens revealed that colonization occurred in some babies within 24 hours after delivery. These isolates showed a different genotype. Cultures of milk from used milk bottles yielded S. marcescens. These isolates showed a third genotype. The method of reprocessing bottles was changed to thermal disinfection. In follow-up prevalence studies, 0 of 29 neonates were found to be colonized by S. marcescens. In summary, 3 consecutive outbreaks caused by 3 genetically unrelated clones of S. marcescens could be documented. Contaminated milk could be identified as the source of at least the third outbreak.

  20. Monogenoid infection of neonatal and older juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris (Carcharhinidae), in a shark nursery.

    PubMed

    Young, Joy M; Frasca, Salvatore; Gruber, Samuel H; Benz, George W

    2013-12-01

    Fifty lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris , were captured in a shallow, mangrove-fringed shark nursery at Bimini, Bahamas and examined for the presence of skin-dwelling ectoparasitic monogenoids (Monogenoidea). Sixteen sharks were infected by Dermophthirius nigrellii (Microbothriidae); the youngest host was estimated to be 3- to 4-wk-old. Infection prevalence, mean intensity, and median intensity (0.32, 2.63, and 2.0, respectively, for all sharks) were not significantly different between neonates (estimated ages 3- to 10-wk-old) and non-neonatal juveniles (estimated ages 1- to 4-yr-old), suggesting that soon after parturition lemon sharks acquire infection levels of D. nigrellii matching those of juvenile conspecifics. Monogenoids were only found on the trailing portion of the first and second dorsal fins and upper lobe of the caudal fin. The prevalence of D. nigrellii was highest on the first dorsal fin; however, the mean and median intensities of D. nigrellii were similar between fins in all but 1 case. These results raise important husbandry implications regarding the practice of preferentially seeking neonatal and other small lemon sharks for captivity.

  1. Cranial MRI in neonatal hypernatraemic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, A; Yiğit, S; Firat, M; Oran, O

    2000-05-01

    Severe neonatal hypernatraemia is a life-threatening electrolyte disorder because of its neurological complications. These are brain oedema, intracranial haemorrhages, haemorrhagic infarcts and thromboses. There are few reports concerning the radiological findings in the central nervous system in severe neonatal hypernatraemia. Cranial MRI findings in hypernatraemia have been reported in an older child, but have not been described in newborn infants. We report the cranial MRI findings in a newborn infant with acute renal failure and severe hypernatraemia.

  2. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kenji; Fujita, Riku; Maezawa, Masaki; Fukumoto, Natsuko; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Inokuma, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-08-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  3. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  4. Legal and ethical issues in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Neonatal nurses regularly face complex legal and ethical dilemmas. This article discusses the hypothetical case of Jack, a two-day-old infant, born at 39 weeks' gestation, and diagnosed with trisomy 13 (syndrome), a life-limiting condition and being cared for in a neonatal intensive care unit. Jack's prognosis is poor and he is not expected to live past two weeks of age. PMID:27615591

  5. Naloxone during neonatal resuscitation: acknowledging the unknown.

    PubMed

    Guinsburg, Ruth; Wyckoff, Myra H

    2006-03-01

    There are no studies to support or to refute the current recommendations regarding naloxone concentration, routes for administration, and doses in neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room. Given the lack of supporting evidence, naloxone should not be given routinely in the delivery room to depressed neonates whether or not they are exposed to opioids before delivery because no important improvement has been documented and the drug may have potential short- and long-term harmful effects.

  6. Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Abdulraheem, Muhydeen Abiodun; Tongo, Olukemi Oluwatoyin; Orimadegun, Adebola Emmanuel; Akinbami, Olukayode Felix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal transport involves moving sick neonates in optimal conditions to ensure good outcomes. It is well organized in most developed countries but receives little attention in developing countries where the highest burden of neonatal mortality exists and a large number of newborns require referrals daily for better medical care. This study sought to evaluate the modes of transport, pre- and intra-transport care of neonates referred to the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods The methods of transporting 401 neonates presenting to the children’s emergency room of the hospital were evaluated as well as the care the babies received during transport. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi square test while continuous variables were compared by the student t-test. Results About a third presented in the first 12hours and 85% in the first week of life, all from within 80km radius. There were 67.1% term, 31.4% preterm and 1.5% post-term neonates, all without prior communication. The modes of transport included private vehicles (43.9%), commercial vehicles (40.6%), motorcycles (9.0%), ambulance (4.0%) and on foot (2.5%). Only 3 (0.7%) were transported in incubators and none in KMC position. Only 42.0% had referral letters and 7.0% were accompanied by medical personnel. Materials available during transport included Ambubags (3.7%), oxygen (3.5%) and some drugs (3.5%). Events during transport were apnoea, 4.7%, vomiting 1.0%, reduced activity 16.2% and seizures 13.7%. 19 (4.7%) neonates were dead on arrival. Pre-transport care included resuscitation (18.2%), intravenous fluid/feeding (24.4%) and supplemental oxygen (14.0%). Conclusion Neonatal transport practices in Ibadan, Nigeria are abysmal with associated high mortality. PMID:27800071

  7. Selenium status in neonates with connatal infection.

    PubMed

    Wiehe, Lennart; Cremer, Malte; Wisniewska, Monika; Becker, Niels-Peter; Rijntjes, Eddy; Martitz, Janine; Hybsier, Sandra; Renko, Kostja; Bührer, Christoph; Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases impair Se metabolism, and low Se status is associated with mortality risk in adults with critical disease. The Se status of neonates is poorly characterised, and a potential impact of connatal infection is unknown. We hypothesised that an infection negatively affects the Se status of neonates. We conducted an observational case-control study at three intensive care units at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Plasma samples were collected from forty-four neonates. On the basis of clinical signs for bacterial infection and concentrations of IL-6 or C-reactive protein, neonates were classified into control (n 23) and infected (n 21) groups. Plasma Se and selenoprotein P (SePP) concentrations were determined by X-ray fluorescence and ELISA, respectively, at day of birth (day 1) and 48 h later (day 3). Se and SePP showed a positive correlation in both groups of neonates. Se concentrations indicative of Se deficit in adults (500 ng/l). During antibiotic therapy, SePP increased significantly from day 1 (1·03 (sd 0·10) mg/l) to day 3 (1·34 (sd 0·10) mg/l), indicative of improved hepatic Se metabolism. We conclude that both Se and SePP are suitable biomarkers for assessing Se status in neonates and for identifying subjects at risk of deficiency. PMID:27267586

  8. A history of neonatal medicine in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaeizadeh, Golnaz; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Shariat, Mamak

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal medicine was officially initiated in the United States of America in 1973, and in the same year, the American Board of Pediatrics held the first subspecialty examination in the field of neonatal-perinatal medicine. The first Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Tehran began its work with great efforts of Prof. Hadi Samaee at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital, approved by the Ministry of Health as the first standard center for training neonatologists. Hence, the first neonatology fellowship program began in 1986 and two years later (1988) its graduate started work at Ali-Asghar Children's Hospital. Afterwards, more NICUs were built all over the country and equipped gradually. The Iranian Association of Neonatology and Perinatology were founded in 1998 and 2003, respectively. These two scientific associations jointly made recommendations to health officials to develop consistent educational programs for neonatal and maternal health promotion in Iran. Regionalization of maternal-neonatal health services was also another recommendation which has now been presented to the Ministry of Health as a national program to promote neonatal and maternal health status. Thanks to the measures taken so far over the last few years, the index of neonatal mortality has declined from 26 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 11 per 1,000 live births in 2012.

  9. Antiepileptic drug treatment strategies in neonatal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hernan, A E; Holmes, G L

    2016-01-01

    The highest risk of seizures across the lifespan is in the neonatal period. The enhanced excitability of the immature brain compared to the mature brain is related to the sequential development and expression of essential neurotransmitter signaling pathways. During the neonatal period there is an overabundance of excitatory receptors, and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is potentially depolarizing, as opposed to hyperpolarizing in the older brain. While this enhanced excitability is required for regulation of activity-dependent synapse formation and refining of synaptic connections that are necessary for normal brain development, enhanced excitability predisposes the immature brain to seizures. In addition to being common, neonatal seizures are very difficult to treat; antiepileptic drugs used in older children and adults are less efficacious, and possibly detrimental to brain development. In an effort to target the unique features of neurotransmission in the neonate, bumetanide, an NKCC1 inhibitor which reduces intraneuronal Cl(-) and induces a significant shift of EGABA toward more hyperpolarized values in vitro, has been used to treat neonatal seizures. As the understanding of the pathophysiology of genetic forms of neonatal epilepsy has evolved there have been a few successful attempts to pharmacologically target the mutated protein. This approach, while promising, is challenging due to the findings that the genetic syndromes presenting in infancy demonstrate genetic heterogeneity in regard to both the mutated gene and its function. PMID:27323943

  10. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia stimulates corticotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin secretion into hypophysial portal blood of conscious, unrestrained rams.

    PubMed Central

    Caraty, A; Grino, M; Locatelli, A; Guillaume, V; Boudouresque, F; Conte-Devolx, B; Oliver, C

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) is a strong stimulator of pituitary ACTH secretion. The mechanisms by which IIH activates the corticotrophs are still controversial. Indeed, in rats the variations of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion in hypophysial portal blood (HPB) during IIH have been diversely appreciated. This may be due to the stressful conditions required for portal blood collection in rats. We studied the effects of IIH on the secretion of CRF and AVP in HPB and on the release of ACTH and cortisol in peripheral plasma in conscious, unrestrained, castrated rams. After the injection of a low (0.2 IU/kg) or high dose (2 IU/kg) of insulin, ACTH and cortisol levels in peripheral plasma increased in a dose-related manner. After injection of the low dose of insulin, CRF and AVP secretion in HPB were equally stimulated. After injection of the high dose of insulin, CRF secretion was further stimulated, while AVP release was dramatically increased. These results suggest that when the hypoglycemia is moderate, CRF is the main factor triggering ACTH release, and that the increased AVP secretion potentiates the stimulatory effect of CRF. When hypoglycemia is deeper, AVP secretion becomes predominant and may by itself stimulate ACTH release. Images PMID:2161426

  11. Ubiquitous expression of the Pik3caH1047R mutation promotes hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and organomegaly.

    PubMed

    Kinross, Kathryn M; Montgomery, Karen G; Mangiafico, Salvatore P; Hare, Lauren M; Kleinschmidt, Margarete; Bywater, Megan J; Poulton, Ingrid J; Vrahnas, Christina; Henneicke, Holger; Malaterre, Jordane; Waring, Paul M; Cullinane, Carleen; Sims, Natalie A; McArthur, Grant A; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Phillips, Wayne A

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of PI3K, are among the most common mutations found in human cancer and have also recently been implicated in a range of overgrowth syndromes in humans. We have used a novel inducible "exon-switch" approach to knock in the constitutively active Pik3ca(H1047R) mutation into the endogenous Pik3ca gene of the mouse. Ubiquitous expression of the Pik3ca(H1047R) mutation throughout the body resulted in a dramatic increase in body weight within 3 weeks of induction (mutant 150 ± 5%; wild-type 117 ± 3%, mean ± sem), which was associated with increased organ size rather than adiposity. Severe metabolic effects, including a reduction in blood glucose levels to 59 ± 4% of baseline (11 days postinduction) and undetectable insulin levels, were also observed. Pik3ca(H1047R) mutant mice died earlier (median survival 46.5 d post-mutation induction) than wild-type control mice (100% survival > 250 days). Although deletion of Akt2 increased median survival by 44%, neither organ overgrowth, nor hypoglycemia were rescued, indicating that both the growth and metabolic functions of constitutive PI3K activity can be Akt2 independent. This mouse model demonstrates the critical role of PI3K in the regulation of both organ size and glucose metabolism at the whole animal level. PMID:25550458

  12. Physical Exercise–Induced Hypoglycemia Caused by Failed Silencing of Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Otonkoski, Timo ; Jiao, Hong ; Kaminen-Ahola, Nina ; Tapia-Paez, Isabel ; Ullah, Mohammed S. ; Parton, Laura E. ; Schuit, Frans ; Quintens, Roel ; Sipilä, Ilkka ; Mayatepek, Ertan ; Meissner, Thomas ; Halestrap, Andrew P. ; Rutter, Guy A. ; Kere, Juha 

    2007-01-01

    Exercise-induced hyperinsulinism (EIHI) is a dominantly inherited hypoglycemic disorder characterized by inappropriate insulin secretion during anaerobic exercise or on pyruvate load. We aimed to identify the molecular basis of this novel disorder of β-cell regulation. EIHI mapped to chromosome 1 (LOD score 3.6) in a genome scan performed for two families with 10 EIHI-affected patients. Mutational analysis of the promoter of the SLC16A1 gene, which encodes monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), located under the linkage peak, revealed changes in all 13 identified patients with EIHI. Patient fibroblasts displayed abnormally high SLC16A1 transcript levels, although monocarboxylate transport activities were not changed in these cells, reflecting additional posttranscriptional control of MCT1 levels in extrapancreatic tissues. By contrast, when examined in β cells, either of two SLC16A1 mutations identified in separate pedigrees resulted in increased protein binding to the corresponding promoter elements and marked (3- or 10-fold) transcriptional stimulation of SLC16A1 promoter-reporter constructs. These studies show that promoter-activating mutations in EIHI induce SLC16A1 expression in β cells, where this gene is not usually transcribed, permitting pyruvate uptake and pyruvate-stimulated insulin release despite ensuing hypoglycemia. These findings describe a novel disease mechanism based on the failure of cell-specific transcriptional silencing of a gene that is highly expressed in other tissues. PMID:17701893

  13. Hypoglycemia, hyperglucagonemia, and fetoplacental defects in glucagon receptor knockout mice: a role for glucagon action in pregnancy maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ouhilal, Sophia; Vuguin, Patricia; Cui, Lingguang; Du, Xiu-Quan; Gelling, Richard W; Reznik, Sandra E; Russell, Robert; Parlow, Albert F; Karpovsky, Clara; Santoro, Nanette; Charron, Maureen J

    2012-03-01

    Alterations in insulin signaling as well as insulin action predispose to infertility as well as adverse pregnancy outcomes; however, little is known about the role of glucagon signaling in reproduction. The glucagon receptor knockout (Gcgr(-/-)) mouse created by our laboratory was used to define the role of glucagon signaling in maintaining normal reproduction. In this mouse model, lack of glucagon signaling did not alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Pregnant Gcgr(-/-) female mice displayed persistent hypoglycemia and hyperglucagonemia. Gcgr(-/-) pregnancies were associated with decreased fetal weight, increased late-gestation fetal demise, and significant abnormalities of placentation. Gcgr(-/-) placentas contained areas of extensive mineralization, fibrinoid necrosis, narrowing of the vascular channels, and a thickened interstitium associated with trophoblast hyperplasia. Absent glucagon signaling did not alter glycogen content in Gcgr(-/-) placentas but significantly downregulated genes that control growth, adrenergic signaling, vascularization, oxidative stress, and G protein-coupled receptors. Our data suggest that, similarly to insulin, glucagon action contributes to normal female reproductive function.

  14. Cause-specific neonatal mortality: analysis of 3772 neonatal deaths in Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and India

    PubMed Central

    Fottrell, Edward; Osrin, David; Alcock, Glyn; Azad, Kishwar; Bapat, Ujwala; Beard, James; Bondo, Austin; Colbourn, Tim; Das, Sushmita; King, Carina; Manandhar, Dharma; Manandhar, Sunil; Morrison, Joanna; Mwansambo, Charles; Nair, Nirmala; Nambiar, Bejoy; Neuman, Melissa; Phiri, Tambosi; Saville, Naomi; Sen, Aman; Seward, Nadine; Shah Moore, Neena; Shrestha, Bhim Prasad; Singini, Bright; Tumbahangphe, Kirti Man; Costello, Anthony; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Objective Understanding the causes of death is key to tackling the burden of three million annual neonatal deaths. Resource-poor settings lack effective vital registration systems for births, deaths and causes of death. We set out to describe cause-specific neonatal mortality in rural areas of Malawi, Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India using verbal autopsy (VA) data. Design We prospectively recorded births, neonatal deaths and stillbirths in seven population surveillance sites. VAs were carried out to ascertain cause of death. We applied descriptive epidemiological techniques and the InterVA method to characterise the burden, timing and causes of neonatal mortality at each site. Results Analysis included 3772 neonatal deaths and 3256 stillbirths. Between 63% and 82% of neonatal deaths occurred in the first week of life, and males were more likely to die than females. Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections accounted for most neonatal deaths, but important subnational and regional differences were observed. More than one-third of deaths in urban India were attributed to asphyxia, making it the leading cause of death in this setting. Conclusions Population-based VA methods can fill information gaps on the burden and causes of neonatal mortality in resource-poor and data-poor settings. Local data should be used to inform and monitor the implementation of interventions to improve newborn health. High rates of home births demand a particular focus on community interventions to improve hygienic delivery and essential newborn care. PMID:25972443

  15. Development of a pressure ulcer trigger tool for the neonatal population.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Bette; Askew, Mary; Otten, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    A large Midwest level IIIb neonatal intensive care unit located in a 500-bed teaching hospital implemented quarterly skin prevalence surveys to monitor prevalence of altered skin integrity including pressure ulcers, diaper dermatitis (incontinence-associated dermatitis), and skin damage as a result of intravenous therapy, adhesive, or medical devices. Pressure ulcer prevalence varied from 0% to 1% per quarter, and no pressure ulcer risk assessment tool was regularly implemented. Therefore, a working group was formed to identify a risk assessment. The Iowa Model for Evidence-Based Practice was used to guide the project. A literature review was completed to identify validated instruments, but available tools were judged lengthy for routine clinical use. Therefore, we developed a short trigger tool comprising 3 questions to identify infants at risk for pressure ulcer development. PMID:22948496

  16. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  17. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  18. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  19. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    PubMed Central

    Mullowney, Tara; Manson, David; Kim, Raymond; Stephens, Derek; Shah, Vibhuti

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare inherited disease affecting motile cilia lining the respiratory tract. Despite neonatal respiratory distress as an early feature, diagnosis is typically delayed until late childhood. Our objective was to identify characteristics that differentiate PCD from common causes of term neonatal respiratory distress. METHODS: This was a case-control study. Patients with PCD born after 1994 attending a regional PCD clinic who had a history of neonatal respiratory distress (n = 46) were included. Controls (n = 46), term neonates with respiratory distress requiring a chest radiograph, were randomly selected from hospital birth records and matched on gender, birth month/year, and mode of delivery. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between neonatal characteristics and PCD diagnosis. The diagnostic performance of the best predictive variables was estimated by calculating sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PCD cases required more oxygen therapy (39 cases, 29 controls, P = .01), longer duration of oxygen therapy (PCD mean = 15.2 days, control mean = 0.80 days, P < .01), had later onset of neonatal respiratory distress (PCD median = 12 hours, control median = 1 hour, P < .001), and higher frequency of lobar collapse and situs inversus (PCD = 70% and 48% respectively, control = 0% for both, P < .001). Situs inversus, lobar collapse, or oxygen need for >2 days had 87% (95% confidence interval: 74–94) sensitivity and 96% (95% confidence interval: 85–99) specificity for PCD. CONCLUSIONS: When encountering term neonates with unexplained respiratory distress, clinicians should consider PCD in those with lobar collapse, situs inversus, and/or prolonged oxygen therapy (>2 days). PMID:25422025

  20. Assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, E.; Gournay, V.; Calamel, J.; Mouzard, A.; Roze, J.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether it is possible to assess baroreflex sensitivity in neonates by studying only spontaneous variations in systolic blood pressure and heart rate.
METHODS—ECG and non-invasive blood pressure signals were continuously studied in 14 preterm neonates (term 29-32 weeks) and five term neonates (term 40-41 weeks). Non-invasive blood pressure measures were obtained using a Finapres placed around the child's wrist. Both signals (ECG and blood pressure), sampled at 400 Hz, were digitised by an A/D converter and stored in a binary mode on magnetic disk. An inhouse software QRS detection algorithm was used to define R peaks of the QRS complexes with an accuracy greater than 2 ms. Four 4 minute periods were recorded in each infant. The slope of the linear regression of RR intervals versus systolic blood pressure was calculated in each period and the mean value of the four slopes was then considered as the index of baroreflex sensitivity (in ms/mm Hg) in each neonate.
RESULTS—Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity was lower in preterm neonates than in term neonates (mean(SD): 4.07 (2.19) ms/mm Hg vs 10.23 (2.92) ms/mm Hg).
CONCLUSION—Baroreflex sensitivity can be assessed in term and preterm neonates by studying spontaneous variations in systolic blood pressure alone. This method could be useful for studying the ontogeny of baroreflex sensitivity and might therefore provide information about the maturation of the autonomic nervous system.

 Keywords: blood pressure; heart rate; baroreflex sensitivity; autonomic nervous system. PMID:9135289

  1. How to manage neonatal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Di Comite, A; Esposito, S; Villani, A; Stronati, M

    2016-02-01

    This article reports the recommendations for managing neonatal tuberculosis (TB) drawn up by a group of Italian scientific societies. The Consensus Conference method was used, and relevant publications in English were identified through a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Group experts concluded that if suspicion is aroused, it is necessary to undertake promptly all of the investigations useful for identifying the disease not only in the newborn, but also in the mother and family contacts because a diagnosis of TB in the family nucleus can guide its diagnosis and treatment in the newborn. If the suspicion is confirmed, empirical treatment should be started. Breast-fed newborns being treated with isoniazid should be given pyridoxine supplementation at a dose of 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Mothers with active-phase TB can breast-feed once they have become smear negative after having received appropriate treatment.

  2. Advances in Neonatal Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2016-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a surprisingly common event in the neonatal intensive care unit, and affects both term and preterm infants. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the maternal, fetal and genetic risk factors that trigger PPHN. There have been numerous therapeutic advances over the last decade. It is now appreciated that oxygen supplementation, particularly for the goal of pulmonary vasodilation, needs to be approached as a therapy that has risks and benefits. Administration of surfactant or inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy at a lower acuity of illness can decrease the risk of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation/death, progression of disease and duration of hospital stay. Milrinone may have specific benefits as an 'inodilator', as prolonged exposure to iNO plus oxygen may activate phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A. Additionally, sildenafil and hydrocortisone may benefit infants exposed to hyperoxia and oxidative stress. Continued investigation is likely to reveal new therapies such as citrulline and cinaciguat that will enhance NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase function. Continued laboratory and clinical investigation will be needed to optimize treatment and improve outcomes. PMID:27251312

  3. Diversity of Disorders Causing Neonatal Cholestasis – The Experience of a Tertiary Pediatric Center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Hoerning, André; Raub, Simon; Dechêne, Alexander; Brosch, Michelle N.; Kathemann, Simone; Hoyer, Peter F.; Gerner, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rapidly establishing the cause of neonatal cholestasis is an urgent matter. The aim of this study was to report on the prevalence and mortality of the diverse disorders causing neonatal cholestasis in an academic center in Germany. Methods: Clinical chemistry and cause of disease were retrospectively analyzed in 82 infants (male n = 42, 51%) that had presented with neonatal cholestasis to a tertiary medical center from January 2009 to April 2013. Results: Altogether, 19 disorders causing neonatal cholestasis were identified. Biliary atresia was the most common diagnosis (41%), followed by idiopathic cases (13%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC, 10%), cholestasis in preterm infants (10%), α1AT deficiency, Alagille syndrome, portocaval shunts, mitochondriopathy, biliary sludge (all 2%), and others. Infants with biliary atresia were diagnosed with a mean age of 62 days, they underwent Kasai portoenterostomy ~66 days after birth. The majority of these children (~70%) received surgery within 10 weeks of age and 27% before 60 days. The 2-year survival with their native liver after Kasai procedure was 12%. The time span between Kasai surgery and liver transplantation was 176 ± 73 days. Six children (7%), of whom three patients had a syndromic and one a non-syndromic biliary atresia, died prior to liver transplantation. The pre- and post-transplant mortality rate for children with biliary atresia was ~12 and ~17%, respectively. Conclusion: Neonatal cholestasis is a severe threat associated with a high risk of complications in infancy and it therefore requires urgent investigation in order to initiate life saving therapy. Although in the last 20 years new causes such as the PFICs have been identified and newer diagnostic tools have been introduced into the clinical routine biliary atresia still represents the major cause. PMID:25003101

  4. Abnormal Cerebral Microstructure in Premature Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael; Pruetz, Jay D.; Detterich, Jon A.; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Nagasunder, Arabhi C.; Kim, Richard; Painter, Michael J.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Williams, Roberta G.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormal cerebral microstructure has been documented in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) portending risk for injury and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Our hypothesis was that preterm neonates with CHD would demonstrate diffuse cerebral microstructural abnormalities when compared to critically ill neonates without CHD. A secondary aim was to identify any association between microstructural abnormalities, white matter injury (e.g., punctate white matter lesions, pWMLs) and other clinical variables, including heart lesion. Material and Methods Using Tract-Based-Spatial-Statistics (TBSS), an unbiased, voxel-wise method for analyzing diffusion tensor imaging data, we compared 21 preterm neonates with CHD to two cohorts of neonates without CHD: 28 term and 27 preterm neonates, identified from the same neonatal intensive care unit. Results Compared to term neonates without CHD, preterm neonates with CHD had microstructural abnormalities in widespread regions of the central white matter. However, 42% of the preterm CHD neonates had pWMLs. When neonates with pWMLs were excluded, microstructural abnormalities remained only in the splenium. Preterms with CHD had similar microstructure to preterms without CHD. Conclusion Diffuse microstructural abnormalities were observed in preterm neonates with CHD, strongly associated with pWMLs. Independently, regional vulnerability of the splenium, a structure associated with visual spatial function, was observed in all preterm CHD neonates. PMID:23703146

  5. The impact of maternally derived immunity on influenza A virus transmission in neonatal pig populations.

    PubMed

    Allerson, Matt; Deen, John; Detmer, Susan E; Gramer, Marie R; Joo, Han Soo; Romagosa, Anna; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    The commonality of influenza A virus (IAV) exposure and vaccination on swine farms in the United States ensures that the majority of neonatal pigs will have some degree of maternal immunity to IAV. The influence of maternal immunity on IAV transmission in neonatal pig populations will impact virus prevalence and infection dynamics across pig populations. The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of maternally derived immunity on IAV transmission in an experimental setting. Neonatal pigs suckled colostrum and derived maternal (passive) immunity from sows in one of three treatment groups: (a) non-vaccinated control (CTRL) or vaccinated with (b) homologous (PASSV-HOM) or (c) heterologous (PASSV-HET) inactivated experimental IAV vaccines. Sentinel neonatal pigs derived from the groups above were challenged with IAV via direct contact with an experimentally infected pig (seeder pig) and monitored for IAV infection daily via nasal swab sampling. A susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) experimental model was used to obtain and estimate transmission parameters in each treatment group via a generalized linear model. All sentinel pigs in the CTRL (30/30) and PASSV-HET (30/30) groups were infected with IAV following contact with the seeder pigs and the reproduction ratio estimates (95% confidence interval) were 10.4 (6.6-15.8) and 7.1 (4.2-11.3), respectively. In contrast, 1/20 sentinel pigs in the PASSV-HOM group was infected following contact with the seeder pigs and the reproduction ratio estimate was significantly lower compared to the CTRL and PASSV-HET groups at 0.8 (0.1-3.7). Under the conditions of this study, IAV transmission was reduced in neonatal pigs with homologous maternal immunity compared to seronegative neonatal pigs and pigs with heterologous maternal immunity as defined in this study. This study provides estimates for IAV transmission in pigs with differing types of maternal immunity which may describe the influence of maternal immunity on

  6. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from a Brazilian neonatal care unit.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Vivian Carolina; Azevedo, Milena Borgo; Iorio, Natalia Lopes Pontes; Amorim, Efigênia de Lourdes Teixeira; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto

    2014-10-01

    To characterize 46 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from Brazilian neonates, we investigated their SCCmec type, susceptibility and clonality. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus were the prevalent species. SCCmec types III or IV were detected in 53.3% S. epidermidis, whereas 63.6% S. haemolyticus were nontypeable. Despite the diversity, specific clones carried specific SCCmec elements, highlighting that effective typing can help in epidemiological analysis. PMID:25037043

  7. Ethanol Pharmacokinetics in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Kraft, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol has been used for years in neonatal and infant liquid medications, yet the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of ethanol in this vulnerable population have not been well characterized. The purpose of this review is to raise awareness of ethanol use as an excipient in neonatal and infant medications and to provide insight, based on the available evidence, into clearance rates of ethanol in babies. We also discuss ethanol pharmacokinetics in adults, theoretical pharmacokinetic changes in neonates and infants as it may apply to ethanol disposition, and case reports involving ethanol exposure in neonates and infants. Materials and methods This study was a narrative review in which relevant papers were selected using databases and scientific search engines such as PubMed with the key words ethanol, infant, and newborninfant. Results It remains unclear what ethanol exposure is safe for neonates and infants. The Food and Drug Administration and American Academy of Pediatrics have both taken action, by either setting limits of ethanol content in over-the-counter medications or by recommending restricted exposure to ethanol-containing pediatric formulations. Conclusions Until the short- and long-term health effects of chronic ethanol administration can be further characterized, ethanol-containing medications should be used with caution. PMID:25379066

  8. Antimicrobial therapy in neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Serra, Gregorio; Stronati, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and in industrialized countries about 1% of neonates are exposed to antibiotic therapy. Sepsis has often nonspecific signs and symptoms and empiric antimicrobial therapy is promptly initiated in high risk of sepsis or symptomatic infants. However continued use of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the setting of negative cultures especially in preterm infants may not be harmless.The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued use of antibiotics without any microbiological justification is dangerous and only leads to adverse events. The purpose of this review is to highlight the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the NICUs, to exam the impact of antibiotic treatment in preterm infants with negative cultures and to summarize existing knowledge regarding the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agents and optimal duration of therapy in neonates with suspected or culture-proven sepsis in order to prevent serious consequences. PMID:25887621

  9. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS. PMID:25425653

  10. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  11. Neonatal Tracheostomy – Issues and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    A, Saadia; GR, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To record and analyse the technical aspects of neonatal tracheostomy and to suggest some solutions. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective observational cohort of 37 cases of neonatal tracheostomies performed over 30 years (1985-2014). Results: Thirty-three of the 37 tracheostomies were done as an elective procedure and four done emergently. Eighteen neonatal tracheostomies were done with a low transverse cervical incision and 19 were done with low vertical cervical incision. Three patients had bleeding while exposing the trachea. Trachea could not easily be identified in 2 cases. Commercial tracheostomy tubes were used in only 20 cases. In 17 patients, the conventional endotracheal tubes 2.5 or 3fr size were used. There were 3 instances of wound infection out of which one has peri-tracheostomy necrotizing cellulitis and the neonate succumbed to sepsis. Two cases had surgical emphysema. No case had pneumothorax. Conclusion: We described tracheostomy in neonates in a resource constrained centre. Various makeshift arrangements can be used in absence of standard supplies. PMID:26034707

  12. Inadvertent Methylergonovine Administration to a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Bryan M.; O’Connell, Charles; Boutin, Mallory A.; Fatayerji, Nabil I.; Sauer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, Newborn Final Diagnosis: Accidental methylergonovine poisoning Symptoms: Respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Methylergonovine is an ergot alkaloid used to treat post-partum hemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Mistaking methylergonovine for vitamin K with accidental administration to the neonate is a rare iatrogenic illness occurring almost exclusively in the delivery room setting. Complications of ergot alkaloids in neonates include respiratory depression, seizures, and death. Case Report: A term infant was inadvertently given 0.1 mg of methylergonovine intramuscularly in the right thigh. The error was only noted when the vial of medication was scanned, after administration, identifying it as methylergonovine rather than vitamin K. The local poison center was notified, and the infant was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for observation. Two hours after transfer, the infant was noted to have oxygen desaturations and required oxygen via nasal cannula. Supplemental oxygen was continued for 4 hours until the neonate was able to maintain normal oxygen saturations in room air. Feeding was started by 10 hours of life, and the infant was discharged home in good condition after a 72-hour stay without further complications. Conclusions: Because of the potential for serious adverse events, vigilance is required to prevent accidental administration of methylergonovine to the neonate as a result of possible confusion with vitamin K in the early post-partum period. PMID:27765939

  13. Late-onset neonatal sepsis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Speer, Christian P

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of neonatal late-onset sepsis (LOS) is inversely related to the degree of maturity and varies geographically from 0.61% to 14.2% among hospitalised newborns. Epidemiological data on very low birth weight infants shows that the predominant pathogens of neonatal LOS are coagulase-negative staphylococci, followed by Gram-negative bacilli and fungi. Due to the difficulties in a prompt diagnosis of LOS and LOS-associated high risk of mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, empirical antibiotic treatment is initiated on suspicion of LOS. However, empirical therapy is often inappropriately used with unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics and a prolonged duration of treatment. The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative micro-organisms in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) worldwide is a serious concern, which requires thorough and efficient surveillance strategies and appropriate treatment regimens. Immunological strategies for preventing neonatal LOS are not supported by current evidence, and approaches, such as a strict hygiene protocol and the minimisation of invasive procedures in NICUs represent the cornerstone to reduce the burden of neonatal LOS.

  14. Neonatal hypothermia in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, LC

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia among newborns is considered an important contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality in low resource settings. However, in these settings only limited progress has been made towards understanding the risk of mortality subsequent to hypothermia, describing how this relationship is dependent on both the degree or severity of exposure and the gestational age and weight status of the baby, and implementing interventions to mitigate both exposure and the associated risk of poor outcomes. Given the centrality of averting neonatal mortality to achieving global milestones towards reductions in child mortality by 2015, recent years have seen substantial resources and efforts to improve understanding of global epidemiology of neonatal health. In this seminar, a summary of the burden, consequences, and risk factors of neonatal hypothermia in low-resources settings is presented, with a particular focus on community-based data. Context-appropriate interventions for reducing hypothermia exposure and the role of these interventions in reducing global neonatal mortality burden are explored. PMID:21094417

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization investigation of potentially pathogenic bacteria involved in neonatal porcine diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal diarrhea is a multifactorial condition commonly present on pig farms and leads to economic losses due to increased morbidity and mortality of piglets. Immature immune system and lack of fully established microbiota at birth predispose neonatal piglets to infection with enteric pathogens. The microorganisms that for decades have been associated with enteritis and diarrhea in suckling piglets are: rotavirus A, coronavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Clostridium perfringens type C, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Cystoisospora suis and Strongyloides ransomi. However, in recent years, the pig industry has experienced an increased number of neonatal diarrhea cases in which the above mentioned pathogens are no longer detected. Potentially pathogenic bacteria have recently received focus in the research on the possible etiology of neonatal diarrhea not caused by common pathogens. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of E. coli, Enterococcus spp., C. perfringens and C. difficile in the pathogenesis of neonatal porcine diarrhea with no established casual agents. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes was applied on the fixed intestinal tissue samples from 51 diarrheic and 50 non-diarrheic piglets collected from four Danish farms during outbreaks of neonatal diarrhea not caused by well-known enteric pathogens. Furthermore, an association between the presence of these bacteria and histological lesions was evaluated. Results The prevalence of fluorescence signals specific for E. coli, C. perfringens and C. difficile was similar in both groups of piglets. However, Enterococcus spp. was primarily detected in the diarrheic piglets. Furthermore, adherent bacteria were detected in 37 % diarrheic and 14 % non-diarrheic piglets. These bacteria were identified as E. coli and Enterococcus spp. and their presence in the intestinal mucosa was associated with histopathological changes. Conclusions The

  16. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  17. Attenuated innate immune defenses in very premature neonates during the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Elizabeth A.; Kan, Bernard; Sharma, Ashish A.; van Zanten, Alice; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Brant, Rollin; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-microbial responses have been shown to be profoundly attenuated in very preterm neonates when examined on cord blood. However, we lack data on these responses at the time these neonates are most vulnerable to infections. Methods Multiple cytokine responses to two prototypic Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists: LPS (TLR4) and R848 (TLR7/8) were prospectively measured in preterm neonates born ≤30 weeks of gestation (n=50) during the first 28 days of age using whole blood and single-cell multi-parameter flow cytometry assays. Results were compared to term neonates (n=30) and adult controls (n=25). Results In preterm neonates, LPS and R848 responses remained attenuated in both cord blood and in the first 28 days of age. These responses showed significant maturation over time after adjusting for gestational age and were confirmed in blood monocytes and dendritic cells on a per-cell basis. We detected no major contribution of chorioamnionitis, maternal antenatal corticosteroids or magnesium sulfate treatment, labor, or mode of delivery to the maturation of cytokine responses. Conclusion Innate immune anti-microbial defenses are profoundly attenuated developmentally in very preterm neonates during the neonatal period, suggesting that exogenous factors drive the sustained systemic inflammation that has been linked to increased morbidities in these infants. PMID:26186294

  18. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  19. A Comparison of Morphine Delivery in Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Chisamore, Brian; Labana, Safaa; Blitz, Sandra; Ordean, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Current estimates of the prevalence of opioid withdrawal in newborns from the 2012 Better Outcomes Registry and Network Ontario reveal that more than 4 births per 1000 display recognizable symptoms of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). With a growing consensus surrounding aspects of newborn opioid withdrawal care, clinicians might agree that all infants exposed to maternal opioids require supportive observation and care to ensure appropriate adaptation and growth in the newborn period and, likewise, that there exists a smaller percentage of newborns who require additional pharmacotherapy. However, due to the dearth of comparative studies of NAS tools, there remains a lack of evidence to support the use of a specific NAS method of scoring or treatment. Two types of NAS treatment protocols currently in use include a symptom-only versus weight-based protocols. Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) has used both models. A formal structured NAS tool and weight-based morphine delivery system began in our NICU in 1999. We audited all newborns with known exposure to maternal opioids in our NICU from the years 2000 to 2014. The Finnegan scoring tool was used throughout all years of the chart audit. Modifications made to the Finnegan scoring tool from the MOTHER study were adapted for use in our NICU at the same time as adopting the Johns Hopkins model of symptom-only based morphine delivery in 2006. The objective of this comparative study using a retrospective chart audit is to compare length of stay (LOS) and total accumulative morphine dose across these two morphine delivery protocols. Our audit revealed that there were a significantly higher proportion of newborns in the symptom-only model that received morphine and, perhaps accordingly, also had a significantly higher LOS compared to those in the weight-based model. Comparing only those infants who did receive morphine, the comparative total accumulative dose of morphine and LOS were not significantly different

  20. Chorioamnionitis and Culture-Confirmed Early-onset Neonatal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wortham, Jonathan M.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Hale, Ellen; Van Meurs, Krisa; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Cantey, Joseph B.; Faix, Roger; Poindexter, Brenda; Goldberg, Ronald; Bizzarro, Matthew; Frantz, Ivan; Das, Abhik; Benitz, William E.; Shane, Andi L.; Higgins, Rosemary; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for prevention of neonatal group B Streptococcal (GBS) disease recommend diagnostic evaluations and empiric antibiotic therapy for well-appearing, chorioamnionitis-exposed newborns. Some clinicians question these recommendations, citing the decline in early-onset GBS disease rates since widespread intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) implementation and potential antibiotic risks. We aimed to determine whether chorioamnionitis-exposed newborns with culture-confirmed early-onset infections can be asymptomatic at birth. Methods Multicenter, prospective surveillance for early-onset neonatal infections was conducted 2006–2009. Early-onset infection was defined as isolation of a pathogen from blood or cerebrospinal fluid collected ≤72 hours after birth. Maternal chorioamnionitis was defined by clinical diagnosis in the medical record or histologic diagnosis by placental pathology. Hospital records of newborns with early-onset infections born to mothers with chorioamnionitis were reviewed retrospectively to determine symptom onset. Results Early-onset infections were diagnosed in 389 of 396,586 live births, including 232 (60%) chorioamnionitis-exposed newborns. Records for 229 were reviewed; 29 (13%) had no documented symptoms within 6 hours of birth, including 21 (9%) who remained asymptomatic at 72 hours. IAP exposure did not differ significantly between asymptomatic and symptomatic infants (76% vs. 69%, p=0.52). Assuming complete guideline implementation, we estimated 60 to 1400 newborns would receive diagnostic evaluations and antibiotics for each infected, asymptomatic newborn, depending on chorioamnionitis prevalence. Conclusions Some infants born to mothers with chorioamnionitis may have no signs of sepsis at birth despite having culture-confirmed infections. Implementation of current clinical guidelines may result in early diagnosis, but large numbers of uninfected asymptomatic infants would be treated. PMID:26719293

  1. A Comparison of Morphine Delivery in Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Chisamore, Brian; Labana, Safaa; Blitz, Sandra; Ordean, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Current estimates of the prevalence of opioid withdrawal in newborns from the 2012 Better Outcomes Registry and Network Ontario reveal that more than 4 births per 1000 display recognizable symptoms of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). With a growing consensus surrounding aspects of newborn opioid withdrawal care, clinicians might agree that all infants exposed to maternal opioids require supportive observation and care to ensure appropriate adaptation and growth in the newborn period and, likewise, that there exists a smaller percentage of newborns who require additional pharmacotherapy. However, due to the dearth of comparative studies of NAS tools, there remains a lack of evidence to support the use of a specific NAS method of scoring or treatment. Two types of NAS treatment protocols currently in use include a symptom-only versus weight-based protocols. Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) has used both models. A formal structured NAS tool and weight-based morphine delivery system began in our NICU in 1999. We audited all newborns with known exposure to maternal opioids in our NICU from the years 2000 to 2014. The Finnegan scoring tool was used throughout all years of the chart audit. Modifications made to the Finnegan scoring tool from the MOTHER study were adapted for use in our NICU at the same time as adopting the Johns Hopkins model of symptom-only based morphine delivery in 2006. The objective of this comparative study using a retrospective chart audit is to compare length of stay (LOS) and total accumulative morphine dose across these two morphine delivery protocols. Our audit revealed that there were a significantly higher proportion of newborns in the symptom-only model that received morphine and, perhaps accordingly, also had a significantly higher LOS compared to those in the weight-based model. Comparing only those infants who did receive morphine, the comparative total accumulative dose of morphine and LOS were not significantly different

  2. Hindbrain medulla catecholamine cell group involvement in lactate-sensitive hypoglycemia-associated patterns of hypothalamic norepinephrine and epinephrine activity.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Tamrakar, P; Ibrahim, B A; Briski, K P

    2014-10-10

    Cell-type compartmentation of glucose metabolism in the brain involves trafficking of the oxidizable glycolytic end product, l-lactate, by astrocytes to fuel neuronal mitochondrial aerobic respiration. Lactate availability within the hindbrain medulla is a monitored function that regulates systemic glucostasis as insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) is exacerbated by lactate repletion of that brain region. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a plausible source of lactoprivic input to the neural gluco-regulatory circuit as caudal fourth ventricular (CV4) lactate infusion normalizes IIH-associated activation, e.g. phosphorylation of the high-sensitivity energy sensor, adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), in these cells. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that A2 neurons are unique among medullary catecholamine cells in directly screening lactate-derived energy. Adult male rats were injected with insulin or vehicle following initiation of continuous l-lactate infusion into the CV4. Two hours after injections, A1, C1, A2, and C2 neurons were collected by laser-microdissection for Western blot analysis of AMPKα1/2 and phosphoAMPKα1/2 proteins. Results show that AMPK is expressed in each cell group, but only a subset, e.g. A1, C1, and A2 neurons, exhibit increased sensor activity in response to IIH. Moreover, hindbrain lactate repletion reversed hypoglycemic augmentation of pAMPKα1/2 content in A2 and C1 but not A1 cells, and normalized hypothalamic norepinephrine and epinephrine content in a site-specific manner. The present evidence for discriminative reactivity of AMPK-expressing medullary catecholamine neurons to the screened energy substrate lactate implies that that lactoprivation is selectively signaled to the hypothalamus by A2 noradrenergic and C1 adrenergic cells.

  3. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  4. Hyperammonemia in neonates receiving intravenous nutrition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Hack, S L; Smith, T M; Platzker, A C; Merritt, R J

    1982-01-01

    Inadequate arginine intake has been suggested as an etiology for hyperammonemia in neonates on parenteral nutrition. We randomized 26 nonasphyxiated neonates to receive amino acid solutions containing either 3.6 or 10.4% of total nitrogen as arginine when intravenous nutrition (IVN) therapy was initiated. Neonates in both amino acid solution study groups were observed to have significantly elevated blood ammonia (BA) concentrations during IVN (p less than 0.01) as compared to pre-IVN levels. Blood ammonia concentrations tended to be higher in infants receiving the 3.6% arginine amino acid solution. Septic infants were at particular risk for hyperammonemia as compared to nonseptic patients (p less than 0.025). Other clinical parameters including birth weight, gestational age, oxygen requirements, enteral nutritional intake, congenital anomalies, and heart disease did not appear to be related to BA concentration.

  5. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  6. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers.

  7. Neonatal management of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Khan, Shareen; Baki, Md Abdul; Zabeen, Bedowra; Azad, Kiswhar

    2016-09-01

    Women with diabetes in pregnancy, either pre-gestational Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 & Type 2) or Gestational Diabetes, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm labour and increased foetal mortality rate. Adequate glycaemic control before and during pregnancy is crucial for improving foetal and perinatal outcomes in these babies. Perinatal and neonatal morbidities and mortality rates have declined since the development of specialized maternal, foetal, and neonatal care for women with diabetes and their offspring. However, infants of diabetic mothers are at risk for developing complications as macrosomia, hypoglycaemia, perinatal asphyxia, cardiac and respiratory problems, birth injuries and congenital malformations. In this review article we describe the neonatal management of the offspring of diabetic mothers. PMID:27582162

  8. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  9. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  10. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  11. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother. PMID:27008754

  12. The neonatal nurse: advocating for breastfeeding mothers.

    PubMed

    Darby, Colm; Nurse, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses' role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, CoIm uses Borton's model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother.

  13. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover and protect the eye of an infant during therapeutic procedures, such as phototherapy....

  14. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies.

  15. From Imitation to Conversation: The First Dialogues with Human Neonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Emese

    2006-01-01

    The functional maturity of the newborn infant's brain, the resemblances between neonatal imitation and imitation in adults and the possibly lateralized neonatal imitation suggest that the mirror neuron system may contribute to neonatal imitation. Newborn infants not only imitate but also initiate previously imitated gestures, and are able to…

  16. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications.

  17. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  20. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... kept in a controlled environment while being transported for medical care. The device may...

  1. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  2. The Tuning of Human Neonates' Preference for Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Hauser, Marc D.; Werker, Janet F.; Martin, Alia

    2010-01-01

    Human neonates prefer listening to speech compared to many nonspeech sounds, suggesting that humans are born with a bias for speech. However, neonates' preference may derive from properties of speech that are not unique but instead are shared with the vocalizations of other species. To test this, thirty neonates and sixteen 3-month-olds were…

  3. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5270 - Neonatal eye pad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neonatal eye pad. 880.5270 Section 880.5270 Food... § 880.5270 Neonatal eye pad. (a) Identification. A neonatal eye pad is an opaque device used to cover...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  7. Ruptured Liver Abscess in Neonates: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Choudhury, SR; Jhanwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal hepatic abscess is a rare disease seen mainly in preterm following umbilical catheterisation. Liver abscess in term neonates without any predisposing factor is still rarer and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of liver abscess in term neonates presenting with abdominal mass due to rupture. PMID:27433449

  8. 21 CFR 880.5410 - Neonatal transport incubator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neonatal transport incubator. 880.5410 Section 880... Devices § 880.5410 Neonatal transport incubator. (a) Identification. A neonatal transport incubator is a... the warmed air, a container for water to add humidity, and provision for a portable oxygen bottle....

  9. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  10. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families.

  11. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  12. D-lactic acidosis in neonatal ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ingrid; Gentile, Arcangelo

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic acidosis in calves with neonatal diarrhea was believed to be mainly caused by the loss of bicarbonate via the intestines or the formation of L-lactate during anaerobic glycolysis after tissue hypoperfusion in dehydrated calves. Because D-lactate was not considered to be of interest in human or veterinary medicine, routine diagnostic methods targeted the detection of L-lactate only. The development of stereospecific assays for the measurement of D-lactate facilitated research. This article summarizes the available information on D-lactic metabolic acidosis in neonatal ruminants.

  13. Next generation neonatal health informatics with Artemis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Carolyn; Catley, Christina; James, Andrew; Padbury, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a platform to enable processing of currently uncharted high frequency, high fidelity, synchronous data from medical devices. Such a platform would support the next generation of informatics solutions for neonatal intensive care. We present Artemis, a platform for real-time enactment of clinical knowledge as it relates to multidimensional data analysis and clinical research. Through specific deployment examples at two different neonatal intensive care units, we demonstrate that Artemis supports: 1) instantiation of clinical rules; 2) multidimensional analysis; 3) distribution of services for critical care via cloud computing; and 4) accomplishing 1 through 3 using current technology without a negative impact on patient care. PMID:21893725

  14. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated.

  15. Diagnosing and Managing Neonatal Respiratory Depression

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Max

    1985-01-01

    There are four types of neonatal respiratory depression. Most infants who require resuscitation have clearly depressed respiration at birth. The onset is prenatal in these cases. However, other infants appear normal at birth, cough and breathe a few times, but become acutely depressed in the first minute or so. A third group deteriorates gradually over the first few minutes, making little or no effort to breathe. A fourth group appears normal or fairly normal at birth, and while breathing strenuously develops signs of asphyxia. The pre- and postnatal signs, causes and differential diagnosis of the four types of neonatal depression are described, and guidelines for resuscitation are provided. PMID:21274148

  16. Staphylococcal bullous impetigo in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Shalini Dewan; Bharara, Tanisha; Jena, Pragnya Paramita; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Abha; Gur, Renu; Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2016-07-16

    An otherwise healthy, full-term neonate presented at day 15 of life to the pediatric emergency with generalized papulo-pustular rash for 2 d. This was finally diagnosed as bullous impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The skin lesions decreased significantly after starting antibiotic therapy and drainage of blister fluid. There was no recurrence of the lesions on follow-up. This case of generalized pustular eruption due to S. aureus in a neonate is reported, as it poses a diagnostic dilemma and can have serious consequences if left untreated. PMID:27458596

  17. Management of neonatal sepsis in term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Du Pont-Thibodeau, Geneviève; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a common and deadly disease. It is broadly defined as a systemic inflammatory response, occurring in the first four weeks of life, as a result of a suspected or proven infection. Yet, more reliable and consistently applied diagnostic criteria would help improve our knowledge of the disease epidemiology. Several therapeutic attempts to control systemic inflammation in sepsis were unsuccessful. Immediate empirical administration of broad-spectrum anti-microbials, aggressive fluid resuscitation, and vaso-active or inotropic support (or both) are the mainstays of the therapeutic management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:25165566

  18. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hammer, S G; Lewan, R B

    1988-01-01

    We report an infant with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency. The initial approach involved rapid evaluation, phototherapy, and close monitoring of serum bilirubin levels. Follow-up included maintenance on folic acid, monitoring blood counts, and educating the parents about the course of pyruvate kinase deficiency, especially aplastic crisis. We suggest that the informed family practitioner can manage neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and pyruvate kinase deficiency with referrals at critical times to pediatric or surgical specialists. The practitioner must be able to recognize quickly the need for exchange transfusion for severe jaundice and for blood transfusions or splenectomy when significant anemia or aplastic crisis occurs.

  19. Neonatal nurse practitioners: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Honeyfield, Mary Ellen

    2009-06-01

    The advanced practice nursing role in neonatal intensive care enjoys an almost 40-year history. The 1970s and the 1980s were fraught with growing pains, including what to call these providers, and role clarity that was defined in most settings by community need. With the birth of NANN, 25 years ago, the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role began to receive support and advocacy that led to the development of educational standards and definition of the role. This article reviews the role's history and identifies current and future issues that will require attention by the national NNP leadership. PMID:19542775

  20. Neonatal death dwarfism. (A further report).

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, K; Masel, J; Morris, L; Kunze, D

    1978-11-01

    Seven cases of rare "Neonatal Death Dwarfism" observed recently in three major Children's Hospitals in Australia are reported. These include Diastrophic Dwarfism, Achondrogenesis II, Lethal Form of Hypophosphatasia, Homozygous Achondroplasia, Minor Form of Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy, Achondrogenesis II (?) and Unclassified Lethal Bone Dysplasia. In all the patients the clinical diagnosis was uncertain or incorrect, whereas a conclusive radiographic diagnosis could be made after X-ray examination in all but one of the cases. Skeletal survey should be performed in each case of neonatal death dwarfism. PMID:152275